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Sample records for fast light slow

  1. Slow and Fast Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-24

    25) where λ is the vacuum wavelength of the radiation. Recent demonstrations of slow light have been enabled by nonlinear optical techniques which can...typical procedure for producing slow light is to make use of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), a technique introduced by Harris, Field and... Slow ” and “Fast” Light Robert W. Boyd The Institute of Optics University of Rochester Rochester, New York 14627 USA Daniel J. Gauthier Department of

  2. Slow and Fast Light in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Smith, David D.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Dimmock, John O.; Gregory, Don A.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2005-01-01

    We predict the propagation of slow and fast light in two co-resonant coupled optical resonators. In coupled resonators, slow light can propagate without attenuation by a cancellation of absorption as a result of mode splitting and destructive interference, whereas transparent fast light propagation can be achieved by the assistance of gain and splitting of the intracavity resonances, which consequently change the dispersion from normal to anomalous. The effective steady-state response of coupled-resonators is derived using the temporal coupled-mode formalism, and the absorptive and dispersive responses are described. Specifically, the occurrence of slow light via coupled-resonator-induced transparency and gain-assisted fast light are discussed.

  3. Slow and Fast Light in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Smith, David D.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Dimmock, John O.; Gregory, Don A.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2005-01-01

    We predict the propagation of slow and fast light in two co-resonant coupled optical resonators. In coupled resonators, slow light can propagate without attenuation by a cancellation of absorption as a result of mode splitting and destructive interference, whereas transparent fast light propagation can be achieved by the assistance of gain and splitting of the intracavity resonances, which consequently change the dispersion from normal to anomalous. The effective steady-state response of coupled-resonators is derived using the temporal coupled-mode formalism, and the absorptive and dispersive responses are described. Specifically, the occurrence of slow light via coupled-resonator-induced transparency and gain-assisted fast light are discussed.

  4. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  5. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  6. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  7. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data

  8. Tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzhen; Chen, Yuping; Jiang, Haowei; Liu, Yi'an; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated a tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals. The light experiences an anomalous dispersion near the transmission center and a normal dispersion away from the center, where it can be accelerated and slowed down, respectively. We also obtained the switch between fast and slow light by adjusting the external electric filed. The observed largest temporal gap is 541 ps, which is crucial in practical event operation inside the gap. The results offer a new solution for temporal cloak.

  9. Force-induced transparency and conversion between slow and fast light in optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhen; Luo, Ren-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Wang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Wen; Feng, Mang

    2017-09-01

    The optomechanics can generate fantastic effects of optics due to appropriate mechanical control. Here we theoretically study effects of slow and fast lights in a single-sided optomechanical cavity with an external force. The force-induced transparency of slow and fast lights and the force-dependent conversion between the slow and fast lights result from effects of the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) and the anti-RWA, which can be controlled by properly modifying the effective cavity frequency due to the external force. These force-induced phenomena can be applied to control the light group velocity and to detect the force variation, which are feasible using current laboratory techniques.

  10. Quantum mutual information of an entangled state propagating through slow- and fast-light media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Ryan T.; Clark, Jeremy B.; Glorieux, Quentin; Vogl, Ulrich; Lett, Paul D.

    2013-03-01

    Due to its vital role in many quantum information and communication protocols, much theoretical and experi- mental work has been conducted in order to investigate the fundamental properties of entanglement. In this work we describe an experimental investigation into the behavior of continuous-variable entanglement and quantum mutual information upon propagation through slow- and fast-light media. A four-wave mixing process in warm atomic vapor is used to generate an entangled two-mode squeezed vacuum state of light. One of the two modes of the resulting state is then sent through a second four-wave mixing process that is tuned to exhibit either slow- or fast-light properties. The cross-correlation and quantum mutual information shared between the resulting modes is quanti ed, and di erences in their behavior after propagation through slow- and fast-light media are discussed.

  11. QUANTUM CONTROL OF LIGHT: From Slow Light and FAST CARS to Nuclear γ-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2007-06-01

    In recent work we have demonstrated strong coherent backward wave oscillation using forward propagating fields only. This surprising result is achieved by applying laser fields to an ultra-dispersive medium with proper chosen detunings to excite a molecular vibrational coherence that corresponds to a backward propagating wave [PRL, 97, 113001 (2006)]. The physics then has much in common with propagation of ultra-slow light. Applications of coherent scattering and remote sensing to the detection of bio and chemical pathogens (e.g., anthrax) via Coherent Anti-Raman Scattering together with Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques (FAST CARS [Opt. Comm., 244, 423 (2005)]) will be discussed. Furthermore, the interplay between quantum optics (Dicke super and sub-radiant states) and nuclear physics (forward scattering of γ radiation) provides interesting problems and insights into the quantum control of scattered light [PRL, 96, 010501 (2005)].

  12. Photonic-chip-based tunable slow and fast light via stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Pant, Ravi; Byrnes, Adam; Poulton, Christopher G; Li, Enbang; Choi, Duk-Yong; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2012-03-01

    We report the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of photonic chip based tunable slow and fast light via stimulated Brillouin scattering. Slow, fast, and negative group velocities were observed in a 7 cm long chalcogenide (As(2)S(3)) rib waveguide with a group index change ranging from ~-44 to +130, which results in a maximum delay of ~23 ns at a relatively low gain of ~23 dB. Demonstration of large tunable delays in a chip scale device opens up applications such as frequency sensing and true-time delay for a phased array antenna, where integration and delays ~10 ns are highly desirable.

  13. Propagation of phase nonanalytical points in fast- and slow-light media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yuma; Tomita, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    We performed a series of experiments to examine the arrival of phase nonanalytical points in fast- and slow-light media, using a Gaussian-shaped temporal pulse and encoding phase nonanalytical points at various positions within the pulse envelope. For the phase nonanalytical points, the amplitude of the slowly varying pulse envelope, as well as any order of the derivatives, is continuous, but the phase of the carrier wave is discontinuous. The phase nonanalytical points were neither advanced nor delayed, but appeared at the same instance as they entered the fast- and slow-light media, in good accordance with the idea that the information velocity was equal to the velocity of light in a vacuum, c , or in the background medium.

  14. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized.

  15. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized. PMID:27725763

  16. High-fidelity, broadband stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-based slow light using fast noise modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunhui; Lee, Myungjun; Neifeld, Mark A; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate a 5-GHz-broadband tunable slow-light device based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard highly-nonlinear optical fiber pumped by a noise-current-modulated laser beam. The noisemodulation waveform uses an optimized pseudo-random distribution of the laser drive voltage to obtain an optimal flat-topped gain profile, which minimizes the pulse distortion and maximizes pulse delay for a given pump power. In comparison with a previous slow-modulation method, eye-diagram and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis show that this broadband slow-light technique significantly increases the fidelity of a delayed data sequence, while maintaining the delay performance. A fractional delay of 0.81 with a SNR of 5.2 is achieved at the pump power of 350 mW using a 2-km-long highly nonlinear fiber with the fast noise-modulation method, demonstrating a 50% increase in eye-opening and a 36% increase in SNR in the comparison.

  17. Slow and fast light using nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesala, Bala Subrahmanyam

    Ability to control the velocity of light is usually referred to as slow or fast light depending on whether the group velocity of light is reduced or increased. The slowing of light as it passes through the glass to 2/3rd its original value is a well known phenomenon. This slowing down happens due to the interaction of light with the electrons in the medium. As a general principle, stronger the interaction, larger is the reduction in velocity. Recently, a fascinating field has emerged with the objective of not only slowing down the velocity of light but also speeding it up as it goes through the medium by enhancing light-matter interaction. This unprecedented control opens up several exciting applications in various scientific disciplines ranging from nonlinear science, RF photonics to all-optical networks. Initial experiments succeeded in reducing the velocity of light more than a million times to a very impressive 17 m/s. This speed reduction is extremely useful to enhance various nonlinear processes. For RF photonic applications including phased array antennas and tunable filters, control of phase velocity of light is required while control of group velocity serves various functionalities including packet synchronization and contention resolution in an optical buffer. Within the last 10 years, several material systems have been proposed and investigated for this purpose. Schemes based on semiconductor systems for achieving slow and fast light has the advantage of extremely high speed and electrical control. In addition, they are compact, operate at room temperature and can be easily integrated with other optical subsystems. In this work, we propose to use nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for the purpose of controlling the velocity of light. The versatility of the physical processes present in SOAs enables the control of optical signals ranging from 1GHz to larger than 1000 GHz (1 THz). First, we experimentally demonstrate both

  18. A simple and tunable switch between slow- and fast-light in two signal modes with an optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Yan, Lei-Lei; Chen, Gui-Bin; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhan, You-Bang

    2016-12-01

    The control of slow and fast light propagation is a challenging task. Here, we theoretically study the dynamics of a driven optomechanical cavity coupled to a charged nanomechanical resonator (NR) via Coulomb interaction. We find that the tunable switch between slow- and fast-light for two signal modes can be observed from the output field by adjusting the laser-cavity detuning in this system. Moreover, the frequencies of two signal light can be tuned by Coulomb coupling strength. In comparison with previous schemes, the clear advantage of our scheme is that we can simply switch from fast- to slow-light in two signal modes by only adjusting the laser-cavity deturning from Δ ={ω1} to Δ =-{ω1} . The proposal may have potential application in optical router and quantum optomechanical memory.

  19. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    PubMed

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  20. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  1. Optical knobs from slow- to fast-light with gain in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dingan; Zeng, Yaguang; Bai, Yanfeng

    2011-09-01

    The light pulse propagation through semiconductor quantum-well heterostructures under realistic experimental conditions is studied analytically with the Schrödinger equations. It is shown that slow light and superluminal propagation with gain can be observed by varying the relative phase and the strength of the applied fields. Such investigation may open up the possibility to control the light propagation and may lead to potential applications such as high-fidelity optical delay lines, optical buffers and optical communication in quantum wells solid materials.

  2. Reversible Fano resonance by transition from fast light to slow light in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yundong; Zhang, Xuenan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Ruidong; Gai, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Ping

    2013-04-08

    We theoretically propose and experimentally perform a novel dispersion tuning scheme to realize a tunable Fano resonance in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) structure coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We reveal that the profile of the Fano resonance in the resonator coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers (RCMZI) is determined not only by the phase shift difference between the two arms of the RCMZI but also by the dispersion (group delay) of the CRIT structure. Furthermore, it is theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated that the slope and the asymmetry parameter (q) describing the Fano resonance spectral line shape of the RCMZI experience a sign reversal when the dispersion of the CRIT structure is tuned from abnormal dispersion (fast light) to normal dispersion (slow light). These theoretical and experimental results indicate that the reversible Fano resonance which holds significant implications for some attractive device applications such as highly sensitive biochemical sensors, ultrafast optical switches and routers can be realized by the dispersion tuning scheme in the RCMZI.

  3. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  4. Slow and fast light via two-wave mixing in the rare-earth doped optical fibers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Serguei I.; Plata Sánchez, Marcos; Hernández, Eliseo

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic population Bragg gratings can be recorded in the rare-earth-doped (e.g. doped with erbium or ytterbium) optical fibers with mWatt-scale cw laser power. Two-wave mixing (TWM) via such gratings is utilized in single-frequency fiber lasers and in adaptive interferometric fiber sensors with automatic stabilization of the operation point. Slow and fast light propagation can also be observed in the vicinity of narrow ( 20-200Hz) spectral profile of stationary no-degenerate TWM. In particular, slow light propagation is observed for the purely amplitude grating, recorded in the erbium-doped fiber in spectral range 1510-1550nm. In its turn, in ytterbium-doped fibers at 1064nm (or in erbium-doped fiber at the wavelength below 1500nm) the dynamic grating has significant contribution of the phase component, the TWM profile has essentially asymmetric form, and both slow and fast (superluminal) light propagation is possible at different frequency off-sets between the counter-propagating interacting waves.

  5. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  6. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, M.; Ikuta, R.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T. E-mail: yamamoto@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Özdemir, Ş. K. E-mail: yamamoto@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Chen, W.; Yang, L.

    2016-05-02

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er{sup 3+}) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  7. Slow light beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanhong; Klein, Mason; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-07-25

    We demonstrate a slow light beam splitter using rapid coherence transport in a wall-coated atomic vapor cell. We show that particles undergoing random and undirected classical motion can mediate coherent interactions between two or more optical modes. Coherence, written into atoms via electromagnetically induced transparency using an input optical signal at one transverse position, spreads out via ballistic atomic motion, is preserved by an antirelaxation wall coating, and is then retrieved in outgoing slow light signals in both the input channel and a spatially-separated second channel. The splitting ratio between the two output channels can be tuned by adjusting the laser power. The slow light beam splitter may improve quantum repeater performance and be useful as an all-optical dynamically reconfigurable router.

  8. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  9. A statistical light scattering approach to separating fast and slow dynamics: application to a model system.

    PubMed

    Barthès, Jennifer; Bulone, Donatella; Manno, Mauro; Martorana, Vincenzo; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2007-09-01

    Light scattering is a powerful technique to study the structural and dynamical properties of biomolecular systems or other soft materials such as polymeric solutions and blends or gels. An important application of this technique is the study of the kinetics of formation of supramolecular structures. However, in such cases, the system under study is rapidly changing, and consequently the integration time for each measurement is limited. In order to overcome this difficulty, a statistical approach has been developed based on the analysis of the scattered light intensity distribution (Manno et al. 2006, 2004). Indeed the intensity distribution depends upon the ratio between the integration time of each measurement and the coherence time of scattered radiation. This method has been applied to protein aggregation (Manno et al. 2006) and to sol-gel transition (Manno et al. 2004), to obtain information on the heterogeneity of morphological and dynamical features during such processes. In the present work, we accurately test the validity of this approach by analyzing the statistical properties of the light scattered by a model system: a solution of polystyrene spherical macromolecules of different sizes. Each molecular size is related to a given diffusion coefficient and to a given coherence time of the scattered intensity. The effect of changing the experimental integration time is systematically investigated. A mixture of particles of two different sizes is also analyzed to test the validity and robustness of the model based on the convolution of a gaussian with an exponential distribution.

  10. Gravity slows light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The speed of light is measured as a constant number of metres per second. However, a meter is a measure of how far light travels in a second. That is, light always travels as far as it does in a second every second. This is a circular definition. When measured against other things, light speed must change. Gravity is usually described as a consequence of a curve in spacetime. The word ``space'' has two distinct meanings. In geometry, space is a continuous area. In relativity, ``space'' refers exclusively to geometric spaces measured with light. ``Time'' in a relativistic sense also refers exclusively to the passage of time as measured against light. So a curve in spacetime (a relativistic concept) is a gradual deviation in the thing we use to measure geometric spaces and the passage of time, i.e. the speed of light. I show how Newtonian gravity can explain observable phenomena if the speed of light is inversely proportional to the strength of the gravitational field. For example, we would also expect light to refract as it changes speed passing near massive bodies. Boundary conditions are also discussed, for example, very high gravity will slow light to a stop, making it impossible to measure anything against light, giving a gravitational singularity.

  11. Slow and fast light propagation in a defect slab doped with polaritonic materials and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the group velocity of transmitted and reflected pulses through a defect dielectric medium doped with polaritonic materials and nanoparticles is explored by using the density matrix equations and transform matrix method. It is demonstrated that the group velocity of transmitted and reflected lights can be manipulated by adjusting the system’s parameters. The effect of the dipole-dipole interaction is also discussed on behaviors of transmitted and reflected pulses through the slab. Our proposed model may be opened up the possibility of new storage and switching devices based on polaritonic material nanoparticles in future commercial systems.

  12. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  13. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  14. Ultrabroad Bandwidth Slow Light in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-31

    REPORT DATE (DDAfM-YYYV? 31-12-2008 2. REPORT DATE Report Type - Final Technical 3L DATES COVERED (From-To) 6/9/06-9/30/08 4. TITLE AMD SUBTITLE...AVAILABIUTY STATEMENT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: UNLIMITED 1i SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 20100426209 14 .AB8TRACT Slow and fast light enables key functionality in...Connie Chang-Hasnain, "Experimental Demonstration of Slow and Superluminal Light in Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers", Vol. 14 , No. 26, OPTICS EXPRESS

  15. Slow light in flight imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kali; Little, Bethany; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single-photon avalanche diode camera array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow-light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapor. Light-in-flight imaging of slow-light propagation enables direct visualization of a series of physical effects, including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  16. Heterogeneity of myofibrillar proteins in lobster fast and slow muscles: variants of troponin, paramyosin, and myosin light chains comprise four distinct protein assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fast and slow muscles from the claws and abdomen of the American lobster Homarus americanus were examined for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and for differences in myofibrillar proteins. Both myosin and actomyosin ATPase were correlated with fiber composition and contractile speed. Four distinct patterns of myofibrilla proteins observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. A total of three species of troponin-T, five species of troponin-I, and three species of troponin-C were observed. Lobster myosins contained two groups of light chains (LC), termed alpha and beta. There were three ..cap alpha..-LC variants and two ..beta..-LC variants. There were no apparent differences in myosin heavy chain, actin, and tropomyosin. Only paramyosin showed a pattern completely consistent with muscle fiber type: slow fibers contained a species (105 kD) slightly smaller than the principle variant (110 kD) in fast fibers. It is proposed that the type of paramyosin present could provide a biochemical marker to identify the fiber composition of muscles that have not been fully characterized. The diversity of troponin and myosin LC variants suggests that subtle differences in physiological performance exist within the broader categories of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Fast and slow ENSO modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, S.; Jin, F.

    2003-12-01

    Climate variability in the tropical Pacific has a rich frequency spectrum that partly results from coupled modes with different time scales. We examined the contributions of the thermocline feedback (the vertical advection of anomalous subsurface temperature by the mean upwelling) and zonal advective feedback (the zonal advection of mean sea surface temperature by anomalous current) in determining the time scales of the coupled modes. Firstly, using a dynamical ocean model, we study the dependence of maximum amplitudes and locations of equatorial zonal current and thermocline on the time scales of the wind forcing. Then we examine in a linearized intermediate air-sea coupled model the impacts of these feedbacks on the co-existence of leading coupled modes of different time scales. For slowly varying wind forcing, amplitudes of zonal currents are very weak and locate at western Pacific, whereas the thermocline response is strong. The zonal advective feedback thus tends but to be of secondly importance in a slow mode of interannual periodicity although it plays a dominating role in a fast coupled mode of near annual periodicity. The changes in the basic state of the coupled system can have significant impacts on the relative importance of the two main feedbacks and thus the periodicity and stability of the leading modes the coupled tropical Pacific climate system.

  18. Comparative analysis of four-wave mixing of optical pulses in slow- and fast-light regimes of a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Lavdas, Spyros; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2015-09-15

    We present an in-depth study of four-wave mixing (FWM) of optical pulses in silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Our analysis is based on a rigorous model that includes all relevant linear and nonlinear optical effects and their dependence on the group velocity, as well as the influence of free carriers on pulse dynamics. In particular, we reveal key differences between FWM in the slow- and fast-light regimes and how they are related to the physical parameters of the pulses and waveguide. Finally, we illustrate how these results can be used to design waveguides with optimized FWM conversion efficiency.

  19. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  20. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  1. Slow Light Semiconductor Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-02

    we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. The views, opinions and/or findings...we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. Further, the large intracavity field...hybrid Si/III- V platforms Abstract The semiconductor laser is the principal light source powering the world-wide optical fiber network . Ever

  2. Fast wandering of slow birds.

    PubMed

    Toner, John

    2011-12-01

    I study a single slow bird moving with a flock of birds of a different and faster (or slower) species. I find that every species of flocker has a characteristic speed γ ≠ v(0), where v(0) is the mean speed of the flock such that if the speed v(s) of the slow bird equals γ, it will randomly wander transverse to the mean direction of flock motion far faster than the other birds will: Its mean-squared transverse displacement will grow in d = 2 with time t like t(5/3), in contrast to t(4/3) for the other birds. In d = 3, the slow bird's mean-squared transverse displacement grows like t(5/4), in contrast to t for the other birds. If v(s) ≠ γ, the mean-squared displacement of the slow bird crosses over from t(5/3) to t(4/3) scaling in d = 2 and from t(5/4) to t scaling in d = 3 at a time t(c) that scales according to t(c) proportionally |v(s) - γ|(-2).

  3. Fractal THz slow light metamaterial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shoichi

    Scope and Method of Study: The goal of this study is to investigate the time delay of the fractal H metamaterials in the terahertz regime. This metamaterial contains resonators with two different sizes of H structures which mimic Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and create a transmission window and the corresponding phase dispersion, thus producing slow light. The Al structures were fabricated on silicon wafer and Mylar by using microelectronic lithography and thermal evaporation technique. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the phase change caused by the slow light system and the actual time delay were obtained. Numerical simulations were carried out to systematize the effect of permittivity and structure dimensions on the optical properties. Findings and Conclusions: We experimentally demonstrated the numerical time delay of the fractal H metamaterial as a slow light device. When permittivity of the substrates increases, the peak position of the transmission window shifts to lower frequency and the bandwidth becomes broader. As a result, silicon performed larger time delay than that of Mylar. By changing the length of the resonator, the bandwidth and the peak position of the transmission window is controllable. At the edges of the transmission window, the negative time delays (fast light) were also observed. Mylar acts as a quaci-free standing structure and allows higher spectral measurement. Moreover, metamaterials fabricated on multiple Mylar films can potentially act as a more effective slow light device. As applications, slow light metamaterials are expected to be used for high-capacity terahertz communication networks, all-optical information processing and sensing devices.

  4. Slow light and slow acoustic phonons in optophononic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafañe, V.; Soubelet, P.; Bruchhausen, A. E.; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaître, A.; Fainstein, A.

    2016-11-01

    Slow and confined light have been exploited in optoelectronics to enhance light-matter interactions. Here we describe the GaAs/AlAs semiconductor microcavity as a device that, depending on the excitation conditions, either confines or slows down both light and optically generated acoustic phonons. The localization of photons and phonons in the same place of space amplifies optomechanical processes. Picosecond laser pulses are used to study through time-resolved reflectivity experiments the coupling between photons and both confined and slow acoustic phonons when the laser is tuned either with the cavity (confined) optical mode or with the stop-band edge (slow) optical modes. A model that fully takes into account the modified propagation of the acoustic phonons and light in these resonant structures is used to describe the laser detuning dependence of the coherently generated phonon spectra and amplitude under these different modes of laser excitation. We observe that confined light couples only to confined mechanical vibrations, while slow light can generate both confined and slow coherent vibrations. A strong enhancement of the optomechanical coupling using confined photons and vibrations, and also with properly designed slow photon and phonon modes, is demonstrated. The prospects for the use of these optoelectronic devices in confined and slow optomechanics are addressed.

  5. Transition from fast to slow atom diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zugarramurdi, Asier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2012-12-01

    For energetic atomic beams grazingly incident at a surface along low-index directions, the fast motion of the projectile in the surface plane and the slow motion in the direction perpendicular to the surface appear nearly decoupled. Fast-atom diffraction (FAD) experiments reveal two-dimensional (2D) diffraction patterns associated with exchange of the reciprocal vector perpendicular to the low-index direction of fast motion. These results are usually interpreted within the axial-channeling approximation, where the effective 2D potential experienced by the projectile is set as an average of the 3D surface potential along the atomic strings forming the channel. In this work, using the example of grazing scattering of He atoms at a LiF(001) surface, we address theoretically the range of validity of the axial-channeling approximation. Full quantum wave-packet-propagation calculations are used to study the transition from the 2D (fast atom) to the 3D diffraction pattern characteristic for low-energy atomic and molecular projectiles scattered from surfaces. Along with exact calculations, a semianalytical perturbative treatment based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation allows an explanation of why the diffraction processes involving the exchange of reciprocal-lattice vectors along the fast-motion direction are exponentially small in typical FAD conditions.

  6. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  7. Multi-band slow light metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Meng, Fan-Yi; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wu, Qun; Hua, Jun

    2012-02-13

    In this paper, a multi-band slow light metamaterial is presented and investigated. The metamaterial unit cell is composed of three cut wires of different sizes and parallel to each other. Two transparency windows induced by two-two overlaps of absorption bands of three cut wires are observed. The multi-band transmission characteristics and the slow light properties of metamaterial are verified by numerical simulation, which is in a good agreement with theoretical predictions. The impacts of structure parameters on transparency windows are also investigated. Simulation results show the spectral properties can be tuned by adjusting structure parameters of metamaterial. The equivalent circuit model and the synthesis method of the multi-band slow light metamaterial are presented. It is seen from simulation results that the synthesis method accurately predicts the center frequency of the multi-band metamaterial, which opens a door to a quick and accurate construction for multi-band slow light metamaterial.

  8. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  9. Fast-to-Slow Transition of Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function and Corresponding Changes in Myosin Heavy and Light Chain Formation in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Tanja; Braubach, Peter; Landwehrmeyer, G. Bernhard; Lindenberg, Katrin S.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington´s disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease resulting from an expanded polyglutamine sequence (poly-Q) in the protein huntingtin (HTT). Various studies report atrophy and metabolic pathology of skeletal muscle in HD and suggest as part of the process a fast-to-slow fiber type transition that may be caused by the pathological changes in central motor control or/and by mutant HTT in the muscle tissue itself. To investigate muscle pathology in HD, we used R6/2 mice, a common animal model for a rapidly progressing variant of the disease expressing exon 1 of the mutant human gene. We investigated alterations in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a typical fast-twitch muscle, and the soleus (SOL), a slow-twitch muscle. We focussed on mechanographic measurements of excised muscles using single and repetitive electrical stimulation and on the expression of the various myosin isoforms (heavy and light chains) using dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole muscle and single fiber preparations. In EDL of R6/2, the functional tests showed a left shift of the force-frequency relation and decrease in specific force. Moreover, the estimated relative contribution of the fastest myosin isoform MyHC IIb decreased, whereas the contribution of the slower MyHC IIx isoform increased. An additional change occurred in the alkali MyLC forms showing a decrease in 3f and an increase in 1f level. In SOL, a shift from fast MyHC IIa to the slow isoform I was detectable in male R6/2 mice only, and there was no evidence of isoform interconversion in the MyLC pattern. These alterations point to a partial remodeling of the contractile apparatus of R6/2 mice towards a slower contractile phenotype, predominantly in fast glycolytic fibers. PMID:27820862

  10. Slow light by coherent hole burnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiong-Yi; Zhang, Bing; Wei, Xiao-Gang; Wu, Jin-Hui; Kuang, Shang-Qi; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2008-06-01

    We show that the simultaneous application of a copropagating saturating pump and a counterpropagating coherent beam can be used to burn a narrow spectral hole within the absorption line of the optical transition in a Doppler-broadened medium. The large index of refraction of this hole slows down a light pulse by a factor of about 104 . In addition, we propose a method to create two-color slow light pulses with simultaneous gain by employing a bichromatic field to saturate the medium.

  11. Fast and Slow Spindles during the Sleep Slow Oscillation: Disparate Coalescence and Engagement in Memory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mölle, Matthias; Bergmann, Til O.; Marshall, Lisa; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Thalamo-cortical spindles driven by the up-state of neocortical slow (< 1 Hz) oscillations (SOs) represent a candidate mechanism of memory consolidation during sleep. We examined interactions between SOs and spindles in human slow wave sleep, focusing on the presumed existence of 2 kinds of spindles, i.e., slow frontocortical and fast centro-parietal spindles. Design: Two experiments were performed in healthy humans (24.5 ± 0.9 y) investigating undisturbed sleep (Experiment I) and the effects of prior learning (word paired associates) vs. non-learning (Experiment II) on multichannel EEG recordings during sleep. Measurements and Results: Only fast spindles (12-15 Hz) were synchronized to the depolarizing SO up-state. Slow spindles (9-12 Hz) occurred preferentially at the transition into the SO down-state, i.e., during waning depolarization. Slow spindles also revealed a higher probability to follow rather than precede fast spindles. For sequences of individual SOs, fast spindle activity was largest for “initial” SOs, whereas SO amplitude and slow spindle activity were largest for succeeding SOs. Prior learning enhanced this pattern. Conclusions: The finding that fast and slow spindles occur at different times of the SO cycle points to disparate generating mechanisms for the 2 kinds of spindles. The reported temporal relationships during SO sequences suggest that fast spindles, driven by the SO up-state feed back to enhance the likelihood of succeeding SOs together with slow spindles. By enforcing such SO-spindle cycles, particularly after prior learning, fast spindles possibly play a key role in sleep-dependent memory processing. Citation: Mölle M; Bergmann TO; Marshall L; Born J. Fast and slow spindles during the sleep slow oscillation: disparate coalescence and engagement in memory processing. SLEEP 2011;34(10):1411–1421. PMID:21966073

  12. Slow clean-up for fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-05-01

    The year 2300 is so distant that one may be forgiven for thinking of it only in terms of science fiction. But this is the year that workers at the Dounreay power station in Northern Scotland - the UK's only centre for research into "fast" nuclear reactors - term as the "end point" by which time the site will be completely clear of radioactive material. More than 180 facilities - including the iconic dome that housed the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) - were built at at the site since it opened in 1959, with almost 50 having been used to handle radioactive material.

  13. Effect of fast and slow pranayama practice on cognitive functions in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek Kumar; M, Rajajeyakumar; S, Velkumary; Subramanian, Senthil Kumar; Bhavanani, Ananda B; Madanmohan; Sahai, Ajit; Thangavel, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    To compare the cumulative effect of commonly practised slow and fast pranayama on cognitive functions in healthy volunteers. 84 participants who were in self-reported good health, who were in the age group of 18-25 years, who were randomized to fast pranayama, slow pranayama and control group with 28 participants in each group. Fast pranayama included kapalabhati, bhastrika and kukkuriya. Slow pranayama included nadishodhana, Pranav and Savitri. Respective pranayama training was given for 35 minutes, three times per week, for a duration of 12 weeks under the supervision of a certified yoga trainer. Parameters were recorded before and after 12 weeks of intervention: Perceived stress scale (PSS), BMI, waist to hip ratio and cognitive parameters-letter cancellation test, trail making tests A and B, forward and reverse digit spans and auditory and visual reaction times for red light and green light. Inter-group comparison was done by one way ANOVA and intra-group comparison was done by paired t-test. Executive functions, PSS and reaction time improved significantly in both fast and slow pranayama groups, except reverse digit span, which showed an improvement only in fast pranayama group. In addition, percentage reduction in reaction time was significantly more in the fast pranayama group as compared to that in slow pranayama group. Both types of pranayamas are beneficial for cognitive functions, but fast pranayama has additional effects on executive function of manipulation in auditory working memory, central neural processing and sensory-motor performance.

  14. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials’ sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  15. Fast and slow myosins as markers of muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, M; Guiu-Comadevall, M; Cadefau, J A; Parra, J; Balius, R; Estruch, A; Rodas, G; Bedini, J L; Cussó, R

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis of muscular lesions suffered by athletes is usually made by clinical criteria combined with imaging of the lesion (ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance) and blood tests to detect the presence of non-specific muscle markers. This study was undertaken to evaluate injury to fast and slow-twitch fibres using specific muscle markers for these fibres. Methods: Blood samples were obtained from 51 non-sports people and 38 sportsmen with skeletal muscle injury. Western blood analysis was performed to determine fast and slow myosin and creatine kinase (CK) levels. Skeletal muscle damage was diagnosed by physical examination, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance and biochemical markers. Results: The imaging tests were found to be excellent for detecting and confirming grade II and III lesions. However, grade I lesions were often unconfirmed by these techniques. Grade I lesions have higher levels of fast myosin than slow myosin with a very small increase in CK levels. Grade II and III lesions have high values of both fast and slow myosin. Conclusions: The evaluation of fast and slow myosin in the blood 48 h after the lesion occurs is a useful aid for the detection of type I lesions in particular, since fast myosin is an exclusive skeletal muscle marker. The correct diagnosis of grade I lesions can prevent progression of the injury in athletes undergoing continual training sessions and competitions, thus aiding sports physicians in their decision making. PMID:18070807

  16. Characterization of slow and fast phase nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Charles S.; Rodriguez-Garcia, Carlos A.; Wong, Wing Chan; Im, Jae J.; Schmidt, Glenn F.

    1991-01-01

    A current literature review of the analog and digital process of vestibular and optical kinetic nystagmus reveals little agreement in the methods used by various labs. The strategies for detection of saccade (fast phase velocity component of nystagmus) vary between labs, and most of the process have not been evaluated and validated with a standard database. A survey was made of major vestibular labs in the U.S. that perform computer analyses of vestibular and optokinetic reflexes to stimuli, and a baseline was established from which to standardize data acquisition and analysis programs. The concept of an Error Index was employed as the criterium for evaluating the performance of the vestibular analysis software programs. The performance criterium is based on the detection of saccades and is the average of the percentages of missed detections and false detections. Evaluation of the programs produced results for lateral gaze with saccadic amplitude of one, two, three, five, and ten degrees with various signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, results were obtained for sinusoidal pursuit of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.50 Hz with saccades from one to ten degrees at various signal-to-noise ratios. Selection of the best program was made from the performance in the lateral gaze with three degrees of saccadic amplitude and in the 0.10 Hz sinusoid with three degrees of saccadic amplitude.

  17. Improved Slow Light Capacity In Graphene-based Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ran; Peng, Xi-Liang; Li, Er-Ping; Xu, Yang; Jin, Jia-Min; Zhang, Xian-Min; Chen, Hong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the wideband slow light in two-dimensional material graphene, revealing that graphene exhibits much larger slow light capability than other materials. The slow light performances including material dispersion, bandwidth, dynamic control ability, delay-bandwidth product, propagation loss, and group-velocity dispersion are studied, proving graphene exhibits significant advantages in these performances. A large delay-bandwidth product has been obtained in a simple yet functional grating waveguide with slow down factor c/vg at 163 and slow light bandwidth Δω at 94.4 nm centered at 10.38 μm, which is several orders of magnitude larger than previous results. Physical explanation of the enhanced slow light in graphene is given. Our results indicate graphene is an excellent platform for slow light applications, promoting various future slow light devices based on graphene. PMID:26478563

  18. Slow Light and Superluminality in Kerr Media without a Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Seo, Jae Tae; Tabibi, Bagher; Wang, Huitian

    2005-08-01

    Subluminal and superluminal propagation of a light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 mm per second to as fast as negative several thousands meters per second can easily be obtained in the Kerr medium, which possesses a large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr3+-doped alexandrite, ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse.

  19. From slow to fast rupture during laboratory earthquakes in dolostones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Fondriest, M.; Nicolas, A.; Aubry, J.; Schubnel, A.; Di Toro, G.

    2016-12-01

    Dolostones are the dominant lithology of the shallow portions of many seismically active regions (e.g., Italian Apennines). Displacement in natural fault zones cutting dolostones and exhumed from < 3-4 km depth is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirror-like) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nano-granular fault rock. Using saw-cut dolostone samples, we conducted stick-slip experiments under upper crustal stress conditions (confining pressures and temperatures of 30, 60 and 90 MPa at 30, 65 and 100 °C, respectively). Samples were equipped with 15 piezoelectric transducers allowing the record of acoustic activity. At 30 and 65 °C, only slow ruptures (Vr < 200 m/s) were observed and the experimental faults exhibited ductile behaviour. At 65 °C, a slip strengthening behaviour was observed after the main slow rupture, leading to a succession of slow ruptures. At T = 100 °C and 30 MPa confining pressure, fault strengthening increased after each rupture, allowing, while the rupture processes remained slow (no acoustic activity), a sequence of slow stick-slip events. Instead, at the same ambient temperature but under larger confining pressures (60 and 90 MPa), we observed the transition from slow to fast rupture events (up to supershear rupture velocities), associated to clusters of acoustic activity and dynamic stress drop occurring in few tens of microseconds. In all experiments, mirror-like surfaces and nanoparticles were observed under the scanning electron microscope as a result of slow and fast ruptures. Clearly, mirror-like surfaces and nano powders are not representative of seismic slip events in cohesive dolostones. Instead, the transition from slow to fast ruptures (and generation of acoustic emissions) was related to a flash weakening processes, enhanced at 100° C, which allowed the experimental fault to weaken with slip faster than the rate at which the elastic strain was released from the surrounding medium.

  20. Fast scintillation light from CaMoO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veresnikova, A. V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Barabanov, I. R.; Grabmayr, P.; Greiner, D.; Jochum, J.; Knapp, M.; Oßwald, C.; Poleshuk, R. V.; Ritter, F.; Shaibonov, B. A. M.; Vyatchin, Y. E.; Meierhofer, G.

    2009-05-01

    We report the observation of multi-exponential scintillation light emission from a CaMoO4 crystal with slow and fast components after both α-particles or γ-quanta irradiation. The slow components with decay times of ˜5 and ˜15 μs produce the main contribution to the light yield. Whereas the fast components with ˜10-50 ns decay times observed for the first time with such a crystal at room temperature contribute <1% to the crystal total light yield.

  1. Nonlinear light propagation in chalcogenide photonic crystal slow light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Baba, Toshihiko

    2010-12-06

    Optical nonlinearity can be enhanced by the combination of highly nonlinear chalcogenide glass and photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) providing strong optical confinement and slow-light effects. In a Ag-As(2)Se(3) chalcogenide PCW, the effective nonlinear parameter γeff reaches 6.3 × 10(4) W(-1)m(-1), which is 200 times larger than that in Si photonic wire waveguides. In this paper, we report the detailed design, fabrication process, and the linear and nonlinear characteristics of this waveguide at silica fiber communication wavelengths. We show that the waveguide exhibits negligible two-photon absorption, and also high-efficiency self-phase modulation and four-wave mixing, which are assisted by low-dispersion slow light.

  2. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales

    PubMed Central

    IDE, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes. PMID:25311138

  3. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    PubMed

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  4. Chirp-enhanced fast light in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, F G; Pesala, Bala; Uskov, Alexander V; Chang-Hasnain, C J

    2007-12-24

    We present a novel scheme to increase the THz-bandwidth fast light effect in semiconductor optical amplifiers and increase the number of advanced pulses. By introducing a linear chirp to the input pulses before the SOA and recompressing at the output with an opposite chirp, the advance-bandwidth product reached 3.5 at room temperature, 1.55 microm wavelength. This is the largest number reported, to the best of our knowledge, for a semiconductor slow/fast light device.

  5. Active vision system integrating fast and slow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillon-Santana, Modesto; Guerra-Artal, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, J.; Dominguez-Brito, A.; Isern-Gonzalez, J.; Cabrera-Gamez, Jorge; Hernandez-Tejera, F. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes an Active Vision System whose design assumes a distinction between fast or reactive and slow or background processes. Fast processes need to operate in cycles with critical timeouts that may affect system stability. While slow processes, though necessary, do not compromise system stability if its execution is delayed. Based on this simple taxonomy, a control architecture has been proposed and a prototype implemented that is able to track people in real-time with a robotic head while trying to identify the target. In this system, the tracking mobile is considered as the reactive part of the system while person identification is considered a background task. This demonstrator has been developed using a new generation DSP (TMS320C80) as a specialized coprocessor to deal with fast processes, and a commercial robotic head with a dedicated DSP-based motor controller. These subsystems are hosted by a standard Pentium-Pro PC running Windows NT where slow processes are executed. The flexibility achieved in the design phase and the preliminary results obtained so far seem to validate the approach followed to integrate time- critical and slow tasks on a heterogeneous hardware platform.

  6. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  7. Optimal control NMR differentiation between fast and slow sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2010-07-01

    Sodium ions in tissues and organs may experience motion on a variety of timescales, leading to NMR relaxation effects with quadrupolar coupling as the primary mechanism. The various effects that this fluctuating interaction has on spin dynamics can be exploited for distinguishing slow sodium ions from fast ones. Techniques such as triple-quantum filtering have been used for this purpose in the past. In this work we present optimal pulses which significantly improve the selectivity towards slow-tumbling sodium. These pulses can also be modified for robustness against magnetic field inhomogeneities, and could hence also become useful as MRI contrast methods.

  8. Dispersion-controlled slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Adachi, Jun; Ishikura, Norihiro; Hamachi, Yohei; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Slow light with a markedly low group velocity is a promising solution for optical buffering and advanced time-domain optical signal processing. It is also anticipated to enhance linear and nonlinear effects and so miniaturize functional photonic devices because slow light compresses optical energy in space. Photonic crystal waveguide devices generate on-chip slow light at room temperature with a wide bandwidth and low dispersion suitable for short pulse transmission. This paper first explains the delay-bandwidth product, fractional delay, and tunability as crucial criteria for buffering capacity of slow light devices. Then the paper describes experimental observations of slow light pulse, exhibiting their record high values. It also demonstrates the nonlinear enhancement based on slow light pulse transmission.

  9. Rapid geometrical chaotization in slow-fast Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M

    2014-06-01

    In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate effects of a new mechanism of adiabaticity destruction in Hamiltonian systems with a separatrix in the phase space. In contrast to the slow diffusive-like destruction typical for many systems, this new mechanism is responsible for very fast chaotization in a large phase volume. To investigate this mechanism we consider a Hamiltonian system with two degrees of freedom and with a separatrix in the phase plane of fast variables. The fast chaotization is due to an asymmetry of the separatrix and corresponding geometrical jumps of an adiabatic invariant. This system describes the motion of charged particles in a inhomogeneous electromagnetic field with a specific configuration. We show that geometrical jumps of the adiabatic invariant result in a very fast chaotization of particle motion.

  10. Slow Light in Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that a splitting of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) occurs in coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs), and that these split modes are of a higher Q than the single-resonator modes, leading to enormous circulating intensity magnification factors that dramatically reduce thresholds for nonlinear optical (NLO) processes. As a result of the enhancements in Q, pulses propagating at a split resonance can propagate much slower (faster) for over (under)-coupled structures, due to the modified dispersion near the split resonance. Moreover, when loss is considered, the mode-splitting may be thought of as analogous to the Autler-Townes splitting that occurs in atomic three-level lambda systems, i.e., it gives rise to induced transparency as a result of destructive interference. In under- or over-coupled CROWs, this coupled resonator induced transparency (CRIT) allows slow light to be achieved at the single-ring resonance with no absorption, while maintaining intensities such that NLO effects are maximized. The intensity magnification of the circulating fields and phase transfer characteristics are examined in detail.

  11. Slow Light in Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that a splitting of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) occurs in coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs), and that these split modes are of a higher Q than the single-resonator modes, leading to enormous circulating intensity magnification factors that dramatically reduce thresholds for nonlinear optical (NLO) processes. As a result of the enhancements in Q, pulses propagating at a split resonance can propagate much slower (faster) for over (under)-coupled structures, due to the modified dispersion near the split resonance. Moreover, when loss is considered, the mode-splitting may be thought of as analogous to the Autler-Townes splitting that occurs in atomic three-level lambda systems, i.e., it gives rise to induced transparency as a result of destructive interference. In under- or over-coupled CROWs, this coupled resonator induced transparency (CRIT) allows slow light to be achieved at the single-ring resonance with no absorption, while maintaining intensities such that NLO effects are maximized. The intensity magnification of the circulating fields and phase transfer characteristics are examined in detail.

  12. Multi-timescale systems and fast-slow analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Richard; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2016-07-15

    Mathematical models of biological systems often have components that vary on different timescales. This multi-timescale character can lead to problems when doing computer simulations, which can require a great deal of computer time so that the components that change on the fastest time scale can be resolved. Mathematical analysis of these multi-timescale systems can be greatly simplified by partitioning them into subsystems that evolve on different time scales. The subsystems are then analyzed semi-independently, using a technique called fast-slow analysis. In this review we describe the fast-slow analysis technique and apply it to relaxation oscillations, neuronal bursting oscillations, canard oscillations, and mixed-mode oscillations. Although these examples all involve neural systems, the technique can and has been applied to other biological, chemical, and physical systems. It is a powerful analysis method that will become even more useful in the future as new experimental techniques push forward the complexity of biological models.

  13. Reply to Origin of fast electrons' from slow atomic collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, R.A. ); Alonso, E.V. ); Oliva, A.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F. )

    1993-08-01

    We show reasons why negative ions cannot contribute significantly to our observation of fast electrons in slow atomic collisions [Phys. Rev. 45, 5286 (1992)]. We point out that the opposite suggestion by Yasui [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1711 (1993)] results from multiple errors in his analysis, including inadequate consideration of energy conservation, the use of nonapplicable data from the literature, neglect of decay in flight of metastable negative ions, nonconsideration of detection efficiency, and the inconsistent fit of experimental data.

  14. Kinematic Changes During a Marathon for Fast and Slow Runners

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Roper, Maggie; Hunter, Iain; W. Myrer, Joseph; L. Eggett, Dennis; K. Seeley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe kinematic changes that occur during an actual marathon. We hypothesized that (1) certain running kinematic measures would change between kilometres 8 and 40 (miles 5 and 25) of a marathon and (2) fast runners would demonstrate smaller changes than slow runners. Subjects (n = 179) were selected according to finish time (Range = 2:20:47 to 5:30:10). Two high-speed cameras were used to measure sagittal-plane kinematics at kilometres 8 and 40 of the marathon. The dependent variables were stride length, contact time, peak knee flexion during support and swing, and peak hip flexion and extension during swing. Two-tailed paired t-tests were used to compare dependent variables between kilometres 8 and 40 for all subjects, and regression analyses were used to determine whether faster runners exhibited smaller changes (between miles 5 and 25) than slower runners. For all runners, every dependent variable changed significantly between kilometres 8 and 40 (p < 0.001). Stride length increased 1.3%, contact time increased 13.1%, peak knee flexion during support decreased 3.2%, and peak hip extension, knee flexion, and hip flexion during swing decreased 27.9%, increased 4.3%, and increased 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). Among these significant changes, all runners generally changed the same from kilometres 8 and 40 except that fast runners decreased peak knee flexion during support less than the slow runners (p < 0.002). We believe that these changes, for all runners (fast and slow), were due to fatigue. The fact that fast runners maintained knee flexion during support more consistently might be due to their condition on the race day. Strengthening of knee extensor muscles may facilitate increased knee flexion during support throughout a marathon. Key points Runners changed kinematics significantly from kilometres 8 to 40 (increased stride length, contact time, peak hip flexion during swing, and peak knee flexion during swing, and

  15. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  16. Physiological changes in fast and slow muscle with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Misulis, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    A rat hindlimb suspension model of simulated weightlessness was used to examine the physiological characteristics of skeletal muscle. The physiological sequelae of hindlimb suspension were compared to those of spinal cord section, denervation by sciatic nerve crush, and control. Muscle examined were the predominantly slow (Type 1) soleus (SOL) and the predominantly fast (Type 2) extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Two procedures which alter motor unit activity, hindlimb suspension and spinal cord section, produce changes in characteristics of skeletal muscles that are dependent upon fiber type. The SOL develops characteristics more representative of a fast muscle, including smaller Type 1 fiber proportion and higher AChE activity. The EDL, which is already predominantly fast, loses most of its few Type 1 fibers, thus also becoming faster. These data are in agreement with the studies in which rats experienced actual weightlessness.

  17. Physiological changes in fast and slow muscle with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Misulis, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    A rat hindlimb suspension model of simulated weightlessness was used to examine the physiological characteristics of skeletal muscle. The physiological sequelae of hindlimb suspension were compared to those of spinal cord section, denervation by sciatic nerve crush, and control. Muscle examined were the predominantly slow (Type 1) soleus (SOL) and the predominantly fast (Type 2) extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Two procedures which alter motor unit activity, hindlimb suspension and spinal cord section, produce changes in characteristics of skeletal muscles that are dependent upon fiber type. The SOL develops characteristics more representative of a fast muscle, including smaller Type 1 fiber proportion and higher AChE activity. The EDL, which is already predominantly fast, loses most of its few Type 1 fibers, thus also becoming faster. These data are in agreement with the studies in which rats experienced actual weightlessness.

  18. Growth of Fast- and Slow-Growing Rhizobia on Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1986-01-01

    Free-living soybean rhizobia and Bradyrhizobium spp. (lupine) have the ability to catabolize ethanol. Of the 30 strains of rhizobia examined, only the fast- and slow-growing soybean rhizobia and the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (lupine) were capable of using ethanol as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two strains from each of the other Rhizobium species examined (R. meliloti, R. loti, and R. leguminosarum biovars phaseoli, trifolii, and viceae) failed to grow on ethanol. One Rhizobium fredii (fast-growing) strain, USDA 191, and one (slow-growing) Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain, USDA 110, grew in ethanol up to concentrations of 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively. While three of the R. fredii strains examined (USDA 192, USDA 194, and USDA 205) utilized 0.2% acetate, only USDA 192 utilized 0.1% n-propanol. None of the three strains utilized 0.1% methanol, formate, or n-butanol as the sole carbon source. PMID:16347190

  19. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  20. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  1. Fast-slow and slow-slow form of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia sustained by the same reentrant circuit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cantù, Francesco; De Filippo, Paolo; Rordorf, Roberto; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Frattini, Folco; Petracci, Barbara; Russo, Giovanni; Cerrone, Marina; Landolina, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that a reentrant circuit confined to the posterior extensions of the atrioventricular node underlies both fast-slow and slow-slow types of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). According to this hypothesis the fast-slow reentrant circuit would be formed by two slow pathways, located in the rightward and leftward posterior extension of the atrioventricular node. Thus, the fast pathway would act as a bystander with respect to the reentrant circuit. We describe the case of a 40-year-old woman with several episodes of palpitations unresponsive to antiarrhythmic drugs. The ECG during symptoms showed a narrow QRS tachycardia with a long ventriculo-atrial interval and a negative P wave in the inferior leads. Electrophysiological study showed the inducibility of a slow-slow AVNRT which rapidly shifted to a fast-slow AVNRT without any change in the duration of the tachycardia cycle. Our observation is in agreement with the hypothesis that the fast-slow reentrant circuit consists of two slow pathways with the fast pathway acting as a bystander.

  2. Singular Hopf Bifurcation in Systems with Fast and Slow Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaksma, B.

    1998-10-01

    We study a general nonlinear ODE system with fast and slow variables, i.e., some of the derivatives are multiplied by a small parameter. The system depends on an additional bifurcation parameter. We derive a normal form for this system, valid close to equilibria where certain conditions on the derivatives hold. The most important condition concerns the presence of eigenvalues with singular imaginary parts, by which we mean that their imaginary part grows without bound as the small parameter tends to zero. We give a simple criterion to test for the possible presence of equilibria satisfying this condition. Using a center manifold reduction, we show the existence of Hopf bifurcation points, originating from the interaction of fast and slow variables, and we determine their nature. We apply the theory, developed here, to two examples: an extended Bonhoeffer—van der Pol system and a predator-prey model. Our theory is in good agreement with the numerical continuation experiments we carried out for the examples.

  3. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. On slow light as a black hole analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, W. G.; Schützhold, R.

    2003-07-01

    Although slow light (electromagnetically induced transparency) would seem an ideal medium in which to institute a “dumb hole” (black hole analogue), it suffers from a number of problems. We show that the high phase velocity in the slow light regime ensures that the system cannot be used as an analogue displaying Hawking radiation. Even though an appropriately designed slow-light setup may simulate classical features of black holes—such as horizon, mode mixing, “Bogoliubov” coefficients, etc.—it does not reproduce the related quantum effects.

  5. Coexistence of fast photodarkening and slow photobleaching in Ge19As21Se60 thin films.

    PubMed

    Khan, Pritam; Barik, A R; Vinod, E M; Sangunni, K S; Jain, H; Adarsh, K V

    2012-05-21

    We experimentally demonstrate the coexistence of two opposite photo-effects, viz. fast photodarkening (PD) and slow photobleaching (PB) in Ge(19)As(21)Se(60) thin films, when illuminated with a laser of wavelength 671 nm. PD appears to begin instantaneously upon light illumination and saturates in tens of seconds. By comparison, PB is a slower process that starts only after PD has saturated. Both PD and PB follow stretched exponential dependence on time. Modeling of overall change as a linear sum of two contributions suggests that the changes in As and Ge parts of glass network respond to light effectively independent of each other.

  6. Photonic crystal slow light waveguides in a kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sebastian A; Upham, Jeremy; O'Faolain, Liam; Boyd, Robert W

    2017-08-15

    Slow light photonic crystal waveguides tightly compress propagating light and increase interaction times, showing immense potential for all-optical delay and enhanced light-matter interactions. Yet, their practical application has largely been limited to moderate group index values (<100), due to a lack of waveguides that reliably demonstrate slower light. This limitation persists because nearly all such research has focused on a single photonic crystal lattice type: the triangular lattice. Here, we present waveguides based on the kagome lattice that demonstrate an intrinsically high group index and exhibit slow and stopped light. We experimentally demonstrate group index values of >150, limited by our measurement resolution. The kagome-lattice waveguides are an excellent starting point for further slow light engineering in photonic crystal waveguides.

  7. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  8. Theoretical investigation and optimization of fiber grating based slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Peng; Du, Chao; Li, Jin; Hu, Haifeng; Zhao, Yong

    2017-07-01

    On the edge of bandgap in a fiber grating, narrow peaks of high transimittivity exist at frequencies where light interferes constructively in the forward direction. In the vicinity of these transmittivity peaks, light reflects back and forth numerous times across the periodic structure and experiences a large group delay. In order to generate the extremely slow light in fiber grating for applications, in this research, the common sense of formation mechanism of slow light in fiber grating was introduced. The means of producing and operating fiber grating was studied to support structural slow light with a group index that can be in principle as high as several thousand. The simulations proceeded by transfer matrix method in the paper were presented to elucidate how the fiber grating parameters effect group refractive index. The main parameters that need to be optimized include grating length, refractive index contrast, grating period, loss coefficient, chirp and apodization functions, those can influence fiber grating characteristics.

  9. Fasting-related autophagic response in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomonori; Oishi, Yasuharu; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Muraoka, Isao

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated regulation of autophagy in slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles in fasting-related atrophy. Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to fasting for 1, 2, or 3 days. Greater weight loss was observed in plantaris muscle than in soleus muscle in response to fasting. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LC3-II, a marker protein for macroautophagy, was expressed at a notably higher level in plantaris than in soleus muscle, and that the expression level was fasting duration-dependent. To identify factors related to LC3-II enhancement, autophagy-related signals were examined in both types of muscle. Phosphorylated mTOR was reduced in plantaris but not in soleus muscle. FOXO3a and ER stress signals were unchanged in both muscle types during fasting. These findings suggest that preferential atrophy of fast-twitch muscle is associated with induction of autophagy during fasting and that differences in autophagy regulation are attributable to differential signal regulation in soleus and plantaris muscle.

  10. Correlation of fast and slow chemical shift spinning sideband patterns under fast magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eléna, Bénédicte; Hediger, Sabine; Emsley, Lyndon

    2003-01-01

    A new two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiment, which correlates slow and fast chemical shift anisotropy sideband patterns is proposed. The experiment, dubbed ROSES, is performed under fast magic-angle spinning and leads to an isotropic spectrum in the directly detected ω2 dimension. In the evolution dimension ω1, the isotropic chemical shift is reduced by a factor S, and spinning sidebands are observed spaced by a scaled effective spinning speed ωR/ S. These spinning sidebands patterns are not identical to those observed with standard slow magic-angle spinning experiments. Chemical shift anisotropy parameters can be accurately extracted with standard methods from these spinning sideband patterns. The experiment is demonstrated with carbon-13 experiments on powdered samples of a dipeptide and a cyclic undecapeptide, cyclosporin-A.

  11. Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2007-04-01

    The authors theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measurements widely employed in analytical chemistry.

  12. Slow light structures in dye-doped polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Ed; Mickelson, Alan R.

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple and consistent technique for fabricating slow light structures in dye-doped polymer waveguides using the process of irreversible photobleaching. The slow light structures are moiré gratings. The gratings are holographically written into channel waveguides photobleached in side-chained PMMA/DR1 films. The films are annealed during the photobleaching process in order to remove stresses in the films generated during the photobleaching process. These stresses have been observed to cause distortion and cracking of the film surface. The slowing factor for the moiré gratings is calculated from the reflectance spectrum of the waveguides using the Hilbert transform. Moiré gratings with slowing factors between 1.6 and 2.6 are demonstrated.

  13. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  14. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths. PMID:27886279

  15. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z H; Chen, H; Yang, F S; Luo, C R; Zhao, X P

    2016-11-25

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  16. Enhanced photoresponsivity in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hao E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Gu, Tingyi E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu McMillan, James F.; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan; Wong, Chee Wei E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate the enhanced fast photoresponsivity in graphene hybrid structures by combining the ultrafast dynamics of graphene with improved light-matter interactions in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides. With a 200 μm interaction length, a 0.8 mA/W photoresponsivity is achieved in a graphene-silicon Schottky-like photodetector, with an operating bandwidth in excess of 5 GHz and wavelength range at least from 1480 nm to 1580 nm. Fourfold enhancement of the photocurrent is observed in the slow light region, compared to the wavelength far from the photonic crystal bandedge, for a chip-scale broadband fast photodetector.

  17. Regular and slow-fast codimension 4 saddle-node bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzak, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Using geometric singular perturbation theory, including the family blow-up as one of the main techniques, we prove that the cyclicity, i.e. maximum number of limit cycles, in both regular and slow-fast unfoldings of nilpotent saddle-node singularity of codimension 4 is 2. The blow-up technique enables us to use the well known results for slow-fast codimension 1 and 2 Hopf bifurcations, slow-fast Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations and slow-fast codimension 3 saddle and elliptic bifurcations.

  18. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  19. Efficient coupling to slow light photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md Shofiqul Islam; Devarapu, Ganga Chinna Rao; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-04-01

    Slow light photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) have been the subject of intensive study due to their potential for on-chip applications such as optical buffers and the enhancement of nonlinear phenomenon. However, due to high group velocity mismatch between the strip waveguide and the slow light waveguide efficient coupling of light is challenging. The coupling efficiency is also very sensitive to the truncation at the interface between the two waveguides. This sensitivity can be removed and light can efficiently be coupled from the strip waveguide to the slow light waveguide by adding an intermediate photonic crystal waveguide (or coupler) that operates at a group index of ˜ 5. Several designs have been proposed for couplers to obtain higher coupling efficiency within the desired group index range. We have studied uniaxial stretched couplers in which the lattice constant is stretched in the direction of propagation by 10-50 nm in the coupler region. Using a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Simulation Method that allows the extraction of the group index, we have observed 8.5 dB improvement in the coupling efficiency at the group index of 30. Efficient coupling is dominantly determined by the band edge position of the coupler region and maximum transmission efficiency is limited by the maximum transmission of the coupler PCW. If the band edge of coupler PCW is sufficiently red shifted relative to the band edge of the slow light PCW then higher coupling efficiency can be achieved.

  20. Spinor Slow-Light and Dirac Particles with Variable Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.; Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.

    2010-10-22

    We consider the interaction of two weak probe fields of light with an atomic ensemble coherently driven by two pairs of standing wave laser fields in a tripod-type linkage scheme. The system is shown to exhibit a Dirac-like spectrum for light-matter quasiparticles with multiple dark states, termed spinor slow-light polaritons. They posses an 'effective speed of light' given by the group velocity of slow light, and can be made massive by inducing a small two-photon detuning. Control of the two-photon detuning can be used to locally vary the mass including a sign flip. Particularly, this allows the implementation of the random-mass Dirac model for which localized zero-energy (midgap) states exist with unusual long-range correlations.

  1. Anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations: fast wind vs slow wind.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasso, S.; Milano, L. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The fluctuations in the solar wind are often modeled in terms of two distinct populations: (a) a 'wave-like' population with quasi-parallel wavenumbers and (b) a quasi-two dimensional 'turbulent-like' fluctuations with perpendicular wavenumbers. Here the qualification "quasi-parallel" or "quasi-2D" means that nearby wavevectors are grouped together in an idealzed way, for simplicity. The relative abundance of these two populations is important in gaining insight on the dynamics of waves or turbulence in the solar wind, and also in understanding the transport of energetic particle populations, as turbulence geometry has a major impact on scattering. It has been established in the literature that turbulence is, generally speaking, more developed in the slow solar wind, with power spectra closer to the kolmogorov value at 1AU, while the fast solar wind is more "Alfvenic", typically with higher values of the cross helicity. It seems natural therefore to investigate the anisotropy structure of solar wind fluctuations as a function of wind speed. We present here our preliminary results in this regard, obtained from magnetic and plasma data from the ACE specraft, at 1AU, essentially in the ecliptic plane. We also discuss possible implications for the modeling the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind.

  2. Fast and slow border traps in MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    Convergent lines of evidence are reviewed which show that near-interfacial oxide traps (border traps) that exchange charge with the Si can strongly affect the performance, radiation response, and long-term reliability of MOS devices. Observable effects of border traps include capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis, enhanced 1/f noise, compensation of trapped holes, and increased thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors. Effects of fast (switching times between {approximately} 10{sup {minus}6} and 1 s) and slow (switching times greater than {approximately} 1 s) border traps have been resolved via a dual-transistor technique. In conjunction with studies of MOS electrical response, electron paramagnetic resonance and spin dependent recombination studies suggest that different types of E{prime} defects (trivalent Si centers in SiO{sub 2} associated with O vacancies) can function as border traps in MOS devices exposed to ionizing radiation or high-field stress. Hydrogen-related centers may also be border traps.

  3. Fast Bayesian inference for slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeval, Christophe

    2014-04-01

    We present and discuss a new approach increasing by orders of magnitude the speed of performing Bayesian inference and parameter estimation within the framework of slow-roll inflation. The method relies on the determination of an effective likelihood for inflation which is a function of the primordial amplitude of the scalar perturbations complemented with the necessary number of the so-called Hubble flow functions to reach the desired accuracy. Starting from any cosmological data set, the effective likelihood is obtained by marginalization over the standard cosmological parameters, here viewed as `nuisance' from the early Universe point of view. As being low dimensional, basic machine-learning algorithms can be trained to accurately reproduce its multidimensional shape and then be used as a proxy to perform fast Bayesian inference on the inflationary models. The robustness and accuracy of the method are illustrated using the Planck cosmic microwave background data to perform primordial parameter estimation for the large field models of inflation. In particular, marginalized over all possible reheating history, we find the power index of the potential to verify p < 2.3 at 95 per cent of confidence.

  4. Numerical simulation of slow light in the semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Hu, Miaomiao; Jia, Dongfang; Yang, Tianxin

    2010-11-01

    Optoelectronic technology played a pivotal role in the unprecedented information revolution in the past two decades. One of the remaining grand challenges is the ability to store an optical signal in optical format. So slowing down the velocity of light have recently attracted substantial interest. In various mechanisms of slow light generation, semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) attracts much attention because it offers the advantage of compactness, room temperature operation, electric-optical controllable and easy integration with existing optical communication systems. In this paper, slow light generation in SOA using four wave mixing (FWM) effect is analyzed. The dynamic changes of the signal light time delay with the outside controllable parameters, such as the injection current into SOA, the pump light power, the detuning frequency between pump light and signal light, are numerically solved on the basis of the theory of refractive modulation-index and the sub-sections model of SOA. This method has the advantage of accurate simulated results and providing the explicit relationships between the controllable parameters with the signal light time delay for the practical experiment.

  5. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  6. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  7. Slow light for deep tissue imaging with ultrasound modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Sabooni, Mahmood; Rippe, Lars; Kim, Chulhong; Kröll, Stefan; Wang, Lihong V.; Hemmer, Philip R.

    2012-03-01

    Slow light has been extensively studied for applications ranging from optical delay lines to single photon quantum storage. Here, we show that the time delay of slow-light significantly improves the performance of the narrowband spectral filters needed to optically detect ultrasound from deep inside highly scattering tissue. We demonstrate this capability with a 9 cm thick tissue phantom, having 10 cm-1 reduced scattering coefficient, and achieve an unprecedented background-free signal. Based on the data, we project real time imaging at video rates in even thicker phantoms and possibly deep enough into real tissue for clinical applications like early cancer detection.

  8. Kinesin-1/Hsc70-dependent mechanism of slow axonal transport and its relation to fast axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Sumio; Kinjo, Masataka; Aihara, Makoto; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2010-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein transport in axons (‘slow axonal transport') is essential for neuronal homeostasis, and involves Kinesin-1, the same motor for membranous organelle transport (‘fast axonal transport'). However, both molecular mechanisms of slow axonal transport and difference in usage of Kinesin-1 between slow and fast axonal transport have been elusive. Here, we show that slow axonal transport depends on the interaction between the DnaJ-like domain of the kinesin light chain in the Kinesin-1 motor complex and Hsc70, scaffolding between cytoplasmic proteins and Kinesin-1. The domain is within the tetratricopeptide repeat, which can bind to membranous organelles, and competitive perturbation of the domain in squid giant axons disrupted cytoplasmic protein transport and reinforced membranous organelle transport, indicating that this domain might have a function as a switchover system between slow and fast transport by Hsc70. Transgenic mice overexpressing a dominant-negative form of the domain showed delayed slow transport, accelerated fast transport and optic axonopathy. These findings provide a basis for the regulatory mechanism of intracellular transport and its intriguing implication in neuronal dysfunction. PMID:20111006

  9. Myosin isoenzymes in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles of normal and dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, R B; Hoh, J F

    1983-10-01

    An analysis of the native myosin isoenzyme composition, myosin light-chain distribution and histochemical profile of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles of normal and dystrophic (129 REJ dy/dy) mice has been performed, and the results correlated with the known contractile abnormalities of murine dystrophic muscles. Normal mouse slow-twitch soleus contained two isomyosins (slow myosin, SM and intermediate myosin, IM) which were electrophoretically distinct from the three major isomyosins (FM1, FM2, FM3) of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscle. The calcium-activated ATPase activities of FM1, FM2, FM3 and IM at pH 9.2 were each much higher than that of SM, and this difference is reflected in the histochemical profile of muscle, as demonstrated with the myofibrillar ATPase reaction at alkaline pH. E.d.l. Type II fibres retained myofibrillar ATPase activity following pre-incubation of histochemical sections at pH 4.6, and were therefore classified Type IIB, whereas soleus Type II fibres did not, and were classified Type IIA. It was concluded that Type I (slow) fibres contain SM, Type IIA (intermediate) fibres contain IM, and Type IIB (fast) fibres contain FM1-FM3. Each electrophoretically distinct myosin contained a different combination of the five skeletal myosin light chains (LCs). Thus different normal muscles, which differed in their isomyosin profiles, differed also in their light-chain composition. Analysis of the distribution of native myosins (FM1, FM2, FM3, IM, SM, in order of decreasing gel migration rate) in dystrophic muscles revealed increased proportions of the slower-migrating forms, when compared with the distribution in the corresponding normal muscles. The shift in isomyosin distribution would explain the known decrease in the proportion of myosin light chain (LCf3) in murine dystrophic muscle. The abnormal isomyosin distribution in the dystrophic muscle is correlated with its altered histochemical characteristics, and with well

  10. Estuary–ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1–3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary–ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to

  11. Mitochondrial divergence between slow- and fast-aging garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial function has long been hypothesized to be intimately involved in aging processes--either directly through declining efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and ATP production with advancing age, or indirectly, e.g., through increased mitochondrial production of damaging free radicals with age. Yet we lack a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genotypes and phenotypes across diverse animal models, particularly in species that have extremely labile physiology. Here, we measure mitochondrial genome-types and transcription in ecotypes of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) that are adapted to disparate habitats and have diverged in aging rates and lifespans despite residing in close proximity. Using two RNA-seq datasets, we (1) reconstruct the garter snake mitochondrial genome sequence and bioinformatically identify regulatory elements, (2) test for divergence of mitochondrial gene expression between the ecotypes and in response to heat stress, and (3) test for sequence divergence in mitochondrial protein-coding regions in these slow-aging (SA) and fast-aging (FA) naturally occurring ecotypes. At the nucleotide sequence level, we confirmed two (duplicated) mitochondrial control regions one of which contains a glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gene expression of protein-coding genes was higher in FA snakes relative to SA snakes for most genes, but was neither affected by heat stress nor an interaction between heat stress and ecotype. SA and FA ecotypes had unique mitochondrial haplotypes with amino acid substitutions in both CYTB and ND5. The CYTB amino acid change (Isoleucine → Threonine) was highly segregated between ecotypes. This divergence of mitochondrial haplotypes between SA and FA snakes contrasts with nuclear gene-flow estimates, but correlates with previously reported divergence in mitochondrial function (mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP production, and reactive oxygen species consequences). Copyright © 2015

  12. Slow light propagation in a ring erbium-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Bencheikh, K; Baldit, E; Briaudeau, S; Monnier, P; Levenson, J A; Mélin, G

    2010-12-06

    Slow light propagation is demonstrated by implementing Coherent Population Oscillations in a silica fiber doped with erbium ions in a ring surrounding the single mode core. Though only the wings of the mode interact with erbium ions, group velocities around 1360 m/s are obtained without any spatial distortion of the propagating mode.

  13. Generality of a "Fast" or "Slow" Test-Taking Style across a Variety of Cognitive Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, Brent

    1980-01-01

    Third grade students were identified as either fast/accurate or slow/accurate in response style on the Matching Familiar Figures Tests and Thurstone's Spatial Relations Test. The fast and slow students performed similarly on untimed tasks, as predicted. Contrary to expectations, they also scored similarly on timed tests. (Author/RD)

  14. Fast and Slow Namers: Benefits of Segmentation and Whole Word Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Betty Ann; Bourassa, Derrick C.; Horn, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Trained fast- and slow-namer groups of poor-reading second graders to read words using different training regimes. Found that slow namers were particularly disadvantaged compared to fast namers when trained with word-level units. Children showed poorer retention following onset/rime training compared to other types. They showed the best…

  15. Slow light in photonic crystal cavity filled with nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Kaisar; Mnaymneh, Khaled; Awad, Hazem; Hasan, Imad; Hall, Trevor

    2013-10-01

    An innovative technique to tune the slow light propagated through photonic crystal cavity filled with E7 type nematic crystal has been simulated and presented. Observed propagating modes in the previously fabricated photonic crystal indicate that both slow and fast modes propagate in the waveguide. Design efforts were made to adjust the propagating modes as well as their group velocities. Numerical studies show that by inserting nematic liquid crystal, designer can achieve additional degree of freedom to tune the device by using external perturbation such as applying heat or electric field. Comparative studies have also been done to see the performance of the devices fabricated in two deferent material platforms (silicon and InP) with an objective to develop economic and efficient functional material systems for building robust integrated photonic devices that have the ability to slow, store, and process light pulses.

  16. Causal information velocity in fast and slow pulse propagation in an optical ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Makoto; Uesugi, Hiroyuki; Sultana, Parvin; Oishi, Tohru

    2011-10-15

    We examined the propagation of nonanalytical points encoded on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast and slow light in an optical ring resonator at {lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m. The temporal peak of the Gaussian pulse was either advanced or delayed, reflecting anomalous or normal dispersions in the ring resonator, relevant to under- or overcoupling conditions, respectively. The nonanalytical points were neither advanced nor delayed but appeared as they entered the ring resonator. The nonanalytical points could be interpreted as information; therefore, the experimental results suggested that information velocity is equal to the light velocity in vacuum or the background medium, independent of the group velocity. The transient behaviors at the leading and trailing edges of the nonanalytical points are discussed in terms of optical precursors.

  17. Estuary-ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology.

    PubMed

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E

    2017-06-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1-3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary-ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to changing

  18. Effect of photoperiod on slow and fast developing individuals in aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus and Propylea dissecta (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-02-01

    The effects of environmental parameters on insect development have been studied extensively. But the reasons for 2 differential developmental rates within same cohort under varying environmental factors have not been explored. For the purpose, in this study the existence and stability of slow and fast development under 5 photoperiods (i.e., 8L: 16D, 10L : 14D, 12L : 12D, 14L : 10D and 16L : 8D; light and dark hours per day) and its effect on body mass and reproductive attributes in 2 aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) and Propylea dissecta (Mulsant) was examined on Aphis craccivora Koch at 27 ± 1 °C temperature. A clear bimodal (2 peaks, where the first peak represented the fast developing and the 2nd peak slow developing individuals) pattern of distribution at each photoperiod was found. The proportion of slow and fast developing individuals in a cohort differed with photoperiods. The slow developing individuals were more in numbers at 8L : 16D, in equal numbers at 14L : 10D and in less numbers at 16L: 8D, indicating that the variation in emergence was owing to exogenous cues influenced differential rates of mortality. Slow developing individuals had female biased sex ratio, higher longevity and lower body mass than fast developing individuals. Fast developing females laid higher numbers of eggs with higher egg viability than slow developing females. Study of such variations in development at different photoperiods is helpful to understand its role in the development of insects particularly ladybirds and permits the selection of fast developing bioagents for their use in biocontrol of pest species.

  19. [Action potentials of the fast and slow muscle fibers of the bog turtle Emys orbicularis].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskaia, I I; Nasledov, G A

    1977-01-01

    In skeletal muscles of the tortoise E. orbicularis, fast and slow muscle fibers were found which differ in the lipid content and electrophysiological properties. Fast fibers contain small amounts of lipid inclusions. In response to direct electrical stimulation they produce fast action potentials (AP) which are capable of rhythmic activity during prolonged depolarization. Slow fibers are rich in lipid inclusions. Their AP differs from that of fast fibers by slow onset, and decay, lower gradient of rise, lower amplitude and lower velocity of propagation. These fibers are not capable of rhythmic activity. The data obtained show that with respect to their morphological and physiological properties slow muscle fibers of the tortoise differ from tonic amphibian fibers, but exhibit the most similarity to slow avian fibers.

  20. [Several features of the metabolism of the fast and slow muscles of Emys orbicularis tortoises].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskaia, I I; Ogorodnikova, L G

    1978-01-01

    In skeletal muscles of the tortoise E. orbicularis, studies have been made on the content of glycogen, lactic acid, on the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphorylase. Histochemical studies were made on the lipid content. Experiments were performed on fast and slow bundles from mm. iliofibularis, testo cervicalis and retractor capitis. For comparison, the same indices of carbohydrate metabolism were investigated in fast m. plantaris and slow m. soleus of rats. In rats, slow muscles exhibit aerobic metabolism, in fast muscles--anaerobic one. In tortoises, slow muscles exhibit intermediate type of metabolism. Fast muscles show an anaerobic type or metabolism which is less intensive than anaerobic metabolism in slow muscles. Significant differences in some of the indices of carbohydrate metabolism were found in muscles which perform different functions in the organism.

  1. [Comparison of force and shortening velocity in fast and slow rabbit muscle fibers at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Kochubeĭ, P V; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of force, maximal shortening velocity and power of maximally activated single permeabilized fibers from fast and slow muscles of the rabbit were recorded in a temperature range from 10 to 35 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It was found that temperature dependence of force of both types of fibers is identical. Averaged maximal shortening velocity in the slow fibers, unlike the fast fibers, had no statistically significant temperature dependence that is not in agreement with the data obtained on intact rat muscle fibers and in an in vitro motility assay. However maximal shortening velocity in each individual slow fiber did depend on temperature. The temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was lower than that of the fast ones. Because of large data scattering the average temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was significantly lower than that in individual slow fibers.

  2. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger mixing system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  3. Origins of the Slow and the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korendyke, Noci C.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    We present in this letter the first coordinated radio occultation measurements and ultraviolet observations of the inner corona below 5.5 Rs, obtained during the Galileo solar conjunction in January 1997, to establish the origin of the slow wind.

  4. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  5. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  6. Flood Regime Dynamics with Slow-Fast Landscape-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    flood distribution at a given spatiotemporal position given the knowledge of the distribution or its drivers at another, along with their dynamic relation. An example application is thus the estimation of hydroclimatic distributions in ungauged basins and their relation to areas where more information is available. This study ultimately brings to light dynamical signatures of change in flood regimes arising from nonlinear slow-fast feedbacks in the landscape-climate dynamics, and provides dynamical links between flood regimes with nonlinearly interacting factors at different scales. The present work builds on Perdigão and Blöschl (2014). Perdigão, R. A. P., and G. Blöschl (2014), Spatiotemporal flood sensitivity to annual precipitation: Evidence for landscape-climate coevolution, Water Resour. Res., 50, doi:10.1002/2014WR015365.

  7. Lineage-specific variation in slow- and fast-X evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Oh, Sohee; Park, Taesung; Presgraves, Daven C; Yi, Soojin V

    2012-06-01

    Theories predict that the evolutionary rates of X-linked regions can differ from those of autosomal regions. The male-biased mutation theory predicts a slower rate of neutral substitution on the X chromosome (slow-X evolution), as the X spends less time in male germlines, where more mutations originate per generation than in female germlines. The fast-X theory, however, predicts a faster rate of adaptive substitution on the X chromosome when newly arising beneficial mutations are, on average, partially recessive (fast-X evolution), as the X enjoys a greater efficacy of positive selection. The slow- and fast-X processes are expected to interact as the degree of male-biased mutation can in turn influence the relative rate of adaptive evolution on the X. Here, we investigate lineage-specific variation in, and the interaction of, slow- and fast-X processes using genomic data from four primates. We find consistent evidence for slow-X evolution in all lineages. In contrast, evidence for fast-X evolution exists in only a subset of lineages. In particular, the marmoset lineage, which shows the strongest evidence of fast-X, exhibits the lowest male mutation bias. We discuss the possible interaction between slow- and fast-X evolution and other factors that influence the degrees of slow- and fast-X evolution. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution © 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Coherent perfect absorption and reflection in slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Nadav; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Chong, Y D; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2013-12-01

    We identify a family of unusual slow-light modes occurring in lossy multimode grating waveguides, for which either the forward or backward mode components, or both, are degenerate. In the fully degenerate case, the response can be modulated between coherent perfect absorption (zero reflection) and perfect reflection by varying the wave amplitudes in a uniform input waveguide. The perfectly absorbed wave has anomalously short absorption length, scaling as the inverse one-third power of the absorptivity.

  9. Dirac-graphene quasiparticles in strong slow-light pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Astapenko, V. A.; Yakovets, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical Volkov's solution of the massless Dirac equation for graphene in the field of slow-light pulse with arbitrary time dependence is obtained. Exact solutions are presented for special cases of monochromatic field and a single-cycle pulse. Following the Fock-Schwinger proper time method, the Green's function for quasiparticles is derived with the account of the influence an external classical electromagnetic wave field.

  10. Enhanced Nonlinear Optical Devices Using Artificial Slow-Light Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-19

    nature is our study of the limitations on the performance of slow light waveguides, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. This work is based upon...interaction, and others (e.g. resonant-enhanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers, or REMZI) do not. We have also performed studies in the linear regime...optical filter configurations, primarily in terms of their linear response. One of the limitations of this approach is that designs cannot always be

  11. Slow light in fiber Bragg gratings and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolianos, George; Arora, Arushi; Bernier, Martin; Digonnet, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Slow-light fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) belong to a class of gratings designed to exhibit one or more narrow resonances in their reflection and transmission spectra, produced either by introducing a π phase shift near the middle of the grating, or by increasing the index modulation so that the grating behaves like a Fabry-Perot interferometer. These resonances can have very narrow linewidths (<50 fm), resulting in low group velocities and high Q factors. Slow-light gratings are finding a growing number of applications in many areas of photonics, including nonlinear optics, optical switching, optical delay lines, and sensing. This paper reviews the principle of these gratings, in particular the more recent slow-light gratings relying on a strong index modulation. It discusses in particular the requirements for achieving large group delays and high sensitivities in sensors, and the fabrication and annealing techniques used to meet these requirements (high index modulation, low loss, index-profile apodization, and optimized length). Several applications are presented, including record-breaking FBGs that exhibit a group delay of 42 ns and Q-factor of ~30 million over a 12.5 mm length, robust acoustic sensors with pressure resolution of ~50 µPa (√Hz)-1 in the few-kHz, and a strain sensor capable of resolving as little as 30 femtostrain (√Hz)-1.

  12. Co- and counter-propagating slow light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, T.; Kondo, K.

    2016-03-01

    We report what we call co- and counter propagating slow-light systems based on the high nonlinearity in Si lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguides (LSPCWs). The intense slow-light pulse, as a control pulse, efficiently generates two-photon absorption and carrier plasma effects, which tunes the dispersion characteristics of the LSPCWs and spectrum of copropagating or counter-propagating slow-light pulse, as a signal pulse. Using the control pulse, we succeeded in experimentally demonstrating adiabatic wavelength conversion and its enhancement, delay tuning of up to 10 ps with a response time <10 ps, and temporal pulse compression of factor 9.9 in the signal pulse. Furthermore, we discussed theoretically the collision and reflection of the signal pulse counterpropagating against the control pulse through the photonic-bandgap shift, resulting in a large Doppler shift. Considering the detail of these phenomena, we clarified the relation and difference between the adiabatic wavelength conversion, cross-phase modulation, and Doppler shift, which have been unclear so far.

  13. Slow light generation in single-mode tellurite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Saini, Than; Kumar, Ajeet; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical investigations of stimulated brillouin scattering-based tunable slow light in (i) Er-doped tellurite and (ii) undoped tellurite fibers are reported. Maximum allowable pump power for undistorted output pulse, Brillouin gain, time-delay, figure-of-merit, and time-delay slop efficiency of both the fibers has been obtained. We have found that (i) Brillouin gain up to ~91 dB and time delay of 140 ns can be achieved using 1100 mW pump power in 2 m Er-doped fiber and (ii) Brillouin gain up to ~86 dB and time delay of ~227 ns using 23 mW pump power in 100 m undoped tellurite fiber can be achieved. Simulated results indicate that the time delay in fibers can be tuned with the pump power to obtain tunable slow light features in these fibers. We feel that detailed theoretical investigations and simulations carried out in the study have potential impact in the design and development of slow light-based photonic devices.

  14. Daily rhythmicity of clock gene transcript levels in fast and slow muscle fibers from Chinese perch (Siniperca chuatsi).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Li, Yu-Long; Cheng, Jia; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Xin; Feng, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Jian-She; Chu, Wu-Ying

    2016-12-08

    Clock genes are considered to be the molecular core of biological clock in vertebrates and they are directly involved in the regulation of daily rhythms in vertebrate tissues such as skeletal muscles. Fish myotomes are composed of anatomically segregated fast and slow muscle fibers that possess different metabolic and contractile properties. To date, there is no report on the characterization of the circadian clock system components of slow muscles in fish. In the present study, the molecular clock components (clock, arntl1/2, cry1/2/3, cry-dash, npas2, nr1d1/2, per1/2/3, rorα and tim genes) and their daily transcription levels were characterized in slow and fast muscles of Chinese perch (Siniperca chuatsi). Among the 15 clock genes, nrld2 and per3 had no daily rhythmicity in slow muscles, and cry2/3 and tim displayed no daily rhythmicity in fast muscles of the adult fish. In the slow muscles, the highest expression of the most clock paralogs occurred at the dark period except arntl1, nr1d1, nr1d2 and tim. With the exception of nr1d2 and tim, the other clock genes had an acrophase at the light period in fast muscles. The circadian expression of the myogenic regulatory factors (mrf4 and myf5), mstn and pnca showed either a positive or a negative correlation with the transcription pattern of the clock genes in both types of muscles. It was the first report to unravel the molecular clock components of the slow and fast muscles in vertebrates. The expressional pattern differences of the clock genes between the two types of muscle fibers suggest that the clock system may play key roles on muscle type-specific tissue maintenance and function.

  15. Interaction of minor ions with fast and slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1990-01-01

    The coronal slow shock was predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at 4 to 10 solar radii. A three-fluid model was used to study the jumps in minor ions propertes across the coronal slow shock. The jump conditions were formulated in the de Hoffmann-Teller frame of reference. The Rankine-Hugoniot solution determines the MHD flow and the magnetic field across the shocks. For each minor ion species, the fluid equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy can be solved to determine the velocity and the temperature of the ions across the shock. A simularity solution was also obtained for heavy ions. The results show that on the downstream side of the coronal slow shock the ion temperatures are nearly proportional to the ion masses for He, O, Si, and Fe in agreement with observed ion temperatures in the inner solar wind. This indicates that the possibly existing coronal slow shock can be responsible for the observed heating of minor ions in the solar wind.

  16. Good cash flow = come in fast, go out slow!

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sherill

    2002-07-01

    The formula for successful cash management in home care is a simple one: The agency must bring cash in as quickly as possible, while keeping expenditures at as low and slow a pace as possible. However, while the formula may be simple, success may be elusive unless agency administrators have a well-thought-out plan to handle cash management.

  17. Slow motions in systems with fast modulated excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, E.

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that high-frequency excitation can modify the behavior of systems with respect to slow motions. The goal of this study is consideration of these effects in a rather general case of analytical systems with modulated sinusoidal excitation. The method of direct separation of motions proposed by I.I. Blekhman was applied in a modified form with the explicit introduction of a small parameter. Equations for the slow motions are obtained and an analysis of how they depend on the structure of the original equations is performed. Five basic effects corresponding to different possible dependencies of the modulation amplitude on position, velocity, and slow time are selected (some of them for the first time). These effects offer a possibility for designing a high-frequency control of the slow motions with specified properties. For example, high-frequency excitation in a system with a nonlinear friction can essentially increase the effective damping. The results are also of significance for system identification and diagnostics. Analysis of a hydraulic valve is given as an example of application.

  18. Desulphurization of lignites by slow, fast, and flash pyrolysis and high intensity dry magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Koca, H.; Kockar, O.M.; Koca, S.

    2007-07-01

    Slow, fast and flash pyrolysis followed by high intensity dry magnetic (HIDM) separation experiments were conducted to obtain improved solid fuels. Pyrolysis experiments were performed in three different apparatus, and important parameters of processes, temperature, particle size, residence time and heating rate were studied to determine the optimum conditions. Desulphurization of lignites by flash pyrolysis is more successful than slow and fast pyrolysis. At optimum conditions of pyrolysis, up to 58.15, 60.24, and 62.31% sulphur reductions were obtained in slow, fast and flash pyrolysis, respectively. Char, obtained from the pyrolysis experiments, was further cleaned by a Permroll HIDM separator. Sulphur reduction enhanced up to 82.68, 84.40, and 86.55% in the char of slow, fast and flash pyrolysis, respectively.

  19. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Varghese, Anu; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated fast and slow mode solitary profiles in a five component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photo-electrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons being described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived and solutions for fast and slow mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to that of comet Halley. From the figures, it is seen that the presence of hydrogen ion determines the polarity of fast and slow mode solitary structures. Also different pair ions like He, C and O have significant effect on the width of the fast and slow mode solitary structures.

  20. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  1. Slow and Fast Responses: Two Mechanisms of Trial Outcome Processing Revealed by EEG Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Nikita A.; Nurislamova, Yulia M.; Zhozhikashvili, Natalia A.; Kalenkovich, Evgenii E.; Lapina, Anna A.; Chernyshev, Boris V.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive control includes maintenance of task-specific processes related to attention, and non-specific regulation of motor threshold. Depending upon the nature of the behavioral tasks, these mechanisms may predispose to different kinds of errors, with either increased or decreased response time (RT) of erroneous responses relative to correct responses. Specifically, slow responses are related to attentional lapses and decision uncertainty, these conditions tending to delay RTs of both erroneous and correct responses. Here we studied if RT may be a valid approximation distinguishing trials with high and low levels of sustained attention and decision uncertainty. We analyzed response-related and feedback-related modulations in theta, alpha and beta band activity in the auditory version of the two-choice condensation task, which is highly demanding for sustained attention while involves no inhibition of prepotent responses. Depending upon response speed and accuracy, trials were divided into slow correct, slow erroneous, fast correct and fast erroneous. We found that error-related frontal midline theta (FMT) was present only on fast erroneous trials. The feedback-related FMT was equally strong on slow erroneous and fast erroneous trials. Late post-response posterior alpha suppression was stronger on erroneous slow trials. Feedback-related frontal beta was present only on slow correct trials. The data obtained cumulatively suggests that RT allows distinguishing the two types of trials, with fast trials related to higher levels of attention and low uncertainty, and slow trials related to lower levels of attention and higher uncertainty. PMID:28529478

  2. Predator-prey interactions in selected slow and fast developing females of a ladybird, Propylea dissecta.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Arshi; Omkar; Mishra, Geetanjali

    2015-10-14

    Development rate polymorphism describes the scenario in which individuals exhibit distinct differences in their rate of development resulting in slow and fast developers even from the same clutch of eggs. Previously we showed that in ladybird, Propylea dissecta fast developers have higher foraging and predation rates than slow developers. But correlation between foraging efficacies with reproductive output of female remains unexplored. We selected slow and fast developmental rate for 15 generations in a P. dissecta and assessed female functional response and numerical response by using varying prey biomasses (A. pisum). We evaluated predatory parameters: prey consumption, attack rate, handling time, and the reproductive measures: number of eggs laid, egg, and body biomass conversion efficiencies. Overall, both group of P. dissecta showed increased prey biomasses curvilinear for consumption rate demonstrating the physiological capacity of foraging for food are mutually exclusive behaviors (i.e., Holling's Type-II functional response). Consumption rate and proportion of prey consumed was higher, and prey handling time was shorter, in experimental fast developers. However, prey attack rate was higher in experimental slow developers. The functional response of experimental fast developers got elevated whereas got depressed for control slow-fast developers. Our results suggest that slow developers may perform better at low prey biomass than fast developers due to their high attack rate whereas high density prey may favour fast developers due to their shorter prey handling time and higher consumption rates. This study is first attempt to evaluate predatory responses of experimentally selected lines of slow and fast developers. J. Exp. Zool. 9999A:XX-XX, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  4. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Groopman, Amber M; Katz, Jonathan I; Holland, Mark R; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A; Miller, James G

    2015-08-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable.

  5. Sliding regimes on slow manifolds of systems with fast actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt; Dwyer, Thomas A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    In this article the slow manifold of a system with actuator parasitics is used as a sliding surface on which a Variable Structure Controller recovers the qualitative properties of the reduced order, closed loop system obtained from an ideal actuator-based feedback controller design. Illustrative examples are presented, where (1) the simplicity of reduced order singular perturbation design methods; and (2) the robustness of Variable Structure sliding modes, are advantageously combined.

  6. Bifurcation of velocity distributions in cooperative transport of filaments by fast and slow motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-02-05

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport.

  7. Bifurcation of Velocity Distributions in Cooperative Transport of Filaments by Fast and Slow Motors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport. PMID:23442917

  8. Whisker Contact Detection of Rodents Based on Slow and Fast Mechanical Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Claverie, Laure N.; Boubenec, Yves; Debrégeas, Georges; Prevost, Alexis M.; Wandersman, Elie

    2017-01-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to locate nearby objects with an extreme precision. To perform such tasks, they need to detect whisker/object contacts with a high temporal accuracy. This contact detection is conveyed by classes of mechanoreceptors whose neural activity is sensitive to either slow or fast time varying mechanical stresses acting at the base of the whiskers. We developed a biomimetic approach to separate and characterize slow quasi-static and fast vibrational stress signals acting on a whisker base in realistic exploratory phases, using experiments on both real and artificial whiskers. Both slow and fast mechanical inputs are successfully captured using a mechanical model of the whisker. We present and discuss consequences of the whisking process in purely mechanical terms and hypothesize that free whisking in air sets a mechanical threshold for contact detection. The time resolution and robustness of the contact detection strategies based on either slow or fast stress signals are determined. Contact detection based on the vibrational signal is faster and more robust to exploratory conditions than the slow quasi-static component, although both slow/fast components allow localizing the object. PMID:28119582

  9. Exploring the contrasts between fast and slow rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.; de Monserrat, Albert; White, Lloyd; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Researchers are now finding that extension sometimes occurs at rates much faster than the mean rates observed in the development of passive margins. Examples of rapid and ultra-rapid extension are found in several locations in Eastern Indonesia. This includes in northern and central Sulawesi as well as in eastern- and westernmost New Guinea. The periods of extension are associated with sedimentary basin growth as well as phases of crustal melting and rapid uplift. This is recorded through seismic imagery of basins offshore Sulawesi and New Guinea as well as through new field studies of the onshore geology in these regions. A growing body of new geochronological and biostratigraphic data provide some control on the rates of processes, indicating that rates of extension are typically at least twice as fast and potentially an order of magnitude faster than the fastest rates applied for more commonly studied rift settings (e.g. Atlantic opening, East African Rift, Australia-Antarctica opening). Here we explore a suite of experiments more appropriate for rifting episodes in Eastern Indonesia, and compare the evolution of these 'fast' (20-100 mm/year full rate) rifting models to experiments with the same crustal geometries rifting at ~5-20 mm/year. In particular, we explore to what depths hot lower crust and mantle can be exhumed by fast rifting, and whether we can produce the p-T-t paths implied by recent onshore geological studies.

  10. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Chiam, Sher-Yi; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-04

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces. Our results show that tailoring the coupling between the resonators modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. Observed change in the transmission amplitude is attributed to the change in the amount of destructive interference between the resonators in the vicinity of strong near field coupling. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters, and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  11. A Numerical Analysis of a Light Slowing and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chough, Young-Tak

    2015-12-01

    We provide an in-depth numerical study on creation of stationary light pulses (SLP) in a cold atomic medium, locating the optimal parameter space for experimental realization. We visualize the dynamics of the atoms and the field inside the medium. We find that as the coupling field strength increases, the light slowing effect is actually diminished. It also turns out that the spatial profile of the pulse inside the medium is indeed not symmetric around its apex, and we point out that this asymmetry causes the energy imbalance between the two signals retrieved into the opposite directions, in addition to such extrinsic reasons as the disparity between the coupling field strengths or the imperfect centering of the pulse in the medium at the time of "writing".

  12. Slow and fast development in two aphidophagous ladybirds on scarce and abundant prey supply.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2016-06-01

    Developmental rates are highly variable, both within and between genotypes and populations. But the rationale for two differential (slow and fast) developmental rates within same cohort under varying prey supply has yet not been explored. For this purpose, we investigated the effect of scarce and abundant prey supply on slow and fast development at 27°C in two aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) and Propylea dissecta (Mulsant) and its effect on their body mass and reproductive attributes. The ladybirds were provided with scarce and abundant supply of Aphis craccivora Koch under standardized abiotic conditions in the laboratory. A clear bimodal (two peaks, where the first peak represented the fast developing individuals and the second peak slow developing individuals) pattern of distribution for both prey supplies was obtained, which got skewed with change in prey supply. On abundant prey supply, more fast developing individuals (139 M. sexmaculatus and 123 P. dissecta) were found and less (46 M. sexmaculatus and 36 P. dissecta) on scarce prey supply. Slow developing individuals had female biased sex ratio, higher longevity and lower body mass. Fast developing females laid higher number of eggs with higher egg viability. Results of the study are indicative of occurrence and constancy of the slow and fast developing individuals in the egg batch.

  13. Slow light in ruby: delaying energy beyond the input pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which light is slowed through ruby has been the subject of great debate. To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the problem in the time domain by modulating a laser beam with a chopper to create a clean square wave. By exploring the trailing edge of the pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby, we can determine whether energy is delayed beyond the input pulse. The effects of a time-varying absorber alone cannot delay energy into the trailing edge of the pulse, as a time-varying absorber can only attenuate a coherent pulse. Therefore, our observation of an increase in intensity at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than just pulse reshaping. In addition, investigating the Fourier components of the modulated square wave shows that harmonic components with different frequencies are delayed by different amounts, regardless of the intensity of the component itself. Understanding the difference in delays of the individual Fourier components of the modulated beam reveals the cause of the distortion the pulse undergoes as it propagates through the ruby.

  14. Measuring attostrains in a slow-light fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolianos, George; Arora, Arushi; Bernier, Martin; Digonnet, Michel

    2016-03-01

    We report a new generation of slow-light FBG strain sensor with a strain resolution (or minimum detectable strain) as low as 30 fepsilon/√Hz at 30 kHz, which is one order of magnitude lower than the record held by the previous generation. This sensor has an ultra-stable output (no drift in 4 days) and is capable of resolving an absolute strain of ~250 attostrains by integrating its output for ~8 hours, which is also a new record for an FBG fiber sensor. These improvements were accomplished by first maximizing the slope of the slow-light resonances, and hence the strain sensitivity. To this end the apodized FBG was written in a deuterium-loaded fiber with a femtosecond infrared laser, then thermally annealed. The three main sources of noise in the sensor system were also carefully reduced. The dominant source of noise, laser frequency noise, was reduced by interrogating the FBG with an ultra-stable laser (linewidth under 200 Hz) with a low intensity noise. The phase noise was minimized by selecting the proper FBG length (~25 mm). When used as an acoustic sensor, the same grating had a measured average pressure resolution of 50 μPa/√Hz between 3 kHz and 6 kHz, one order of magnitude lower than the previous lowest reported value for an FBG sensor.

  15. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  16. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  17. Effect of inaction on function of fast and slow muscle spindles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunyan, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    There is no data on the comparative effect of tenotomy on the function of the muscle spindles of fast and slow muscles. This study covers this question. The experiments were conducted on cats. The musuculus extensor digitorum longus (m. EDL) was selected as the fast muscle, and the musculus soleus (m. Sol.) as the slow. In a comparison of the spontaneous activity of primary and secondary endings of the fast and slow muscle spindles (i.e., the activity with complete relaxation of the muscles) normally no difference between them was successfully found. The authors recorded the integrative, and not the individual activity, and secondly, under conditions of such recording technique, those slight changes that are observed in the fast muscle receptors could remain unnoticed.

  18. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  19. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  20. Uncertainty transformation via Hopf bifurcation in fast-slow systems.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Propagation of uncertainty in dynamical systems is a significant challenge. Here we focus on random multiscale ordinary differential equation models. In particular, we study Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem for random initial conditions. We show that a random initial condition distribution can be transformed during the passage near a delayed/dynamic Hopf bifurcation: (i) to certain classes of symmetric copies, (ii) to an almost deterministic output, (iii) to a mixture distribution with differing moments and (iv) to a very restricted class of general distributions. We prove under which conditions the cases (i)-(iv) occur in certain classes vector fields.

  1. Chaos and Variability of Inter-Spike Intervals in Neuronal Models with Slow-Fast Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Shinji; Inoue, Junko

    2011-04-01

    A neuron generates action potentials or spikes in response to electric stimuli, and also produces a train of spikes (periodic oscillation) when a continuous stimulus current is injected. Using the extended Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BVP) or FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations, which is a simplified version of the famous Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal model, we show that very slow spiking can appear near the (singular) Hopf bifurcation point in a certain generic situation. The patterns of the extraordinary slow spiking are phenomenologically classified into two types: a regular slow spiking and chaotic slow spiking. The variability of inter-spike intervals (ISI's) and the possible mechanism of slow spiking are discussed under slow-fast decomposition analysis. The noise effects on such variability of ISI's are also examined.

  2. Ultracompact all-optical XOR logic gate in a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Husko, C; Vo, T D; Corcoran, B; Li, J; Krauss, T F; Eggleton, B J

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate an ultracompact, chip-based, all-optical exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gate via slow-light enhanced four-wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide (PhCWG). We achieve error-free operation (<10⁻⁹) for 40 Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals with a 2.8 dB power penalty. Slowing the light to vg = c/32 enables a FWM conversion efficiency, η, of -30 dB for a 396 μm device. The nonlinear FWM process is enhanced by 20 dB compared to a relatively fast mode of vg = c/5. The XOR operation requires ≈ 41 mW, corresponding to a switching energy of 1 pJ/bit. We compare the slow-light PhCWG device performance with experimentally demonstrated XOR DPSK logic gates in other platforms and discuss scaling the device operation to higher bit-rates. The ultracompact structure suggests the potential for device integration.

  3. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  4. Effects of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers of the frog.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Miguel; Ortiz-Mesina, Mónica; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Pastor, Enrique; Vásquez, Clemente; Castro, Elena; Velasco, Raymundo; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Onetti, Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The effect of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures was investigated in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers using isometric tension recording. In slow muscle fibers, WIN 55,212-2 (10 and 5 microM) caused a decrease in tension. These doses reduced maximum tension to 67.43 +/- 8.07% (P = 0.02, n = 5) and 79.4 +/- 14.11% (P = 0.007, n = 5) compared to control, respectively. Tension-time integral was reduced to 58.37 +/- 7.17% and 75.10 +/- 3.60% (P = 0.002, n = 5), respectively. Using the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor agonist ACPA (1 microM) reduced the maximum tension of caffeine contractures by 68.70 +/- 11.63% (P = 0.01, n = 5); tension-time integral was reduced by 66.82 +/- 6.89% (P = 0.02, n = 5) compared to controls. When the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM281 was coapplied with ACPA, it reversed the effect of ACPA on caffeine-evoked tension. In slow and fast muscle fibers incubated with the pertussis toxin, ACPA had no effect on tension evoked by caffeine. In fast muscle fibers, ACPA (1 microM) also decreased tension; the maximum tension was reduced by 56.48 +/- 3.4% (P = 0.001, n = 4), and tension-time integral was reduced by 57.81 +/- 2.6% (P = 0.006, n = 4). This ACPA effect was not statistically significant with respect to the reduction in tension in slow muscle fibers. Moreover, we detected the presence of mRNA for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor on fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers, which was significantly higher in fast compared to slow muscle fiber expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that in the slow and fast muscle fibers of the frog cannabinoids diminish caffeine-evoked tension through a receptor-mediated mechanism.

  5. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Chad; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However, comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague–Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (“slow motor axons”) and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (“fast motor axons”) muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001) or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008). Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003). In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047) accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH) than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions. PMID:25309406

  6. Cerebral awakening concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane predicted during slow and fast alveolar washout.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Suguro, Y; Kimura, T; Ikeda, K

    1993-11-01

    We studied 49 patients of ASA physical status I to determine cerebral anesthetic concentration on awakening calculated with end-tidal anesthetic concentration, when the end-tidal concentration decreased spontaneously. We also attempted to explain the difference in the average of the bracketing alveolar anesthetic concentration that allows and prevents the response to verbal command during recovery from anesthesia (MAC-Awake) between slow and fast alveolar washout by comparing the cerebral anesthetic concentrations with MAC-Awake determined by fast and slow washout. Slow washout was obtained by decreasing anesthetic concentrations in predetermined steps of 15 min, assuming equilibration between brain and alveolar partial pressures. Fast alveolar washout was obtained by discontinuation of the inhaled anesthetic, which had been maintained at 0.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) for at least 15 min. MAC-Awake values for sevoflurane and isoflurane obtained by slow washout were 0.34 +/- 0.05 and 0.31 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SD), respectively, when MAC-Awake was expressed as a ratio to age-adjusted MAC. MAC-Awake values obtained by fast washout (0.22 +/- 0.07 MAC for sevoflurane, 0.22 +/- 0.05 MAC for isoflurane) were significantly smaller than those obtained by slow washout. Anesthetic concentrations in the brain at first eye opening calculated with end-tidal concentrations during fast alveolar washout (0.34 +/- 0.08 MAC for sevoflurane, 0.30 +/- 0.08 MAC for isoflurane) were nearly equal to MAC-Awake obtained by slow alveolar washout. The difference in MAC-Awake between fast and slow alveolar washout could be explained by arterial-to-cerebral and end-tidal-to-arterial anesthetic differences.

  7. Precursors to Failure Extend Across the Transition from Slow to Fast Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Elisa; Scuderi, Marco Maria; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Marone, Chris; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Active tectonic faults exhibit a spectrum of failure modes that range from aseismic creep to slow tremor and devastating earthquakes. Slow earthquakes and other quasi-dynamic modes of fault failure have been observed in many tectonic environments but their relationship to dynamic rupture and the mechanics of regular earthquakes remains poorly understood. Current models can explain slow slip but require specialized conditions and do not address possible precursory changes in fault properties prior to failure. Here, we report elastic properties of laboratory faults for a wide range of stick-slip velocities. Our experiments document slip modes that mimic the full spectrum observed in nature from slow events, with peak slip velocity of ~100 μm/s, to earthquakes with slip velocity approaching m/s. We find systematic variations of fault zone elastic properties during the seismic cycle for the complete range of stick-slip rates. Our results suggest that the mechanics of slow slip and fast dynamic rupture share key features and that they can occur on the same fault segment, depending on fault rock frictional properties and elastic conditions. During the preparatory phase preceding stick-slip failure, we find that accelerated fault creep causes reduction of seismic wave velocity and elastic moduli for both fast and slow slip events, which illuminates similarities in the underlying physics of slow and fast slip. Our data suggest that real time monitoring of active faults may prove useful as a means to detect earthquake precursors.

  8. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amber M.; Hoffman, Joseph J.; Anderson, Christian C.; Holland, Mark R.; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone. PMID:21973378

  9. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amber M; Hoffman, Joseph J; Anderson, Christian C; Holland, Mark R; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone.

  10. Slow and Fast Escape for Open Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Mark F.; Todd, Mike

    2017-04-01

    If a system mixes too slowly, putting a hole in it can completely destroy the richness of the dynamics. Here we study this instability for a class of intermittent maps with a family of slowly mixing measures. We show that there are three regimes: (1) standard hyperbolic-like behavior where the rate of mixing is faster than the rate of escape through the hole, there is a unique limiting absolutely continuous conditionally invariant measure (accim) and there is a complete thermodynamic description of the dynamics on the survivor set; (2) an intermediate regime, where the rate of mixing and escape through the hole coincide, limiting accims exist, but much of the thermodynamic picture breaks down; (3) a subexponentially mixing regime where the slow mixing means that mass simply accumulates on the parabolic fixed point. We give a complete picture of the transitions and stability properties (in the size of the hole and as we move through the family) in this class of open systems. In particular, we are able to recover a form of stability in the third regime above via the dynamics on the survivor set, even when no limiting accim exists.

  11. Applications Of Fast And Slow Streak Recording Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1988-02-01

    This paper deals with two applications of streak photography in everyday industrial and biological research and development endeavors. In each instance, the simplicity and low cost with which the data could be reduced to useful information and the ease with which it could be communicated to other technical personnel was an important side benefit. In the first case, a laboratory built rotating drum streak camera with a 12" circumference, was used to study the performance of the new Olympus F280 flash on an Olympus 0M4-T camera. The strobing frequency, starting characteristics, duration under manual and camera control, flash relationship to shutter curtain position, flash initiation and curtain velocities were examined. In the second case, a standard oscilloscope recording camera was modified to study the growth characteristics of a fungus culture growing under controlled laboratory conditions for periods up to one full week. The streak photographs, taken at ultra slow rates, were correlated with 2-dimensional photographs taken at regular intervals to eliminate ambiguity in the growth cycle whe the photographs were included in a written report.

  12. Comparison for the compositions of fast and slow pyrolysis oils by NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Ben, Haoxi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-11-01

    The pyrolysis of softwood (SW) kraft lignin and pine wood in different pyrolysis systems were examined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. NMR including quantitative (13)C and Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC)-NMR, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize various pyrolysis oils. The content of methoxyl groups decreased by 76% for pine wood and 70% for lignin when using fast pyrolysis system. The carbonyl groups also decreased by 76% and nearly completely eliminated in 600 °C pine wood fast pyrolysis oil. Compared to the slow pyrolysis process, fast pyrolysis process was found to improve the cleavage of methoxyl groups, aliphatic CC bonds and carbonyl groups and produce more polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from lignin and aliphatic CO bonds from carbohydrates. Another remarkable difference between fast and slow pyrolysis oils was the molecular weight of fast pyrolysis oils increased by 85-112% for pine wood and 104-112% for lignin.

  13. Both the Fast and Slow Refolding Reactions of Ribonuclease A Yield Native Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Garel, Jean-Renaud; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1973-01-01

    The fast reaction (T̄2 ≃ 50 msec) observed previously in the refolding of thermally unfolded ribonuclease A (disulfide bonds intact) has now been studied by two properties indicative of enzyme function: binding of a competitive inhibitor (2′CMP) and hydrolysis of a substrate (CpA → C > p + A). Both the binding and catalytic reactions are fast (<2 msec) compared to refolding. Binding of 2′CMP occurs during both fast and slow refolding reactions, and the protein folded in the fast reaction has a normal binding constant for 2′CMP. Recovery of enzymatic activity during the fast refolding reaction, as measured by the rate of CpA hydrolysis, parallels the kinetic curve for 2′CMP binding. When the kinetics of refolding are measured by the burying of exposed tyrosine groups, no difference is found. The presence of 2′CMP has no effect on the kinetics of refolding. The results show that the fast refolding reaction does not yield an intermediate in the refolding of RNase A. Instead, both fast and slow refolding reactions have a common product, fully active RNase A. Although they show a 100-fold difference in rates of refolding, the starting materials for the fast and slow refolding reactions have similar properties, as regards: (a) the molar absorbancy at 286 nm, reflecting the state of exposed tyrosine groups, and (b) their apparent failure to bind 2′CMP. Images PMID:4519627

  14. Demonstration of bicolor slow-light channelization in rubidium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkansky, Mark; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Reintjes, John; Dutton, Zachary; Steiner, Michael

    2007-02-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a proof-of-principle of a previously proposed 'channelization' architecture for wideband slow-light propagation in atomic vapors using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We use two optical frequencies to generate a sine wave signal which is delayed in rubidium vapor. The optical frequencies were tuned near the EIT resonances of two Zeeman sublevels, which are shifted from each other well beyond the EIT linewidth by a uniform magnetic field. We varied the Zeeman shift between these two levels (relative to the optical frequency splitting) and measured the delay versus Zeeman shift. Significant delays were observed and were in agreement with a theoretical model treating each Zeeman sublevel as part of an independent three-level system. We achieved delay of a signal with a bandwidth 16 times the EIT linewidth and confirmed our earlier theoretical models that delay occurs only when the optical spectral separation slightly exceeds the Zeeman splitting.

  15. Differential effect of denervation on free radical scavenging enzymes in slow and fast muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asayama, K.; Dettbarn, W. D.; Burr, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of denervation on the free radical scavenging systems in relation to the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the slow twitch soleus and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed in the mid-thigh region and the muscle tissue levels of 5 enzymes were studied 2 and 5 weeks following crush. Radioimmunoassays were utilized for the selective measurement of cuprozinc (cytosolic) and mangano (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutases. These data represent the first systematic report of free radical scavening systems in slow and fast muscles in response to denervation. Selective modification of cuprozinc and manganosuperoxide dismutases and differential regulation of GSH-peroxidase was demonstrated in slow and fast muscle.

  16. Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    A study of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is conducted for a model composed of cool and hot ions and cool and hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism, the scope of earlier studies is extended to consider why upper Mach number limitations arise for slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. Treating all plasma constituents as adiabatic fluids, slow ion-acoustic solitons are limited in the order of increasing cool ion concentrations by the number densities of the cool, and then the hot ions becoming complex valued, followed by positive and then negative potential double layer regions. Only positive potentials are found for fast ion-acoustic solitons which are limited only by the hot ion number density having to remain real valued. The effect of neglecting as opposed to including inertial effects of the hot electrons is found to induce only minor quantitative changes in the existence regions of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons.

  17. Effect of protozoan predation on relative abundance of fast- and slow-growing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.; Alexander, M.

    1989-01-01

    Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. When the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-growing species were rapidly eliminated, and two of the three fast-growing species survived in detectable numbers. It is suggested that in environments with intense protozoan predation, protozoa may alter composition of bacterial communities by eliminating slow-growing bacteria.

  18. Fast-Slow Partially Hyperbolic Systems Versus Freidlin-Wentzell Random Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simoi, Jacopo; Liverani, Carlangelo; Poquet, Christophe; Volk, Denis

    2017-02-01

    We consider a simple class of fast-slow partially hyperbolic dynamical systems and show that the (properly rescaled) behaviour of the slow variable is very close to a Freidlin-Wentzell type random system for times that are rather long, but much shorter than the metastability scale. Also, we show the possibility of a "sink" with all the Lyapunov exponents positive, a phenomenon that turns out to be related to the lack of absolutely continuity of the central foliation.

  19. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  20. Recovery time course in contractile function of fast and slow skeletal muscle after hindlimb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the time course and extent of recovery in the isometric and isotonic contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to an immobilized group or a control group. The results of the study show that fast and slow skeletal muscles possess the ability to completely recover normal contractile function following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. The rate of recovery is dependent on the fiber type composition of the affected muscle.

  1. Effects of Spatial Frequencies on Word Identification by Fast and Slow Readers: Evidence from Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Dixon, Jasmine; McGowan, Victoria A.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that differences in the effectiveness of spatial frequencies for fast and slow skilled adult readers may be an important component of differences in reading ability in the skilled adult reading population (Jordan et al., 2016a). But the precise nature of this influence on lexical processing during reading remains to be fully determined. Accordingly, to gain more insight into the use of spatial frequencies by skilled adult readers with fast and slow reading abilities, the present study looked at effects of spatial frequencies on the processing of specific target words in sentences. These target words were of either high or low lexical frequency and each sentence was displayed as normal or filtered to contain only very low, low, medium, high, or very high spatial frequencies. Eye movement behavior for target words was closest to normal for each reading ability when text was shown in medium or higher spatial frequency displays, although reading occurred for all spatial frequencies. Moreover, typical word frequency effects (the processing advantage for words with higher lexical frequencies) were observed for each reading ability across a broad range of spatial frequencies, indicating that many different spatial frequencies provide access to lexical representations during textual reading for both fast and slow skilled adult readers. Crucially, however, target word fixations were fewer and shorter for fast readers than for slow readers for all display types, and this advantage for fast readers appeared to be similar for normal, medium, high, and very high spatial frequencies but larger for low and very low spatial frequencies. Therefore, although fast and slow skilled adult readers can both use a broad range of spatial frequencies when reading, fast readers make more effective use of these spatial frequencies, and especially those that are lower, when processing the identities of words. PMID:27733837

  2. Extending the zero-derivative principle for slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Eric; Brøns, Morten; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Slow-fast systems often possess slow manifolds, that is invariant or locally invariant sub-manifolds on which the dynamics evolves on the slow time scale. For systems with explicit timescale separation, the existence of slow manifolds is due to Fenichel theory, and asymptotic expansions of such manifolds are easily obtained. In this paper, we discuss methods of approximating slow manifolds using the so-called zero-derivative principle. We demonstrate several test functions that work for systems with explicit time scale separation including ones that can be generalized to systems without explicit timescale separation. We also discuss the possible spurious solutions, known as ghosts, as well as treat the Templator system as an example.

  3. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five-Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Sreekala, G.; Varghese, Anu; Venugopal, Chandu

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated fast- and slow-mode solitary profiles in a five-component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions, and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photoelectrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons are described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived, and solutions for fast- and slow-mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to comet Halley. We found that the presence of hydrogen ions determines the polarity of the fast- and slow-mode solitary structures. Also, variations of equilibrium number density of hydrogen ions and charge numbers on the heavier pair ions act differently on the fast- and slow-mode solitary structures. The addition of hydrogen ions significantly affects the amplitude of the solitary structures for the fast mode. Further, the cyclotron frequency of the lighter and heavier ions has a noticeable effect on the width of the solitary waves.

  4. Fast Scintillating Paddles for DarkLight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The DarkLight experiment proposes to search for a dark photon in the 10-100 MeV mass range via its production in fixed-target electron-proton collisions. The experimental design is driven by the desire to detect the complete final state including the recoiling proton, while also sustaining a very high luminosity in order to search for this rare process. Although the final design of the DarkLight experiment calls for fully streamed detector readout, initial studies will rely on traditional, triggered approaches. In order to facilitate precision measurements at high rate, a fast, thin, finely-segmented trigger detector based on plastic scintillating paddles and custom amplifiers was developed. I will discuss this design and its performance in recent DarkLight beam studies, as well as the work we have done to develop detectors using individual scintillating fibers. The DarkLight project is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-94ER40818.

  5. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  6. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-05-31

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies.

  7. Enhanced all-optical switching with double slow light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Ching; Wu, Meng-Chang; Shiau, Bor-Wen; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Yong-Fan; Chen, Ying-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-optical switching (AOS) scheme based on double slow light (DSL) pulses, in which one pulse is switched by another due to the cross-Kerr nonlinearity. The interaction time is prolonged by optically dense atomic media and matched group velocities. The interaction strength is maintained at a high level by keeping both fields at their electromagnetically-induced-transparency resonances to minimize the linear loss. In the AOS without the DSL scheme, the group velocity mismatch sets an upper limit on the switching efficiency of two photons per atomic cross section as discussed by Harris and Hau [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.82.4611 82, 4611 (1999)]. Compared to that limit, we have obtained an enhanced switching efficiency by a factor of 3 with our DSL scheme. The nonlinear efficiency can be further improved by increasing the optical depth of the medium. Our work advances low-light-level nonlinear optics and provides essential ingredients for quantum many-body physics using strongly interacting photons.

  8. α-Adrenoceptor constrictor responses and their modulation in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, David G; Thomas, Gail D

    2005-01-01

    Vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation and their sensitivity to metabolic modulation reportedly differ in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors mediate these vascular responses in fast-twitch muscle, while their roles in slow-twitch muscle are less well defined. In this study, the phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain (smRLC) was measured as an index of vasoconstriction in slow-twitch soleus muscles and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles isolated from C57BL/6J mice. In soleus muscles, incubation with phenylephrine (PE) or UK 14,304 to selectively activate α1- or α2-adrenoceptors resulted in concentration-dependent increases in smRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate metabolic modulation of these responses, vasodilator pathways previously implicated in such modulation in fast-twitch muscle were activated in soleus muscles by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroprusside or the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel opener cromakalim. Both drugs inhibited responses to UK 14,304, but not to PE. The effect of nitroprusside to antagonize UK 14,304 responses was prevented by inhibition of guanylyl cyclase or by blockade of KATP channels, but not by blockade of other potassium channels. Results were similar in EDL muscles. These data provide the first evidence for α2-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in slow-twitch muscle, and show that it is sensitive to modulation by NO via a cGMP-dependent mechanism that requires KATP channel activation. Based on the similar findings in soleus and EDL muscles, fibre type does not appear to determine the innate vascular response to α1- or α2-adrenoceptor activation. PMID:15618269

  9. Modulating the extent of fast and slow boron-oxygen related degradation in Czochralski silicon by thermal annealing: Evidence of a single defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moonyong; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Wenham, Stuart; Stefani, Bruno; Hallam, Brett

    2017-02-01

    The fast and slow boron-oxygen related degradation in p-type Czochralski silicon is often attributed to two separate defects due to the different time constants and the determination of different capture cross section ratios (k). However, a recent study using high lifetime samples demonstrated identical recombination properties for the fast and slow degradation and proposed an alternative hypothesis that these were in fact due to a single defect. The study presented in this article provides further experimental evidence to support the single defect hypothesis. Thermal annealing after light soaking is used to investigate the behaviour of subsequent boron-oxygen related degradation. Modifying the temperature and duration of dark annealing on pre-degraded samples is observed to alter the fraction of fast and slow degradation during subsequent illumination. Dark annealing at 173 °C for 60 s is shown to result in almost all degradation occurring during the fast time-scale, whereas annealing at 155 °C for 7 h causes all degradation to occur during the slow time-scale. This modulation occurs without changing the total extent of degradation or changing the capture cross-section ratio. The results are consistent with the fast decay being caused by defect formation from immediately available defect precursors after dark annealing, whereas the slow degradation is caused by the slow transformation of another species into the defect precursor species before the more rapid reaction of defect formation can proceed.

  10. Numerical continuation of canard orbits in slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Krauskopf, B.; Osinga, H. M.

    2010-03-01

    A trajectory of a system with two clearly separated time scales generally consists of fast segments (or jumps) followed by slow segments where the trajectory follows an attracting part of a slow manifold. The switch back to fast dynamics typically occurs when the trajectory passes a fold with respect to a fast direction. A special role is played by trajectories known as canard orbits, which do not jump at a fold but, instead, follow a repelling slow manifold for some time. We concentrate here on the case of a slow-fast system with two slow and one fast variable, where canard orbits arise geometrically as intersection curves of two-dimensional attracting and repelling slow manifolds. Canard orbits are intimately related to the dynamics near special points known as folded singularities, which in turn have been shown to explain small-amplitude oscillations that can be found as part of so-called mixed-mode oscillations. In this paper we present a numerical method to detect and then follow branches of canard orbits in a system parameter. More specifically, we define well-posed two-point boundary value problems (BVPs) that represent orbit segments on the slow manifolds, and we continue their solution families with the package AUTO. In this way, we are able to deal effectively with the numerical challenge of strong attraction to and strong repulsion from the slow manifolds. Canard orbits are detected as the transverse intersection points of the curves along which attracting and repelling slow manifolds intersect a suitable section (near a folded node). These intersection points correspond to a unique pair of orbits segments, one on the attracting and one on the repelling slow manifold. After concatenation of the respective pairs of orbit segments, all detected canard orbits are represented as solutions of a single BVP, which allows us to continue them in system parameters. We demonstrate with two examples—the self-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo system and a three

  11. Slow light in evanescently coupled optical cavities containing quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergecen, Emre

    2014-05-01

    Ability to tune the group velocity of a light pulse is of great importance for optical communication applications and realization of quantum information processing. Tunability of group velocity can be achieved by using either optical or electronic resonances. Tunability of an optical resonance depends on the change in refractive index of the cavity material. However, since electro-optical coefficients of non-engineered materials are quite small, the tuning range of optical resonances by electric field is narrow. This makes tuning by electric field impractical for most applications. Quantum dot (QD) coupled to a photonic crystal cavity is a useful hybrid system exhibiting nonlinear features. In this work, we analyze the use of quantum dot - optical cavity hybrid systems to engineer nonlinear waveguides susceptible to electric fields. We start by theoretically analyzing the optical pulse propagation at low-photon number excitation limit in a periodically arranged strongly coupled quantum dot - photonic crystal system. A one dimensional periodic array of evanescently coupled photonic cavities (coupled resonator optical waveguides, CROWs) containing non-interacting quantum dots allows us to tune the group velocity and the bandwidth of the pulse by adjusting the cavity/QD coupling. Tunable group velocity can be achieved by applying an external electric field which will result in a significant decrease in the cavity/QD coupling because of DC Stark effect. We also show that, using this approach, light pulses can be slowed down or stored by compressing the pulse bandwidth adiabatically and reversibly. Adiabatic bandwidth compression can be achieved by slowly decreasing the coupling strength when the light pulse is inside the coupled resonator optical waveguide. The energy splitting and the coupling constant after applying electric field is calculated by using perturbation theory for two level systems. With our approach, nonlinear materials highly susceptible to electric

  12. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors.

  13. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape.

  14. Refractive index fiber sensor based on Brillouin fast light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiali; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Yang, Tong; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    A new type of refractive index fiber sensor was invented by combining the evanescent-field scattering sensing mechanism with the Brillouin fast light scheme. Superluminal light was realized using Brillouin lasing oscillation in a fiber ring cavity. The refractive index of the solution around the microfiber within the cavity is related to the group velocity of the fast light. This fast light refractive index sensor offers an alternative for high-accuracy sensing applications.

  15. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shocks. Fast and slow MHD shocks differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so their radiative signatures reveal distinct physical conditions. We use a two-fluid model to compare one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km s- 1). Fast shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables smoothly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow shocks are driven by gas pressure, and neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock. We consider shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km s- 1 and pre-shock hydrogen nuclei densities nH = 102-104 cm-3. We include a simple oxygen chemistry and cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. CO rotational lines above J = 6-5 are more strongly excited in slow shocks. These slow-shock signatures may have already been observed in infrared dark clouds in the Milky Way.

  16. Stability and oscillations in a slow-fast flexible joint system with transformation delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan-Ying; Xu, Jian; Yan, Yao

    2014-10-01

    Flexible joints are usually used to transfer velocities in robot systems and may lead to delays in motion transformation due to joint flexibility. In this paper, a link-rotor structure connected by a flexible joint or shaft is firstly modeled to be a slow-fast delayed system when moment of inertia of the lightweight link is far less than that of the heavy rotor. To analyze the stability and oscillations of the slow-fast system, the geometric singular perturbation method is extended, with both slow and fast manifolds expressed analytically. The stability of the slow manifold is investigated and critical boundaries are obtained to divide the stable and the unstable regions. To study effects of the transformation delay on the stability and oscillations of the link, two quantitatively different driving forces derived from the negative feedback of the link are considered. The results show that one of these two typical driving forces may drive the link to exhibit a stable state and the other kind of driving force may induce a relaxation oscillation for a very small delay. However, the link loses stability and undergoes regular periodic and bursting oscillation when the transformation delay is large. Basically, a very small delay does not affect the stability of the slow manifold but a large delay affects substantially.

  17. Boundary-equilibrium bifurcations in piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, P; Glendinning, P

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the qualitative dynamics of piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems (singularly perturbed systems) which are everywhere continuous. We consider phase space topology of systems with one-dimensional slow dynamics and one-dimensional fast dynamics. The slow manifold of the reduced system is formed by a piecewise-continuous curve, and the differentiability is lost across the switching surface. In the full system the slow manifold is no longer continuous, and there is an O(ɛ) discontinuity across the switching manifold, but the discontinuity cannot qualitatively alter system dynamics. Revealed phase space topology is used to unfold qualitative dynamics of planar slow-fast systems with an equilibrium point on the switching surface. In this case the local dynamics corresponds to so-called boundary-equilibrium bifurcations, and four qualitative phase portraits are uncovered. Our results are then used to investigate the dynamics of a box model of a thermohaline circulation, and the presence of a boundary-equilibrium bifurcation of a fold type is shown.

  18. Fast men slow more than fast women in a 10 kilometer road race.

    PubMed

    Deaner, Robert O; Addona, Vittorio; Carter, Rickey E; Joyner, Michael J; Hunter, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that men are more likely than women to slow in the marathon (footrace). This study investigated whether the sex difference in pacing occurs for a shorter race distance. Materials & Methods. Data were acquired from the Bolder Boulder 10 km road race for the years 2008-2013, which encompassed 191,693 performances. There were two pacing measures, percentage change in pace of the first 3 miles relative to the final 3.2 miles and percentage change in pace of the first mile relative to the final 5.2 miles. Pacing was analyzed as a continuous variable and as two categorical variables, as follows: "maintain the pace," defined as slowing <5% and "marked slowing," defined as slowing ≥10%. Results. Among the fastest (men < 48:40; women < 55:27) and second fastest (men < 53:54; women < 60:28) sex-specific finishing time sextiles, men slowed significantly more than women with both pacing measures, but there were no consistently significant sex differences in pacing among the slower four sextiles. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 1.96 (first pacing measure) and 1.36 (second measure) times greater than men to maintain the pace. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 0.46 (first measure) and 0.65 (second measure) times that of men to exhibit marked slowing. Multiple regression indicated that being older was associated with lesser slowing, but the sex difference among faster runners persisted when age was controlled. Conclusions. There was a sex difference in pacing during a 10 km race where glycogen depletion is not typically relevant. These results support the hypothesis that the sex difference in pacing partly reflects a sex difference in decision making.

  19. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  20. [Influence of tenotomy on posttetanic responses of the rat fast and slow muscle].

    PubMed

    Arutiunian, R S; Zhabko, E P

    2011-08-01

    The effect of two weeks of tenotomy on posttetanic isometric contractile responses of the rat fast: Extensor digitorum longus and slow: soleus muscles was studied in experiments on isolated muscle preparations. Direct tetanic stimulation (100 impulses, 50 Hz) increased the force of contractions by 20-25% (p < 0.05) of both, control and tenotomized fast muscles. Identical to above tetanic stimulation of control, slow muscle resulted in posttetanic depression, a decrease in the amplitude of contractile responses. Tenotomized slow muscles did not develop posttetanic depression. Caffeine (4 mM) increased and dandrolene (10 microM) decreased the force of unitary and tetanic contractions of control and tenotomized muscles. Neither drug, however, affected development of posttetanic phenomena in ether fast or slow muscles. The fact that in extensor digitorum longus, posttetanic potentiation is preserved for at least forty days of tenotomy but disappears after only 2 weeks of denervation suggests important role of neurotrophic influences in regulation of posttetanic responses of fast muscles.

  1. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  2. Enzymatic Basis for Differentiation of Rhizobium into Fast- and Slow-Growing Groups

    PubMed Central

    Drets, G. Martinez-De; Arias, A.

    1972-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and other enzymes related to carbohydrate metabolism were studied in rhizobia. A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was detected in strains of the fast-growing group of Rhizobium but not in strains of the slow-growing group. An enzymatic differentiation of rhizobia was established. PMID:4400417

  3. Fast Radio Bursts from Extragalactic Light Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    We examine the possibility that fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from the activity of extragalactic civilizations. Our analysis shows that beams used for powering large light sails could yield parameters that are consistent with FRBs. The characteristic diameter of the beam emitter is estimated through a combination of energetic and engineering constraints, and both approaches intriguingly yield a similar result that is on the scale of a large rocky planet. Moreover, the optimal frequency for powering the light sail is shown to be similar to the detected FRB frequencies. These “coincidences” lend some credence to the possibility that FRBs might be artificial in origin. Other relevant quantities, such as the characteristic mass of the light sail, and the angular velocity of the beam, are also derived. By using the FRB occurrence rate, we infer upper bounds on the rate of FRBs from extragalactic civilizations in a typical galaxy. The possibility of detecting fainter signals is briefly discussed, and the wait time for an exceptionally bright FRB event in the Milky Way is estimated.

  4. General purpose algorithms for characterization of slow and fast phase nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    In the overall aim for a better understanding of the vestibular and optokinetic systems and their roles in space motion sickness, the eye movement responses to various dynamic stimuli are measured. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the optokinetic response, as the eye movement responses are known, consist of slow phase and fast phase nystagmus. The specific objective is to develop software programs necessary to characterize the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic responses by distinguishing between the two phases of nystagmus. The overall program is to handle large volumes of highly variable data with minimum operator interaction. The programs include digital filters, differentiation, identification of fast phases, and reconstruction of the slow phase with a least squares fit such that sinusoidal or psuedorandom data may be processed with accurate results. The resultant waveform, slow phase velocity eye movements, serves as input data to the spectral analysis programs previously developed for NASA to analyze nystagmus responses to pseudorandom angular velocity inputs.

  5. Cultured slow vs. fast skeletal muscle cells differ in physiology and responsiveness to stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chih; Dennis, Robert G; Baar, Keith

    2006-07-01

    In vitro studies have used protein markers to distinguish between myogenic cells isolated from fast and slow skeletal muscles. The protein markers provide some support for the hypothesis that satellite cells from fast and slow muscles are different, but the data are equivocal. To test this hypothesis directly, three-dimensional skeletal muscle constructs were engineered from myogenic cells isolated from fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus (SOL) muscles of rats and functionality was tested. Time to peak twitch tension (TPT) and half relaxation time (RT(1/2)) were approximately 30% slower in constructs from the SOL. The slower contraction and relaxation times for the SOL constructs resulted in left shift of the force-frequency curve compared with those from the TA. Western blot analysis showed a 60% greater quantity of fast myosin heavy chain in the TA constructs. 14 days of chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation resulted in a 15% slower TPT and a 14% slower RT(1/2), but no change in absolute force production in the TA constructs. In SOL constructs, slow electrical stimulation resulted in an 80% increase in absolute force production with no change in TPT or RT(1/2). The addition of cyclosporine A did not prevent the increase in force in SOL constructs after chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting that calcineurin is not responsible for the increase in force. We conclude that myogenic cells associated with a slow muscle are imprinted to produce muscle that contracts and relaxes slowly and that calcineurin activity cannot explain the response to a slow pattern of electrical stimulation.

  6. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method.

  7. Tripolyphosphate hydrolysis by bovine fast and slow myosin subfragment 1 isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Marie; Shen, Qingwu W.; Swartz, Darl R.

    2010-01-01

    Polyphosphates are used in the meat industry to increase the water holding capacity of meat products. Tripolyphosphate (TPP) is a commonly used polyphosphate and it is metabolized into pyrophosphate and monophosphate in meat. The enzymes responsible for its metabolism have not been fully characterized. The motor domain of myosin (subfragment 1 or S1) is a likely candidate. The objectives of this study were to determine if bovine S1 hydrolyzes TPP, to characterize the TPPase activity of the fast (cutaneous trunci) and slow (masseter) isoforms, and to determine the influence of pH on S1 TPPase activity. S1 hydrolyzed TPP and in comparison with ATP as substrate, it hydrolyzed TPP 16 – 32% more slowly. Fast S1 hydrolyzed both substrates faster compared to slow S1 and the difference between the isoforms was greater with TPP as the substrate. The Vmax was 0.94 and 5.0 nmole Pi/mg S1 protein/min while the Km was 0.38 and 0.90 mM TPP for slow and fast S1, respectively. Pyrophosphate was a strong inhibitor of TPPase activity with a Ki of 88 and 8.3 μM PPi for fast and slow S1 isoforms, respectively. Both ATPase and TPPase activities were influenced by pH with the activity being higher at low pH for both fast and slow S1 isoforms. The activity at pH 5.4 was 1.5 to 4 fold higher than that at pH 7.6 for the different isoforms and substrates. These data show that myosin S1 readily hydrolyzes TPP and suggest that it is a major TPPase in meat. PMID:20416813

  8. Acute sensitivity of FAST and SLOW mice to the effects of abused drugs on locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Burkhart-Kasch, S; Gwiazdon, C C; Crabbe, J C

    1992-05-01

    The universal nature of the stimulant or euphoric effect of addictive drugs suggests that it may be an important predictor of a drug's addiction potential. Furthermore, assessment of stimulant sensitivity could be useful for predicting the liability of individuals to drug abuse. The stimulant actions of abused drugs from different pharmacological classes may share a common biological mechanism. We investigated this notion by assessing the drug responses relative to base-line locomotor activity of mice selectively bred for increased (FAST) and reduced (SLOW) sensitivity to ethanol-induced stimulation. FAST mice were more sensitive than SLOW mice to the stimulant effects of methanol (1.5-3.0 g/kg), t-butanol (0.2-0.6 g/kg), n-propanol (0.15-1.2 g/kg), pentobarbital (10-40 mg/kg) and phenobarbital (15-120 mg/kg). FAST and SLOW mice were similarly stimulated by d-amphetamine (1.25-10 mg/kg) and caffeine (2.5-20 mg/kg). The activity of FAST and SLOW mice was equally depressed by nicotine (0.5-2.0 mg/kg) and morphine (4-75 mg/kg). Finally, FAST mice were unaffected, whereas SLOW mice were depressed by diazepam (1-8 mg/kg). Selection for relative sensitivity to stimulation by ethanol has generalized to other alcohols and to barbiturates, but not to several other abused drugs, including amphetamine. The data presented here support a hypothesized common mechanism of stimulant action for alcohols and barbiturates, and suggest that differences in sensitivity to drug stimulant effects can be seen in the absence of dopamine system differences.

  9. Required coefficient of friction during turning at self-selected slow, normal, and fast walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Fino, Peter; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2014-04-11

    This study investigated the relationship of required coefficient of friction to gait speed, obstacle height, and turning strategy as participants walked around obstacles of various heights. Ten healthy, young adults performed 90° turns around corner pylons of four different heights at their self selected normal, slow, and fast walking speeds using both step and spin turning strategies. Kinetic data was captured using force plates. Results showed peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF) at push off increased with increased speed (slow μ=0.38, normal μ=0.45, and fast μ=0.54). Obstacle height had no effect on RCOF values. The average peak RCOF for fast turning exceeded the OSHA safety guideline for static COF of μ>0.50, suggesting further research is needed into the minimum static COF to prevent slips and falls, especially around corners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On forward inferences of fast and slow readers. An eye movement study

    PubMed Central

    Hawelka, Stefan; Schuster, Sarah; Gagl, Benjamin; Hutzler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unimpaired readers process words incredibly fast and hence it was assumed that top-down processing, such as predicting upcoming words, would be too slow to play an appreciable role in reading. This runs counter the major postulate of the predictive coding framework that our brain continually predicts probable upcoming sensory events. This means, it may generate predictions about the probable upcoming word during reading (dubbed forward inferences). Trying to asses these contradictory assumptions, we evaluated the effect of the predictability of words in sentences on eye movement control during silent reading. Participants were a group of fluent (i.e., fast) and a group of speed-impaired (i.e., slow) readers. The findings indicate that fast readers generate forward inferences, whereas speed-impaired readers do so to a reduced extent - indicating a significant role of predictive coding for fluent reading. PMID:25678030

  11. Fast and slow radiation-driven wind solutions using ZEUS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; ud-Doula, A.; Santillán, A.

    2014-10-01

    Currently, the theory of radiation-driven winds of massive stars possess three known solutions for the velocity and density profiles of the stellar winds, namely: the fast, Ω -slow and δ -slow solutions. In order to confirm their stability we use a time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic code called ZEUS-3D, and then we compare their results with the stationary solutions from our numerical hydrodynamic code. ZEUS-3D needs an initial trial solution to start to integrate, for this we use the stationary solution (from our code) or a β-law for the velocity field. In both cases we obtain the same results. Fast and both slow stationary solutions are attained in ZEUS-3D and are all stable. Furthermore, there is a very good agreement with the velocity and density fields from ZEUS-3D and our code, having differences between the terminal velocities lower than 3%. In addition, we found that ZEUS-3D is very sensitive to the boundary conditions (base density and velocity profile), in some cases we obtain kinks in the velocity profiles, similar to the ones obtained by Madura et al. (2007) for stars with high rotation. Such kinks are most likely the result of the wind being mass overloaded, but further investigation is needed to understand its nature better. Currently, we are exploring the effects of small perturbation at the base of the wind in order to study possible transitions or oscillations between δ-slow and fast solutions.

  12. Fast and slow activation of voltage-dependent ion channels in radish vacuoles.

    PubMed Central

    Gambale, F; Cantu, A M; Carpaneto, A; Keller, B U

    1993-01-01

    The molecular processes associated with voltage-dependent opening and closing (gating) of ion channels were investigated using a new preparation from plant cells, i.e., voltage and calcium-activated ion channels in radish root vacuoles. These channels display a main single channel conductance of approximately 90 pS and are characterized by long activation times lasting several hundreds of milliseconds. Here, we demonstrate that these channels have a second kinetically distinct activation mode which is characterized by even longer activation times. Different membrane potential protocols allowed to switch between the fast and the slow mode in a controlled and reversible manner. At transmembrane potentials of -100 mV, the ratio between the fast and slow activation time constant was around 1:5. Correspondingly, activation times lasting several seconds were observed in the slow mode. The molecular process controlling fast and slow activation may represent an effective modulator of voltage-dependent gating of ion channels in other plant and animal systems. PMID:7507716

  13. Human upright posture control models based on multisensory inputs; in fast and slow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Ryosuke; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Ota, Jun; Yozu, Arito; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Posture control to maintain an upright stance is one of the most important and basic requirements in the daily life of humans. The sensory inputs involved in posture control include visual and vestibular inputs, as well as proprioceptive and tactile somatosensory inputs. These multisensory inputs are integrated to represent the body state (body schema); this is then utilized in the brain to generate the motion. Changes in the multisensory inputs result in postural alterations (fast dynamics), as well as long-term alterations in multisensory integration and posture control itself (slow dynamics). In this review, we discuss the fast and slow dynamics, with a focus on multisensory integration including an introduction of our study to investigate "internal force control" with multisensory integration-evoked posture alteration. We found that the study of the slow dynamics is lagging compared to that of fast dynamics, such that our understanding of long-term alterations is insufficient to reveal the underlying mechanisms and to propose suitable models. Additional studies investigating slow dynamics are required to expand our knowledge of this area, which would support the physical training and rehabilitation of elderly and impaired persons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. The neurosteroid THDOC differentially affects spatial behavior and anesthesia in Slow and Fast kindling rat strains.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, K; McIntyre, D C; Poulter, M O

    2007-03-28

    Rats selectively bred for "Fast" or "Slow" kindling epileptogenesis express different GABA(A) receptor subunits that may account for differences in their miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The neurosteroid tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), an endogenous modulator of GABA-mediated inhibition with anesthetic properties and effects on mnemonic processes, preferentially enhances the mIPSCs recorded from the interneurons of Fast rats. Here we show that the anesthetic effect of 20 mg/kg THDOC was reduced in Fast compared to Slow rats. Further, as the strains have previously been shown to differ in their spatial learning abilities, we subsequently examined the effect of a lower dose (5 mg/kg) of THDOC on their performance in the Morris water maze using a matching-to-place paradigm. THDOC injection deteriorated the usually superior mnemonic capabilities of the Slow rats, i.e., concept learning as well as working and reference memory, while marginally improving these behaviors in Fast rats. These outcomes may reflect the divergent expression of GABAA receptors or disinhibition on interneurons versus principal cells that have been observed between the two strains. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Numerical studies of fast ion slowing down rates in cool magnetized plasma using LSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric; Welch, Dale R.

    2016-10-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products from the core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. The first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products from small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices will traverse the SOL, allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and be exhausted along the open field lines. Thus, the fast ion slowing-down time should affect the energy balance of an FRC reactor and its neutron emissions. However, the dynamics of fast ion energy loss processes under the conditions expected in the FRC SOL (with ρe <λDe) are analytically complex, and not yet fully understood. We use LSP, a 3D electromagnetic PIC code, to examine the effects of SOL density and background B-field on the slowing-down time of fast ions in a cool plasma. As we use explicit algorithms, these simulations must spatially resolve both ρe and λDe, as well as temporally resolve both Ωe and ωpe, increasing computation time. Scaling studies of the fast ion charge (Z) and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing down theory. Notably, Z-scaling represents a viable way to dramatically reduce the required CPU time for each simulation. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph J; Nelson, Amber M; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2012-09-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R(2) = 0.73 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R(2) = 0.73, slow wave: R(2) = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.39).

  17. Safety Design Requirements for Active Hazard Mitigation Device (AHMD) Employed to Address Fast and Slow Cook-off Thermal Threats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    Hazard Mitigation Device (AHMD) Employed to Address Fast and Slow Cook -off Thermal Threats 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...environments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Active Hazard Mitigation Device insensitive munitions fast cook -off slow... cook -off 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 14 19a. NAME

  18. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph J.; Nelson, Amber M.; Holland, Mark R.; Miller, James G.

    2012-01-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R2 = 0.73 and R2 = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R2 = 0.73, slow wave: R2 = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R2 = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R2 = 0.39). PMID:22978910

  19. Not So Fast: Hippocampal Amnesia Slows Word Learning Despite Successful Fast Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Warren, David E.; Duff, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    The human hippocampus is widely believed to be necessary for the rapid acquisition of new declarative relational memories. However, processes supporting on-line inferential word use (“fast mapping”) may also exercise a dissociable learning mechanism and permit rapid word learning without the hippocampus (Sharon et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:1146–1151). We investigated fast mapping in severely amnesic patients with hippocampal damage (N = 4), mildly amnesic patients (N = 6), and healthy comparison participants (N = 10) using on-line measures (eye movements) that reflected ongoing processing. All participants studied unique word-picture associations in two encoding conditions. In the explicit-encoding condition, uncommon items were paired with their names (e.g., “This is a numbat.”). In the fast mapping study condition, participants heard an instruction using a novel word (e.g., “Click on the numbat.”) while two items were presented (an uncommon target such as a numbat, and a common distracter such as a dog). All groups performed fast mapping well at study, and on-line eye movement measures did not reveal group differences. However, while comparison participants showed robust word learning irrespective of encoding condition, severely amnesic patients showed no evidence of learning after fast mapping or explicit encoding on any behavioral or eye-movement measure. Mildly amnesic patients showed some learning, but performance was unaffected by encoding condition. The findings are consistent with the following propositions: the hippocampus is not essential for on-line fast mapping of novel words; but is necessary for the rapid learning of arbitrary relational information irrespective of encoding conditions. PMID:24719218

  20. Estimation of fast and slow wave properties in cancellous bone using Prony's method and curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith A

    2013-04-01

    The presence of two longitudinal waves in poroelastic media is predicted by Biot's theory and has been confirmed experimentally in through-transmission measurements in cancellous bone. Estimation of attenuation coefficients and velocities of the two waves is challenging when the two waves overlap in time. The modified least squares Prony's (MLSP) method in conjuction with curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) is tested using simulations based on published values for fast and slow wave attenuation coefficients and velocities in cancellous bone from several studies in bovine femur, human femur, and human calcaneus. The search algorithm is accelerated by exploiting correlations among search parameters. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For a typical experimental SNR (40 dB), the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for one example (human femur) with fast and slow waves separated by approximately half of a pulse duration were 1 m/s (slow wave velocity), 4 m/s (fast wave velocity), 0.4 dB/cm MHz (slow wave attenuation slope), and 1.7 dB/cm MHz (fast wave attenuation slope). The MLSP + CF method is fast (requiring less than 2 s at SNR = 40 dB on a consumer-grade notebook computer) and is flexible with respect to the functional form of the parametric model for the transmission coefficient. The MLSP + CF method provides sufficient accuracy and precision for many applications such that experimental error is a greater limiting factor than estimation error.

  1. MAC-awake of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane evaluated by slow and fast alveolar washout.

    PubMed

    Gaumann, D M; Mustaki, J P; Tassonyi, E

    1992-01-01

    End-tidal anaesthetic concentrations at first eye opening in response to a verbal command during recovery from anaesthesia (MAC-awake), were measured for isoflurane (n = 16), enflurane (n = 16) and halothane (n = 14). MAC-awake was measured during either slow or fast alveolar washout. Slow washout was obtained by decreasing anaesthetic concentrations in predetermined steps of 15 min, assuming equilibration between brain and alveolar partial pressures. Fast alveolar washout was obtained by discontinuation of the inhalation anaesthetic, which had been maintained at 1 MAC for at least 15 min. Mean MAC-awake obtained with slow alveolar washout was similar for isoflurane (0.25 (SD 0.03) MAC), and enflurane (0.27 (0.04) MAC) and significantly greater than values obtained by fast alveolar washout (isoflurane: 0.19 (0.03) MAC; enflurane: 0.20 (0.03) MAC). The MAC-awake of isoflurane and enflurane was significantly less than that of halothane, which was 0.59 (0.10) MAC as evaluated by the slow and 0.50 (0.05) MAC as evaluated by the fast alveolar washout method. Recovery time from anaesthesia with fast alveolar washout was 8.8 (4.0) min for halothane, which was not different from isoflurane (15 (2.5) min), but significantly shorter than for enflurane (22 (10) min), reflecting differences in the anaesthetic concentration gradient between MAC and MAC-awake values. These data do not support the hypothesis of a uniform ratio between MAC and MAC-awake values.

  2. Wideband slow-light propagation with no distortion in a nanofiber-plane-grating composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Guo, Wenge; Fu, Haiwei; Xu, Yiping; Liu, Yinggang; Zhang, Xiaozhen

    2016-06-01

    A nanofiber-plane-grating composite slow-light waveguide to achieve wideband slowlight propagation with no distortion is proposed. The waveguide is formed by embedding a tapered nanofiber into a V-groove on a plane-grating surface. By optimizing the waveguide structural parameters, a slow-light effect with bandwidth of about 1453 GHz is obtained. Based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we analyze the waveguide's optical properties and slow-light characteristics. Simulation results show that a picosecond optical pulse propagating in the slow-light waveguide can be delayed for about 980 fs and without distortion. The group velocity of the optical pulse can be reduced to about 0.3c (c is the speed of light in vacuum). This study will provide important theoretical basis and innovative ideas for the development of new-type slow-light elements.

  3. Slow versus fast subcutaneous heparin injections for prevention of bruising and site-pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Akbari Sari, Ali; Janani, Leila; Mohammady, Mina; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2014-07-18

    Heparin is an anticoagulant medication that is normally injected subcutaneously. Subcutaneous administration of heparin may result in complications such as bruising, haematoma and pain at the injection site. One of the factors that may affect pain, haematoma and bruising is injection speed. To assess the effects of the duration (speed) of subcutaneous heparin injection on pain, haematoma and bruising at the injection site in people admitted to hospitals or clinics who require treatment with unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched August 2013) and CENTRAL (2013, Issue 7). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and two Persian databases Iranmedex and SID (August 2013). We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of different durations of subcutaneous injections of heparin on pain, bruising and haematoma at the injection site. Two review authors, working independently, extracted data onto a structured form and assessed study quality. We used the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Handbook to assess the quality of included studies. The study outcomes were summarised using quantitative and qualitative methods. One RCT was identified which met the inclusion criteria, involving 50 participants with a mean age of 55.25 (± 12.37) years. In this trial it was not possible to blind the participants and care givers. The method of sequence generation and allocation concealment was not described. The overall quality of the evidence was moderate due to the single small included study. Each participant had two injections, one in the left side and one in right side of the abdomen. One of these was injected slowly (intervention) and the other was injected fast (control). The second injection was 12 hours after the first injection. The duration of fast injection was 10 seconds and the duration of slow injection was 30

  4. Timescale halo: average-speed targets elicit more positive and less negative attributions than slow or fast targets.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ivan; Preston, Jesse Lee; Hepler, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Research on the timescale bias has found that observers perceive more capacity for mind in targets moving at an average speed, relative to slow or fast moving targets. The present research revisited the timescale bias as a type of halo effect, where normal-speed people elicit positive evaluations and abnormal-speed (slow and fast) people elicit negative evaluations. In two studies, participants viewed videos of people walking at a slow, average, or fast speed. We find evidence for a timescale halo effect: people walking at an average-speed were attributed more positive mental traits, but fewer negative mental traits, relative to slow or fast moving people. These effects held across both cognitive and emotional dimensions of mind and were mediated by overall positive/negative ratings of the person. These results suggest that, rather than eliciting greater perceptions of general mind, the timescale bias may reflect a generalized positivity toward average speed people relative to slow or fast moving people.

  5. Slow and fast ultrasonic wave detection improvement in human trabecular bones using Golay code modulation.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Manbachi, Amir; Mandelis, Andreas; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-09-01

    The identification of fast and slow waves propagating through trabecular bone is a challenging task due to temporal wave overlap combined with the high attenuation of the fast wave in the presence of noise. However, it can provide valuable information about bone integrity and become a means for monitoring osteoporosis. The objective of this work is to apply different coded excitation methods for this purpose. The results for single-sine cycle pulse, Golay code, and chirp excitations are compared. It is shown that Golay code is superior to the other techniques due to its signal enhancement while exhibiting excellent resolution without the ambiguity of sidelobes.

  6. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, R. V.

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger chaotic system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  7. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  8. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; Shindell, D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  9. Finest Filamentary Structures of the Corona in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of electron density fluctuations observed by radio occultation measurements has demonstrated that a break in the vicinity of 1 Hz in the temporal frequency spectrum of the density fluctuations provides a measure of the size of the finest filamentary structures in the solar corona. Breaks in frequency have been inferred from the density spectra deduced by Coles et al. from 1979-1980 Voyager phase scintillation and spectral broadening measurements. These results show that the finest filamentary structures are found in the extensions or stalks of coronal streamers--the likely sources of the slow solar wind--and are over a factor of 3 smaller than those in the fast wind emanating from coronal holes. The inferred sizes of the finest filamentary structures are approximately 6 km in the slow wind at 8 Rsolar and 22 km in the fast wind at 9.1 Rsolar.

  10. Coupling of Fast and Slow Modes in the Reaction Pathway of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    By employing classical molecular dynamics, correlation analysis of coupling between slow and fast dynamical modes, and free energy (umbrella) sampling using classical as well as mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics force fields, we uncover a possible pathway for phosphoryl transfer in the self-cleaving reaction of the minimal hammerhead ribozyme. The significance of this pathway is that it initiates from the minimal hammerhead crystal structure and describes the reaction landscape as a conformational rearrangement followed by a covalent transformation. The delineated mechanism is catalyzed by two metal (Mg2+) ions, proceeds via an in-line-attack by CYT 17 O2′ on the scissile phosphorous (ADE 1.1 P), and is therefore consistent with the experimentally observed inversion configuration. According to the delineated mechanism, the coupling between slow modes involving the hammerhead backbone with fast modes in the cleavage site appears to be crucial for setting up the in-line nucleophilic attack. PMID:17545240

  11. Different transmitter transients underlie presynaptic cell type specificity of GABAA,slow and GABAA,fast

    PubMed Central

    Szabadics, János; Tamás, Gábor; Soltesz, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Phasic (synaptic) and tonic (extrasynaptic) inhibition represent the two most fundamental forms of GABAA receptor-mediated transmission. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) generated by GABAA receptors are typically extremely rapid synaptic events that do not last beyond a few milliseconds. Although unusually slow GABAA IPSCs, lasting for tens of milliseconds, have been observed in recordings of spontaneous events, their origin and mechanisms are not known. We show that neocortical GABAA,slow IPSCs originate from a specialized interneuron called neurogliaform cells. Compared with classical GABAA,fast IPSCs evoked by basket cells, single spikes in neurogliaform cells evoke extraordinarily prolonged GABAA responses that display tight regulation by transporters, low peak GABA concentration, unusual benzodiazepine modulation, and spillover. These results reveal a form of GABAA receptor mediated communication by a dedicated cell type that produces slow ionotropic responses with properties intermediate between phasic and tonic inhibition. PMID:17785408

  12. A Comparison of Elemental Abundance Ratios in SEP Events in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-24

    that the elemental abundances of gradual SEP events reflect the composition of the solar corona , implying that the ambient coronal thermal ions...point at the top of the corona , although the plasma near Earth emerged ~4 days prior to its arrival at 1 AU. Thus energetic-particle and solar -wind...TYPE REPRINT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of Elemental Abundance Ratios in SEP Events in Fast and Slow Solar

  13. Slow and fast dynamics of gain and phase in a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Koos, C; Bonk, R; Freude, W; Laemmlin, M; Meuer, C; Bimberg, D; Leuthold, J

    2008-01-07

    Gain and phase dynamics in InAs/GaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers are investigated. It is shown that gain recovery is dominated by fast processes, whereas phase recovery is dominated by slow processes. Relative strengths and time constants of the underlying processes are measured. We find that operation at high bias currents optimizes the performance for nonlinear cross-gain signal processing if a low chirp is required.

  14. Fast Versus Slow Strategy of Switching Patients With Schizophrenia to Aripiprazole From Other Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Lo, Wei-Ming; Chan, Hung-Yu; Lin, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming H; Liu, Chen-Chun; Liu, Chih-Min; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Chen, Wei J

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to compare strategies differing in the speed of switching schizophrenic patients to aripiprazole from other antipsychotic agents, with dual administration for 2 weeks and then tapering off the current antipsychotic in fast (within 1 week) versus slow (within 4 weeks) strategies. This 8-week, open-label, randomized, parallel study assigned patients with a primary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder to either the fast-switching (n = 38) or slow-switching (n = 41) group. Efficacy assessments at 5 time points included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Clinical Global Impression scale. Safety assessments included extrapyramidal symptoms, metabolic profile, serum prolactin level, QTc interval, and adverse events. Drug concentrations and cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 genotypes were also measured. The fast- and slow-switching groups were comparable in demographical and clinical features at baseline and dropout rate. In the intention-to-treat analysis using mixed-effects models, there were significant within-group decreases over time in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total scores (P = 0.03) and its subscores except for positive subscores, whereas no between-group differences were found. A reduction in body weight (P = 0.01) and lower levels of total cholesterol (P = 0.03), triglycerides (P = 0.03), and prolactin (P = 0.01) were noted in both groups but no increase in extrapyramidal symptoms or prolongation of QTc. The blood concentrations of aripiprazole in all patients were in a therapeutic range at day 56, with CYP2D6*10 polymorphisms being associated with aripiprazole concentrations. In conclusion, there is no significant difference between the fast- and slow-switching strategy in terms of improvements in clinical symptoms and metabolic profile in this 8-week study.

  15. Slow Versus Fast Robot-Assisted Locomotor Training After Severe Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Thais Amanda; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo; Westgate, Philip M; Carrico, Cheryl; Batistella, Linamara R; Sawaki, Lumy

    2017-10-01

    Robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill is a rehabilitation intervention that compels repetitive practice of gait movements. Standard treadmill speed may elicit rhythmic movements generated primarily by spinal circuits. Slower-than-standard treadmill speed may elicit discrete movements, which are more complex than rhythmic movements and involve cortical areas. Compare effects of fast (i.e., rhythmic) versus slow (i.e., discrete) robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in subjects with chronic, severe gait deficit after stroke. Subjects (N = 18) were randomized to receive 30 sessions (5 d/wk) of either fast or slow robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in an inpatient setting. Functional ambulation category, time up and go, 6-min walk test, 10-m walk test, Berg Balance Scale, and Fugl-Meyer Assessment were administered at baseline and postintervention. The slow group had statistically significant improvement on functional ambulation category (first quartile-third quartile, P = 0.004), 6-min walk test (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.8 to 49.0, P = 0.040), Berg Balance Scale (95% CI = 7.4 to 14.8, P < 0.0001), time up and go (95% CI = -79.1 to 5.0, P < 0.0030), and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (95% CI = 24.1 to 45.1, P < 0.0001). The fast group had statistically significant improvement on Berg Balance Scale (95% CI = 1.5 to 10.5, P = 0.02). In initial stages of robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill after severe stroke, slow training targeting discrete movement may yield greater benefit than fast training.

  16. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  17. Endothermic force generation in fast and slow mammalian (rabbit) muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1996-01-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 3-7 degrees C were examined in single skinned fibers isolated from rabbit psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles. T-jumps were induced by an infrared laser pulse (wavelength 1.32 microns, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fiber and bathing buffer solution in a 50-microliter trough. After a T-jump, the temperature near the fiber remained constant for approximately 0.5 s, and the temperature could be clamped for longer periods by means of Peltier units assembled on the back trough wall. A T-jump produced a step decrease in tension in both fast and slow muscle fibers in rigor, indicating thermal expansion. In maximally Ca-activated (pCa approximately 4) fibers, the increase of steady tension with heating (3-35 degrees C) was approximately sigmoidal, and a T-jump at any temperature induced a more complex tension transient than in rigor fibers. An initial (small amplitude) step decrease in tension followed by a rapid recovery (tau(1); see Davis and Harrington, 1993) was seen in some records from both fiber types, which presumably was an indirect consequence of thermal expansion. The net rise in tension after a T-jump was biexponential, and its time course was characteristically different in the two fibers. At approximately 12 degrees C the reciprocal time constants for the two exponential components (tau(2) and tau(3), respectively, were approximately 70.s(-1) and approximately 15.s(-1) in fast fibers and approximately 20.s(-1) and approximately 3.s(-1) in slow fibers. In both fibers, tau(2) ("endothermic force regeneration") became faster with an increase in temperature. Furthermore, tau(3) was temperature sensitive in slow fibers but not in fast fibers. The results are compared and contrasted with previous findings from T-jump experiments on fast fibers. It is observed that the fast/slow fiber difference in the rate of endothermic force generation (three- to

  18. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  19. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AbstractHippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal–interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory. PMID:24277864

  20. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Hippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal-interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory.

  1. Store and recoil of elastic energy in slow and fast types of human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Tihanyi, J; Komi, P V; Fekete, G; Apor, P

    1982-12-01

    Stretch-shortening cycle refers to the mechanical condition in which store and recoil of elastic energy occur in the skeletal muscle. This leads to a greater work output when compared to a simple shortening contraction. The subjects performed vertical jumps with and without preliminary counter-movement and with small and large knee angular displacement. The results indicated that those subjects who had more fast twitch (FT) fibers benefited more from the stretching phase performed with high speed and short angular displacement. The amounts of elastic energy stored in this phase were 30 and 26 N X kgBW-1, respectively, for FT and slow twitch (ST) type subjects. The recoil of elastic energy was proportional to the amount of energy storage. In large amplitude jumps where transient period between stretch and shortening is long the both types of subjects demonstrated similar amount of storage of elastic energy (17 and 16 N X kgBW-1, respectively). However, the re-use of this elastic energy was greater in ST group (24%) as compared to the FT group (17%). The results can be interpreted through differences in sarcomere crossbridge life times between fast and slow muscle fibers. The slow type muscle may be able to retain the cross-bridge attachment for a longer period of time and therefore it may utilize elastic energy better in a slow type ballistic motion.

  2. Intermittency and Multifractal behavior in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Echim, Marius; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the evolution of intermittency in the solar wind magnetic turbulence at heliocentric distances between 1.5 and 5.4 AU and at heliolatitudes between -80 and 70o. We use the a multifractal analysis based on the partition function formalism. More precisely, we consider magnetic field intensity for the solar wind data from Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998, 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). By modeling multifractal spectrum we reveal intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun both in the slow and fast solar wind we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) which decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks and other nonlinear interaction can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm the lower level of multifractality and intermittency than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  3. Proline Can Have Opposite Effects on Fast and Slow Protein Folding Phases

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, Szabolcs; Gruebele, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Proline isomerization is well known to cause additional slow phases during protein refolding. We address a new question: does the presence of prolines significantly affect the very fast kinetics that lead to the formation of folding intermediates? We examined both the very slow (10–100 min) and very fast (4 μs–2.5 ms) folding kinetics of the two-domain enzyme yeast phosphoglycerate kinase by temperature-jump relaxation. Phosphoglycerate kinase contains a conserved cis-proline in position 204, in addition to several trans-prolines. Native cis-prolines have the largest effect on folding kinetics because the unfolded state favors trans isomerization, so we compared the kinetics of a P204H mutant with the wild-type as a proof of principle. The presence of Pro-204 causes an additional slow phase upon refolding from the cold denatured state, as reported in the literature. Contrary to this, the fast folding events are sped up in the presence of the cis-proline, probably by restriction of the conformational space accessible to the molecule. The wild-type and Pro204His mutant would be excellent models for off-lattice simulations probing the effects of conformational restriction on short timescales. PMID:12885665

  4. EVOLUTION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE SLOW AND FAST SOLAR WIND BEYOND THE ECLIPTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Macek, W. M.; Echim, M.; Bruno, R. E-mail: marius.echim@oma.be E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  5. Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2012-09-25

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  6. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients.

  7. Fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-ho

    2012-09-01

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  8. Slow and fast visual motion channels have independent binocular-rivalry stages.

    PubMed Central

    van de Grind, W. A.; van Hof, P.; van der Smagt, M. J.; Verstraten, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported a transparent motion after-effect indicating that the human visual system comprises separate slow and fast motion channels. Here, we report that the presentation of a fast motion in one eye and a slow motion in the other eye does not result in binocular rivalry but in a clear percept of transparent motion. We call this new visual phenomenon 'dichoptic motion transparency' (DMT). So far only the DMT phenomenon and the two motion after-effects (the 'classical' motion after-effect, seen after motion adaptation on a static test pattern, and the dynamic motion after-effect, seen on a dynamic-noise test pattern) appear to isolate the channels completely. The speed ranges of the slow and fast channels overlap strongly and are observer dependent. A model is presented that links after-effect durations of an observer to the probability of rivalry or DMT as a function of dichoptic velocity combinations. Model results support the assumption of two highly independent channels showing only within-channel rivalry, and no rivalry or after-effect interactions between the channels. The finding of two independent motion vision channels, each with a separate rivalry stage and a private line to conscious perception, might be helpful in visualizing or analysing pathways to consciousness. PMID:11270442

  9. From Slow to Fast: Hypogravity-Induced Remodeling of Muscle Fiber Myosin Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle consists of different fiber types arranged in a mosaic pattern. These fiber types are characterized by specific functional properties. Slow-type fibers demonstrate a high level of fatigue resistance and prolonged contraction duration, but decreased maximum contraction force and velocity. Fast-type fibers demonstrate high contraction force and velocity, but profound fatigability. During the last decades, it has been discovered that all these properties are determined by the predominance of slow or fast myosin-heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms. It was observed that gravitational unloading during space missions and simulated microgravity in ground-based experiments leads to the transformation of some slow-twitch muscle fibers into fast-twitch ones due to changes in the patterns of MyHC gene expression in the postural soleus muscle. The present review covers the facts and mechanistic speculations regarding myosin phenotype remodeling under conditions of gravitational unloading. The review considers the neuronal mechanisms of muscle fiber control and molecular mechanisms of regulation of myosin gene expression, such as inhibition of the calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway, epigenomic changes, and the behavior of specific microRNAs. In the final portion of the review, we discuss the adaptive role of myosin phenotype transformations. PMID:28050266

  10. Impact of TIEG1 on the structural properties of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Malek; Meme, Sandra; Meme, William; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Hawse, John R; Canon, Francis; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2017-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) is a transcription factor that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to characterize the structural properties of both fast-twitch (EDL) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles in the hindlimb of TIEG1-deficient (TIEG1(-/-) ) mice. Ten slow and 10 fast muscles were analyzed from TIEG1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice using MRI texture (MRI-TA) and histological analyses. MRI-TA could discriminate between WT slow and fast muscles. Deletion of the TIEG1 gene led to changes in the texture profile within both muscle types. Specifically, muscle isolated from TIEG1(-/-) mice displayed hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and a modification of fiber area distribution. We demonstrated that TIEG1 plays an important role in the structural properties of skeletal muscle. This study further implicates important roles for TIEG1 in the development of skeletal muscle and suggests that defects in TIEG1 expression and/or function may be associated with muscle disease. Muscle Nerve 55: 410-416, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evolution of Intermittency in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Echim, M.; Macek, W. M.; Bruno, R.

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998 and 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  12. Magnetization transfer studies of the fast and slow tissue water diffusion components in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Haker, Steven J; Maier, Stephan E

    2005-05-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) properties of the fast and slow diffusion components recently observed in the human brain were assessed experimentally. One set of experiments, performed at 1.5 T in healthy volunteers, was designed to determine whether the amplitudes of fast and slow diffusion components, differentiated on the basis of biexponential fits to signal decays over a wide range of b-factors, demonstrated a different or similar magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Another set of experiments, performed at 3 T in healthy volunteers, was designed to determine whether MTRs differed when measured from high signal-to-noise images acquired with b-factor weightings of 350 vs 3500 s/mm2. The 3 T studies included measurements of MTR as a function of off-resonance frequency for the MT pulse at both low and high b-factors. The primary conclusion drawn from all the studies is that there appears to be no significant difference between the magnetization transfer properties of the fast and slow tissue water diffusion components. The conclusions do not lend support to a direct interpretation of the 'components' of the biexponential diffusion decay in terms of the 'compartments' associated with intra- and extracellular water. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Chemical energetics of slow- and fast-twitch muscles of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The energy utilization associated with contraction was measured in isolated slow- and fast-twitch muscles of the mouse at 20 degrees C. The extent of this utilization was estimated from either the extent of high-energy phosphate splitting occurring during contraction (the initial chemical change, delta approximately P init) or from the extent of recovery resynthesis calculated from the observed oxygen consumption and lactate production occurring during the recovery period (recovery chemical resynthesis, delta approximately P rec). For short tetani, the cost to maintain isometric tension in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) was approximately threefold greater than that in the slow-twitch soleus. With prolonged stimulation, however, the energy cost in the EDL diminished so that after 12 s of stimulation, the energy cost in the EDL was only 50% greater than that of the soleus. For both the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch EDL and for all tetanus durations (up to 15 s), the extent of the initial chemical change was identical with the amount of recovery chemical resynthesis, showing that a biochemical energy balance existed in these muscles. PMID:7061985

  14. Separate activation of fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benardo, L S

    1994-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition was investigated by stimulating inhibitory neurones with focal microapplications of glutamate, while recording from layer V pyramidal neurones of rat somatosensory cortical slices. One class of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) thus elicited was characterized as a fast, chloride-mediated, GABAA IPSP in part by its fast time-to-peak (mean 2.5 ms) and brief duration, but primarily on the basis of its reversal potential at -68 mV, and its blockade by picrotoxin. The average peak amplitude for these fast IPSPs was -1.5 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance calculated for these events was about 10 nS. The conductance change associated with the maximal fast inhibitory postsynaptic potential resulting from electrical stimulation of afferent pathways ranged up to 116 nS. A second class of IPSP was encountered much less frequently. These glutamate-triggered events were characterized as slow, potassium-mediated GABAB IPSPs partly because of their longer times-to-peak (mean, 45 ms) and duration, but especially because of their extrapolated equilibrium potential at about -89 mV and blockade by 2-hydroxysaclofen. The average peak amplitude for these slow IPSPs was -2.3 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance for these events was about 8 nS. IPSPs resulting from the excitation of individual inhibitory interneurones were elicited by glutamate microapplication at particular locations relative to recording sites. Both fast and slow IPSPs were generated, but these occurred as separate events, and mixed responses were never seen. Thus, the two mechanistically distinct types of IPSPs which result from GABA interaction at GABAA and GABAB receptors on neocortical neurones may be mediated by separate classes of inhibitory neurones. PMID:7913968

  15. Slow-light total-internal-reflection switch with bending angle of 30 deg.

    PubMed

    Fuchida, Ayumi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2011-07-15

    Slowing light in a Bragg reflector waveguide is used to miniaturize optical waveguide switches. We can realize a giant equivalent refractive index change induced by carrier injection near a cutoff wavelength due to its large waveguide dispersion. We fabricate and characterize a reflection-type slow-light switch. Input light is reflected at the off state due to an equivalent index difference between an oxide aperture and an oxide region, while it passes through at the on state, since the equivalent index difference is compensated using carrier injection. We obtained a large bending angle of 30° with total internal reflection of slow light.

  16. Structure, distribution and innervation of muscle spindles in avian fast and slow skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, W K; Dow, P R; Nahirney, P C

    1999-04-01

    Muscle spindles in 2 synergistic avian skeletal muscles, the anterior (ALD) and posterior (PLD) latissimus dorsi, were studied by light and electron microscopy to determine whether morphological or quantitative differences existed between these sensory receptors. Differences were found in the density, distribution and location of muscle spindles in the 2 muscles. They also differed with respect to the morphology of their capsules and intracapsular components. The slow ALD possessed muscle spindles which were evenly distributed throughout the muscle, whereas in the fast PLD they were mainly concentrated around the single nerve entry point into the muscle. The muscle spindle index (number of spindles per gram wet muscle weight) in the ALD was more than double that of its fast-twitch PLD counterpart (130.5+/-2.0 vs 55.4+/-2.0 respectively, n = 6). The number of intrafusal fibres per spindle ranged from 1 to 8 in the ALD and 2 to 9 in the PLD, and their diameters varied from 5.0 to 16.0 microm and 4.5 to 18.5 microm, respectively. Large diameter intrafusal fibres were more frequently encountered in spindles of the PLD. Unique to the ALD was the presence of monofibre muscle spindles (12.7% of total spindles observed in ALD) which contained a solitary intrafusal fibre. In muscle spindles of both the ALD and PLD, sensory nerve endings terminated in a spiral fashion on the intrafusal fibres in their equatorial regions. Motor innervation was restricted to either juxtaequatorial or polar regions of the intrafusal fibres. Outer capsule components were extensive in polar and juxtaequatorial regions of ALD spindles, whereas inner capsule cells of PLD spindles were more numerous in juxtaequatorial and equatorial regions. Overall, muscle spindles of the PLD exhibited greater complexity with respect to the number of intrafusal fibres per spindle, range of intrafusal fibre diameters and development of their inner capsules. It is postulated that the differences in muscle spindle

  17. Modeling fast and slow gamma oscillations with interneurons of different subtype.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Stephen; Fenton, André A; Rinzel, John

    2017-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies demonstrate that neuronal gamma oscillations crucially depend on interneurons, but current models do not consider the diversity of known interneuron subtypes. Moreover, in CA1 of the hippocampus, experimental evidence indicates the presence of multiple gamma oscillators, two of which may be coordinated by differing interneuron populations. In this article, we show that models of networks with competing interneuron populations with different postsynaptic effects are sufficient to generate, within CA1, distinct oscillatory regimes. We find that strong mutual inhibition between the interneuron populations permits distinct fast and slow gamma states, whereas weak mutual inhibition generates mixed gamma states. We develop idealized firing rate models to illuminate dynamic properties of these competitive gamma networks, and reinforce these concepts with basic spiking models. The models make several explicit predictions about gamma oscillators in CA1. Specifically, interneurons of different subtype phase-lock to different gamma states, and one population of interneurons is silenced and the other active during fast and slow gamma events. Finally, mutual inhibition between interneuron populations is necessary to generate distinct gamma states. Previous experimental studies indicate that fast and slow gamma oscillations reflect different information processing modes, although it is unclear whether these rhythms are intrinsic or imposed. The models outlined demonstrate that basic architectures can locally generate these oscillations, as well as capture other features of fast and slow gamma, including theta-phase preference and spontaneous transitions between gamma states. These models may extend to describe general dynamics in networks with diverse interneuron populations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The oscillatory coordination of neural signals is crucial to healthy brain function. We have developed an idealized neuronal model that generates

  18. Fast and slow adsorption of carbamazepine on biochar as affected by carbon structure and mineral composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Huang; Ghosh, Saikat; Pan, Bo

    2017-02-01

    The influence of carbon structure and mineral composition of biochar on fast adsorption and slow adsorption of ionic organic contaminants (IOCs) is still unclear. This study used carbamazepine (CBZ) as adsorbate, peanut-shell-derived biochars produced at different charred temperatures, and the corresponding acid-washed biochars as adsorbents, to investigate the adsorption kinetics as affected by carbon structure and mineral composition of biochar. The adsorption of CBZ on amorphous (loose) carbon was lower than aromatic (condensed) carbon, but the former mainly contributed to the fast adsorption of CBZ. The hydrophobic and π-π interactions were likely the predominant adsorption mechanisms of CBZ on biochar. The ratio of CBZ fast and slow adsorption fractions (ffast/fslow) significantly reduced after acid-wash treatment of the biochars. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that minerals, including CaCO3, KAlO2, and quartz, were likely responsible for the fast adsorption of CBZ by the hydrogen bonds between CBZ and -OH on the surface of minerals. These results are useful for better understanding of the environmental behavior and prediction of the environmental risks of IOCs in biochar-amended soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The relationship between gamma frequency and running speed differs for slow and fast gamma rhythms in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chenguang; Bieri, Kevin Wood; Trettel, Sean Gregory; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2015-01-01

    In hippocampal area CA1 of rats, the frequency of gamma activity has been shown to increase with running speed (Ahmed and Mehta, 2012). This finding suggests that different gamma frequencies simply allow for different timings of transitions across cell assemblies at varying running speeds, rather than serving unique functions. However, accumulating evidence supports the conclusion that slow (~25–55 Hz) and fast (~60–100 Hz) gamma are distinct network states with different functions. If slow and fast gamma constitute distinct network states, then it is possible that slow and fast gamma frequencies are differentially affected by running speed. In this study, we tested this hypothesis and found that slow and fast gamma frequencies change differently as a function of running speed in hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3, and in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Fast gamma frequencies increased with increasing running speed in all three areas. Slow gamma frequencies changed significantly less across different speeds. Furthermore, at high running speeds, CA3 firing rates were low, and MEC firing rates were high, suggesting that CA1 transitions from CA3 inputs to MEC inputs as running speed increases. These results support the hypothesis that slow and fast gamma reflect functionally distinct states in the hippocampal network, with fast gamma driven by MEC at high running speeds and slow gamma driven by CA3 at low running speeds. PMID:25601003

  20. The relationship between gamma frequency and running speed differs for slow and fast gamma rhythms in freely behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chenguang; Bieri, Kevin Wood; Trettel, Sean Gregory; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2015-08-01

    In hippocampal area CA1 of rats, the frequency of gamma activity has been shown to increase with running speed (Ahmed and Mehta, 2012). This finding suggests that different gamma frequencies simply allow for different timings of transitions across cell assemblies at varying running speeds, rather than serving unique functions. However, accumulating evidence supports the conclusion that slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma are distinct network states with different functions. If slow and fast gamma constitute distinct network states, then it is possible that slow and fast gamma frequencies are differentially affected by running speed. In this study, we tested this hypothesis and found that slow and fast gamma frequencies change differently as a function of running speed in hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3, and in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Fast gamma frequencies increased with increasing running speed in all three areas. Slow gamma frequencies changed significantly less across different speeds. Furthermore, at high running speeds, CA3 firing rates were low, and MEC firing rates were high, suggesting that CA1 transitions from CA3 inputs to MEC inputs as running speed increases. These results support the hypothesis that slow and fast gamma reflect functionally distinct states in the hippocampal network, with fast gamma driven by MEC at high running speeds and slow gamma driven by CA3 at low running speeds.

  1. Resveratrol exhibits differential protective effects on fast- and slow-twitch muscles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chun; Yang, Meng-Hsuan; Tung, Hung-Chun; Chang, Chieh-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Huang, Jiung-Pang; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Hung, Li-Man

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differential protective effect of resveratrol (RSV) on oxidative stress and metabolic signaling pathways in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats with diabetes. Diabetic rats were induced by streptozotocin (STZ) for 2 weeks and then administered with RSV (1, 10 and 100 μg/kg per day) for 1 week. We determined oxidative stress and protein expression by lucigenin-mediated chemiluminescence and Western immunoblot. The superoxide anion production and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein level were increased in fast-twitch muscle than in slow-twitch muscle of diabetes. The Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) phosphorylations were reduced in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Oxidative stress and GSK-3 dephosphorylation were corrected by RSV treatment in both fast- and slow-twitch muscles of diabetes. Furthermore, RSV treatment downregulated CuZnSOD protein level in diabetic fast-twitch muscle. In diabetic slow-twitch muscle, RSV treatment elevated manganese SOD (MnSOD) and phosphorylated Akt protein levels and reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Our results suggested that fast-twitch muscle incurred more oxidative stress, whereas slow-twitch muscle altered metabolic signaling molecules activities under diabetic status. The antidiabetic effect of RSV on fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles was mediated by different antioxidative and metabolic signals. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. A comparative study of slow and fast suryanamaskar on physiological function.

    PubMed

    Bhavanani, Ananda Balayogi; Udupa, Kaviraja; Madanmohan; Ravindra, Pn

    2011-07-01

    Numerous scientific studies have reported beneficial physiological changes after short- and long-term yoga training. Suryanamaskar (SN) is an integral part of modern yoga training and may be performed either in a slow or rapid manner. As there are few studies on SN, we conducted this study to determine the differential effect of 6 months training in the fast and slow versions. 42 school children in the age group of 12-16 years were randomly divided into two groups of 21 each. Group I and Group II received 6 months training in performance of slow suryanamaskar (SSN) and fast suryanamaskar (FSN), respectively. Training in SSN produced a significant decrease in diastolic pressure. In contrast, training in FSN produced a significant increase in systolic pressure. Although there was a highly significant increase in isometric hand grip (IHG) strength and hand grip endurance (HGE) in both the groups, the increase in HGE in FSN group was significantly more than in SSN group. Pulmonary function tests showed improvements in both the groups though intergroup comparison showed no significance difference. Maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure increased significantly in both the groups with increase of MIP in FSN group being more significant than in SSN. The present study reports that SN has positive physiological benefits as evidenced by improvement of pulmonary function, respiratory pressures, hand grip strength and endurance, and resting cardiovascular parameters. It also demonstrates the differences between SN training when performed in a slow and fast manner, concluding that the effects of FSN are similar to physical aerobic exercises, whereas the effects of SSN are similar to those of yoga training.

  3. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  4. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%.

  5. Weekly versus monthly testosterone administration on fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers in older adult males.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Robert H; Peters, James R; Dillon, E Lichar; Durham, William J; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    In older adults, loss of mobility due to sarcopenia is exacerbated in men with low serum T. T replacement therapy is known to increase muscle mass and strength, but the effect of weekly (WK) vs monthly (MO) administration on specific fiber types is unknown. To determine the efficacy of WK vs MO T replacement on the size and functional capacity of individual fast and slow skeletal muscle fiber types. Subjects were randomized into a 5-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. All subjects (ages, 61-71 y) were community-dwelling men who had T levels < 500 ng/dL. Subjects were dosed weekly for 5 months, receiving continuous T (WK, n = 5; 100 mg T enanthate, im injection), monthly cycled T (MO, n = 7; alternating months of T and placebo), or placebo (n = 7). Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained before and after treatment. Main outcomes for individual slow and fast fibers included fiber diameter, peak force (P0), rate of tension development, maximal shortening velocity, peak power, and Ca(2+) sensitivity. Both treatments increased fiber diameter and peak power, with WK treatment 5-fold more effective than MO in increasing type I fiber P0. WK effects on fiber diameter and force were 1.5-fold higher in slow fibers compared to fast fibers. In fast type II fibers, diameter and P0 increased similarly between treatments. The increased power was entirely due to increased fiber size and force. In conclusion, T replacement effects were fiber-type dependent, restricted to increases in cell size, P0, and peak power, and dependent on the paradigm selected (WK vs MO).

  6. Selective stimulation of neurons in visual cortex enables segregation of slow and fast connections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taekjun; Freeman, Ralph D.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of the central visual pathway is generally studied from a perspective of feedforward processes. However, there are horizontal connections and also strong feedback from extra striate to visual cortex. Here, we use visual stimuli designed to maximize relative differential involvements of these three main types of connections. The approach relies on differences between stimulation within the classical receptive field (CRF) and that of the surround region. Although previous studies have used similar approaches, they were limited primarily to spatial segregation of neural connections. Our experimental design provides clear segregation of fast and slow components of surround modulation. We assume these are mediated by feedback and horizontal connections, respectively, but other factors may be involved. Our results imply that both horizontal and feedback connections contribute to integration of visual information outside the CRF and provide suppressive or facilitative modulation. For a given cell, modulation may change in strength and sign from suppression to facilitation or the reverse depending on surround parameters. Sub-threshold input from the CRF surround increases local field potential (LFP) power in distinct frequency ranges which differ for suppression and facilitation. Horizontal connections have delayed CRF-surround modulation and are sensitive to position changes in the surround. Therefore, surround information beyond the CRF is initially processed by fast connections which we consider to be feedback, whereas spatially tuned mechanisms are relatively slow and presumably mediated by horizontal connections. Overall, results suggest that convergent fast (feedforward) inputs determine size and structure of the CRFs of recipient cells in visual cortex. And fast connections from extra striate regions (feedback) plus slow tuned connections (horizontal) within visual cortex contribute to spatial influences of CRF surround activation. PMID:24881577

  7. Osteoprotegerin and β2-Agonists Mitigate Muscular Dystrophy in Slow- and Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Frenette, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Our recent work showed that daily injections of osteoprotegerin (OPG)-immunoglobulin fragment complex (OPG-Fc) completely restore the function of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles in dystrophic mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, despite marked improvements, OPG-Fc was not as effective in preventing the loss of function of slow-twitch soleus and diaphragm muscles. Because β2-agonists enhance the function of slow- and fast-twitch dystrophic muscles and because their use is limited by their adverse effects on bone and cardiac tissues, we hypothesized that OPG-Fc, a bone and skeletal muscle protector, acts synergistically with β2-agonists and potentiates their positive effects on skeletal muscles. We observed that the content of β2-adrenergic receptors, which are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, is significantly reduced in dystrophic muscles but is rescued by the injection of OPG-Fc. Most important, OPG-Fc combined with a low dose of formoterol, a member of a new generation of β2-agonists, histologically and functionally rescued slow-twitch dystrophic muscles. This combination of therapeutic agents, which have already been tested and approved for human use, may open up new therapeutic avenues for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and possibly other neuromuscular diseases.

  8. The Parkfield Tremors: Slow and Fast Ruptures on the Same Asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele Veedu, Deepa; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A number of tremor sources have been burst into low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) in the deep extension of the San Andreas Fault in the last decade. Among the tremor sources, a particular LFE family near Parkfield exhibited doubling recurrence intervals alternating between about three and six days. A simple physical model producing successive slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity can explain the doubling recurrence intervals (manuscript accepted by Nature, 2016), but the source characteristics of the LFEs may not be fully explained by this simple model. The source characteristics show that tremor bursts containing more LFEs and lasting longer are associated with lower-amplitude ground motion. We find that the number of LFEs per burst is controlled by peak velocity of the modeled slip event. However, the duration of the tremor burst is not directly controlled by the duration of the underlying slip. The findings imply that the LFEs occur contemporaneous with the underlying slow and fast ruptures successively. Our results bring a better understanding of the mechanics of tectonic tremors associated with underlying slow-slip events.

  9. Explicit and Implicit Processes Constitute the Fast and Slow Processes of Sensorimotor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Krista M.; Taylor, Jordan A.

    2015-01-01

    A popular model of human sensorimotor learning suggests that a fast process and a slow process work in parallel to produce the canonical learning curve (Smith et al., 2006). Recent evidence supports the subdivision of sensorimotor learning into explicit and implicit processes that simultaneously subserve task performance (Taylor et al., 2014). We set out to test whether these two accounts of learning processes are homologous. Using a recently developed method to assay explicit and implicit learning directly in a sensorimotor task, along with a computational modeling analysis, we show that the fast process closely resembles explicit learning and the slow process approximates implicit learning. In addition, we provide evidence for a subdivision of the slow/implicit process into distinct manifestations of motor memory. We conclude that the two-state model of motor learning is a close approximation of sensorimotor learning, but it is unable to describe adequately the various implicit learning operations that forge the learning curve. Our results suggest that a wider net be cast in the search for the putative psychological mechanisms and neural substrates underlying the multiplicity of processes involved in motor learning. PMID:26134640

  10. The speed of feature-based attention: attentional advantage is slow, but selection is fast.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liqiang

    2010-12-01

    When paying attention to a feature (e.g., red), no attentional advantage is gained in perceiving items with this feature in very brief displays. Therefore, feature-based attention seems to be slow. In previous feature-based attention studies, attention has often been measured as the difference in performance in a secondary task. In our recent work on Boolean map theory (Huang & Pashler, 2007), we distinguished between 2 concepts that are often conflated with the term attention, namely the selection of information from stimulus and the following processing optimization (i.e., attentional advantage) of the selected stimulus. Attention, as examined in previous feature-based attention studies, only fits the definition of processing optimization, but does not fit the definition of selection of information. Therefore, it is open to question whether feature-based attention, when defined as selection, is fast or slow. In this study, I systematically measured the speed of feature-based attention in relation to both definitions. Attention was found to be slow (~100 ms) in terms of processing optimization (i.e., attentional advantage) but fast in terms of the selection of information (<50 ms). These results support the view that feature-based attention works by creating a spatial representation (i.e., a Boolean map; Huang & Pashler, 2007) for the stimulus of a feature and a processing optimization of the visual information residing in the region of this spatial representation.

  11. Explicit and Implicit Processes Constitute the Fast and Slow Processes of Sensorimotor Learning.

    PubMed

    McDougle, Samuel D; Bond, Krista M; Taylor, Jordan A

    2015-07-01

    A popular model of human sensorimotor learning suggests that a fast process and a slow process work in parallel to produce the canonical learning curve (Smith et al., 2006). Recent evidence supports the subdivision of sensorimotor learning into explicit and implicit processes that simultaneously subserve task performance (Taylor et al., 2014). We set out to test whether these two accounts of learning processes are homologous. Using a recently developed method to assay explicit and implicit learning directly in a sensorimotor task, along with a computational modeling analysis, we show that the fast process closely resembles explicit learning and the slow process approximates implicit learning. In addition, we provide evidence for a subdivision of the slow/implicit process into distinct manifestations of motor memory. We conclude that the two-state model of motor learning is a close approximation of sensorimotor learning, but it is unable to describe adequately the various implicit learning operations that forge the learning curve. Our results suggest that a wider net be cast in the search for the putative psychological mechanisms and neural substrates underlying the multiplicity of processes involved in motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359568-12$15.00/0.

  12. Enhanced spectral sensitivity of a chip-scale photonic-crystal slow-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; Gao, Boshen; Schulz, Sebastian A; Awan, Kashif M; Upham, Jeremy; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Boyd, Robert W

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the spectral sensitivity of a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer can be enhanced through structural slow light. We observe a 20-fold resolution enhancement by placing a dispersion-engineered, slow-light, photonic-crystal waveguide in one arm of a fiber-based MZ interferometer. The spectral sensitivity of the interferometer increases roughly linearly with the group index, and we have quantified the resolution in terms of the spectral density of interference fringes. These results show promise for the use of slow-light methods for developing novel tools for optical metrology and, specifically, for compact high-resolution spectrometers.

  13. Differential Macrophage Response to Slow- and Fast-Growing Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Helguera-Repetto, A. Cecilia; Chacon-Salinas, Rommel; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F.; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have recently been recognized as important species that cause disease even in immunocompetent individuals. The mechanisms that these species use to infect and persist inside macrophages are not well characterised. To gain insight concerning this process we used THP-1 macrophages infected with M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. celatum, and M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that slow-growing mycobacteria gained entrance into these cells with more efficiency than fast-growing mycobacteria. We have also demonstrated that viable slow-growing M. celatum persisted inside macrophages without causing cell damage and without inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS), as M. tuberculosis caused. In contrast, fast-growing mycobacteria destroyed the cells and induced high levels of ROS. Additionally, the macrophage cytokine pattern induced by M. celatum was different from the one induced by either M. tuberculosis or fast-growing mycobacteria. Our results also suggest that, in some cases, the intracellular survival of mycobacteria and the immune response that they induce in macrophages could be related to their growth rate. In addition, the modulation of macrophage cytokine production, caused by M. celatum, might be a novel immune-evasion strategy used to survive inside macrophages that is different from the one reported for M. tuberculosis. PMID:24949482

  14. Large Deviations and Importance Sampling for Systems of Slow-Fast Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-02-15

    In this paper we develop the large deviations principle and a rigorous mathematical framework for asymptotically efficient importance sampling schemes for general, fully dependent systems of stochastic differential equations of slow and fast motion with small noise in the slow component. We assume periodicity with respect to the fast component. Depending on the interaction of the fast scale with the smallness of the noise, we get different behavior. We examine how one range of interaction differs from the other one both for the large deviations and for the importance sampling. We use the large deviations results to identify asymptotically optimal importance sampling schemes in each case. Standard Monte Carlo schemes perform poorly in the small noise limit. In the presence of multiscale aspects one faces additional difficulties and straightforward adaptation of importance sampling schemes for standard small noise diffusions will not produce efficient schemes. It turns out that one has to consider the so called cell problem from the homogenization theory for Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations in order to guarantee asymptotic optimality. We use stochastic control arguments.

  15. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  16. Slow and fast ruptures on a laboratory fault controlled by loading characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, Gregory C.; Yamashita, Futoshi

    2017-05-01

    Recent geodetic observations indicate that a single fault may slip slowly and silently or fast and seismically in different circumstances. We report laboratory experiments that demonstrate how the mode of faulting can alternate between fast "stick-slip" events (70 to 500 mm/s sliding rates) and slow silent events ( 0.001 to 30 mm/s) as a result of loading conditions rather than friction properties or stiffness of the loading machine. The 760 mm long granite sample is close to the critical nucleation length scale for unstable slip, so small variations in nucleation properties result in measurable differences in slip events. Slow events occur when instability cannot fully nucleate before reaching the sample ends. Dynamic events occur after long healing times or abrupt increases in loading rate which suggests that these factors shrink the spatial and temporal extents of the nucleation zone. Arrays of slip, strain, and ground motion sensors installed on the sample allow us to quantify seismic coupling and study details of premonitory slip and afterslip. We find that seismic coupling decreases when slip rates fall below about 70 mm/s. The slow slip events we observe are primarily aseismic (less than 1% of the seismic coupling of faster events) and produce swarms of very small M -6 to M -8 events. These mechanical and seismic interactions suggest that faults with transitional behavior—where creep, small earthquakes, and tremor are often observed—could become seismically coupled if loaded rapidly, either by a slow slip front or dynamic rupture of an earthquake that nucleated elsewhere.

  17. Isotopic and Elemental Compositions of Ar, Kr, and Xe in Bulk, Slow, and Fast Solar Wind Targets from Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Baur, H.; Burnett, D. S.; Heber, V. S.; Wieler, R.

    2010-03-01

    We present new heavy noble gas isotopic and elemental data from GENESIS targets exposed to the bulk, the fast, and the slow solar wind. Implications on fractionation effects between the Sun and the Solar Wind will be discussed.

  18. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  19. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  20. Fast network oscillations in vitro exhibit a slow decay of temporal auto-correlations.

    PubMed

    Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Jansen, Rick; van Aerde, Karlijn; Timmerman, Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2011-08-01

    Ongoing neuronal oscillations in vivo exhibit non-random amplitude fluctuations as reflected in a slow decay of temporal auto-correlations that persist for tens of seconds. Interestingly, the decay of auto-correlations is altered in several brain-related disorders, including epilepsy, depression and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that the temporal structure of oscillations depends on intact neuronal networks in the brain. Whether structured amplitude modulation occurs only in the intact brain or whether isolated neuronal networks can also give rise to amplitude modulation with a slow decay is not known. Here, we examined the temporal structure of cholinergic fast network oscillations in acute hippocampal slices. For the first time, we show that a slow decay of temporal correlations can emerge from synchronized activity in isolated hippocampal networks from mice, and is maximal at intermediate concentrations of the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Using zolpidem, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(A) receptor function, we found that increased inhibition leads to longer oscillation bursts and more persistent temporal correlations. In addition, we asked if these findings were unique for mouse hippocampus, and we therefore analysed cholinergic fast network oscillations in rat prefrontal cortex slices. We observed significant temporal correlations, which were similar in strength to those found in mouse hippocampus and human cortex. Taken together, our data indicate that fast network oscillations with temporal correlations can be induced in isolated networks in vitro in different species and brain areas, and therefore may serve as model systems to investigate how altered temporal correlations in disease may be rescued with pharmacology. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  2. Intracellular regulation of protein degradation during sepsis is different in fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Tiao, G; Lieberman, M; Fischer, J E; Hasselgren, P O

    1997-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the difference in the response to sepsis of protein breakdown between fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. In addition, we defined the time course and the tissue specificity of sepsis-induced changes in the expression of the ubiquitin pathway. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture; control rats were sham operated. Energy-dependent protein breakdown was measured in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ubiquitin mRNA levels were determined by Northern blot analysis. Sepsis resulted in increased energy-dependent protein breakdown and upregulated expression of ubiquitin mRNA in the fast-twitch EDL but not in the slow-twitch soleus muscle. The sepsis-induced increase in ubiquitin mRNA levels in the EDL muscle was noticeable before the increase in energy-dependent protein breakdown. Sepsis increased ubiquitin mRNA levels in the diaphragm (a mixed fiber-type muscle) but not in heart, liver, kidney, or intestine, consistent with a tissue-specific regulation of the ubiquitin system during sepsis. The results suggest that the difference in protein breakdown during sepsis between fast- and slow-twitch muscles reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. The data also suggest that the expression of the ubiquitin pathway is upregulated in a time-dependent fashion during sepsis and that this response is not a generalized phenomenon but is tissue specific.

  3. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide.

    PubMed

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke; Blomberg, Simon P; Hodgson, David J; Mbeau-Ache, Cyril; Zuidema, Pieter A; de Kroon, Hans; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2016-01-05

    The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population performance. We show that 55% of the variation in plant life-history strategies is adequately characterized using two independent axes: the fast-slow continuum, including fast-growing, short-lived plant species at one end and slow-growing, long-lived species at the other, and a reproductive strategy axis, with highly reproductive, iteroparous species at one extreme and poorly reproductive, semelparous plants with frequent shrinkage at the other. Our findings remain consistent across major habitats and are minimally affected by plant growth form and phylogenetic ancestry, suggesting that the relative independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments.

  4. Matching of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile properties in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Huong H; Lamb, Graham D

    2006-07-01

    1. The twitch characteristics (fast-twitch or slow-twitch) of skeletal muscle fibres are determined not only by the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, but also by the time-course of Ca2+ release and re-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The present study examined, in individual fibres from non-transforming muscle of the rat, whether particular SR properties are matched to the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, in particular in the case of fibres with fast-twitch contractile apparatus located in a slow-twitch muscle, namely the soleus. 2. Force was recorded in single, mechanically skinned fibres from extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and soleus muscles. Using repeated cycles in which the SR was emptied of all releasable Ca2+ and then reloaded, it was possible to determine the relative amount of Ca2+ present in the SR endogenously, the maximum SR capacity and the rate of Ca2+ loading. The sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was used to classify the fibres as fast-twitch (FT), slow-twitch (ST) or mixed (< 3% of the fibres examined) and thereby identify the likely troponin C and myosin heavy chain types present. 3. There was no significant difference in SR properties between the groups of FT fibres obtained from the four different muscles, including soleus. Despite some overlap in the SR properties of individual fibres between the FT and ST groups, the properties of the FT fibres in all four muscles studied were significantly different from those of the ST and mixed fibres. 4. In general, in FT fibres the SR had a larger capacity and the endogenous Ca2+ content was a relatively lower percentage of maximum compared with ST fibres. Importantly, in terms of their SR properties, FT fibres from soleus muscle more closely resembled FT fibres from other muscles than they did ST fibres from soleus muscle.

  5. Coexisting attractors and chaotic canard explosions in a slow-fast optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The multiple time scale dynamics induced by radiation pressure and photothermal effects in a high-finesse optomechanical resonator is experimentally studied. At difference with two-dimensional slow-fast systems, the transition from the quasiharmonic to the relaxational regime occurs via chaotic canard explosions, where large-amplitude relaxation spikes are separated by an irregular number of subthreshold oscillations. We also show that this regime coexists with other periodic attractors, on which the trajectories evolve on a substantially faster time scale. The experimental results are reproduced and analyzed by means of a detailed physical model of our system.

  6. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  7. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  8. Basin stability for burst synchronization in small-world networks of chaotic slow-fast oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of connectivity and individual dynamics on the basin stability of the burst synchronization regime in small-world networks consisting of chaotic slow-fast oscillators is studied. It is shown that there are rewiring probabilities corresponding to the largest basin stabilities, which uncovers a reason for finding small-world topologies in real neuronal networks. The impact of coupling density and strength as well as the nodal parameters of relaxation or excitability are studied. Dynamic mechanisms are uncovered that most strongly influence basin stability of the burst synchronization regime.

  9. Anomalous negative dispersion in bone can result from the interference of fast and slow waves.

    PubMed

    Marutyan, Karen R; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this work was to show that the apparent negative dispersion of ultrasonic waves propagating in bone can arise from interference between fast and slow longitudinal modes, each exhibiting positive dispersion. Simulations were carried out using two approaches: one based on the Biot-Johnson model and one independent of that model. Results of the simulations are mutually consistent and appear to account for measurements from many laboratories that report that the phase velocity of ultrasonic waves propagating in cancellous bone decreases with increasing frequency (negative dispersion) in about 90% of specimens but increases with frequency in about 10%.

  10. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  11. A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Popović, Nikola; Marr, Carsten; Swain, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic models for gene expression frequently exhibit dynamics on several different scales. One potential time-scale separation is caused by significant differences in the lifetimes of mRNA and protein; the ratio of the two degradation rates gives a natural small parameter in the resulting chemical master equation, allowing for the application of perturbation techniques. Here, we develop a framework for the analysis of a family of 'fast-slow' models for gene expression that is based on geometric singular perturbation theory. We illustrate our approach by giving a complete characterisation of a standard two-stage model which assumes transcription, translation, and degradation to be first-order reactions. In particular, we present a systematic expansion procedure for the probability-generating function that can in principle be taken to any order in the perturbation parameter, allowing for an approximation of the corresponding propagator probabilities to that same order. For illustrative purposes, we perform this expansion explicitly to first order, both on the fast and the slow time-scales; then, we combine the resulting asymptotics into a composite fast-slow expansion that is uniformly valid in time. In the process, we extend, and prove rigorously, results previously obtained by Shahrezaei and Swain (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(45):17256-17261, 2008) and Bokes et al. (J Math Biol 64(5):829-854, 2012; J Math Biol 65(3):493-520, 2012). We verify our asymptotics by numerical simulation, and we explore its practical applicability and the effects of a variation in the system parameters and the time-scale separation. Focussing on biologically relevant parameter regimes that induce translational bursting, as well as those in which mRNA is frequently transcribed, we find that the first-order correction can significantly improve the steady-state probability distribution. Similarly, in the time-dependent scenario, inclusion of the first-order fast asymptotics results in a

  12. Differential kinetics of fast and slow ankle extensors during the paw-shake in the cat.

    PubMed

    Fowler, E G; Gregor, R J; Roy, R R

    1988-01-01

    Force, length, and EMG were assessed in the medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of two cats during the paw-shake response. The medial gastrocnemius produced high forces and significant electrical activity while force production and electrical activity were negligible in the soleus. This observation is significant as it provides evidence, through the direct measurement of muscle force, of selective recruitment of a fast muscle when a slow synergist is not activated. Additionally, the relationship among force, length, and neural activation indicates that the role of the medial gastrocnemius during the paw-shake response is to decelerate muscle lengthening and begin muscle shortening.

  13. Robust Detection of Fast and Slow Frequency Jumps of Atomic Clocks.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a frequency jump detector for atomic clocks. The detector considers both fast frequency jumps, which are abrupt variations of the clock frequency trend, and slow frequency jumps, which correspond to variations of the frequency trend over a finite time interval. These anomalies are particularly critical to space clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). The developed detector is robust in the sense that it can deal with time-varying frequency trends, sinusoidal terms, outliers, and missing data. The detection performances are analyzed both analytically and numerically, and the effectiveness of the detector is shown by applying it to GNSS experimental data, as well as to simulated clock data.

  14. Rotation sensing with Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-01

    An optical gyroscope, which is constituted by Er3+-doped active ring resonator (EDARR) slow light structure, is presented for the first time. The principle of improving the sensitivity of the detection of angular velocity is analysed in detail. The expression of the rotation phase difference of EDARR between the counter-propagating waves is derived and discussed. At the resonant frequency, the phase shift difference has the maximum value when the light power in the cavity is far greater than the input light power. We designed an experimental scheme of Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light system. Two additional bias phases ϕb = ±π/2 were introduced in the optical path, by recording the light intensity difference ? and I0 at the resonant frequency ?, the input angular velocity can be obtained. The slow light structure based on EDARR can enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the angular velocity by three orders of magnitude.

  15. Slow light hierarchy and tunable switching in fractal wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-05-01

    An exact analytical description of unraveling hierarchical distribution of slow optical modes in the context of propagation of classical waves through a fractal wave guide is reported using the scale invariance of the underlying geometry in the tight-binding formalism. The flat photonic modes are localized with finite support in the fractal system and getting trapped over clusters of increasing spans displaying the existence of multitude of localization area. The onset of localization can in principal be delayed in space by a suitable choice of the frequency of the incoming radiation. The length scale at which the onset of localization for each bounded optical mode occurs can be tuned at will following real space renormalization group method. Scanning over arbitrary small range of frequency may lead to the possibility of inter-modal switching behavior.

  16. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material

    PubMed Central

    Tweten, Dennis J.; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Schmidt, John L.; Garbow, Joel R.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly-incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  17. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole-Cell Imaging at Nanometer Resolutions Using Fast and Slow Focused Helium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Udalagama, Chammika N.B.; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Pickard, Daniel S.; Venkatesan, T.; Watt, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Observations of the interior structure of cells and subcellular organelles are important steps in unraveling organelle functions. Microscopy using helium ions can play a major role in both surface and subcellular imaging because it can provide subnanometer resolutions at the cell surface for slow helium ions, and fast helium ions can penetrate cells without a significant loss of resolution. Slow (e.g., 10–50 keV) helium ion beams can now be focused to subnanometer dimensions (∼0.25 nm), and keV helium ion microscopy can be used to image the surfaces of cells at high resolutions. Because of the ease of neutralizing the sample charge using a flood electron beam, surface charging effects are minimal and therefore cell surfaces can be imaged without the need for a conducting metallic coating. Fast (MeV) helium ions maintain a straight path as they pass through a cell. Along the ion trajectory, the helium ion undergoes multiple electron collisions, and for each collision a small amount of energy is lost to the scattered electron. By measuring the total energy loss of each MeV helium ion as it passes through the cell, we can construct an energy-loss image that is representative of the mass distribution of the cell. This work paves the way to use ions for whole-cell investigations at nanometer resolutions through structural, elemental (via nuclear elastic backscattering), and fluorescence (via ion induced fluorescence) imaging. PMID:21961606

  19. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  20. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  1. Modular time division multiplexer: Efficient simultaneous characterization of fast and slow transients in multiple samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Stephan D.; Luo, Jiajun; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, R. P. H.; Grayson, M.

    2016-09-01

    A modular time division multiplexer (MTDM) device is introduced to enable parallel measurement of multiple samples with both fast and slow decay transients spanning from millisecond to month-long time scales. This is achieved by dedicating a single high-speed measurement instrument for rapid data collection at the start of a transient, and by multiplexing a second low-speed measurement instrument for slow data collection of several samples in parallel for the later transients. The MTDM is a high-level design concept that can in principle measure an arbitrary number of samples, and the low cost implementation here allows up to 16 samples to be measured in parallel over several months, reducing the total ensemble measurement duration and equipment usage by as much as an order of magnitude without sacrificing fidelity. The MTDM was successfully demonstrated by simultaneously measuring the photoconductivity of three amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin films with 20 ms data resolution for fast transients and an uninterrupted parallel run time of over 20 days. The MTDM has potential applications in many areas of research that manifest response times spanning many orders of magnitude, such as photovoltaics, rechargeable batteries, amorphous semiconductors such as silicon and amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide.

  2. A mathematical framework for critical transitions: Bifurcations, fast-slow systems and stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Bifurcations can cause dynamical systems with slowly varying parameters to transition to far-away attractors. The terms “critical transition” or “tipping point” have been used to describe this situation. Critical transitions have been observed in an astonishingly diverse set of applications from ecosystems and climate change to medicine and finance. The main goal of this paper is to give an overview which standard mathematical theories can be applied to critical transitions. We shall focus on early-warning signs that have been suggested to predict critical transitions and point out what mathematical theory can provide in this context. Starting from classical bifurcation theory and incorporating multiple time scale dynamics one can give a detailed analysis of local bifurcations that induce critical transitions. We suggest that the mathematical theory of fast-slow systems provides a natural definition of critical transitions. Since noise often plays a crucial role near critical transitions the next step is to consider stochastic fast-slow systems. The interplay between sample path techniques, partial differential equations and random dynamical systems is highlighted. Each viewpoint provides potential early-warning signs for critical transitions. Since increasing variance has been suggested as an early-warning sign we examine it in the context of normal forms analytically, numerically and geometrically; we also consider autocorrelation numerically. Hence we demonstrate the applicability of early-warning signs for generic models. We end with suggestions for future directions of the theory.

  3. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  4. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  5. The Parkfield tremors reveal slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Deepa Mele; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The deep extension of the San Andreas Fault is believed to be creeping, but the recent observations of tectonic tremors from these depths indicate a complex deformation style. In particular, an isolated tremor source near Parkfield has been producing a sequence of low-frequency earthquakes that indicates an uncommon mechanism of stress accumulation and release. The tremor pattern regularly oscillated between three and six days from mid-2003 until it was disrupted by the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. After that event, the tremor source ruptured only about every three days, but over the next two years it gradually returned to its initial alternating recurrence pattern. The mechanism that drives this recurrence pattern is unknown. Here we use physics-based models to show that the same tremor asperity—the region from which the low-frequency earthquakes radiate—can regularly slip in slow and fast ruptures, naturally resulting in recurrence intervals alternating between three and six days. This unusual slip behaviour occurs when the tremor asperity size is close to the critical nucleation size of earthquakes. We also show that changes in pore pressure following the Parkfield earthquake can explain the sudden change and gradual recovery of the recurrence intervals. Our findings suggest a framework for fault deformation in which the same asperity can release tectonic stress through both slow and fast ruptures.

  6. Characterization of fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2)-knock out mice: unexpected adaptive changes of fast-twitch muscles only.

    PubMed

    Valle, Giorgia; Vergani, Barbara; Sacchetto, Roberta; Reggiani, Carlo; De Rosa, Edith; Maccatrozzo, Lisa; Nori, Alessandra; Villa, Antonello; Volpe, Pompeo

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the functional role of calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles by using CASQ2-/- mice; CASQ2 is expressed throughout life in slow-twitch muscles, but only in the developmental and neonatal stages in fast-twitch muscles. CASQ2-/- causes increase in calsequestrin 1 (CASQ1) expression, but without functional changes in both muscle types. CASQ2-/- mice have ultrastructural changes in fast-twitch muscles only, i.e., formation of pentads and stacks in the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  7. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via active Raman gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Datang; Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme to realize the storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via a mechanism of active Raman gain (ARG). The system under consideration is a four-level atomic gas interacting with three (pump, signal, and control) laser fields. We show that a stable propagation of signal light pulses with superluminal velocity (i.e., fast-light pulses) is possible in such a system through the ARG contributed by the pump field and the quantum interference effect induced by the control field. We further show that a robust storage and retrieval of light pulses in such a fast-light medium can be implemented by switching on and off the pump and the control fields simultaneously. The results reported here may have potential applications for light information processing and transmission using fast-light media.

  8. Simple, fast, bright, and stable light sources.

    PubMed

    Tordera, Daniel; Meier, Sebastian; Lenes, Martijn; Costa, Rubén D; Ortí, Enrique; Sarfert, Wiebke; Bolink, Henk J

    2012-02-14

    In this work we show that solution-processed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) based on only an ionic iridium complex and a small amount of ionic liquid exhibit exceptionally good performances when applying a pulsed current: sub-second turn-on times and almost constant high luminances (>600 cd m(-2) ) and power efficiencies over the first 600 h. This demonstrates the potential of LECs for applications in solid-state signage and lighting.

  9. Subjective and Objective Effects of Fast and Slow Compression on the Perception of Reverberant Speech in Listeners with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Doherty, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of fast and slow attack/release times (ATs/RTs) on aided perception of reverberant speech in quiet. Method: Thirty listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested monaurally with a commercial hearing aid programmed in 3 AT/RT settings: linear, fast (AT = 9…

  10. Subjective and Objective Effects of Fast and Slow Compression on the Perception of Reverberant Speech in Listeners with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Doherty, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of fast and slow attack/release times (ATs/RTs) on aided perception of reverberant speech in quiet. Method: Thirty listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested monaurally with a commercial hearing aid programmed in 3 AT/RT settings: linear, fast (AT = 9…

  11. RNA sequencing reveals a slow to fast muscle fiber type transition after olanzapine infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher J; Xu, Yuping; Hajnal, Andras; Salzberg, Anna C; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura

    2015-01-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs), like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1), while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions.

  12. A data-driven prediction method for fast-slow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Andreas; Chekroun, Mickael; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Ghil, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a prediction method for processes that exhibit a mixture of variability on low and fast scales. The method relies on combining empirical model reduction (EMR) with singular spectrum analysis (SSA). EMR is a data-driven methodology for constructing stochastic low-dimensional models that account for nonlinearity and serial correlation in the estimated noise, while SSA provides a decomposition of the complex dynamics into low-order components that capture spatio-temporal behavior on different time scales. Our study focuses on the data-driven modeling of partial observations from dynamical systems that exhibit power spectra with broad peaks. The main result in this talk is that the combination of SSA pre-filtering with EMR modeling improves, under certain circumstances, the modeling and prediction skill of such a system, as compared to a standard EMR prediction based on raw data. Specifically, it is the separation into "fast" and "slow" temporal scales by the SSA pre-filtering that achieves the improvement. We show, in particular that the resulting EMR-SSA emulators help predict intermittent behavior such as rapid transitions between specific regions of the system's phase space. This capability of the EMR-SSA prediction will be demonstrated on two low-dimensional models: the Rössler system and a Lotka-Volterra model for interspecies competition. In either case, the chaotic dynamics is produced through a Shilnikov-type mechanism and we argue that the latter seems to be an important ingredient for the good prediction skills of EMR-SSA emulators. Shilnikov-type behavior has been shown to arise in various complex geophysical fluid models, such as baroclinic quasi-geostrophic flows in the mid-latitude atmosphere and wind-driven double-gyre ocean circulation models. This pervasiveness of the Shilnikow mechanism of fast-slow transition opens interesting perspectives for the extension of the proposed EMR-SSA approach to more realistic situations.

  13. RNA Sequencing Reveals a Slow to Fast Muscle Fiber Type Transition after Olanzapine Infusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher J.; Xu, Yuping; Hajnal, Andras; Salzberg, Anna C.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura

    2015-01-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs), like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1), while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions. PMID:25893406

  14. All-Optical Delay of Images using Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Ryan M.; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Ali-Khan, Irfan; Howell, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional images carried by optical pulses (2 ns) are delayed by up to 10 ns in a 10 cm cesium vapor cell. By interfering the delayed images with a local oscillator, the transverse phase and amplitude profiles of the images are shown to be preserved. It is further shown that delayed images can be well preserved even at very low light levels, where each pulse contains on average less than one photon.

  15. Fast and slow wave detection in bovine cancellous bone in vitro using bandlimited deconvolution and Prony's method.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2014-10-01

    Fast and slow waves were detected in a bovine cancellous bone sample for thicknesses ranging from 7 to 12 mm using bandlimited deconvolution and the modified least-squares Prony's method with curve fitting (MLSP + CF). Bandlimited deconvolution consistently isolated two waves with linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficients as evidenced by high correlation coefficients between attenuation coefficient and frequency: 0.997 ± 0.002 (fast wave) and 0.986 ± 0.013 (slow wave) (mean ± standard deviation). Average root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the two algorithms for phase velocities were 5 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 13 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Average RMS differences for signal loss were 1.6 dB (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 0.4 dB (slow wave, 750 kHz). Phase velocities for thickness = 10 mm were 1726 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 1455 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Results show support for the model of two waves with linear-with frequency attenuation, successful isolation of fast and slow waves, good agreement between bandlimited deconvolution and MLSP + CF as well as with a Bayesian algorithm, and potential variations of fast and/or slow wave properties with bone sample thickness.

  16. Lacosamide Inhibition of Nav1.7 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Slow Binding to Fast-Inactivated States.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-04-01

    Lacosamide is an antiseizure agent that targets voltage-dependent sodium channels. Previous experiments have suggested that lacosamide is unusual in binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state of sodium channels, in contrast to drugs like carbamazepine and phenytoin, which bind tightly to fast-inactivated states. Using heterologously expressed human Nav1.7 sodium channels, we examined the state-dependent effects of lacosamide. Lacosamide induced a reversible shift in the voltage dependence of fast inactivation studied with 100-millisecond prepulses, suggesting binding to fast-inactivated states. Using steady holding potentials, lacosamide block was very weak at -120 mV (3% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide) but greatly enhanced at -80 mV (43% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide), where there is partial fast inactivation but little or no slow inactivation. During long depolarizations, lacosamide slowly (over seconds) put channels into states that recovered availability slowly (hundreds of milliseconds) at -120 mV. This resembles enhancement of slow inactivation, but the effect was much more pronounced at -40 mV, where fast inactivation is complete, but slow inactivation is not, than at 0 mV, where slow inactivation is maximal, more consistent with slow binding to fast-inactivated states than selective binding to slow-inactivated states. Furthermore, inhibition by lacosamide was greatly reduced by pretreatment with 300 µM lidocaine or 300 µM carbamazepine, suggesting that lacosamide, lidocaine, and carbamazepine all bind to the same site. The results suggest that lacosamide binds to fast-inactivated states in a manner similar to other antiseizure agents but with slower kinetics of binding and unbinding.

  17. Slow light and chromatic temporal dispersion in photonic crystal waveguides using femtosecond time of flight.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, C E; Cattaneo, F; Perney, N M B; Baumberg, J J; Netti, M C; Zoorob, M E; Charlton, M D B; Parker, G J

    2006-01-01

    We report time-of-flight experiments on photonic-crystal waveguide structures using optical Kerr gating of a femtosecond white-light supercontinuum. These photonic-crystal structures, based on engineered silicon-nitride slab waveguides, possess broadband low-loss guiding properties, allowing the group velocity dispersion of optical pulses to be directly tracked as a function of wavelength. This dispersion is shown to be radically disrupted by the spectral band gaps associated with the photonic-crystal periodicity. Increased time-of-flight effects, or "slowed light," are clearly observed at the edges of band gaps in agreement with two-dimensional plane-wave theoretical models of group velocity dispersion. A universal model for slow light in such photonic crystals is proposed, which shows that slow light is controlled predominantly by the detuning from, and the size of, the photonic band gaps. Slowed light observed up to time delays of approximately 1 ps, corresponds to anomalous dispersion of approximately 3.5 ps/nm per mm of the photonic crystal structure. From the decreasing intensity of time-gated slow light as a function of time delay, we estimate the characteristic losses of modes which are guided in the spectral proximity of the photonic band gaps.

  18. Differences in early and late stages of information processing between slow versus fast participants.

    PubMed

    Portella, Claudio; Machado, Sergio; Paes, Flávia; Cagy, Mauricio; Sack, Alexander T; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; Salas-Pacheco, Jose; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is a system consisting of various interconnected neural networks, with functional specialization coexisting with functional integration occurring both; temporally and spatially at many levels. The current study ranked and compared fast and slow participants in processing information by assessing latency and amplitude of early and late Event-Related Potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, Premotor Potential (PMP) and P300. In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components. For this purpose, twenty right-handed and healthy individuals were subjected to a classical ERP "Oddball" paradigm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function analyses (DFA) used PRE components and the Reaction Time (RT) to classify individuals. Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants. In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants. Based on these findings, we suggest that the ERP is able to detect even minimal impairments, in the processing of somatosensory information and cognitive and motor stages. Hence, the study of ERP might also be capable of assessing sensorimotor dysfunctions in healthy old-aged people and in neuropsychiatric patients (suffering from dementia, Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders).

  19. Polarization rotation of slow light with orbital angular momentum in ultracold atomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseckas, Julius; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Oehberg, Patrik; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2007-11-15

    We consider the propagation of slow light with an orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a moving atomic medium. We have derived a general equation of motion and applied it in analyzing propagation of slow light with an OAM in a rotating medium, such as a vortex lattice. We have shown that the OAM of slow light manifests itself in a rotation of the polarization plane of linearly polarized light. To extract a pure rotational phase shift, we suggest to measure a difference in the angle of the polarization plane rotation by two consecutive light beams with opposite OAM. The differential angle {delta}{alpha}{sub l} is proportional to the rotation frequency of the medium {omega}{sub rot} and the winding number l of light, and is inversely proportional to the group velocity of light. For slow light the angle {delta}{alpha}{sub l} should be large enough to be detectable. The effect can be used as a tool for measuring the rotation frequency {omega}{sub rot} of the medium.

  20. Myosin binding protein-C slow: a multifaceted family of proteins with a complex expression profile in fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2013-01-01

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C) comprises a complex family of proteins expressed in slow and fast type skeletal muscles. Similar to its fast and cardiac counterparts, sMyBP-C functions to modulate the formation of actomyosin cross-bridges, and to organize and stabilize sarcomeric A- and M-bands. The slow form of MyBP-C was originally classified as a single protein, however several variants encoded by the single MYBPC1 gene have been recently identified. Alternative splicing of the 5' and 3' ends of the MYBPC1 transcript has led to the differential expression of small unique segments interspersed between common domains. In addition, the NH2-terminus of sMyBP-C undergoes complex phosphorylation. Thus, alternative splicing and phosphorylation appear to regulate the functional activities of sMyBP-C. sMyBP-C proteins are not restricted to slow twitch muscles, but they are abundantly expressed in fast twitch muscles, too. Using bioinformatic tools, we herein perform a systematic comparison of the known human and mouse sMyBP-C variants. In addition, using single fiber westerns and antibodies to a common region of all known sMyBP-C variants, we present a detailed and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of sMyBP-C proteins in the slow twitch soleus and the fast twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) mouse muscles. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that distinct sMyBP-C variants are co-expressed in the same fiber, and that their expression profile differs among fibers. Given the differential expression of sMyBP-C variants in single fibers, it becomes apparent that each variant or combination thereof may play unique roles in the regulation of actomyosin cross-bridges formation and the stabilization of thick filaments.

  1. Tamm plasmon polaritons: Slow and spatially compact light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasin, M. E.; Seisyan, R. P.; Kalitteevski, M. A.; Brand, S.; Abram, R. A.; Chamberlain, J. M.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs) formed at the interface between a metal and a dielectric Bragg reflector (DBR). In contrast to conventional surface plasmons, TPPs have an in-plane wavevector less than the wavevector of light in vacuum, which allows for their direct optical excitation. The angular resolved reflectivity and transmission spectra of a GaAs /AlAs DBR covered by Au films of various thicknesses show the resonances associated with the TPP at low temperatures and room temperature. The in-plane dispersion of TTPs is parabolic with an effective mass of 4×10-5 of the free electron mass.

  2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway is differentially involved in beta-agonist-induced hypertrophy in slow and fast muscles.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Zeng, C; Ricome, A; Hannon, K M; Grant, A L; Gerrard, D E

    2007-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling beta-adrenergic receptor agonist (BA)-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy are not well known. We presently report that BA exerts a distinct muscle- and muscle fiber type-specific hypertrophy. Moreover, we have shown that pharmacologically or genetically attenuating extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in muscle fibers resulted in decreases (P < 0.05) in fast but not slow fiber type-specific reporter gene expressions in response to BA exposure in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with these data, forced expression of MAPK phosphatase 1, a nuclear protein that dephosphorylates ERK1/2, in fast-twitch skeletal muscle ablated (P < 0.05) the hypertrophic effects of BA feeding (clenbuterol, 20 parts per million in water) in vivo. Further analysis has shown that BA-induced phosphorylation and activation of ERK occurred to a greater (P < 0.05) extent in fast myofibers than in slow myofibers. Analysis of the basal level of ERK activity in slow and fast muscles revealed that ERK1/2 is activated to a greater extent in fast- than in slow-twitch muscles. These data indicate that ERK signaling is differentially involved in BA-induced hypertrophy in slow and fast skeletal muscles, suggesting that the increased abundance of phospho-ERK1/2 and ERK activity found in fast-twitch myofibers, compared with their slow-twitch counterparts, may account, at least in part, for the fiber type-specific hypertrophy induced by BA stimulation. These data suggest that fast myofibers are pivotal in the adaptation of muscle to environmental cues and that the mechanism underlying this change is partially mediated by the MAPK signaling cascade.

  3. Slow-Light Optical Bullets in Arrays of Nonlinear Bragg-Grating Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate that propagation direction and velocity of optical pulses can be controlled independently in the structures with multiscale modulation of the refractive index in transverse and longitudinal directions. We reveal that, in arrays of waveguides with phase-shifted Bragg gratings, the refraction angle does not depend on the speed of light, allowing for efficient spatial steering of slow light. In this system, both spatial diffraction and temporal dispersion can be designed independently, and we identify the possibility for self-collimation of slow light when spatial diffraction is suppressed for certain propagation directions. We also show that broadening of pulses in space and time can be eliminated in nonlinear media, supporting the formation of slow-light optical bullets that remain localized irrespective of propagation direction.

  4. Third-harmonic generation in slow-light chalcogenide glass photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Christelle; Spurny, Marcel; Grillet, Christian; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Bulla, Douglas; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate third-harmonic generation (THG) in a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide fabricated in AMTIR-1 chalcogenide glass. Owing to the relatively low loss and low dispersion in the slow-light (c/30) regime, combined with the high nonlinear figure of merit of the material (˜2), we obtain a relatively large conversion efficiency (1.4×10-8/W2), which is 30× higher than in comparable silicon waveguides, and observe a uniform visible light pattern along the waveguide. These results widen the number of applications underpinned by THG in slow-light platforms, such as the direct observation of the spatial evolution of the propagating mode.

  5. Experimental constraints of using slow-light in sodium vapor for light-drag enhanced relative rotation sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Renu; Pati, G. S.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.; Shahriar, M. S.

    2006-10-01

    We report on experimental observation of electromagnetically induced transparency and slow-light (vg ≈ c/607) in atomic sodium vapor, as a potential medium for a recently proposed experiment on slow-light enhanced relative rotation sensing [Shahriar et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted for publication), http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0505192.]. We have performed an interferometric measurement of the index variation associated with a two-photon resonance to estimate the dispersion characteristics of the medium that are relevant to the slow-light based rotation sensing scheme. We also show that the presence of counter-propagating pump beams in an optical Sagnac loop produces a backward optical phase conjugation beam that can generate spurious signals, which may complicate the measurement of small rotations in the slow-light enhanced gyroscope. We identify techniques for overcoming this constraint. Conclusions reached from the results presented here will pave the way for designing and carrying out an experiment that will demonstrate the slow-light induced enhancement of rotation sensing.

  6. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  7. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  8. Fast and Slow Gating Relaxations in the Muscle Chloride Channel Clc-1

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Alessio; Pusch, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Gating of the muscle chloride channel CLC-1 involves at least two processes evidenced by double-exponential current relaxations when stepping the voltage to negative values. However, there is little information about the gating of CLC-1 at positive voltages. Here, we analyzed macroscopic gating of CLC-1 over a large voltage range (from −160 to +200 mV). Activation was fast at positive voltages but could be easily followed using envelope protocols that employed a tail pulse to −140 mV after stepping the voltage to a certain test potential for increasing durations. Activation was biexponential, demonstrating the presence of two gating processes. Both time constants became exponentially faster at positive voltages. A similar voltage dependence was also seen for the fast gate time constant of CLC-0. The voltage dependence of the time constant of the fast process of CLC-1, τf, was steeper than that of the slow one, τs (apparent activation valences were zf ∼ −0.79 and zs ∼ −0.42) such that at +200 mV the two processes became kinetically distinct by almost two orders of magnitude (τf ∼ 16 μs, τs ∼ 1 ms). This voltage dependence is inconsistent with a previously published gating model for CLC-1 (Fahlke, C., A. Rosenbohm, N. Mitrovic, A.L. George, and R. Rüdel. 1996. Biophys. J. 71:695–706). The kinetic difference at 200 mV allowed us to separate the steady state open probabilities of the two processes assuming that they reflect two parallel (not necessarily independent) gates that have to be open simultaneously to allow ion conduction. Both open probabilities could be described by Boltzmann functions with gating valences around one and with nonzero “offsets” at negative voltages, indicating that the two “gates” never close completely. For comparison with single channel data and to correlate the two gating processes with the two gates of CLC-0, we characterized their voltage, pHint, and [Cl]ext dependence, and the dominant myotonia inducing

  9. Effects of pre-exercise listening to slow and fast rhythm music on supramaximal cycle performance and selected metabolic variables.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Ohkuwa, T; Itoh, H; Kitoh, M; Terasawa, J; Tsuda, T; Kitagawa, S; Sato, Y

    2003-07-01

    We examined the effect of listening to two different types of music (with slow and fast rhythm), prior to supramaximal cycle exercise, on performance, heart rate, the concentration of lactate and ammonia in blood, and the concentration of catecholamines in plasma. Six male students participated in this study. After listening to slow rhythm or fast rhythm music for 20 min, the subjects performed supramaximal exercise for 45 s using a cycle ergometer. Listening to slow and fast rhythm music prior to supramaximal exercise did not significantly affect the mean power output. The plasma norepinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to slow rhythm music was significantly lower than before listening (p < 0.05). The plasma epinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to fast rhythm music was significantly higher than before listening (p < 0.05). The type of music had no effect on blood lactate and ammonia levels or on plasma catecholamine levels following exercise. In conclusion, listening to slow rhythm music decreases the plasma norepinephrine level, and listening to fast rhythm music increases the plasma epinephrine level. The type of music has no impact on power output during exercise.

  10. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Modeling of low- and high-frequency noise by slow and fast fluctuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both 1/f and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modeled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) ensembles of fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as biological complexes, semiconductors, superconducting, and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  12. Slow and fast responses of mean and extreme precipitation to different forcing in CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillmann, Jana; Stjern, Camilla Weum; Myhre, Gunnar; Forster, Piers M.

    2017-06-01

    We are investigating the fast and slow responses of changes in mean and extreme precipitation to different climate forcing mechanisms, such as greenhouse gas and solar forcing, to understand whether rapid adjustments are important for extreme precipitation. To disentangle the effect of rapid adjustment to a given forcing on the overall change in extreme precipitation, we use a linear regression method that has been previously applied to mean precipitation. Equilibrium experiments with preindustrial CO2 concentrations and reduced solar constant were compared with a four times CO2 concentration experiment for 10 state-of-the-art climate models. We find that the two forcing mechanisms, greenhouse gases and solar, impose clearly different rapid adjustment signals in the mean precipitation, while such difference is difficult to discern for extreme precipitation due to large internal variability. In contrast to mean precipitation, changes in extreme precipitation scale with surface temperature trends and do not seem to depend on the forcing mechanism.

  13. The nucleation of "fast" and "slow" stick slip instabilities in sheared granular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Seismological observations in the past few decades have revealed a diversity of slip behaviors of faults, involving interactions and transition between slow to fast slip phenomena. Field studies show that exhumed fault zones comprise mixtures of materials with variable frictional strength and stability. Emergent models of slip diversity emphasize the role of heterogeneities of fault zone properties and the potential interactions between seismic and aseismic deformation. Here, we develop analog laboratory experiments to study the mechanics of heterogeneous faults with the goal to identify factors controlling their slip stability and rupture style. We report on results from room temperature sliding experiments using a rotary shear apparatus. We simulated gouge heterogeneity by using materials with different frictional strength and stability. At room temperature conditions, dry glass beads typically stick slip, whereas dry granular calcite exhibits stable sliding. The peak strength of glass beads aggregates is typically lower than that of granular calcite aggregates. Our samples consisted of a layer of glass beads sandwiched between two layers of granular calcite. The initial particle size was between 100 and 200 μm for both materials and the initial thickness of each layer was about 1.5 mm. We tested our layered aggregates under 1 to 7 MPa normal stress and at sliding velocities between 1 and 100 μm/s. Within that range of conditions, high normal stress and slow sliding velocities promoted fast, regular stick slip. For normal stress values of less than about 4 MPa, the recurrence time and stress drop of stick slips became irregular, particularly at sliding rates above 20 μm/s. As the accumulated shear displacement increased, slip events became slower and the magnitudes of their stress drop, compaction and slip distance decreased. We recorded acoustic emissions (AEs) associated with each slip event (fast and slow) and estimated their source azimuth. AE activity was

  14. Slow Ca2+ dynamics in pharyngeal muscles in Caenorhabditis elegans during fast pumping.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Fukano, Takashi; Kimura, Koutarou D; Mori, Ikue; Kirino, Yutaka; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of Caenorhabditis elegans are composed of the corpus, isthmus and terminal bulb from anterior to posterior. These components are excited in a coordinated fashion to facilitate proper feeding through pumping and peristalsis. We analysed the spatiotemporal pattern of intracellular calcium dynamics in the pharyngeal muscles during feeding. We used a new ratiometric fluorescent calcium indicator and a new optical system that allows simultaneous illumination and detection at any two wavelengths. Pumping was observed with fast, repetitive and synchronous spikes in calcium concentrations in the corpus and terminal bulb, indicative of electrical coupling throughout the muscles. The posterior isthmus, however, responded to only one out of several pumping spikes to produce broad calcium transients, leading to peristalsis, the slow and gradual motion needed for efficient swallows. The excitation-calcium coupling may be uniquely modulated in this region at the level of calcium channels on the plasma membrane.

  15. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  16. Whole-cell imaging at nanometer resolutions using fast and slow focused helium ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Udalagama, Chammika N B; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A; Pickard, Daniel S; Venkatesan, T; Watt, Frank

    2011-10-05

    Observations of the interior structure of cells and subcellular organelles are important steps in unraveling organelle functions. Microscopy using helium ions can play a major role in both surface and subcellular imaging because it can provide subnanometer resolutions at the cell surface for slow helium ions, and fast helium ions can penetrate cells without a significant loss of resolution. Slow (e.g., 10-50 keV) helium ion beams can now be focused to subnanometer dimensions (∼0.25 nm), and keV helium ion microscopy can be used to image the surfaces of cells at high resolutions. Because of the ease of neutralizing the sample charge using a flood electron beam, surface charging effects are minimal and therefore cell surfaces can be imaged without the need for a conducting metallic coating. Fast (MeV) helium ions maintain a straight path as they pass through a cell. Along the ion trajectory, the helium ion undergoes multiple electron collisions, and for each collision a small amount of energy is lost to the scattered electron. By measuring the total energy loss of each MeV helium ion as it passes through the cell, we can construct an energy-loss image that is representative of the mass distribution of the cell. This work paves the way to use ions for whole-cell investigations at nanometer resolutions through structural, elemental (via nuclear elastic backscattering), and fluorescence (via ion induced fluorescence) imaging. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers marks the acceleration of sarcopenia in slow and fast twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sharon L; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-08-01

    The age-related decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, exhibits a marked acceleration in advanced age. Although many studies have remarked upon the accumulation of very small myofibers, particularly at advanced stages of sarcopenia, the significance of this phenomenon in the acceleration of sarcopenia has never been examined. Furthermore, although mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by a lack of cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity has been implicated in myofiber atrophy in sarcopenia, the contribution of this phenotype to the accumulation of severely atrophied fibers in aged muscles has never been determined. To this end, we examined the fiber size distribution in the slow twitch soleus (Sol) and fast twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscles between young adulthood (YA) and senescence (SEN). We also quantified the abundance of COX deficient myocytes and their size attributes to gain insight into the contribution of this phenotype to myofiber atrophy with aging. Our data showed that the progression of muscle atrophy, particularly its striking acceleration between late middle age and SEN, was paralleled by an accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers (≤ 1000 μm(2) in size) in both Sol and Gas. On the other hand, we observed no COX deficient myofibers in Sol, despite nearly 20% of the myofibers being severely atrophic. Similarly, only 0.17 ± 0.06% of all fibers in Gas were COX deficient, and their size was generally larger (2375 ± 319 μm(2)) than the severely atrophied myofibers noted above. Collectively, our results suggest that similar processes likely contribute to the acceleration of sarcopenia in both slow twitch and fast twitch muscles, and that COX deficiency is not a major contributor to this phenomenon.

  18. Melanin is effective in protecting fast and slow growing fungi from various types of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Claudia; Bryan, Ruth A; Onofri, Silvano; Selbmann, Laura; Shuryak, Igor; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    Melanin is a ubiquitous pigment with unique physicochemical properties. The resistance of melanized fungi to cosmic and terrestrial ionizing radiation suggests that melanin also plays a pivotal role in radioprotection. In this study, we compared the effects of densely-ionizing deuterons and sparsely-ionizing X-rays on two microscopic fungi capable of melanogenesis. We utilized the fast-growing pathogenic basiodiomycete forming an induced DOPA-melanin, Cryptococcus neoformans (CN); and the slow-growing environmental rock-inhabiting ascomycete synthesizing a constitutive DHN-melanin, Cryomyces antarcticus (CA); melanized and non-melanized counterparts were compared. CA was more resistant to deuterons than CN, and similar resistance was observed for X-rays. Melanin afforded protection against high-dose (1.5 kGy) deuterons for both CN and CA (p-values < 10(-4) ). For X-rays (0.3 kGy), melanin protected CA (p-values < 10(-4) ) and probably CN. Deuterons increased XTT activity in melanized strains of both species, while the activity in non-melanized cells remained stable or decreased. For ATP levels the reverse occurred: it decreased in melanized strains, but not in non-melanized ones, after deuteron exposure. For both XTT and ATP, which reflect the metabolic activity of the cells, larger and more statistically-significant differences as a function of melanization status occurred in CN. Our data show, for the first time, that melanin protected both fast-growing and slow-growing fungi from high doses of deuterons under physiological conditions. These observations may give clues for creating melanin-based radioprotectors. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Slow-fast stochastic diffusion dynamics and quasi-stationarity for diploid populations with varying size.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in the long-time behavior of a diploid population with sexual reproduction and randomly varying population size, characterized by its genotype composition at one bi-allelic locus. The population is modeled by a 3-dimensional birth-and-death process with competition, weak cooperation and Mendelian reproduction. This stochastic process is indexed by a scaling parameter K that goes to infinity, following a large population assumption. When the individual birth and natural death rates are of order K, the sequence of stochastic processes indexed by K converges toward a new slow-fast dynamics with variable population size. We indeed prove the convergence toward 0 of a fast variable giving the deviation of the population from quasi Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while the sequence of slow variables giving the respective numbers of occurrences of each allele converges toward a 2-dimensional diffusion process that reaches (0,0) almost surely in finite time. The population size and the proportion of a given allele converge toward a Wright-Fisher diffusion with stochastically varying population size and diploid selection. We insist on differences between haploid and diploid populations due to population size stochastic variability. Using a non trivial change of variables, we study the absorption of this diffusion and its long time behavior conditioned on non-extinction. In particular we prove that this diffusion starting from any non-trivial state and conditioned on not hitting (0,0) admits a unique quasi-stationary distribution. We give numerical approximations of this quasi-stationary behavior in three biologically relevant cases: neutrality, overdominance, and separate niches.

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Erdos, G.; Balogh, A.

    2012-07-10

    The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

  1. Deficiency of alpha-sarcoglycan differently affects fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Esposito, Alessandra; Germinario, Elena; Sandonà, Dorianna; Martinello, Tiziana; Jakubiec-Puka, Anna; Biral, Donatella; Betto, Romeo

    2005-11-01

    Alpha-sarcoglycan (Sgca) is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the dystrophin complex located at skeletal and cardiac muscle sarcolemma. Defects in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene (Sgca) cause the severe human-type 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Because Sgca-null mice develop progressive muscular dystrophy similar to human disorder they are a valuable animal model for investigating the physiopathology of the disorder. In this study, biochemical and functional properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of the Sgca-null mice were analyzed. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice showed twitch and tetanic kinetics comparable with those of wild-type controls. In contrast, soleus muscle showed reduction of twitch half-relaxation time, prolongation of tetanic half-relaxation time, and increase of maximal rate of rise of tetanus. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice demonstrated a marked reduction of specific twitch and tetanic tensions and a higher resistance to fatigue compared with controls, changes that were not evident in dystrophic soleus. Contrary to EDL fibers, soleus muscle fibers of Sgca-null mice distinctively showed right shift of the pCa-tension (pCa is the negative log of Ca2+ concentration) relationships and reduced sensitivity to caffeine of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Both EDL and soleus muscles showed striking changes in myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition, whereas EDL showed a larger number of hybrid fibers than soleus. In contrast to the EDL, soleus muscle of Sgca-null mice contained a higher number of regenerating fibers and thus higher levels of embryonic MHC. In conclusion, this study revealed profound distinctive biochemical and physiological modifications in fast- and slow-twitch muscles resulting from alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency.

  2. Motor units in cross-reinnervated fast and slow twitch muscle of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bagust, J; Lewis, D M; Westerman, R A

    1981-01-01

    1. Isometric contractile properties of motor units were measured in cross-reinnervated fast (flexor digitorum longus) and slow (soleus) twitch muscles of the cat. All but one cross was at least 95% pure. 2. There was a reduction in the number of motor units in all muscles, but totals remained about equal in cross-reinnervated soleus and flexor digitorum longus. 3. Motor unit tensions (mean and maximum values) were higher in cross-reinnervated soleus than in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, reversing the differences between normal muscles. This was due to increases in muscle mass and in the tension developed per unit cross-sectional area. There were motor unit tensions larger and smaller than those seen in normal muscle, but the range was comparable with that seen in self-reinnervated muscle. 4. The changes in twitch time to peak of whole muscle following cross-reinnervations resulted from a change over the whole range of motor units. The conversion of soleus was less complete than that of flexor digitorum longus, and the time to peak of its fastest motor unit was twice as long as any seen in normal flexor digitorum longus. 5. In neither of the cross-reinnervated muscles were the fast contracting motor units larger than the slow contracting ones, and in cross-reinnervated soleus they were smaller. 6. Axonal conduction velocity was correlated with motor unit tension in both muscles and with twitch time to peak in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, but in all cases less clearly than in normal muscles. 7. The ratio of twitch to tetanic tension increased with increasing twitch time to peak, as in normal muscles. PMID:7277217

  3. The Hot-Gas Content of Early-Type Galaxies: Slow vs. Fast Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc; Atlas^{3D} Team

    2012-09-01

    For a galaxy, the ability to sustain a corona of hot, X-ray emitting gas can be a key element determining its star-formation history. An halo of hot gas can indeed be an effective shield against the acquisition of cold gas and stellar-mass loss material is quickly absorbed by such an hot medium. Early-type galaxies are known to sometime display bright X-ray halos, but the precise amount of hot gas around these objects and what drives its presence is still largely unknown. By combining homogeneously-derived photometric and kinematic measurements for the 260 early-type galaxies of the Atlas3D integral-field spectroscopic survey with both low- and high-spatial resolution X-ray measurements, I will show that the ability to sustain an halo of hot gas depends crucially on the dynamical structure and intrinsic flattening of a galaxy. Specifically, in the framework of the revised classification for early-type galaxies advanced by the SAURON survey, I find that: 1) Slow Rotators have hot-gas halos with X-ray luminosity and temperature values that are entirely consistent with what expected if the hot gas originates from stellar-mass loss material that is heated up at the kinetic temperature of the stars through shocks and collisions. 2) Fast Rotators have hot-gas halos with X-ray luminosities that always fall short of such a prediction, and the more so the lower their dynamical mass and the larger their intrinsic flattening and degree of rotation support. I will discuss the implication of such a systematic difference in the hot-gas content of fast and slow rotators galaxies for the most recent evolution of these two class of objects.

  4. Distinct fast and slow processes contribute to the selection of preferred step frequency during human walking

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Robert; Kuo, Arthur D.; Donelan, J. Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Humans spontaneously select a step frequency that minimizes the energy expenditure of walking. This selection might be embedded within the neural circuits that generate gait so that the optimum is pre-programmed for a given walking speed. Or perhaps step frequency is directly optimized, based on sensed feedback of energy expenditure. Direct optimization is expected to be slow due to the compounded effect of delays and iteration, whereas a pre-programmed mechanism presumably allows for faster step frequency selection, albeit dependent on prior experience. To test for both pre-programmed selection and direct optimization, we applied perturbations to treadmill walking to elicit transient changes in step frequency. We found that human step frequency adjustments (n = 7) occurred with two components, the first dominating the response (66 ± 10% of total amplitude change; mean ± SD) and occurring quite quickly (1.44 ± 1.14 s to complete 95% of total change). The other component was of smaller amplitude (35 ± 10% of total change) and took tens of seconds (27.56 ± 16.18 s for 95% completion). The fast process appeared to be too fast for direct optimization and more indicative of a pre-programmed response. It also persisted even with unusual closed-loop perturbations that conflicted with prior experience and rendered the response energetically suboptimal. The slow process was more consistent with the timing expected for direct optimization. Our interpretation of these results is that humans may rely heavily on pre-programmed gaits to rapidly select their preferred step frequency and then gradually fine-tune that selection with direct optimization. PMID:21393467

  5. Observation of four-wave mixing in slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    McMillan, James F; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2010-07-19

    Four-wave mixing is observed in a silicon W1 photonic crystal waveguide. The dispersion dependence of the idler conversion efficiency is measured and shown to be enhanced at wavelengths exhibiting slow group velocities. A 12-dB increase in the conversion efficiency is observed. Concurrently, a decrease in the conversion bandwidth is observed due to the increase in group velocity dispersion in the slow-light regime. The experimentally observed conversion efficiencies agree with the numerically modeled results.

  6. Slow light and band gaps in metallodielectric cylinder arrays.

    PubMed

    Shainline, Jeffrey M; Xu, Jimmy

    2009-05-25

    We consider two-dimensional three-component photonic crystals wherein one component is modeled as a drude-dispersive metal. It is found that the dispersion relation of light in this environment depends critically on the configuration of the metallic and dielectric components. In particular, for the case of an incident electromagnetic wave with electric field vector parallel to the axis of the cylinders it is shown that the presence of dielectric shells covering the metallic cylinders leads to a closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor, as would be expected for a purely dielectric photonic crystal. For the same polarization, the photonic band structure of an array of metallic shell cylinders with dielectric cores do not show the closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor of the metallic component. In this geometry, the photonic band structure contains bands with very small values of group velocity with some bands having a maximum of group velocity as small as .05c.

  7. Dynamic optical absorption characteristics of blood after slow and fast heating.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hao; Chen, Bin; Li, Dong

    2017-04-01

    Laser treatment is the most effective therapy in dermatology for vascular skin disorders, such as port-wine stains (PWS). Changes in heat-induced absorbance in blood must be determined for accurate numerical simulation and implementation of multi-pulse laser therapy for treatment of PWS. Thermally induced absorbance changes in hemoglobin in blood were compared in vitro between slow water bath heating and fast heating irradiated by using sub-millisecond Nd:YAG laser. Blood composition at different temperatures was calculated by comparing blood absorption spectra with those of pure HbO2, Hb, and metHb at room temperature. Blood absorbance to heat energy were categorized into three stages distinguished by metHb and coagulation points, which are the validity and security thresholds of the optimized therapy, respectively. Rapid laser heating can distinctively enhance blood absorbance by photochemically induced strong instability compared with slow heating at a constant temperature. Slow heating facilitates metHb point at 70 °C and coagulation point at 75 °C as the temperature of the water bath increases. However, the temperature at which metHb or coagulation point shifts to higher than 10 °C when pulses and fluence in laser irradiation change. Laser fluence less than 20 J/cm(2) and more than 50 J/cm(2) is unsuitable for laser treatment because of its low probability to coagulate vascular hyperplasia and high probability to damage normal tissues adjacent to target lesions, respectively. Few bubbles formed after mediate fluence is beneficial to minimize adverse side-effects. Considering blood absorbance, temperature evolution, and bubble formation, we recommend 30-40 J/cm(2) and 2-4 Hz frequency as the optimal laser parameters in sub-millisecond Nd:YAG laser.

  8. Multiscale analysis of slow-fast neuronal learning models with noise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of temporal averaging methods to recurrent networks of noisy neurons undergoing a slow and unsupervised modification of their connectivity matrix called learning. Three time-scales arise for these models: (i) the fast neuronal dynamics, (ii) the intermediate external input to the system, and (iii) the slow learning mechanisms. Based on this time-scale separation, we apply an extension of the mathematical theory of stochastic averaging with periodic forcing in order to derive a reduced deterministic model for the connectivity dynamics. We focus on a class of models where the activity is linear to understand the specificity of several learning rules (Hebbian, trace or anti-symmetric learning). In a weakly connected regime, we study the equilibrium connectivity which gathers the entire ‘knowledge’ of the network about the inputs. We develop an asymptotic method to approximate this equilibrium. We show that the symmetric part of the connectivity post-learning encodes the correlation structure of the inputs, whereas the anti-symmetric part corresponds to the cross correlation between the inputs and their time derivative. Moreover, the time-scales ratio appears as an important parameter revealing temporal correlations. PMID:23174307

  9. Validation of a fast gas chromatographic method for the study of semiochemical slow release formulations.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, Stéphanie; Rozet, Eric; Lorge, Stéphanie; Farmakidis, Julien; Hubert, Philippe; Verheggen, François; Haubruge, Eric; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Lognay, Georges

    2010-12-01

    The validation of a fast GC-FID analytical method for the quantitative determination of semiochemical sesquiterpenes (E-beta-farnesene and beta-caryophyllene) to be used in an integrated pest management approach is described. Accuracy profiles using total error as decision criteria for validation were used to verify the overall accuracy of the method results within a well defined range of concentrations and to determine the lowest limit of quantification for each analyte. Furthermore it allowed to select a very simple and reliable regression model for calibration curve for the quantification of both analytes as well as to provide measurement uncertainty without any additional experiments. Finally, this validated method was used for the quantification of semiochemicals in slow release formulations. The goal was to verify the protection efficiency of alginate gel beads formulations against oxidation and degradation of sesquiterpenes. The results showed that the alginate beads are adequate slow release devices which protect the bio-active molecules during at least twenty days. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  11. Recognition errors suggest fast familiarity and slow recollection in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    One influential model of recognition posits two underlying memory processes: recollection, which is detailed but relatively slow, and familiarity, which is quick but lacks detail. Most of the evidence for this dual-process model in nonhumans has come from analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in rats, but whether ROC analyses can demonstrate dual processes has been repeatedly challenged. Here, we present independent converging evidence for the dual-process model from analyses of recognition errors made by rhesus monkeys. Recognition choices were made in three different ways depending on processing duration. Short-latency errors were disproportionately false alarms to familiar lures, suggesting control by familiarity. Medium-latency responses were less likely to be false alarms and were more accurate, suggesting onset of a recollective process that could correctly reject familiar lures. Long-latency responses were guesses. A response deadline increased false alarms, suggesting that limiting processing time weakened the contribution of recollection and strengthened the contribution of familiarity. Together, these findings suggest fast familiarity and slow recollection in monkeys, that monkeys use a “recollect to reject” strategy to countermand false familiarity, and that primate recognition performance is well-characterized by a dual-process model consisting of recollection and familiarity. PMID:23864646

  12. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  13. ORBITAL SUPPORT OF FAST AND SLOW INNER BARS IN DOUBLE-BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, Witold; Small, Emma E.

    2010-08-10

    We analyze how the orbital support of the inner bar in a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) depends on the angular velocity (i.e., pattern speed) of this bar. We study orbits in seven models of double bars using the method of invariant loops. The range of pattern speed is covered exhaustively. We find that not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below a certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, while at high values of this speed the orbits indicate an increasingly round bar that looks more like a twist in the nuclear isophotes than a dynamically independent component. For values between these two extremes, orbits supporting the inner bar extend further out as the bar's pattern speed decreases, their corresponding loops become more eccentric, pulsate more, and their rotation becomes increasingly non-uniform, as they speed up and slow down in their motion. Lower pattern speeds also lead to a less coherent bar, as the pulsation and acceleration increasingly varies among the loops supporting the inner bar. The morphologies of fast and slow inner bars expected from the orbital structure studied here have been recently recovered observationally by decomposition of double-barred galaxies. Our findings allow us to link the observed morphology to the dynamics of the inner bar.

  14. Modelling a Wolbachia invasion using a slow-fast dispersal reaction-diffusion approach.

    PubMed

    Chan, Matthew H T; Kim, Peter S

    2013-09-01

    This paper uses a reaction-diffusion approach to examine the dynamics in the spread of a Wolbachia infection within a population of mosquitoes in a homogeneous environment. The formulated model builds upon an earlier model by Skalski and Gilliam (Am. Nat. 161(3):441-458, 2003), which incorporates a slow and fast dispersal mode. This generates a faster wavespeed than previous reaction-diffusion approaches, which have been found to produce wavespeeds that are unrealistically slow when compared with direct observations. In addition, the model incorporates cytoplasmic incompatibility between male and female mosquitoes, which creates a strong Allee effect in the dynamics. In previous studies, linearised wavespeeds have been found to be inaccurate when a strong Allee effect is underpinning the dynamics. We provide a means to approximate the wavespeed generated by the model and show that it is in close agreement with numerical simulations. Wavespeeds are approximated for both Aedes aegypti and Drosophila simulans mosquitoes at different temperatures. These wavespeeds indicate that as the temperature decreases within the optimal temperature range for mosquito survival, the speed of a Wolbachia invasion increases for Aedes aegypti populations and decreases for Drosophila simulans populations.

  15. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  16. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS/ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  17. Mechanism of Modification, by Lidocaine, of Fast and Slow Recovery from Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Na⁺ Channels.

    PubMed

    Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Lukacs, Peter; Cervenka, Rene; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter; Todt, Hannes

    2015-11-01

    The clinically important suppression of high-frequency discharges of excitable cells by local anesthetics (LA) is largely determined by drug-induced prolongation of the time course of repriming (recovery from inactivation) of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. This prolongation may result from periodic drug-binding to a high-affinity binding site during the action potentials and subsequent slow dissociation from the site between action potentials ("dissociation hypothesis"). For many drugs it has been suggested that the fast inactivated state represents the high-affinity binding state. Alternatively, LAs may bind with high affinity to a native slow-inactivated state, thereby accelerating the development of this state during action potentials ("stabilization hypothesis"). In this case, slow recovery between action potentials occurs from enhanced native slow inactivation. To test these two hypotheses we produced serial cysteine mutations of domain IV segment 6 in rNav1.4 that resulted in constructs with varying propensities to enter fast- and slow-inactivated states. We tested the effect of the LA lidocaine on the time course of recovery from short and long depolarizing prepulses, which, under drug-free conditions, recruited mainly fast- and slow-inactivated states, respectively. Among the tested constructs the mutation-induced changes in native slow recovery induced by long depolarizations were not correlated with the respective lidocaine-induced slow recovery after short depolarizations. On the other hand, for long depolarizations the mutation-induced alterations in native slow recovery were significantly correlated with the kinetics of lidocaine-induced slow recovery. These results favor the "dissociation hypothesis" for short depolarizations but the "stabilization hypothesis" for long depolarizations. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Developmental changes in the activation properties and ultrastructure of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    West, J M; Barclay, C J; Luff, A R; Walker, D W

    1999-04-01

    At early stages of muscle development, skeletal muscles contract and relax slowly, regardless of whether they are destined to become fast- or slow-twitch. In this study, we have characterised the activation profiles of developing fast- and slow-twitch muscles from a precocial species, the sheep, to determine if the activation profiles of the muscles are characteristically slow when both the fast- and slow-twitch muscles have slow isometric contraction profiles. Single skinned muscle fibres from the fast-twitch flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles from fetal (gestational ages 70, 90, 120 and 140 days; term 147 days) and neonatal (8 weeks old) sheep were used to determine the isometric force-pCa (pCa = -log10[Ca2+]) and force-pSr relations during development. Fast-twitch mammalian muscles generally have a greatly different sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ whereas slow-twitch muscles have a similar sensitivity to these divalent cations. At all ages studied, the force-pCa and force-pSr relations of the FDL muscle were widely separated. The mean separation of the mid-point of the curves (pCa50-pSr50) was approximately 1.1. This is typical of adult fast-twitch muscle. The force-pCa and force-pSr curves for soleus muscle were also widely separated at 70 and 90 days gestation (pCa50-pSr50 approximately 0.75); between 90 days and 140 days this separation decreased significantly to approximately 0.2. This leads to a paradoxical situation whereby at early stages of muscle development the fast muscles have contraction dynamics of slow muscles but the slow muscles have activation profiles more characteristic of fast muscles. The time course for development of the FDL and soleus is different, based on sarcomere structure with the soleus muscle developing clearly defined sarcomere structure earlier in gestation than the FDL. At 70 days gestation the FDL muscle had no clearly defined sarcomeres. Force (N cm-2) increased almost linearly between 70 and 140 days

  19. A proposal for enhancing four-wave mixing in slow light engineered photonic crystal waveguides and its application to optical regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ebnali-Heidari, M; Monat, C; Grillet, C; Moravvej-Farshi, M K

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, we investigate both analytically and numerically four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 microm) dispersion engineered slow light photonic crystal waveguides. We demonstrate that both a larger FWM conversion efficiency and an increased FWM bandwidth (approximately 10 nm) can be achieved in these waveguides as compared to dispersive PhC waveguides. This improvement is achieved through the net slow light enhancement of the FWM efficiency (almost 30dB as compared to a fast nanowire of similar length), even in the presence of slow light increased linear and nonlinear losses, and the suitable dispersion profile of these waveguides. We show how such improved FWM operation can be advantageously exploited for designing a compact 2R and 3R regenerator with the appropriate nonlinear power transfer function.

  20. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F. A.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  1. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  2. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; ...

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  3. Slow light enhancement of nonlinear effects in silicon engineered photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Monat, Christelle; Corcoran, Bill; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Grillet, Christian; Eggleton, Benjamin J; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2009-02-16

    We report nonlinear measurements on 80microm silicon photonic crystal waveguides that are designed to support dispersionless slow light with group velocities between c/20 and c/50. By launching picoseconds pulses into the waveguides and comparing their output spectral signatures, we show how self phase modulation induced spectral broadening is enhanced due to slow light. Comparison of the measurements and numerical simulations of the pulse propagation elucidates the contribution of the various effects that determine the output pulse shape and the waveguide transfer function. In particular, both experimental and simulated results highlight the significant role of two photon absorption and free carriers in the silicon waveguides and their reinforcement in the slow light regime.

  4. Wideband slow light with ultralow dispersion in a W1 photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Ren, Li-Yong; Yun, Mao-Jin; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2011-11-01

    A dispersion tailoring scheme for obtaining slow light in a silicon-on-insulator W1-type photonic crystal waveguide, novel to our knowledge, is proposed in this paper. It is shown that, by simply shifting the first two rows of air holes adjacent to the waveguide to specific directions, slow light with large group-index, wideband, and low group-velocity dispersion can be realized. Defining a criterion of restricting the group-index variation within a ±0.8% range as a flattened region, we obtain the ultraflat slow light with bandwidths over 5.0, 4.0, 2.5, and 1.0 nm when keeping the group index at 38.0, 48.8, 65.2, and 100.4, respectively. Numerical simulations are performed utilizing the three-dimensional (3D) plane-wave expansion method and the 3D finite-difference time-domain method.

  5. Nonlinear enhancement in photonic crystal slow light waveguides fabricated using CMOS-compatible process.

    PubMed

    Shinkawa, Mizuki; Ishikura, Norihiro; Hama, Yosuke; Suzuki, Keijiro; Baba, Toshihiko

    2011-10-24

    We have studied low-dispersion slow light and its nonlinear enhancement in photonic crystal waveguides. In this work, we fabricated the waveguides using Si CMOS-compatible process. It enables us to integrate spotsize converters, which greatly simplifies the optical coupling from fibers as well as demonstration of the nonlinear enhancement. Two-photon absorption, self-phase modulation and four-wave mixing were observed clearly for picosecond pulses in a 200-μm-long device. In comparison with Si wire waveguides, a 60-120 fold higher nonlinearity was evaluated for a group index of 51. Unique intensity response also occurred due to the specific transmission spectrum and enhanced nonlinearities. Such slow light may add various functionalities in Si photonics, while loss reduction is desired for ensuring the advantage of slow light.

  6. Four-wave mixing in slow light engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Monat, C; Ebnali-Heidari, M; Grillet, C; Corcoran, B; Eggleton, B J; White, T P; O'Faolain, L; Li, J; Krauss, T F

    2010-10-25

    We experimentally investigate four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 μm) dispersion-engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. The pump, probe and idler signals all lie in a 14 nm wide low dispersion region with a near-constant group velocity of c/30. We measure an instantaneous conversion efficiency of up to -9dB between the idler and the continuous-wave probe, with 1W peak pump power and 6 nm pump-probe detuning. This conversion efficiency is found to be considerably higher (>10 × ) than that of a Si nanowire with a group velocity ten times larger. In addition, we estimate the FWM bandwidth to be at least that of the flat band slow light window. These results, supported by numerical simulations, emphasize the importance of engineering the dispersion of PhC waveguides to exploit the slow light enhancement of FWM efficiency, even for short device lengths.

  7. Modal theory of slow light enhanced third-order nonlinear effects in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Sun, Junqiang; Li, Linsen

    2012-08-27

    In this paper, we derive the couple-mode equations for third-order nonlinear effects in photonic crystal waveguides by employing the modal theory. These nonlinear interactions include self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation and degenerate four-wave mixing. The equations similar to that in nonlinear fiber optics could be expanded and applied for third-order nonlinear processes in other periodic waveguides. Based on the equations, we systematically analyze the group-velocity dispersion, optical propagation loss, effective interaction area, slow light enhanced factor and phase mismatch for a slow light engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. Considering the two-photon and free-carrier absorptions, the wavelength conversion efficiencies in two low-dispersion regions are numerically simulated by utilizing finite difference method. Finally, we investigate the influence of slow light enhanced multiple four-wave-mixing process on the conversion efficiency.

  8. Inverse problems in cancellous bone: estimation of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves using Bayesian probability theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christian C; Bauer, Adam Q; Holland, Mark R; Pakula, Michal; Laugier, Pascal; Bretthorst, G Larry; Miller, James G

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of cancellous bone can be complicated by artifacts introduced by analyzing acquired data consisting of two propagating waves (a fast wave and a slow wave) as if only one wave were present. Recovering the ultrasonic properties of overlapping fast and slow waves could therefore lead to enhancement of bone quality assessment. The current study uses Bayesian probability theory to estimate phase velocity and normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) parameters in a model of fast and slow wave propagation. Calculations are carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo with simulated annealing to approximate the marginal posterior probability densities for parameters in the model. The technique is applied to simulated data, to data acquired on two phantoms capable of generating two waves in acquired signals, and to data acquired on a human femur condyle specimen. The models are in good agreement with both the simulated and experimental data, and the values of the estimated ultrasonic parameters fall within expected ranges.

  9. A COMPARISON OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN SEP EVENTS IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Reames, D. V.

    2009-08-10

    The solar energetic (E > 1 MeV nucleon{sup -1}) particles (SEPs) observed in gradual events at 1 AU are assumed to be accelerated by coronal/interplanetary shocks from ambient thermal or suprathermal seed particles. If so, then the elemental abundances of SEPs produced in different solar wind (SW) stream types (transient, fast, and slow) might be systematically distinguished from each other. We look for these differences in SEP energy spectra and in elemental abundance ratios (including Mg/Ne and Fe/C, which compare low/high first ionization potential elements), in a large number of SEP time intervals over the past solar cycle. The SW regions are characterized by the three-component stream classification of Richardson et al. Our survey shows no significant compositional or energy spectral differences in the 5-10 MeV nucleon{sup -1} range for SEP events of different SW stream types. This result extends the earlier finding that SEP events are observed frequently in fast SW streams, although their higher Alfven and SW flow speeds should constrain SEP production by coronal mass ejection-driven shocks in those regions. We discuss the implications of our results for shock seed populations and cross-field propagation.

  10. Fast- and slow-exploring pigeons differ in how they use previously learned rules.

    PubMed

    Guillette, L M; Baron, D M; Sturdy, C B; Spetch, M L

    2017-01-01

    Several studies report a correlation between exploratory behaviour and performance on tests of cognitive ability. Exploration may influence learning because less exploratory animals are less likely to come in contact with to-be-learned stimuli. Alternatively, the way information available in the environment is processed could influence the rate of exploration. Pigeons are one of the most-studied species used to examine the mechanisms underlying cognitive abilities, but have not been used to examine the relationship between these abilities and animal personality. Here, twelve pigeons were first tested in a novel environment to assess repeatability in exploratory behaviour. Pigeons were then trained to discriminate between two visual stimuli: lines oriented at 90° (vertical, the S+) and 135° (the S-). After training pigeons underwent generalization testing with ten additional visual line orientation stimuli. We found exploratory behaviour was related to generalization performance: fast-explorers had steeper generalization gradients compared to slow-explorers. This effect was only seen in the direction towards the S-. These results suggest that birds with different exploratory styles differ in how they use previously learned information. Further testing is needed to confirm which cue(s) (S+ or S-) control the behaviour of fast-explorers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Geoeffectiveness of Fast and Slow Solar Wind Stream Associated to SIRs During 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Garcia, E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.

    2016-12-01

    The Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) are generated in the interplanetary medium when a fast solar wind stream overtakes a slower one. If these large-scale phenomena interact with the Earth's magnetosphere they can give rise to geomagnetic storms (GSs). In this study we analyze the degree of geoeffectiveness of 20 events that were generated by SIRs. The events were observed during the 2007-2008 period that comprising the minimum extended of solar cycle 23. The degree of geoeffectivity is measured using magnetic indices from different latitudes: PCN (Polar cap north), PCS (polar cap south), AA (antipodal amplitude), AE (Auroral Electrojet), Kp (estimated global index) and Dst (Disturbance storm time). We locate the peak of southward componente Bz if this occur before or after to current interface (CI). We identify the maximum intensity of GSs if this occur before or after to CI. We discuss and compare about the geoeffectivity of fast or slow solar wind stream associated to SIRs. Finally we determine the difference time between the peak of southward component Bz and the peak value of each GS.

  12. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value Umax at a temperature Tmax that lies between the glass-transition temperature Tg and the melting temperature Tm. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high Umax, a low Tmax / Tm, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / Tm. In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low Umax, a high Tmax / Tm, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / Tm. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in Umax seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (Tg / Tm) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of Tg / Tm and fragility, can show a good correlation with Umax. For all the systems, growth at Umax is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, Tmax / Tg = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  13. Pathological scattering by a defect in a slow-light periodic layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, Stephen P.; Welters, Aaron T.

    2016-02-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic fields by a defect layer embedded in a slow-light periodically layered ambient medium exhibits phenomena markedly different from typical scattering problems. In a slow-light periodic medium, constructed by Figotin and Vitebskiy, the energy velocity of a propagating mode in one direction slows to zero, creating a "frozen mode" at a single frequency within a pass band, where the dispersion relation possesses a flat inflection point. The slow-light regime is characterized by a 3 × 3 Jordan block of the log of the 4 × 4 monodromy matrix for EM fields in a periodic medium at special frequency and parallel wavevector. The scattering problem breaks down as the 2D rightward and leftward mode spaces intersect in the frozen mode and therefore span only a 3D subspace V ˚ of the 4D space of EM fields. Analysis of pathological scattering near the slow-light frequency and wavevector is based on the interaction between the flux-unitary transfer matrix T across the defect layer and the projections to the rightward and leftward spaces, which blow up as Laurent-Puiseux series. Two distinct cases emerge: the generic, non-resonant case when T does not map V ˚ to itself and the quadratically growing mode is excited and the resonant case, when V ˚ is invariant under T and a guided frozen mode is resonantly excited.

  14. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  15. Differential responses of fast- and slow-conducting pyramidal tract neurons to changes in accuracy demands during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Erik E; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2013-01-01

    Most movements need to be accurate. The neuronal mechanisms controlling accuracy during movements are poorly understood. In this study we compare the activity of fast- and slow-conducting pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) of the motor cortex in cats as they walk over both a flat surface, a task that does not require accurate stepping and can be accomplished without the motor cortex, as well as along a horizontal ladder, a task that requires accuracy and the activity of the motor cortex to be successful. Fast- and slow-conducting PTNs are known to have distinct biophysical properties as well as different afferent and efferent connections. We found that while the activity of all PTNs changes substantially upon transition from simple locomotion to accurate stepping on the ladder, slow-conducting PTNs respond in a much more concerted manner than fast-conducting ones. As a group, slow-conducting PTNs increase discharge rate, especially during the late stance and early swing phases, decrease discharge variability, have a tendency to shift their preferred phase of the discharge into the swing phase, and almost always produce a single peak of activity per stride during ladder locomotion. In contrast, the fast-conducting PTNs do not display such concerted changes to their activity. In addition, upon transfer from simple locomotion to accurate stepping on the ladder slow-conducting PTNs more profoundly increase the magnitude of their stride-related frequency modulation compared with fast-conducting PTNs. We suggest that slow-conducting PTNs are involved in control of accuracy of locomotor movements to a greater degree than fast-conducting PTNs. PMID:23381901

  16. A comparison of peripheral and rubrospinal synaptic input to slow and fast twitch motor units of triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Jankowska, E; ten Bruggencate, G

    1970-05-01

    1. Post-synaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of a variety of input systems have been compared in triceps surae motoneurones innervating slow and fast muscle units, the speed of contraction of which was also determined.2. Stimulation of high threshold afferents in both flexor and extensor muscle nerves, and of joint afferents, evoked polysynaptic PSPs which were predominantly hyperpolarizing in both fast and slow twitch motor units.3. Volleys in cutaneous afferents in the sural and saphenous nerves evoked polysynaptic PSPs composed of mixtures of inhibitory and excitatory components. The inhibitory components were predominant in slow twitch motor units, while in fast twitch units there was a trend towards excitatory predominance.4. Repetitive stimulation of the red nucleus caused predominantly inhibitory PSPs in slow twitch units and mixed or predominantly excitatory PSPs in fast twitch units. There was a correlation in the excitatory/inhibitory balance between PSPs of cutaneous and rubrospinal origin in those motoneurones in which both types of PSPs were studied.5. The amplitudes of group Ia disynaptic inhibitory PSPs were found to be correlated with motor unit twitch type: IPSPs in slow twitch units were larger than those in fast twitch units. Rubrospinal conditioning volleys were found to facilitate group Ia IPSPs in both fast and slow twitch motor units.6. The results suggest that there may be several basic patterns of synaptic input organization to motoneurones within a given motor unit pool. In addition to quantitative variation in synaptic distribution, there is evidence that qualitative differences in excitatory to inhibitory balance also exist in the pathways conveying input from cutaneous afferents and rubrospinal systems to triceps surae motoneurones. These qualitative differences are correlated with the motor unit twitch type.

  17. Systematic design of flat band slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Gomez-Iglesias, Alvaro; Krauss, Thomas F

    2008-04-28

    We present a systematic procedure for designing "flat bands" of photonic crystal waveguides for slow light propagation. The procedure aims to maximize the group index - bandwidth product by changing the position of the first two rows of holes of W1 line defect photonic crystal waveguides. A nearly constant group index - bandwidth product is achieved for group indices of 30-90 and as an example, we experimentally demonstrate flat band slow light with nearly constant group indices of 32.5, 44 and 49 over 14 nm, 11 nm and 9.5 nm bandwidth around 1550 nm, respectively.

  18. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank; Asger Mortensen, N; Pertsch, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maximally achievable efficiency reached for finite values of the group index at the point of phase-matching. Furthermore, we identify situations for which slow light, surprisingly, does not enhance the second-harmonic generation efficiency. Our results are corroborated by rigorous nonlinear simulations of second-harmonic generation in periodic nanobeam waveguides with loss.

  19. Slow-light-enhanced upconversion for photovoltaic applications in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Craig M; Reece, Peter J; Conibeer, Gavin J

    2011-10-15

    We present an approach to realizing enhanced upconversion efficiency in erbium (Er)-doped photonic crystals. Slow-light-mode pumping of the first Er excited state transition can result in enhanced emission from higher-energy levels that may lead to finite subbandgap external quantum efficiency in crystalline silicon solar cells. Using a straightforward electromagnetic model, we calculate potential field enhancements of more than 18× within he slow-light mode of a one-dimensional photonic crystal and discuss design trade-offs and considerations for photovoltaics.

  20. Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

  1. INERTIAL RANGE TURBULENCE OF FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND AT 0.72 AU AND SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-05-10

    We investigate Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of solar cycle 24. The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the magnetic field components have been computed for time intervals that satisfy the data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow, defined for speeds larger and smaller, respectively, than 450 km s{sup −1}. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast wind than for the slow. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005–0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is −1.60 for fast solar wind and −1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is observed for the spectral behavior of both the slow and fast wind.

  2. Differing Event-Related Patterns of Gamma-Band Power in Brain Waves of Fast- and Slow-Reacting Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Wilhelm Wundt proposed that there are two types of subjects in sim- ple RT experiments: fast-reacting subjects, who respond before they fully...quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects...accord with the hypothesis of Wundt and others that slower ("sensorial") responders wait to fully perceive a stimulus and then react to their perception

  3. Slow and Spike Potentials Recorded from Retinula Cells of the Honeybee Drone in Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Fritz

    1968-01-01

    Responses to light recorded by means of intracellular microelectrodes in isolated heads kept in oxygenated Ringer solution consist of a slow depolarization. Light adaptation increases the rates of depolarization and repolarization and decreases the amplitude of the response. Qualitatively these changes are similar to those observed in Limulus by Fuortes and Hodgkin. They are rapidly reversible during dark adaptation. In retinula cells of the drone eye a large single spike is recorded superimposed on the rising phase of the slow potential. The spike is a regenerative phenomenon; it can be triggered with electric current and is markedly reduced, sometimes abolished by tetrodotoxin. In rare cases cells were found which responded to light with a train of spikes. This behavior was only found under "unusual" experimental conditions; i.e., towards the end of a long experiment, during impalement, or at the beginning of responses to steps of strongly light-adapted preparations. PMID:5722083

  4. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 degrees C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing

  5. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion

    PubMed Central

    Boirie, Yves; Dangin, Martial; Gachon, Pierre; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Maubois, Jean-Louis; Beaufrère, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    The speed of absorption of dietary amino acids by the gut varies according to the type of ingested dietary protein. This could affect postprandial protein synthesis, breakdown, and deposition. To test this hypothesis, two intrinsically 13C-leucine-labeled milk proteins, casein (CAS) and whey protein (WP), of different physicochemical properties were ingested as one single meal by healthy adults. Postprandial whole body leucine kinetics were assessed by using a dual tracer methodology. WP induced a dramatic but short increase of plasma amino acids. CAS induced a prolonged plateau of moderate hyperaminoacidemia, probably because of a slow gastric emptying. Whole body protein breakdown was inhibited by 34% after CAS ingestion but not after WP ingestion. Postprandial protein synthesis was stimulated by 68% with the WP meal and to a lesser extent (+31%) with the CAS meal. Postprandial whole body leucine oxidation over 7 h was lower with CAS (272 ± 91 μmol⋅kg−1) than with WP (373 ± 56 μmol⋅kg−1). Leucine intake was identical in both meals (380 μmol⋅kg−1). Therefore, net leucine balance over the 7 h after the meal was more positive with CAS than with WP (P < 0.05, WP vs. CAS). In conclusion, the speed of protein digestion and amino acid absorption from the gut has a major effect on whole body protein anabolism after one single meal. By analogy with carbohydrate metabolism, slow and fast proteins modulate the postprandial metabolic response, a concept to be applied to wasting situations. PMID:9405716

  6. Slow light enhanced optical nonlinearity in a silicon photonic crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Takumi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Takesue, Hiroki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate highly enhanced optical nonlinearity in a coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) in a four-wave mixing experiment. Using a CROW consisting of 200 coupled resonators based on width-modulated photonic crystal nanocavities in a line defect, we obtained an effective nonlinear constant exceeding 10,000 /W/m, thanks to slow light propagation combined with a strong spatial confinement of light achieved by the wavelength-sized cavities.

  7. Slow-light-induced Doppler shift in photonic-crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Baba, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we theoretically discuss a large Doppler shift in a signal slow-light pulse in a photonic-crystal waveguide by considering its reflection at a quasilight speed mirror. The mirror is formed by the photonic band-gap shift induced by the high nonlinearity of a control slow-light pulse, which could be possible in a realistic device. In the simulation, the Doppler shift appears at multiple frequencies due to the Bloch nature of the photonic lattice. Larger but inefficient Doppler shifts occur through nonadiabatic processes, whereas the smallest but more efficient shift (i.e., the intraband Doppler shift) occurs through an adiabatic process. The occurrence of the intraband shift depends on whether the adiabatic process produces a complete reflection of the incident pulse, despite the fact that the pulse penetrates the mirror. A large band-gap shift and a moderately slow mirror satisfy this condition; otherwise, the shift ends at the halfway point.

  8. Slow terahertz light via resonant tunneling induced transparency in quantum well heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzenov, Petar; Jirauschek, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical and computational investigation of the possibility of achieving slow terahertz light by exploiting the tunneling induced transparency (TIT) effect in suitably engineered quantum well heterostructure devices. We design such a meta-material and show how TIT could lead to large values of the group refractive index, unfortunately at the cost of strong field attenuation due to decoherence. As a suitable alternative, we propose a grating, consisting of a buffer and a quantum cascade amplifier regions, arranged in such a way as to achieve slow light and simultaneously compensate for the large signal losses. Our calculations show that a binary message could be reliably transmitted through this system, with non-critical reduction of the signal to noise ratio, as we achieve a slow-down factor of more than 70.

  9. Telomeres shorten more slowly in slow-aging wild animals than in fast-aging ones.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2015-11-01

    Research on the physiological causes of senescence aim to identify common physiological mechanisms that explain age-related declines in fitness across taxonomic groups. Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found on the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Past research indicates that telomere attrition is strongly correlated with inter-specific rates of aging, though these studies cannot distinguish whether telomere attrition is a cause or consequence of the aging process. We extend previous research on this topic by incorporating recent studies to test the hypothesis that telomeres shorten more slowly with age in slow-aging animals than in fast-aging ones. We assembled all studies that have quantified cross-sectional (i.e. between-individual) telomere rates of change (TROC) over the lifespans of wild animals. This included 22 estimates reflecting absolute TROC (TROCabs, bp/yr, primarily measured using the terminal restriction fragment length method), and 10 estimates reflecting relative TROC (TROCrel, relative telomere length/yr, measured using qPCR), from five classes (Aves, Mammalia, Bivalvia, Reptilia, and Actinopterygii). In 14 bird species, we correlated between-individual (i.e. cross-sectional) TROCabs estimates with both maximum lifespan and a phylogenetically-corrected principle component axis (pcPC1) that reflected the slow-fast axis of life-history variation. Bird species characterized by faster life-histories and shorter maximum lifespans had faster TROCabs. In nine studies, both between-individual and within-individual TROC estimates were available (n=8 for TROCabs, n=1 for TROCrel). Within-individual TROC estimates were generally greater than between-individual TROC estimates, which is indicative of selective disappearance of individuals with shorter telomeres. However, the difference between within- and between-individual TROC estimates was only significant in two out of nine studies. The relationship between within-individual TROCabs and maximum

  10. Actions of caffeine on fast- and slow-twitch muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Fryer, M W; Neering, I R

    1989-09-01

    1. The effects of caffeine (0.2-20 mmol l-1) have been examined on calcium transients (measured with aequorin) and isometric force in intact bundles of fibres from soleus (slow-twitch) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL; fast-twitch) muscles of the rat. 2. At 25 degrees C, threshold caffeine concentration for an observable increase in resting [Ca2+]i was 0.2 and 1.0 mmol l-1 for soleus and EDL muscles respectively. Increases in resting force were first detectable at about 0.5 mmol l-1 caffeine for soleus muscles and 5.0 mmol l-1 caffeine for EDL muscles and occurred in the range 0.2-0.4 mumol l-1 [Ca2+]i for soleus and 0.7-0.9 mumol l-1 for EDL. 3. Caffeine potentiated the twitch responses of soleus and EDL in a dose-related manner. The soleus was more sensitive in this respect, with 50% potentiation occurring at 1 mmol l-1 caffeine compared with 3.5 mmol l-1 for the EDL. Concentrations of caffeine below 2 mmol l-1 potentiated Ca2+ transients associated with twitches in both soleus and EDL muscles with no apparent change in the decay rate constant. 4. High concentrations of caffeine (greater than 2 mmol l-1) further potentiated peak Ca2+ in the EDL but depressed it in the soleus. The rate of decay of the Ca2+ transient in high caffeine was significantly prolonged in the soleus but remained unaffected in the EDL. 5. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) had little effect on force or [Ca2+]i at concentrations known to significantly increase intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The Ca2+ transient during fused tetani was characterized by an initial peak, a decline to a plateau level and sometimes a gradual rise towards the end of the stimulus train. Peak [Ca2+]i during normal tetani ranged between 1.1 and 2.4 mumol l-1 in the soleus and 1.9 and 4.0 mumol l-1 in the EDL. 7. Caffeine potentiated both force and [Ca2+]i during tetanus. Since the increase of the Ca2+ transient was significantly greater than potentiation of force, it is likely

  11. Actions of caffeine on fast- and slow-twitch muscles of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, M W; Neering, I R

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of caffeine (0.2-20 mmol l-1) have been examined on calcium transients (measured with aequorin) and isometric force in intact bundles of fibres from soleus (slow-twitch) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL; fast-twitch) muscles of the rat. 2. At 25 degrees C, threshold caffeine concentration for an observable increase in resting [Ca2+]i was 0.2 and 1.0 mmol l-1 for soleus and EDL muscles respectively. Increases in resting force were first detectable at about 0.5 mmol l-1 caffeine for soleus muscles and 5.0 mmol l-1 caffeine for EDL muscles and occurred in the range 0.2-0.4 mumol l-1 [Ca2+]i for soleus and 0.7-0.9 mumol l-1 for EDL. 3. Caffeine potentiated the twitch responses of soleus and EDL in a dose-related manner. The soleus was more sensitive in this respect, with 50% potentiation occurring at 1 mmol l-1 caffeine compared with 3.5 mmol l-1 for the EDL. Concentrations of caffeine below 2 mmol l-1 potentiated Ca2+ transients associated with twitches in both soleus and EDL muscles with no apparent change in the decay rate constant. 4. High concentrations of caffeine (greater than 2 mmol l-1) further potentiated peak Ca2+ in the EDL but depressed it in the soleus. The rate of decay of the Ca2+ transient in high caffeine was significantly prolonged in the soleus but remained unaffected in the EDL. 5. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) had little effect on force or [Ca2+]i at concentrations known to significantly increase intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The Ca2+ transient during fused tetani was characterized by an initial peak, a decline to a plateau level and sometimes a gradual rise towards the end of the stimulus train. Peak [Ca2+]i during normal tetani ranged between 1.1 and 2.4 mumol l-1 in the soleus and 1.9 and 4.0 mumol l-1 in the EDL. 7. Caffeine potentiated both force and [Ca2+]i during tetanus. Since the increase of the Ca2+ transient was significantly greater than potentiation of force, it is likely

  12. Ballistic contractions in fast or slow human muscles; discharge patterns of single motor units

    PubMed Central

    Desmedt, John E.; Godaux, Emile

    1978-01-01

    1. Single motor units were recorded from the masseter, soleus and first dorsal interosseous muscles of normal adult man. An analysis of discharge patterns was carried out either during slow ramp voluntary contractions, or during self-initiated isolated ballistic voluntary contractions. The isometric myogram was simultaneously recorded. 2. Each motor unit was only recruited when the peak force of a brisk contraction exceeded a certain value and a `ballistic force threshold' (in kg) was estimated for the unit from a large series of brisk contractions of different strengths. For each muscle, the ranking order for recruitment of different motor units recorded from one electrode position was virtually identical in slow ramp versus brisk ballistic contractions of different force (Kendall rank correlation coefficient = 0·91-1·0). There was no evidence for any consistent selective activation of fast twitch motor units in ballistic contractions. 3. The ballistic force threshold is considerably reduced with respect to the slow ramp force threshold for the motor units of the soleus muscle. This drop is also marked for the units of the first interosseous and tibialis anterior muscles, whereas it is only small for the units of the masseter muscle. These data have been validated after consideration of the complicating factor related to the possible differential involvement of synergic muscles in ramp or ballistic contractions. 4. In the masseter and first interosseous muscles, the time to peak is about 80 msec in small ballistic voluntary contractions and it increases to about 150 msec in strong contractions. This effect appears related to repetitive discharges of single motor units when their force threshold is exceeded. By contrast, in the soleus muscle, the time to peak remains at about 150 msec both in small and in strong ballistic contractions and most soleus motor units fire only one spike in the ballistic burst. 5. Brisk ballistic contractions are graded in force by the

  13. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  14. Energy efficient nonlinear optics in silicon: are slow-light structures more efficient than nanowires?

    PubMed

    Husko, Chad; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2012-07-15

    We compare the energy performance of four-wave mixing in nanowires and slow-light photonic crystals and outline the regimes where each platform exhibits salient advantages and limitations, including analysis of the impact of future fabrication improvement. These results suggest a route towards energy efficient silicon integrated photonics.

  15. Wideband slow light with low dispersion in asymmetric slotted photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Chuanbo; He, Yu

    2013-12-01

    A new procedure of designing slotted photonic crystal waveguides is proposed to achieve slow light with improved normalized delay-bandwidth product and low group velocity dispersion that is suitable for both the W1 defect mode and the slot mode. The lateral symmetry of the waveguide in our study is broken by shifting the air holes periodically along the slot axis. The conversion of the "flat band" from band-up slow light to band-down slow light is achieved for the W1 defect mode. The group index curves of the W1 mode change from U-like to step-like and the group indices of 47, 67 and 130 are obtained with the bandwidth over 7.2, 4.8, and 2.3 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. We also obtain the group indices of 42, 55, and 108 for the slot mode with the bandwidth over 6.2, 5.6, and 2.2 nm, respectively. Then the low dispersion slow light propagation is numerically demonstrated by the finite-difference time-domain method.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Slow Light by Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Huang, Yan; Mao, Xiao-Yu; Cui, Kai-Yu; Huang, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Jiang-De

    2009-07-01

    A simple and effective way to measure the group velocity of photonic crystal waveguides (PCWGs) is developed by using a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A PCWG with perfect air-bridge structure is fabricated and slow light with group velocity slower than c/80 is demonstrated.

  17. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Orava, J; Greer, A L

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U(max) at a temperature T(max) that lies between the glass-transition temperature T(g) and the melting temperature T(m). A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high U(max), a low T(max)/T(m), and a very broad peak in U vs. T/T(m). In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low U(max), a high T(max)/T(m), and a sharp peak in U vs. T/T(m). Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U(max) seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T(g)/T(m)) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T(g)/T(m) and fragility, can show a good correlation with U(max). For all the systems, growth at U(max) is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T(max)/T(g) = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  18. Fast to forgive, slow to retaliate: intuitive responses in the ultimatum game depend on the degree of unfairness.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Maltby, John; Bibby, Peter A; Lawrence, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary accounts have difficulty explaining why people cooperate with anonymous strangers they will never meet. Recently models, focusing on emotional processing, have been proposed as a potential explanation, with attention focusing on a dual systems approach based on system 1 (fast, intuitive, automatic, effortless, and emotional) and system 2 (slow, reflective, effortful, proactive and unemotional). Evidence shows that when cooperation is salient, people are fast (system 1) to cooperate, but with longer delays (system 2) they show greed. This is interpreted within the framework of the social heuristic hypothesis (SHH), whereby people overgeneralize potentially advantageous intuitively learnt and internalization social norms to 'atypical' situations. We extend this to explore intuitive reactions to unfairness by integrating the SHH with the 'fast to forgive, slow to anger' (FFSA) heuristic. This suggests that it is advantageous to be prosocial when facing uncertainty. We propose that whether or not someone intuitively shows prosociality (cooperation) or retaliation is moderated by the degree (certainty) of unfairness. People should intuitively cooperate when facing mild levels of unfairness (fast to forgive) but when given longer to decide about another's mild level of unfairness should retaliate (slow to anger). However, when facing severe levels of unfairness, the intuitive response is always retaliation. We test this using a series of one-shot ultimatum games and manipulate level of offer unfairness (50:50 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and enforced time delays prior to responding (1s, 2s, 8s, 15s). We also measure decision times to make responses after the time delays. The results show that when facing mildly unfair offers (60:40) people are fast (intuitive) to cooperate but with longer delays reject these mildly unfair offers: 'fast to forgive, and slow to retaliate'. However, for severely unfair offers (90:10) the intuitive and fast response is to always

  19. miRNA targeted signaling pathway in the early stage of denervated fast and slow muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Li, Qing-shan; Li, Wen-bin; Wei, Jian; Chang, Wen-kai; Chen, Zhi; Qiao, Hu-yun; Jia, Ying-wei; Tian, Jiang-hua; Liang, Bing-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Denervation often results in skeletal muscle atrophy. Different mechanisms seem to be involved in the determination between denervated slow and fast skeletal muscle atrophy. At the epigenetic level, miRNAs are thought to be highly involved in the pathophysiological progress of denervated muscles. We used miRNA microarrays to determine miRNA expression profiles from a typical slow muscle (soleus muscle) and a typical fast muscle (tibialis anterior muscle) at an early denervation stage in a rat model. Results showed that miR-206, miR-195, miR-23a, and miR-30e might be key factors in the transformation process from slow to fast muscle in denervated slow muscles. Additionally, certain miRNA molecules (miR-214, miR-221, miR-222, miR-152, miR-320, and Let-7e) could be key regulatory factors in the denervated atrophy process involved in fast muscle. Analysis of signaling pathway networks revealed the miRNA molecules that were responsible for regulating certain signaling pathways, which were the final targets (e.g., p38 MAPK pathway; Pax3/Pax7 regulates Utrophin and follistatin by HDAC4; IGF1/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression via FoxO phosphorylation). Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of denervated skeletal muscle pathophysiology. PMID:27651778

  20. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  1. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  2. Selective four electron reduction of O2 by an iron porphyrin electrocatalyst under fast and slow electron fluxes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Sengupta, Kushal; Mittra, Kaustuv; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-08-07

    An iron porphyrin catalyst with four electron donor groups is reported. The porphyrin ligand bears a distal hydrogen bonding pocket which inverts the normal axial ligand binding selectivity exhibited by porphyrins bearing sterically crowded distal structures. This catalyst specifically reduces O(2) by four electrons under both fast and slow electron fluxes at pH 7.

  3. Measurements of the fast ion slowing-down times in the HL-2A tokamak and comparison to classical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Song, X. M.; Cao, J. Y.; Lei, G. J.; Wei, H. L.; Li, Y. G.; Shi, Z. B.; Li, X.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Isobe, M.; Collaboration: HL-2A Team

    2012-11-15

    Physics related to fast ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is a very important issue, since these particles will play an important role in future burning plasmas. Indeed, they will act as primary heating source and will sustain the self-ignited condition. To measure the fast ion slowing-down times in a magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas in different scenarios, very short pulses of a deuterium neutral beam, so-called 'blip,' with duration of about 5 ms were tangentially co-injected into a deuterium plasmas at the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) tokamak [L. W. Yan, Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)]. The decay rate of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutrons produced by beam-plasma reactions following neutral beam termination was measured by means of a {sup 235}U fission chamber. Experimental results were compared with those predicted by a classical slowing-down model. These results show that the fast ions are well confined with a peaked profile and the ions are slowed down classically without significant loss in the HL-2A tokamak. Moreover, it has been observed that during electron cyclotron resonance heating the fast ions have a longer slowing-down time and the neutron emission rate decay time becomes longer.

  4. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  5. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  6. RecBCD enzyme is a DNA helicase with fast and slow motors of opposite polarity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew F; Smith, Gerald R

    2003-06-19

    Helicases are molecular motors that move along and unwind double-stranded nucleic acids. RecBCD enzyme is a complex helicase and nuclease, essential for the major pathway of homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. It has sets of helicase motifs in both RecB and RecD, two of its three subunits. This rapid, highly processive enzyme unwinds DNA in an unusual manner: the 5'-ended strand forms a long single-stranded tail, whereas the 3'-ended strand forms an ever-growing single-stranded loop and short single-stranded tail. Here we show by electron microscopy of individual molecules that RecD is a fast helicase acting on the 5'-ended strand and RecB is a slow helicase acting on the 3'-ended strand on which the single-stranded loop accumulates. Mutational inactivation of the helicase domain in RecB or in RecD, or removal of the RecD subunit, altered the rates of unwinding or the types of structure produced, or both. This dual-helicase mechanism explains how the looped recombination intermediates are generated and may serve as a general model for highly processive travelling machines with two active motors, such as other helicases and kinesins.

  7. Dynamics of wind bubbles and superbubbles. I - Slow winds and fast winds. II - Analytic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the overall evolution of wind-blown bubbles in a uniform medium from the initial, free-expansion stage to the final stage in which the pressure of the ambient medium is significant. The concepts of slow and fast winds, which naturally arise from consideration of radiative losses at the free-expansion stage, are introduced. The evolution of bubbles in a plane-parallel disk, where the density decreases steeply along a vertical direction, is considered. The questions of when a bubble can break out of a thin galactic disk and how they evolve after the breakout are discussed. After breakout, bubbles can evolve into jets. Steady, collimated jets can form only over a limited range of wind luminosity and Mach number; astronomical jets are likely to be unsteady and/or hydromagnetic. The results are applied to the neutral stellar wind in the HH 7-11 region, to the north polar spur, and to the galactic winds in starburst galaxies. The evolution of wind-blown bubbles in a power-law density distribution is investigated. Characteristic evolutionary time scales, as well as the equation of motion for both the swept-up gas and the wind shock in each evolutionary stage are obtained.

  8. Using Instrumental and Proxy Data to Determine the Causes of Fast and Slow Warming rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegerl, G. C.; Schurer, A. P.; Obrochta, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent warming 'hiatus' is subject to intense interest, with proposed causes including natural forcing and internal variability. We derive samples of all natural and interval variability from observations and a recent proxy reconstruction to investigate the likelihood that these two sources of variability could produce a hiatus or rapid warming in surface temperature. The likelihood is found to be consistent with that calculated previously for models and exhibits a similar spatial pattern, with an Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation-like structure, although with more signal in the Atlantic than in model patterns. The number and length of events increases if natural forcing is also considered, with volcanic forcing acting as a pacemaker for both fast and slow warming rates in model simulations of the last millennium, and, to a smaller extent, from observations. Big eruptions, such as Mount Tambora in 1815, or clusters of eruptions, may result in a hiatus of over 20 years. A striking finding is the smaller influence of volcanism on surface temperature warming rates in instrumental and proxy data than in climate models. This talk will discuss the possible reasons of this discrepancy.

  9. Transition from slow Abrikosov to fast moving Josephson vortices in iron pnictide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Balicas, Luis; Geshkenbein, Vadim; Blatter, Gianni; Karpinski, Janusz; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Batlogg, Bertram

    2013-02-01

    Iron pnictides are layered high Tc superconductors with moderate material anisotropy and thus Abrikosov vortices are expected in the mixed state. Yet, we have discovered a distinct change in the nature of the vortices from Abrikosov-like to Josephson-like in the pnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) with Tc~48-50 K on cooling below a temperature T*~41-42 K, despite its moderate electronic anisotropy γ~4-6. This transition is hallmarked by a sharp drop in the critical current and accordingly a jump in the flux-flow voltage in a magnetic field precisely aligned along the FeAs layers, indicative of highly mobile vortices. T* coincides well with the temperature where the coherence length ξc perpendicular to the layers matches half of the FeAs-layer spacing. For fields slightly out-of-plane (> 0.1°- 0.15°) the vortices are completely immobilized as well-pinned Abrikosov segments are introduced when the vortex crosses the FeAs layers. We interpret these findings as a transition from well-pinned, slow moving Abrikosov vortices at high temperatures to weakly pinned, fast flowing Josephson vortices at low temperatures. This vortex dynamics could become technologically relevant as superconducting applications will always operate deep in the Josephson regime.

  10. RecBCD enzyme is a DNA helicase with fast and slow motors of opposite polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2003-06-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that move along and unwind double-stranded nucleic acids. RecBCD enzyme is a complex helicase and nuclease, essential for the major pathway of homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. It has sets of helicase motifs in both RecB and RecD, two of its three subunits. This rapid, highly processive enzyme unwinds DNA in an unusual manner: the 5'-ended strand forms a long single-stranded tail, whereas the 3'-ended strand forms an ever-growing single-stranded loop and short single-stranded tail. Here we show by electron microscopy of individual molecules that RecD is a fast helicase acting on the 5'-ended strand and RecB is a slow helicase acting on the 3'-ended strand on which the single-stranded loop accumulates. Mutational inactivation of the helicase domain in RecB or in RecD, or removal of the RecD subunit, altered the rates of unwinding or the types of structure produced, or both. This dual-helicase mechanism explains how the looped recombination intermediates are generated and may serve as a general model for highly processive travelling machines with two active motors, such as other helicases and kinesins.

  11. Fatigue and caffeine effects in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brust, M

    1976-12-28

    In excised, curarized and massively stimulated fast-twitch mouse gastrocnemius muscles the early twitch tension enhancements (treppe) during 1/s activity between 10 and 36 degrees C increase and affect more contractions as temperature increases. Tension output eventually declines at a temperature-independent rate. Half-relaxation time lengthens below 25 degrees C and shortens above 25 degrees C. During 1/0.63s twitches half-relaxation time lengthens even at 25 degrees C. In slow-twitch soleus muscles activity decreases twitch tension and half-relaxation time regardless of temperature. Activity shortens contraction times in both muscles. Oxygen lack induced by NaN3 cannot account satisfactorily for these results. Activation is apparently more plastic in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus, and the relationship between the rates of their activation and relaxation processes and the temperature sensitivities of these rates also seem to differ. In both muscles caffeine can convert activity-induced shortened of half-relaxation times into prolongations. In the soleus this effect is more pronounced at 30 than at 25 degrees C. At high temperature and twitch rates caffeine reduces treppe amplitude and duration without affecting the eventual twitch tension decline in the gastrocnemius while it greatly accelerates twitch tension decline in the soleus. In both muscles intrafiber Ca2+ movements are apparently major determinants of fatigue behavior.

  12. Fast versus slow larval growth in an invasive marine mollusc: does paternity matter?

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Sabrina; Pechenik, Jan A; Cagnon, Mathilde; Viard, Frédérique

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive strategies and parental effects play a major role in shaping early life-history traits. Although polyandry is a common reproductive strategy, its role is still poorly documented in relation to paternal effects. Here, we used as a case study the invasive sessile marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata, a mollusc with polyandry and extreme larval growth variation among sibling larvae. Based on paternity analyses, the relationships between paternal identity and the variations in a major early life-history trait in marine organisms, that is, larval growth, were investigated. Using microsatellite markers, paternities of 437 fast- and slow-growing larvae from 6 broods were reliably assigned to a set of 20 fathers. No particular fathers were found responsible for the specific growth performances of their offspring. However, the range of larval growth rates within a brood was significantly correlated to 1) an index of sire diversity and 2) the degree of larvae relatedness within broods. Multiple paternity could thus play an important role in determining the extent of pelagic larval duration and consequently the range of dispersal distances achieved during larval life. This study also highlighted the usefulness of using indices based on fathers' relative contribution to the progeny in paternity studies.

  13. Estimates for Pu-239 loadings in burial ground culverts based on fast/slow neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hochel, R.C.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.A.

    1989-08-15

    This report provides guideline estimates for Pu-239 mass loadings in selected burial ground culverts. The relatively high recorded Pu-239 contents of these culverts have been appraised as suspect relative to criticality concerns, because they were assayed only with the solid waste monitor (SWM) per gamma-ray counting. After 1985, subsequent waste was also assayed with the neutron coincidence counter (NCC), and a comparison of the assay methods showed that the NCC generally yielded higher assays than the SWM. These higher NCC readings signaled a need to conduct non-destructive/non-intrusive nuclear interrogations of these culverts, and a technical team conducted scoping measurements to illustrate potential assay methods based on neutron and/or gamma counting. A fast/slow neutron method has been developed to estimate the Pu-239 in the culverts. In addition, loading records include the SWM assays of all Pu-239 cuts of some of the culvert drums and these data are useful in estimating the corresponding NCC drum assays from NCC vs SWM data. Together, these methods yield predictions based on direct measurements and statistical inference.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and dynamics of insulin resistance in denervated slow and fast muscles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, J S; Damrau-Abney, A; Smith, T R; David, T S; Turinsky, J

    1997-04-01

    Regulation of glucose uptake by 1- and 3-day denervated soleus (slow-twitch) and plantaris (fast-twitch) muscles in vivo was investigated. One day after denervation, soleus and plantaris muscles exhibited 62 and 65% decreases in insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake, respectively, compared with corresponding control muscles. At this interval, denervated muscles showed no alterations in insulin receptor binding and activity, amount and activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and amounts of GLUT-1 and GLUT-4. Three days after denervation, there was no increase in 2-deoxyglucose uptake in response to insulin in soleus muscle, whereas plantaris muscle exhibited a 158% increase in basal and an almost normal absolute increment in insulin-stimulated uptake. Despite these differences, denervated soleus and plantaris muscles exhibited comparable decreases in insulin-stimulated activities of the insulin receptor (approximately 40%) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (approximately 50%) and a pronounced decrease in GLUT-4. An increase in GLUT-1 in plantaris, but not soleus, muscle 3 days after denervation is consistent with augmented basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake in plantaris muscle at this interval. These results demonstrate that, in denervated muscles, there is a clear dissociation between insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and upstream events involved in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

  15. Dispersion relations for slow and fast resistive wall modes within the Haney-Freidberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2014-04-01

    The dispersion relation for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is derived by using the trial function for the magnetic perturbation proposed in S. W. Haney and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1637 (1989). The Haney-Freidberg (HF) approach is additionally based on the expansion in dw/s ≪1, where dw is the wall thickness and s is the skin depth. Here, the task is solved without this constraint. The derivation procedure is different too, but the final result is expressed in a similar form with the use of the quantities entering the HF relation. The latter is recovered from our more general relation as an asymptote at dw≪s, which proves the equivalence of the both approaches in this case. In the opposite limit (dw≫s), we obtain the growth rate γ of the RWMs as a function of γHF calculated by the HF prescription. It is shown that γ ∝γHF2 and γ ≫γHF in this range. The proposed relations give γ for slow and fast RWMs in terms of the integrals calculated by the standard stability codes for toroidal systems with and without a perfectly conducting wall. Also, the links between the considered and existing toroidal and cylindrical models are established with estimates explicitly showing the relevant dependencies.

  16. EEG-based classification of fast and slow hand movements using Wavelet-CSP algorithm.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neethu; Vinod, A P; Ang, Kai Keng; Tee, Keng Peng; Guan, Cuntai T

    2013-08-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) acquires brain signals, extracts informative features, and translates these features to commands to control an external device. This paper investigates the application of a noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based BCI to identify brain signal features in regard to actual hand movement speed. This provides a more refined control for a BCI system in terms of movement parameters. An experiment was performed to collect EEG data from subjects while they performed right-hand movement at two different speeds, namely fast and slow, in four different directions. The informative features from the data were obtained using the Wavelet-Common Spatial Pattern (W-CSP) algorithm that provided high-temporal-spatial-spectral resolution. The applicability of these features to classify the two speeds and to reconstruct the speed profile was studied. The results for classifying speed across seven subjects yielded a mean accuracy of 83.71% using a Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) classifier. The speed components were reconstructed using multiple linear regression and significant correlation of 0.52 (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient) was obtained between recorded and reconstructed velocities on an average. The spatial patterns of the W-CSP features obtained showed activations in parietal and motor areas of the brain. The results achieved promises to provide a more refined control in BCI by including control of movement speed.

  17. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  18. Fatigue and contraction of slow and fast muscles in hypokinetic/hypodynamic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, R. D.; Gladden, L. B.; Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) on the fatigability and contractile properties of the rat soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles have been investigated experimentally. Whole body suspension for one week was used to induce H/H, and fatigue was brought on by train stimulation for periods of 45 and 16 minutes. Following stimulation, rapid rates of fatigue were observed in the G-muscles of the suspended rats, while minimal fatigue was observed in the S-muscles. The twitch and tetanic contractile properties of the muscles were measured before and after train stimulation. It is found that H/H suspension increased twitch tension in the G-muscles, but did not change any contractile properties in the S-muscles. The peak twitch, train, tetanic tensions and time to peak were unchanged in the S-muscles of the suspended rats. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that 1 wk of muscle atropy induced by H/H significantly increases fatigability in G-muscles, but does not affect the contractile properties of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles.

  19. Disentangling fast and slow responses of the East Asian summer monsoon to reflecting and absorbing aerosol forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhili; Lin, Lei; Yang, Meilin; Xu, Yangyang; Li, Jiangnan

    2017-09-01

    We examine the roles of fast and slow responses in shaping the total equilibrium response of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) to reflecting (sulfate, SO4) and absorbing (black carbon, BC) aerosol forcings over the industrial era using the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). Our results show that there is a clear distinction between fast and slow responses of the EASM to aerosol forcings and the slow climate response due to aerosol-induced change in sea surface temperature (SST) plays an important role in the impacts of aerosols on the EASM. The EASM is weakened by a decrease in land-sea surface thermal contrast in the fast response (FR) component to SO4 forcing, whereas the weakening is more intensive due to the changes in tropospheric thermodynamic and dynamic structures in the slow response (SR) component to SO4. The total climate adjustment caused by SO4 is a significant weakening of the EASM and a decrease in precipitation. The BC-induced fast adjustment strengthens the EASM both by increasing the local land-sea surface thermal contrast and shifting the East Asian subtropical jet (EASJ) northwards. The BC-induced slow climate adjustment, however, weakens the EASM through altering the atmospheric temperature and circulation. Consequently, the EASM is slightly enhanced, especially north of 30° N, in the total response (TR) to BC. The spatial patterns of precipitation change over East Asia due to BC are similar in the total response and slow response. This study highlights the importance of ocean response to aerosol forcings in driving the changes of the EASM.

  20. Slow light in dual-periodic photonic crystals based slotted-waveguide coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Cheng; Yan, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Considering the capacity of the nanoscale width area with the low-refractive index can confine light waves, the dual-periodic slotted photonic crystals, which is constructed by coupling low-refractive index's slotted-waveguide with high-refractive index's cavity is proposed in this paper. The best slow light properties and the optimal slotted-waveguide coupled cavity are achieved by adjusting the slotted-width and the period of cavity respectively. In this structure, the slow-light properties are simulated by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE), the result reveals that the group velocities are all three orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum, the slowest value is 7.96 ×10-4 c when the slotted-width is 0.54a and the period of cavity is 0.95a. Moreover, the corresponding Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) values are larger than 0.24. Besides, the slotted-waveguide coupled cavity can be reconfigured, which accordingly changes the corresponding slow-light property. At last, the numerical results provide a new thought and method for decreasing group velocity and potential application for optical buffer in photonic crystals field.

  1. Light harvesting in photonic crystals revisited: why do slow photons at the blue edge enhance absorption?

    PubMed

    Deparis, O; Mouchet, S R; Su, B-L

    2015-11-11

    Light harvesting enhancement by slow photons in photonic crystal catalysts or dye-sensitized solar cells is a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of photoreactions. This structural effect is exploited in inverse opal TiO2 photocatalysts by tuning the red edge of the photonic band gap to the TiO2 electronic excitation band edge. In spite of many experimental demonstrations, the slow photon effect is not fully understood yet. In particular, observed enhancement by tuning the blue edge has remained unexplained. Based on rigorous couple wave analysis simulations, we quantify light harvesting enhancement in terms of absorption increase at a specific wavelength (monochromatic UV illumination) or photocurrent increase (solar light illumination), with respect to homogeneous flat slab of equivalent material thickness. We show that the commonly accepted explanation relying on light intensity confinement in high (low) dielectric constant regions at the red (blue) edge is challenged in the case of TiO2 inverse opals because of the sub-wavelength size of the material skeleton. The reason why slow photons at the blue edge are also able to enhance light harvesting is the loose confinement of the field, which leads to significant resonantly enhanced field intensity overlap with the skeleton in both red and blue edge tuning cases, yet with different intensity patterns.

  2. Coded output photonic A/D converter based on photonic crystal slow-light structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Koo, Sukmo; Park, Namkyoo

    2008-09-01

    A photonic analog-to-digital converter (PADC) utilizing a slow-light photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed, to enable the optically coded output of a PADC with reduced device size and power consumption. Assuming an index modulation for the MZI on the Taylor's PADC structure, limiting factors in device size, speed, and effective number of bits are derived considering the signal transition time of the light and the slow light dispersion effects. Details of the device design and results of a time domain assessment of the device performance is described with discussions on the feasibility of sub-mm size, 20GS/s operation of the device having the ENOB (effective number of bits) > 5.

  3. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel B.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-11-10

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  4. The First Slow Step: Differential Effects of Object and Word-Form Familiarization on Retention of Fast-Mapped Words

    PubMed Central

    Kucker, Sarah C.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research demonstrated that although twenty-four month-old infants do well on the initial pairing of a novel word and novel object in fast-mapping tasks, they are unable to retain the mapping after a five-minute delay. The current study examines the role of familiarity with the objects and words on infants' ability to bridge between the initial fast mapping of a name and object, and later retention in the service of slow mapping. Twenty-four-month-old infants were familiarized with either novel objects or novel names prior to the referent selection portion of a fast-mapping task. When familiarized with the novel objects, infants retained the novel mapping after a delay, but not when familiarized with the novel words. This suggests familiarity with the object versus the word form leads to differential encoding of the name-object link. We discuss the implications of this finding for subsequent slow mapping. PMID:22661907

  5. Anatomy and histochemistry of spread-wing posture inbirds. 4. Eagles soar with fast, not slow muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Ron A.; McFarland, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Slow fibers are typically characterized as functioning in avian postural behaviors such as soaring flight, and are described for a number of elite soarers such as vultures, pelicans and albatrosses. Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles also display soaring behavior and we examined their flight muscles for the presence of slow fibers. Surprisingly, eagles lack a deep layer to the pectoralis found in other soaring species. Additionally, the pectoralis as well as other shoulder muscles had few to no slow muscle fibers. The lack of functionally meaningful numbers of slow muscle fibers in eagle flight muscles indicates that they must rely on fast fibers for posture; these can function in that role due to their high aerobic capacity and also perhaps a “tuning” of muscle contraction frequency to function more efficiently at isometric contractions. PMID:27616780

  6. Anatomy and histochemistry of spread-wing posture inbirds. 4. Eagles soar with fast, not slow muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Ron A; McFarland, Joshua C

    2016-07-01

    Slow fibers are typically characterized as functioning in avian postural behaviors such as soaring flight, and are described for a number of elite soarers such as vultures, pelicans and albatrosses. Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles also display soaring behavior and we examined their flight muscles for the presence of slow fibers. Surprisingly, eagles lack a deep layer to the pectoralis found in other soaring species. Additionally, the pectoralis as well as other shoulder muscles had few to no slow muscle fibers. The lack of functionally meaningful numbers of slow muscle fibers in eagle flight muscles indicates that they must rely on fast fibers for posture; these can function in that role due to their high aerobic capacity and also perhaps a "tuning" of muscle contraction frequency to function more efficiently at isometric contractions.

  7. Transcriptome profiling in fast versus slow-growing rainbow trout across seasonal gradients.

    PubMed

    Danzmann, Roy G; Kocmarek, Andrea L; Norman, Joseph D; Rexroad, Caird E; Palti, Yniv

    2016-01-15

    Circannual rhythms in vertebrates can influence a wide variety of physiological processes. Some notable examples include annual reproductive cycles and for poikilotherms, seasonal changes modulating growth. Increasing water temperature elevates growth rates in fishes, but increases in photoperiod regime can have similar influences even at constant temperature. Therefore, in order to understand the dynamics of growth in fish it is important to consider the background influence of photoperiod regime on gene expression differences. This study examined the influence of a declining photoperiod regime (winter solstice) compared to an increasing photoperiod regime (spring equinox) on white muscle transcriptome profiles in fast and slow-growing rainbow trout from a commercial aquaculture strain. Slow-growing fish could be characterized as possessing transcriptome profiles that conform in many respects to an endurance training regime in humans. They have elevated mitochondrial and cytosolic creatine kinase expression levels and appear to suppress mTOR-signaling as evidenced by elevated TSC2 expression, and they also have elevated p53 levels. Large fish display a physiological repertoire that may be consistent with strength/resistance physiology having elevated cytoskeletal gene component expression and glycogen metabolism cycling along with higher PI3K levels. In many respects small vs. large fish match eccentric vs. concentric muscle expression patterns, respectively. Lipid metabolic genes are also more elevated in larger fish, the most notable being the G0S2 switch gene. M and Z-line sarcomere remodelling appears to be more prevalent in large fish. Twenty-three out of 26 gene families with previously reported significant SNP-based growth differences were detected as having significant expression differences. Larger fish display a broader array of genes showing higher expression, and their profiles are more similar to those observed in December lot fish (i.e., an

  8. Satellite cell ablation attenuates short-term fast-to-slow fibre type transformations in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen J B; Murdoch, Gordon K; Shu, Yang; Harris, R Luke W; Gallo, Maria; Dixon, Walter T; Foxcroft, George R; Gordon, Tessa; Putman, Charles T

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this time-course study was to determine whether satellite cell ablation within rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscles exposed to short-term chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) would limit fast-to-slow fibre type transformations. Satellite cells of the left TA were ablated by exposure to gamma-irradiation before 1, 2, 5 or 10 days of CLFS and 1 week later where required. Control groups received only CLFS or a sham operation. Continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine revealed that CLFS first induced an increase in satellite cell proliferation at 1 day, up to a maximum at 10 days over control (mean +/- SEM, 5.7 +/- 0.7 and 20.4 +/- 1.0 versus 1.5 +/- 0.2 mm(-2), respectively, P < 0.007) that was abolished by gamma-irradiation. Myosin heavy chain mRNA, immunohistochemical and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses revealed CLFS-induced fast-to-slow fibre type transformation began at 5 days and continued at 10 days; in those muscles that were also exposed to gamma-irradiation, attenuation occurred within the fast fibre population, and the final fast-twitch to slow-twitch adaptation did not occur. These findings indicate satellite cells play active and obligatory roles early on in the time course during skeletal muscle fibre type adaptations to CLFS.

  9. Experimental investigation of the transient dynamics of slow light in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham M.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-12-01

    When a pulsed light beam propagates through ruby, it is delayed by a slow-light mechanism. This mechanism has been the subject of debate (Wisniewski-Barker et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 083020; Kozlov et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038001; Wisniewski-Barker et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038002). To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the trailing edge of a square-wave pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby. Our observation of a pronounced tail on the trailing edge of the transmitted pulse cannot be explained solely by the effects of a time-varying absorber acting upon the incident pulse. Therefore, our observation of the creation of a tail at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than pulse reshaping. The different delays of individual Fourier components of the pulse signal explain the pulse distortion that occurs upon transmission through the ruby and must be accounted for by any model that attempts to describe the effects of slow light in ruby.

  10. Comparison of Cryopreservation Protocols (Single and Two-steps) and Thawing (Fast and Slow) for Canine Sperm.

    PubMed

    Brito, Maíra M; Lúcio, Cristina F; Angrimani, Daniel S R; Losano, João Diego A; Dalmazzo, Andressa; Nichi, Marcílio; Vannucchi, Camila I

    2017-01-02

    In addition to the existence of several cryopreservation protocols, no systematic research has been carried out in order to confirm the suitable protocol for canine sperm. This study aims to assess the effect of adding 5% glycerol during cryopreservation at 37°C (one-step) and 5°C (two-steps), in addition of testing two thawing protocols (37°C for 30 seconds, and 70°C for 8 seconds). We used 12 sperm samples divided into four experimental groups: Single-Step - Slow Thawing Group; Two-Step - Slow Thawing Group; Single-Step - Fast Thawing Group; and Two-Step - Fast Thawing Group. Frozen-thawed samples were submitted to automated analysis of sperm motility, evaluation of plasmatic membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, mitochondrial activity, sperm morphology, sperm susceptibility to oxidative stress, and sperm binding assay to perivitellinic membrane of chicken egg yolk. Considering the comparison between freezing protocols, no statistical differences were verified for any of the response variables. When comparison between thawing protocols was performed, slow thawing protocol presented higher sperm count bound to perivitelline membrane of chicken egg yolk, compared to fast thawing protocol. Regardless of the freezing process, the slow thawing protocol can be recommended for the large scale cryopreservation of canine semen, since it shows a consistent better functional result.

  11. PATTERNS OF X-RAY, CHROMOSPHERIC, AND RADIO EMISSION IN LOW-MASS STARS: FAST AND SLOW MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection events in the atmospheres of low-mass dwarf stars can be classified as either slow or fast, depending on whether ohmic diffusion or Hall currents dominate in the reconnection process. We suggest that the separation of reconnection into slow and fast categories can help to explain some systematics of low-mass dwarfs as regards their emissions in X-rays, H{alpha}, and radio. On the one hand, in the warmer dwarfs (fast reconnection is permitted, and this can explain the occurrence of flares and 'quiescent' coronal heating. On the other hand, the fact that the coolest dwarfs (>M7) are inefficient emitters in H{alpha} and X-rays but strong emitters in radio, may be understood in the context that only slow reconnection is permitted to occur in those stars, as a result of high electrical resistivity. However, even though only slow reconnection is permitted in the latter stars, the speed of the outflow jets from reconnection sites can serve as efficient sources of radio emission as a result of the electron cyclotron maser instability.

  12. Image information transfer via electromagnetically induced transparency-based slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Sun, Jia-Xiang; Sun, Yuan-Hang; Li, Ai-Jun; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hai-Hua; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate an image information transfer between two channels by using slow light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a solid. The probe optical image is slowed due to steep dispersion induced by EIT. By applying an additional control field to an EIT-driven medium, the slowed image is transferred into two information channels. Image intensities between two information channels can be controlled by adjusting the intensities of the control fields. The similarity of output images is further analyzed. This image information transfer allows for manipulating images in a controlled fashion, and will be important in further information processing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374126, 11347137, 11204103, 11404336, and 11204029), and the Fund for Fostering Talents in Basic Science of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. J1103202).

  13. Broadband slow light in one-dimensional logically combined photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2015-01-28

    Here, we demonstrate the broadband slow light effects in a new family of one dimensional photonic crystals, which are obtained by logically combining two photonic crystals of slightly different periods. The logical combination slowly destroys the original translational symmetries of the individual photonic crystals. Consequently, the Bloch modes of the individual photonic crystals with different wavevectors couple with each other, creating a vast number of slow modes. Specifically, we describe a photonic crystal architecture that results from a logical "OR" mixture of two one dimensional photonic crystals with a periods ratio of r = R/(R - 1), where R > 2 is an integer. Such a logically combined architecture, exhibits a broad region of frequencies in which a dense number of slow modes with varnishing group velocities, appear naturally as Bloch modes.

  14. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time.

  15. Spontaneous slow and fast MEG activity in male schizophrenics treated with clozapine.

    PubMed

    Sperling, W; Vieth, J; Martus, M; Demling, J; Barocka, A

    1999-03-01

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine induces specific electroencephalogram changes, which have not been investigated using the technique of magnetoencephalography (MEG). The present study investigated whether spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) activity in patients treated with clozapine differs from that in patients treated with haloperidol and untreated control subjects. A 2 x 37 channel biomagnetic system was used to record spontaneous magnetic activity for the frequency ranges (2-6 Hz), (7.5-12 Hz), (12.5-30 Hz) in schizophrenic patients and controls in two trials within 3 weeks. After data acquisition, the processed data were digitally filtered and the spatial distribution of dipoles was determined by a 3-D convolution with a Gaussian envelope. The dipole localisation was calculated by the dipole density plot and the principal component analysis. The target parameters were absolute dipole values and the dipole localisations. The relationship between absolute dipole values, dipole localisations and psychopathological findings (documented by the use of the PANSS, BPRS-scale) during a 3 week period with constant doses of clozapine and haloperidol was investigated using correlation analysis. Our results lend strong support to the assumption of a significant elevation of absolute dipole values [dipole density maximum (Dmax), dipole number (Dtotal), absolute and relative dipole density] in the fast frequency range (12.5-30 Hz) over the left hemisphere, especially in the temporoparietal region by clozapine. In this area, we found a dipole concentration effect only in patients treated with the atypical neuroleptic, whereas the dipole distribution in patients treated with haloperidol and healthy controls was concentrated in the central region. With regard to the absolute dipole values in the frequency ranges 2-6 Hz (delta, theta) and 7.5-12 Hz (alpha), we found no statistically significant differences between the groups investigated. In the slow frequency range (2

  16. Fast and slow shifts of the zonal-mean intertropical convergence zone in response to an idealized anthropogenic aerosol

    DOE PAGES

    Voigt, Aiko; Pincus, Robert; Stevens, Bjorn; ...

    2017-04-03

    Previous modeling work showed that aerosol can affect the position of the tropical rain belt, i.e., the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Yet it remains unclear which aspects of the aerosol impact are robust across models, and which are not. Here we present simulations with seven comprehensive atmosphere models that study the fast and slow impacts of an idealized anthropogenic aerosol on the zonal-mean ITCZ position. The fast impact, which results from aerosol atmospheric heating and land cooling before sea-surface temperature (SST) has time to respond, causes a northward ITCZ shift. Yet the fast impact is compensated locally by decreased evaporationmore » over the ocean, and a clear northward shift is only found for an unrealistically large aerosol forcing. The local compensation implies that while models differ in atmospheric aerosol heating, this does not contribute to model differences in the ITCZ shift. The slow impact includes the aerosol impact on the ocean surface energy balance and is mediated by SST changes. The slow impact is an order of magnitude more effective than the fast impact and causes a clear southward ITCZ shift for realistic aerosol forcing. Models agree well on the slow ITCZ shift when perturbed with the same SST pattern. However, an energetic analysis suggests that the slow ITCZ shifts would be substantially more model-dependent in interactive-SST setups due to model differences in clear-sky radiative transfer and clouds. In conclusion, we also discuss implications for the representation of aerosol in climate models and attributions of recent observed ITCZ shifts to aerosol.« less

  17. Fast and slow shifts of the zonal-mean intertropical convergence zone in response to an idealized anthropogenic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Pincus, Robert; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; Bellouin, Nicolas; Lewinschal, Anna; Medeiros, Brian; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Previous modeling work showed that aerosol can affect the position of the tropical rain belt, i.e., the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Yet, it remains unclear which aspects of the aerosol impact are robust across models, and which are not. Here, we present simulations with seven comprehensive atmosphere models that study the fast and slow impacts of an idealized anthropogenic aerosol on the zonal-mean ITCZ position. The fast impact, which results from aerosol atmospheric heating and land cooling before sea-surface temperature (SST) have time to respond, causes a northward ITCZ shift. Yet, the fast impact is compensated locally by decreased evaporation over the ocean, and a clear northward shift is only found for an unrealistically large aerosol forcing. The local compensation implies that while models differ in atmospheric aerosol heating, this does not contribute to model differences in the ITCZ shift. The slow impact includes the aerosol impact on the ocean surface energy balance and is mediated by SST changes. The slow impact is an order of magnitude more effective than the fast impact and causes a clear southward ITCZ shift already for realistic aerosol forcing. Models agree well on the slow ITCZ shift when perturbed with the same SST pattern. However, an energetic analysis suggests that the slow ITCZ shifts would be substantially more model dependent in interactive-SST setups due to model differences in clear-sky radiative transfer and clouds. We also discuss implications for the representation of aerosol in climate models and attributions of recent observed ITCZ shifts to aerosol.

  18. Fast and slow shifts of the zonal-mean intertropical convergence zone in response to an idealized anthropogenic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Pincus, Robert; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; Bellouin, Nicolas; Lewinschal, Anna; Medeiros, Brian; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Previous modeling work showed that aerosol can affect the position of the tropical rain belt, i.e., the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Yet it remains unclear which aspects of the aerosol impact are robust across models, and which are not. Here we present simulations with seven comprehensive atmosphere models that study the fast and slow impacts of an idealized anthropogenic aerosol on the zonal-mean ITCZ position. The fast impact, which results from aerosol atmospheric heating and land cooling before sea-surface temperature (SST) has time to respond, causes a northward ITCZ shift. Yet the fast impact is compensated locally by decreased evaporation over the ocean, and a clear northward shift is only found for an unrealistically large aerosol forcing. The local compensation implies that while models differ in atmospheric aerosol heating, this does not contribute to model differences in the ITCZ shift. The slow impact includes the aerosol impact on the ocean surface energy balance and is mediated by SST changes. The slow impact is an order of magnitude more effective than the fast impact and causes a clear southward ITCZ shift for realistic aerosol forcing. Models agree well on the slow ITCZ shift when perturbed with the same SST pattern. However, an energetic analysis suggests that the slow ITCZ shifts would be substantially more model-dependent in interactive-SST setups due to model differences in clear-sky radiative transfer and clouds. We also discuss implications for the representation of aerosol in climate models and attributions of recent observed ITCZ shifts to aerosol.

  19. Role of contraction duration in inducing fast-to-slow contractile and metabolic protein and functional changes in engineered muscle.

    PubMed

    Khodabukus, Alastair; Baehr, Leslie M; Bodine, Sue C; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-01

    The role of factors such as frequency, contraction duration and active time in the adaptation to chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS) is widely disputed. In this study we explore the ability of contraction duration (0.6, 6, 60, and 600 sec) to induce a fast-to-slow shift in engineered muscle while using a stimulation frequency of 10 Hz and keeping active time constant at 60%. We found that all contraction durations induced similar slowing of time-to-peak tension. Despite similar increases in total myosin heavy (MHC) levels with stimulation, increasing contraction duration resulted in progressive decreases in total fast myosin. With contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec, MHC IIx levels decreased and MHC IIa levels increased. All contraction durations resulted in fast-to-slow shifts in TnT and TnC but increased both fast and slow TnI levels. Half-relaxation slowed to a greater extent with contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec despite similar changes in the calcium sequestering proteins calsequestrin and parvalbumin and the calcium uptake protein SERCA. All CLFS groups resulted in greater fatigue resistance than control. Similar increases in GLUT4, mitochondrial enzymes (SDH and ATPsynthase), the fatty acid transporter CPT-1, and the metabolic regulators PGC-1α and MEF2 were found with all contraction durations. However, the mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome C and citrate synthase were increased to greater levels with contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec. These results demonstrate that contraction duration plays a pivotal role in dictating the level of CLFS-induced contractile and metabolic adaptations in tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

  20. Fast Versus Slow Recruitment Maneuver at Different Degrees of Acute Lung Inflammation Induced by Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raquel S; Moraes, Lillian; Samary, Cynthia S; Santos, Cíntia L; Ramos, Maíra B A; Vasconcellos, Ana P; Horta, Lucas F; Morales, Marcelo M; Capelozzi, Vera L; Garcia, Cristiane S N B; Marini, John J; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Pelosi, Paolo; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-04-01

    Large tidal volume (VT) breaths or "recruitment maneuvers" (RMs) are used commonly to open collapsed lungs, but their effectiveness may depend on how the RM is delivered. We hypothesized that a stepped approach to RM delivery ("slow" RM) compared with a nonstepped ("fast" RM), when followed by decremental positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration to lowest dynamic elastance, would (1) yield a more homogeneous inflation of the lungs, thus reducing the PEEP obtained during post-RM titration; (2) produce less lung morphofunctional injury, regardless of the severity of sepsis-induced acute lung inflammation; and (3) result in less biological damage in severe, but not in moderate, acute lung inflammation. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in 51 Wistar rats. After 48 hours, animals were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated (VT = 6 mL/kg), and stratified by PO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio into moderate (≥300) and severe (<300) acute lung inflammation groups. Each group was then subdivided randomly into 3 subgroups: (1) nonrecruited; (2) RM with continuous positive airway pressure (30 cm H2O for 30 seconds; CPAPRM or fast RM); and (3) RM with stepwise airway pressure increase (5 cm H2O/step, 8.5 seconds/step, 6 steps, 51 seconds; STEPRM or slow RM), with a maximum pressure hold for 10 seconds. All animals underwent decremental PEEP titration to determine the level of PEEP required to optimize dynamic compliance after RM and were then ventilated for 60 minutes with VT = 6 mL/kg, respiratory rate = 80 bpm, fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.4, and the newly adjusted PEEP for each animal. Respiratory mechanics, hemodynamics, and arterial blood gases were measured before and at the end of 60-minute mechanical ventilation. Lung histology and biological markers of inflammation and damage inflicted to endothelial cells were evaluated at the end of the 60-minute mechanical ventilation. Respiratory system mean airway pressure was lower in

  1. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed. PMID:25893952

  2. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  3. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-04-20

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  4. Slow and fast annual cycles of the Asian summer monsoon in the NCEP CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chul-Su; Huang, Bohua

    2016-07-01

    The climatological Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is decomposed into the slow and fast annual cycles (SAC and FAC). The FAC represents the abrupt onset and breaks phase-locked to the ASM seasonal progression. This study evaluates how well the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) simulates the SAC and FAC over the Indian and East Asia monsoon regions (IMR and EAMR). The simulated SACs are in good agreement with observations in both regions. The FAC also represents the northward propagation in both observations and CFSv2. It is further demonstrated that the FAC is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea interaction. In particular, the different roles played by the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback may account for the faster propagation in the IMR than the EAMR. However, compared with observations, the simulated FAC shows earlier monsoon onset and long-lasting stronger dry and wet phases in the IMR but delayed monsoon onset with weaker and less organized FAC in the EAMR. These reversed behaviors may originate from a warm (cold) SST bias in the IMR (EAMR) in boreal spring and enhanced by an overly sensitive surface evaporation to wind changes in the CFSv2. As a result, the warm spring SST bias in the IMR initiates a strong WES feedback and changes of solar insolation during boreal summer, which leads to a cold SST bias in early fall. On the other hand, the cold spring SST bias in the EAMR accounts for a weaker air-sea coupling, which in turn results in a warm SST bias after the withdrawal of the monsoon.

  5. The origin and evolution of fast and slow rotators in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penoyre, Zephyr; Moster, Benjamin P.; Sijacki, Debora; Genel, Shy

    2017-07-01

    Using the Illustris simulation, we follow thousands of elliptical galaxies back in time to identify how the dichotomy between fast- and slow-rotating ellipticals (FRs and SRs) develops. Comparing to the ATLAS3D survey, we show that Illustris reproduces similar elliptical galaxy rotation properties, quantified by the degree of ordered rotation, λR. There is a clear segregation between low-mass (M* < 1011 M⊙) ellipticals, which form a smooth distribution of FRs, and high-mass galaxies (M* > 1011.5 M⊙), which are mostly SRs, in agreement with observations. We find that SRs are very gas poor, metal rich and red in colour, while FRs are generally more gas rich and still star forming. We suggest that ellipticals begin naturally as FRs and, as they grow in mass, lose their spin and become SRs. While at z = 1, the progenitors of SRs and FRs are nearly indistinguishable, their merger and star formation histories differ thereafter. We find that major mergers tend to disrupt galaxy spin, though in rare cases can lead to a spin-up. No major difference is found between the effects of gas-rich and gas-poor mergers, and the number of minor mergers seems to have little correlation with galaxy spin. In between major mergers, lower mass ellipticals, which are mostly gas rich, tend to recover their spin by accreting gas and stars. For galaxies with M* above ˜1011 M⊙, this trend reverses; galaxies only retain or steadily lose their spin. More frequent mergers, accompanied by an inability to regain spin, lead massive ellipticals to lose most of ordered rotation and transition from FRs to SRs.

  6. Double-sigmoid model for fitting fatigue profiles in mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Cairns, S P; Robinson, D M; Loiselle, D S

    2008-07-01

    We present a curve-fitting approach that permits quantitative comparisons of fatigue profiles obtained with different stimulation protocols in isolated slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of mice. Profiles from our usual stimulation protocol (125 Hz for 500 ms, evoked once every second for 100-300 s) could be fitted by single-term functions (sigmoids or exponentials) but not by a double exponential. A clearly superior fit, as confirmed by the Akaiki Information Criterion, was achieved using a double-sigmoid function. Fitting accuracy was exceptional; mean square errors were typically <1% and r(2) > 0.9995. The first sigmoid (early fatigue) involved approximately 10% decline of isometric force to an intermediate plateau in both muscle types; the second sigmoid (late fatigue) involved a reduction of force to a final plateau, the decline being 83% of initial force in EDL and 63% of initial force in soleus. The maximal slope of each sigmoid was seven- to eightfold greater in EDL than in soleus. The general applicability of the model was tested by fitting profiles with a severe force loss arising from repeated tetanic stimulation evoked at different frequencies or rest periods, or with excitation via nerve terminals in soleus. Late fatigue, which was absent at 30 Hz, occurred earlier and to a greater extent at 125 than 50 Hz. The model captured small changes in rate of late fatigue for nerve terminal versus sarcolemmal stimulation. We conclude that a double-sigmoid expression is a useful and accurate model to characterize fatigue in isolated muscle preparations.

  7. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  8. In-situ monitoring of slow light structures in dye-doped polymer waveguide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Edward M., Jr.; Lin, Andy; Waskiewicz, Alex; Mickelson, Alan R.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for positioning the passband and monitoring the slowing factor of Moiré gratings written into PMMA-DR1 waveguides during fabrication. Slow light structures made with material platforms such as silicon must fabricated before their actual slowing properties can be measured. In our dye doped polymer waveguides, the slowing can be decided beforehand and the fabrication controlled to achieve the desired performance figure. The resulting group velocity slowing in the composite waveguide can be controlled by varying the index contrast of the grating. In dye-doped polymer materials we use, the index contrast can be changed using the process of irreversible photobleaching. Our technique uses a broadband source to monitor the reflectance spectrum of the grating and the delay of the structure is determined from this measurement. The theory behind the technique is reviewed and results are presented for a Moiré grating written into waveguides fabricated in the dye-doped polymer material system, PMMA-DR1.

  9. Slow light with large group index - bandwidth product in lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Li, Wenhui; Wu, Jun; Xu, Zhonghui

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a systematic optimization procedure to generate slow light with large group index, wideband, and low dispersion in an lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguide. The waveguide is based on triangular lattice photonic crystal imposed by selectively altering the locations of the holes adjacent to the line defect. Under a constant group index criterion of ± 10% variation, when group indices are nearly constants of 24, 33, 46, 57, and 66, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 24.2, 17.6, 12.8, 10.1 and 8.6 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. A nearly constant large group index - bandwidth product (GBP) of 0.37 is achieved for all cases. Low dispersion slow light propagation is confirmed by studying the relative temporal pulse-width spreading with the 2-D finite-difference time-domain method.

  10. Slow light in resonant photonic crystals with a complex unit cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanov, D. R.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Shubina, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    Features of the propagation and slowing down of short light pulses (duration of 0.1-2 ps) in one-dimensional resonant photonic crystals with various types of unit cells containing several quantum wells are discussed. It is established that the use of structures with a complex unit cell makes it possible to reduce the group velocity of exciton-polaritons along with the conservation of the width of the transparency window. The calculations show the possibility of the slowing down of a light pulse by a factor of 50 as compared to a pulse propagating in vacuum. The predicted delay time of the pulse is 2 ps at a damping of only 3-5 times.

  11. Dual coupled-resonator system for plasmon-induced transparency and slow light effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinghao; Meng, Hongyun; Huang, Ben; Wang, Huihao; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Wei; Tan, Chunhua; Huang, Xuguang; Li, Shuti

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a dual coupled-resonator system based on the metal-insulator-metal bus waveguide and numerically investigated the plasmon-induced transparency and slow light effect with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations in this paper. The electromagnetically induced transparency-like spectral response will occur between two adjacent stub resonators with detuned resonant wavelength due to the phase-coupled effect. The transmissivity and group index equations were been deduced, which indicated that the system can achieve the effect of the multiple electromagnetically induced transparency-like and slow light. With the optimization, the single peak transmission can reach to as high as 92%, dual PIT transmission peaks appear, as well as group index can reach over 75. These characteristics indicate multiple applications of our system in integrated optical circuits.

  12. Wideband slow light and dispersion control in oblique lattice photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Feng-Chun; Liang, Wen-Yao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Tong-Biao; Wang, He-Zhou

    2010-03-15

    We find that the angle between elementary lattice vectors obviously affects the bandwidth and dispersion of slow light in photonic crystal line-defect waveguides. When the fluctuation of group index is strictly limited in a +/-1% range, the oblique lattice structures with the angle between elementary lattice vectors slightly larger than 60 degrees have broader available bandwidth of flat band slow light than triangular lattice structures. For example, for the angle 66 degrees , there are increases of the available bandwidth from 20% to 68% for several different structures. For the same angle and a +/-10% variation in group velocity, when group indices are nearly constants of 30, 48.5, 80 and 130, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 20 nm, 11.8 nm, 7.3 nm and 3.9 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. The increasing of bandwidth is related to the shift of the anticrossing point towards smaller wave numbers.

  13. Four-wave mixing in slow light photonic crystal waveguides with very high group index.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2012-07-30

    We report efficient four-wave mixing in dispersion engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides with a flat band group index of n(g) = 60. Using only 15 mW continuous wave coupled input power, we observe a conversion efficiency of -28 dB. This efficiency represents a 30 dB enhancement compared to a silicon nanowire of the same length. At higher powers, thermal redshifting due to linear absorption was found to detune the slow light regime preventing the expected improvement in efficiency. We then overcome this thermal limitation by using oxide-clad waveguides, which we demonstrate for group indices of ng = 30. Higher group indices may be achieved with oxide clad-waveguides, and we predict conversion efficiencies approaching -10 dB, which is equivalent to that already achieved in silicon nanowires but for a 50x shorter length.

  14. Dynamic saturation in Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers: accurate model, role of carrier density, and slow light.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Alouini, Mehdi; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2010-01-18

    We developed an improved model in order to predict the RF behavior and the slow light properties of the SOA valid for any experimental conditions. It takes into account the dynamic saturation of the SOA, which can be fully characterized by a simple measurement, and only relies on material fitting parameters, independent of the optical intensity and the injected current. The present model is validated by showing a good agreement with experiments for small and large modulation indices.

  15. Information-theoretic analysis of a stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-based slow-light system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungjun; Zhu, Yunhui; Gauthier, Daniel J; Gehm, Michael E; Neifeld, Mark A

    2011-11-10

    We use an information-theoretic method developed by Neifeld and Lee [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 25, C31 (2008)] to analyze the performance of a slow-light system. Slow-light is realized in this system via stimulated Brillouin scattering in a 2 km-long, room-temperature, highly nonlinear fiber pumped by a laser whose spectrum is tailored and broadened to 5 GHz. We compute the information throughput (IT), which quantifies the fraction of information transferred from the source to the receiver and the information delay (ID), which quantifies the delay of a data stream at which the information transfer is largest, for a range of experimental parameters. We also measure the eye-opening (EO) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the transmitted data stream and find that they scale in a similar fashion to the information-theoretic method. Our experimental findings are compared to a model of the slow-light system that accounts for all pertinent noise sources in the system as well as data-pulse distortion due to the filtering effect of the SBS process. The agreement between our observations and the predictions of our model is very good. Furthermore, we compare measurements of the IT for an optimal flattop gain profile and for a Gaussian-shaped gain profile. For a given pump-beam power, we find that the optimal profile gives a 36% larger ID and somewhat higher IT compared to the Gaussian profile. Specifically, the optimal (Gaussian) profile produces a fractional slow-light ID of 0.94 (0.69) and an IT of 0.86 (0.86) at a pump-beam power of 450 mW and a data rate of 2.5 Gbps. Thus, the optimal profile better utilizes the available pump-beam power, which is often a valuable resource in a system design.

  16. Slow light in metal-insulator-metal waveguide by negative Goos-Hänchen shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Geum-Yoon; Chheang, Vuthy; Kim, Doo-Gun; Kim, Tae-Ryong; Jun, Li; Kim, Hong-Seung; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrated group velocity delay using a metal-insulator-metal structure for slow light that would be very simple to fabricate. A negative Goos-Hänchen shift of the surface plasmon resonance can be caused by incident radiation while reflecting, resulting in a general group delay. Using this phenomenon, we induced a group delay of 70 fs using a very simple 20-μm-long waveguide.

  17. Light-Induced Responses of Slow Oscillatory Neurons of the Rat Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Szkudlarek, Hanna J.; Orlowska, Patrycja; Lewandowski, Marian H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN) is a small midbrain structure responsible for pupil constriction in response to eye illumination. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that OPN neurons code light intensity levels and therefore are called luminance detectors. Recently, we described an additional population of OPN neurons, characterized by a slow rhythmic pattern of action potentials in light-on conditions. Rhythmic patterns generated by these cells last for a period of approximately 2 minutes. Methodology To answer whether oscillatory OPN cells are light responsive and whether oscillatory activity depends on retinal afferents, we performed in vivo electrophysiology experiments on urethane anaesthetized Wistar rats. Extracellular recordings were combined with changes in light conditions (light-dark-light transitions), brief light stimulations of the contralateral eye (diverse illuminances) or intraocular injections of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Conclusions We found that oscillatory neurons were able to fire rhythmically in darkness and were responsive to eye illumination in a manner resembling that of luminance detectors. Their firing rate increased together with the strength of the light stimulation. In addition, during the train of light pulses, we observed two profiles of responses: oscillation-preserving and oscillation-disrupting, which occurred during low- and high-illuminance stimuli presentation respectively. Moreover, we have shown that contralateral retina inactivation eliminated oscillation and significantly reduced the firing rate of oscillatory cells. These results suggest that contralateral retinal innervation is crucial for the generation of an oscillatory pattern in addition to its role in driving responses to visual stimuli. PMID:22427957

  18. Slow light engineering in polyatomic photonic crystal waveguides based on square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daobin; Zhang, Jie; Yuan, Lihua; Lei, Jingli; Chen, Sai; Han, Jiawei; Hou, Shanglin

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the slow light properties of the polyatomic Photonic Crystal (PhC) which has multiple different air holes in each primitive cell are investigated. A slow light waveguide with "U-type" group index-frequency curve, which results in nearly constant group index over large bandwidth, is achieved using this new photonic crystal geometry based on the square lattice. Also, the radius and position of the innermost rows of small air holes have been modified to investigate the feasibility of controlling the dispersion relation by subtle structural modification. Numerical results demonstrate that decreasing the group velocity effectively and meanwhile maintaining a large Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product ( NDBP) can be achieved by only modifying the radius of the innermost rows of small air holes. Shifting the innermost rows of small air holes toward the waveguide core is highly beneficial to enlarge the slow light bandwidth, but it contributes nothing to the promotion of NDBP. Our results provide important theoretical basis for the potential application offered by the polyatomic photonic crystal in future optical networks.

  19. Theoretical study of ultra-wideband slow light in dual-stub-coupled plasmonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlei; Su, Runzhou; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide side coupled double stubs to realize broadband slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) around the telecom frequency 193.5 THz. When the depth of single stub is approximately equal to integral multiple of half plasmon wavelength, owing to the constructive interferences between the electromagnetic wave propagating through the MIM waveguide and that reflected from the stubs, wideband slow light effect appears. The improved transmission line theory calculation indicates that the group velocity of SPPs in the plasmonic waveguide system for stub depth 1111 nm is 0.1c (c is light speed in vacuum.) over a broad bandwidth of 69 THz. Exploiting the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the group velocity of pulse for width 20 fs (Full width at half high) is calculated. The result agrees well with that predicted by the transmission line theory. This plasmonic waveguide for slow light effect has important potential application in optical delay lines.

  20. High sensitivity electro-optic modulation of slow light in ellipse rods PC-CROW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhong; Wan, Yong; Zong, Weihua

    2017-07-01

    A tunable slow light with low group velocity, high buffer performance and high sensitivity is realized in photonic crystal coupled resonator optical waveguide (PC-CROW) with elliptical rod around cavity. By adjusting the long axis and short axis of the elliptical rods, the slow light and buffer performance of PC-CROW are optimized. As ae=0.42a, be=0.20a, the group velocity is below 2.3053×10-4c, simultaneously, the buffer capacity C and delay time Ts reach the optimum value of 9.8214 bit and 354.8 ps. Then the dynamic modulation of the slow light and buffer performance based on this optimized structure has been discussed systematically. Thanks to the electro-optic effect of the polystyrene substrate, the guided mode shifts linearly to short wavelength in sensitivity of 3.0 nm/mV around 1550 nm, as the applied voltage increases. The modulation sensitivities of delay time and buffer capacity are 0.445 ns/mV and 0.051 bit/mV, respectively. These results show a considerable potential for this structure that can be dynamically controlled according to the practical requirements by electro-optic effect in PC-CROW.

  1. Slow light in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Jiang Cheng; Zhu Kadi

    2011-05-15

    We theoretically investigate the light propagation in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). It is shown that slow light can easily be realized in this system via a BEC coupled to an optical cavity field. The numerical results further demonstrate that the transmitted probe beam from the cavity can be delayed as much as 0.8 ms by suitably selecting the pump field detuning from the cavity field frequency. The scheme proposed here may have potential applications in telecommunication and interferometry.

  2. Electromagnetic field manipulation in planar nanorod antennas metamaterial for slow light application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junqiao; Zhang, Jia; Fan, Chunzhen; Mu, Kaijun; Liang, Erjun; Ding, Pei

    2017-01-01

    We numerically investigated the optical properties of planar nanorod antennas metamaterial that exhibits plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effect. The designed metamaterial is made of a silver nanorod dimer antenna surrounded by two parallel silver nanorods. The interaction between two parallel nanorods and middle nanorod dimer antenna leads to a single PIT band in the transmission spectrum. Moreover, the double PIT windows and slow light can be realized by breaking the structure symmetry. The multi-bands PIT effect offers an excellent potential to manipulate the light speed at multi-frequencies.

  3. Diffraction as a reason for slowing down light pulses in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. V.; Vintskevich, S. V.; Grigoriev, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    The mean velocity of a finite-size short light pulse in a far zone is defined as the vectorial sum of velocities of all rays forming the pulse. Because of diffraction, the mean pulse velocity defined in this way is always somewhat smaller than the speed of light. The conditions are found when this slowing-down effect is sufficiently pronounced to be experimentally measurable. Under these conditions the original Gaussian shape of a pulse is found to be strongly modified with significant lengthening of the rear wing of the field envelope. Schemes for measuring these effects are suggested and discussed.

  4. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2011-06-15

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  5. Slow light in saturable absorbers: Progress in the resolution of a controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Razdobreev, Igor; Ségard, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    There are two opposing models in the analysis of the slow transmission of light pulses through saturable absorbers. The canonical incoherent bleaching model simply explains the slow transmission by combined effects of saturation and of noninstantaneous response of the medium resulting in absorption of the front part of the incident pulse larger than that of its rear. The second model, referred to as the coherent-population-oscillations (CPO) model, considers light beams whose intensity is slightly pulse modulated and attributes the time delay of the transmitted pulse to a reduction of the group velocity. We point out some inconsistencies in the CPO model and show that the two models lie in reality on the same hypotheses, the equations derived in the duly rectified CPO model being local expressions of the integral equations obtained in the incoherent bleaching model. When intense pulses without background are used, the CPO model, based on linearized equations, breaks down. The incoherent bleaching model then predicts that the transmitted light should vanish when the intensity of the incident light is strictly zero. This point is confirmed by the experiments that we have performed on ruby with square-wave incident pulses and we show that the whole shape of the observed pulses agrees with that derived analytically by means of the incoherent bleaching model. We also determine in this model the corresponding evolution of the fluorescence light, which seems to have been evidenced in other experiments.

  6. Tunable slow light in graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide operating in SCLU telecom bands.

    PubMed

    Tyszka-Zawadzka, Anna; Janaszek, Bartosz; Szczepański, Paweł

    2017-04-03

    The tunability of slow light in graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide operating in SCLU telecom bands is investigated. For the first time it has been shown that proper design of a GHMM structure forming waveguide layer and the geometry of the waveguide itself allows stopped light to be obtained in an almost freely selected range of wavelengths within SCLU bands. In particular, the possibility of controlling light propagation in GHMM waveguides by external biasing has been presented. The change of external electric field enables the stop light of the selected wavelength as well as the control of a number of modes, which can be stopped, cut off or supported. Proposed GHMM waveguides could offer great opportunities in the field of integrated photonics that are compatible with CMOS technology, especially since such structures can be utilized as photonic memory cells, tunable optical buffers, delays, optical modulators etc.

  7. Field efficacy and transmission of fast- and slow-killing nucleopolyhedroviruses that are infectious to Adoxophyes honmai (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Maho; Nakai, Madoka; Saito, Yasumasa; Sato, Yasushi; Ishijima, Chikara; Kunimi, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-18

    The smaller tea tortrix, Adoxophyes honmai (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is an economically important pest of tea in Japan. Previous work showed that a fast-killing nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) isolated from A. orana (AdorNPV) and a slow-killing NPV isolated from A. honmai (AdhoNPV) are both infectious to A. honmai larvae. Field application of these different NPVs was conducted against an A. honmai larval population in tea plants, and the control efficacy and transmission rate of the two NPVs were compared. The slow-killing AdhoNPV showed lower field efficacy, in terms of preventing damage caused by A. honmai larvae against the tea plants, than the fast-killing AdorNPV. However, AdhoNPV had a significantly higher horizontal transmission rate than AdorNPV. These results show that AdorNPV is suitable as an inundative agent, while AdhoNPV is an appropriate inoculative agent.

  8. Kinetic theory for neuronal networks with fast and slow excitatory conductances driven by the same spike train.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Aaditya V; Kovacic, Gregor; Cai, David

    2008-04-01

    We present a kinetic theory for all-to-all coupled networks of identical, linear, integrate-and-fire, excitatory point neurons in which a fast and a slow excitatory conductance are driven by the same spike train in the presence of synaptic failure. The maximal-entropy principle guides us in deriving a set of three (1+1) -dimensional kinetic moment equations from a Boltzmann-like equation describing the evolution of the one-neuron probability density function. We explain the emergence of correlation terms in the kinetic moment and Boltzmann-like equations as a consequence of simultaneous activation of both the fast and slow excitatory conductances and furnish numerical evidence for their importance in correctly describing the coarse-grained dynamics of the underlying neuronal network.

  9. Effect of tibial bone resection on the development of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles in foetal sheep.

    PubMed

    West, J M; Williams, N A; Luff, A R; Walker, D W

    2000-04-01

    To determine if longitudinal bone growth affects the differentiation of fast- and slow-twitch muscles, the tibial bone was sectioned at 90 days gestation in foetal sheep so that the lower leg was permanently without structural support. At 140 days (term is approximately 147 days) the contractile properties of whole muscles, activation profiles of single fibres and ultrastructure of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from the hindlimbs were studied. The contractile and activation profiles of the slow-twitch soleus muscles were significantly affected by tibial bone resection (TIBX). The soleus muscles from the TIBX hindlimbs showed: (1) a decrease in the time to peak of the twitch responses from 106.2 +/- 10.7 ms (control, n = 4) to 65.1 +/- 2.48 ms (TIBX, n = 5); (2) fatigue profiles more characteristic of those observed in the fast-twitch muscles: and (3) Ca2+ - and Sr2+ -activation profiles of skinned fibres similar to those from intact hindlimbs at earlier stages of gestation. In the FDL, TIBX did not significantly change whole muscle twitch contraction time, the fatigue profile or the Ca2+ - and Sr2+ -activation profiles of skinned fibres. Electron microscopy showed an increased deposition of glycogen in both soleus and FDL muscles. This study shows that the development of the slow-twitch phenotype is impeded in the absence of the physical support normally provided by the tibial bone. We suggest that longitudinal stretch is an important factor in allowing full expression of the slow-twitch phenotype.

  10. The effects of maternal corticosterone levels on offspring behavior in fast- and slow-growth garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans).

    PubMed

    Robert, Kylie A; Vleck, Carol; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, viviparous offspring are exposed to maternally circulating hormones. Maternal stress increases offspring exposure to corticosterone and this hormonal exposure has the potential to influence developmental, morphological and behavioral traits of the resulting offspring. We treated pregnant female garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) with low levels of corticosterone after determining both natural corticosterone levels in the field and pre-treatment levels upon arrival in the lab. Additional measurements of plasma corticosterone were taken at days 1, 5, and 10 during the 10-day exposure, which occurred during the last third of gestation (of 4-month gestation). These pregnant snakes were from replicate populations of fast- and slow-growth ecotypes occurring in Northern California, with concomitant short and long lifespans. Field corticosterone levels of pregnant females of the slow-growth ecotype were an order of magnitude higher than fast-growth dams. In the laboratory, corticosterone levels increased over the 10 days of corticosterone manipulation for animals of both ecotypes, and reached similar plateaus for both control and treated dams. Despite similar plasma corticosterone levels in treated and control mothers, corticosterone-treated dams produced more stillborn offspring and exhibited higher total reproductive failure than control dams. At one month of age, offspring from fast-growth females had higher plasma corticosterone levels than offspring from slow-growth females, which is opposite the maternal pattern. Offspring from corticosterone-treated mothers, although unaffected in their slither speed, exhibited changes in escape behaviors and morphology that were dependent upon maternal ecotype. Offspring from corticosterone-treated fast-growth females exhibited less anti-predator reversal behavior; offspring from corticosterone-treated slow-growth females exhibited less anti-predator tail lashing behavior.

  11. The role of protons in fast and slow gating of the Torpedo chloride channel ClC-0.

    PubMed

    Zifarelli, Giovanni; Pusch, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Transmembrane proton transport is of fundamental importance for life. The list of H(+) transporting proteins has been recently expanded with the discovery that some members of the CLC gene family are stoichiometrically coupled Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. Other CLC proteins are instead passive Cl(-) selective anion channels. The gating of these CLC channels is, however, strongly regulated by pH, likely reflecting the evolutionary relationship with CLC Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. The role of protons in the gating of the model Torpedo channel ClC-0 is best understood. ClC-0 is a homodimer with separate pores in each subunit. Each protopore can be opened and closed independently from the other pore by a "fast gate". A common, slow gate acts on both pores simultaneously. The opening of the fast gate is controlled by a critical glutamate (E166), whose protonation state determines the fast gate's pH dependence. Extracellular protons likely can arrive directly at E166. In contrast, protonation of E166 from the inside has been proposed to be mediated by the dissociation of an intrapore water molecule. The OH(-) anion resulting from the water dissociation is stabilized in one of the anion binding sites of the channel, competing with intracellular Cl(-) ions. The pH dependence of the slow gate is less well understood. It has been shown that proton translocation drives irreversible gating transitions associated with the slow gate. However, the relationship of the fast gate's pH dependence on the proton translocation and the molecular basis of the slow gate remain to be discovered.

  12. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D.; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. PMID:25100314

  13. Intracellular calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, action potentials elicit contractions by releasing calcium ions (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Experiments on individual mouse muscle fibers micro-injected with a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye reveal that the amount of Ca2+ released is three- to fourfold larger in fast-twitch fibers than in slow-twitch fibers, and the proportion of the released Ca2+ that binds to troponin to activate contraction is substantially smaller. PMID:22450485

  14. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of acetylcholinesterase-associated collagen ColQ in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ting, Annie K L; Siow, Nina L; Kong, L W; Tsim, Karl W K

    2005-12-15

    The presence of a collagenous protein (ColQ) characterizes the collagen-tailed forms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions, which is tethered in the synaptic basal lamina. ColQ subunits, differing mostly by their signal sequences, are encoded by transcripts ColQ-1 and ColQ-1a, which are differentially expressed in slow- and fast-twitch muscles in mammals, respectively. Both ColQ transcripts are derived from a single COLQ gene. Transcripts encoding ColQ increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells; the increase was in parallel with AChE catalytic subunit. Quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the increase during the myotube formation was due to the up regulation of ColQ-1 transcript instead of ColQ-1a. In order to reveal the regulatory mechanism of ColQ transcripts, two distinct promoters, pColQ-1 and pColQ-1a, were isolated from human COLQ gene. The ColQ promoters showed a muscle fiber type-specific expression pattern, and which was in line with the expression of endogenous transcript. After in vivo DNA transfection, pColQ-1 showed strong activity in slow-twitch muscle (e.g. soleus), while pColQ-1a was preferably expressed in fast-twitch muscle (e.g. tibialis). Mutation analysis of the ColQ promoters suggested that the muscle fiber type-specific expression pattern of ColQ transcripts was regulated by a slow upsteam regulatory element (SURE) and a fast intronic regulatory element (FIRE). These results explain the specific expression patterns of collagen-tailed AChE in slow and fast muscle fibers.

  16. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  17. Analytical studies on an extended car following model for mixed traffic flow with slow and fast vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Xu, Xun; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing; Xu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The car-following model is extended to take into account the characteristics of mixed traffic flow containing fast and slow vehicles. We conduct the linear stability analysis to the extended model with finding that the traffic flow can be stabilized with the increase of the percentage of the slow vehicle. It also can be concluded that the stabilization of the traffic flow closely depends on not only the average value of two maximum velocities characterizing two vehicle types, but also the standard deviation of the maximum velocities among all vehicles, when the percentage of the slow vehicles is the same as that of the fast ones. With increase of the average maximum velocity, the traffic flow becomes more and more unstable, while the increase of the standard deviation takes negative effect in stabilizing the traffic system. The direct numerical results are in good agreement with those of theoretical analysis. Moreover, the relation between the flux and the traffic density is investigated to simulate the effects of the percentage of slow vehicles on traffic flux in the whole density regions.

  18. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  19. Inverse problems in cancellous bone: Estimation of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves using Bayesian probability theory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christian C.; Bauer, Adam Q.; Holland, Mark R.; Pakula, Michal; Laugier, Pascal; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Miller, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of cancellous bone can be complicated by artifacts introduced by analyzing acquired data consisting of two propagating waves (a fast wave and a slow wave) as if only one wave were present. Recovering the ultrasonic properties of overlapping fast and slow waves could therefore lead to enhancement of bone quality assessment. The current study uses Bayesian probability theory to estimate phase velocity and normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) parameters in a model of fast and slow wave propagation. Calculations are carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo with simulated annealing to approximate the marginal posterior probability densities for parameters in the model. The technique is applied to simulated data, to data acquired on two phantoms capable of generating two waves in acquired signals, and to data acquired on a human femur condyle specimen. The models are in good agreement with both the simulated and experimental data, and the values of the estimated ultrasonic parameters fall within expected ranges. PMID:21110589

  20. Slow- and fast-twitch hindlimb skeletal muscle phenotypes 12 wk after ⅚ nephrectomy in Wistar rats of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; López, Ignacio; Chamizo, Verónica E; Pineda, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2015-10-01

    This study describes fiber-type adaptations in hindlimb muscles, the interaction of sex, and the role of hypoxia on this response in 12-wk ⅚ nephrectomized rats (Nx). Contractile, metabolic, and morphological features of muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of Nx rats, and compared with sham-operated controls. Rats of both sexes were considered in both groups. A slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation occurred in the tibialis cranialis of Nx rats, particularly in males. This adaptation was accomplished by impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity, increased glycolytic capacity, and no changes in size and nuclear density of muscle fiber types. An oxidative-to-glycolytic metabolic transformation was also found in the soleus muscle of Nx rats. However, a modest fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation, fiber hypertrophy, and nuclear proliferation were observed in soleus muscle fibers of male, but not of female, Nx rats. Serum testosterone levels decreased by 50% in male but not in female Nx rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level decreased by 42% in the tibialis cranialis muscle of male Nx rats. These data demonstrate that 12 wk of Nx induces a muscle-specific adaptive response in which myofibers do not change (or enlarge minimally) in size and nuclear density, but acquire markedly different contractile and metabolic characteristics, which are accompanied by capillary rarefaction. Muscle function and sex play relevant roles in these adaptations.

  1. Slow inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster express as much inbreeding depression as fast inbred lines under semi-natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Knudsen, Morten Ravn; Loeschcke, Volker

    2011-04-01

    Selection may reduce the deleterious consequences of inbreeding. This may be due to purging of recessive deleterious alleles or balancing selection favouring heterozygote offspring. Such selection is expected to be more efficient at slower compared to at faster rates of inbreeding. In this study we tested the impact of inbreeding and the rate of inbreeding on fitness related traits (egg productivity, egg-to-adult viability, developmental time and behaviour) under cold and benign semi-natural thermal conditions using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. We used non-inbred control and slow and fast inbred lines (both with an expected inbreeding level of 0.25). The results show that contrary to expectations the slow inbred lines do not maintain higher average fitness than the fast inbred lines. Furthermore, we found that stressful environmental conditions increased the level of inbreeding depression but the impact of inbreeding rate on the level of inbreeding depression was not affected by the environmental conditions. The results do not support the hypothesis that inbreeding depression is less severe with slow compared to fast rates of inbreeding and illustrate that although selection may be more efficient with slower rates of inbreeding this does not necessary lead to less inbreeding depression.

  2. Simulations of Binary Galaxy Mergers and the Link with Fast Rotators, Slow Rotators, and Kinematically Distinct Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bois, M.; Emsellem, E.; Bournaud, F.; Alatalo, K.; Blitz, L.; Bureau, M.; Cappellari, M.; Davies, R. L.; Davis, T. A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, P.-A.; Khochfar, S.; Krajnović; D.; Kuntschner, H.; Lablanche, P.-Y.; McDermid, R. M.; Morganti, R.; Naab, T.; Oosterloo, T.; Sarzi, M.; Scott, N.; Serra, P.; Weijmans, A.-M.; Young, L. M.

    2013-10-01

    We study the formation of early-type galaxies (ETGs) through mergers with a sample of 70 high-resolution numerical simulations of binary mergers of disc galaxies. These simulations encompass various mass ratios, initial conditions and orbital parameters. We find that binary mergers of disc galaxies with mass ratios of 3:1 and 6:1 are nearly always classified as Fast Rotators according to the ATLAS3D criterion: they preserve the structure of the input fast rotating spiral progenitors. Major disc mergers (mass ratios of 2:1 and 1:1) lead to both Fast and Slow Rotators. Most of the Slow Rotators hold a stellar Kinematically Distinct Core (KDC) in their 1-3 central kilo-parsec: these KDCs are built from the stellar components of the progenitors. The mass ratio of the progenitors is a fundamental parameter for the formation of Slow Rotators in binary mergers, but it also requires a retrograde spin for the progenitor galaxies with respect to the orbital angular momentum. The importance of the initial spin of the progenitors is also investigated in the library of galaxy mergers of the GalMer project.

  3. The influence of climate on the basal metabolic rate of small mammals: a slow-fast metabolic continuum.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, B G

    2003-03-01

    The influence of climate (mean annual rainfall, rainfall variability, ambient temperature, T(a)) on the basal metabolic rate (BMR) of 267 small mammals (<1 kg) from six zoogeographical zones was investigated using conventional and phylogenetically independent data (linear contrasts). All climate variables varied between zones, as did BMR and body temperature ( T(b)), but not thermal conductance. Holarctic zones were more seasonal and colder, but rainfall was less variable, than non-Holarctic zones. In general, the BMR was most strongly influenced by body mass, followed by T(a) and the rainfall variables. However, there was significant variation in the strength of these relationships between zones. BMR and T(b) increased with latitude, and mass-independent BMR and T(b) were positively correlated. The latter relationship offers evidence of a slow-fast metabolic continuum in small mammals. The fast end of the continuum (high BMR) is associated with the highest latitudes where BMR is most strongly influenced by T(a) and mean annual rainfall (i.e. mean productivity). The slow end of the continuum (low BMR) is associated with the semi-tropics, low productivity zones, and climatically unpredictable zones, such as deserts. Here rainfall variability has the strongest influence on BMR after body size. The implications of a slow-fast metabolic continuum are discussed in terms of various models associated with the evolution of BMR, such as the aerobic capacity models and the "energetic definition of fitness" models.

  4. Seismicity rates of slow, intermediate, and fast spreading ridges: Insights from long-term hydroacoustic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Goslin, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean basin earthquakes recorded on NOAA/OSU and U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays are used to evaluate long-term volcano-tectonic seismicity levels from segments of the fast-spreading rate East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 20° S-20° N, intermediate-spreading rate Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) from 39° -52° N and Galapagos Rift (GR) from 90° -103° W, and the slow-spreading northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) from 5° -60° N. The hydrophones record the acoustic energy of seafloor earthquakes that propagate along the ocean sound channel with little attenuation over large distances. Frequency-magnitude relationships (Bohnenstiehl et al., 2002; Dziak et al., 2004) indicate the hydrophone catalogs are complete in these regions to body-wave magnitude ˜2.5 (EPR and GR), 2.5 (JdFR), and 3.0 (MAR), an improvement of 1.5 to 2 units over the land-based seismic catalogs for mid-ocean ridge systems. Using the hydrophone earthquake catalog, we will compare seismicity rates of the JdFR (12 years of data), to seismicity rates along the GR (6 years) and EPR (6 years) and MAR (4 years of data from 5° -39° N; 16 months from 39° -60° N). During these monitoring periods, five confirmed seafloor spreading events (four of which were associated with magmatic activity) were recorded on discrete JdFR segments, while 6 possible magmatic events were observed on the EPR, one on the GR, and one on the MAR. Empirical orthogonal functions will be used to elucidate the space-time patterns of seismicity and compare between the various spreading rates ridges, as well as to investigate the recurrence rate of seafloor spreading events present. In addition, single-link cluster analysis (SLC; Frolich and Davis, 1990) will be used to de-cluster the earthquake databases to reduce the effects of aftershock sequences and magmatic swarms, allowing us to evaluate how overall plate motion and changes in spreading rate effect levels of seismicity between ridge segments and different ridge systems. Preliminary

  5. Carbofuran-induced oxidative stress in slow and fast skeletal muscles: prevention by memantine and atropine.

    PubMed

    Milatovic, Dejan; Gupta, Ramesh C; Dekundy, Andrzej; Montine, Thomas J; Dettbarn, Wolf-D

    2005-03-01

    Acute toxic effects of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors on skeletal muscles are thought to involve oxidative stress with increased generation of free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Muscle hyperactivity with its increased oxygen and energy consumption appear to be the primary cause of oxidative stress. The present investigation was therefore undertaken to establish the normal levels of F(2)-isoprostanes (F(2)-IsoPs, specific markers of ROS/oxidative stress), citrulline (determinant of NO/NOS and marker of RNS), and high-energy phosphates (HEP: adenosine triphosphate, ATP and phosphocreatine, PCr) in slow (soleus) and fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscles of rats. In addition, we aimed to determine if memantine HCl (MEM), in combination with atropine sulfate (ATS), prevents carbofuran-induced changes in markers of oxidative stress. Control values were not significantly different for F(2)-IsoPs (1.142 +/- 0.027 and 1.177 +/- 0.092 ng/g) and citrulline (469.7 +/- 31.8 and 417.8 +/- 18.5 nmol/g) in soleus and EDL muscles, while the values were different for HEP (ATP, 3.66 +/- 0.11 and 5.85 +/- 0.14 micromol/g; PCr, 7.91 +/- 0.26 and 13.14 +/- 0.31 micromol/g). Rats acutely intoxicated with carbofuran (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.) showed the signs of maximal toxicity including muscle hyperactivity within 60 min of exposure. At this time, F(2)-IsoPs (177 and 153%) and citrulline (267 and 304%) levels were significantly increased, while ATP (46 and 43%) and PCr (44 and 46%) levels were decreased in soleus and EDL, respectively. Rats pretreated with MEM (18 mg/kg, s.c.) and ATS (16 mg/kg, s.c.), 60 and 15 min prior to carbofuran, respectively, showed no signs of toxicity. MEM in combination with ATS protected muscles from carbofuran-induced hyperactivity and attenuated increases in F(2)-IsoPs and citrulline, and depletion of HEP. Carbofuran-induced changes and protection by MEM and ATS were of similar magnitude in both

  6. Differences in egg deposition of corticosterone and embryonic expression of corticosterone metabolic enzymes between slow and fast growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Ma, Wenqiang; Guo, Feng; Ni, Yingdong; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ruqian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are vital for embryonic development and their bioactivity is regulated by the intracellular metabolism involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11β-HSDs) and 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-HSD). Here we sought to reveal the differences in egg deposition of corticosterone and embryonic expression of corticosterone metabolic enzymes between slow and fast growing broiler chickens (Gallus gallus). Eggs of fast-growing breed contained significantly higher (P<0.05) corticosterone in the yolk and albumen, compared with that of a slow-growing breed. 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 were expressed in relatively higher abundance in the liver, kidney and intestine, following similar tissue-specific ontogenic patterns. In the liver, expression of both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 was upregulated (P<0.05) towards hatching, yet 20-HSD displayed distinct pattern showing a significant decrease (P<0.05) on posthatch day 1 (D1). Hepatic mRNA expression of 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 was significantly higher in fast-growing chicken embryos at all the embryonic stages investigated and so was the hepatic protein content on embryonic day of 14 (E14) for 11β-HSD1 and on E14 and D1 for 11β-HSD2. 20-HSD mRNA was higher in fast-growing chicken embryos only on E14. Our data provide the first evidence that egg deposition of corticosterone, as well as the hepatic expression of glucocorticoid metabolic enzymes, differs between fast-growing and slow-growing chickens, which may account, to some extent, for the breed disparities in embryonic development.

  7. The numerical study on large bandwidth photonic crystal waveguide with slow light phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming-Bao; Fu, Zhen-Tang; Wang, Wei-Yu

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, two novel types of semi-slow light photonic crystal waveguide with large transmission bandwidth obtained by shifting the boundaries of a W1 waveguide in the direction of light propagation are presented. One includes air rings localized at only one side of the line defect and the other replaces the holes at each side of the waveguide by the uniform air rings which are constructed by the homocentric square dielectric rod inserted into the air holes. The structure produces unusual "n-type" transmission spectrum depending on the different parameters such as inner radius of air ring, dielectric constant of square dielectric rod, etc. It is shown that the transmission spectra of the two structures are completely different from each other. A versatile control of light propagation with large normalized bandwidth and slow light phenomena can be obtained using a unique geometrical parameter. Numerical simulation by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method demonstrates the propagation of the broadband pulse.

  8. Photon drag enhancement by a slow-light moving medium via electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Khan, Naveed; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Rahman, Amin Ur; Ahmad, Afaq

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a considerable enhancement has been observed in the celebrated Fresnel-Fizeau light drag by innovative experimental and theoretical approaches because of its fundamental and practical interest in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. We present a semiclassical density matrix approach on the demonstration of light drag in a slow-light moving medium comprising five-level single tripod atomic configuration. To accomplish this, we introduce Kerr-type nonlinearity that leads to electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification under resonance conditions. By switching ON Kerr-type nonlinearity effect, we observe a prominent transparency window in probe field's absorption spectrum whose width and amplitude can be controlled further by the intensity of Kerr field and control field. The incorporation of Kerr field also switches light propagation from superluminal to subluminal domain. We predict a significant enhancement both in the lateral and the rotary photon drag owing to drag of light linear polarization state subjected to translation and rotation of the host medium, respectively. Consistent with earlier results, light drag considerably depends on both transverse and angular velocity of the host medium. In regime of subluminal propagation, light polarization state drags along the medium motion while in the superluminal propagation region it drags opposite to the medium motion.

  9. Size-dependent waveguide dispersion in nanowire optical cavities: slowed light and dispersionless guiding.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Lambert K; Zhang, Bin; Piccione, Brian; Spector, Arthur A; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2009-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of the size dependence of nanoscale optical confinement in semiconductor nanowire waveguides, as expressed by changes in the dispersion of light, is crucial for the optimal design of nanophotonic devices. Measurements of the dispersion are particularly challenging for nanoscale cavities due to difficulties associated with the in- and out-coupling of light resulting from diffraction effects. We report the strong size dependence of optical dispersion and associated group velocities in subwavelength width ZnSe nanowire waveguide cavities, using a technique based on Fabry-Perot resonator modes as probes over a wide energy range. Furthermore, we observed subwavelength (lambda/9) dispersionless waveguiding and significant slowing of the propagating light by 90% (c/8). These results, in addition to providing insights into nanoscale optical transport, will facilitate the rational design of nanowire photonic devices with tailored dispersion and group velocities.

  10. Comparison of population dynamics between slow- and fast-growing strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus pallas in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William N; Boraas, Martin E

    1989-12-01

    The population dynamics of a slow- and a fast-g