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Sample records for fast light slow

  1. Slow and Fast Light in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Smith, David D.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Dimmock, John O.; Gregory, Don A.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2005-01-01

    We predict the propagation of slow and fast light in two co-resonant coupled optical resonators. In coupled resonators, slow light can propagate without attenuation by a cancellation of absorption as a result of mode splitting and destructive interference, whereas transparent fast light propagation can be achieved by the assistance of gain and splitting of the intracavity resonances, which consequently change the dispersion from normal to anomalous. The effective steady-state response of coupled-resonators is derived using the temporal coupled-mode formalism, and the absorptive and dispersive responses are described. Specifically, the occurrence of slow light via coupled-resonator-induced transparency and gain-assisted fast light are discussed.

  2. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  3. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  4. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  5. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data

  6. Tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzhen; Chen, Yuping; Jiang, Haowei; Liu, Yi'an; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated a tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals. The light experiences an anomalous dispersion near the transmission center and a normal dispersion away from the center, where it can be accelerated and slowed down, respectively. We also obtained the switch between fast and slow light by adjusting the external electric filed. The observed largest temporal gap is 541 ps, which is crucial in practical event operation inside the gap. The results offer a new solution for temporal cloak.

  7. QUANTUM CONTROL OF LIGHT: From Slow Light and FAST CARS to Nuclear γ-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2007-06-01

    In recent work we have demonstrated strong coherent backward wave oscillation using forward propagating fields only. This surprising result is achieved by applying laser fields to an ultra-dispersive medium with proper chosen detunings to excite a molecular vibrational coherence that corresponds to a backward propagating wave [PRL, 97, 113001 (2006)]. The physics then has much in common with propagation of ultra-slow light. Applications of coherent scattering and remote sensing to the detection of bio and chemical pathogens (e.g., anthrax) via Coherent Anti-Raman Scattering together with Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques (FAST CARS [Opt. Comm., 244, 423 (2005)]) will be discussed. Furthermore, the interplay between quantum optics (Dicke super and sub-radiant states) and nuclear physics (forward scattering of γ radiation) provides interesting problems and insights into the quantum control of scattered light [PRL, 96, 010501 (2005)].

  8. Photonic-chip-based tunable slow and fast light via stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Pant, Ravi; Byrnes, Adam; Poulton, Christopher G; Li, Enbang; Choi, Duk-Yong; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2012-03-01

    We report the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of photonic chip based tunable slow and fast light via stimulated Brillouin scattering. Slow, fast, and negative group velocities were observed in a 7 cm long chalcogenide (As(2)S(3)) rib waveguide with a group index change ranging from ~-44 to +130, which results in a maximum delay of ~23 ns at a relatively low gain of ~23 dB. Demonstration of large tunable delays in a chip scale device opens up applications such as frequency sensing and true-time delay for a phased array antenna, where integration and delays ~10 ns are highly desirable.

  9. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized.

  10. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized. PMID:27725763

  11. High-fidelity, broadband stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-based slow light using fast noise modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunhui; Lee, Myungjun; Neifeld, Mark A; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate a 5-GHz-broadband tunable slow-light device based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard highly-nonlinear optical fiber pumped by a noise-current-modulated laser beam. The noisemodulation waveform uses an optimized pseudo-random distribution of the laser drive voltage to obtain an optimal flat-topped gain profile, which minimizes the pulse distortion and maximizes pulse delay for a given pump power. In comparison with a previous slow-modulation method, eye-diagram and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis show that this broadband slow-light technique significantly increases the fidelity of a delayed data sequence, while maintaining the delay performance. A fractional delay of 0.81 with a SNR of 5.2 is achieved at the pump power of 350 mW using a 2-km-long highly nonlinear fiber with the fast noise-modulation method, demonstrating a 50% increase in eye-opening and a 36% increase in SNR in the comparison.

  12. Slow and fast light using nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesala, Bala Subrahmanyam

    Ability to control the velocity of light is usually referred to as slow or fast light depending on whether the group velocity of light is reduced or increased. The slowing of light as it passes through the glass to 2/3rd its original value is a well known phenomenon. This slowing down happens due to the interaction of light with the electrons in the medium. As a general principle, stronger the interaction, larger is the reduction in velocity. Recently, a fascinating field has emerged with the objective of not only slowing down the velocity of light but also speeding it up as it goes through the medium by enhancing light-matter interaction. This unprecedented control opens up several exciting applications in various scientific disciplines ranging from nonlinear science, RF photonics to all-optical networks. Initial experiments succeeded in reducing the velocity of light more than a million times to a very impressive 17 m/s. This speed reduction is extremely useful to enhance various nonlinear processes. For RF photonic applications including phased array antennas and tunable filters, control of phase velocity of light is required while control of group velocity serves various functionalities including packet synchronization and contention resolution in an optical buffer. Within the last 10 years, several material systems have been proposed and investigated for this purpose. Schemes based on semiconductor systems for achieving slow and fast light has the advantage of extremely high speed and electrical control. In addition, they are compact, operate at room temperature and can be easily integrated with other optical subsystems. In this work, we propose to use nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for the purpose of controlling the velocity of light. The versatility of the physical processes present in SOAs enables the control of optical signals ranging from 1GHz to larger than 1000 GHz (1 THz). First, we experimentally demonstrate both

  13. A simple and tunable switch between slow- and fast-light in two signal modes with an optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Yan, Lei-Lei; Chen, Gui-Bin; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhan, You-Bang

    2016-12-01

    The control of slow and fast light propagation is a challenging task. Here, we theoretically study the dynamics of a driven optomechanical cavity coupled to a charged nanomechanical resonator (NR) via Coulomb interaction. We find that the tunable switch between slow- and fast-light for two signal modes can be observed from the output field by adjusting the laser-cavity detuning in this system. Moreover, the frequencies of two signal light can be tuned by Coulomb coupling strength. In comparison with previous schemes, the clear advantage of our scheme is that we can simply switch from fast- to slow-light in two signal modes by only adjusting the laser-cavity deturning from Δ ={ω1} to Δ =-{ω1} . The proposal may have potential application in optical router and quantum optomechanical memory.

  14. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    PubMed

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  15. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  16. Optical knobs from slow- to fast-light with gain in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dingan; Zeng, Yaguang; Bai, Yanfeng

    2011-09-01

    The light pulse propagation through semiconductor quantum-well heterostructures under realistic experimental conditions is studied analytically with the Schrödinger equations. It is shown that slow light and superluminal propagation with gain can be observed by varying the relative phase and the strength of the applied fields. Such investigation may open up the possibility to control the light propagation and may lead to potential applications such as high-fidelity optical delay lines, optical buffers and optical communication in quantum wells solid materials.

  17. Reversible Fano resonance by transition from fast light to slow light in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yundong; Zhang, Xuenan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Ruidong; Gai, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Ping

    2013-04-08

    We theoretically propose and experimentally perform a novel dispersion tuning scheme to realize a tunable Fano resonance in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) structure coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We reveal that the profile of the Fano resonance in the resonator coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers (RCMZI) is determined not only by the phase shift difference between the two arms of the RCMZI but also by the dispersion (group delay) of the CRIT structure. Furthermore, it is theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated that the slope and the asymmetry parameter (q) describing the Fano resonance spectral line shape of the RCMZI experience a sign reversal when the dispersion of the CRIT structure is tuned from abnormal dispersion (fast light) to normal dispersion (slow light). These theoretical and experimental results indicate that the reversible Fano resonance which holds significant implications for some attractive device applications such as highly sensitive biochemical sensors, ultrafast optical switches and routers can be realized by the dispersion tuning scheme in the RCMZI.

  18. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  19. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  20. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  1. Slow and fast light propagation in a defect slab doped with polaritonic materials and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the group velocity of transmitted and reflected pulses through a defect dielectric medium doped with polaritonic materials and nanoparticles is explored by using the density matrix equations and transform matrix method. It is demonstrated that the group velocity of transmitted and reflected lights can be manipulated by adjusting the system’s parameters. The effect of the dipole-dipole interaction is also discussed on behaviors of transmitted and reflected pulses through the slab. Our proposed model may be opened up the possibility of new storage and switching devices based on polaritonic material nanoparticles in future commercial systems.

  2. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  3. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  4. Ultrabroad Bandwidth Slow Light in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-31

    REPORT DATE (DDAfM-YYYV? 31-12-2008 2. REPORT DATE Report Type - Final Technical 3L DATES COVERED (From-To) 6/9/06-9/30/08 4. TITLE AMD SUBTITLE...AVAILABIUTY STATEMENT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: UNLIMITED 1i SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 20100426209 14 .AB8TRACT Slow and fast light enables key functionality in...Connie Chang-Hasnain, "Experimental Demonstration of Slow and Superluminal Light in Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers", Vol. 14 , No. 26, OPTICS EXPRESS

  5. Slow light in flight imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kali; Little, Bethany; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single-photon avalanche diode camera array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow-light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapor. Light-in-flight imaging of slow-light propagation enables direct visualization of a series of physical effects, including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  6. Heterogeneity of myofibrillar proteins in lobster fast and slow muscles: variants of troponin, paramyosin, and myosin light chains comprise four distinct protein assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fast and slow muscles from the claws and abdomen of the American lobster Homarus americanus were examined for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and for differences in myofibrillar proteins. Both myosin and actomyosin ATPase were correlated with fiber composition and contractile speed. Four distinct patterns of myofibrilla proteins observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. A total of three species of troponin-T, five species of troponin-I, and three species of troponin-C were observed. Lobster myosins contained two groups of light chains (LC), termed alpha and beta. There were three ..cap alpha..-LC variants and two ..beta..-LC variants. There were no apparent differences in myosin heavy chain, actin, and tropomyosin. Only paramyosin showed a pattern completely consistent with muscle fiber type: slow fibers contained a species (105 kD) slightly smaller than the principle variant (110 kD) in fast fibers. It is proposed that the type of paramyosin present could provide a biochemical marker to identify the fiber composition of muscles that have not been fully characterized. The diversity of troponin and myosin LC variants suggests that subtle differences in physiological performance exist within the broader categories of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Comparative analysis of four-wave mixing of optical pulses in slow- and fast-light regimes of a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Lavdas, Spyros; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2015-09-15

    We present an in-depth study of four-wave mixing (FWM) of optical pulses in silicon photonic crystal waveguides. Our analysis is based on a rigorous model that includes all relevant linear and nonlinear optical effects and their dependence on the group velocity, as well as the influence of free carriers on pulse dynamics. In particular, we reveal key differences between FWM in the slow- and fast-light regimes and how they are related to the physical parameters of the pulses and waveguide. Finally, we illustrate how these results can be used to design waveguides with optimized FWM conversion efficiency.

  8. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  9. Fast wandering of slow birds.

    PubMed

    Toner, John

    2011-12-01

    I study a single slow bird moving with a flock of birds of a different and faster (or slower) species. I find that every species of flocker has a characteristic speed γ ≠ v(0), where v(0) is the mean speed of the flock such that if the speed v(s) of the slow bird equals γ, it will randomly wander transverse to the mean direction of flock motion far faster than the other birds will: Its mean-squared transverse displacement will grow in d = 2 with time t like t(5/3), in contrast to t(4/3) for the other birds. In d = 3, the slow bird's mean-squared transverse displacement grows like t(5/4), in contrast to t for the other birds. If v(s) ≠ γ, the mean-squared displacement of the slow bird crosses over from t(5/3) to t(4/3) scaling in d = 2 and from t(5/4) to t scaling in d = 3 at a time t(c) that scales according to t(c) proportionally |v(s) - γ|(-2).

  10. Slow light and slow acoustic phonons in optophononic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafañe, V.; Soubelet, P.; Bruchhausen, A. E.; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaître, A.; Fainstein, A.

    2016-11-01

    Slow and confined light have been exploited in optoelectronics to enhance light-matter interactions. Here we describe the GaAs/AlAs semiconductor microcavity as a device that, depending on the excitation conditions, either confines or slows down both light and optically generated acoustic phonons. The localization of photons and phonons in the same place of space amplifies optomechanical processes. Picosecond laser pulses are used to study through time-resolved reflectivity experiments the coupling between photons and both confined and slow acoustic phonons when the laser is tuned either with the cavity (confined) optical mode or with the stop-band edge (slow) optical modes. A model that fully takes into account the modified propagation of the acoustic phonons and light in these resonant structures is used to describe the laser detuning dependence of the coherently generated phonon spectra and amplitude under these different modes of laser excitation. We observe that confined light couples only to confined mechanical vibrations, while slow light can generate both confined and slow coherent vibrations. A strong enhancement of the optomechanical coupling using confined photons and vibrations, and also with properly designed slow photon and phonon modes, is demonstrated. The prospects for the use of these optoelectronic devices in confined and slow optomechanics are addressed.

  11. Multi-band slow light metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Meng, Fan-Yi; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wu, Qun; Hua, Jun

    2012-02-13

    In this paper, a multi-band slow light metamaterial is presented and investigated. The metamaterial unit cell is composed of three cut wires of different sizes and parallel to each other. Two transparency windows induced by two-two overlaps of absorption bands of three cut wires are observed. The multi-band transmission characteristics and the slow light properties of metamaterial are verified by numerical simulation, which is in a good agreement with theoretical predictions. The impacts of structure parameters on transparency windows are also investigated. Simulation results show the spectral properties can be tuned by adjusting structure parameters of metamaterial. The equivalent circuit model and the synthesis method of the multi-band slow light metamaterial are presented. It is seen from simulation results that the synthesis method accurately predicts the center frequency of the multi-band metamaterial, which opens a door to a quick and accurate construction for multi-band slow light metamaterial.

  12. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  13. Fast-to-Slow Transition of Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function and Corresponding Changes in Myosin Heavy and Light Chain Formation in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Tanja; Braubach, Peter; Landwehrmeyer, G. Bernhard; Lindenberg, Katrin S.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington´s disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease resulting from an expanded polyglutamine sequence (poly-Q) in the protein huntingtin (HTT). Various studies report atrophy and metabolic pathology of skeletal muscle in HD and suggest as part of the process a fast-to-slow fiber type transition that may be caused by the pathological changes in central motor control or/and by mutant HTT in the muscle tissue itself. To investigate muscle pathology in HD, we used R6/2 mice, a common animal model for a rapidly progressing variant of the disease expressing exon 1 of the mutant human gene. We investigated alterations in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a typical fast-twitch muscle, and the soleus (SOL), a slow-twitch muscle. We focussed on mechanographic measurements of excised muscles using single and repetitive electrical stimulation and on the expression of the various myosin isoforms (heavy and light chains) using dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole muscle and single fiber preparations. In EDL of R6/2, the functional tests showed a left shift of the force-frequency relation and decrease in specific force. Moreover, the estimated relative contribution of the fastest myosin isoform MyHC IIb decreased, whereas the contribution of the slower MyHC IIx isoform increased. An additional change occurred in the alkali MyLC forms showing a decrease in 3f and an increase in 1f level. In SOL, a shift from fast MyHC IIa to the slow isoform I was detectable in male R6/2 mice only, and there was no evidence of isoform interconversion in the MyLC pattern. These alterations point to a partial remodeling of the contractile apparatus of R6/2 mice towards a slower contractile phenotype, predominantly in fast glycolytic fibers. PMID:27820862

  14. Slow light by coherent hole burnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiong-Yi; Zhang, Bing; Wei, Xiao-Gang; Wu, Jin-Hui; Kuang, Shang-Qi; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2008-06-01

    We show that the simultaneous application of a copropagating saturating pump and a counterpropagating coherent beam can be used to burn a narrow spectral hole within the absorption line of the optical transition in a Doppler-broadened medium. The large index of refraction of this hole slows down a light pulse by a factor of about 104 . In addition, we propose a method to create two-color slow light pulses with simultaneous gain by employing a bichromatic field to saturate the medium.

  15. Slow clean-up for fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-05-01

    The year 2300 is so distant that one may be forgiven for thinking of it only in terms of science fiction. But this is the year that workers at the Dounreay power station in Northern Scotland - the UK's only centre for research into "fast" nuclear reactors - term as the "end point" by which time the site will be completely clear of radioactive material. More than 180 facilities - including the iconic dome that housed the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) - were built at at the site since it opened in 1959, with almost 50 having been used to handle radioactive material.

  16. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials’ sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  17. Fast and slow myosins as markers of muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, M; Guiu-Comadevall, M; Cadefau, J A; Parra, J; Balius, R; Estruch, A; Rodas, G; Bedini, J L; Cussó, R

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis of muscular lesions suffered by athletes is usually made by clinical criteria combined with imaging of the lesion (ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance) and blood tests to detect the presence of non-specific muscle markers. This study was undertaken to evaluate injury to fast and slow-twitch fibres using specific muscle markers for these fibres. Methods: Blood samples were obtained from 51 non-sports people and 38 sportsmen with skeletal muscle injury. Western blood analysis was performed to determine fast and slow myosin and creatine kinase (CK) levels. Skeletal muscle damage was diagnosed by physical examination, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance and biochemical markers. Results: The imaging tests were found to be excellent for detecting and confirming grade II and III lesions. However, grade I lesions were often unconfirmed by these techniques. Grade I lesions have higher levels of fast myosin than slow myosin with a very small increase in CK levels. Grade II and III lesions have high values of both fast and slow myosin. Conclusions: The evaluation of fast and slow myosin in the blood 48 h after the lesion occurs is a useful aid for the detection of type I lesions in particular, since fast myosin is an exclusive skeletal muscle marker. The correct diagnosis of grade I lesions can prevent progression of the injury in athletes undergoing continual training sessions and competitions, thus aiding sports physicians in their decision making. PMID:18070807

  18. Characterization of slow and fast phase nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Charles S.; Rodriguez-Garcia, Carlos A.; Wong, Wing Chan; Im, Jae J.; Schmidt, Glenn F.

    1991-01-01

    A current literature review of the analog and digital process of vestibular and optical kinetic nystagmus reveals little agreement in the methods used by various labs. The strategies for detection of saccade (fast phase velocity component of nystagmus) vary between labs, and most of the process have not been evaluated and validated with a standard database. A survey was made of major vestibular labs in the U.S. that perform computer analyses of vestibular and optokinetic reflexes to stimuli, and a baseline was established from which to standardize data acquisition and analysis programs. The concept of an Error Index was employed as the criterium for evaluating the performance of the vestibular analysis software programs. The performance criterium is based on the detection of saccades and is the average of the percentages of missed detections and false detections. Evaluation of the programs produced results for lateral gaze with saccadic amplitude of one, two, three, five, and ten degrees with various signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, results were obtained for sinusoidal pursuit of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.50 Hz with saccades from one to ten degrees at various signal-to-noise ratios. Selection of the best program was made from the performance in the lateral gaze with three degrees of saccadic amplitude and in the 0.10 Hz sinusoid with three degrees of saccadic amplitude.

  19. Improved Slow Light Capacity In Graphene-based Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ran; Peng, Xi-Liang; Li, Er-Ping; Xu, Yang; Jin, Jia-Min; Zhang, Xian-Min; Chen, Hong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the wideband slow light in two-dimensional material graphene, revealing that graphene exhibits much larger slow light capability than other materials. The slow light performances including material dispersion, bandwidth, dynamic control ability, delay-bandwidth product, propagation loss, and group-velocity dispersion are studied, proving graphene exhibits significant advantages in these performances. A large delay-bandwidth product has been obtained in a simple yet functional grating waveguide with slow down factor c/vg at 163 and slow light bandwidth Δω at 94.4 nm centered at 10.38 μm, which is several orders of magnitude larger than previous results. Physical explanation of the enhanced slow light in graphene is given. Our results indicate graphene is an excellent platform for slow light applications, promoting various future slow light devices based on graphene. PMID:26478563

  20. Slow Light and Superluminality in Kerr Media without a Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Seo, Jae Tae; Tabibi, Bagher; Wang, Huitian

    2005-08-01

    Subluminal and superluminal propagation of a light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 mm per second to as fast as negative several thousands meters per second can easily be obtained in the Kerr medium, which possesses a large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr3+-doped alexandrite, ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse.

  1. Nonlinear light propagation in chalcogenide photonic crystal slow light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Baba, Toshihiko

    2010-12-06

    Optical nonlinearity can be enhanced by the combination of highly nonlinear chalcogenide glass and photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) providing strong optical confinement and slow-light effects. In a Ag-As(2)Se(3) chalcogenide PCW, the effective nonlinear parameter γeff reaches 6.3 × 10(4) W(-1)m(-1), which is 200 times larger than that in Si photonic wire waveguides. In this paper, we report the detailed design, fabrication process, and the linear and nonlinear characteristics of this waveguide at silica fiber communication wavelengths. We show that the waveguide exhibits negligible two-photon absorption, and also high-efficiency self-phase modulation and four-wave mixing, which are assisted by low-dispersion slow light.

  2. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    PubMed

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  3. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales

    PubMed Central

    IDE, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes. PMID:25311138

  4. Active vision system integrating fast and slow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillon-Santana, Modesto; Guerra-Artal, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, J.; Dominguez-Brito, A.; Isern-Gonzalez, J.; Cabrera-Gamez, Jorge; Hernandez-Tejera, F. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes an Active Vision System whose design assumes a distinction between fast or reactive and slow or background processes. Fast processes need to operate in cycles with critical timeouts that may affect system stability. While slow processes, though necessary, do not compromise system stability if its execution is delayed. Based on this simple taxonomy, a control architecture has been proposed and a prototype implemented that is able to track people in real-time with a robotic head while trying to identify the target. In this system, the tracking mobile is considered as the reactive part of the system while person identification is considered a background task. This demonstrator has been developed using a new generation DSP (TMS320C80) as a specialized coprocessor to deal with fast processes, and a commercial robotic head with a dedicated DSP-based motor controller. These subsystems are hosted by a standard Pentium-Pro PC running Windows NT where slow processes are executed. The flexibility achieved in the design phase and the preliminary results obtained so far seem to validate the approach followed to integrate time- critical and slow tasks on a heterogeneous hardware platform.

  5. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  6. Optimal control NMR differentiation between fast and slow sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2010-07-01

    Sodium ions in tissues and organs may experience motion on a variety of timescales, leading to NMR relaxation effects with quadrupolar coupling as the primary mechanism. The various effects that this fluctuating interaction has on spin dynamics can be exploited for distinguishing slow sodium ions from fast ones. Techniques such as triple-quantum filtering have been used for this purpose in the past. In this work we present optimal pulses which significantly improve the selectivity towards slow-tumbling sodium. These pulses can also be modified for robustness against magnetic field inhomogeneities, and could hence also become useful as MRI contrast methods.

  7. Chirp-enhanced fast light in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, F G; Pesala, Bala; Uskov, Alexander V; Chang-Hasnain, C J

    2007-12-24

    We present a novel scheme to increase the THz-bandwidth fast light effect in semiconductor optical amplifiers and increase the number of advanced pulses. By introducing a linear chirp to the input pulses before the SOA and recompressing at the output with an opposite chirp, the advance-bandwidth product reached 3.5 at room temperature, 1.55 microm wavelength. This is the largest number reported, to the best of our knowledge, for a semiconductor slow/fast light device.

  8. Rapid geometrical chaotization in slow-fast Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Zelenyi, L M

    2014-06-01

    In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate effects of a new mechanism of adiabaticity destruction in Hamiltonian systems with a separatrix in the phase space. In contrast to the slow diffusive-like destruction typical for many systems, this new mechanism is responsible for very fast chaotization in a large phase volume. To investigate this mechanism we consider a Hamiltonian system with two degrees of freedom and with a separatrix in the phase plane of fast variables. The fast chaotization is due to an asymmetry of the separatrix and corresponding geometrical jumps of an adiabatic invariant. This system describes the motion of charged particles in a inhomogeneous electromagnetic field with a specific configuration. We show that geometrical jumps of the adiabatic invariant result in a very fast chaotization of particle motion.

  9. Dispersion-controlled slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Adachi, Jun; Ishikura, Norihiro; Hamachi, Yohei; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Slow light with a markedly low group velocity is a promising solution for optical buffering and advanced time-domain optical signal processing. It is also anticipated to enhance linear and nonlinear effects and so miniaturize functional photonic devices because slow light compresses optical energy in space. Photonic crystal waveguide devices generate on-chip slow light at room temperature with a wide bandwidth and low dispersion suitable for short pulse transmission. This paper first explains the delay-bandwidth product, fractional delay, and tunability as crucial criteria for buffering capacity of slow light devices. Then the paper describes experimental observations of slow light pulse, exhibiting their record high values. It also demonstrates the nonlinear enhancement based on slow light pulse transmission.

  10. Slow Light in Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that a splitting of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) occurs in coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs), and that these split modes are of a higher Q than the single-resonator modes, leading to enormous circulating intensity magnification factors that dramatically reduce thresholds for nonlinear optical (NLO) processes. As a result of the enhancements in Q, pulses propagating at a split resonance can propagate much slower (faster) for over (under)-coupled structures, due to the modified dispersion near the split resonance. Moreover, when loss is considered, the mode-splitting may be thought of as analogous to the Autler-Townes splitting that occurs in atomic three-level lambda systems, i.e., it gives rise to induced transparency as a result of destructive interference. In under- or over-coupled CROWs, this coupled resonator induced transparency (CRIT) allows slow light to be achieved at the single-ring resonance with no absorption, while maintaining intensities such that NLO effects are maximized. The intensity magnification of the circulating fields and phase transfer characteristics are examined in detail.

  11. Multi-timescale systems and fast-slow analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Richard; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2016-07-15

    Mathematical models of biological systems often have components that vary on different timescales. This multi-timescale character can lead to problems when doing computer simulations, which can require a great deal of computer time so that the components that change on the fastest time scale can be resolved. Mathematical analysis of these multi-timescale systems can be greatly simplified by partitioning them into subsystems that evolve on different time scales. The subsystems are then analyzed semi-independently, using a technique called fast-slow analysis. In this review we describe the fast-slow analysis technique and apply it to relaxation oscillations, neuronal bursting oscillations, canard oscillations, and mixed-mode oscillations. Although these examples all involve neural systems, the technique can and has been applied to other biological, chemical, and physical systems. It is a powerful analysis method that will become even more useful in the future as new experimental techniques push forward the complexity of biological models.

  12. Reply to Origin of fast electrons' from slow atomic collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, R.A. ); Alonso, E.V. ); Oliva, A.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F. )

    1993-08-01

    We show reasons why negative ions cannot contribute significantly to our observation of fast electrons in slow atomic collisions [Phys. Rev. 45, 5286 (1992)]. We point out that the opposite suggestion by Yasui [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1711 (1993)] results from multiple errors in his analysis, including inadequate consideration of energy conservation, the use of nonapplicable data from the literature, neglect of decay in flight of metastable negative ions, nonconsideration of detection efficiency, and the inconsistent fit of experimental data.

  13. Kinematic Changes During a Marathon for Fast and Slow Runners

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Roper, Maggie; Hunter, Iain; W. Myrer, Joseph; L. Eggett, Dennis; K. Seeley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe kinematic changes that occur during an actual marathon. We hypothesized that (1) certain running kinematic measures would change between kilometres 8 and 40 (miles 5 and 25) of a marathon and (2) fast runners would demonstrate smaller changes than slow runners. Subjects (n = 179) were selected according to finish time (Range = 2:20:47 to 5:30:10). Two high-speed cameras were used to measure sagittal-plane kinematics at kilometres 8 and 40 of the marathon. The dependent variables were stride length, contact time, peak knee flexion during support and swing, and peak hip flexion and extension during swing. Two-tailed paired t-tests were used to compare dependent variables between kilometres 8 and 40 for all subjects, and regression analyses were used to determine whether faster runners exhibited smaller changes (between miles 5 and 25) than slower runners. For all runners, every dependent variable changed significantly between kilometres 8 and 40 (p < 0.001). Stride length increased 1.3%, contact time increased 13.1%, peak knee flexion during support decreased 3.2%, and peak hip extension, knee flexion, and hip flexion during swing decreased 27.9%, increased 4.3%, and increased 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). Among these significant changes, all runners generally changed the same from kilometres 8 and 40 except that fast runners decreased peak knee flexion during support less than the slow runners (p < 0.002). We believe that these changes, for all runners (fast and slow), were due to fatigue. The fact that fast runners maintained knee flexion during support more consistently might be due to their condition on the race day. Strengthening of knee extensor muscles may facilitate increased knee flexion during support throughout a marathon. Key points Runners changed kinematics significantly from kilometres 8 to 40 (increased stride length, contact time, peak hip flexion during swing, and peak knee flexion during swing, and

  14. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  15. Physiological changes in fast and slow muscle with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Misulis, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    A rat hindlimb suspension model of simulated weightlessness was used to examine the physiological characteristics of skeletal muscle. The physiological sequelae of hindlimb suspension were compared to those of spinal cord section, denervation by sciatic nerve crush, and control. Muscle examined were the predominantly slow (Type 1) soleus (SOL) and the predominantly fast (Type 2) extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Two procedures which alter motor unit activity, hindlimb suspension and spinal cord section, produce changes in characteristics of skeletal muscles that are dependent upon fiber type. The SOL develops characteristics more representative of a fast muscle, including smaller Type 1 fiber proportion and higher AChE activity. The EDL, which is already predominantly fast, loses most of its few Type 1 fibers, thus also becoming faster. These data are in agreement with the studies in which rats experienced actual weightlessness.

  16. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  17. Singular Hopf Bifurcation in Systems with Fast and Slow Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaksma, B.

    1998-10-01

    We study a general nonlinear ODE system with fast and slow variables, i.e., some of the derivatives are multiplied by a small parameter. The system depends on an additional bifurcation parameter. We derive a normal form for this system, valid close to equilibria where certain conditions on the derivatives hold. The most important condition concerns the presence of eigenvalues with singular imaginary parts, by which we mean that their imaginary part grows without bound as the small parameter tends to zero. We give a simple criterion to test for the possible presence of equilibria satisfying this condition. Using a center manifold reduction, we show the existence of Hopf bifurcation points, originating from the interaction of fast and slow variables, and we determine their nature. We apply the theory, developed here, to two examples: an extended Bonhoeffer—van der Pol system and a predator-prey model. Our theory is in good agreement with the numerical continuation experiments we carried out for the examples.

  18. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. On slow light as a black hole analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, W. G.; Schützhold, R.

    2003-07-01

    Although slow light (electromagnetically induced transparency) would seem an ideal medium in which to institute a “dumb hole” (black hole analogue), it suffers from a number of problems. We show that the high phase velocity in the slow light regime ensures that the system cannot be used as an analogue displaying Hawking radiation. Even though an appropriately designed slow-light setup may simulate classical features of black holes—such as horizon, mode mixing, “Bogoliubov” coefficients, etc.—it does not reproduce the related quantum effects.

  20. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  1. Fasting-related autophagic response in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomonori; Oishi, Yasuharu; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Muraoka, Isao

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated regulation of autophagy in slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles in fasting-related atrophy. Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to fasting for 1, 2, or 3 days. Greater weight loss was observed in plantaris muscle than in soleus muscle in response to fasting. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LC3-II, a marker protein for macroautophagy, was expressed at a notably higher level in plantaris than in soleus muscle, and that the expression level was fasting duration-dependent. To identify factors related to LC3-II enhancement, autophagy-related signals were examined in both types of muscle. Phosphorylated mTOR was reduced in plantaris but not in soleus muscle. FOXO3a and ER stress signals were unchanged in both muscle types during fasting. These findings suggest that preferential atrophy of fast-twitch muscle is associated with induction of autophagy during fasting and that differences in autophagy regulation are attributable to differential signal regulation in soleus and plantaris muscle.

  2. Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2007-04-01

    The authors theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measurements widely employed in analytical chemistry.

  3. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  4. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z H; Chen, H; Yang, F S; Luo, C R; Zhao, X P

    2016-11-25

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  5. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths. PMID:27886279

  6. Regular and slow-fast codimension 4 saddle-node bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzak, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Using geometric singular perturbation theory, including the family blow-up as one of the main techniques, we prove that the cyclicity, i.e. maximum number of limit cycles, in both regular and slow-fast unfoldings of nilpotent saddle-node singularity of codimension 4 is 2. The blow-up technique enables us to use the well known results for slow-fast codimension 1 and 2 Hopf bifurcations, slow-fast Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations and slow-fast codimension 3 saddle and elliptic bifurcations.

  7. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  8. Efficient coupling to slow light photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md Shofiqul Islam; Devarapu, Ganga Chinna Rao; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-04-01

    Slow light photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) have been the subject of intensive study due to their potential for on-chip applications such as optical buffers and the enhancement of nonlinear phenomenon. However, due to high group velocity mismatch between the strip waveguide and the slow light waveguide efficient coupling of light is challenging. The coupling efficiency is also very sensitive to the truncation at the interface between the two waveguides. This sensitivity can be removed and light can efficiently be coupled from the strip waveguide to the slow light waveguide by adding an intermediate photonic crystal waveguide (or coupler) that operates at a group index of ˜ 5. Several designs have been proposed for couplers to obtain higher coupling efficiency within the desired group index range. We have studied uniaxial stretched couplers in which the lattice constant is stretched in the direction of propagation by 10-50 nm in the coupler region. Using a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Simulation Method that allows the extraction of the group index, we have observed 8.5 dB improvement in the coupling efficiency at the group index of 30. Efficient coupling is dominantly determined by the band edge position of the coupler region and maximum transmission efficiency is limited by the maximum transmission of the coupler PCW. If the band edge of coupler PCW is sufficiently red shifted relative to the band edge of the slow light PCW then higher coupling efficiency can be achieved.

  9. Spinor Slow-Light and Dirac Particles with Variable Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.; Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.

    2010-10-22

    We consider the interaction of two weak probe fields of light with an atomic ensemble coherently driven by two pairs of standing wave laser fields in a tripod-type linkage scheme. The system is shown to exhibit a Dirac-like spectrum for light-matter quasiparticles with multiple dark states, termed spinor slow-light polaritons. They posses an 'effective speed of light' given by the group velocity of slow light, and can be made massive by inducing a small two-photon detuning. Control of the two-photon detuning can be used to locally vary the mass including a sign flip. Particularly, this allows the implementation of the random-mass Dirac model for which localized zero-energy (midgap) states exist with unusual long-range correlations.

  10. Fast Bayesian inference for slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeval, Christophe

    2014-04-01

    We present and discuss a new approach increasing by orders of magnitude the speed of performing Bayesian inference and parameter estimation within the framework of slow-roll inflation. The method relies on the determination of an effective likelihood for inflation which is a function of the primordial amplitude of the scalar perturbations complemented with the necessary number of the so-called Hubble flow functions to reach the desired accuracy. Starting from any cosmological data set, the effective likelihood is obtained by marginalization over the standard cosmological parameters, here viewed as `nuisance' from the early Universe point of view. As being low dimensional, basic machine-learning algorithms can be trained to accurately reproduce its multidimensional shape and then be used as a proxy to perform fast Bayesian inference on the inflationary models. The robustness and accuracy of the method are illustrated using the Planck cosmic microwave background data to perform primordial parameter estimation for the large field models of inflation. In particular, marginalized over all possible reheating history, we find the power index of the potential to verify p < 2.3 at 95 per cent of confidence.

  11. Anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations: fast wind vs slow wind.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasso, S.; Milano, L. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    The fluctuations in the solar wind are often modeled in terms of two distinct populations: (a) a 'wave-like' population with quasi-parallel wavenumbers and (b) a quasi-two dimensional 'turbulent-like' fluctuations with perpendicular wavenumbers. Here the qualification "quasi-parallel" or "quasi-2D" means that nearby wavevectors are grouped together in an idealzed way, for simplicity. The relative abundance of these two populations is important in gaining insight on the dynamics of waves or turbulence in the solar wind, and also in understanding the transport of energetic particle populations, as turbulence geometry has a major impact on scattering. It has been established in the literature that turbulence is, generally speaking, more developed in the slow solar wind, with power spectra closer to the kolmogorov value at 1AU, while the fast solar wind is more "Alfvenic", typically with higher values of the cross helicity. It seems natural therefore to investigate the anisotropy structure of solar wind fluctuations as a function of wind speed. We present here our preliminary results in this regard, obtained from magnetic and plasma data from the ACE specraft, at 1AU, essentially in the ecliptic plane. We also discuss possible implications for the modeling the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind.

  12. Fast and slow border traps in MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    Convergent lines of evidence are reviewed which show that near-interfacial oxide traps (border traps) that exchange charge with the Si can strongly affect the performance, radiation response, and long-term reliability of MOS devices. Observable effects of border traps include capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis, enhanced 1/f noise, compensation of trapped holes, and increased thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors. Effects of fast (switching times between {approximately} 10{sup {minus}6} and 1 s) and slow (switching times greater than {approximately} 1 s) border traps have been resolved via a dual-transistor technique. In conjunction with studies of MOS electrical response, electron paramagnetic resonance and spin dependent recombination studies suggest that different types of E{prime} defects (trivalent Si centers in SiO{sub 2} associated with O vacancies) can function as border traps in MOS devices exposed to ionizing radiation or high-field stress. Hydrogen-related centers may also be border traps.

  13. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  14. Estuary-ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology.

    PubMed

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E

    2016-11-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1-3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary-ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to changing

  15. Estuary–ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Cloern, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical, and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1–3 years, by 3- to 19-fold increased abundances of five ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary–ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure, and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the timescale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to

  16. Fast and Slow Namers: Benefits of Segmentation and Whole Word Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Betty Ann; Bourassa, Derrick C.; Horn, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Trained fast- and slow-namer groups of poor-reading second graders to read words using different training regimes. Found that slow namers were particularly disadvantaged compared to fast namers when trained with word-level units. Children showed poorer retention following onset/rime training compared to other types. They showed the best…

  17. Slow light propagation in a ring erbium-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Bencheikh, K; Baldit, E; Briaudeau, S; Monnier, P; Levenson, J A; Mélin, G

    2010-12-06

    Slow light propagation is demonstrated by implementing Coherent Population Oscillations in a silica fiber doped with erbium ions in a ring surrounding the single mode core. Though only the wings of the mode interact with erbium ions, group velocities around 1360 m/s are obtained without any spatial distortion of the propagating mode.

  18. Causal information velocity in fast and slow pulse propagation in an optical ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Makoto; Uesugi, Hiroyuki; Sultana, Parvin; Oishi, Tohru

    2011-10-15

    We examined the propagation of nonanalytical points encoded on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast and slow light in an optical ring resonator at {lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m. The temporal peak of the Gaussian pulse was either advanced or delayed, reflecting anomalous or normal dispersions in the ring resonator, relevant to under- or overcoupling conditions, respectively. The nonanalytical points were neither advanced nor delayed but appeared as they entered the ring resonator. The nonanalytical points could be interpreted as information; therefore, the experimental results suggested that information velocity is equal to the light velocity in vacuum or the background medium, independent of the group velocity. The transient behaviors at the leading and trailing edges of the nonanalytical points are discussed in terms of optical precursors.

  19. Selective innervation of fast and slow muscle regions during early chick neuromuscular development.

    PubMed

    Rafuse, V F; Milner, L D; Landmesser, L T

    1996-11-01

    The electrical properties of adult motoneurons are well matched to the contractile properties of the fast or slow muscle fibers that they innervate. How this precise matching occurs developmentally is not known. To investigate whether motoneurons exhibit selectivity in innervating discrete muscle regions, containing either fast or slow muscle fibers during early neuromuscular development, we caused embryonic chick hindlimb muscles to become innervated by segmentally inappropriate motoneurons. We used the in vitro spinal cord-hindlimb preparation to identify electrophysiologically the pools of foreign motoneurons innervating the posterior iliotibialis (pITIB), an all-fast muscle, and the iliofibularis (IFIB), a partitioned muscle containing discrete fast and slow regions. The results showed that the pITIB and the fast region of the IFIB were exclusively innervated by motoneurons that normally supply fast muscles. In contrast, the slow region of the IFIB was always innervated by motoneuron pools that normally supply slow muscles. Some experimental IFIB muscles lacked a fast region and were innervated solely by "slow" motoneurons. In addition, the intramuscular nerve branching patterns were always appropriate to the fast-slow nature of the muscle (region) innervated. The selective innervation was found early in the motoneuron death period, and we found no evidence that motoneurons grew into appropriate muscle regions, but failed to form functional contacts. Together, these results support the hypothesis that different classes of motoneurons exhibit molecular differences that allow them to project selectively to, and innervate, muscle fibers of the appropriate type during early neuromuscular development.

  20. Effect of photoperiod on slow and fast developing individuals in aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus and Propylea dissecta (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Mishra, Geetanjali; Omkar

    2016-02-01

    The effects of environmental parameters on insect development have been studied extensively. But the reasons for 2 differential developmental rates within same cohort under varying environmental factors have not been explored. For the purpose, in this study the existence and stability of slow and fast development under 5 photoperiods (i.e., 8L: 16D, 10L : 14D, 12L : 12D, 14L : 10D and 16L : 8D; light and dark hours per day) and its effect on body mass and reproductive attributes in 2 aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) and Propylea dissecta (Mulsant) was examined on Aphis craccivora Koch at 27 ± 1 °C temperature. A clear bimodal (2 peaks, where the first peak represented the fast developing and the 2nd peak slow developing individuals) pattern of distribution at each photoperiod was found. The proportion of slow and fast developing individuals in a cohort differed with photoperiods. The slow developing individuals were more in numbers at 8L : 16D, in equal numbers at 14L : 10D and in less numbers at 16L: 8D, indicating that the variation in emergence was owing to exogenous cues influenced differential rates of mortality. Slow developing individuals had female biased sex ratio, higher longevity and lower body mass than fast developing individuals. Fast developing females laid higher numbers of eggs with higher egg viability than slow developing females. Study of such variations in development at different photoperiods is helpful to understand its role in the development of insects particularly ladybirds and permits the selection of fast developing bioagents for their use in biocontrol of pest species.

  1. [Several features of the metabolism of the fast and slow muscles of Emys orbicularis tortoises].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskaia, I I; Ogorodnikova, L G

    1978-01-01

    In skeletal muscles of the tortoise E. orbicularis, studies have been made on the content of glycogen, lactic acid, on the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphorylase. Histochemical studies were made on the lipid content. Experiments were performed on fast and slow bundles from mm. iliofibularis, testo cervicalis and retractor capitis. For comparison, the same indices of carbohydrate metabolism were investigated in fast m. plantaris and slow m. soleus of rats. In rats, slow muscles exhibit aerobic metabolism, in fast muscles--anaerobic one. In tortoises, slow muscles exhibit intermediate type of metabolism. Fast muscles show an anaerobic type or metabolism which is less intensive than anaerobic metabolism in slow muscles. Significant differences in some of the indices of carbohydrate metabolism were found in muscles which perform different functions in the organism.

  2. [Comparison of force and shortening velocity in fast and slow rabbit muscle fibers at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Kochubeĭ, P V; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of force, maximal shortening velocity and power of maximally activated single permeabilized fibers from fast and slow muscles of the rabbit were recorded in a temperature range from 10 to 35 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It was found that temperature dependence of force of both types of fibers is identical. Averaged maximal shortening velocity in the slow fibers, unlike the fast fibers, had no statistically significant temperature dependence that is not in agreement with the data obtained on intact rat muscle fibers and in an in vitro motility assay. However maximal shortening velocity in each individual slow fiber did depend on temperature. The temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was lower than that of the fast ones. Because of large data scattering the average temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was significantly lower than that in individual slow fibers.

  3. Origins of the Slow and the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korendyke, Noci C.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    We present in this letter the first coordinated radio occultation measurements and ultraviolet observations of the inner corona below 5.5 Rs, obtained during the Galileo solar conjunction in January 1997, to establish the origin of the slow wind.

  4. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  5. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  6. Flood Regime Dynamics with Slow-Fast Landscape-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    flood distribution at a given spatiotemporal position given the knowledge of the distribution or its drivers at another, along with their dynamic relation. An example application is thus the estimation of hydroclimatic distributions in ungauged basins and their relation to areas where more information is available. This study ultimately brings to light dynamical signatures of change in flood regimes arising from nonlinear slow-fast feedbacks in the landscape-climate dynamics, and provides dynamical links between flood regimes with nonlinearly interacting factors at different scales. The present work builds on Perdigão and Blöschl (2014). Perdigão, R. A. P., and G. Blöschl (2014), Spatiotemporal flood sensitivity to annual precipitation: Evidence for landscape-climate coevolution, Water Resour. Res., 50, doi:10.1002/2014WR015365.

  7. Dirac-graphene quasiparticles in strong slow-light pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Astapenko, V. A.; Yakovets, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical Volkov's solution of the massless Dirac equation for graphene in the field of slow-light pulse with arbitrary time dependence is obtained. Exact solutions are presented for special cases of monochromatic field and a single-cycle pulse. Following the Fock-Schwinger proper time method, the Green's function for quasiparticles is derived with the account of the influence an external classical electromagnetic wave field.

  8. Coherent perfect absorption and reflection in slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Nadav; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Chong, Y D; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2013-12-01

    We identify a family of unusual slow-light modes occurring in lossy multimode grating waveguides, for which either the forward or backward mode components, or both, are degenerate. In the fully degenerate case, the response can be modulated between coherent perfect absorption (zero reflection) and perfect reflection by varying the wave amplitudes in a uniform input waveguide. The perfectly absorbed wave has anomalously short absorption length, scaling as the inverse one-third power of the absorptivity.

  9. Enhanced Nonlinear Optical Devices Using Artificial Slow-Light Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-19

    nature is our study of the limitations on the performance of slow light waveguides, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. This work is based upon...interaction, and others (e.g. resonant-enhanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers, or REMZI) do not. We have also performed studies in the linear regime...optical filter configurations, primarily in terms of their linear response. One of the limitations of this approach is that designs cannot always be

  10. Slow motions in systems with fast modulated excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, E.

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that high-frequency excitation can modify the behavior of systems with respect to slow motions. The goal of this study is consideration of these effects in a rather general case of analytical systems with modulated sinusoidal excitation. The method of direct separation of motions proposed by I.I. Blekhman was applied in a modified form with the explicit introduction of a small parameter. Equations for the slow motions are obtained and an analysis of how they depend on the structure of the original equations is performed. Five basic effects corresponding to different possible dependencies of the modulation amplitude on position, velocity, and slow time are selected (some of them for the first time). These effects offer a possibility for designing a high-frequency control of the slow motions with specified properties. For example, high-frequency excitation in a system with a nonlinear friction can essentially increase the effective damping. The results are also of significance for system identification and diagnostics. Analysis of a hydraulic valve is given as an example of application.

  11. Good cash flow = come in fast, go out slow!

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sherill

    2002-07-01

    The formula for successful cash management in home care is a simple one: The agency must bring cash in as quickly as possible, while keeping expenditures at as low and slow a pace as possible. However, while the formula may be simple, success may be elusive unless agency administrators have a well-thought-out plan to handle cash management.

  12. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Varghese, Anu; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated fast and slow mode solitary profiles in a five component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photo-electrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons being described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived and solutions for fast and slow mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to that of comet Halley. From the figures, it is seen that the presence of hydrogen ion determines the polarity of fast and slow mode solitary structures. Also different pair ions like He, C and O have significant effect on the width of the fast and slow mode solitary structures.

  13. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  14. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Groopman, Amber M; Katz, Jonathan I; Holland, Mark R; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A; Miller, James G

    2015-08-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable.

  15. Sliding regimes on slow manifolds of systems with fast actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt; Dwyer, Thomas A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    In this article the slow manifold of a system with actuator parasitics is used as a sliding surface on which a Variable Structure Controller recovers the qualitative properties of the reduced order, closed loop system obtained from an ideal actuator-based feedback controller design. Illustrative examples are presented, where (1) the simplicity of reduced order singular perturbation design methods; and (2) the robustness of Variable Structure sliding modes, are advantageously combined.

  16. Bifurcation of velocity distributions in cooperative transport of filaments by fast and slow motors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-02-05

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport.

  17. Bifurcation of Velocity Distributions in Cooperative Transport of Filaments by Fast and Slow Motors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport. PMID:23442917

  18. Whisker Contact Detection of Rodents Based on Slow and Fast Mechanical Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Claverie, Laure N.; Boubenec, Yves; Debrégeas, Georges; Prevost, Alexis M.; Wandersman, Elie

    2017-01-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to locate nearby objects with an extreme precision. To perform such tasks, they need to detect whisker/object contacts with a high temporal accuracy. This contact detection is conveyed by classes of mechanoreceptors whose neural activity is sensitive to either slow or fast time varying mechanical stresses acting at the base of the whiskers. We developed a biomimetic approach to separate and characterize slow quasi-static and fast vibrational stress signals acting on a whisker base in realistic exploratory phases, using experiments on both real and artificial whiskers. Both slow and fast mechanical inputs are successfully captured using a mechanical model of the whisker. We present and discuss consequences of the whisking process in purely mechanical terms and hypothesize that free whisking in air sets a mechanical threshold for contact detection. The time resolution and robustness of the contact detection strategies based on either slow or fast stress signals are determined. Contact detection based on the vibrational signal is faster and more robust to exploratory conditions than the slow quasi-static component, although both slow/fast components allow localizing the object. PMID:28119582

  19. Exploring the contrasts between fast and slow rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.; de Monserrat, Albert; White, Lloyd; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Researchers are now finding that extension sometimes occurs at rates much faster than the mean rates observed in the development of passive margins. Examples of rapid and ultra-rapid extension are found in several locations in Eastern Indonesia. This includes in northern and central Sulawesi as well as in eastern- and westernmost New Guinea. The periods of extension are associated with sedimentary basin growth as well as phases of crustal melting and rapid uplift. This is recorded through seismic imagery of basins offshore Sulawesi and New Guinea as well as through new field studies of the onshore geology in these regions. A growing body of new geochronological and biostratigraphic data provide some control on the rates of processes, indicating that rates of extension are typically at least twice as fast and potentially an order of magnitude faster than the fastest rates applied for more commonly studied rift settings (e.g. Atlantic opening, East African Rift, Australia-Antarctica opening). Here we explore a suite of experiments more appropriate for rifting episodes in Eastern Indonesia, and compare the evolution of these 'fast' (20-100 mm/year full rate) rifting models to experiments with the same crustal geometries rifting at ~5-20 mm/year. In particular, we explore to what depths hot lower crust and mantle can be exhumed by fast rifting, and whether we can produce the p-T-t paths implied by recent onshore geological studies.

  20. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Chiam, Sher-Yi; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-04

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces. Our results show that tailoring the coupling between the resonators modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. Observed change in the transmission amplitude is attributed to the change in the amount of destructive interference between the resonators in the vicinity of strong near field coupling. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters, and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  1. A Numerical Analysis of a Light Slowing and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chough, Young-Tak

    2015-12-01

    We provide an in-depth numerical study on creation of stationary light pulses (SLP) in a cold atomic medium, locating the optimal parameter space for experimental realization. We visualize the dynamics of the atoms and the field inside the medium. We find that as the coupling field strength increases, the light slowing effect is actually diminished. It also turns out that the spatial profile of the pulse inside the medium is indeed not symmetric around its apex, and we point out that this asymmetry causes the energy imbalance between the two signals retrieved into the opposite directions, in addition to such extrinsic reasons as the disparity between the coupling field strengths or the imperfect centering of the pulse in the medium at the time of "writing".

  2. Effect of inaction on function of fast and slow muscle spindles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunyan, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    There is no data on the comparative effect of tenotomy on the function of the muscle spindles of fast and slow muscles. This study covers this question. The experiments were conducted on cats. The musuculus extensor digitorum longus (m. EDL) was selected as the fast muscle, and the musculus soleus (m. Sol.) as the slow. In a comparison of the spontaneous activity of primary and secondary endings of the fast and slow muscle spindles (i.e., the activity with complete relaxation of the muscles) normally no difference between them was successfully found. The authors recorded the integrative, and not the individual activity, and secondly, under conditions of such recording technique, those slight changes that are observed in the fast muscle receptors could remain unnoticed.

  3. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  4. Slow light in ruby: delaying energy beyond the input pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which light is slowed through ruby has been the subject of great debate. To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the problem in the time domain by modulating a laser beam with a chopper to create a clean square wave. By exploring the trailing edge of the pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby, we can determine whether energy is delayed beyond the input pulse. The effects of a time-varying absorber alone cannot delay energy into the trailing edge of the pulse, as a time-varying absorber can only attenuate a coherent pulse. Therefore, our observation of an increase in intensity at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than just pulse reshaping. In addition, investigating the Fourier components of the modulated square wave shows that harmonic components with different frequencies are delayed by different amounts, regardless of the intensity of the component itself. Understanding the difference in delays of the individual Fourier components of the modulated beam reveals the cause of the distortion the pulse undergoes as it propagates through the ruby.

  5. Measuring attostrains in a slow-light fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolianos, George; Arora, Arushi; Bernier, Martin; Digonnet, Michel

    2016-03-01

    We report a new generation of slow-light FBG strain sensor with a strain resolution (or minimum detectable strain) as low as 30 fepsilon/√Hz at 30 kHz, which is one order of magnitude lower than the record held by the previous generation. This sensor has an ultra-stable output (no drift in 4 days) and is capable of resolving an absolute strain of ~250 attostrains by integrating its output for ~8 hours, which is also a new record for an FBG fiber sensor. These improvements were accomplished by first maximizing the slope of the slow-light resonances, and hence the strain sensitivity. To this end the apodized FBG was written in a deuterium-loaded fiber with a femtosecond infrared laser, then thermally annealed. The three main sources of noise in the sensor system were also carefully reduced. The dominant source of noise, laser frequency noise, was reduced by interrogating the FBG with an ultra-stable laser (linewidth under 200 Hz) with a low intensity noise. The phase noise was minimized by selecting the proper FBG length (~25 mm). When used as an acoustic sensor, the same grating had a measured average pressure resolution of 50 μPa/√Hz between 3 kHz and 6 kHz, one order of magnitude lower than the previous lowest reported value for an FBG sensor.

  6. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  7. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  8. Ultracompact all-optical XOR logic gate in a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Husko, C; Vo, T D; Corcoran, B; Li, J; Krauss, T F; Eggleton, B J

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate an ultracompact, chip-based, all-optical exclusive-OR (XOR) logic gate via slow-light enhanced four-wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide (PhCWG). We achieve error-free operation (<10⁻⁹) for 40 Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals with a 2.8 dB power penalty. Slowing the light to vg = c/32 enables a FWM conversion efficiency, η, of -30 dB for a 396 μm device. The nonlinear FWM process is enhanced by 20 dB compared to a relatively fast mode of vg = c/5. The XOR operation requires ≈ 41 mW, corresponding to a switching energy of 1 pJ/bit. We compare the slow-light PhCWG device performance with experimentally demonstrated XOR DPSK logic gates in other platforms and discuss scaling the device operation to higher bit-rates. The ultracompact structure suggests the potential for device integration.

  9. Precursors to Failure Extend Across the Transition from Slow to Fast Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Elisa; Scuderi, Marco Maria; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Marone, Chris; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Active tectonic faults exhibit a spectrum of failure modes that range from aseismic creep to slow tremor and devastating earthquakes. Slow earthquakes and other quasi-dynamic modes of fault failure have been observed in many tectonic environments but their relationship to dynamic rupture and the mechanics of regular earthquakes remains poorly understood. Current models can explain slow slip but require specialized conditions and do not address possible precursory changes in fault properties prior to failure. Here, we report elastic properties of laboratory faults for a wide range of stick-slip velocities. Our experiments document slip modes that mimic the full spectrum observed in nature from slow events, with peak slip velocity of ~100 μm/s, to earthquakes with slip velocity approaching m/s. We find systematic variations of fault zone elastic properties during the seismic cycle for the complete range of stick-slip rates. Our results suggest that the mechanics of slow slip and fast dynamic rupture share key features and that they can occur on the same fault segment, depending on fault rock frictional properties and elastic conditions. During the preparatory phase preceding stick-slip failure, we find that accelerated fault creep causes reduction of seismic wave velocity and elastic moduli for both fast and slow slip events, which illuminates similarities in the underlying physics of slow and fast slip. Our data suggest that real time monitoring of active faults may prove useful as a means to detect earthquake precursors.

  10. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Chad; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However, comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague–Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (“slow motor axons”) and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (“fast motor axons”) muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001) or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008). Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003). In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047) accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH) than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions. PMID:25309406

  11. Effects of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers of the frog.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Miguel; Ortiz-Mesina, Mónica; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Pastor, Enrique; Vásquez, Clemente; Castro, Elena; Velasco, Raymundo; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Onetti, Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The effect of cannabinoids on caffeine contractures was investigated in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers using isometric tension recording. In slow muscle fibers, WIN 55,212-2 (10 and 5 microM) caused a decrease in tension. These doses reduced maximum tension to 67.43 +/- 8.07% (P = 0.02, n = 5) and 79.4 +/- 14.11% (P = 0.007, n = 5) compared to control, respectively. Tension-time integral was reduced to 58.37 +/- 7.17% and 75.10 +/- 3.60% (P = 0.002, n = 5), respectively. Using the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor agonist ACPA (1 microM) reduced the maximum tension of caffeine contractures by 68.70 +/- 11.63% (P = 0.01, n = 5); tension-time integral was reduced by 66.82 +/- 6.89% (P = 0.02, n = 5) compared to controls. When the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM281 was coapplied with ACPA, it reversed the effect of ACPA on caffeine-evoked tension. In slow and fast muscle fibers incubated with the pertussis toxin, ACPA had no effect on tension evoked by caffeine. In fast muscle fibers, ACPA (1 microM) also decreased tension; the maximum tension was reduced by 56.48 +/- 3.4% (P = 0.001, n = 4), and tension-time integral was reduced by 57.81 +/- 2.6% (P = 0.006, n = 4). This ACPA effect was not statistically significant with respect to the reduction in tension in slow muscle fibers. Moreover, we detected the presence of mRNA for the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor on fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers, which was significantly higher in fast compared to slow muscle fiber expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that in the slow and fast muscle fibers of the frog cannabinoids diminish caffeine-evoked tension through a receptor-mediated mechanism.

  12. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amber M; Hoffman, Joseph J; Anderson, Christian C; Holland, Mark R; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone.

  13. Slow and Fast Escape for Open Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Mark F.; Todd, Mike

    2017-04-01

    If a system mixes too slowly, putting a hole in it can completely destroy the richness of the dynamics. Here we study this instability for a class of intermittent maps with a family of slowly mixing measures. We show that there are three regimes: (1) standard hyperbolic-like behavior where the rate of mixing is faster than the rate of escape through the hole, there is a unique limiting absolutely continuous conditionally invariant measure (accim) and there is a complete thermodynamic description of the dynamics on the survivor set; (2) an intermediate regime, where the rate of mixing and escape through the hole coincide, limiting accims exist, but much of the thermodynamic picture breaks down; (3) a subexponentially mixing regime where the slow mixing means that mass simply accumulates on the parabolic fixed point. We give a complete picture of the transitions and stability properties (in the size of the hole and as we move through the family) in this class of open systems. In particular, we are able to recover a form of stability in the third regime above via the dynamics on the survivor set, even when no limiting accim exists.

  14. Comparison for the compositions of fast and slow pyrolysis oils by NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Ben, Haoxi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-11-01

    The pyrolysis of softwood (SW) kraft lignin and pine wood in different pyrolysis systems were examined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. NMR including quantitative (13)C and Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC)-NMR, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize various pyrolysis oils. The content of methoxyl groups decreased by 76% for pine wood and 70% for lignin when using fast pyrolysis system. The carbonyl groups also decreased by 76% and nearly completely eliminated in 600 °C pine wood fast pyrolysis oil. Compared to the slow pyrolysis process, fast pyrolysis process was found to improve the cleavage of methoxyl groups, aliphatic CC bonds and carbonyl groups and produce more polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from lignin and aliphatic CO bonds from carbohydrates. Another remarkable difference between fast and slow pyrolysis oils was the molecular weight of fast pyrolysis oils increased by 85-112% for pine wood and 104-112% for lignin.

  15. Demonstration of bicolor slow-light channelization in rubidium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkansky, Mark; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Reintjes, John; Dutton, Zachary; Steiner, Michael

    2007-02-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a proof-of-principle of a previously proposed 'channelization' architecture for wideband slow-light propagation in atomic vapors using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We use two optical frequencies to generate a sine wave signal which is delayed in rubidium vapor. The optical frequencies were tuned near the EIT resonances of two Zeeman sublevels, which are shifted from each other well beyond the EIT linewidth by a uniform magnetic field. We varied the Zeeman shift between these two levels (relative to the optical frequency splitting) and measured the delay versus Zeeman shift. Significant delays were observed and were in agreement with a theoretical model treating each Zeeman sublevel as part of an independent three-level system. We achieved delay of a signal with a bandwidth 16 times the EIT linewidth and confirmed our earlier theoretical models that delay occurs only when the optical spectral separation slightly exceeds the Zeeman splitting.

  16. Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    A study of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is conducted for a model composed of cool and hot ions and cool and hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism, the scope of earlier studies is extended to consider why upper Mach number limitations arise for slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. Treating all plasma constituents as adiabatic fluids, slow ion-acoustic solitons are limited in the order of increasing cool ion concentrations by the number densities of the cool, and then the hot ions becoming complex valued, followed by positive and then negative potential double layer regions. Only positive potentials are found for fast ion-acoustic solitons which are limited only by the hot ion number density having to remain real valued. The effect of neglecting as opposed to including inertial effects of the hot electrons is found to induce only minor quantitative changes in the existence regions of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons.

  17. Differential effect of denervation on free radical scavenging enzymes in slow and fast muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asayama, K.; Dettbarn, W. D.; Burr, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of denervation on the free radical scavenging systems in relation to the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the slow twitch soleus and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed in the mid-thigh region and the muscle tissue levels of 5 enzymes were studied 2 and 5 weeks following crush. Radioimmunoassays were utilized for the selective measurement of cuprozinc (cytosolic) and mangano (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutases. These data represent the first systematic report of free radical scavening systems in slow and fast muscles in response to denervation. Selective modification of cuprozinc and manganosuperoxide dismutases and differential regulation of GSH-peroxidase was demonstrated in slow and fast muscle.

  18. Effect of protozoan predation on relative abundance of fast- and slow-growing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.; Alexander, M.

    1989-01-01

    Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. When the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-growing species were rapidly eliminated, and two of the three fast-growing species survived in detectable numbers. It is suggested that in environments with intense protozoan predation, protozoa may alter composition of bacterial communities by eliminating slow-growing bacteria.

  19. Fast-Slow Partially Hyperbolic Systems Versus Freidlin-Wentzell Random Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simoi, Jacopo; Liverani, Carlangelo; Poquet, Christophe; Volk, Denis

    2017-02-01

    We consider a simple class of fast-slow partially hyperbolic dynamical systems and show that the (properly rescaled) behaviour of the slow variable is very close to a Freidlin-Wentzell type random system for times that are rather long, but much shorter than the metastability scale. Also, we show the possibility of a "sink" with all the Lyapunov exponents positive, a phenomenon that turns out to be related to the lack of absolutely continuity of the central foliation.

  20. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  1. Effects of Spatial Frequencies on Word Identification by Fast and Slow Readers: Evidence from Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Dixon, Jasmine; McGowan, Victoria A.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that differences in the effectiveness of spatial frequencies for fast and slow skilled adult readers may be an important component of differences in reading ability in the skilled adult reading population (Jordan et al., 2016a). But the precise nature of this influence on lexical processing during reading remains to be fully determined. Accordingly, to gain more insight into the use of spatial frequencies by skilled adult readers with fast and slow reading abilities, the present study looked at effects of spatial frequencies on the processing of specific target words in sentences. These target words were of either high or low lexical frequency and each sentence was displayed as normal or filtered to contain only very low, low, medium, high, or very high spatial frequencies. Eye movement behavior for target words was closest to normal for each reading ability when text was shown in medium or higher spatial frequency displays, although reading occurred for all spatial frequencies. Moreover, typical word frequency effects (the processing advantage for words with higher lexical frequencies) were observed for each reading ability across a broad range of spatial frequencies, indicating that many different spatial frequencies provide access to lexical representations during textual reading for both fast and slow skilled adult readers. Crucially, however, target word fixations were fewer and shorter for fast readers than for slow readers for all display types, and this advantage for fast readers appeared to be similar for normal, medium, high, and very high spatial frequencies but larger for low and very low spatial frequencies. Therefore, although fast and slow skilled adult readers can both use a broad range of spatial frequencies when reading, fast readers make more effective use of these spatial frequencies, and especially those that are lower, when processing the identities of words. PMID:27733837

  2. Extending the zero-derivative principle for slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Eric; Brøns, Morten; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Slow-fast systems often possess slow manifolds, that is invariant or locally invariant sub-manifolds on which the dynamics evolves on the slow time scale. For systems with explicit timescale separation, the existence of slow manifolds is due to Fenichel theory, and asymptotic expansions of such manifolds are easily obtained. In this paper, we discuss methods of approximating slow manifolds using the so-called zero-derivative principle. We demonstrate several test functions that work for systems with explicit time scale separation including ones that can be generalized to systems without explicit timescale separation. We also discuss the possible spurious solutions, known as ghosts, as well as treat the Templator system as an example.

  3. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five-Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Sreekala, G.; Varghese, Anu; Venugopal, Chandu

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated fast- and slow-mode solitary profiles in a five-component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions, and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photoelectrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons are described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived, and solutions for fast- and slow-mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to comet Halley. We found that the presence of hydrogen ions determines the polarity of the fast- and slow-mode solitary structures. Also, variations of equilibrium number density of hydrogen ions and charge numbers on the heavier pair ions act differently on the fast- and slow-mode solitary structures. The addition of hydrogen ions significantly affects the amplitude of the solitary structures for the fast mode. Further, the cyclotron frequency of the lighter and heavier ions has a noticeable effect on the width of the solitary waves.

  4. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  5. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-05-31

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies.

  6. α-Adrenoceptor constrictor responses and their modulation in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, David G; Thomas, Gail D

    2005-01-01

    Vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation and their sensitivity to metabolic modulation reportedly differ in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors mediate these vascular responses in fast-twitch muscle, while their roles in slow-twitch muscle are less well defined. In this study, the phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain (smRLC) was measured as an index of vasoconstriction in slow-twitch soleus muscles and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles isolated from C57BL/6J mice. In soleus muscles, incubation with phenylephrine (PE) or UK 14,304 to selectively activate α1- or α2-adrenoceptors resulted in concentration-dependent increases in smRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate metabolic modulation of these responses, vasodilator pathways previously implicated in such modulation in fast-twitch muscle were activated in soleus muscles by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroprusside or the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel opener cromakalim. Both drugs inhibited responses to UK 14,304, but not to PE. The effect of nitroprusside to antagonize UK 14,304 responses was prevented by inhibition of guanylyl cyclase or by blockade of KATP channels, but not by blockade of other potassium channels. Results were similar in EDL muscles. These data provide the first evidence for α2-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in slow-twitch muscle, and show that it is sensitive to modulation by NO via a cGMP-dependent mechanism that requires KATP channel activation. Based on the similar findings in soleus and EDL muscles, fibre type does not appear to determine the innate vascular response to α1- or α2-adrenoceptor activation. PMID:15618269

  7. Modulating the extent of fast and slow boron-oxygen related degradation in Czochralski silicon by thermal annealing: Evidence of a single defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moonyong; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Wenham, Stuart; Stefani, Bruno; Hallam, Brett

    2017-02-01

    The fast and slow boron-oxygen related degradation in p-type Czochralski silicon is often attributed to two separate defects due to the different time constants and the determination of different capture cross section ratios (k). However, a recent study using high lifetime samples demonstrated identical recombination properties for the fast and slow degradation and proposed an alternative hypothesis that these were in fact due to a single defect. The study presented in this article provides further experimental evidence to support the single defect hypothesis. Thermal annealing after light soaking is used to investigate the behaviour of subsequent boron-oxygen related degradation. Modifying the temperature and duration of dark annealing on pre-degraded samples is observed to alter the fraction of fast and slow degradation during subsequent illumination. Dark annealing at 173 °C for 60 s is shown to result in almost all degradation occurring during the fast time-scale, whereas annealing at 155 °C for 7 h causes all degradation to occur during the slow time-scale. This modulation occurs without changing the total extent of degradation or changing the capture cross-section ratio. The results are consistent with the fast decay being caused by defect formation from immediately available defect precursors after dark annealing, whereas the slow degradation is caused by the slow transformation of another species into the defect precursor species before the more rapid reaction of defect formation can proceed.

  8. Safety Design Requirements for Active Hazard Mitigation Device (AHMD) Employed to Address Fast and Slow Cook-off Thermal Threats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    Hazard Mitigation Device (AHMD) Employed to Address Fast and Slow Cook-off Thermal Threats 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...environments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Active Hazard Mitigation Device insensitive munitions fast cook-off slow...DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR ACTIVE HAZARD MITIGATION DEVICE (AHMD) EMPLOYED TO ADDRESS FAST AND SLOW COOK-OFF THERMAL THREATS DOD Fuze Engineering

  9. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors.

  10. Fast Scintillating Paddles for DarkLight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The DarkLight experiment proposes to search for a dark photon in the 10-100 MeV mass range via its production in fixed-target electron-proton collisions. The experimental design is driven by the desire to detect the complete final state including the recoiling proton, while also sustaining a very high luminosity in order to search for this rare process. Although the final design of the DarkLight experiment calls for fully streamed detector readout, initial studies will rely on traditional, triggered approaches. In order to facilitate precision measurements at high rate, a fast, thin, finely-segmented trigger detector based on plastic scintillating paddles and custom amplifiers was developed. I will discuss this design and its performance in recent DarkLight beam studies, as well as the work we have done to develop detectors using individual scintillating fibers. The DarkLight project is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-94ER40818.

  11. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape.

  12. Boundary-equilibrium bifurcations in piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, P; Glendinning, P

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the qualitative dynamics of piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems (singularly perturbed systems) which are everywhere continuous. We consider phase space topology of systems with one-dimensional slow dynamics and one-dimensional fast dynamics. The slow manifold of the reduced system is formed by a piecewise-continuous curve, and the differentiability is lost across the switching surface. In the full system the slow manifold is no longer continuous, and there is an O(ɛ) discontinuity across the switching manifold, but the discontinuity cannot qualitatively alter system dynamics. Revealed phase space topology is used to unfold qualitative dynamics of planar slow-fast systems with an equilibrium point on the switching surface. In this case the local dynamics corresponds to so-called boundary-equilibrium bifurcations, and four qualitative phase portraits are uncovered. Our results are then used to investigate the dynamics of a box model of a thermohaline circulation, and the presence of a boundary-equilibrium bifurcation of a fold type is shown.

  13. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  14. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  15. Cultured slow vs. fast skeletal muscle cells differ in physiology and responsiveness to stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chih; Dennis, Robert G; Baar, Keith

    2006-07-01

    In vitro studies have used protein markers to distinguish between myogenic cells isolated from fast and slow skeletal muscles. The protein markers provide some support for the hypothesis that satellite cells from fast and slow muscles are different, but the data are equivocal. To test this hypothesis directly, three-dimensional skeletal muscle constructs were engineered from myogenic cells isolated from fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus (SOL) muscles of rats and functionality was tested. Time to peak twitch tension (TPT) and half relaxation time (RT(1/2)) were approximately 30% slower in constructs from the SOL. The slower contraction and relaxation times for the SOL constructs resulted in left shift of the force-frequency curve compared with those from the TA. Western blot analysis showed a 60% greater quantity of fast myosin heavy chain in the TA constructs. 14 days of chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation resulted in a 15% slower TPT and a 14% slower RT(1/2), but no change in absolute force production in the TA constructs. In SOL constructs, slow electrical stimulation resulted in an 80% increase in absolute force production with no change in TPT or RT(1/2). The addition of cyclosporine A did not prevent the increase in force in SOL constructs after chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting that calcineurin is not responsible for the increase in force. We conclude that myogenic cells associated with a slow muscle are imprinted to produce muscle that contracts and relaxes slowly and that calcineurin activity cannot explain the response to a slow pattern of electrical stimulation.

  16. Refractive index fiber sensor based on Brillouin fast light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiali; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Yang, Tong; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    A new type of refractive index fiber sensor was invented by combining the evanescent-field scattering sensing mechanism with the Brillouin fast light scheme. Superluminal light was realized using Brillouin lasing oscillation in a fiber ring cavity. The refractive index of the solution around the microfiber within the cavity is related to the group velocity of the fast light. This fast light refractive index sensor offers an alternative for high-accuracy sensing applications.

  17. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method.

  18. Fast Radio Bursts from Extragalactic Light Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    We examine the possibility that fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from the activity of extragalactic civilizations. Our analysis shows that beams used for powering large light sails could yield parameters that are consistent with FRBs. The characteristic diameter of the beam emitter is estimated through a combination of energetic and engineering constraints, and both approaches intriguingly yield a similar result that is on the scale of a large rocky planet. Moreover, the optimal frequency for powering the light sail is shown to be similar to the detected FRB frequencies. These “coincidences” lend some credence to the possibility that FRBs might be artificial in origin. Other relevant quantities, such as the characteristic mass of the light sail, and the angular velocity of the beam, are also derived. By using the FRB occurrence rate, we infer upper bounds on the rate of FRBs from extragalactic civilizations in a typical galaxy. The possibility of detecting fainter signals is briefly discussed, and the wait time for an exceptionally bright FRB event in the Milky Way is estimated.

  19. Fast and slow radiation-driven wind solutions using ZEUS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; ud-Doula, A.; Santillán, A.

    2014-10-01

    Currently, the theory of radiation-driven winds of massive stars possess three known solutions for the velocity and density profiles of the stellar winds, namely: the fast, Ω -slow and δ -slow solutions. In order to confirm their stability we use a time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic code called ZEUS-3D, and then we compare their results with the stationary solutions from our numerical hydrodynamic code. ZEUS-3D needs an initial trial solution to start to integrate, for this we use the stationary solution (from our code) or a β-law for the velocity field. In both cases we obtain the same results. Fast and both slow stationary solutions are attained in ZEUS-3D and are all stable. Furthermore, there is a very good agreement with the velocity and density fields from ZEUS-3D and our code, having differences between the terminal velocities lower than 3%. In addition, we found that ZEUS-3D is very sensitive to the boundary conditions (base density and velocity profile), in some cases we obtain kinks in the velocity profiles, similar to the ones obtained by Madura et al. (2007) for stars with high rotation. Such kinks are most likely the result of the wind being mass overloaded, but further investigation is needed to understand its nature better. Currently, we are exploring the effects of small perturbation at the base of the wind in order to study possible transitions or oscillations between δ-slow and fast solutions.

  20. Fast and slow activation of voltage-dependent ion channels in radish vacuoles.

    PubMed Central

    Gambale, F; Cantu, A M; Carpaneto, A; Keller, B U

    1993-01-01

    The molecular processes associated with voltage-dependent opening and closing (gating) of ion channels were investigated using a new preparation from plant cells, i.e., voltage and calcium-activated ion channels in radish root vacuoles. These channels display a main single channel conductance of approximately 90 pS and are characterized by long activation times lasting several hundreds of milliseconds. Here, we demonstrate that these channels have a second kinetically distinct activation mode which is characterized by even longer activation times. Different membrane potential protocols allowed to switch between the fast and the slow mode in a controlled and reversible manner. At transmembrane potentials of -100 mV, the ratio between the fast and slow activation time constant was around 1:5. Correspondingly, activation times lasting several seconds were observed in the slow mode. The molecular process controlling fast and slow activation may represent an effective modulator of voltage-dependent gating of ion channels in other plant and animal systems. PMID:7507716

  1. Numerical studies of fast ion slowing down rates in cool magnetized plasma using LSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric; Welch, Dale R.

    2016-10-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products from the core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. The first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products from small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices will traverse the SOL, allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and be exhausted along the open field lines. Thus, the fast ion slowing-down time should affect the energy balance of an FRC reactor and its neutron emissions. However, the dynamics of fast ion energy loss processes under the conditions expected in the FRC SOL (with ρe <λDe) are analytically complex, and not yet fully understood. We use LSP, a 3D electromagnetic PIC code, to examine the effects of SOL density and background B-field on the slowing-down time of fast ions in a cool plasma. As we use explicit algorithms, these simulations must spatially resolve both ρe and λDe, as well as temporally resolve both Ωe and ωpe, increasing computation time. Scaling studies of the fast ion charge (Z) and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing down theory. Notably, Z-scaling represents a viable way to dramatically reduce the required CPU time for each simulation. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. The neurosteroid THDOC differentially affects spatial behavior and anesthesia in Slow and Fast kindling rat strains.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, K; McIntyre, D C; Poulter, M O

    2007-03-28

    Rats selectively bred for "Fast" or "Slow" kindling epileptogenesis express different GABA(A) receptor subunits that may account for differences in their miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The neurosteroid tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), an endogenous modulator of GABA-mediated inhibition with anesthetic properties and effects on mnemonic processes, preferentially enhances the mIPSCs recorded from the interneurons of Fast rats. Here we show that the anesthetic effect of 20 mg/kg THDOC was reduced in Fast compared to Slow rats. Further, as the strains have previously been shown to differ in their spatial learning abilities, we subsequently examined the effect of a lower dose (5 mg/kg) of THDOC on their performance in the Morris water maze using a matching-to-place paradigm. THDOC injection deteriorated the usually superior mnemonic capabilities of the Slow rats, i.e., concept learning as well as working and reference memory, while marginally improving these behaviors in Fast rats. These outcomes may reflect the divergent expression of GABAA receptors or disinhibition on interneurons versus principal cells that have been observed between the two strains. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph J; Nelson, Amber M; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2012-09-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R(2) = 0.73 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R(2) = 0.73, slow wave: R(2) = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.39).

  4. Wideband slow-light propagation with no distortion in a nanofiber-plane-grating composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Guo, Wenge; Fu, Haiwei; Xu, Yiping; Liu, Yinggang; Zhang, Xiaozhen

    2016-06-01

    A nanofiber-plane-grating composite slow-light waveguide to achieve wideband slowlight propagation with no distortion is proposed. The waveguide is formed by embedding a tapered nanofiber into a V-groove on a plane-grating surface. By optimizing the waveguide structural parameters, a slow-light effect with bandwidth of about 1453 GHz is obtained. Based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we analyze the waveguide's optical properties and slow-light characteristics. Simulation results show that a picosecond optical pulse propagating in the slow-light waveguide can be delayed for about 980 fs and without distortion. The group velocity of the optical pulse can be reduced to about 0.3c (c is the speed of light in vacuum). This study will provide important theoretical basis and innovative ideas for the development of new-type slow-light elements.

  5. Slow and fast ultrasonic wave detection improvement in human trabecular bones using Golay code modulation.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Manbachi, Amir; Mandelis, Andreas; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-09-01

    The identification of fast and slow waves propagating through trabecular bone is a challenging task due to temporal wave overlap combined with the high attenuation of the fast wave in the presence of noise. However, it can provide valuable information about bone integrity and become a means for monitoring osteoporosis. The objective of this work is to apply different coded excitation methods for this purpose. The results for single-sine cycle pulse, Golay code, and chirp excitations are compared. It is shown that Golay code is superior to the other techniques due to its signal enhancement while exhibiting excellent resolution without the ambiguity of sidelobes.

  6. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; Shindell, D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  7. Coupling of Fast and Slow Modes in the Reaction Pathway of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    By employing classical molecular dynamics, correlation analysis of coupling between slow and fast dynamical modes, and free energy (umbrella) sampling using classical as well as mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics force fields, we uncover a possible pathway for phosphoryl transfer in the self-cleaving reaction of the minimal hammerhead ribozyme. The significance of this pathway is that it initiates from the minimal hammerhead crystal structure and describes the reaction landscape as a conformational rearrangement followed by a covalent transformation. The delineated mechanism is catalyzed by two metal (Mg2+) ions, proceeds via an in-line-attack by CYT 17 O2′ on the scissile phosphorous (ADE 1.1 P), and is therefore consistent with the experimentally observed inversion configuration. According to the delineated mechanism, the coupling between slow modes involving the hammerhead backbone with fast modes in the cleavage site appears to be crucial for setting up the in-line nucleophilic attack. PMID:17545240

  8. Finest Filamentary Structures of the Corona in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of electron density fluctuations observed by radio occultation measurements has demonstrated that a break in the vicinity of 1 Hz in the temporal frequency spectrum of the density fluctuations provides a measure of the size of the finest filamentary structures in the solar corona. Breaks in frequency have been inferred from the density spectra deduced by Coles et al. from 1979-1980 Voyager phase scintillation and spectral broadening measurements. These results show that the finest filamentary structures are found in the extensions or stalks of coronal streamers--the likely sources of the slow solar wind--and are over a factor of 3 smaller than those in the fast wind emanating from coronal holes. The inferred sizes of the finest filamentary structures are approximately 6 km in the slow wind at 8 Rsolar and 22 km in the fast wind at 9.1 Rsolar.

  9. Different transmitter transients underlie presynaptic cell type specificity of GABAA,slow and GABAA,fast

    PubMed Central

    Szabadics, János; Tamás, Gábor; Soltesz, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Phasic (synaptic) and tonic (extrasynaptic) inhibition represent the two most fundamental forms of GABAA receptor-mediated transmission. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) generated by GABAA receptors are typically extremely rapid synaptic events that do not last beyond a few milliseconds. Although unusually slow GABAA IPSCs, lasting for tens of milliseconds, have been observed in recordings of spontaneous events, their origin and mechanisms are not known. We show that neocortical GABAA,slow IPSCs originate from a specialized interneuron called neurogliaform cells. Compared with classical GABAA,fast IPSCs evoked by basket cells, single spikes in neurogliaform cells evoke extraordinarily prolonged GABAA responses that display tight regulation by transporters, low peak GABA concentration, unusual benzodiazepine modulation, and spillover. These results reveal a form of GABAA receptor mediated communication by a dedicated cell type that produces slow ionotropic responses with properties intermediate between phasic and tonic inhibition. PMID:17785408

  10. A Comparison of Elemental Abundance Ratios in SEP Events in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-24

    that the elemental abundances of gradual SEP events reflect the composition of the solar corona , implying that the ambient coronal thermal ions...point at the top of the corona , although the plasma near Earth emerged ~4 days prior to its arrival at 1 AU. Thus energetic-particle and solar -wind...TYPE REPRINT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of Elemental Abundance Ratios in SEP Events in Fast and Slow Solar

  11. Fast Versus Slow Strategy of Switching Patients With Schizophrenia to Aripiprazole From Other Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Lo, Wei-Ming; Chan, Hung-Yu; Lin, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming H; Liu, Chen-Chun; Liu, Chih-Min; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Chen, Wei J

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to compare strategies differing in the speed of switching schizophrenic patients to aripiprazole from other antipsychotic agents, with dual administration for 2 weeks and then tapering off the current antipsychotic in fast (within 1 week) versus slow (within 4 weeks) strategies. This 8-week, open-label, randomized, parallel study assigned patients with a primary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder to either the fast-switching (n = 38) or slow-switching (n = 41) group. Efficacy assessments at 5 time points included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Clinical Global Impression scale. Safety assessments included extrapyramidal symptoms, metabolic profile, serum prolactin level, QTc interval, and adverse events. Drug concentrations and cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 genotypes were also measured. The fast- and slow-switching groups were comparable in demographical and clinical features at baseline and dropout rate. In the intention-to-treat analysis using mixed-effects models, there were significant within-group decreases over time in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total scores (P = 0.03) and its subscores except for positive subscores, whereas no between-group differences were found. A reduction in body weight (P = 0.01) and lower levels of total cholesterol (P = 0.03), triglycerides (P = 0.03), and prolactin (P = 0.01) were noted in both groups but no increase in extrapyramidal symptoms or prolongation of QTc. The blood concentrations of aripiprazole in all patients were in a therapeutic range at day 56, with CYP2D6*10 polymorphisms being associated with aripiprazole concentrations. In conclusion, there is no significant difference between the fast- and slow-switching strategy in terms of improvements in clinical symptoms and metabolic profile in this 8-week study.

  12. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Hippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal-interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory.

  13. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AbstractHippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal–interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory. PMID:24277864

  14. Endothermic force generation in fast and slow mammalian (rabbit) muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1996-01-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 3-7 degrees C were examined in single skinned fibers isolated from rabbit psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles. T-jumps were induced by an infrared laser pulse (wavelength 1.32 microns, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fiber and bathing buffer solution in a 50-microliter trough. After a T-jump, the temperature near the fiber remained constant for approximately 0.5 s, and the temperature could be clamped for longer periods by means of Peltier units assembled on the back trough wall. A T-jump produced a step decrease in tension in both fast and slow muscle fibers in rigor, indicating thermal expansion. In maximally Ca-activated (pCa approximately 4) fibers, the increase of steady tension with heating (3-35 degrees C) was approximately sigmoidal, and a T-jump at any temperature induced a more complex tension transient than in rigor fibers. An initial (small amplitude) step decrease in tension followed by a rapid recovery (tau(1); see Davis and Harrington, 1993) was seen in some records from both fiber types, which presumably was an indirect consequence of thermal expansion. The net rise in tension after a T-jump was biexponential, and its time course was characteristically different in the two fibers. At approximately 12 degrees C the reciprocal time constants for the two exponential components (tau(2) and tau(3), respectively, were approximately 70.s(-1) and approximately 15.s(-1) in fast fibers and approximately 20.s(-1) and approximately 3.s(-1) in slow fibers. In both fibers, tau(2) ("endothermic force regeneration") became faster with an increase in temperature. Furthermore, tau(3) was temperature sensitive in slow fibers but not in fast fibers. The results are compared and contrasted with previous findings from T-jump experiments on fast fibers. It is observed that the fast/slow fiber difference in the rate of endothermic force generation (three- to

  15. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  16. Proline Can Have Opposite Effects on Fast and Slow Protein Folding Phases

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, Szabolcs; Gruebele, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Proline isomerization is well known to cause additional slow phases during protein refolding. We address a new question: does the presence of prolines significantly affect the very fast kinetics that lead to the formation of folding intermediates? We examined both the very slow (10–100 min) and very fast (4 μs–2.5 ms) folding kinetics of the two-domain enzyme yeast phosphoglycerate kinase by temperature-jump relaxation. Phosphoglycerate kinase contains a conserved cis-proline in position 204, in addition to several trans-prolines. Native cis-prolines have the largest effect on folding kinetics because the unfolded state favors trans isomerization, so we compared the kinetics of a P204H mutant with the wild-type as a proof of principle. The presence of Pro-204 causes an additional slow phase upon refolding from the cold denatured state, as reported in the literature. Contrary to this, the fast folding events are sped up in the presence of the cis-proline, probably by restriction of the conformational space accessible to the molecule. The wild-type and Pro204His mutant would be excellent models for off-lattice simulations probing the effects of conformational restriction on short timescales. PMID:12885665

  17. Chemical energetics of slow- and fast-twitch muscles of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The energy utilization associated with contraction was measured in isolated slow- and fast-twitch muscles of the mouse at 20 degrees C. The extent of this utilization was estimated from either the extent of high-energy phosphate splitting occurring during contraction (the initial chemical change, delta approximately P init) or from the extent of recovery resynthesis calculated from the observed oxygen consumption and lactate production occurring during the recovery period (recovery chemical resynthesis, delta approximately P rec). For short tetani, the cost to maintain isometric tension in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) was approximately threefold greater than that in the slow-twitch soleus. With prolonged stimulation, however, the energy cost in the EDL diminished so that after 12 s of stimulation, the energy cost in the EDL was only 50% greater than that of the soleus. For both the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch EDL and for all tetanus durations (up to 15 s), the extent of the initial chemical change was identical with the amount of recovery chemical resynthesis, showing that a biochemical energy balance existed in these muscles. PMID:7061985

  18. Slow and fast visual motion channels have independent binocular-rivalry stages.

    PubMed Central

    van de Grind, W. A.; van Hof, P.; van der Smagt, M. J.; Verstraten, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported a transparent motion after-effect indicating that the human visual system comprises separate slow and fast motion channels. Here, we report that the presentation of a fast motion in one eye and a slow motion in the other eye does not result in binocular rivalry but in a clear percept of transparent motion. We call this new visual phenomenon 'dichoptic motion transparency' (DMT). So far only the DMT phenomenon and the two motion after-effects (the 'classical' motion after-effect, seen after motion adaptation on a static test pattern, and the dynamic motion after-effect, seen on a dynamic-noise test pattern) appear to isolate the channels completely. The speed ranges of the slow and fast channels overlap strongly and are observer dependent. A model is presented that links after-effect durations of an observer to the probability of rivalry or DMT as a function of dichoptic velocity combinations. Model results support the assumption of two highly independent channels showing only within-channel rivalry, and no rivalry or after-effect interactions between the channels. The finding of two independent motion vision channels, each with a separate rivalry stage and a private line to conscious perception, might be helpful in visualizing or analysing pathways to consciousness. PMID:11270442

  19. From Slow to Fast: Hypogravity-Induced Remodeling of Muscle Fiber Myosin Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle consists of different fiber types arranged in a mosaic pattern. These fiber types are characterized by specific functional properties. Slow-type fibers demonstrate a high level of fatigue resistance and prolonged contraction duration, but decreased maximum contraction force and velocity. Fast-type fibers demonstrate high contraction force and velocity, but profound fatigability. During the last decades, it has been discovered that all these properties are determined by the predominance of slow or fast myosin-heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms. It was observed that gravitational unloading during space missions and simulated microgravity in ground-based experiments leads to the transformation of some slow-twitch muscle fibers into fast-twitch ones due to changes in the patterns of MyHC gene expression in the postural soleus muscle. The present review covers the facts and mechanistic speculations regarding myosin phenotype remodeling under conditions of gravitational unloading. The review considers the neuronal mechanisms of muscle fiber control and molecular mechanisms of regulation of myosin gene expression, such as inhibition of the calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway, epigenomic changes, and the behavior of specific microRNAs. In the final portion of the review, we discuss the adaptive role of myosin phenotype transformations. PMID:28050266

  20. Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2012-09-25

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  1. Fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-ho

    2012-09-01

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  2. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients.

  3. EVOLUTION OF INTERMITTENCY IN THE SLOW AND FAST SOLAR WIND BEYOND THE ECLIPTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Macek, W. M.; Echim, M.; Bruno, R. E-mail: marius.echim@oma.be E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  4. Separate activation of fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benardo, L S

    1994-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition was investigated by stimulating inhibitory neurones with focal microapplications of glutamate, while recording from layer V pyramidal neurones of rat somatosensory cortical slices. One class of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) thus elicited was characterized as a fast, chloride-mediated, GABAA IPSP in part by its fast time-to-peak (mean 2.5 ms) and brief duration, but primarily on the basis of its reversal potential at -68 mV, and its blockade by picrotoxin. The average peak amplitude for these fast IPSPs was -1.5 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance calculated for these events was about 10 nS. The conductance change associated with the maximal fast inhibitory postsynaptic potential resulting from electrical stimulation of afferent pathways ranged up to 116 nS. A second class of IPSP was encountered much less frequently. These glutamate-triggered events were characterized as slow, potassium-mediated GABAB IPSPs partly because of their longer times-to-peak (mean, 45 ms) and duration, but especially because of their extrapolated equilibrium potential at about -89 mV and blockade by 2-hydroxysaclofen. The average peak amplitude for these slow IPSPs was -2.3 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance for these events was about 8 nS. IPSPs resulting from the excitation of individual inhibitory interneurones were elicited by glutamate microapplication at particular locations relative to recording sites. Both fast and slow IPSPs were generated, but these occurred as separate events, and mixed responses were never seen. Thus, the two mechanistically distinct types of IPSPs which result from GABA interaction at GABAA and GABAB receptors on neocortical neurones may be mediated by separate classes of inhibitory neurones. PMID:7913968

  5. Slow-light total-internal-reflection switch with bending angle of 30 deg.

    PubMed

    Fuchida, Ayumi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2011-07-15

    Slowing light in a Bragg reflector waveguide is used to miniaturize optical waveguide switches. We can realize a giant equivalent refractive index change induced by carrier injection near a cutoff wavelength due to its large waveguide dispersion. We fabricate and characterize a reflection-type slow-light switch. Input light is reflected at the off state due to an equivalent index difference between an oxide aperture and an oxide region, while it passes through at the on state, since the equivalent index difference is compensated using carrier injection. We obtained a large bending angle of 30° with total internal reflection of slow light.

  6. Structure, distribution and innervation of muscle spindles in avian fast and slow skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, W K; Dow, P R; Nahirney, P C

    1999-04-01

    Muscle spindles in 2 synergistic avian skeletal muscles, the anterior (ALD) and posterior (PLD) latissimus dorsi, were studied by light and electron microscopy to determine whether morphological or quantitative differences existed between these sensory receptors. Differences were found in the density, distribution and location of muscle spindles in the 2 muscles. They also differed with respect to the morphology of their capsules and intracapsular components. The slow ALD possessed muscle spindles which were evenly distributed throughout the muscle, whereas in the fast PLD they were mainly concentrated around the single nerve entry point into the muscle. The muscle spindle index (number of spindles per gram wet muscle weight) in the ALD was more than double that of its fast-twitch PLD counterpart (130.5+/-2.0 vs 55.4+/-2.0 respectively, n = 6). The number of intrafusal fibres per spindle ranged from 1 to 8 in the ALD and 2 to 9 in the PLD, and their diameters varied from 5.0 to 16.0 microm and 4.5 to 18.5 microm, respectively. Large diameter intrafusal fibres were more frequently encountered in spindles of the PLD. Unique to the ALD was the presence of monofibre muscle spindles (12.7% of total spindles observed in ALD) which contained a solitary intrafusal fibre. In muscle spindles of both the ALD and PLD, sensory nerve endings terminated in a spiral fashion on the intrafusal fibres in their equatorial regions. Motor innervation was restricted to either juxtaequatorial or polar regions of the intrafusal fibres. Outer capsule components were extensive in polar and juxtaequatorial regions of ALD spindles, whereas inner capsule cells of PLD spindles were more numerous in juxtaequatorial and equatorial regions. Overall, muscle spindles of the PLD exhibited greater complexity with respect to the number of intrafusal fibres per spindle, range of intrafusal fibre diameters and development of their inner capsules. It is postulated that the differences in muscle spindle

  7. The relationship between gamma frequency and running speed differs for slow and fast gamma rhythms in freely behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chenguang; Bieri, Kevin Wood; Trettel, Sean Gregory; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2015-08-01

    In hippocampal area CA1 of rats, the frequency of gamma activity has been shown to increase with running speed (Ahmed and Mehta, 2012). This finding suggests that different gamma frequencies simply allow for different timings of transitions across cell assemblies at varying running speeds, rather than serving unique functions. However, accumulating evidence supports the conclusion that slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma are distinct network states with different functions. If slow and fast gamma constitute distinct network states, then it is possible that slow and fast gamma frequencies are differentially affected by running speed. In this study, we tested this hypothesis and found that slow and fast gamma frequencies change differently as a function of running speed in hippocampal areas CA1 and CA3, and in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Fast gamma frequencies increased with increasing running speed in all three areas. Slow gamma frequencies changed significantly less across different speeds. Furthermore, at high running speeds, CA3 firing rates were low, and MEC firing rates were high, suggesting that CA1 transitions from CA3 inputs to MEC inputs as running speed increases. These results support the hypothesis that slow and fast gamma reflect functionally distinct states in the hippocampal network, with fast gamma driven by MEC at high running speeds and slow gamma driven by CA3 at low running speeds.

  8. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  9. Selective stimulation of neurons in visual cortex enables segregation of slow and fast connections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taekjun; Freeman, Ralph D.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of the central visual pathway is generally studied from a perspective of feedforward processes. However, there are horizontal connections and also strong feedback from extra striate to visual cortex. Here, we use visual stimuli designed to maximize relative differential involvements of these three main types of connections. The approach relies on differences between stimulation within the classical receptive field (CRF) and that of the surround region. Although previous studies have used similar approaches, they were limited primarily to spatial segregation of neural connections. Our experimental design provides clear segregation of fast and slow components of surround modulation. We assume these are mediated by feedback and horizontal connections, respectively, but other factors may be involved. Our results imply that both horizontal and feedback connections contribute to integration of visual information outside the CRF and provide suppressive or facilitative modulation. For a given cell, modulation may change in strength and sign from suppression to facilitation or the reverse depending on surround parameters. Sub-threshold input from the CRF surround increases local field potential (LFP) power in distinct frequency ranges which differ for suppression and facilitation. Horizontal connections have delayed CRF-surround modulation and are sensitive to position changes in the surround. Therefore, surround information beyond the CRF is initially processed by fast connections which we consider to be feedback, whereas spatially tuned mechanisms are relatively slow and presumably mediated by horizontal connections. Overall, results suggest that convergent fast (feedforward) inputs determine size and structure of the CRFs of recipient cells in visual cortex. And fast connections from extra striate regions (feedback) plus slow tuned connections (horizontal) within visual cortex contribute to spatial influences of CRF surround activation. PMID:24881577

  10. Explicit and Implicit Processes Constitute the Fast and Slow Processes of Sensorimotor Learning.

    PubMed

    McDougle, Samuel D; Bond, Krista M; Taylor, Jordan A

    2015-07-01

    A popular model of human sensorimotor learning suggests that a fast process and a slow process work in parallel to produce the canonical learning curve (Smith et al., 2006). Recent evidence supports the subdivision of sensorimotor learning into explicit and implicit processes that simultaneously subserve task performance (Taylor et al., 2014). We set out to test whether these two accounts of learning processes are homologous. Using a recently developed method to assay explicit and implicit learning directly in a sensorimotor task, along with a computational modeling analysis, we show that the fast process closely resembles explicit learning and the slow process approximates implicit learning. In addition, we provide evidence for a subdivision of the slow/implicit process into distinct manifestations of motor memory. We conclude that the two-state model of motor learning is a close approximation of sensorimotor learning, but it is unable to describe adequately the various implicit learning operations that forge the learning curve. Our results suggest that a wider net be cast in the search for the putative psychological mechanisms and neural substrates underlying the multiplicity of processes involved in motor learning.

  11. The Parkfield Tremors: Slow and Fast Ruptures on the Same Asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele Veedu, Deepa; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A number of tremor sources have been burst into low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) in the deep extension of the San Andreas Fault in the last decade. Among the tremor sources, a particular LFE family near Parkfield exhibited doubling recurrence intervals alternating between about three and six days. A simple physical model producing successive slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity can explain the doubling recurrence intervals (manuscript accepted by Nature, 2016), but the source characteristics of the LFEs may not be fully explained by this simple model. The source characteristics show that tremor bursts containing more LFEs and lasting longer are associated with lower-amplitude ground motion. We find that the number of LFEs per burst is controlled by peak velocity of the modeled slip event. However, the duration of the tremor burst is not directly controlled by the duration of the underlying slip. The findings imply that the LFEs occur contemporaneous with the underlying slow and fast ruptures successively. Our results bring a better understanding of the mechanics of tectonic tremors associated with underlying slow-slip events.

  12. Osteoprotegerin and β2-Agonists Mitigate Muscular Dystrophy in Slow- and Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Frenette, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Our recent work showed that daily injections of osteoprotegerin (OPG)-immunoglobulin fragment complex (OPG-Fc) completely restore the function of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles in dystrophic mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, despite marked improvements, OPG-Fc was not as effective in preventing the loss of function of slow-twitch soleus and diaphragm muscles. Because β2-agonists enhance the function of slow- and fast-twitch dystrophic muscles and because their use is limited by their adverse effects on bone and cardiac tissues, we hypothesized that OPG-Fc, a bone and skeletal muscle protector, acts synergistically with β2-agonists and potentiates their positive effects on skeletal muscles. We observed that the content of β2-adrenergic receptors, which are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, is significantly reduced in dystrophic muscles but is rescued by the injection of OPG-Fc. Most important, OPG-Fc combined with a low dose of formoterol, a member of a new generation of β2-agonists, histologically and functionally rescued slow-twitch dystrophic muscles. This combination of therapeutic agents, which have already been tested and approved for human use, may open up new therapeutic avenues for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and possibly other neuromuscular diseases.

  13. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%.

  14. Enhanced spectral sensitivity of a chip-scale photonic-crystal slow-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; Gao, Boshen; Schulz, Sebastian A; Awan, Kashif M; Upham, Jeremy; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Boyd, Robert W

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the spectral sensitivity of a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer can be enhanced through structural slow light. We observe a 20-fold resolution enhancement by placing a dispersion-engineered, slow-light, photonic-crystal waveguide in one arm of a fiber-based MZ interferometer. The spectral sensitivity of the interferometer increases roughly linearly with the group index, and we have quantified the resolution in terms of the spectral density of interference fringes. These results show promise for the use of slow-light methods for developing novel tools for optical metrology and, specifically, for compact high-resolution spectrometers.

  15. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  16. Isotopic and Elemental Compositions of Ar, Kr, and Xe in Bulk, Slow, and Fast Solar Wind Targets from Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Baur, H.; Burnett, D. S.; Heber, V. S.; Wieler, R.

    2010-03-01

    We present new heavy noble gas isotopic and elemental data from GENESIS targets exposed to the bulk, the fast, and the slow solar wind. Implications on fractionation effects between the Sun and the Solar Wind will be discussed.

  17. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  18. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide.

    PubMed

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke; Blomberg, Simon P; Hodgson, David J; Mbeau-Ache, Cyril; Zuidema, Pieter A; de Kroon, Hans; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2016-01-05

    The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population performance. We show that 55% of the variation in plant life-history strategies is adequately characterized using two independent axes: the fast-slow continuum, including fast-growing, short-lived plant species at one end and slow-growing, long-lived species at the other, and a reproductive strategy axis, with highly reproductive, iteroparous species at one extreme and poorly reproductive, semelparous plants with frequent shrinkage at the other. Our findings remain consistent across major habitats and are minimally affected by plant growth form and phylogenetic ancestry, suggesting that the relative independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments.

  19. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  20. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  1. Intracellular regulation of protein degradation during sepsis is different in fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Tiao, G; Lieberman, M; Fischer, J E; Hasselgren, P O

    1997-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the difference in the response to sepsis of protein breakdown between fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. In addition, we defined the time course and the tissue specificity of sepsis-induced changes in the expression of the ubiquitin pathway. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture; control rats were sham operated. Energy-dependent protein breakdown was measured in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ubiquitin mRNA levels were determined by Northern blot analysis. Sepsis resulted in increased energy-dependent protein breakdown and upregulated expression of ubiquitin mRNA in the fast-twitch EDL but not in the slow-twitch soleus muscle. The sepsis-induced increase in ubiquitin mRNA levels in the EDL muscle was noticeable before the increase in energy-dependent protein breakdown. Sepsis increased ubiquitin mRNA levels in the diaphragm (a mixed fiber-type muscle) but not in heart, liver, kidney, or intestine, consistent with a tissue-specific regulation of the ubiquitin system during sepsis. The results suggest that the difference in protein breakdown during sepsis between fast- and slow-twitch muscles reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. The data also suggest that the expression of the ubiquitin pathway is upregulated in a time-dependent fashion during sepsis and that this response is not a generalized phenomenon but is tissue specific.

  2. Matching of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile properties in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Huong H; Lamb, Graham D

    2006-07-01

    1. The twitch characteristics (fast-twitch or slow-twitch) of skeletal muscle fibres are determined not only by the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, but also by the time-course of Ca2+ release and re-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The present study examined, in individual fibres from non-transforming muscle of the rat, whether particular SR properties are matched to the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, in particular in the case of fibres with fast-twitch contractile apparatus located in a slow-twitch muscle, namely the soleus. 2. Force was recorded in single, mechanically skinned fibres from extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and soleus muscles. Using repeated cycles in which the SR was emptied of all releasable Ca2+ and then reloaded, it was possible to determine the relative amount of Ca2+ present in the SR endogenously, the maximum SR capacity and the rate of Ca2+ loading. The sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was used to classify the fibres as fast-twitch (FT), slow-twitch (ST) or mixed (< 3% of the fibres examined) and thereby identify the likely troponin C and myosin heavy chain types present. 3. There was no significant difference in SR properties between the groups of FT fibres obtained from the four different muscles, including soleus. Despite some overlap in the SR properties of individual fibres between the FT and ST groups, the properties of the FT fibres in all four muscles studied were significantly different from those of the ST and mixed fibres. 4. In general, in FT fibres the SR had a larger capacity and the endogenous Ca2+ content was a relatively lower percentage of maximum compared with ST fibres. Importantly, in terms of their SR properties, FT fibres from soleus muscle more closely resembled FT fibres from other muscles than they did ST fibres from soleus muscle.

  3. Coexisting attractors and chaotic canard explosions in a slow-fast optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The multiple time scale dynamics induced by radiation pressure and photothermal effects in a high-finesse optomechanical resonator is experimentally studied. At difference with two-dimensional slow-fast systems, the transition from the quasiharmonic to the relaxational regime occurs via chaotic canard explosions, where large-amplitude relaxation spikes are separated by an irregular number of subthreshold oscillations. We also show that this regime coexists with other periodic attractors, on which the trajectories evolve on a substantially faster time scale. The experimental results are reproduced and analyzed by means of a detailed physical model of our system.

  4. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  5. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  6. Robust Detection of Fast and Slow Frequency Jumps of Atomic Clocks.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a frequency jump detector for atomic clocks. The detector considers both fast frequency jumps, which are abrupt variations of the clock frequency trend, and slow frequency jumps, which correspond to variations of the frequency trend over a finite time interval. These anomalies are particularly critical to space clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). The developed detector is robust in the sense that it can deal with time-varying frequency trends, sinusoidal terms, outliers, and missing data. The detection performances are analyzed both analytically and numerically, and the effectiveness of the detector is shown by applying it to GNSS experimental data, as well as to simulated clock data.

  7. A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Popović, Nikola; Marr, Carsten; Swain, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic models for gene expression frequently exhibit dynamics on several different scales. One potential time-scale separation is caused by significant differences in the lifetimes of mRNA and protein; the ratio of the two degradation rates gives a natural small parameter in the resulting chemical master equation, allowing for the application of perturbation techniques. Here, we develop a framework for the analysis of a family of 'fast-slow' models for gene expression that is based on geometric singular perturbation theory. We illustrate our approach by giving a complete characterisation of a standard two-stage model which assumes transcription, translation, and degradation to be first-order reactions. In particular, we present a systematic expansion procedure for the probability-generating function that can in principle be taken to any order in the perturbation parameter, allowing for an approximation of the corresponding propagator probabilities to that same order. For illustrative purposes, we perform this expansion explicitly to first order, both on the fast and the slow time-scales; then, we combine the resulting asymptotics into a composite fast-slow expansion that is uniformly valid in time. In the process, we extend, and prove rigorously, results previously obtained by Shahrezaei and Swain (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(45):17256-17261, 2008) and Bokes et al. (J Math Biol 64(5):829-854, 2012; J Math Biol 65(3):493-520, 2012). We verify our asymptotics by numerical simulation, and we explore its practical applicability and the effects of a variation in the system parameters and the time-scale separation. Focussing on biologically relevant parameter regimes that induce translational bursting, as well as those in which mRNA is frequently transcribed, we find that the first-order correction can significantly improve the steady-state probability distribution. Similarly, in the time-dependent scenario, inclusion of the first-order fast asymptotics results in a

  8. Rotation sensing with Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-01

    An optical gyroscope, which is constituted by Er3+-doped active ring resonator (EDARR) slow light structure, is presented for the first time. The principle of improving the sensitivity of the detection of angular velocity is analysed in detail. The expression of the rotation phase difference of EDARR between the counter-propagating waves is derived and discussed. At the resonant frequency, the phase shift difference has the maximum value when the light power in the cavity is far greater than the input light power. We designed an experimental scheme of Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light system. Two additional bias phases ϕb = ±π/2 were introduced in the optical path, by recording the light intensity difference ? and I0 at the resonant frequency ?, the input angular velocity can be obtained. The slow light structure based on EDARR can enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the angular velocity by three orders of magnitude.

  9. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  10. Whole-cell imaging at nanometer resolutions using fast and slow focused helium ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Udalagama, Chammika N B; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A; Pickard, Daniel S; Venkatesan, T; Watt, Frank

    2011-10-05

    Observations of the interior structure of cells and subcellular organelles are important steps in unraveling organelle functions. Microscopy using helium ions can play a major role in both surface and subcellular imaging because it can provide subnanometer resolutions at the cell surface for slow helium ions, and fast helium ions can penetrate cells without a significant loss of resolution. Slow (e.g., 10-50 keV) helium ion beams can now be focused to subnanometer dimensions (∼0.25 nm), and keV helium ion microscopy can be used to image the surfaces of cells at high resolutions. Because of the ease of neutralizing the sample charge using a flood electron beam, surface charging effects are minimal and therefore cell surfaces can be imaged without the need for a conducting metallic coating. Fast (MeV) helium ions maintain a straight path as they pass through a cell. Along the ion trajectory, the helium ion undergoes multiple electron collisions, and for each collision a small amount of energy is lost to the scattered electron. By measuring the total energy loss of each MeV helium ion as it passes through the cell, we can construct an energy-loss image that is representative of the mass distribution of the cell. This work paves the way to use ions for whole-cell investigations at nanometer resolutions through structural, elemental (via nuclear elastic backscattering), and fluorescence (via ion induced fluorescence) imaging.

  11. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  12. The Parkfield tremors reveal slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Deepa Mele; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The deep extension of the San Andreas Fault is believed to be creeping, but the recent observations of tectonic tremors from these depths indicate a complex deformation style. In particular, an isolated tremor source near Parkfield has been producing a sequence of low-frequency earthquakes that indicates an uncommon mechanism of stress accumulation and release. The tremor pattern regularly oscillated between three and six days from mid-2003 until it was disrupted by the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. After that event, the tremor source ruptured only about every three days, but over the next two years it gradually returned to its initial alternating recurrence pattern. The mechanism that drives this recurrence pattern is unknown. Here we use physics-based models to show that the same tremor asperity—the region from which the low-frequency earthquakes radiate—can regularly slip in slow and fast ruptures, naturally resulting in recurrence intervals alternating between three and six days. This unusual slip behaviour occurs when the tremor asperity size is close to the critical nucleation size of earthquakes. We also show that changes in pore pressure following the Parkfield earthquake can explain the sudden change and gradual recovery of the recurrence intervals. Our findings suggest a framework for fault deformation in which the same asperity can release tectonic stress through both slow and fast ruptures.

  13. Modular time division multiplexer: Efficient simultaneous characterization of fast and slow transients in multiple samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Stephan D.; Luo, Jiajun; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, R. P. H.; Grayson, M.

    2016-09-01

    A modular time division multiplexer (MTDM) device is introduced to enable parallel measurement of multiple samples with both fast and slow decay transients spanning from millisecond to month-long time scales. This is achieved by dedicating a single high-speed measurement instrument for rapid data collection at the start of a transient, and by multiplexing a second low-speed measurement instrument for slow data collection of several samples in parallel for the later transients. The MTDM is a high-level design concept that can in principle measure an arbitrary number of samples, and the low cost implementation here allows up to 16 samples to be measured in parallel over several months, reducing the total ensemble measurement duration and equipment usage by as much as an order of magnitude without sacrificing fidelity. The MTDM was successfully demonstrated by simultaneously measuring the photoconductivity of three amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin films with 20 ms data resolution for fast transients and an uninterrupted parallel run time of over 20 days. The MTDM has potential applications in many areas of research that manifest response times spanning many orders of magnitude, such as photovoltaics, rechargeable batteries, amorphous semiconductors such as silicon and amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide.

  14. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  15. Subjective and Objective Effects of Fast and Slow Compression on the Perception of Reverberant Speech in Listeners with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Doherty, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of fast and slow attack/release times (ATs/RTs) on aided perception of reverberant speech in quiet. Method: Thirty listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss were tested monaurally with a commercial hearing aid programmed in 3 AT/RT settings: linear, fast (AT = 9…

  16. All-Optical Delay of Images using Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Ryan M.; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Ali-Khan, Irfan; Howell, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional images carried by optical pulses (2 ns) are delayed by up to 10 ns in a 10 cm cesium vapor cell. By interfering the delayed images with a local oscillator, the transverse phase and amplitude profiles of the images are shown to be preserved. It is further shown that delayed images can be well preserved even at very low light levels, where each pulse contains on average less than one photon.

  17. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via active Raman gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Datang; Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme to realize the storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via a mechanism of active Raman gain (ARG). The system under consideration is a four-level atomic gas interacting with three (pump, signal, and control) laser fields. We show that a stable propagation of signal light pulses with superluminal velocity (i.e., fast-light pulses) is possible in such a system through the ARG contributed by the pump field and the quantum interference effect induced by the control field. We further show that a robust storage and retrieval of light pulses in such a fast-light medium can be implemented by switching on and off the pump and the control fields simultaneously. The results reported here may have potential applications for light information processing and transmission using fast-light media.

  18. Lacosamide Inhibition of Nav1.7 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Slow Binding to Fast-Inactivated States.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-04-01

    Lacosamide is an antiseizure agent that targets voltage-dependent sodium channels. Previous experiments have suggested that lacosamide is unusual in binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state of sodium channels, in contrast to drugs like carbamazepine and phenytoin, which bind tightly to fast-inactivated states. Using heterologously expressed human Nav1.7 sodium channels, we examined the state-dependent effects of lacosamide. Lacosamide induced a reversible shift in the voltage dependence of fast inactivation studied with 100-millisecond prepulses, suggesting binding to fast-inactivated states. Using steady holding potentials, lacosamide block was very weak at -120 mV (3% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide) but greatly enhanced at -80 mV (43% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide), where there is partial fast inactivation but little or no slow inactivation. During long depolarizations, lacosamide slowly (over seconds) put channels into states that recovered availability slowly (hundreds of milliseconds) at -120 mV. This resembles enhancement of slow inactivation, but the effect was much more pronounced at -40 mV, where fast inactivation is complete, but slow inactivation is not, than at 0 mV, where slow inactivation is maximal, more consistent with slow binding to fast-inactivated states than selective binding to slow-inactivated states. Furthermore, inhibition by lacosamide was greatly reduced by pretreatment with 300 µM lidocaine or 300 µM carbamazepine, suggesting that lacosamide, lidocaine, and carbamazepine all bind to the same site. The results suggest that lacosamide binds to fast-inactivated states in a manner similar to other antiseizure agents but with slower kinetics of binding and unbinding.

  19. Fast and slow wave detection in bovine cancellous bone in vitro using bandlimited deconvolution and Prony's method.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2014-10-01

    Fast and slow waves were detected in a bovine cancellous bone sample for thicknesses ranging from 7 to 12 mm using bandlimited deconvolution and the modified least-squares Prony's method with curve fitting (MLSP + CF). Bandlimited deconvolution consistently isolated two waves with linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficients as evidenced by high correlation coefficients between attenuation coefficient and frequency: 0.997 ± 0.002 (fast wave) and 0.986 ± 0.013 (slow wave) (mean ± standard deviation). Average root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the two algorithms for phase velocities were 5 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 13 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Average RMS differences for signal loss were 1.6 dB (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 0.4 dB (slow wave, 750 kHz). Phase velocities for thickness = 10 mm were 1726 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 1455 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Results show support for the model of two waves with linear-with frequency attenuation, successful isolation of fast and slow waves, good agreement between bandlimited deconvolution and MLSP + CF as well as with a Bayesian algorithm, and potential variations of fast and/or slow wave properties with bone sample thickness.

  20. Simple, fast, bright, and stable light sources.

    PubMed

    Tordera, Daniel; Meier, Sebastian; Lenes, Martijn; Costa, Rubén D; Ortí, Enrique; Sarfert, Wiebke; Bolink, Henk J

    2012-02-14

    In this work we show that solution-processed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) based on only an ionic iridium complex and a small amount of ionic liquid exhibit exceptionally good performances when applying a pulsed current: sub-second turn-on times and almost constant high luminances (>600 cd m(-2) ) and power efficiencies over the first 600 h. This demonstrates the potential of LECs for applications in solid-state signage and lighting.

  1. Differences in early and late stages of information processing between slow versus fast participants.

    PubMed

    Portella, Claudio; Machado, Sergio; Paes, Flávia; Cagy, Mauricio; Sack, Alexander T; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; Salas-Pacheco, Jose; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is a system consisting of various interconnected neural networks, with functional specialization coexisting with functional integration occurring both; temporally and spatially at many levels. The current study ranked and compared fast and slow participants in processing information by assessing latency and amplitude of early and late Event-Related Potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, Premotor Potential (PMP) and P300. In addition, the Reaction Time (RT) of participants was compared and related to the respective ERP components. For this purpose, twenty right-handed and healthy individuals were subjected to a classical ERP "Oddball" paradigm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function analyses (DFA) used PRE components and the Reaction Time (RT) to classify individuals. Our results indicate that latencies of P200 (O2 electrode), N200 (O2), PMP (C3) and P300 (Pz) components are significantly reduced in the group of fast responding participants. In addition, the P200 amplitude is significantly increased in the group of fast responding participants. Based on these findings, we suggest that the ERP is able to detect even minimal impairments, in the processing of somatosensory information and cognitive and motor stages. Hence, the study of ERP might also be capable of assessing sensorimotor dysfunctions in healthy old-aged people and in neuropsychiatric patients (suffering from dementia, Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders).

  2. Slow light and chromatic temporal dispersion in photonic crystal waveguides using femtosecond time of flight.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, C E; Cattaneo, F; Perney, N M B; Baumberg, J J; Netti, M C; Zoorob, M E; Charlton, M D B; Parker, G J

    2006-01-01

    We report time-of-flight experiments on photonic-crystal waveguide structures using optical Kerr gating of a femtosecond white-light supercontinuum. These photonic-crystal structures, based on engineered silicon-nitride slab waveguides, possess broadband low-loss guiding properties, allowing the group velocity dispersion of optical pulses to be directly tracked as a function of wavelength. This dispersion is shown to be radically disrupted by the spectral band gaps associated with the photonic-crystal periodicity. Increased time-of-flight effects, or "slowed light," are clearly observed at the edges of band gaps in agreement with two-dimensional plane-wave theoretical models of group velocity dispersion. A universal model for slow light in such photonic crystals is proposed, which shows that slow light is controlled predominantly by the detuning from, and the size of, the photonic band gaps. Slowed light observed up to time delays of approximately 1 ps, corresponds to anomalous dispersion of approximately 3.5 ps/nm per mm of the photonic crystal structure. From the decreasing intensity of time-gated slow light as a function of time delay, we estimate the characteristic losses of modes which are guided in the spectral proximity of the photonic band gaps.

  3. Myosin binding protein-C slow: a multifaceted family of proteins with a complex expression profile in fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2013-01-01

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C) comprises a complex family of proteins expressed in slow and fast type skeletal muscles. Similar to its fast and cardiac counterparts, sMyBP-C functions to modulate the formation of actomyosin cross-bridges, and to organize and stabilize sarcomeric A- and M-bands. The slow form of MyBP-C was originally classified as a single protein, however several variants encoded by the single MYBPC1 gene have been recently identified. Alternative splicing of the 5' and 3' ends of the MYBPC1 transcript has led to the differential expression of small unique segments interspersed between common domains. In addition, the NH2-terminus of sMyBP-C undergoes complex phosphorylation. Thus, alternative splicing and phosphorylation appear to regulate the functional activities of sMyBP-C. sMyBP-C proteins are not restricted to slow twitch muscles, but they are abundantly expressed in fast twitch muscles, too. Using bioinformatic tools, we herein perform a systematic comparison of the known human and mouse sMyBP-C variants. In addition, using single fiber westerns and antibodies to a common region of all known sMyBP-C variants, we present a detailed and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of sMyBP-C proteins in the slow twitch soleus and the fast twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) mouse muscles. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that distinct sMyBP-C variants are co-expressed in the same fiber, and that their expression profile differs among fibers. Given the differential expression of sMyBP-C variants in single fibers, it becomes apparent that each variant or combination thereof may play unique roles in the regulation of actomyosin cross-bridges formation and the stabilization of thick filaments.

  4. Tamm plasmon polaritons: Slow and spatially compact light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasin, M. E.; Seisyan, R. P.; Kalitteevski, M. A.; Brand, S.; Abram, R. A.; Chamberlain, J. M.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs) formed at the interface between a metal and a dielectric Bragg reflector (DBR). In contrast to conventional surface plasmons, TPPs have an in-plane wavevector less than the wavevector of light in vacuum, which allows for their direct optical excitation. The angular resolved reflectivity and transmission spectra of a GaAs /AlAs DBR covered by Au films of various thicknesses show the resonances associated with the TPP at low temperatures and room temperature. The in-plane dispersion of TTPs is parabolic with an effective mass of 4×10-5 of the free electron mass.

  5. Effects of pre-exercise listening to slow and fast rhythm music on supramaximal cycle performance and selected metabolic variables.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Ohkuwa, T; Itoh, H; Kitoh, M; Terasawa, J; Tsuda, T; Kitagawa, S; Sato, Y

    2003-07-01

    We examined the effect of listening to two different types of music (with slow and fast rhythm), prior to supramaximal cycle exercise, on performance, heart rate, the concentration of lactate and ammonia in blood, and the concentration of catecholamines in plasma. Six male students participated in this study. After listening to slow rhythm or fast rhythm music for 20 min, the subjects performed supramaximal exercise for 45 s using a cycle ergometer. Listening to slow and fast rhythm music prior to supramaximal exercise did not significantly affect the mean power output. The plasma norepinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to slow rhythm music was significantly lower than before listening (p < 0.05). The plasma epinephrine concentration immediately before the end of listening to fast rhythm music was significantly higher than before listening (p < 0.05). The type of music had no effect on blood lactate and ammonia levels or on plasma catecholamine levels following exercise. In conclusion, listening to slow rhythm music decreases the plasma norepinephrine level, and listening to fast rhythm music increases the plasma epinephrine level. The type of music has no impact on power output during exercise.

  6. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  7. Fast and Slow Gating Relaxations in the Muscle Chloride Channel Clc-1

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Alessio; Pusch, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Gating of the muscle chloride channel CLC-1 involves at least two processes evidenced by double-exponential current relaxations when stepping the voltage to negative values. However, there is little information about the gating of CLC-1 at positive voltages. Here, we analyzed macroscopic gating of CLC-1 over a large voltage range (from −160 to +200 mV). Activation was fast at positive voltages but could be easily followed using envelope protocols that employed a tail pulse to −140 mV after stepping the voltage to a certain test potential for increasing durations. Activation was biexponential, demonstrating the presence of two gating processes. Both time constants became exponentially faster at positive voltages. A similar voltage dependence was also seen for the fast gate time constant of CLC-0. The voltage dependence of the time constant of the fast process of CLC-1, τf, was steeper than that of the slow one, τs (apparent activation valences were zf ∼ −0.79 and zs ∼ −0.42) such that at +200 mV the two processes became kinetically distinct by almost two orders of magnitude (τf ∼ 16 μs, τs ∼ 1 ms). This voltage dependence is inconsistent with a previously published gating model for CLC-1 (Fahlke, C., A. Rosenbohm, N. Mitrovic, A.L. George, and R. Rüdel. 1996. Biophys. J. 71:695–706). The kinetic difference at 200 mV allowed us to separate the steady state open probabilities of the two processes assuming that they reflect two parallel (not necessarily independent) gates that have to be open simultaneously to allow ion conduction. Both open probabilities could be described by Boltzmann functions with gating valences around one and with nonzero “offsets” at negative voltages, indicating that the two “gates” never close completely. For comparison with single channel data and to correlate the two gating processes with the two gates of CLC-0, we characterized their voltage, pHint, and [Cl]ext dependence, and the dominant myotonia inducing

  8. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  9. Slow Ca2+ dynamics in pharyngeal muscles in Caenorhabditis elegans during fast pumping.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Fukano, Takashi; Kimura, Koutarou D; Mori, Ikue; Kirino, Yutaka; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of Caenorhabditis elegans are composed of the corpus, isthmus and terminal bulb from anterior to posterior. These components are excited in a coordinated fashion to facilitate proper feeding through pumping and peristalsis. We analysed the spatiotemporal pattern of intracellular calcium dynamics in the pharyngeal muscles during feeding. We used a new ratiometric fluorescent calcium indicator and a new optical system that allows simultaneous illumination and detection at any two wavelengths. Pumping was observed with fast, repetitive and synchronous spikes in calcium concentrations in the corpus and terminal bulb, indicative of electrical coupling throughout the muscles. The posterior isthmus, however, responded to only one out of several pumping spikes to produce broad calcium transients, leading to peristalsis, the slow and gradual motion needed for efficient swallows. The excitation-calcium coupling may be uniquely modulated in this region at the level of calcium channels on the plasma membrane.

  10. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Deficiency of alpha-sarcoglycan differently affects fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Esposito, Alessandra; Germinario, Elena; Sandonà, Dorianna; Martinello, Tiziana; Jakubiec-Puka, Anna; Biral, Donatella; Betto, Romeo

    2005-11-01

    Alpha-sarcoglycan (Sgca) is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the dystrophin complex located at skeletal and cardiac muscle sarcolemma. Defects in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene (Sgca) cause the severe human-type 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Because Sgca-null mice develop progressive muscular dystrophy similar to human disorder they are a valuable animal model for investigating the physiopathology of the disorder. In this study, biochemical and functional properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of the Sgca-null mice were analyzed. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice showed twitch and tetanic kinetics comparable with those of wild-type controls. In contrast, soleus muscle showed reduction of twitch half-relaxation time, prolongation of tetanic half-relaxation time, and increase of maximal rate of rise of tetanus. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice demonstrated a marked reduction of specific twitch and tetanic tensions and a higher resistance to fatigue compared with controls, changes that were not evident in dystrophic soleus. Contrary to EDL fibers, soleus muscle fibers of Sgca-null mice distinctively showed right shift of the pCa-tension (pCa is the negative log of Ca2+ concentration) relationships and reduced sensitivity to caffeine of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Both EDL and soleus muscles showed striking changes in myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition, whereas EDL showed a larger number of hybrid fibers than soleus. In contrast to the EDL, soleus muscle of Sgca-null mice contained a higher number of regenerating fibers and thus higher levels of embryonic MHC. In conclusion, this study revealed profound distinctive biochemical and physiological modifications in fast- and slow-twitch muscles resulting from alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency.

  12. The Hot-Gas Content of Early-Type Galaxies: Slow vs. Fast Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi, Marc; Atlas^{3D} Team

    2012-09-01

    For a galaxy, the ability to sustain a corona of hot, X-ray emitting gas can be a key element determining its star-formation history. An halo of hot gas can indeed be an effective shield against the acquisition of cold gas and stellar-mass loss material is quickly absorbed by such an hot medium. Early-type galaxies are known to sometime display bright X-ray halos, but the precise amount of hot gas around these objects and what drives its presence is still largely unknown. By combining homogeneously-derived photometric and kinematic measurements for the 260 early-type galaxies of the Atlas3D integral-field spectroscopic survey with both low- and high-spatial resolution X-ray measurements, I will show that the ability to sustain an halo of hot gas depends crucially on the dynamical structure and intrinsic flattening of a galaxy. Specifically, in the framework of the revised classification for early-type galaxies advanced by the SAURON survey, I find that: 1) Slow Rotators have hot-gas halos with X-ray luminosity and temperature values that are entirely consistent with what expected if the hot gas originates from stellar-mass loss material that is heated up at the kinetic temperature of the stars through shocks and collisions. 2) Fast Rotators have hot-gas halos with X-ray luminosities that always fall short of such a prediction, and the more so the lower their dynamical mass and the larger their intrinsic flattening and degree of rotation support. I will discuss the implication of such a systematic difference in the hot-gas content of fast and slow rotators galaxies for the most recent evolution of these two class of objects.

  13. Accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers marks the acceleration of sarcopenia in slow and fast twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Sharon L; Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-08-01

    The age-related decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, exhibits a marked acceleration in advanced age. Although many studies have remarked upon the accumulation of very small myofibers, particularly at advanced stages of sarcopenia, the significance of this phenomenon in the acceleration of sarcopenia has never been examined. Furthermore, although mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by a lack of cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity has been implicated in myofiber atrophy in sarcopenia, the contribution of this phenotype to the accumulation of severely atrophied fibers in aged muscles has never been determined. To this end, we examined the fiber size distribution in the slow twitch soleus (Sol) and fast twitch gastrocnemius (Gas) muscles between young adulthood (YA) and senescence (SEN). We also quantified the abundance of COX deficient myocytes and their size attributes to gain insight into the contribution of this phenotype to myofiber atrophy with aging. Our data showed that the progression of muscle atrophy, particularly its striking acceleration between late middle age and SEN, was paralleled by an accumulation of severely atrophic myofibers (≤ 1000 μm(2) in size) in both Sol and Gas. On the other hand, we observed no COX deficient myofibers in Sol, despite nearly 20% of the myofibers being severely atrophic. Similarly, only 0.17 ± 0.06% of all fibers in Gas were COX deficient, and their size was generally larger (2375 ± 319 μm(2)) than the severely atrophied myofibers noted above. Collectively, our results suggest that similar processes likely contribute to the acceleration of sarcopenia in both slow twitch and fast twitch muscles, and that COX deficiency is not a major contributor to this phenomenon.

  14. Slow-fast stochastic diffusion dynamics and quasi-stationarity for diploid populations with varying size.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in the long-time behavior of a diploid population with sexual reproduction and randomly varying population size, characterized by its genotype composition at one bi-allelic locus. The population is modeled by a 3-dimensional birth-and-death process with competition, weak cooperation and Mendelian reproduction. This stochastic process is indexed by a scaling parameter K that goes to infinity, following a large population assumption. When the individual birth and natural death rates are of order K, the sequence of stochastic processes indexed by K converges toward a new slow-fast dynamics with variable population size. We indeed prove the convergence toward 0 of a fast variable giving the deviation of the population from quasi Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while the sequence of slow variables giving the respective numbers of occurrences of each allele converges toward a 2-dimensional diffusion process that reaches (0,0) almost surely in finite time. The population size and the proportion of a given allele converge toward a Wright-Fisher diffusion with stochastically varying population size and diploid selection. We insist on differences between haploid and diploid populations due to population size stochastic variability. Using a non trivial change of variables, we study the absorption of this diffusion and its long time behavior conditioned on non-extinction. In particular we prove that this diffusion starting from any non-trivial state and conditioned on not hitting (0,0) admits a unique quasi-stationary distribution. We give numerical approximations of this quasi-stationary behavior in three biologically relevant cases: neutrality, overdominance, and separate niches.

  15. Distinct fast and slow processes contribute to the selection of preferred step frequency during human walking

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Robert; Kuo, Arthur D.; Donelan, J. Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Humans spontaneously select a step frequency that minimizes the energy expenditure of walking. This selection might be embedded within the neural circuits that generate gait so that the optimum is pre-programmed for a given walking speed. Or perhaps step frequency is directly optimized, based on sensed feedback of energy expenditure. Direct optimization is expected to be slow due to the compounded effect of delays and iteration, whereas a pre-programmed mechanism presumably allows for faster step frequency selection, albeit dependent on prior experience. To test for both pre-programmed selection and direct optimization, we applied perturbations to treadmill walking to elicit transient changes in step frequency. We found that human step frequency adjustments (n = 7) occurred with two components, the first dominating the response (66 ± 10% of total amplitude change; mean ± SD) and occurring quite quickly (1.44 ± 1.14 s to complete 95% of total change). The other component was of smaller amplitude (35 ± 10% of total change) and took tens of seconds (27.56 ± 16.18 s for 95% completion). The fast process appeared to be too fast for direct optimization and more indicative of a pre-programmed response. It also persisted even with unusual closed-loop perturbations that conflicted with prior experience and rendered the response energetically suboptimal. The slow process was more consistent with the timing expected for direct optimization. Our interpretation of these results is that humans may rely heavily on pre-programmed gaits to rapidly select their preferred step frequency and then gradually fine-tune that selection with direct optimization. PMID:21393467

  16. Observation of four-wave mixing in slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    McMillan, James F; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2010-07-19

    Four-wave mixing is observed in a silicon W1 photonic crystal waveguide. The dispersion dependence of the idler conversion efficiency is measured and shown to be enhanced at wavelengths exhibiting slow group velocities. A 12-dB increase in the conversion efficiency is observed. Concurrently, a decrease in the conversion bandwidth is observed due to the increase in group velocity dispersion in the slow-light regime. The experimentally observed conversion efficiencies agree with the numerically modeled results.

  17. Slow light and band gaps in metallodielectric cylinder arrays.

    PubMed

    Shainline, Jeffrey M; Xu, Jimmy

    2009-05-25

    We consider two-dimensional three-component photonic crystals wherein one component is modeled as a drude-dispersive metal. It is found that the dispersion relation of light in this environment depends critically on the configuration of the metallic and dielectric components. In particular, for the case of an incident electromagnetic wave with electric field vector parallel to the axis of the cylinders it is shown that the presence of dielectric shells covering the metallic cylinders leads to a closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor, as would be expected for a purely dielectric photonic crystal. For the same polarization, the photonic band structure of an array of metallic shell cylinders with dielectric cores do not show the closing of the structural band gap with increased filling factor of the metallic component. In this geometry, the photonic band structure contains bands with very small values of group velocity with some bands having a maximum of group velocity as small as .05c.

  18. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  19. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  20. ORBITAL SUPPORT OF FAST AND SLOW INNER BARS IN DOUBLE-BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, Witold; Small, Emma E.

    2010-08-10

    We analyze how the orbital support of the inner bar in a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) depends on the angular velocity (i.e., pattern speed) of this bar. We study orbits in seven models of double bars using the method of invariant loops. The range of pattern speed is covered exhaustively. We find that not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below a certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, while at high values of this speed the orbits indicate an increasingly round bar that looks more like a twist in the nuclear isophotes than a dynamically independent component. For values between these two extremes, orbits supporting the inner bar extend further out as the bar's pattern speed decreases, their corresponding loops become more eccentric, pulsate more, and their rotation becomes increasingly non-uniform, as they speed up and slow down in their motion. Lower pattern speeds also lead to a less coherent bar, as the pulsation and acceleration increasingly varies among the loops supporting the inner bar. The morphologies of fast and slow inner bars expected from the orbital structure studied here have been recently recovered observationally by decomposition of double-barred galaxies. Our findings allow us to link the observed morphology to the dynamics of the inner bar.

  1. Multiscale analysis of slow-fast neuronal learning models with noise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of temporal averaging methods to recurrent networks of noisy neurons undergoing a slow and unsupervised modification of their connectivity matrix called learning. Three time-scales arise for these models: (i) the fast neuronal dynamics, (ii) the intermediate external input to the system, and (iii) the slow learning mechanisms. Based on this time-scale separation, we apply an extension of the mathematical theory of stochastic averaging with periodic forcing in order to derive a reduced deterministic model for the connectivity dynamics. We focus on a class of models where the activity is linear to understand the specificity of several learning rules (Hebbian, trace or anti-symmetric learning). In a weakly connected regime, we study the equilibrium connectivity which gathers the entire ‘knowledge’ of the network about the inputs. We develop an asymptotic method to approximate this equilibrium. We show that the symmetric part of the connectivity post-learning encodes the correlation structure of the inputs, whereas the anti-symmetric part corresponds to the cross correlation between the inputs and their time derivative. Moreover, the time-scales ratio appears as an important parameter revealing temporal correlations. PMID:23174307

  2. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS/ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  3. Developmental changes in the activation properties and ultrastructure of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    West, J M; Barclay, C J; Luff, A R; Walker, D W

    1999-04-01

    At early stages of muscle development, skeletal muscles contract and relax slowly, regardless of whether they are destined to become fast- or slow-twitch. In this study, we have characterised the activation profiles of developing fast- and slow-twitch muscles from a precocial species, the sheep, to determine if the activation profiles of the muscles are characteristically slow when both the fast- and slow-twitch muscles have slow isometric contraction profiles. Single skinned muscle fibres from the fast-twitch flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles from fetal (gestational ages 70, 90, 120 and 140 days; term 147 days) and neonatal (8 weeks old) sheep were used to determine the isometric force-pCa (pCa = -log10[Ca2+]) and force-pSr relations during development. Fast-twitch mammalian muscles generally have a greatly different sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ whereas slow-twitch muscles have a similar sensitivity to these divalent cations. At all ages studied, the force-pCa and force-pSr relations of the FDL muscle were widely separated. The mean separation of the mid-point of the curves (pCa50-pSr50) was approximately 1.1. This is typical of adult fast-twitch muscle. The force-pCa and force-pSr curves for soleus muscle were also widely separated at 70 and 90 days gestation (pCa50-pSr50 approximately 0.75); between 90 days and 140 days this separation decreased significantly to approximately 0.2. This leads to a paradoxical situation whereby at early stages of muscle development the fast muscles have contraction dynamics of slow muscles but the slow muscles have activation profiles more characteristic of fast muscles. The time course for development of the FDL and soleus is different, based on sarcomere structure with the soleus muscle developing clearly defined sarcomere structure earlier in gestation than the FDL. At 70 days gestation the FDL muscle had no clearly defined sarcomeres. Force (N cm-2) increased almost linearly between 70 and 140 days

  4. A proposal for enhancing four-wave mixing in slow light engineered photonic crystal waveguides and its application to optical regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ebnali-Heidari, M; Monat, C; Grillet, C; Moravvej-Farshi, M K

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, we investigate both analytically and numerically four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 microm) dispersion engineered slow light photonic crystal waveguides. We demonstrate that both a larger FWM conversion efficiency and an increased FWM bandwidth (approximately 10 nm) can be achieved in these waveguides as compared to dispersive PhC waveguides. This improvement is achieved through the net slow light enhancement of the FWM efficiency (almost 30dB as compared to a fast nanowire of similar length), even in the presence of slow light increased linear and nonlinear losses, and the suitable dispersion profile of these waveguides. We show how such improved FWM operation can be advantageously exploited for designing a compact 2R and 3R regenerator with the appropriate nonlinear power transfer function.

  5. Wideband slow light with ultralow dispersion in a W1 photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Ren, Li-Yong; Yun, Mao-Jin; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2011-11-01

    A dispersion tailoring scheme for obtaining slow light in a silicon-on-insulator W1-type photonic crystal waveguide, novel to our knowledge, is proposed in this paper. It is shown that, by simply shifting the first two rows of air holes adjacent to the waveguide to specific directions, slow light with large group-index, wideband, and low group-velocity dispersion can be realized. Defining a criterion of restricting the group-index variation within a ±0.8% range as a flattened region, we obtain the ultraflat slow light with bandwidths over 5.0, 4.0, 2.5, and 1.0 nm when keeping the group index at 38.0, 48.8, 65.2, and 100.4, respectively. Numerical simulations are performed utilizing the three-dimensional (3D) plane-wave expansion method and the 3D finite-difference time-domain method.

  6. Slow light enhancement of nonlinear effects in silicon engineered photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Monat, Christelle; Corcoran, Bill; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Grillet, Christian; Eggleton, Benjamin J; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2009-02-16

    We report nonlinear measurements on 80microm silicon photonic crystal waveguides that are designed to support dispersionless slow light with group velocities between c/20 and c/50. By launching picoseconds pulses into the waveguides and comparing their output spectral signatures, we show how self phase modulation induced spectral broadening is enhanced due to slow light. Comparison of the measurements and numerical simulations of the pulse propagation elucidates the contribution of the various effects that determine the output pulse shape and the waveguide transfer function. In particular, both experimental and simulated results highlight the significant role of two photon absorption and free carriers in the silicon waveguides and their reinforcement in the slow light regime.

  7. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  8. Nonlinear enhancement in photonic crystal slow light waveguides fabricated using CMOS-compatible process.

    PubMed

    Shinkawa, Mizuki; Ishikura, Norihiro; Hama, Yosuke; Suzuki, Keijiro; Baba, Toshihiko

    2011-10-24

    We have studied low-dispersion slow light and its nonlinear enhancement in photonic crystal waveguides. In this work, we fabricated the waveguides using Si CMOS-compatible process. It enables us to integrate spotsize converters, which greatly simplifies the optical coupling from fibers as well as demonstration of the nonlinear enhancement. Two-photon absorption, self-phase modulation and four-wave mixing were observed clearly for picosecond pulses in a 200-μm-long device. In comparison with Si wire waveguides, a 60-120 fold higher nonlinearity was evaluated for a group index of 51. Unique intensity response also occurred due to the specific transmission spectrum and enhanced nonlinearities. Such slow light may add various functionalities in Si photonics, while loss reduction is desired for ensuring the advantage of slow light.

  9. Four-wave mixing in slow light engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Monat, C; Ebnali-Heidari, M; Grillet, C; Corcoran, B; Eggleton, B J; White, T P; O'Faolain, L; Li, J; Krauss, T F

    2010-10-25

    We experimentally investigate four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 μm) dispersion-engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. The pump, probe and idler signals all lie in a 14 nm wide low dispersion region with a near-constant group velocity of c/30. We measure an instantaneous conversion efficiency of up to -9dB between the idler and the continuous-wave probe, with 1W peak pump power and 6 nm pump-probe detuning. This conversion efficiency is found to be considerably higher (>10 × ) than that of a Si nanowire with a group velocity ten times larger. In addition, we estimate the FWM bandwidth to be at least that of the flat band slow light window. These results, supported by numerical simulations, emphasize the importance of engineering the dispersion of PhC waveguides to exploit the slow light enhancement of FWM efficiency, even for short device lengths.

  10. Modal theory of slow light enhanced third-order nonlinear effects in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Sun, Junqiang; Li, Linsen

    2012-08-27

    In this paper, we derive the couple-mode equations for third-order nonlinear effects in photonic crystal waveguides by employing the modal theory. These nonlinear interactions include self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation and degenerate four-wave mixing. The equations similar to that in nonlinear fiber optics could be expanded and applied for third-order nonlinear processes in other periodic waveguides. Based on the equations, we systematically analyze the group-velocity dispersion, optical propagation loss, effective interaction area, slow light enhanced factor and phase mismatch for a slow light engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. Considering the two-photon and free-carrier absorptions, the wavelength conversion efficiencies in two low-dispersion regions are numerically simulated by utilizing finite difference method. Finally, we investigate the influence of slow light enhanced multiple four-wave-mixing process on the conversion efficiency.

  11. Inverse problems in cancellous bone: estimation of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves using Bayesian probability theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christian C; Bauer, Adam Q; Holland, Mark R; Pakula, Michal; Laugier, Pascal; Bretthorst, G Larry; Miller, James G

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of cancellous bone can be complicated by artifacts introduced by analyzing acquired data consisting of two propagating waves (a fast wave and a slow wave) as if only one wave were present. Recovering the ultrasonic properties of overlapping fast and slow waves could therefore lead to enhancement of bone quality assessment. The current study uses Bayesian probability theory to estimate phase velocity and normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) parameters in a model of fast and slow wave propagation. Calculations are carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo with simulated annealing to approximate the marginal posterior probability densities for parameters in the model. The technique is applied to simulated data, to data acquired on two phantoms capable of generating two waves in acquired signals, and to data acquired on a human femur condyle specimen. The models are in good agreement with both the simulated and experimental data, and the values of the estimated ultrasonic parameters fall within expected ranges.

  12. A COMPARISON OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN SEP EVENTS IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Reames, D. V.

    2009-08-10

    The solar energetic (E > 1 MeV nucleon{sup -1}) particles (SEPs) observed in gradual events at 1 AU are assumed to be accelerated by coronal/interplanetary shocks from ambient thermal or suprathermal seed particles. If so, then the elemental abundances of SEPs produced in different solar wind (SW) stream types (transient, fast, and slow) might be systematically distinguished from each other. We look for these differences in SEP energy spectra and in elemental abundance ratios (including Mg/Ne and Fe/C, which compare low/high first ionization potential elements), in a large number of SEP time intervals over the past solar cycle. The SW regions are characterized by the three-component stream classification of Richardson et al. Our survey shows no significant compositional or energy spectral differences in the 5-10 MeV nucleon{sup -1} range for SEP events of different SW stream types. This result extends the earlier finding that SEP events are observed frequently in fast SW streams, although their higher Alfven and SW flow speeds should constrain SEP production by coronal mass ejection-driven shocks in those regions. We discuss the implications of our results for shock seed populations and cross-field propagation.

  13. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value Umax at a temperature Tmax that lies between the glass-transition temperature Tg and the melting temperature Tm. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high Umax, a low Tmax / Tm, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / Tm. In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low Umax, a high Tmax / Tm, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / Tm. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in Umax seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (Tg / Tm) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of Tg / Tm and fragility, can show a good correlation with Umax. For all the systems, growth at Umax is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, Tmax / Tg = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  14. Pathological scattering by a defect in a slow-light periodic layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, Stephen P.; Welters, Aaron T.

    2016-02-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic fields by a defect layer embedded in a slow-light periodically layered ambient medium exhibits phenomena markedly different from typical scattering problems. In a slow-light periodic medium, constructed by Figotin and Vitebskiy, the energy velocity of a propagating mode in one direction slows to zero, creating a "frozen mode" at a single frequency within a pass band, where the dispersion relation possesses a flat inflection point. The slow-light regime is characterized by a 3 × 3 Jordan block of the log of the 4 × 4 monodromy matrix for EM fields in a periodic medium at special frequency and parallel wavevector. The scattering problem breaks down as the 2D rightward and leftward mode spaces intersect in the frozen mode and therefore span only a 3D subspace V ˚ of the 4D space of EM fields. Analysis of pathological scattering near the slow-light frequency and wavevector is based on the interaction between the flux-unitary transfer matrix T across the defect layer and the projections to the rightward and leftward spaces, which blow up as Laurent-Puiseux series. Two distinct cases emerge: the generic, non-resonant case when T does not map V ˚ to itself and the quadratically growing mode is excited and the resonant case, when V ˚ is invariant under T and a guided frozen mode is resonantly excited.

  15. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  16. Differential responses of fast- and slow-conducting pyramidal tract neurons to changes in accuracy demands during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Erik E; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2013-01-01

    Most movements need to be accurate. The neuronal mechanisms controlling accuracy during movements are poorly understood. In this study we compare the activity of fast- and slow-conducting pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) of the motor cortex in cats as they walk over both a flat surface, a task that does not require accurate stepping and can be accomplished without the motor cortex, as well as along a horizontal ladder, a task that requires accuracy and the activity of the motor cortex to be successful. Fast- and slow-conducting PTNs are known to have distinct biophysical properties as well as different afferent and efferent connections. We found that while the activity of all PTNs changes substantially upon transition from simple locomotion to accurate stepping on the ladder, slow-conducting PTNs respond in a much more concerted manner than fast-conducting ones. As a group, slow-conducting PTNs increase discharge rate, especially during the late stance and early swing phases, decrease discharge variability, have a tendency to shift their preferred phase of the discharge into the swing phase, and almost always produce a single peak of activity per stride during ladder locomotion. In contrast, the fast-conducting PTNs do not display such concerted changes to their activity. In addition, upon transfer from simple locomotion to accurate stepping on the ladder slow-conducting PTNs more profoundly increase the magnitude of their stride-related frequency modulation compared with fast-conducting PTNs. We suggest that slow-conducting PTNs are involved in control of accuracy of locomotor movements to a greater degree than fast-conducting PTNs. PMID:23381901

  17. A comparison of peripheral and rubrospinal synaptic input to slow and fast twitch motor units of triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Jankowska, E; ten Bruggencate, G

    1970-05-01

    1. Post-synaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of a variety of input systems have been compared in triceps surae motoneurones innervating slow and fast muscle units, the speed of contraction of which was also determined.2. Stimulation of high threshold afferents in both flexor and extensor muscle nerves, and of joint afferents, evoked polysynaptic PSPs which were predominantly hyperpolarizing in both fast and slow twitch motor units.3. Volleys in cutaneous afferents in the sural and saphenous nerves evoked polysynaptic PSPs composed of mixtures of inhibitory and excitatory components. The inhibitory components were predominant in slow twitch motor units, while in fast twitch units there was a trend towards excitatory predominance.4. Repetitive stimulation of the red nucleus caused predominantly inhibitory PSPs in slow twitch units and mixed or predominantly excitatory PSPs in fast twitch units. There was a correlation in the excitatory/inhibitory balance between PSPs of cutaneous and rubrospinal origin in those motoneurones in which both types of PSPs were studied.5. The amplitudes of group Ia disynaptic inhibitory PSPs were found to be correlated with motor unit twitch type: IPSPs in slow twitch units were larger than those in fast twitch units. Rubrospinal conditioning volleys were found to facilitate group Ia IPSPs in both fast and slow twitch motor units.6. The results suggest that there may be several basic patterns of synaptic input organization to motoneurones within a given motor unit pool. In addition to quantitative variation in synaptic distribution, there is evidence that qualitative differences in excitatory to inhibitory balance also exist in the pathways conveying input from cutaneous afferents and rubrospinal systems to triceps surae motoneurones. These qualitative differences are correlated with the motor unit twitch type.

  18. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank; Asger Mortensen, N; Pertsch, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maximally achievable efficiency reached for finite values of the group index at the point of phase-matching. Furthermore, we identify situations for which slow light, surprisingly, does not enhance the second-harmonic generation efficiency. Our results are corroborated by rigorous nonlinear simulations of second-harmonic generation in periodic nanobeam waveguides with loss.

  19. Systematic design of flat band slow light in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; White, Thomas P; O'Faolain, Liam; Gomez-Iglesias, Alvaro; Krauss, Thomas F

    2008-04-28

    We present a systematic procedure for designing "flat bands" of photonic crystal waveguides for slow light propagation. The procedure aims to maximize the group index - bandwidth product by changing the position of the first two rows of holes of W1 line defect photonic crystal waveguides. A nearly constant group index - bandwidth product is achieved for group indices of 30-90 and as an example, we experimentally demonstrate flat band slow light with nearly constant group indices of 32.5, 44 and 49 over 14 nm, 11 nm and 9.5 nm bandwidth around 1550 nm, respectively.

  20. Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

  1. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F. A.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  2. INERTIAL RANGE TURBULENCE OF FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND AT 0.72 AU AND SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-05-10

    We investigate Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of solar cycle 24. The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the magnetic field components have been computed for time intervals that satisfy the data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow, defined for speeds larger and smaller, respectively, than 450 km s{sup −1}. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast wind than for the slow. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005–0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is −1.60 for fast solar wind and −1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is observed for the spectral behavior of both the slow and fast wind.

  3. Differing Event-Related Patterns of Gamma-Band Power in Brain Waves of Fast- and Slow-Reacting Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Wilhelm Wundt proposed that there are two types of subjects in sim- ple RT experiments: fast-reacting subjects, who respond before they fully...quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects...accord with the hypothesis of Wundt and others that slower ("sensorial") responders wait to fully perceive a stimulus and then react to their perception

  4. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 degrees C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing

  5. Slow and Spike Potentials Recorded from Retinula Cells of the Honeybee Drone in Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Fritz

    1968-01-01

    Responses to light recorded by means of intracellular microelectrodes in isolated heads kept in oxygenated Ringer solution consist of a slow depolarization. Light adaptation increases the rates of depolarization and repolarization and decreases the amplitude of the response. Qualitatively these changes are similar to those observed in Limulus by Fuortes and Hodgkin. They are rapidly reversible during dark adaptation. In retinula cells of the drone eye a large single spike is recorded superimposed on the rising phase of the slow potential. The spike is a regenerative phenomenon; it can be triggered with electric current and is markedly reduced, sometimes abolished by tetrodotoxin. In rare cases cells were found which responded to light with a train of spikes. This behavior was only found under "unusual" experimental conditions; i.e., towards the end of a long experiment, during impalement, or at the beginning of responses to steps of strongly light-adapted preparations. PMID:5722083

  6. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion

    PubMed Central

    Boirie, Yves; Dangin, Martial; Gachon, Pierre; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Maubois, Jean-Louis; Beaufrère, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    The speed of absorption of dietary amino acids by the gut varies according to the type of ingested dietary protein. This could affect postprandial protein synthesis, breakdown, and deposition. To test this hypothesis, two intrinsically 13C-leucine-labeled milk proteins, casein (CAS) and whey protein (WP), of different physicochemical properties were ingested as one single meal by healthy adults. Postprandial whole body leucine kinetics were assessed by using a dual tracer methodology. WP induced a dramatic but short increase of plasma amino acids. CAS induced a prolonged plateau of moderate hyperaminoacidemia, probably because of a slow gastric emptying. Whole body protein breakdown was inhibited by 34% after CAS ingestion but not after WP ingestion. Postprandial protein synthesis was stimulated by 68% with the WP meal and to a lesser extent (+31%) with the CAS meal. Postprandial whole body leucine oxidation over 7 h was lower with CAS (272 ± 91 μmol⋅kg−1) than with WP (373 ± 56 μmol⋅kg−1). Leucine intake was identical in both meals (380 μmol⋅kg−1). Therefore, net leucine balance over the 7 h after the meal was more positive with CAS than with WP (P < 0.05, WP vs. CAS). In conclusion, the speed of protein digestion and amino acid absorption from the gut has a major effect on whole body protein anabolism after one single meal. By analogy with carbohydrate metabolism, slow and fast proteins modulate the postprandial metabolic response, a concept to be applied to wasting situations. PMID:9405716

  7. Slow-light-induced Doppler shift in photonic-crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Baba, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we theoretically discuss a large Doppler shift in a signal slow-light pulse in a photonic-crystal waveguide by considering its reflection at a quasilight speed mirror. The mirror is formed by the photonic band-gap shift induced by the high nonlinearity of a control slow-light pulse, which could be possible in a realistic device. In the simulation, the Doppler shift appears at multiple frequencies due to the Bloch nature of the photonic lattice. Larger but inefficient Doppler shifts occur through nonadiabatic processes, whereas the smallest but more efficient shift (i.e., the intraband Doppler shift) occurs through an adiabatic process. The occurrence of the intraband shift depends on whether the adiabatic process produces a complete reflection of the incident pulse, despite the fact that the pulse penetrates the mirror. A large band-gap shift and a moderately slow mirror satisfy this condition; otherwise, the shift ends at the halfway point.

  8. Slow light enhanced optical nonlinearity in a silicon photonic crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Takumi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Takesue, Hiroki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate highly enhanced optical nonlinearity in a coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) in a four-wave mixing experiment. Using a CROW consisting of 200 coupled resonators based on width-modulated photonic crystal nanocavities in a line defect, we obtained an effective nonlinear constant exceeding 10,000 /W/m, thanks to slow light propagation combined with a strong spatial confinement of light achieved by the wavelength-sized cavities.

  9. Telomeres shorten more slowly in slow-aging wild animals than in fast-aging ones.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2015-11-01

    Research on the physiological causes of senescence aim to identify common physiological mechanisms that explain age-related declines in fitness across taxonomic groups. Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found on the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Past research indicates that telomere attrition is strongly correlated with inter-specific rates of aging, though these studies cannot distinguish whether telomere attrition is a cause or consequence of the aging process. We extend previous research on this topic by incorporating recent studies to test the hypothesis that telomeres shorten more slowly with age in slow-aging animals than in fast-aging ones. We assembled all studies that have quantified cross-sectional (i.e. between-individual) telomere rates of change (TROC) over the lifespans of wild animals. This included 22 estimates reflecting absolute TROC (TROCabs, bp/yr, primarily measured using the terminal restriction fragment length method), and 10 estimates reflecting relative TROC (TROCrel, relative telomere length/yr, measured using qPCR), from five classes (Aves, Mammalia, Bivalvia, Reptilia, and Actinopterygii). In 14 bird species, we correlated between-individual (i.e. cross-sectional) TROCabs estimates with both maximum lifespan and a phylogenetically-corrected principle component axis (pcPC1) that reflected the slow-fast axis of life-history variation. Bird species characterized by faster life-histories and shorter maximum lifespans had faster TROCabs. In nine studies, both between-individual and within-individual TROC estimates were available (n=8 for TROCabs, n=1 for TROCrel). Within-individual TROC estimates were generally greater than between-individual TROC estimates, which is indicative of selective disappearance of individuals with shorter telomeres. However, the difference between within- and between-individual TROC estimates was only significant in two out of nine studies. The relationship between within-individual TROCabs and maximum

  10. Ballistic contractions in fast or slow human muscles; discharge patterns of single motor units

    PubMed Central

    Desmedt, John E.; Godaux, Emile

    1978-01-01

    1. Single motor units were recorded from the masseter, soleus and first dorsal interosseous muscles of normal adult man. An analysis of discharge patterns was carried out either during slow ramp voluntary contractions, or during self-initiated isolated ballistic voluntary contractions. The isometric myogram was simultaneously recorded. 2. Each motor unit was only recruited when the peak force of a brisk contraction exceeded a certain value and a `ballistic force threshold' (in kg) was estimated for the unit from a large series of brisk contractions of different strengths. For each muscle, the ranking order for recruitment of different motor units recorded from one electrode position was virtually identical in slow ramp versus brisk ballistic contractions of different force (Kendall rank correlation coefficient = 0·91-1·0). There was no evidence for any consistent selective activation of fast twitch motor units in ballistic contractions. 3. The ballistic force threshold is considerably reduced with respect to the slow ramp force threshold for the motor units of the soleus muscle. This drop is also marked for the units of the first interosseous and tibialis anterior muscles, whereas it is only small for the units of the masseter muscle. These data have been validated after consideration of the complicating factor related to the possible differential involvement of synergic muscles in ramp or ballistic contractions. 4. In the masseter and first interosseous muscles, the time to peak is about 80 msec in small ballistic voluntary contractions and it increases to about 150 msec in strong contractions. This effect appears related to repetitive discharges of single motor units when their force threshold is exceeded. By contrast, in the soleus muscle, the time to peak remains at about 150 msec both in small and in strong ballistic contractions and most soleus motor units fire only one spike in the ballistic burst. 5. Brisk ballistic contractions are graded in force by the

  11. Energy efficient nonlinear optics in silicon: are slow-light structures more efficient than nanowires?

    PubMed

    Husko, Chad; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2012-07-15

    We compare the energy performance of four-wave mixing in nanowires and slow-light photonic crystals and outline the regimes where each platform exhibits salient advantages and limitations, including analysis of the impact of future fabrication improvement. These results suggest a route towards energy efficient silicon integrated photonics.

  12. Wideband slow light with low dispersion in asymmetric slotted photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Chuanbo; He, Yu

    2013-12-01

    A new procedure of designing slotted photonic crystal waveguides is proposed to achieve slow light with improved normalized delay-bandwidth product and low group velocity dispersion that is suitable for both the W1 defect mode and the slot mode. The lateral symmetry of the waveguide in our study is broken by shifting the air holes periodically along the slot axis. The conversion of the "flat band" from band-up slow light to band-down slow light is achieved for the W1 defect mode. The group index curves of the W1 mode change from U-like to step-like and the group indices of 47, 67 and 130 are obtained with the bandwidth over 7.2, 4.8, and 2.3 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. We also obtain the group indices of 42, 55, and 108 for the slot mode with the bandwidth over 6.2, 5.6, and 2.2 nm, respectively. Then the low dispersion slow light propagation is numerically demonstrated by the finite-difference time-domain method.

  13. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  14. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Orava, J; Greer, A L

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U(max) at a temperature T(max) that lies between the glass-transition temperature T(g) and the melting temperature T(m). A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high U(max), a low T(max)/T(m), and a very broad peak in U vs. T/T(m). In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low U(max), a high T(max)/T(m), and a sharp peak in U vs. T/T(m). Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U(max) seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T(g)/T(m)) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T(g)/T(m) and fragility, can show a good correlation with U(max). For all the systems, growth at U(max) is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T(max)/T(g) = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  15. Fast to forgive, slow to retaliate: intuitive responses in the ultimatum game depend on the degree of unfairness.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Maltby, John; Bibby, Peter A; Lawrence, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary accounts have difficulty explaining why people cooperate with anonymous strangers they will never meet. Recently models, focusing on emotional processing, have been proposed as a potential explanation, with attention focusing on a dual systems approach based on system 1 (fast, intuitive, automatic, effortless, and emotional) and system 2 (slow, reflective, effortful, proactive and unemotional). Evidence shows that when cooperation is salient, people are fast (system 1) to cooperate, but with longer delays (system 2) they show greed. This is interpreted within the framework of the social heuristic hypothesis (SHH), whereby people overgeneralize potentially advantageous intuitively learnt and internalization social norms to 'atypical' situations. We extend this to explore intuitive reactions to unfairness by integrating the SHH with the 'fast to forgive, slow to anger' (FFSA) heuristic. This suggests that it is advantageous to be prosocial when facing uncertainty. We propose that whether or not someone intuitively shows prosociality (cooperation) or retaliation is moderated by the degree (certainty) of unfairness. People should intuitively cooperate when facing mild levels of unfairness (fast to forgive) but when given longer to decide about another's mild level of unfairness should retaliate (slow to anger). However, when facing severe levels of unfairness, the intuitive response is always retaliation. We test this using a series of one-shot ultimatum games and manipulate level of offer unfairness (50:50 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and enforced time delays prior to responding (1s, 2s, 8s, 15s). We also measure decision times to make responses after the time delays. The results show that when facing mildly unfair offers (60:40) people are fast (intuitive) to cooperate but with longer delays reject these mildly unfair offers: 'fast to forgive, and slow to retaliate'. However, for severely unfair offers (90:10) the intuitive and fast response is to always

  16. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  17. miRNA targeted signaling pathway in the early stage of denervated fast and slow muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Li, Qing-shan; Li, Wen-bin; Wei, Jian; Chang, Wen-kai; Chen, Zhi; Qiao, Hu-yun; Jia, Ying-wei; Tian, Jiang-hua; Liang, Bing-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Denervation often results in skeletal muscle atrophy. Different mechanisms seem to be involved in the determination between denervated slow and fast skeletal muscle atrophy. At the epigenetic level, miRNAs are thought to be highly involved in the pathophysiological progress of denervated muscles. We used miRNA microarrays to determine miRNA expression profiles from a typical slow muscle (soleus muscle) and a typical fast muscle (tibialis anterior muscle) at an early denervation stage in a rat model. Results showed that miR-206, miR-195, miR-23a, and miR-30e might be key factors in the transformation process from slow to fast muscle in denervated slow muscles. Additionally, certain miRNA molecules (miR-214, miR-221, miR-222, miR-152, miR-320, and Let-7e) could be key regulatory factors in the denervated atrophy process involved in fast muscle. Analysis of signaling pathway networks revealed the miRNA molecules that were responsible for regulating certain signaling pathways, which were the final targets (e.g., p38 MAPK pathway; Pax3/Pax7 regulates Utrophin and follistatin by HDAC4; IGF1/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression via FoxO phosphorylation). Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of denervated skeletal muscle pathophysiology. PMID:27651778

  18. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  19. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  20. RecBCD enzyme is a DNA helicase with fast and slow motors of opposite polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2003-06-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that move along and unwind double-stranded nucleic acids. RecBCD enzyme is a complex helicase and nuclease, essential for the major pathway of homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. It has sets of helicase motifs in both RecB and RecD, two of its three subunits. This rapid, highly processive enzyme unwinds DNA in an unusual manner: the 5'-ended strand forms a long single-stranded tail, whereas the 3'-ended strand forms an ever-growing single-stranded loop and short single-stranded tail. Here we show by electron microscopy of individual molecules that RecD is a fast helicase acting on the 5'-ended strand and RecB is a slow helicase acting on the 3'-ended strand on which the single-stranded loop accumulates. Mutational inactivation of the helicase domain in RecB or in RecD, or removal of the RecD subunit, altered the rates of unwinding or the types of structure produced, or both. This dual-helicase mechanism explains how the looped recombination intermediates are generated and may serve as a general model for highly processive travelling machines with two active motors, such as other helicases and kinesins.

  1. Fatigue and caffeine effects in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brust, M

    1976-12-28

    In excised, curarized and massively stimulated fast-twitch mouse gastrocnemius muscles the early twitch tension enhancements (treppe) during 1/s activity between 10 and 36 degrees C increase and affect more contractions as temperature increases. Tension output eventually declines at a temperature-independent rate. Half-relaxation time lengthens below 25 degrees C and shortens above 25 degrees C. During 1/0.63s twitches half-relaxation time lengthens even at 25 degrees C. In slow-twitch soleus muscles activity decreases twitch tension and half-relaxation time regardless of temperature. Activity shortens contraction times in both muscles. Oxygen lack induced by NaN3 cannot account satisfactorily for these results. Activation is apparently more plastic in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus, and the relationship between the rates of their activation and relaxation processes and the temperature sensitivities of these rates also seem to differ. In both muscles caffeine can convert activity-induced shortened of half-relaxation times into prolongations. In the soleus this effect is more pronounced at 30 than at 25 degrees C. At high temperature and twitch rates caffeine reduces treppe amplitude and duration without affecting the eventual twitch tension decline in the gastrocnemius while it greatly accelerates twitch tension decline in the soleus. In both muscles intrafiber Ca2+ movements are apparently major determinants of fatigue behavior.

  2. Dispersion relations for slow and fast resistive wall modes within the Haney-Freidberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2014-04-01

    The dispersion relation for the resistive wall modes (RWMs) is derived by using the trial function for the magnetic perturbation proposed in S. W. Haney and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1637 (1989). The Haney-Freidberg (HF) approach is additionally based on the expansion in dw/s ≪1, where dw is the wall thickness and s is the skin depth. Here, the task is solved without this constraint. The derivation procedure is different too, but the final result is expressed in a similar form with the use of the quantities entering the HF relation. The latter is recovered from our more general relation as an asymptote at dw≪s, which proves the equivalence of the both approaches in this case. In the opposite limit (dw≫s), we obtain the growth rate γ of the RWMs as a function of γHF calculated by the HF prescription. It is shown that γ ∝γHF2 and γ ≫γHF in this range. The proposed relations give γ for slow and fast RWMs in terms of the integrals calculated by the standard stability codes for toroidal systems with and without a perfectly conducting wall. Also, the links between the considered and existing toroidal and cylindrical models are established with estimates explicitly showing the relevant dependencies.

  3. Fast versus slow larval growth in an invasive marine mollusc: does paternity matter?

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Sabrina; Pechenik, Jan A; Cagnon, Mathilde; Viard, Frédérique

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive strategies and parental effects play a major role in shaping early life-history traits. Although polyandry is a common reproductive strategy, its role is still poorly documented in relation to paternal effects. Here, we used as a case study the invasive sessile marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata, a mollusc with polyandry and extreme larval growth variation among sibling larvae. Based on paternity analyses, the relationships between paternal identity and the variations in a major early life-history trait in marine organisms, that is, larval growth, were investigated. Using microsatellite markers, paternities of 437 fast- and slow-growing larvae from 6 broods were reliably assigned to a set of 20 fathers. No particular fathers were found responsible for the specific growth performances of their offspring. However, the range of larval growth rates within a brood was significantly correlated to 1) an index of sire diversity and 2) the degree of larvae relatedness within broods. Multiple paternity could thus play an important role in determining the extent of pelagic larval duration and consequently the range of dispersal distances achieved during larval life. This study also highlighted the usefulness of using indices based on fathers' relative contribution to the progeny in paternity studies.

  4. EEG-based classification of fast and slow hand movements using Wavelet-CSP algorithm.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neethu; Vinod, A P; Ang, Kai Keng; Tee, Keng Peng; Guan, Cuntai T

    2013-08-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) acquires brain signals, extracts informative features, and translates these features to commands to control an external device. This paper investigates the application of a noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based BCI to identify brain signal features in regard to actual hand movement speed. This provides a more refined control for a BCI system in terms of movement parameters. An experiment was performed to collect EEG data from subjects while they performed right-hand movement at two different speeds, namely fast and slow, in four different directions. The informative features from the data were obtained using the Wavelet-Common Spatial Pattern (W-CSP) algorithm that provided high-temporal-spatial-spectral resolution. The applicability of these features to classify the two speeds and to reconstruct the speed profile was studied. The results for classifying speed across seven subjects yielded a mean accuracy of 83.71% using a Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) classifier. The speed components were reconstructed using multiple linear regression and significant correlation of 0.52 (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient) was obtained between recorded and reconstructed velocities on an average. The spatial patterns of the W-CSP features obtained showed activations in parietal and motor areas of the brain. The results achieved promises to provide a more refined control in BCI by including control of movement speed.

  5. Transition from slow Abrikosov to fast moving Josephson vortices in iron pnictide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Balicas, Luis; Geshkenbein, Vadim; Blatter, Gianni; Karpinski, Janusz; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Batlogg, Bertram

    2013-02-01

    Iron pnictides are layered high Tc superconductors with moderate material anisotropy and thus Abrikosov vortices are expected in the mixed state. Yet, we have discovered a distinct change in the nature of the vortices from Abrikosov-like to Josephson-like in the pnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) with Tc~48-50 K on cooling below a temperature T*~41-42 K, despite its moderate electronic anisotropy γ~4-6. This transition is hallmarked by a sharp drop in the critical current and accordingly a jump in the flux-flow voltage in a magnetic field precisely aligned along the FeAs layers, indicative of highly mobile vortices. T* coincides well with the temperature where the coherence length ξc perpendicular to the layers matches half of the FeAs-layer spacing. For fields slightly out-of-plane (> 0.1°- 0.15°) the vortices are completely immobilized as well-pinned Abrikosov segments are introduced when the vortex crosses the FeAs layers. We interpret these findings as a transition from well-pinned, slow moving Abrikosov vortices at high temperatures to weakly pinned, fast flowing Josephson vortices at low temperatures. This vortex dynamics could become technologically relevant as superconducting applications will always operate deep in the Josephson regime.

  6. Estimates for Pu-239 loadings in burial ground culverts based on fast/slow neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hochel, R.C.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.A.

    1989-08-15

    This report provides guideline estimates for Pu-239 mass loadings in selected burial ground culverts. The relatively high recorded Pu-239 contents of these culverts have been appraised as suspect relative to criticality concerns, because they were assayed only with the solid waste monitor (SWM) per gamma-ray counting. After 1985, subsequent waste was also assayed with the neutron coincidence counter (NCC), and a comparison of the assay methods showed that the NCC generally yielded higher assays than the SWM. These higher NCC readings signaled a need to conduct non-destructive/non-intrusive nuclear interrogations of these culverts, and a technical team conducted scoping measurements to illustrate potential assay methods based on neutron and/or gamma counting. A fast/slow neutron method has been developed to estimate the Pu-239 in the culverts. In addition, loading records include the SWM assays of all Pu-239 cuts of some of the culvert drums and these data are useful in estimating the corresponding NCC drum assays from NCC vs SWM data. Together, these methods yield predictions based on direct measurements and statistical inference.

  7. Using Instrumental and Proxy Data to Determine the Causes of Fast and Slow Warming rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegerl, G. C.; Schurer, A. P.; Obrochta, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent warming 'hiatus' is subject to intense interest, with proposed causes including natural forcing and internal variability. We derive samples of all natural and interval variability from observations and a recent proxy reconstruction to investigate the likelihood that these two sources of variability could produce a hiatus or rapid warming in surface temperature. The likelihood is found to be consistent with that calculated previously for models and exhibits a similar spatial pattern, with an Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation-like structure, although with more signal in the Atlantic than in model patterns. The number and length of events increases if natural forcing is also considered, with volcanic forcing acting as a pacemaker for both fast and slow warming rates in model simulations of the last millennium, and, to a smaller extent, from observations. Big eruptions, such as Mount Tambora in 1815, or clusters of eruptions, may result in a hiatus of over 20 years. A striking finding is the smaller influence of volcanism on surface temperature warming rates in instrumental and proxy data than in climate models. This talk will discuss the possible reasons of this discrepancy.

  8. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  9. Fatigue and contraction of slow and fast muscles in hypokinetic/hypodynamic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, R. D.; Gladden, L. B.; Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) on the fatigability and contractile properties of the rat soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles have been investigated experimentally. Whole body suspension for one week was used to induce H/H, and fatigue was brought on by train stimulation for periods of 45 and 16 minutes. Following stimulation, rapid rates of fatigue were observed in the G-muscles of the suspended rats, while minimal fatigue was observed in the S-muscles. The twitch and tetanic contractile properties of the muscles were measured before and after train stimulation. It is found that H/H suspension increased twitch tension in the G-muscles, but did not change any contractile properties in the S-muscles. The peak twitch, train, tetanic tensions and time to peak were unchanged in the S-muscles of the suspended rats. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that 1 wk of muscle atropy induced by H/H significantly increases fatigability in G-muscles, but does not affect the contractile properties of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles.

  10. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel B.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-11-10

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  11. Slow light in dual-periodic photonic crystals based slotted-waveguide coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Cheng; Yan, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Considering the capacity of the nanoscale width area with the low-refractive index can confine light waves, the dual-periodic slotted photonic crystals, which is constructed by coupling low-refractive index's slotted-waveguide with high-refractive index's cavity is proposed in this paper. The best slow light properties and the optimal slotted-waveguide coupled cavity are achieved by adjusting the slotted-width and the period of cavity respectively. In this structure, the slow-light properties are simulated by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE), the result reveals that the group velocities are all three orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum, the slowest value is 7.96 ×10-4 c when the slotted-width is 0.54a and the period of cavity is 0.95a. Moreover, the corresponding Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) values are larger than 0.24. Besides, the slotted-waveguide coupled cavity can be reconfigured, which accordingly changes the corresponding slow-light property. At last, the numerical results provide a new thought and method for decreasing group velocity and potential application for optical buffer in photonic crystals field.

  12. Coded output photonic A/D converter based on photonic crystal slow-light structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Koo, Sukmo; Park, Namkyoo

    2008-09-01

    A photonic analog-to-digital converter (PADC) utilizing a slow-light photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed, to enable the optically coded output of a PADC with reduced device size and power consumption. Assuming an index modulation for the MZI on the Taylor's PADC structure, limiting factors in device size, speed, and effective number of bits are derived considering the signal transition time of the light and the slow light dispersion effects. Details of the device design and results of a time domain assessment of the device performance is described with discussions on the feasibility of sub-mm size, 20GS/s operation of the device having the ENOB (effective number of bits) > 5.

  13. Anatomy and histochemistry of spread-wing posture inbirds. 4. Eagles soar with fast, not slow muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Ron A; McFarland, Joshua C

    2016-07-01

    Slow fibers are typically characterized as functioning in avian postural behaviors such as soaring flight, and are described for a number of elite soarers such as vultures, pelicans and albatrosses. Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles also display soaring behavior and we examined their flight muscles for the presence of slow fibers. Surprisingly, eagles lack a deep layer to the pectoralis found in other soaring species. Additionally, the pectoralis as well as other shoulder muscles had few to no slow muscle fibers. The lack of functionally meaningful numbers of slow muscle fibers in eagle flight muscles indicates that they must rely on fast fibers for posture; these can function in that role due to their high aerobic capacity and also perhaps a "tuning" of muscle contraction frequency to function more efficiently at isometric contractions.

  14. Satellite cell ablation attenuates short-term fast-to-slow fibre type transformations in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen J B; Murdoch, Gordon K; Shu, Yang; Harris, R Luke W; Gallo, Maria; Dixon, Walter T; Foxcroft, George R; Gordon, Tessa; Putman, Charles T

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this time-course study was to determine whether satellite cell ablation within rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscles exposed to short-term chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) would limit fast-to-slow fibre type transformations. Satellite cells of the left TA were ablated by exposure to gamma-irradiation before 1, 2, 5 or 10 days of CLFS and 1 week later where required. Control groups received only CLFS or a sham operation. Continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine revealed that CLFS first induced an increase in satellite cell proliferation at 1 day, up to a maximum at 10 days over control (mean +/- SEM, 5.7 +/- 0.7 and 20.4 +/- 1.0 versus 1.5 +/- 0.2 mm(-2), respectively, P < 0.007) that was abolished by gamma-irradiation. Myosin heavy chain mRNA, immunohistochemical and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses revealed CLFS-induced fast-to-slow fibre type transformation began at 5 days and continued at 10 days; in those muscles that were also exposed to gamma-irradiation, attenuation occurred within the fast fibre population, and the final fast-twitch to slow-twitch adaptation did not occur. These findings indicate satellite cells play active and obligatory roles early on in the time course during skeletal muscle fibre type adaptations to CLFS.

  15. PATTERNS OF X-RAY, CHROMOSPHERIC, AND RADIO EMISSION IN LOW-MASS STARS: FAST AND SLOW MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection events in the atmospheres of low-mass dwarf stars can be classified as either slow or fast, depending on whether ohmic diffusion or Hall currents dominate in the reconnection process. We suggest that the separation of reconnection into slow and fast categories can help to explain some systematics of low-mass dwarfs as regards their emissions in X-rays, H{alpha}, and radio. On the one hand, in the warmer dwarfs (fast reconnection is permitted, and this can explain the occurrence of flares and 'quiescent' coronal heating. On the other hand, the fact that the coolest dwarfs (>M7) are inefficient emitters in H{alpha} and X-rays but strong emitters in radio, may be understood in the context that only slow reconnection is permitted to occur in those stars, as a result of high electrical resistivity. However, even though only slow reconnection is permitted in the latter stars, the speed of the outflow jets from reconnection sites can serve as efficient sources of radio emission as a result of the electron cyclotron maser instability.

  16. Experimental investigation of the transient dynamics of slow light in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham M.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-12-01

    When a pulsed light beam propagates through ruby, it is delayed by a slow-light mechanism. This mechanism has been the subject of debate (Wisniewski-Barker et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 083020; Kozlov et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038001; Wisniewski-Barker et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038002). To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the trailing edge of a square-wave pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby. Our observation of a pronounced tail on the trailing edge of the transmitted pulse cannot be explained solely by the effects of a time-varying absorber acting upon the incident pulse. Therefore, our observation of the creation of a tail at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than pulse reshaping. The different delays of individual Fourier components of the pulse signal explain the pulse distortion that occurs upon transmission through the ruby and must be accounted for by any model that attempts to describe the effects of slow light in ruby.

  17. Image information transfer via electromagnetically induced transparency-based slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Sun, Jia-Xiang; Sun, Yuan-Hang; Li, Ai-Jun; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hai-Hua; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate an image information transfer between two channels by using slow light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a solid. The probe optical image is slowed due to steep dispersion induced by EIT. By applying an additional control field to an EIT-driven medium, the slowed image is transferred into two information channels. Image intensities between two information channels can be controlled by adjusting the intensities of the control fields. The similarity of output images is further analyzed. This image information transfer allows for manipulating images in a controlled fashion, and will be important in further information processing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374126, 11347137, 11204103, 11404336, and 11204029), and the Fund for Fostering Talents in Basic Science of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. J1103202).

  18. Role of contraction duration in inducing fast-to-slow contractile and metabolic protein and functional changes in engineered muscle.

    PubMed

    Khodabukus, Alastair; Baehr, Leslie M; Bodine, Sue C; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-01

    The role of factors such as frequency, contraction duration and active time in the adaptation to chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS) is widely disputed. In this study we explore the ability of contraction duration (0.6, 6, 60, and 600 sec) to induce a fast-to-slow shift in engineered muscle while using a stimulation frequency of 10 Hz and keeping active time constant at 60%. We found that all contraction durations induced similar slowing of time-to-peak tension. Despite similar increases in total myosin heavy (MHC) levels with stimulation, increasing contraction duration resulted in progressive decreases in total fast myosin. With contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec, MHC IIx levels decreased and MHC IIa levels increased. All contraction durations resulted in fast-to-slow shifts in TnT and TnC but increased both fast and slow TnI levels. Half-relaxation slowed to a greater extent with contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec despite similar changes in the calcium sequestering proteins calsequestrin and parvalbumin and the calcium uptake protein SERCA. All CLFS groups resulted in greater fatigue resistance than control. Similar increases in GLUT4, mitochondrial enzymes (SDH and ATPsynthase), the fatty acid transporter CPT-1, and the metabolic regulators PGC-1α and MEF2 were found with all contraction durations. However, the mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome C and citrate synthase were increased to greater levels with contraction durations of 60 and 600 sec. These results demonstrate that contraction duration plays a pivotal role in dictating the level of CLFS-induced contractile and metabolic adaptations in tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

  19. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time.

  20. Double-sigmoid model for fitting fatigue profiles in mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Cairns, S P; Robinson, D M; Loiselle, D S

    2008-07-01

    We present a curve-fitting approach that permits quantitative comparisons of fatigue profiles obtained with different stimulation protocols in isolated slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of mice. Profiles from our usual stimulation protocol (125 Hz for 500 ms, evoked once every second for 100-300 s) could be fitted by single-term functions (sigmoids or exponentials) but not by a double exponential. A clearly superior fit, as confirmed by the Akaiki Information Criterion, was achieved using a double-sigmoid function. Fitting accuracy was exceptional; mean square errors were typically <1% and r(2) > 0.9995. The first sigmoid (early fatigue) involved approximately 10% decline of isometric force to an intermediate plateau in both muscle types; the second sigmoid (late fatigue) involved a reduction of force to a final plateau, the decline being 83% of initial force in EDL and 63% of initial force in soleus. The maximal slope of each sigmoid was seven- to eightfold greater in EDL than in soleus. The general applicability of the model was tested by fitting profiles with a severe force loss arising from repeated tetanic stimulation evoked at different frequencies or rest periods, or with excitation via nerve terminals in soleus. Late fatigue, which was absent at 30 Hz, occurred earlier and to a greater extent at 125 than 50 Hz. The model captured small changes in rate of late fatigue for nerve terminal versus sarcolemmal stimulation. We conclude that a double-sigmoid expression is a useful and accurate model to characterize fatigue in isolated muscle preparations.

  1. Slow and fast annual cycles of the Asian summer monsoon in the NCEP CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chul-Su; Huang, Bohua

    2016-07-01

    The climatological Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is decomposed into the slow and fast annual cycles (SAC and FAC). The FAC represents the abrupt onset and breaks phase-locked to the ASM seasonal progression. This study evaluates how well the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) simulates the SAC and FAC over the Indian and East Asia monsoon regions (IMR and EAMR). The simulated SACs are in good agreement with observations in both regions. The FAC also represents the northward propagation in both observations and CFSv2. It is further demonstrated that the FAC is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea interaction. In particular, the different roles played by the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback may account for the faster propagation in the IMR than the EAMR. However, compared with observations, the simulated FAC shows earlier monsoon onset and long-lasting stronger dry and wet phases in the IMR but delayed monsoon onset with weaker and less organized FAC in the EAMR. These reversed behaviors may originate from a warm (cold) SST bias in the IMR (EAMR) in boreal spring and enhanced by an overly sensitive surface evaporation to wind changes in the CFSv2. As a result, the warm spring SST bias in the IMR initiates a strong WES feedback and changes of solar insolation during boreal summer, which leads to a cold SST bias in early fall. On the other hand, the cold spring SST bias in the EAMR accounts for a weaker air-sea coupling, which in turn results in a warm SST bias after the withdrawal of the monsoon.

  2. Fast optical recording of light-flash evoked neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2005-08-01

    Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses closely associated with neural activation promises important technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for dynamic measurements of visual processing and early detection of eye diseases. We have developed a fast, no-moving-parts optical coherence tomography (OCT), system based on an electro-optic phase modulator, and used it to record dynamic near infrared (NIR) light scattering changes in frog retina activated by a visible light-flash. We also employed transmitted light for highly sensitive measurement and imaging of neural activation, and to optimize illumination and optical configuration. Using a photodiode detector, we routinely measured dynamic NIR transmitted optical responses in single passes. When the whole retina was illuminated by a visible light-flash, a positive peak was typically observed in transmitted light measurements. CCD image sequences disclosed larger fractional responses, in some cases exceeding 0.5% in individual pixels, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals with different timescales and complex but consistent spatial organization. The fast negative-going signals are highly correlated with the a-wave of the electrophysiological signals, and may reflect the activation of photoreceptors. The fast positive-going responses are related to the b-wave of the electrophysiological signals, and may result from the activation of ON bipolar cells. Slow optical responses may signal metabolic changes of retinal tissue. Our experimental results and theoretical analysis suggest that the optical responses may result from dynamic volume changes associated with neural activation, corresponding to ion and water flow across the cell membrane.

  3. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  4. Wideband slow light and dispersion control in oblique lattice photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Feng-Chun; Liang, Wen-Yao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Tong-Biao; Wang, He-Zhou

    2010-03-15

    We find that the angle between elementary lattice vectors obviously affects the bandwidth and dispersion of slow light in photonic crystal line-defect waveguides. When the fluctuation of group index is strictly limited in a +/-1% range, the oblique lattice structures with the angle between elementary lattice vectors slightly larger than 60 degrees have broader available bandwidth of flat band slow light than triangular lattice structures. For example, for the angle 66 degrees , there are increases of the available bandwidth from 20% to 68% for several different structures. For the same angle and a +/-10% variation in group velocity, when group indices are nearly constants of 30, 48.5, 80 and 130, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 20 nm, 11.8 nm, 7.3 nm and 3.9 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. The increasing of bandwidth is related to the shift of the anticrossing point towards smaller wave numbers.

  5. Dual coupled-resonator system for plasmon-induced transparency and slow light effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinghao; Meng, Hongyun; Huang, Ben; Wang, Huihao; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Wei; Tan, Chunhua; Huang, Xuguang; Li, Shuti

    2016-12-01

    We proposed a dual coupled-resonator system based on the metal-insulator-metal bus waveguide and numerically investigated the plasmon-induced transparency and slow light effect with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations in this paper. The electromagnetically induced transparency-like spectral response will occur between two adjacent stub resonators with detuned resonant wavelength due to the phase-coupled effect. The transmissivity and group index equations were been deduced, which indicated that the system can achieve the effect of the multiple electromagnetically induced transparency-like and slow light. With the optimization, the single peak transmission can reach to as high as 92%, dual PIT transmission peaks appear, as well as group index can reach over 75. These characteristics indicate multiple applications of our system in integrated optical circuits.

  6. Slow light with large group index - bandwidth product in lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Li, Wenhui; Wu, Jun; Xu, Zhonghui

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a systematic optimization procedure to generate slow light with large group index, wideband, and low dispersion in an lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguide. The waveguide is based on triangular lattice photonic crystal imposed by selectively altering the locations of the holes adjacent to the line defect. Under a constant group index criterion of ± 10% variation, when group indices are nearly constants of 24, 33, 46, 57, and 66, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 24.2, 17.6, 12.8, 10.1 and 8.6 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. A nearly constant large group index - bandwidth product (GBP) of 0.37 is achieved for all cases. Low dispersion slow light propagation is confirmed by studying the relative temporal pulse-width spreading with the 2-D finite-difference time-domain method.

  7. Four-wave mixing in slow light photonic crystal waveguides with very high group index.

    PubMed

    Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2012-07-30

    We report efficient four-wave mixing in dispersion engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides with a flat band group index of n(g) = 60. Using only 15 mW continuous wave coupled input power, we observe a conversion efficiency of -28 dB. This efficiency represents a 30 dB enhancement compared to a silicon nanowire of the same length. At higher powers, thermal redshifting due to linear absorption was found to detune the slow light regime preventing the expected improvement in efficiency. We then overcome this thermal limitation by using oxide-clad waveguides, which we demonstrate for group indices of ng = 30. Higher group indices may be achieved with oxide clad-waveguides, and we predict conversion efficiencies approaching -10 dB, which is equivalent to that already achieved in silicon nanowires but for a 50x shorter length.

  8. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  9. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed. PMID:25893952

  10. Dynamic saturation in Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers: accurate model, role of carrier density, and slow light.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Alouini, Mehdi; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2010-01-18

    We developed an improved model in order to predict the RF behavior and the slow light properties of the SOA valid for any experimental conditions. It takes into account the dynamic saturation of the SOA, which can be fully characterized by a simple measurement, and only relies on material fitting parameters, independent of the optical intensity and the injected current. The present model is validated by showing a good agreement with experiments for small and large modulation indices.

  11. Information-theoretic analysis of a stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-based slow-light system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungjun; Zhu, Yunhui; Gauthier, Daniel J; Gehm, Michael E; Neifeld, Mark A

    2011-11-10

    We use an information-theoretic method developed by Neifeld and Lee [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 25, C31 (2008)] to analyze the performance of a slow-light system. Slow-light is realized in this system via stimulated Brillouin scattering in a 2 km-long, room-temperature, highly nonlinear fiber pumped by a laser whose spectrum is tailored and broadened to 5 GHz. We compute the information throughput (IT), which quantifies the fraction of information transferred from the source to the receiver and the information delay (ID), which quantifies the delay of a data stream at which the information transfer is largest, for a range of experimental parameters. We also measure the eye-opening (EO) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the transmitted data stream and find that they scale in a similar fashion to the information-theoretic method. Our experimental findings are compared to a model of the slow-light system that accounts for all pertinent noise sources in the system as well as data-pulse distortion due to the filtering effect of the SBS process. The agreement between our observations and the predictions of our model is very good. Furthermore, we compare measurements of the IT for an optimal flattop gain profile and for a Gaussian-shaped gain profile. For a given pump-beam power, we find that the optimal profile gives a 36% larger ID and somewhat higher IT compared to the Gaussian profile. Specifically, the optimal (Gaussian) profile produces a fractional slow-light ID of 0.94 (0.69) and an IT of 0.86 (0.86) at a pump-beam power of 450 mW and a data rate of 2.5 Gbps. Thus, the optimal profile better utilizes the available pump-beam power, which is often a valuable resource in a system design.

  12. Slow light in metal-insulator-metal waveguide by negative Goos-Hänchen shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Geum-Yoon; Chheang, Vuthy; Kim, Doo-Gun; Kim, Tae-Ryong; Jun, Li; Kim, Hong-Seung; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrated group velocity delay using a metal-insulator-metal structure for slow light that would be very simple to fabricate. A negative Goos-Hänchen shift of the surface plasmon resonance can be caused by incident radiation while reflecting, resulting in a general group delay. Using this phenomenon, we induced a group delay of 70 fs using a very simple 20-μm-long waveguide.

  13. Theoretical study of ultra-wideband slow light in dual-stub-coupled plasmonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlei; Su, Runzhou; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide side coupled double stubs to realize broadband slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) around the telecom frequency 193.5 THz. When the depth of single stub is approximately equal to integral multiple of half plasmon wavelength, owing to the constructive interferences between the electromagnetic wave propagating through the MIM waveguide and that reflected from the stubs, wideband slow light effect appears. The improved transmission line theory calculation indicates that the group velocity of SPPs in the plasmonic waveguide system for stub depth 1111 nm is 0.1c (c is light speed in vacuum.) over a broad bandwidth of 69 THz. Exploiting the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the group velocity of pulse for width 20 fs (Full width at half high) is calculated. The result agrees well with that predicted by the transmission line theory. This plasmonic waveguide for slow light effect has important potential application in optical delay lines.

  14. Slow light engineering in polyatomic photonic crystal waveguides based on square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daobin; Zhang, Jie; Yuan, Lihua; Lei, Jingli; Chen, Sai; Han, Jiawei; Hou, Shanglin

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the slow light properties of the polyatomic Photonic Crystal (PhC) which has multiple different air holes in each primitive cell are investigated. A slow light waveguide with "U-type" group index-frequency curve, which results in nearly constant group index over large bandwidth, is achieved using this new photonic crystal geometry based on the square lattice. Also, the radius and position of the innermost rows of small air holes have been modified to investigate the feasibility of controlling the dispersion relation by subtle structural modification. Numerical results demonstrate that decreasing the group velocity effectively and meanwhile maintaining a large Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product ( NDBP) can be achieved by only modifying the radius of the innermost rows of small air holes. Shifting the innermost rows of small air holes toward the waveguide core is highly beneficial to enlarge the slow light bandwidth, but it contributes nothing to the promotion of NDBP. Our results provide important theoretical basis for the potential application offered by the polyatomic photonic crystal in future optical networks.

  15. Electromagnetic field manipulation in planar nanorod antennas metamaterial for slow light application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junqiao; Zhang, Jia; Fan, Chunzhen; Mu, Kaijun; Liang, Erjun; Ding, Pei

    2017-01-01

    We numerically investigated the optical properties of planar nanorod antennas metamaterial that exhibits plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effect. The designed metamaterial is made of a silver nanorod dimer antenna surrounded by two parallel silver nanorods. The interaction between two parallel nanorods and middle nanorod dimer antenna leads to a single PIT band in the transmission spectrum. Moreover, the double PIT windows and slow light can be realized by breaking the structure symmetry. The multi-bands PIT effect offers an excellent potential to manipulate the light speed at multi-frequencies.

  16. Slow light in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Jiang Cheng; Zhu Kadi

    2011-05-15

    We theoretically investigate the light propagation in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). It is shown that slow light can easily be realized in this system via a BEC coupled to an optical cavity field. The numerical results further demonstrate that the transmitted probe beam from the cavity can be delayed as much as 0.8 ms by suitably selecting the pump field detuning from the cavity field frequency. The scheme proposed here may have potential applications in telecommunication and interferometry.

  17. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2011-06-15

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  18. Kinetic theory for neuronal networks with fast and slow excitatory conductances driven by the same spike train.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Aaditya V; Kovacic, Gregor; Cai, David

    2008-04-01

    We present a kinetic theory for all-to-all coupled networks of identical, linear, integrate-and-fire, excitatory point neurons in which a fast and a slow excitatory conductance are driven by the same spike train in the presence of synaptic failure. The maximal-entropy principle guides us in deriving a set of three (1+1) -dimensional kinetic moment equations from a Boltzmann-like equation describing the evolution of the one-neuron probability density function. We explain the emergence of correlation terms in the kinetic moment and Boltzmann-like equations as a consequence of simultaneous activation of both the fast and slow excitatory conductances and furnish numerical evidence for their importance in correctly describing the coarse-grained dynamics of the underlying neuronal network.

  19. Field efficacy and transmission of fast- and slow-killing nucleopolyhedroviruses that are infectious to Adoxophyes honmai (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Maho; Nakai, Madoka; Saito, Yasumasa; Sato, Yasushi; Ishijima, Chikara; Kunimi, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-18

    The smaller tea tortrix, Adoxophyes honmai (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is an economically important pest of tea in Japan. Previous work showed that a fast-killing nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) isolated from A. orana (AdorNPV) and a slow-killing NPV isolated from A. honmai (AdhoNPV) are both infectious to A. honmai larvae. Field application of these different NPVs was conducted against an A. honmai larval population in tea plants, and the control efficacy and transmission rate of the two NPVs were compared. The slow-killing AdhoNPV showed lower field efficacy, in terms of preventing damage caused by A. honmai larvae against the tea plants, than the fast-killing AdorNPV. However, AdhoNPV had a significantly higher horizontal transmission rate than AdorNPV. These results show that AdorNPV is suitable as an inundative agent, while AdhoNPV is an appropriate inoculative agent.

  20. Effect of tibial bone resection on the development of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles in foetal sheep.

    PubMed

    West, J M; Williams, N A; Luff, A R; Walker, D W

    2000-04-01

    To determine if longitudinal bone growth affects the differentiation of fast- and slow-twitch muscles, the tibial bone was sectioned at 90 days gestation in foetal sheep so that the lower leg was permanently without structural support. At 140 days (term is approximately 147 days) the contractile properties of whole muscles, activation profiles of single fibres and ultrastructure of fast- and slow-twitch muscles from the hindlimbs were studied. The contractile and activation profiles of the slow-twitch soleus muscles were significantly affected by tibial bone resection (TIBX). The soleus muscles from the TIBX hindlimbs showed: (1) a decrease in the time to peak of the twitch responses from 106.2 +/- 10.7 ms (control, n = 4) to 65.1 +/- 2.48 ms (TIBX, n = 5); (2) fatigue profiles more characteristic of those observed in the fast-twitch muscles: and (3) Ca2+ - and Sr2+ -activation profiles of skinned fibres similar to those from intact hindlimbs at earlier stages of gestation. In the FDL, TIBX did not significantly change whole muscle twitch contraction time, the fatigue profile or the Ca2+ - and Sr2+ -activation profiles of skinned fibres. Electron microscopy showed an increased deposition of glycogen in both soleus and FDL muscles. This study shows that the development of the slow-twitch phenotype is impeded in the absence of the physical support normally provided by the tibial bone. We suggest that longitudinal stretch is an important factor in allowing full expression of the slow-twitch phenotype.

  1. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

  2. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D.; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. PMID:25100314

  3. Transcriptional regulation of acetylcholinesterase-associated collagen ColQ in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ting, Annie K L; Siow, Nina L; Kong, L W; Tsim, Karl W K

    2005-12-15

    The presence of a collagenous protein (ColQ) characterizes the collagen-tailed forms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions, which is tethered in the synaptic basal lamina. ColQ subunits, differing mostly by their signal sequences, are encoded by transcripts ColQ-1 and ColQ-1a, which are differentially expressed in slow- and fast-twitch muscles in mammals, respectively. Both ColQ transcripts are derived from a single COLQ gene. Transcripts encoding ColQ increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells; the increase was in parallel with AChE catalytic subunit. Quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the increase during the myotube formation was due to the up regulation of ColQ-1 transcript instead of ColQ-1a. In order to reveal the regulatory mechanism of ColQ transcripts, two distinct promoters, pColQ-1 and pColQ-1a, were isolated from human COLQ gene. The ColQ promoters showed a muscle fiber type-specific expression pattern, and which was in line with the expression of endogenous transcript. After in vivo DNA transfection, pColQ-1 showed strong activity in slow-twitch muscle (e.g. soleus), while pColQ-1a was preferably expressed in fast-twitch muscle (e.g. tibialis). Mutation analysis of the ColQ promoters suggested that the muscle fiber type-specific expression pattern of ColQ transcripts was regulated by a slow upsteam regulatory element (SURE) and a fast intronic regulatory element (FIRE). These results explain the specific expression patterns of collagen-tailed AChE in slow and fast muscle fibers.

  4. Analytical studies on an extended car following model for mixed traffic flow with slow and fast vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Xu, Xun; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing; Xu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The car-following model is extended to take into account the characteristics of mixed traffic flow containing fast and slow vehicles. We conduct the linear stability analysis to the extended model with finding that the traffic flow can be stabilized with the increase of the percentage of the slow vehicle. It also can be concluded that the stabilization of the traffic flow closely depends on not only the average value of two maximum velocities characterizing two vehicle types, but also the standard deviation of the maximum velocities among all vehicles, when the percentage of the slow vehicles is the same as that of the fast ones. With increase of the average maximum velocity, the traffic flow becomes more and more unstable, while the increase of the standard deviation takes negative effect in stabilizing the traffic system. The direct numerical results are in good agreement with those of theoretical analysis. Moreover, the relation between the flux and the traffic density is investigated to simulate the effects of the percentage of slow vehicles on traffic flux in the whole density regions.

  5. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  6. Slow inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster express as much inbreeding depression as fast inbred lines under semi-natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Knudsen, Morten Ravn; Loeschcke, Volker

    2011-04-01

    Selection may reduce the deleterious consequences of inbreeding. This may be due to purging of recessive deleterious alleles or balancing selection favouring heterozygote offspring. Such selection is expected to be more efficient at slower compared to at faster rates of inbreeding. In this study we tested the impact of inbreeding and the rate of inbreeding on fitness related traits (egg productivity, egg-to-adult viability, developmental time and behaviour) under cold and benign semi-natural thermal conditions using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. We used non-inbred control and slow and fast inbred lines (both with an expected inbreeding level of 0.25). The results show that contrary to expectations the slow inbred lines do not maintain higher average fitness than the fast inbred lines. Furthermore, we found that stressful environmental conditions increased the level of inbreeding depression but the impact of inbreeding rate on the level of inbreeding depression was not affected by the environmental conditions. The results do not support the hypothesis that inbreeding depression is less severe with slow compared to fast rates of inbreeding and illustrate that although selection may be more efficient with slower rates of inbreeding this does not necessary lead to less inbreeding depression.

  7. Slow- and fast-twitch hindlimb skeletal muscle phenotypes 12 wk after ⅚ nephrectomy in Wistar rats of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; López, Ignacio; Chamizo, Verónica E; Pineda, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2015-10-01

    This study describes fiber-type adaptations in hindlimb muscles, the interaction of sex, and the role of hypoxia on this response in 12-wk ⅚ nephrectomized rats (Nx). Contractile, metabolic, and morphological features of muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of Nx rats, and compared with sham-operated controls. Rats of both sexes were considered in both groups. A slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation occurred in the tibialis cranialis of Nx rats, particularly in males. This adaptation was accomplished by impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity, increased glycolytic capacity, and no changes in size and nuclear density of muscle fiber types. An oxidative-to-glycolytic metabolic transformation was also found in the soleus muscle of Nx rats. However, a modest fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation, fiber hypertrophy, and nuclear proliferation were observed in soleus muscle fibers of male, but not of female, Nx rats. Serum testosterone levels decreased by 50% in male but not in female Nx rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level decreased by 42% in the tibialis cranialis muscle of male Nx rats. These data demonstrate that 12 wk of Nx induces a muscle-specific adaptive response in which myofibers do not change (or enlarge minimally) in size and nuclear density, but acquire markedly different contractile and metabolic characteristics, which are accompanied by capillary rarefaction. Muscle function and sex play relevant roles in these adaptations.

  8. Seismicity rates of slow, intermediate, and fast spreading ridges: Insights from long-term hydroacoustic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Goslin, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean basin earthquakes recorded on NOAA/OSU and U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays are used to evaluate long-term volcano-tectonic seismicity levels from segments of the fast-spreading rate East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 20° S-20° N, intermediate-spreading rate Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) from 39° -52° N and Galapagos Rift (GR) from 90° -103° W, and the slow-spreading northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) from 5° -60° N. The hydrophones record the acoustic energy of seafloor earthquakes that propagate along the ocean sound channel with little attenuation over large distances. Frequency-magnitude relationships (Bohnenstiehl et al., 2002; Dziak et al., 2004) indicate the hydrophone catalogs are complete in these regions to body-wave magnitude ˜2.5 (EPR and GR), 2.5 (JdFR), and 3.0 (MAR), an improvement of 1.5 to 2 units over the land-based seismic catalogs for mid-ocean ridge systems. Using the hydrophone earthquake catalog, we will compare seismicity rates of the JdFR (12 years of data), to seismicity rates along the GR (6 years) and EPR (6 years) and MAR (4 years of data from 5° -39° N; 16 months from 39° -60° N). During these monitoring periods, five confirmed seafloor spreading events (four of which were associated with magmatic activity) were recorded on discrete JdFR segments, while 6 possible magmatic events were observed on the EPR, one on the GR, and one on the MAR. Empirical orthogonal functions will be used to elucidate the space-time patterns of seismicity and compare between the various spreading rates ridges, as well as to investigate the recurrence rate of seafloor spreading events present. In addition, single-link cluster analysis (SLC; Frolich and Davis, 1990) will be used to de-cluster the earthquake databases to reduce the effects of aftershock sequences and magmatic swarms, allowing us to evaluate how overall plate motion and changes in spreading rate effect levels of seismicity between ridge segments and different ridge systems. Preliminary

  9. Differences in egg deposition of corticosterone and embryonic expression of corticosterone metabolic enzymes between slow and fast growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Ma, Wenqiang; Guo, Feng; Ni, Yingdong; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ruqian

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are vital for embryonic development and their bioactivity is regulated by the intracellular metabolism involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11β-HSDs) and 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-HSD). Here we sought to reveal the differences in egg deposition of corticosterone and embryonic expression of corticosterone metabolic enzymes between slow and fast growing broiler chickens (Gallus gallus). Eggs of fast-growing breed contained significantly higher (P<0.05) corticosterone in the yolk and albumen, compared with that of a slow-growing breed. 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 were expressed in relatively higher abundance in the liver, kidney and intestine, following similar tissue-specific ontogenic patterns. In the liver, expression of both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 was upregulated (P<0.05) towards hatching, yet 20-HSD displayed distinct pattern showing a significant decrease (P<0.05) on posthatch day 1 (D1). Hepatic mRNA expression of 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 was significantly higher in fast-growing chicken embryos at all the embryonic stages investigated and so was the hepatic protein content on embryonic day of 14 (E14) for 11β-HSD1 and on E14 and D1 for 11β-HSD2. 20-HSD mRNA was higher in fast-growing chicken embryos only on E14. Our data provide the first evidence that egg deposition of corticosterone, as well as the hepatic expression of glucocorticoid metabolic enzymes, differs between fast-growing and slow-growing chickens, which may account, to some extent, for the breed disparities in embryonic development.

  10. The numerical study on large bandwidth photonic crystal waveguide with slow light phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming-Bao; Fu, Zhen-Tang; Wang, Wei-Yu

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, two novel types of semi-slow light photonic crystal waveguide with large transmission bandwidth obtained by shifting the boundaries of a W1 waveguide in the direction of light propagation are presented. One includes air rings localized at only one side of the line defect and the other replaces the holes at each side of the waveguide by the uniform air rings which are constructed by the homocentric square dielectric rod inserted into the air holes. The structure produces unusual "n-type" transmission spectrum depending on the different parameters such as inner radius of air ring, dielectric constant of square dielectric rod, etc. It is shown that the transmission spectra of the two structures are completely different from each other. A versatile control of light propagation with large normalized bandwidth and slow light phenomena can be obtained using a unique geometrical parameter. Numerical simulation by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method demonstrates the propagation of the broadband pulse.

  11. Size-dependent waveguide dispersion in nanowire optical cavities: slowed light and dispersionless guiding.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Lambert K; Zhang, Bin; Piccione, Brian; Spector, Arthur A; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2009-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of the size dependence of nanoscale optical confinement in semiconductor nanowire waveguides, as expressed by changes in the dispersion of light, is crucial for the optimal design of nanophotonic devices. Measurements of the dispersion are particularly challenging for nanoscale cavities due to difficulties associated with the in- and out-coupling of light resulting from diffraction effects. We report the strong size dependence of optical dispersion and associated group velocities in subwavelength width ZnSe nanowire waveguide cavities, using a technique based on Fabry-Perot resonator modes as probes over a wide energy range. Furthermore, we observed subwavelength (lambda/9) dispersionless waveguiding and significant slowing of the propagating light by 90% (c/8). These results, in addition to providing insights into nanoscale optical transport, will facilitate the rational design of nanowire photonic devices with tailored dispersion and group velocities.

  12. SLOW PATCHY EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET PROPAGATING FRONTS ASSOCIATED WITH FAST CORONAL MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.

    2015-08-15

    Using the high spatiotemporal resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we conduct a statistical study of the observational properties of the coronal EUV propagating fronts. We find that it might be a universal phenomenon for two types of fronts to coexist in a large solar eruptive event. It is consistent with the hybrid model of EUV propagating fronts, which predicts that coronal EUV propagating fronts consist of both a fast magneto-acoustic wave and a nonwave component. We find that the morphologies, propagation behaviors, and kinematic features of the two EUV propagating fronts are completely different from each other. The fast magneto-acoustic wave fronts are almost isotropic. They travel continuously from the flaring region across multiple magnetic polarities to global distances. On the other hand, the slow nonwave fronts appear as anisotropic and sequential patches of EUV brightening. Each patch propagates locally in the magnetic domains where the magnetic field lines connect to the bottom boundary and stops at the magnetic domain boundaries. Within each magnetic domain, the velocities of the slow patchy nonwave component are an order of magnitude lower than that of the fast-wave component. However, the patches of the slow EUV propagating front can jump from one magnetic domain to a remote one. The velocities of such a transit between different magnetic domains are about one-third to one-half of those of the fast-wave component. The results show that the velocities of the nonwave component, both within one magnetic domain and between different magnetic domains, are highly nonuniform due to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the lower atmosphere.

  13. Slow Patchy Extreme-ultraviolet Propagating Fronts Associated with Fast Coronal Magneto-acoustic Waves in Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.

    2015-08-01

    Using the high spatiotemporal resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we conduct a statistical study of the observational properties of the coronal EUV propagating fronts. We find that it might be a universal phenomenon for two types of fronts to coexist in a large solar eruptive event. It is consistent with the hybrid model of EUV propagating fronts, which predicts that coronal EUV propagating fronts consist of both a fast magneto-acoustic wave and a nonwave component. We find that the morphologies, propagation behaviors, and kinematic features of the two EUV propagating fronts are completely different from each other. The fast magneto-acoustic wave fronts are almost isotropic. They travel continuously from the flaring region across multiple magnetic polarities to global distances. On the other hand, the slow nonwave fronts appear as anisotropic and sequential patches of EUV brightening. Each patch propagates locally in the magnetic domains where the magnetic field lines connect to the bottom boundary and stops at the magnetic domain boundaries. Within each magnetic domain, the velocities of the slow patchy nonwave component are an order of magnitude lower than that of the fast-wave component. However, the patches of the slow EUV propagating front can jump from one magnetic domain to a remote one. The velocities of such a transit between different magnetic domains are about one-third to one-half of those of the fast-wave component. The results show that the velocities of the nonwave component, both within one magnetic domain and between different magnetic domains, are highly nonuniform due to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the lower atmosphere.

  14. Temperature- and wavelength-dependent scattering of light during slow heating of porcine septal cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Reshmi; Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Wong, Brian J.; Madsen, Steen J.

    2002-06-01

    The response of cartilage tissue to thermal stress can be investigated indirectly by measuring changes in optical properties during heating. Temperature distributions in cartilage depend on the mode of heating. Laser irradiation of thick cartilage specimens results in non-uniform heating, causing asynchronous stress relaxation in different regions of the tissue. In contrast, slow heating of cartilage in a Rose chamber results in more uniform temperature profiles. In addition, the heating of tissue in a saline- (or mineral oil) filled Rose chamber eliminates dehydration effects that are commonly encountered during laser heating. The purpose of this investigation was to measure diffuse reflectance and diffuse transmittance of porcine septal cartilage tissue during slow heating. Diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured using integrating sphere and lock-in detection techniques. Cartilage surface temperatures were estimated using a thermocouple and cold-junction compensator. Diffusely transmitted light was observed to decrease, plateau, and then increase, whereas diffusely reflected light was observed to increase, plateau, and then decrease. The change in slope for both transmitted and reflected light occurred at cartilage front surface temperatures of between 45 and 50 degree(s)C. The results suggest that changes in the optical properties of cartilage tissue occur due to a phase transformation during heating.

  15. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-09

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW(-1) and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  16. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW-1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  17. Slow light from sharp dispersion by exciting dark photonic angular momentum states.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-Hua; Kang, Ming; Li, Teng-Fei; Cui, Hai-Xu; Chen, Jing

    2013-02-01

    A photonic angular momentum state (PAMS) with a topological charge of m≠±1 is dipole forbidden at all polarizations of free-space incidence due to the existence of a unique helical phase. We show that by indirectly exciting dark PAMSs through coupling with a bright resonant element, a sharply variant transmission behavior and strong dispersion can be achieved. This behavior can subsequently be utilized in slow light. A metamaterial design, in which a group index n(g) greater than 500 can be achieved, is present.

  18. Slow-light dispersion engineering of photonic crystal waveguides using selective microfluidic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Casas-Bedoya, A; Husko, C; Monat, C; Grillet, C; Gutman, N; Domachuk, P; Eggleton, B J

    2012-10-15

    We experimentally demonstrate dispersion engineering of slow light photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides using selective infiltration of the first two rows of air holes with high index ionic liquids. The infiltrated PhC waveguide exhibits a dispersion window of 3 nm with a nearly constant group velocity of ~c/80 that depends on the liquid physical properties. We investigate how the effective refractive index changes in time due to the dynamics of the liquids in the holes. This demonstration highlights the versatility, flexibility, and tunability offered by optofluidics in PhC circuits.

  19. Novel slow light waveguide with controllable delay-bandwidth product and utra-low dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ran; Cassan, Eric; Kurt, Hamza; Le Roux, Xavier; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vivien, Laurent; Wu, Huaming; Zhou, Zhiping; Zhang, Xinliang

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate a novel type of slow light photonic crystal waveguide which can produce unusual "U" type group index - frequency curves with constant group index n(g) over large bandwidth. By shifting the boundaries of this waveguide, flexible control of n(g) (10

  20. Polarization-independent waveguides in air holes photonic crystals and its slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qingbin; Li, Chuanqi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Ye; Zhang, Dongchuang

    2016-12-01

    A line-defect waveguide in a triangular lattice photonic crystal (PC) made of air holes in dielectric is demonstrated to support transverse magnetic (TM) as well as transverse electric (TE) guided modes simultaneously. A group of suitable geometric parameters were found to make the guided bands overlapped by means of Genetic Algorithm. The optimized waveguide realizes a polarization-independent single-mode transmission and wide operating bandwidth which reaches 0.012 Δ ω a / (2 π c) . Moreover, the guided modes are shown to exhibit a wide-bandwidth slow light and an extremely low group velocity dispersion in most frequency range.

  1. Preservation of Energy-Time Entanglement in a Slow Light Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Camacho, Ryan M.; Xin, Ran; Howell, John C.

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrate the preservation of entanglement of an energy-time entangled biphoton through a slow light medium. Using the D1 and D2 fine structure resonances of Rubidium, we delay one photon of the 1.5 THz biphoton by ˜1.3 correlation lengths and measure the fourth order correlation fringes. After the group delay the fringe visibility is reduced from 97.0±4.4% to 80.0±4.8%, but is still sufficient to violate a Bell inequality. We show that temporal broadening is the primary mechanism for reducing the fringe visibility and that smaller bandwidths lead to greatly reduced broadening.

  2. Theory of slow light enhanced four-wave mixing in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Santagiustina, M; Someda, C G; Vadalà, G; Combrié, S; De Rossi, A

    2010-09-27

    The equations for Four-Wave-Mixing in a Photonic Crystal waveguide are derived accurately. The dispersive nature of slow-light enhancement, the impact of Bloch mode reshaping in the nonlinear overlap integrals and the tensor nature of the third order polarization are therefore taken into account. Numerical calculations reveal substantial differences with simpler models, which increase with decreasing group velocity. We predict that the gain for a 1.3 mm long, unoptimized GaInP waveguide will exceed 10 dB if the pump power exceeds 1 W.

  3. Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Monat, Christelle; Clark, Alex S; Grillet, Christian; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F; Rarity, John G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    We report the generation of correlated photon pairs in the telecom C-band at room temperature from a dispersion-engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. The spontaneous four-wave mixing process producing the photon pairs is enhanced by slow-light propagation enabling an active device length of less than 100 μm. With a coincidence to accidental ratio of 12.8 at a pair generation rate of 0.006 per pulse, this ultracompact photon pair source paves the way toward scalable quantum information processing realized on-chip.

  4. Greater hydrogen ion-induced depression of tension and velocity in skinned single fibres of rat fast than slow muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, J M; Moss, R L

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of variations in pH between 7.00 and 6.20 on Ca2+ -activated tension development and maximum velocity of shortening (Vmax) were examined in skinned single skeletal fibres from rat slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch superficial (s.v.l.) and deep (d.v.l.) regions of the vastus lateralis muscle. 2. At pH 6.50, Vmax was depressed to a similar degree in each of the soleus, d.v.l., and s.v.l. fibres. Lowering pH to 6.20 resulted in a further decline in Vmax in all fibres; however, differences between the slow fibres, identified by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and fast fibres were apparent, with soleus retaining a significantly greater proportion of its control Vmax (0.83 +/- 0.03 in soleus vs. 0.69 +/- 0.03 in s.v.l.; mean +/- S.E.M.). 3. Maximum force production decreased significantly as pH was reduced. Peak force at pH 6.50, relative to that at pH 7.00, was significantly greater in soleus (0.80 +/- 0.01) than in the s.v.l. (0.75 +/- 0.01) fibres. At pH 6.20 these differences between slow and fast fibres were still greater, in that soleus fibres generated significantly greater relative forces (0.73 +/- 0.01) than did d.v.l. (0.67 +/- 0.02) or s.v.l. (0.63 +/- 0.02) fibres. 4. As pH was lowered the tension-pCa relationship shifted to the right (i.e. to higher [Ca2+]), indicating a reduction in the Ca2+ sensitivity of tension development. The [Ca2+] necessary to achieve half-maximal tension in both the slow- and fast-twitch fibres increased approximately 5-fold when pH was lowered from 7.00 to 6.20. Furthermore, in the case of the soleus, the Ca2+ threshold for tension development was 45 times greater at pH 6.20 than at pH 7.00, while in the fast-twitch fibres, this increase was 4-fold. 5. Increased [H+] differentially affected the steepness of the tension-pCa relationship between slow and fast fibres. As pH was lowered, the steepness of the lower portion of the tension-pCa curve increased in the soleus and decreased in d.v.l. and s

  5. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras.

  6. Broad self-trapped and slow light bands based on negative refraction and interference of magnetic coupled modes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun-Tuan; Ni, Zhi-Yao; Zhu, Na; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-13

    We propose a new mechanism to achieve light localization and slow light. Through the study on the coupling of two magnetic surface modes, we find a special convex band that takes on a negative refraction effect. The negative refraction results in an energy flow concellation effect from two degenerated modes on the convex band. The energy flow concellation effect leads to forming of the self-trapped and slow light bands. In the self-trapped band light is localized around the source without reflection wall in the waveguide direction, whereas in the slow light band, light becomes the standing-waves and moving standing-waves at the center and the two sides of the waveguide, respectively.

  7. An application of fast response Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, Deependra; van Winkle, David

    2007-03-01

    A fast response polarized light microscope was designed based on the algorithm by Shribak et. al (Applied Optics, vol. 42, 3009-3017). A pulsed laser beam was passed through two Pockels cells aligned at different angles with respect to optical axis. The retardance of the Pockels cell was controlled by external switches and power supplies. The electronics circuit in the system allows change of the retardance of the Pockels cell each millisecond for four milliseconds. In four milliseconds, four images of a birefringent sample, formed by different states of polarized light are recorded. The images are added appropriately to calculate retardence amplitude and phase by using codes written in imageJ software. The microscope was used to show the retardance and phase of a rabbit muscle fiber. Recordings were also taken of the contraction of Vorticella convallaria but the changes were too fast to yield retardance images. This type of microscope can be used to study different kinds of biological functions that change on a timescale slower than four milliseconds but faster than two seconds.

  8. The Speed of Feature-Based Attention: Attentional Advantage Is Slow, but Selection Is Fast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Liqiang

    2010-01-01

    When paying attention to a feature (e.g., red), no attentional advantage is gained in perceiving items with this feature in very brief displays. Therefore, feature-based attention seems to be slow. In previous feature-based attention studies, attention has often been measured as the difference in performance in a secondary task. In our recent work…

  9. Recognition Errors Suggest Fast Familiarity and Slow Recollection in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    One influential model of recognition posits two underlying memory processes: recollection, which is detailed but relatively slow, and familiarity, which is quick but lacks detail. Most of the evidence for this dual-process model in nonhumans has come from analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in rats, but whether ROC analyses…

  10. "Slow Down, You Move Too Fast:" Literature Circles as Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Becoming an effective literacy learner requires a bit of slowing down and appreciating the reflective nature of reading and writing. Literature circles support this instructional direction because they provide opportunities for immersing students in discussions that encourage their personal responses. When students feel their personal responses…

  11. Reptilian skeletal muscle: contractile properties of identified, single fast-twitch and slow fibers from the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, T T; Johnston, I A

    1987-06-01

    Contractile properties and innervation patterns were determined in identified single fibers from the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Single fibers from both the red and white regions of the iliofibularis muscle were dissected along their length under oil and a portion was mounted on transducers for determination of maximum isometric tension (Po) and unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax) using the slack test method. Fibers were chemically skinned and activated by high Ca++. The remaining portion of the muscle fiber was mounted on a glass slide and histochemically treated to demonstrate myosin ATPase activity. Fibers studied functionally could therefore be classified as fast or slow according to their myosin ATPase activity, and they could also be classified metabolically according to the region of the muscle from which they were dissected. Fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers from the white region and fast-twitch oxidative, glycolytic (FOG) and slow fibers from the red region had shortening velocities at 25 degrees C of 7.5, 4.4, and 1.5 l X s-1, respectively. Po did not differ in the three fiber types, averaging 279 kN X m-2. In a second experiment, 10 microns sections were examined every 30 microns through the proximal-most 7.5 mm of the iliofibularis muscle for motor endplates. Sections were stained to demonstrate regions of acetylcholinesterase activity. Fibers with visible endplates were classified in serial sections by histochemical treatment for myosin ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. All slow fibers examined (n = 22) exhibited multiple endplates, averaging one every 725 microns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effect of sequential radiofrequency ablation lesions at fast and slow atrioventricular nodal pathway positions in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Garratt, C. J.; Skehan, J. D.; Payne, G. E.; Stafford, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the hypothesis that the anatomic equivalents of the fast and slow pathways identified in patients with atrioventricular (AV) nodal tachycardia may be universal and represent the principal sites of atrial input into the normal compact AV node. METHODS: 15 patients undergoing complete AV junction ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were studied. Radiofrequency energy was delivered first in the anterior "fast pathway" position so as to prolong the atrium to bundle of His (AH) interval by over 50% of baseline (protocol 1) and then to the "slow pathway" position using the anatomical technique (protocol 2). RESULTS: Ablation protocol 1 resulted in prolongation of AH interval in all patients. Subsequent lesions at the level of the coronary sinus produced complete heart block in four patients, and in five caused a further increase in AH interval above that produced by protocol 1. Four of these latter patients developed complete block after delivery of RF energy slightly anterior to the level of the coronary sinus os, as did three further patients in whom ablation at the level of the coronary sinus had no effect. In four patients complete heart block could not be achieved by protocol 2. CONCLUSIONS: A discrete anterior "fast" pathway and a posterior "slow" pathway or network of posterior pathways form the principal inputs to the compact AV node in most patients with atrial fibrillation. The absence of dual AV nodal physiology in the majority of these patients may be related to the functional properties of the individual components of this posterior network. PMID:8665345

  13. Impact of TIEG1 Deletion on the Passive Mechanical Properties of Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kammoun, Malek; Pouletaut, Philippe; Canon, Francis; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Hawse, John R.; Vayssade, Muriel; Bensamoun, Sabine F.

    2016-01-01

    As transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle, the effect of TIEG1 gene deletion on the passive mechanical properties of slow and fast twitch muscle fibers was analyzed. Twenty five muscle fibers were harvested from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from TIEG1-/- (N = 5) and control (N = 5) mice. Mechanical tests were performed on fibers and the dynamic and static stresses were measured. A viscoelastic Hill model of 3rd order was used to fit the experimental relaxation test data. In parallel, immunohistochemical analyses were performed on three serial transverse sections to detect the myosin isoforms within the slow and fast muscles. The percentage and the mean cross sectional area of each fiber type were calculated. These tests revealed a significant increase in the mechanical stress properties for the TIEG1-/- Sol fibers while a significant decrease appeared for the TIEG1-/- EDL fibers. Hill model tracked the shape of the experimental relaxation curve for both genotypes and both fiber types. Immunohistochemical results showed hypertrophy of all fiber types for TIEG1-/- muscles with an increase in the percentage of glycolytic fibers (IIX, and IIB) and a decrease of oxidative fibers (I, and IIA). This study has provided new insights into the role of TIEG1, known as KLF10, in the functional (SoltypeI: more resistant, EDLtypeIIB: less resistant) and morphological (glycolytic hypertrophy) properties of fast and slow twitch skeletal muscles. Further investigation at the cellular level will better reveal the role of the TIEG1 gene in skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:27736981

  14. Slow-to-fast transformation of denervated soleus muscles by chronic high-frequency stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Gorza, L; Gundersen, K; Lømo, T; Schiaffino, S; Westgaard, R H

    1988-01-01

    1. Adult soleus muscles were denervated and stimulated directly for 2-130 days with 'fast' (short pulse trains at 100 Hz) or 'slow' (continuously at 10 Hz, or long pulse trains at 15 Hz) stimulus patterns. 2. At the end of the period of stimulation isometric twitches and tetani and isotonic shortening velocities were measured. Frozen cross-sections were later examined with antibodies against myosin heavy chains specific for adult fast, adult slow and fetal myosin. 3. Isometric twitch duration (twitch time-to-peak and half-relaxation time) decreased during intermittent 100 Hz stimulation to values that were almost as fast as in the normal extensor digitorum longus (EDL) (95 and 94% transformation). The major part of the decrease occurred between 2 and 21 days after the onset of stimulation, and was accompanied by post-tetanic potentiation of the twitch, 'sag' in tension during an unfused tetanus, lower twitch/tetanus ratio and marked shifts to the right (higher frequencies) of the tension-frequency curve of the muscle. In contrast, during 10 or 15 Hz stimulation the isometric twitch duration remained slow, the twitch continued to show post-tetanic depression and absence of 'sag', while the twitch/tetanus ratio increased. 4. Denervation per se led to a slight increase and, then, after about a month, to a moderate and gradual decrease in twitch duration. The twitch/tetanus ratio increased markedly and post-tetanic depression became less pronounced or disappeared. Muscle weight and particularly tetanic tension were markedly reduced and these reductions were to a large extent counteracted by electrical stimulation. 5. Implantation of sham electrodes had no effect on twitch duration of denervated or innervated control muscles, but reduced tetanic tension in the innervated control muscles. 6. Maximum isotonic shortening velocity of the whole muscle (mm/s) increased during intermittent 100 Hz stimulation to a value as fast as in the normal EDL (110% transformation). Since

  15. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-01-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light–matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW−1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10–90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater. PMID:28181531

  16. Slow-light Mach–Zehnder modulators based on Si photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Toshihiko; Nguyen, Hong C; Yazawa, Naoya; Terada, Yosuke; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tomohiko

    2014-01-01

    Mach–Zehnder optical modulators are the key devices for high-speed electrical-to-optical conversion in Si photonics. Si rib waveguides with a p–n diode structure operated in the carrier depletion mode have mainly been developed as their phase shifters. Their length is usually longer than millimeters due to the limited change in the refractive index due to the carrier depletion in a Si p–n diode. This length is shorter than commercial LiNbO3 modulators, but still much shorter devices are desired for large-scale integration and for simplifying the high-speed RF modulation. A promising solution is to use slow light in photonic crystal waveguides, which enhances the modulation efficiency in proportion to the group-velocity refractive index ng. In particular, dispersion-engineered slow light allows more than five-fold enhancement, maintaining a wide working spectrum as well as large temperature tolerance. The devices with a phase shifter length of around 100 μm are fabricated by a standard process compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductors. The operation at 10 Gbps and higher speeds are obtained in the wavelength range of 16.9 nm and temperature range of 105 K. PMID:27877658

  17. Dispersion engineering of slow light in hexagonal ring hole photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min; Li, Changhong; Li, Liucun; Wang, Yumeng

    2016-10-01

    We adopt hexagonal optofluidic ring scatterers to built two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) with triangular lattice. By studying slow light effects of varieties of optical optofluidic rings, the thickness of optofluidic ring in X and Z direction, and the moving distance of the first row of scatterers near central waveguide, some relatively optimism results have been founded. In addition, in the process of research, we adopt PWE method to simulation calculation. When the thickness of optofluidic ring changes, the optimization results which ng equals 47.2120, bandwidth Δλ is 28.5nm and the group velocity dispersion β2 is 43.3418 ps2/mm. When the moving distance changes, the optimization results we could get that ng equals 15.6569, Δλ is 92.9nm and β2 is 7.8202 ps2/mm. This wideband and low dispersion slow light can be used for storage capacity with certain requirements of the optical buffer, optical sensors, etc.

  18. Effect of fast-, medium- and slow-growing strains on meat quality of chickens reared under the organic farming method.

    PubMed

    Sirri, F; Castellini, C; Bianchi, M; Petracci, M; Meluzzi, A; Franchini, A

    2011-02-01

    The characteristics of meat quality, chemical and fatty acid composition, from fast-growing (FG) and medium-growing (MG) meat-type and slow-growing (SG) egg-type chickens reared under organic conditions were compared. Three-hundred and sixty 1-day-old male chicks, equally divided into three experimental groups represented by strains (FG: Cobb 700, MG: Naked neck Kabir and SG: Brown Classic Lohman) were housed into three poultry houses with outdoor pasture availability of 10 m(2)/bird located in the same Research Centre of the University of Perugia. All the birds were fed ad libitum the same diets formulated according to the European Union (EU) Regulations by using organic raw materials. Birds from the FG and MG groups were raised until 81 days, whereas birds from the SG group were raised until 96 days in order to achieve an acceptable market live weight. SG birds showed significantly (P < 0.01) higher breast meat drip and cook losses, Allo-Kramer shear values and collagen content. In comparison with FG and SG, MG exhibited a higher breast meat pH (5.86% v. 5.79% and 5.78%, respectively; P < 0.01) and a lower lightness (54.88% v. 57.81% and 56.98%, respectively; P < 0.05). Genotype dramatically affected the lipid content as well as the fatty acid composition of both breast and thigh meat. SG exhibited the lowest content of lipid, both in breast and in thigh meat, the lowest proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the highest proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The total n-3 PUFA of SG breast meat was double that of FG meat and intermediate with respect to MG birds (8.07% v. 4.07% v. 5.14% total fatty acids; P < 0.01). The fatty acid composition of thigh meat is similar to that of breast meat, but the differences among genotypes are less pronounced. Total saturated fatty acids were not affected by the genotype. In conclusion, meat functional properties of FG and MG strains appeared much more attractive both for industry and consumer

  19. Optimization of slow light one-dimensional Bragg structures for photocurrent enhancement in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Deparis, Olivier; El Daif, Ounsi

    2012-10-15

    In 1D photonic crystal Bragg structures, strong localization of the light occurs in the high refractive index layers at wavelengths on the red edge of the photonic bandgap. We exploit this slow light effect for thin film solar cells in order to increase the absorption of light in silicon, as the latter has a high refractive index. Amorphous silicon and a transparent conductive oxide are chosen as high-index and low-index materials, respectively. Reference thin film cells have equivalent total thickness of amorphous silicon, plus antireflection coating and optional metallic back mirror. Through transfer-matrix calculations, we demonstrate that the spectrally integrated photon flux absorbed in active layers, hence the photocurrent, is enhanced by at least 10% with respect to reference using only a few periods. The enhancement is robust with respect to the light incidence angle. The key of such an enhancement is the tuning of the red edge to both the solar irradiance spectrum and the intrinsic material absorption spectrum, which is achieved by suitably selecting the layer thicknesses.

  20. Calcium-activated force responses in fast- and slow-twitch skinned muscle fibres of the rat at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D G; Williams, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Force responses from mechanically skinned fibres of rat skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) were measured at different temperatures in the range 3-35 degrees C following sudden changes in Ca2+ concentration in the preparations. 2. At all temperatures there were characteristic differences between the slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres with respect to the relative steady-state force-[Ca2+] relation: such as a lower [Ca2+] threshold for activation and a less steep force-pCa curve in slow-twitch muscle fibres. 3. At 3-5 degrees C the force changes in both types of muscle fibres lagged considerably behind the estimated changes in [Ca2+] within the preparations and this enabled us to perform a comparative analysis of the Ca2+ kinetics in the process of force development in both muscle fibre types. This analysis suggest that two and six Ca2+ ions are involved in the regulatory unit for contraction of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres respectively. 4. The rate of relaxation following a sudden decrease in [Ca2+] was much lower in the slow-twitch than in the fast-twitch muscle at 5 degrees C, suggesting that properties of the contractile apparatus could play an essential role in determining the rate of relaxation in vivo. 5. There was substantial variation in Ca2+ sensitivity between muscle fibres of the same type from different animals at each temperature. However the steepness of the force-[Ca2+] relation was essentially the same for all fibres of the same type. 6. A change in temperature from 5 to 25 degrees C had a statistically significant effect on the sensitivity of the fast-twitch muscle fibres, rendering them less sensitive to Ca2+ by a factor of 2. However a further increase in temperature from 25 to 35 degrees C did not have any statistically significant effect on the force-[Ca2+] relation in fast-twitch muscle fibres. 7. The effect of temperature on the Ca2+ sensitivity of slow-twitch muscle fibres was not statistically significant

  1. Unloading-induced slow-to-fast myosin shift in soleus muscle: nuclear MuRFs and calsarcin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris; Lomonosova, Yulia

    Exposure to actual and simulated microgravity is known to induce decrease in slow MyHC mRNA expression and increase in fast MyHC mRNAs expression. We supposed that altered expression of the calsarcin (CS) I and II (specific for type I and type II fibers respectively) may provide the control over myosin phenotype during unloading. We found that after 3 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) the content of CSII mRNA increased two-fold in rat soleus as compared to the cage controls. This level was maintained till the 7th day of the exposure and increased by more than 5-fold (as compared to controls) after two weeks of HU. In contrast to CSII, CSI mRNA expression didn’t change after 3 days of HU, but decreased more than 2-fold by the 7th and 14th day of HU. The increase of CSII RNA (in type II fibers) may be explained as the mechanism of stabilization of fast phenotype in all, but more important, in newly transformed type II fibers. At the same time, the decrease of CSI mRNA (in type I fibers) may be understood as counteracting the slow-to-fast transformation. Morriscot et al, (2010) demonstrated that calsarcin II expression decreased only in the double knockouts MuRF1-/MuRF2-. So, we hypothesized that CSII expression in unloaded soleus muscle might be associated with the cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of MuRF1 and MuRF2. We observed significant accumulation of MuRF1 and MuRF2 in the nuclear fraction after 3 days of HU. Thus the accumulation of MuRFs in myonuclei may promote the expression of CSII, necessary for stabilization of fast phenotype in the course of slow-to-fast shift in unloaded soleus muscle. We express our gratitude to Prof. S. Labeit (Mannheim) for kind presenting us the best antibodies against MuRF1 and MuRF2.

  2. Comparison of regulated passive membrane conductance in action potential-firing fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Macdonald, William Alexander; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; de Paoli, Frank Vinzenco; Gurung, Iman Singh; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2009-10-01

    In several pathological and experimental conditions, the passive membrane conductance of muscle fibers (G(m)) and their excitability are inversely related. Despite this capacity of G(m) to determine muscle excitability, its regulation in active muscle fibers is largely unexplored. In this issue, our previous study (Pedersen et al. 2009. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910291) established a technique with which biphasic regulation of G(m) in action potential (AP)-firing fast-twitch fibers of rat extensor digitorum longus muscles was identified and characterized with temporal resolution of seconds. This showed that AP firing initially reduced G(m) via ClC-1 channel inhibition but after approximately 1,800 APs, G(m) rose substantially, causing AP excitation failure. This late increase of G(m) reflected activation of ClC-1 and K(ATP) channels. The present study has explored regulation of G(m) in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers of soleus muscle and compared it to G(m) dynamics in fast-twitch fibers. It further explored aspects of the cellular signaling that conveyed regulation of G(m) in AP-firing fibers. Thus, in both fiber types, AP firing first triggered protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ClC-1 channel inhibition that reduced G(m) by approximately 50%. Experiments with dantrolene showed that AP-triggered SR Ca(2+) release activated this PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition that was associated with reduced rheobase current and improved function of depolarized muscles, indicating that the reduced G(m) enhanced muscle fiber excitability. In fast-twitch fibers, the late rise in G(m) was accelerated by glucose-free conditions, whereas it was postponed when intermittent resting periods were introduced during AP firing. Remarkably, elevation of G(m) was never encountered in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers, even after 15,000 APs. These observations implicate metabolic depression in the elevation of G(m) in AP-firing fast-twitch fibers. It is concluded that regulation of G(m) is

  3. Fast sampling in the slow manifold: The momentum-enhanced hybrid Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricioaei, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    We will present a novel dynamic algorithm, the MEHMC method, which enhances sampling and at the same time yielding correct Boltzmann weighted statistical distributions. The gist of the MEHMC method is to use momentum averaging to identify the slow manifold and bias along this manifold the Maxwell distribution of momenta usually employed in Hybrid Monte Carlo. Several tests and applications are to exemplify the method.

  4. Confinement and low adhesion induce fast amoeboid migration of slow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Le Berre, Maël; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Heuzé, Mélina; Takaki, Tohru; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-02-12

    The mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) was proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to adapt their migration mode to their environment. While the molecular pathways involved in this transition are well documented, the role of the microenvironment in the MAT is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how confinement and adhesion affect this transition. We report that, in the absence of focal adhesions and under conditions of confinement, mesenchymal cells can spontaneously switch to a fast amoeboid migration phenotype. We identified two main types of fast migration--one involving a local protrusion and a second involving a myosin-II-dependent mechanical instability of the cell cortex that leads to a global cortical flow. Interestingly, transformed cells are more prone to adopt this fast migration mode. Finally, we propose a generic model that explains migration transitions and predicts a phase diagram of migration phenotypes based on three main control parameters: confinement, adhesion, and contractility.

  5. The role of fast and slow EEG activity during sleep in males and females with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Deldin, Patricia; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2015-01-01

    Sleep difficulties are highly prevalent in depression, and appears to be a contributing factor in the development and maintenance of symptoms. However, despite the generally acknowledged relationship between sleep and depression, the neurophysiological substrates underlying this relationship still remain unclear. Two main hypotheses were tested in this study. The first hypothesis states that sleep in depression is characterized by inadequate generation of restorative sleep, as indexed by reduced amounts of slow-wave activity. Conversely, the second hypothesis states that poor sleep in depression is due to intrusions of fast-frequency activity that may be reflective of a hyperaroused central nervous system. This study aimed to test both hypotheses in a large sample of individuals with clinically validated depression, as well as examine sex as a moderator. Results suggest that depression is better characterized by an overall decrease in slow-wave activity, which is related to elevated anxious and depressed mood the following morning. Results also suggest that females may be more likely to experience fast frequency activity related to depression symptom severity. PMID:26175101

  6. Two distinct plant respiratory physiotypes might exist which correspond to fast-growing and slow-growing species.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Salvador; Aljazairi, Salvador; Arias, Claudia; Sánchez, Elena; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2014-08-15

    The origin of the carbon atoms in CO2 respired by leaves in the dark of several plant species has been studied using 13C/12C stable isotopes. This study was conducted using an open gas exchange system for isotope labeling that was coupled to an elemental analyzer and further linked to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IRMS) or coupled to a gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS). We demonstrate here that the carbon, which is recently assimilated during photosynthesis, accounts for nearly ca. 50% of the carbon in the CO2 lost through dark respiration (Rd) after illumination in fast-growing and cultivated plants and trees and, accounts for only ca. 10% in slow-growing plants. Moreover, our study shows that fast-growing plants, which had the largest percentages of newly fixed carbon of leaf-respired CO2, were also those with the largest shoot/root ratios, whereas slow-growing plants showed the lowest shoot/root values.

  7. Causal impact of magnetic fluctuations in slow and fast L-H transitions at TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Estrada, T.; Carreras, B. A.; Ascasíbar, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Pastor, I.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Balbín, R.

    2016-07-01

    This work focuses on the relationship between L-H (or L-I) transitions and MHD activity in the low magnetic shear TJ-II stellarator. It is shown that the presence of a low order rational surface in the plasma edge (gradient) region lowers the threshold density for H-mode access. MHD activity is systematically suppressed near the confinement transition. We apply a causality detection technique (based on the Transfer Entropy) to study the relation between magnetic oscillations and locally measured plasma rotation velocity (related to Zonal Flows). For this purpose, we study a large number of discharges in two magnetic configurations, corresponding to "fast" and "slow" transitions. With the "slow" transitions, the developing Zonal Flow prior to the transition is associated with the gradual reduction of magnetic oscillations. The transition itself is marked by a strong spike of "information transfer" from magnetic to velocity oscillations, suggesting that the magnetic drive may play a role in setting up the final sheared flow responsible for the H-mode transport barrier. Similar observations were made for the "fast" transitions. Thus, it is shown that magnetic oscillations associated with rational surfaces play an important and active role in confinement transitions, so that electromagnetic effects should be included in any complete transition model.

  8. Microwave plasma generation by the fast rotation and slow pulsation of resonant fields in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuichi; Nakamura, Keiji; Lubomirsky, Dima; Park, Soonam; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sugai, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    A digitally controlled solid-state microwave generator allowing variable frequency operation and precise phase control is adopted for plasma generation. In this study, a resonant cylindrical cavity is used as a microwave applicator in place of conventional waveguides. In order to improve the plasma uniformity, the TE111 mode is agitated by injecting microwaves into the cavity from two spatially orthogonal directions, with a temporal phase difference ϕ. Theoretical analyses and finite-difference time-domain simulations derive the following effects of the phase control. In the case of ϕ = ±π/2, fast rotation of the cavity field takes place with a rotational frequency of ω/2π (= 2.4–2.5 GHz), where ω denotes the microwave angular frequency. On the other hand, when ϕ is linearly modulated in time with a low frequency of Ω/2π (= 0.1–1000 Hz), slow pulsation takes place, in which the cavity field alternately excites a circular rotation and a standing oscillation at the modulation frequency. These effects are experimentally confirmed in microwave discharges in argon at 0.1–20 Torr with total injection powers from 50 to 800 W. Two-dimensional images of the optical emission from the generated plasma show that both the fast rotation and slow pulsation improve azimuthal plasma uniformity.

  9. Staying away from the bar: the local dynamical signature of slow and fast bars in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monari, Giacomo; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud; Duchateau, Aurore; Lorscheider, Thibault; Bienaymé, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Both the three-dimensional density of red clump giants and the gas kinematics in the inner Galaxy indicate that the pattern speed of the Galactic bar could be much lower than previously estimated. Here, we show that such slow bar models are unable to reproduce the bimodality observed in local stellar velocity space. We do so by computing the response of stars in the solar neighbourhood to the gravitational potential of slow and fast bars, in terms of their perturbed distribution function in action-angle space up to second order, as well as by identifying resonantly trapped orbits. We also check that the bimodality is unlikely to be produced through perturbations from spiral arms, and conclude that, contrary to gas kinematics, local stellar kinematics still favour a fast bar in the Milky Way, with a pattern speed of the order of almost twice (and no less than 1.8 times) the circular frequency at the Sun's position. This leaves open the question of the nature of the long flat extension of the bar in the Milky Way.

  10. TREK-1 and Best1 channels mediate fast and slow glutamate release in astrocytes upon GPCR activation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Dong Ho; Han, Kyung-Seok; Shim, Jae Wan; Yoon, Bo-Eun; Kim, Eunju; Bae, Jin Young; Oh, Soo-Jin; Hwang, Eun Mi; Marmorstein, Alan D; Bae, Yong Chul; Park, Jae-Yong; Lee, C Justin

    2012-09-28

    Astrocytes release glutamate upon activation of various GPCRs to exert important roles in synaptic functions. However, the molecular mechanism of release has been controversial. Here, we report two kinetically distinct modes of nonvesicular, channel-mediated glutamate release. The fast mode requires activation of G(αi), dissociation of G(βγ), and subsequent opening of glutamate-permeable, two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 through direct interaction between G(βγ) and N terminus of TREK-1. The slow mode is Ca(2+) dependent and requires G(αq) activation and opening of glutamate-permeable, Ca(2+)-activated anion channel Best1. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrate that TREK-1 is preferentially localized at cell body and processes, whereas Best1 is mostly found in microdomains of astrocytes near synapses. Diffusion modeling predicts that the fast mode can target neuronal mGluR with peak glutamate concentration of 100 μM, whereas slow mode targets neuronal NMDA receptors at around 1 μM. Our results reveal two distinct sources of astrocytic glutamate that can differentially influence neighboring neurons.

  11. Slow-down of 13C spin diffusion in organic solids by fast MAS: a CODEX NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Reichert, D; Bonagamba, T J; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2001-07-01

    One- and two-dimensional 13C exchange nuclear magnetic resonance experiments under magic-angle spinning (MAS) can provide detailed information on slow segmental reorientations and chemical exchange in organic solids, including polymers and proteins. However, observations of dynamics on the time scale of seconds or longer are hampered by the competing process of dipolar 13C spin exchange (spin diffusion). In this Communication, we show that fast MAS can significantly slow down the dipolar spin exchange effect for unprotonated carbon sites. The exchange is measured quantitatively using the centerband-only detection of exchange technique, which enables the detection of exchange at any spinning speed, even in the absence of changes of isotropic chemical shifts. For chemically equivalent unprotonated 13C sites, the dipolar spin exchange rate is found to decrease slightly less than proportionally with the sample-rotation frequency, between 8 and 28 kHz. In the same range, the dipolar spin exchange rate for a glassy polymer with an inhomogeneously broadened MAS line decreases by a factor of 10. For methylene groups, no or only a minor slow-down of the exchange rate is found.

  12. Analysis of Synchronization in a Slowly Changing Environment: How Slow Coupling Becomes Fast Weak Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Jonathan J.; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2013-05-01

    Many physical and biological oscillators are coupled indirectly through a slowly evolving dynamic medium. We present a perturbation method that shows that slow dynamics of a coupling medium is effectively equivalent to weak coupling of oscillators. Our methods first apply the theory of averaging to obtain a periodic solution to a single system and then exploit small fluctuations around the mean to analyze coupling between systems. We use this method to explain the spike-to-spike asynchrony seen in a model for bursting neurons coupled through extracellular potassium and to explore synchronization in a model for quorum sensing.

  13. Zero-broadening SBS slow light propagation in an optical fiber using two broadband pump beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihe; Ren, Liyong; Liu, Yu; Tomita, Yasuo

    2008-05-26

    A new method of tailoring stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) gain spectrum for slow light propagation is proposed by use of two Gaussian-shaped broadband pump beams with different powers and spectral widths. The central frequency interval between the two pump beams are carefully set to be two inherent Brillouin frequency shift, ensuring that the gain spectrum of one pump has the same central frequency with the loss spectrum of the other one. Different gain profiles are obtained and analyzed. Among them a special gain profile is found that ensures a zero-broadening of the signal pulse independent of the Brillouin gain. This is owing to the compensation between the positive gain-dependent broadening and the negative GVD (group velocity dispersion) dependent broadening. The relationship of two pump beams is also found for constructing such a gain profile. It provides us a new idea of managing the broadening of SBS-based slow pulse by artificially constructing and optimizing the profile of gain spectrum.

  14. Slow light miniature devices with ultra-flattened dispersion in silicon-on-insulator photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Swati; Sinha, Ravindra; De La Rue, Richard M

    2009-08-03

    We propose a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic crystal waveguide within a hexagonal lattice of elliptical air holes for slow light propagation with group velocity in the range 0.0028c to 0.044c and ultra-flattened group velocity dispersion (GVD). The proposed structure is also investigated for its application as an optical buffer with a large value of normalized delay bandwidth product (DBP), equal to 0.778. Furthermore it is shown that the proposed structure can also be used for time or wavelength-division demultiplexing to separate two telecom wavelengths, 1.31 microm and 1.55 microm, on a useful time-scale and with minimal distortion.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal slow light waveguides and cavities.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Christopher Paul; Rey, Isabella H; Welna, Karl; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2012-11-30

    Slow light has been one of the hot topics in the photonics community in the past decade, generating great interest both from a fundamental point of view and for its considerable potential for practical applications. Slow light photonic crystal waveguides, in particular, have played a major part and have been successfully employed for delaying optical signals(1-4) and the enhancement of both linear(5-7) and nonlinear devices.(8-11) Photonic crystal cavities achieve similar effects to that of slow light waveguides, but over a reduced band-width. These cavities offer high Q-factor/volume ratio, for the realization of optically(12) and electrically(13) pumped ultra-low threshold lasers and the enhancement of nonlinear effects.(14-16) Furthermore, passive filters(17) and modulators(18-19) have been demonstrated, exhibiting ultra-narrow line-width, high free-spectral range and record values of low energy consumption. To attain these exciting results, a robust repeatable fabrication protocol must be developed. In this paper we take an in-depth look at our fabrication protocol which employs electron-beam lithography for the definition of photonic crystal patterns and uses wet and dry etching techniques. Our optimised fabrication recipe results in photonic crystals that do not suffer from vertical asymmetry and exhibit very good edge-wall roughness. We discuss the results of varying the etching parameters and the detrimental effects that they can have on a device, leading to a diagnostic route that can be taken to identify and eliminate similar issues. The key to evaluating slow light waveguides is the passive characterization of transmission and group index spectra. Various methods have been reported, most notably resolving the Fabry-Perot fringes of the transmission spectrum(20-21) and interferometric techniques.(22-25) Here, we describe a direct, broadband measurement technique combining spectral interferometry with Fourier transform analysis.(26) Our method stands out

  16. Transparency and slow light in a four-level quantum system near a plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelou, Sofia; Yannopapas, Vassilios; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    We study theoretically the effects of a plasmonic nanostructure on the linear absorption and dispersion spectrum of a four-level double- V-type quantum system. In the quantum system under study one V-type transition is influenced by the interaction with surface plasmons while the other V-type transition interacts with free-space vacuum. As plasmonic nanostructure we consider a two-dimensional array of metal-coated dielectric nanospheres. We analyze the optical properties of a linearly polarized laser field that couples the lowest state with the upper states in the free-space transitions. We show that, due to the presence of the plasmonic nanostructure, effects of optical transparency are created. These effects are also complemented by the existence of slow light.

  17. Post-process wavelength tuning of silicon photonic crystal slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kashif M; Schulz, Sebastian A; Liu, Dennis X; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Upham, Jeremy; Boyd, Robert W

    2015-05-01

    Silicon photonic crystal waveguides have enabled a range of technologies, yet their fabrication continues to present challenges. Here, we report on a post-processing method that allows us to tune the operational wavelength of slow-light photonic crystal waveguides in concert with optical characterization, offsetting the effects of hole-radii and slab thickness variations. Our method consist of wet chemical surface oxidation, followed by oxide stripping. Theoretical modelling shows that the changes in optical behavior were predictable, and hence controlled tuning can be achieved by changing the number of processing cycles, where each cycle removes approximately 0.25 nm from all exposed surfaces, producing a blueshift of 1.6±0.1  nm in operating wavelength.

  18. High Purcell factor in fiber Bragg gratings utilizing the fundamental slow-light mode.

    PubMed

    Skolianos, George; Arora, Arushi; Bernier, Martin; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate through numerical simulations that the slow-light resonances that exist in strong, apodized fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) fabricated with femtosecond pulses in deuterium-loaded fibers can exhibit very large intensity enhancements and Purcell factors with the proper optimization of their length. This potential is illustrated with two saturated FBGs that are less than 5 mm long and have been annealed to reduce their internal loss. The first one exhibits the largest measured Purcell factor in an all-fiber device (38.7), and the second one exhibits the largest intensity enhancement (1525). These devices are anticipated to have significant applications in quantum-dot lasers, nonlinear fiber devices, and cavity quantum-electrodynamics experiments.

  19. Theoretical study of the effect of slow light on BOTDA spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Ravet, Fabien; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi; Zou, Lufan; Kalosha, V P

    2006-10-30

    Due to the resonant nature of Brillouin scattering, delay occurs while pulse is propagating in an optical fiber. This effect influences the location accuracy of distributed Brillouin sensors. The maximum delay in sensing fibers depends on length, position, pump and Stokes powers. Considering pump depletion, we have obtained integral solutions for the coupled amplitude equations under steady state conditions and then calculated the group delay. The results show that moderate pump depletion (which is the optimized sensor working range) mitigates significantly the delay, and the maximum delay induced at resonance is only a fraction of Brillouin Optical Time Domain (BOTDA) spatial resolution, which means that the use of pulse width to define the spatial resolution is valid when Brillouin slow light is considered. We have shown that uniform strain and temperature distribution in a fiber gives the maximum delay induced uncertainty.

  20. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  1. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s) scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  2. Effects of caffeine at different temperatures on contractile properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch rat muscles.

    PubMed

    Wondmikun, Y; Soukup, T; Asmussen, G

    2006-01-01

    The slow-twitch soleus muscle (SOL) exhibits decreased twitch tension (cold depression) in response to a decreased temperature, whereas the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle shows enhanced twitch tension (cold potentiation). On the other hand, the slow-twitch SOL muscle is more sensitive to twitch potentiation and contractures evoked by caffeine than the fast-twitch EDL muscle. In order to reveal the effects of these counteracting conditions (temperature and caffeine), we have studied the combined effects of temperature changes on the potentiation effects of caffeine in modulating muscle contractions and contractures in both muscles. Isolated muscles, bathed in a Tyrode solution containing 0.1-60 mM caffeine, were stimulated directly and isometric single twitches, fused tetanic contractions and contractures were recorded at 35 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Our results showed that twitches and tetani of both SOL and EDL were potentiated and prolonged in the presence of 0.3-10 mM caffeine. Despite the cold depression, the extent of potentiation of the twitch tension by caffeine in the SOL muscle at 20 degrees C was by 10-15 % higher than that at 35 degrees C, while no significant difference was noted in the EDL muscle between both temperatures. Since the increase of twitch tension was significantly higher than potentiation of tetani in both muscles, the twitch-tetanus ratio was enhanced. Higher concentrations of caffeine induced contractures in both muscles; the contracture threshold was, however, lower in the SOL than in the EDL muscle at both temperatures. Furthermore, the maximal tension was achieved at lower caffeine concentrations in the SOL muscle at both 35 degrees C and 20 degrees C compared to the EDL muscle. These effects of caffeine were rapidly and completely reversed in both muscles when the test solution was replaced by the Tyrode solution. The results have indicated that the potentiation effect of caffeine is both time- and temperature

  3. The responses of frog muscle spindles and fast and slow muscle fibres to a variety of mechanical inputs.

    PubMed

    Brown, M C

    1971-10-01

    1. The tension in the iliofibularis muscle of frogs was recorded while the muscle was stretched or released. At the same time recordings were made from single spindle afferents in dorsal root filaments. Either large or small motor nerve fibres were stimulated in split ventral root filaments.2. While small motor nerve fibres were stimulated the discharge from muscle spindle afferents was greatly increased by stretching, and greatly reduced by shortening the muscle. This sensitivity to movement was shown even if the movements were small, so that a stretch of 0.2% of the muscle length was sufficient to cause a pronounced increase in the afferent discharge.3. In contrast, during stimulation of the large motor nerve fibres the spindle was much less sensitive to movements with the result that even stretches or releases of the muscle by 1 mm did not cause very large changes in the discharge frequency.4. The tension in slow extrafusal muscle fibres in many ways mirrored the spindle discharge during the stimulation of small motor nerve fibres, for the tension was greatly increased by stretching, even through small distances, and greatly reduced by releasing the muscle. The tension in fast extrafusal muscle fibres was much less changed by such movements, and thus was rather like the spindle discharge during stimulation of large motor nerve fibres.5. As the extrafusal muscle fibres do not directly pull on and excite the spindle afferents, the simplest explanation for the similarities between the muscle tension and the spindle discharge is that the mechanical properties of the intrafusal muscle fibres innervated by the large motor nerve fibres are like those of fast extrafusal muscle fibres, and that the mechanical properties of the small intrafusal fibres are similar to those of slow extrafusal muscle fibres.6. It is shown that the cross-bridge sliding filament mechanism of muscle contraction provides a ready explanation for the differences found between fast and slow muscles

  4. The effect of higher-order dispersion on slow light propagation in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Engelen, R J P; Sugimoto, Y; Watanabe, Y; Korterik, J P; Ikeda, N; van Hulst, N F; Asakawa, K; Kuipers, L

    2006-02-20

    We have studied the dispersion of ultrafast pulses in a photonic crystal waveguide as a function of optical frequency, in both experiment and theory. With phase-sensitive and time-resolved near-field microscopy, the light was probed inside the waveguide in a non-invasive manner. The effect of dispersion on the shape of the pulses was determined. As the optical frequency decreased, the group velocity decreased. Simultaneously, the measured pulses were broadened during propagation, due to an increase in group velocity dispersion. On top of that, the pulses exhibited a strong asymmetric distortion as the propagation distance increased. The asymmetry increased as the group velocity decreased. The asymmetry of the pulses is caused by a strong increase of higher order dispersion. As the group velocity was reduced to 0.116(9) .c, we found group velocity dispersion of -1.1(3) .10(6) ps(2)/km and third order dispersion of up to 1.1(4) .10(5) ps(3)/km. We have modelled our interferometric measurements and included the full dispersion of the photonic crystal waveguide. Our mathematical model and the experimental findings showed a good correspondence. Our findings show that if the most commonly used slow light regime in photonic crystals is to be exploited, great care has to be taken about higher-order dispersion.

  5. Slow and fast diffusion in a lead sulphate gravity separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cregan, Vincent; Lee, William T.

    2017-02-01

    A model for the growth of lead sulphate particles in a gravity separation system from the crystal glassware industry is presented. The lead sulphate particles are an undesirable byproduct, and thus the model is used to ascertain the optimal system temperature configuration such that particle extraction is maximised. The model describes the evolution of a single, spherical particle due to the mass flux of lead particles from a surrounding acid solution. We divide the concentration field into two separate regions. Specifically, a relatively small boundary layer region around the particle is characterised by fast diffusion, and is thus considered quasi-static. In contrast, diffusion in the far-field is slower, and hence assumed to be time-dependent. The final system consisting of two nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations for the particle radius and lead concentration, is integrated numerically.

  6. Stochastic switching in slow-fast systems: a large-fluctuation approach.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Christoffer R; Schwartz, Ira B

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we develop a perturbation method to predict the rate of occurrence of rare events for singularly perturbed stochastic systems using a probability density function approach. In contrast to a stochastic normal form approach, we model rare event occurrences due to large fluctuations probabilistically and employ a WKB ansatz to approximate their rate of occurrence. This results in the generation of a two-point boundary value problem that models the interaction of the state variables and the most likely noise force required to induce a rare event. The resulting equations of motion of describing the phenomenon are shown to be singularly perturbed. Vastly different time scales among the variables are leveraged to reduce the dimension and predict the dynamics on the slow manifold in a deterministic setting. The resulting constrained equations of motion may be used to directly compute an exponent that determines the probability of rare events. To verify the theory, a stochastic damped Duffing oscillator with three equilibrium points (two sinks separated by a saddle) is analyzed. The predicted switching time between states is computed using the optimal path that resides in an expanded phase space. We show that the exponential scaling of the switching rate as a function of system parameters agrees well with numerical simulations. Moreover, the dynamics of the original system and the reduced system via center manifolds are shown to agree in an exponentially scaling sense.

  7. Reconnection-driven plasmoids in blazars: fast flares on a slow envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-05-01

    TeV flares of a duration of ˜10 min have been observed in several blazars. The fast flaring requires compact regions in the jet that boost their emission towards the observer at an extreme Doppler factor of δem ≳ 50. For ˜100 GeV photons to avoid annihilation in the broad-line region of PKS 1222+216, the flares must come from large (pc) scales, challenging most models proposed to explain them. Here I elaborate on the magnetic reconnection minijet model for the blazar flaring, focusing on the inherently time-dependent aspects of the process of magnetic reconnection. I argue that, for the physical conditions prevailing in blazar jets, the reconnection layer fragments, leading to the formation a large number of plasmoids. Occasionally, a plasmoid grows to become a large, `monster' plasmoid. I show that radiation emitted from the reconnection event can account for the observed `envelope' of day-long blazar activity, while radiation from monster plasmoids can power the fastest TeV flares. The model is applied to several blazars with observed fast flaring. The inferred distance of the dissipation zone from the black hole and the typical size of the reconnection regions are Rdiss ˜ 0.3-1 pc and l' ≲ 1016 cm, respectively. The required magnetization of the jet at this distance is modest: σ ˜ a few. Such distance Rdiss and reconnection size l' are expected if the jet contains field structures with a size of the order of the black hole horizon.

  8. Fast and slow frequency-drifting millisecond bursts in Jovian decametric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. B.; Zarka, P.; Hess, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Zakharenko, V.; Shevchenko, V. A.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of several Jovian Io-related decametric radio storms recorded in 2004-2012 at the Ukrainian array UTR-2 using the new generation of baseband digital receivers. Continuous baseband sampling within sessions lasting for several hours enabled us to study the evolution of multiscale spectral patterns during the whole storm at varying time and frequency resolutions and trace the temporal transformation of burst structures in unprecedented detail. In addition to the well-known frequency drifting millisecond patterns known as S bursts we detected two other classes of events that often look like S bursts at low resolution but reveal a more complicated structure in high resolution dynamic spectra. The emissions of the first type (LS bursts, superposition of L and S type emissions) have a much lower frequency drift rate than the usual quasi linearly drifting S bursts (QS) and often occur within a frequency band where L emission is simultaneously present, suggesting that both LS and at least part of L emissions may come from the same source. The bursts of the second type (modulated S bursts called MS) are formed by a wideband frequency-modulated envelope that can mimic S bursts with very steep negative (or even positive) drift rates. Observed with insufficient time-frequency resolution, MS look like S bursts with complex shapes and varying drifts; MS patterns often occur in association with (i) narrowband emission; (ii) S burst trains; or (iii) sequences of fast drift shadow events. We propose a phenomenological description for various types of S emissions, that should include at least three components: high- and low-frequency limitation of the overall frequency band of the emission, fast frequency modulation of emission structures within this band, and emergence of elementary S burst substructures, that we call "forking" structures. All together, these three components can produce most of the observed spectral structures, including S bursts with

  9. Unified rheology of vibro-fluidized dry granular media: From slow dense flows to fast gas-like regimes

    PubMed Central

    Gnoli, Andrea; Lasanta, Antonio; Sarracino, Alessandro; Puglisi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Granular media take on great importance in industry and geophysics, posing a severe challenge to materials science. Their response properties elude known soft rheological models, even when the yield-stress discontinuity is blurred by vibro-fluidization. Here we propose a broad rheological scenario where average stress sums up a frictional contribution, generalizing conventional μ(I)-rheology, and a kinetic collisional term dominating at fast fluidization. Our conjecture fairly describes a wide series of experiments in a vibrofluidized vane setup, whose phenomenology includes velocity weakening, shear thinning, a discontinuous thinning transition, and gaseous shear thickening. The employed setup gives access to dynamic fluctuations, which exhibit a broad range of timescales. In the slow dense regime the frequency of cage-opening increases with stress and enhances, with respect to μ(I)-rheology, the decrease of viscosity. Diffusivity is exponential in the shear stress in both thinning and thickening regimes, with a huge growth near the transition. PMID:27924928

  10. Use and disuse and the control of acetylcholinesterase activity in fast and slow twitch muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Groswald, D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in neuromuscular transmission is relatively well established, little is known, however, of the mechanisms that regulate its synthesis and control its specific distribution in fast and slow muscle. Innervation plays an important role in the regulation of AChE and elimination of the influence of the nerve by surgical denervation results in a loss of AChE. The influences of the nerve and how they are mediated was investigated. It is suggested that muscle usage and other factors such as materials carried by axonal transport may participate in the regulation of this enzyme. The mechanisms that regulate AChE and its molecular forms in two functionally different forms are studied.

  11. Unified rheology of vibro-fluidized dry granular media: From slow dense flows to fast gas-like regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnoli, Andrea; Lasanta, Antonio; Sarracino, Alessandro; Puglisi, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Granular media take on great importance in industry and geophysics, posing a severe challenge to materials science. Their response properties elude known soft rheological models, even when the yield-stress discontinuity is blurred by vibro-fluidization. Here we propose a broad rheological scenario where average stress sums up a frictional contribution, generalizing conventional μ(I)-rheology, and a kinetic collisional term dominating at fast fluidization. Our conjecture fairly describes a wide series of experiments in a vibrofluidized vane setup, whose phenomenology includes velocity weakening, shear thinning, a discontinuous thinning transition, and gaseous shear thickening. The employed setup gives access to dynamic fluctuations, which exhibit a broad range of timescales. In the slow dense regime the frequency of cage-opening increases with stress and enhances, with respect to μ(I)-rheology, the decrease of viscosity. Diffusivity is exponential in the shear stress in both thinning and thickening regimes, with a huge growth near the transition.

  12. Enhancing the modulation bandwidth of VCSELs to the millimeter-waveband using strong transverse slow-light feedback.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2015-06-15

    We present modeling on the millimeter (mm)-wave modulation of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a transverse coupled cavity (TCC). We show that strong slow-light feedback can induce 300% boosting of the modulation bandwidth of the TCC-VCSEL. Also, the strong lateral feedback can induce resonance modulation over passbands centered on frequencies as high as 3.8 times the VCSEL bandwidth. The slow-light feedback is modeled by a time-delay rate equation model that takes into account the multiple round trips as well as the optical loss and phase delay in each round trip in the feedback cavity.

  13. Long-term Seismicity Comparisons from Oceanic Transforms Bounded by Slow, Intermediate, and Fast Mid-ocean Ridge Spreading Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Lau, T. K.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term observations of seismicity along oceanic transform faults have traditionally been difficult due to limited coverage provided by land based seismic networks. More recently, hydroacoustically recorded earthquakes have been catalogued along the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR), and in the northeast Pacific by the NOAA/PMEL and Oregon State University Acoustic Monitoring Program. These catalogs reduce earthquake detection thresholds by nearly 2 orders of magnitude for the slow spreading MAR, the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca system, and the fast spreading EPR allowing for a more complete long-term time series of seismic activity along the associated transforms in each spreading regime. Using these hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalogs from 1996-2005, this study examines the long-term temporal and spatial seismicity rate patterns of oceanic transform faults bounded by slow, intermediate, and fast mid-ocean ridge spreading. Our analysis includes 5 MAR transforms, 1 northeast Pacific, and 7 EPR tranform faults. Using standard time series analysis techniques in addition to empirical orthogonal functions (EOF), we describe time space patterns along each transform, characterize seismic behavior between transforms within each spreading regime, and finally compare seismicity time series between transforms bounded by different spreading rates. Through our analysis we anticipate the development of an oceanic tranform fault index parameterized by background seismicity rate, seismicity rate variability during seismic events, fault length, degree of tranform segmentation, and rate of spreading along bounding ridge segments. Utilizing a more complete hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalog provides an unprecedented and comprehensive approach for examining long-term seismicity patterns in transform faulting within these 3 mid-ocean ridge settings.

  14. Carnivora population dynamics are as slow and as fast as those of other mammals: implications for their conservation.

    PubMed

    van de Kerk, Madelon; de Kroon, Hans; Conde, Dalia A; Jongejans, Eelke

    2013-01-01

    Of the 285 species of Carnivora 71 are threatened, while many of these species fulfill important ecological roles in their ecosystems as top or meso-predators. Population transition matrices make it possible to study how age-specific survival and fecundity affect population growth, extinction risks, and responses to management strategies. Here we review 38 matrix models from 35 studies on 27 Carnivora taxa, covering 11% of the threatened Carnivora species. We show that the elasticity patterns (i.e. distribution over fecundity, juvenile survival and adult survival) in Carnivora cover the same range in triangular elasticity plots as those of other mammal species, despite the specific place of Carnivora in the food chain. Furthermore, reproductive loop elasticity analysis shows that the studied species spread out evenly over a slow-fast continuum, but also quantifies the large variation in the duration of important life cycles and their contributions to population growth rate. These general elasticity patterns among species, and their correlation with simple life history characteristics like body mass, age of first reproduction and life span, enables the extrapolation of population dynamical properties to unstudied species. With several examples we discuss how this slow-fast continuum, and related patterns of variation in reproductive loop elasticity, can be used in the formulation of tentative management plans for threatened species that cannot wait for the results of thorough demographic studies. We argue, however, that such management programs should explicitly include a plan for learning about the key demographic rates and how these are affected by environmental drivers and threats.

  15. Different event-related patterns of gamma-band power in brain waves of fast- and slow-reacting subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Jokeit, H; Makeig, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast- and slow-reacting subjects exhibit different patterns of gamma-band electroencephalogram (EEG) activity when responding as quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects produce speeded reactions in different ways and demonstrates that analysis of event-related changes in the amplitude of EEG activity recorded from the human scalp can reveal information about event-related brain processes unavailable using event-related potential measures. Time-varying spectral power in a selected (35- to 43-Hz) gamma frequency band was averaged across trials in two experimental conditions: passive listening and speeded reacting to binaural clicks, forming 40-Hz event-related spectral responses. Factor analysis of between-subject event-related spectral response differences split subjects into two near-equal groups composed of faster- and slower-reacting subjects. In faster-reacting subjects, 40-Hz power peaked near 200 ms and 400 ms poststimulus in the react condition, whereas in slower-reacting subjects, 40-Hz power just before stimulus delivery was larger in the react condition. These group differences were preserved in separate averages of relatively long and short reaction-time epochs for each group. gamma-band (20-60 Hz)-filtered event-related potential response averages did not differ between the two groups or conditions. Because of this and because gamma-band power in the auditory event-related potential is small compared with the EEG, the observed event-related spectral response features must represent gamma-band EEG activity reliably induced by, but not phase-locked to, experimental stimuli or events. PMID:8022783

  16. Differential regulation of apoptosis in slow and fast twitch muscles of aged female F344BN rats

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, Kevin M.; Manne, Nandini D. P. K.; Gadde, Murali K.; ...

    2015-03-28

    Age-related muscle atrophy is characterized by decreases in muscle mass and is thought be mediated, at least in part, by increases in myocyte apoptosis. Recent data has demonstrated that the degree of muscle loss with aging may differ between males and females while other work has suggested that apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation may be regulated differently in fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Herein, we investigate how aging affects the regulation of muscle apoptosis in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of young (6-month), aged (26-month), and very aged (30-month) female Fischer 344/NNiaHSD × Brown Norway/BiNiamore » (F344BN) rats. Tissue sections were stained with hydroethidium for ROS and protein extract was subjected to immunoblotting for assessing apoptotic markers. Our data suggest that decreases in muscle mass were associated with increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL positive) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) as determined by hydroethidium staining in both the EDL and soleus. Similar to our previous work using aged male animals, we observed that the time course and magnitude of changes in Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, and cleavage of α-fodrin protein were regulated differently between muscles. As a result, These data suggest that aging in the female F344BN rat is associated with decreases in muscle mass, elevations in ROS level, increased muscle cell DNA fragmentation, and alterations in cell membrane integrity and that apoptotic mechanisms may differ between fiber types.« less

  17. Differential regulation of apoptosis in slow and fast twitch muscles of aged female F344BN rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Kevin M.; Manne, Nandini D. P. K.; Gadde, Murali K.; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Blough, Eric

    2015-03-28

    Age-related muscle atrophy is characterized by decreases in muscle mass and is thought be mediated, at least in part, by increases in myocyte apoptosis. Recent data has demonstrated that the degree of muscle loss with aging may differ between males and females while other work has suggested that apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation may be regulated differently in fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Herein, we investigate how aging affects the regulation of muscle apoptosis in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of young (6-month), aged (26-month), and very aged (30-month) female Fischer 344/NNiaHSD × Brown Norway/BiNia (F344BN) rats. Tissue sections were stained with hydroethidium for ROS and protein extract was subjected to immunoblotting for assessing apoptotic markers. Our data suggest that decreases in muscle mass were associated with increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL positive) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) as determined by hydroethidium staining in both the EDL and soleus. Similar to our previous work using aged male animals, we observed that the time course and magnitude of changes in Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, and cleavage of α-fodrin protein were regulated differently between muscles. As a result, These data suggest that aging in the female F344BN rat is associated with decreases in muscle mass, elevations in ROS level, increased muscle cell DNA fragmentation, and alterations in cell membrane integrity and that apoptotic mechanisms may differ between fiber types.

  18. Carnivora Population Dynamics Are as Slow and as Fast as Those of Other Mammals: Implications for Their Conservation

    PubMed Central

    van de Kerk, Madelon; de Kroon, Hans; Conde, Dalia A.; Jongejans, Eelke

    2013-01-01

    Of the 285 species of Carnivora 71 are threatened, while many of these species fulfill important ecological roles in their ecosystems as top or meso-predators. Population transition matrices make it possible to study how age-specific survival and fecundity affect population growth, extinction risks, and responses to management strategies. Here we review 38 matrix models from 35 studies on 27 Carnivora taxa, covering 11% of the threatened Carnivora species. We show that the elasticity patterns (i.e. distribution over fecundity, juvenile survival and adult survival) in Carnivora cover the same range in triangular elasticity plots as those of other mammal species, despite the specific place of Carnivora in the food chain. Furthermore, reproductive loop elasticity analysis shows that the studied species spread out evenly over a slow-fast continuum, but also quantifies the large variation in the duration of important life cycles and their contributions to population growth rate. These general elasticity patterns among species, and their correlation with simple life history characteristics like body mass, age of first reproduction and life span, enables the extrapolation of population dynamical properties to unstudied species. With several examples we discuss how this slow-fast continuum, and related patterns of variation in reproductive loop elasticity, can be used in the formulation of tentative management plans for threatened species that cannot wait for the results of thorough demographic studies. We argue, however, that such management programs should explicitly include a plan for learning about the key demographic rates and how these are affected by environmental drivers and threats. PMID:23950922

  19. The force-velocity relation of rat fast- and slow-twitch muscles examined at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1984-01-01

    The steady-state force-velocity relation was examined at temperatures between 35 and 10 degrees C in rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus, e.d.l.) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscle preparations in vitro, with direct stimulation, and employing the isotonic release technique. The curvature of the force-velocity relation increased with cooling in both muscles; the increase was more pronounced below 25 degrees C. The maximum shortening velocity of e.d.l. muscle decreased with a Q10 (temperature coefficient) of 1.8 in cooling from 35 to 25 degrees C; it decreased with a Q10 of 2.4 in cooling below 20 degrees C. The shortening velocity of slow muscle was more temperature sensitive. The Q10 values for soleus muscle were 2.0 at 35-25 degrees C and 3.5 below 20 degrees C. The maximum rate of isometric tetanic tension rise had a temperature sensitivity similar to the maximum velocity of shortening in each muscle type. PMID:6747875

  20. Disuse Induced Changes in the Cholinergic System of Sciatic Nerve and Slow and Fast Twitch Muscle of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension was used as a model of disuse in experiments studing the effects of reduced muscle activity on AChE and its molecular forms, choline acetyltransferase and nicotinic receptor binding in innervated slow and fast muscle. The weight of SOL was reduced to 64% within one week and continued to decrease progressively up to the third week when the weight was reduced to 40% as compared to controls. EDL showed a significant decrease in its weight only at the end of three weeks hypokinesia when it was reduced to 71% of control. Biochemical and histochemical findings are summarized. From these data and from morphological findings it is evident that some properties of skeletal muscles are strongly dependent on patterns and level of loadbearing and on motor unit activiy. With suspension-induced disuse, the usually slow SOL appeared to change its characteristics such as fiber type distribution and AChE activity to one that more resembled a faster muscle. It is important to note that hypokinesia induced changes either physiological, biochemical or morphological, are totally reversible as the induced changes returned to control levels within a week after cessation of disuse.

  1. Tracking the time course of action priming on object recognition: evidence for fast and slow influences of action on perception.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Markus; Sim, Eun-Jin; Helbig, Hannah; Graf, Markus

    2011-08-01

    Perception and action are classically thought to be supported by functionally and neuroanatomically distinct mechanisms. However, recent behavioral studies using an action priming paradigm challenged this view and showed that action representations can facilitate object recognition. This study determined whether action representations influence object recognition during early visual processing stages, that is, within the first 150 msec. To this end, the time course of brain activation underlying such action priming effects was examined by recording ERPs. Subjects were sequentially presented with two manipulable objects (e.g., tools), which had to be named. In the congruent condition, both objects afforded similar actions, whereas dissimilar actions were afforded in the incongruent condition. In order to test the influence of the prime modality on action priming, the first object (prime) was presented either as picture or as word. We found an ERP effect of action priming over the central scalp as early as 100 msec after target onset for pictorial, but not for verbal primes. A later action priming effect on the N400 ERP component known to index semantic integration processes was obtained for both picture and word primes. The early effect was generated in a fronto-parietal motor network, whereas the late effect reflected activity in anterior temporal areas. The present results indicate that action priming influences object recognition through both fast and slow pathways: Action priming affects rapid visuomotor processes only when elicited by pictorial prime stimuli. However, it also modulates comparably slow conceptual integration processes independent of the prime modality.

  2. Transition from Slow to Fast Slip with Temperature, Forcing Velocity and Normal Stress: Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. K.; Brown, K. M.; Fialko, Y.

    2009-12-01

    temperatures. Our observations are consistent with the concept that thermally activated flattening and associated increases in asperity contact area dominate over any decrease in shear strength with temperature to produce a net strengthening effect. We plan to model individual asperities as Hertzian contacts to define the temperature dependent rheology that controls the evolution of frictional strength as a function of temperature, slip rate and stress. We will use a finite element Abaqus code to run our numerical simulations. We also plan to compare model predictions with data from laboratory experiments. Interestingly, we observe stick-slip behavior at temperatures as high as 500 °C in our dry tests. This may highlight the importance of water in the stick-slip/creep transition at the bottom of the seismogenic zone as well as the presence of the refractory feldspar phase. We also observe other interesting frictional phenomena, such as the growth or decay of oscillations in friction coefficient, slow slip events, and “double period” slip events. These phenomena may be due to a complex transition between stick-slip and creep frictional behavior and are in many ways similar to observations in natural slow-slip systems.

  3. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast aminoacid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; de Lecea, Luis; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The Locus Coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate in a time scale of several seconds. Evidences from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments have shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called Hypocretins (HCRTs) that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic neurons. Since the time scales of GABAA inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABAA inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Despite slower forms of GABAA can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABAA and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides that exert effects in a similar time scale as the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. PMID:25598695

  4. Organic-carbon-rich rocks: Fast or slow organic-carbon accumulation?

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, C.M.; Piper, D.Z.; Keller, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Organic-carbon-rich rocks and sediments are generally attributed in the marine geologic literature to high rates of organic carbon accumulation, resulting either from rapid input and/or excellent preservation. An alternate interpretation suggested by evidence from both oil-source rocks and modern sediments is that many organic-carbon-rich strata result from comparatively slow accumulation of organic carbon that is little diluted. The idea that organic-carbon-rich rocks represent rapid organic-carbon accumulation derives partly from the enhanced organic-carbon preservation associated with faster burial. Re-evaluation of published sediment trap and accumulation rate data in modern oceans shows, however, that sedimentation rate has been highly over-rated as a cause of high organic carbon abundance. As sedimentation rate increases, increased dilution outpaces increased preservation such that, other things being equal, more abundant organic carbon is associated with slower (not faster) sedimentation rates. Compared to an equal thickness of rapidly accumulated organic-carbon-lean sediment in the geologic record, slowly accumulated organic-carbon-rich sediment can represent 10-20 times more time-but be misinterpreted as reflecting rapid organic carbon accumulation by the common practice of interpolating age linearly with strata thickness. This relation explains the {open_quotes}enigma{close_quotes} of transgressive black shales, including numerous oil source-rocks worldwide associated with early phases of sea level rise. In offshore locations (20-200 km from the coast), rising sea level may sharply reduce terrigenous supply without significantly affecting productivity. The result is an organic-carbon-rich condensed zone reflecting neither high productivity nor low bottom-water oxygen nor rapid sedimentation, but simply lack of dilution.

  5. Organic-carbon-rich rocks: Fast or slow organic-carbon accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, C.M.; Piper, D.Z.; Keller, M.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Organic-carbon-rich rocks and sediments are generally attributed in the marine geologic literature to high rates of organic carbon accumulation, resulting either from rapid input and/or excellent preservation. An alternate interpretation suggested by evidence from both oil-source rocks and modern sediments is that many organic-carbon-rich strata result from comparatively slow accumulation of organic carbon that is little diluted. The idea that organic-carbon-rich rocks represent rapid organic-carbon accumulation derives partly from the enhanced organic-carbon preservation associated with faster burial. Re-evaluation of published sediment trap and accumulation rate data in modern oceans shows, however, that sedimentation rate has been highly over-rated as a cause of high organic carbon abundance. As sedimentation rate increases, increased dilution outpaces increased preservation such that, other things being equal, more abundant organic carbon is associated with slower (not faster) sedimentation rates. Compared to an equal thickness of rapidly accumulated organic-carbon-lean sediment in the geologic record, slowly accumulated organic-carbon-rich sediment can represent 10-20 times more time-but be misinterpreted as reflecting rapid organic carbon accumulation by the common practice of interpolating age linearly with strata thickness. This relation explains the [open quotes]enigma[close quotes] of transgressive black shales, including numerous oil source-rocks worldwide associated with early phases of sea level rise. In offshore locations (20-200 km from the coast), rising sea level may sharply reduce terrigenous supply without significantly affecting productivity. The result is an organic-carbon-rich condensed zone reflecting neither high productivity nor low bottom-water oxygen nor rapid sedimentation, but simply lack of dilution.

  6. Fast and slow methylators: do racial differences influence risk of allograft rejection?

    PubMed

    Chocair, P R; Duley, J A; Sabbaga, E; Arap, S; Simmonds, H A; Cameron, J S

    1993-06-01

    A catabolic route for azathioprine involving methylation by thiopurine methyltransferase has been directly implicated in the drug's immunosuppressive efficacy. Since ethnic differences in thiopurine methyltransferase activity have been reported in a study of Lapps, this study compared the distribution of thiopurine methyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates from 134 healthy, randomly selected subjects living in Brazil, comprising 39 blacks (i.e. Afro-Brazilians), 33 white subjects, 30 mixed-race subjects, and 32 Brazilian-residing Japanese subjects. The results demonstrated bimodality of thiopurine methyltransferase activity compatible with genetic polymorphism in the white, black and mixed-race groups, but not in the Japanese, who were homogeneously 'fast methylators' (high thiopurine methyltransferase activity). Thiopurine methyltransferase activity was generally higher in Brazilian males than females, and some individuals in the black and mixed-race groups had very high activity. Azathioprine-immunosuppressed transplant patients with thiopurine methyltransferase activity above 35 pmol/h/mgHb have previously been shown to have significantly poorer outcomes. Using this thiopurine methyltransferase value as the cut-off point between 'poor responders' and 'good responders' to azathioprine, 65% of the Japanese, 59% of the black subjects, and 63% of the mixed-race subjects fell into the 'poor responder' category, compared with only 42% of the white group. Interestingly, this approximately 20% difference in azathioprine response corresponds to the racial differences seen in allograft survival.

  7. A state observer for using a slow camera as a sensor for fast control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahleitner, Reinhard; Schagerl, Martin

    2013-03-01

    This contribution concerns about a problem that often arises in vision based control, when a camera is used as a sensor for fast control applications, or more precisely, when the sample rate of the control loop is higher than the frame rate of the camera. In control applications for mechanical axes, e.g. in robotics or automated production, a camera and some image processing can be used as a sensor to detect positions or angles. The sample time in these applications is typically in the range of a few milliseconds or less and this demands the use of a camera with a high frame rate up to 1000 fps. The presented solution is a special state observer that can work with a slower and therefore cheaper camera to estimate the state variables at the higher sample rate of the control loop. To simplify the image processing for the determination of positions or angles and make it more robust, some LED markers are applied to the plant. Simulation and experimental results show that the concept can be used even if the plant is unstable like the inverted pendulum.

  8. Differential microRNA Expression in Fast- and Slow-Twitch Skeletal Muscle of Piaractus mesopotamicus during Growth

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Bruno Oliveira da Silva; Fernandez, Geysson Javier; Mareco, Edson Assunção; Moraes, Leonardo Nazario; Salomão, Rondinelle Artur Simões; Gutierrez de Paula, Tassiana; Santos, Vander Bruno; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dal-Pai-Silvca, Maeli

    2015-01-01

    Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) is a Brazilian fish with a high economic value in pisciculture due to its rusticity and fast growth. Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle in fish occurs by hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy, processes that are dependent on the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. A class of small noncoding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), represses the expression of target mRNAs, and many studies have demonstrated that miR-1, miR-133, miR-206 and miR-499 regulate different processes in skeletal muscle through the mRNA silencing of hdac4 (histone deacetylase 4), srf (serum response factor), pax7 (paired box 7) and sox6 ((sex determining region Y)-box 6), respectively. The aim of our work was to evaluate the expression of these miRNAs and their putative target mRNAs in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle of pacu during growth. We used pacus in three different development stages: larval (aged 30 days), juvenile (aged 90 days and 150 days) and adult (aged 2 years). To complement our study, we also performed a pacu myoblast cell culture, which allowed us to investigate miRNA expression in the progression from myoblast proliferation to differentiation. Our results revealed an inverse correlation between the expression of the miRNAs and their target mRNAs, and there was evidence that miR-1 and miR-206 may regulate the differentiation of myoblasts, whereas miR-133 may regulate the proliferation of these cells. miR-499 was highly expressed in slow-twitch muscle, which suggests its involvement in the specification of the slow phenotype in muscle fibers. The expression of these miRNAs exhibited variations between different development stages and between distinct muscle twitch phenotypes. This work provides the first identification of miRNA expression profiles in pacu skeletal muscle and suggests an important role of these molecules in muscle growth and in the maintenance of the muscle phenotype. PMID:26529415

  9. Decay of Ca2+ and force transients in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles from the rat, mouse and Etruscan shrew.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, P; Gros, G

    1998-02-01

    Isometric single-twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ transients were recorded simultaneously, using fura-2, from slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres of the rat, mouse and Etruscan shrew Suncus etruscus. In the slow-twitch rat soleus, force half-relaxation time was three times longer than the 50% decay time of the fura-2 signal. In contrast, in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles of all three animals, muscle relaxation preceded Ca2+ decay. It is proposed that this surprising property of fast-twitch muscles is due to their pCa-tension curve, which is shifted to the right compared with that of slow-twitch muscle.

  10. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  11. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  12. Properties of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Julie D; Scott, Rachel L; West, Jan M; Lopes, Elizabeth; Quah, Alvin K J; Cheema, Surindar S

    2005-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine if there are altered histological, pathological and contractile properties in presymptomatic or endstage diseased muscle fibres from representative slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscles of SOD1 G93A mice in comparison to wildtype mice. In presymptomatic SOD1 G93A mice, there was no detectable peripheral dysfunction, providing evidence that muscle pathology is secondary to motor neuronal dysfunction. At disease endstage however, single muscle fibre contractile analysis demonstrated that fast-twitch muscle fibres and neuromuscular junctions are preferentially affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-induced denervation, being unable to produce the same levels of force when activated by calcium as muscle fibres from their age-matched controls. The levels of transgenic SOD1 expression, aggregation state and activity were also examined in these muscles but there no was no preference for muscle fibre type. Hence, there is no simple correlation between SOD1 protein expression/activity, and muscle fibre type vulnerability in SOD1 G93A mice.

  13. A shocked-Bz event caused by fast steady flow-slow transient flow interaction. [with coronal mass ejection in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, X.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the 25 November 1978 shock pair was caused by the interaction of a fast steady flow with a slow coronal mass ejection in interplanetary space (ICME). It is suggested that the slow ICME may be disconnected from the sun. In addition, a new method to infer the shock angle and Mach number from the observed upstream plasma beta and the jump ratios of proton density and magnetic flux density across a shock is described.

  14. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  15. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms.

    PubMed

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  16. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  17. Single-channel properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channel in slow- and fast-twitch muscles of Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bastide, B; Mounier, Y

    1998-08-01

    RyR1 is the main isoform of ryanodine receptor expressed in fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscles although differences in Ca2+-release kinetics and properties have been reported. Single-channel measurements reveal that a large proportion (82%) of Ca2+-release channels measured in slow-twitch muscle preparations have properties similar to those of the Ca2+-release channels of fast-twitch preparations, i.e. the same conductance, an identical sensitivity to caffeine and a bell-shaped Ca2+ activation curve for pCa (-log10[Ca2+]) 7 to 3. A low proportion (18%) of Ca2+-release channels observed in preparations from slow-twitch muscles were characterized by a very high activity level. These channels were not inhibited at a millimolar concentration of Ca2+. Our data suggest that the different properties of Ca2+ release in slow- and fast-twitch muscles might not be related to intrinsic properties of the Ca2+-release channels of each type of muscle but rather to the co-expression of two isoforms of ryanodine receptor and the lower amount of Ca2+-release channels expressed in slow- than in fast-twitch muscles.

  18. Regulation of jaw-specific isoforms of myosin-binding protein-C and tropomyosin in regenerating cat temporalis muscle innervated by limb fast and slow motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lucia H D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-11-01

    Cat jaw-closing muscles are a distinct muscle allotype characterized by the expression of masticatory-specific myofibrillar proteins. Transplantation studies showed that expression of masticatory myosin heavy chain (m-MyHC) is promoted by fast motor nerves, but suppressed by slow motor nerves. We investigated whether masticatory myosin-binding protein-C (m-MBP-C) and masticatory tropomyosin (m-Tm) are similarly regulated. Temporalis muscle strips were transplanted into limb muscle beds to allow innervation by fast or slow muscle nerve during regeneration. Regenerated muscles were examined postoperatively up to 168 days by peroxidase IHC using monoclonal antibodies to m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm. Regenerates in both muscle beds expressed fetal and slow MyHCs, m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm during the first 4 weeks. Longer-term regenerates innervated by fast nerve suppressed fetal and slow MyHCs, retaining m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm, whereas fibers innervated by slow nerve suppressed fetal MyHCs and the three masticatory-specific proteins, induced slow MyHC, and showed immunohistochemical characteristics of jaw-slow fibers. We concluded that expression of m-MBP-C and m-Tm is coregulated by m-MyHC and that neural impulses to limb slow muscle are capable of suppressing masticatory-specific proteins and to channel gene expression along the jaw-slow phenotype unique to jaw-closing muscle.

  19. The electrophoretically 'slow' and 'fast' forms of the alpha 2-macroglobulin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A J; Brown, M A; Sayers, C A

    1979-01-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin (alpha 2M) was isolated from human plasma by a four-step procedure: poly(ethylene glyco) fractionation, gel chromatography, euglobulin precipitation and immunoadsorption. No contaminants were detected in the final preparations by electrophoresis or immunoprecipitation. The protein ran as a single slow band in gel electrophoresis, and was designated 'S-alpha 2M'. S-alpha 2M bound about 2 mol of trypsin/mol. Treatment of S-alpha 2M with a proteinase or ammonium salts produced a form of the molecule more mobile in electrophoresis, and lacking proteinase-binding activity (F-alpha 2M). The electrophoretic mobility of the F-alpha 2M resulting from reaction with NH4+ salts was identical with that of proteinase complexes. We attribute the change in electrophoretic mobility of the alpha 2M to a conformation change, but there was no evidence of a change in pI or Strokes radius. Electrophoresis of S-alpha 2M in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate gave results consistent with the view that the alpha 2M molecule is a tetramer of identical subunits, assembled as a non-covalent pair of disulphide-linked dimers. Some of the subunits seemed to be 'nicked' into two-thires-length and one-third-length chains, however. This was not apparent with F-alpha 2M produced by ammonium salts. F-alpha 2M produced by trypsin showed two new bands attributable to cleavage of the subunit polypeptide chain near the middle. Immunoassays of F-alpha 2M gave 'rockets' 12-29% lower than those with S-alpha 2M. The nature of the interactions between subunits in S-alpha 2M and F-alpha 2M was investigated by treating each form with glutaraldehyde before electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate. A much greater degree of cross-linking was observed with the F-alpha 2M, indicating that the subunits interact most closely in this form of the molecule. Exposure of S-alpha 2M to 3 M-urea or pH3 resulted in dissociation to the disulphide-bonded half-molecules; these did not

  20. Ultracompact (3 μm) silicon slow-light optical modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opheij, Aron; Rotenberg, Nir; Beggs, Daryl M.; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Kuipers, L.

    2013-12-01

    Wavelength-scale optical modulators are essential building blocks for future on-chip optical interconnects. Any modulator design is a trade-off between bandwidth, size and fabrication complexity, size being particularly important as it determines capacitance and actuation energy. Here, we demonstrate an interesting alternative that is only 3 μm long, only uses silicon on insulator (SOI) material and accommodates several nanometres of optical bandwidth at 1550 nm. The device is based on a photonic crystal waveguide: by combining the refractive index shift with slow-light enhanced absorption induced by free-carrier injection, we achieve an operation bandwidth that significantly exceeds the shift of the bandedge. We compare a 3 μm and an 80 μm long modulator and surprisingly, the shorter device outperforms the longer one. Despite its small size, the device achieves an optical bandwidth as broad as 7 nm for an extinction ratio of 10 dB, and modulation times ranging between 500 ps and 100 ps.

  1. Control of Fano resonances and slow light using Bose-Einstein condensates in a nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M. Javed; Ghafoor, Fazal; Khan, M. Miskeen; Saif, Farhan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a standing wave in an optical nanocavity with Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) constitutes a one-dimensional optical lattice potential in the presence of a finite two bodies atomic interaction. We report that the interaction of a BEC with a standing field in an optical cavity coherently evolves to exhibit Fano resonances in the output field at the probe frequency. The behavior of the reported resonance shows an excellent compatibility with the original formulation of asymmetric resonance as discovered by Fano [U. Fano, Phys. Rev. 124, 1866 (1961), 10.1103/PhysRev.124.1866]. Based on our analytical and numerical results, we find that the Fano resonances and subsequently electromagnetically induced transparency of the probe pulse can be controlled through the intensity of the cavity standing wave field and the strength of the atom-atom interaction in the BEC. In addition, enhancement of the slow light effect by the strength of the atom-atom interaction and its robustness against the condensate fluctuations are realizable using presently available technology.

  2. Optically induced indirect photonic transitions in a slow light photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Castellanos Muñoz, Michel; Petrov, Alexander Yu; O'Faolain, Liam; Li, Juntao; Krauss, Thomas F; Eich, Manfred

    2014-02-07

    We demonstrate indirect photonic transitions in a silicon slow light photonic crystal waveguide. The transitions are driven by an optically generated refractive index front that moves along the waveguide and interacts with a signal pulse copropagating in the structure. We experimentally confirm a theoretical model which indicates that the ratio of the frequency and wave vector shifts associated with the indirect photonic transition is identical to the propagation velocity of the refractive index front. The physical origin of the transitions achieved here is fundamentally different than in previously proposed refractive index modulation concepts with fixed temporal and spatial modulation frequencies; as here, the interaction with the refractive index front results in a Doppler-like signal frequency and wave vector shift. Consequently, the bandwidth over which perfect mode frequency and wave vector matching is achieved is not intrinsically limited by the shape of the photonic bands, and tuning of the indirect photonic transitions is possible without any need for geometrical modifications of the structure. Our device is genuinely nonreciprocal, as it provides different frequency shifts for co- and counterpropagating signal and index fronts.

  3. A calcium homeostasis model: orchestration of fast acting PTH and calcitonin with slow calcitriol.

    PubMed

    Kurbel, Sven; Radić, Radivoje; Kotromanović, Zeljko; Puseljić, Zeljka; Kratofil, Boris

    2003-09-01

    abundant calcium. An overnight fast with a reduced absorption of dietary calcium, might decrease plasma calcium below the regulatory set point, inducing an increase in PTH secretion. Increased average nighttime PTH secretion induces more calcitriol to be synthesized in kidneys. The resultant late calcitriol morning and daytime tide would stimulate calcium absorption from gut, or from bone, depending on the availability of dietary calcium. Due to the described time lag in calcitriol effects, increased calcium absorption might continue during daytime, regardless of the plasma calcium level. If plasma calcium is above the set point, calcitonin will allow excess calcium to deposit in bones. A speculation based on this model is that it might be more efficient to avoid calcium rich food for dinner or supper, and to administer calcium supplementation in the morning, during the calcitriol tide.

  4. Ultrahigh sensitivity of rotation sensing beyond the trade-off between sensitivity and linewidth by the storage of light in a dynamic slow-light resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xuenan; Zhang Yundong; Tian He; Wu Hao; Li Geng; Zhu Ruidong; Yuan Ping

    2011-12-15

    We propose to employ the storage of light in a dynamically tuned add-drop resonator to realize an optical gyroscope of ultrahigh sensitivity and compact size. Taking the impact of the linewidth of incident light on the sensitivity into account, we investigate the effect of rotation on the propagation of a partially coherent light field in this dynamically tuned slow-light structure. It is demonstrated that the fundamental trade-off between the rotation-detection sensitivity and the linewidth will be overcome and the sensitivity-linewidth product will be enhanced by two orders of magnitude in comparison to that of the corresponding static slow-light structure. Furthermore, the optical gyroscope employing the storage of light in the dynamically tuned add-drop resonator can acquire ultrahigh sensitivity by extremely short fiber length without a high-performance laser source of narrow linewidth and a complex laser frequency stabilization system. Thus the proposal in this paper provides a promising and feasible scheme to realize highly sensitive and compact integrated optical gyroscopes by slow-light structures.

  5. The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

    2009-04-15

    Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

  6. Quantification of the nonenzymatic fast and slow TRAP in a postaddition assay in human seminal plasma and the antioxidant contributions of various seminal compounds.

    PubMed

    Rhemrev, J P; van Overveld, F W; Haenen, G R; Teerlink, T; Bast, A; Vermeiden, J P

    2000-01-01

    Total radical-trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP) measurements of human seminal plasma (N = 25) were performed by using a post-addition assay based on trapping 2,2' Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radicals. This method enables the antioxidant capacity of human seminal plasma and its constituents to be quantified. The standard procedure consisted of determination of the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) after incubating the test sample in the ABTS radical solution for 10 seconds (fast TRAP) and 300 s (total TRAP). Interestingly, seminal plasma showed a fast TRAP and a high slow TRAP (Total TRAP - Fast TRAP). The final total TRAP of seminal plasma is about 10 times higher than that of blood plasma. Various components of seminal plasma contribute to its fast TRAP; 37% can be attributed to vitamin C, uric acid, and tyrosine; proteins and polyphenolic compounds contribute a further 57%. In contrast, the slow TRAP was attributed to vitamin C (1%), uric acid (2%), and tyrosine (15%) and to proteins and polyphenolic compounds (33%). It was not possible to account for the remaining 49%. Neither known putative antioxidants, such as spermine, pyruvate, and taurine, nor other seminal compounds, such as carnitine, sialic acid, fructose, spermidine, glycerophosphorylcholine, and hyaluronic acid, contributed to any significant radical-trapping activity at a standard concentration of 1 mM. Of the amino acids, only tyrosine possessed a slow TRAP, and it is present at a high concentration in seminal plasma. Glutathione and hypotaurine show high fast and slow TRAPs, respectively. However, because of their low concentration in seminal plasma, their contribution to the TRAP is negligible. In conclusion, seminal plasma possesses a high antioxidant buffer capacity that protects spermatozoa from oxidative stress. Moreover, these findings suggest that the fast and slow TRAPs may have an important role as infertility markers and treatment targets in

  7. Thermal dependence of clearance and metabolic rates in slow- and fast-growing spats of manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, David; Ibarrola, Irrintzi; Navarro, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    Thermal dependence of clearance rate (CR: l h(-1)), standard (SMR: J h(-1)) and routine metabolic rates (RMR: J h(-1)), were analyzed in fast (F)- and slow (S)-growing juveniles of the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Physiological rates were measured at the maintenance temperature (17 °C), and compared with measurements performed at 10 and 24 °C after 16 h and 14 days to analyze acute and acclimated responses, respectively. Metabolic rates (both RMR and SMR) differed significantly between F and S seeds, irrespective of temperature. Mass-specific CRs were not different for F and S seeds but were significantly higher in F clams for rates standardized according to allometric size-scaling rules. Acute thermal dependency of CR was equal for F and S clams: mean Q 10 were ≈3 and 2 in temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively. CR did not change after 2 weeks of acclimation to temperatures. Acute thermal effects on SMR were similar in both groups (Q 10 ≈ 1 and 1.6 in temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively). Large differences between groups were found in the acute thermal dependence of RMR: Q 10 in F clams (≈1.2 and 1.9 at temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively) were similar to those found for SMR (Q 10 = 1.0 and 1.7). In contrast, RMR of S clams exhibited maximum thermal dependence (Q 10 = 3.1) at 10-17 °C and become depressed at higher temperatures (Q 10 = 0.9 at 17-24 °C). A recovery of RMR in S clams was recorded upon acclimation to 24 °C. Contrasting metabolic patterns between fast and slow growers are interpreted as a consequence of differential thermal sensitivity of the fraction of metabolism associated to food processing and assimilation.

  8. Decay of calcium transients after electrical stimulation in rat fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, S L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1997-01-01

    1. Calcium transients were calculated from fura-2 fluorescence signals (corrected for kinetic delays in the Ca(2+)-fura-2 reaction) from single rat skeletal muscle fibres, either fully dissociated from the fast-twitch flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle or in small bundles from the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Fibres or bundles were embedded in agarose gel to inhibit movement and stimulated by single or trains of 1-2 ms electrical pulses (100 Hz, 2-400 ms train duration). 2. The rate constant of decay of [Ca2+] determined from single-exponential fits to the final decay phase of [Ca2+] after a single action potential was considerably faster in FDB fibres than in soleus fibres. As the stimulation duration increased, the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay decreased for both the FDB and soleus fibres, but the effect was greater in FDB than in soleus fibres. 3. Using the magnitude of the decline in the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay with increasing stimulation duration as an index of relative contribution of the saturable Ca2+ binding sites on parvalbumin, subpopulations termed 'high', 'medium' and 'low', referring to estimated parvalbumin content, were determined within each group of FDB and soleus fibres. In fibres assigned to the 'high' and 'medium' groups, parvalbumin was the major contributor (50-73%) to the [Ca2+] decay rate constant after a single action potential. In fibres in the 'low' group, parvalbumin contributed only 0-28% to the rate constant of [Ca2+] decay. 4. Fluorescence recordings using mag-fura-2, a lower-affinity Ca2+ indicator expected to be in equilibrium with myoplasmic Ca2+, gave similar values for both the [Ca2+] decay rate constant after a single action potential and the decrease in this rate constant with increased stimulation duration, as found for the fura-2 [Ca2+] transients from FDB and soleus fibres. Thus, the observed differences in decay rate of Ca2+ were not introduced by kinetic correction of the fura-2 recordings, but are attributed to

  9. Synchronized ion acceleration by ultraintense slow light and electron source for x-ray production from low-density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu

    2017-03-01

    Synchronized proton acceleration by ultraintense slow light in a low-density target Brantov et al (2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 085004) is studied for a circularly polarized laser pulse. This study demonstrates the advantage of circularly polarized light compared with linearly polarized light used for high-energy proton generation. At the same time, high-energy electron production for gamma-ray generation is not sensitive to the polarization of the laser pulse. Both the proton and the electron sources are considered in application to petawatt-class lasers.

  10. Slow light performance enhancement of Bragg slot photonic crystal waveguide with particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Kambiz; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Recently, majority of current research in the field of designing Phonic Crystal Waveguides (PCW) focus in extracting the relations between output slow light properties of PCW and structural parameters through a huge number of tedious non-systematic simulations in order to introduce better designs. This paper proposes a novel systematic approach which can be considered as a shortcut to alleviate the difficulties and human involvements in designing PCWs. In the proposed method, the problem of PCW design is first formulated as an optimization problem. Then, an optimizer is employed in order to automatically find the optimum design for the formulated PCWs. Meanwhile, different constraints are also considered during optimization with the purpose of applying physical limitations to the final optimum structure. As a case study, the structure of a Bragg-like Corrugation Slotted PCWs (BCSPCW) is optimized by using the proposed method. One of the most computationally powerful techniques in Computational Intelligence (CI) called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is employed as an optimizer to automatically find the optimum structure for BCSPCW. The optimization process is done by considering five constraints to guarantee the feasibility of the final optimized structures and avoid band mixing. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to find an optimum structure for BCSPCW with 172% and 100% substantial improvements in the bandwidth and Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) respectively compared to the best current structure in the literature. Moreover, there is a time domain analysis at the end of the paper which verifies the performance of the optimized structure and proves that this structure has low distortion and attenuation simultaneously.

  11. Differences in histone modifications between slow- and fast-twitch muscle of adult rats and following overload, denervation, or valproic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Nakai, Naoya; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in skeletal muscle properties and phenotypes in response to various stimuli such as exercise, unloading, and gene mutation. However, a shift in muscle fiber phenotype from fast twitch to slow twitch is not completely induced by stimuli. This limitation is hypothesized to result from the epigenetic differences between muscle types. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the differences in histone modification for the plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles of adult rats. Genome-wide analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and acetylation of histone 3, which occurs at transcriptionally active gene loci, was less prevalent in the genes specific to the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Conversely, gene loci specific to the fast-twitch plantaris muscle were associated with the aforementioned histone modifications. We also found that upregulation of slow genes in the plantaris muscle, which are related to enhanced muscular activity, is not associated with activating histone modifications. Furthermore, silencing of muscle activity by denervation caused the displacement of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in 5' ends of genes in plantaris, but minor effects were observed in soleus. Increased recruitment of Pol II induced by forced acetylation of histone was also suppressed in valproic acid-treated soleus. Our present data indicate that the slow-twitch soleus muscle has a unique set of histone modifications, which may relate to the preservation of the genetic backbone against physiological stimuli.

  12. Fermentation of Ammonia Fiber Expansion Treated and Untreated Barley Straw in a Rumen Simulation Technique Using Rumen Inoculum from Cattle with Slow versus Fast Rate of Fiber Disappearance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Candace L; Ribeiro, Gabriel O; Oba, Masahito; McAllister, Tim A; Beauchemin, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of rumen inoculum from heifers with fast vs. slow rate of in situ fiber digestion on the fermentation of complex versus easily digested fiber sources in the forms of untreated and Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) treated barley straw, respectively, using an artificial rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). In situ fiber digestion was measured in a previous study by incubating untreated barley straw in the rumen of 16 heifers fed a diet consisting of 700 g/kg barley straw and 300 g/kg concentrate. The two heifers with fastest rate of digestion (Fast ≥ 4.18% h(-1)) and the two heifers with the slowest rate of digestion (Slow ≤ 3.17% h(-1)) were chosen as inoculum donors for this study. Two Rusitec apparatuses each equipped with eight fermenters were used in a completely randomized block design with two blocks (apparatus) and four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (Fast or Slow rumen inoculum and untreated or AFEX treated straw). Fast rumen inoculum and AFEX straw both increased (P < 0.05) disappearance of dry matter (DMD), organic matter, true DMD, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen (N) with an interactive effect between the two (P < 0.05). Fast rumen inoculum increased (P > 0.05) methane production per gram of digested material for both untreated and AFEX straw, and reduced (interaction, P < 0.05) acetate: propionate ratio for untreated straw. Greater relative populations of Ruminococcus albus (P < 0.05) and increased microbial N production (P = 0.045) were observed in Fast rumen inoculum. AFEX straw in Fast inoculum had greater total bacterial populations than Slow, but for untreated straw this result was reversed (interaction, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that differences in microbial populations in rumen fluid contribute to differences in the capacity of rumen inoculum to digest fiber.

  13. Fermentation of Ammonia Fiber Expansion Treated and Untreated Barley Straw in a Rumen Simulation Technique Using Rumen Inoculum from Cattle with Slow versus Fast Rate of Fiber Disappearance

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Candace L.; Ribeiro, Gabriel O.; Oba, Masahito; McAllister, Tim A.; Beauchemin, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of rumen inoculum from heifers with fast vs. slow rate of in situ fiber digestion on the fermentation of complex versus easily digested fiber sources in the forms of untreated and Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) treated barley straw, respectively, using an artificial rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). In situ fiber digestion was measured in a previous study by incubating untreated barley straw in the rumen of 16 heifers fed a diet consisting of 700 g/kg barley straw and 300 g/kg concentrate. The two heifers with fastest rate of digestion (Fast ≥ 4.18% h-1) and the two heifers with the slowest rate of digestion (Slow ≤ 3.17% h-1) were chosen as inoculum donors for this study. Two Rusitec apparatuses each equipped with eight fermenters were used in a completely randomized block design with two blocks (apparatus) and four treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments (Fast or Slow rumen inoculum and untreated or AFEX treated straw). Fast rumen inoculum and AFEX straw both increased (P < 0.05) disappearance of dry matter (DMD), organic matter, true DMD, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen (N) with an interactive effect between the two (P < 0.05). Fast rumen inoculum increased (P > 0.05) methane production per gram of digested material for both untreated and AFEX straw, and reduced (interaction, P < 0.05) acetate: propionate ratio for untreated straw. Greater relative populations of Ruminococcus albus (P < 0.05) and increased microbial N production (P = 0.045) were observed in Fast rumen inoculum. AFEX straw in Fast inoculum had greater total bacterial populations than Slow, but for untreated straw this result was reversed (interaction, P = 0.013). These findings indicate that differences in microbial populations in rumen fluid contribute to differences in the capacity of rumen inoculum to digest fiber. PMID:27899919

  14. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families.

  15. LIGHT SCATTERING: Fast path-integration technique in simulation of light propagation through highly scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Aleksandr V.; Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2004-06-01

    Based on the path-integration technique and the Metropolis method, the original calculation scheme is developed for solving the problem of light propagation through highly scattering objects. The elimination of calculations of 'unnecessary' realisations and the phenomenological description of processes of multiple small-angle scattering provided a drastic increase (by nine and more orders of magnitude) in the calculation rate, retaining the specific features of the problem (consideration of spatial inhomogeneities, boundary conditions, etc.). The scheme allows one to verify other fast calculation algorithms and to obtain information required to reconstruct the internal structure of highly scattering objects (of size ~1000 scattered lengths and more) by the method of diffusion optical tomography.

  16. Diurnal changes in gas exchange and carbon partitioning in needles of fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    PubMed

    Yang, W Q; Murthy, R; King, P; Topa, M A

    2002-05-01

    We investigated diurnal and seasonal changes in carbon acquisition and partitioning of recently assimilated carbon in fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) to determine whether fast-growing families exhibited greater carbon gain at the leaf level. Since planting on a xeric infertile site in Scotland County, NC, USA in 1993, five Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) and five "Lost Pines" Texas (TX) families have been grown with either optimal nutrition or without fertilization (control). In 1998 and 1999, gas exchange parameters were monitored bimonthly in four families and needles were analyzed bimonthly for starch and soluble sugar concentrations. Although diurnal and seasonal effects on net photosynthesis (A(net)) and maximum rate of light-saturated photosynthesis (A(max)) were significant, few family or treatment differences in gas exchange characteristics were observed. The A(net) peaked at different times during the day over the season, and A(max) was generally highest in May. Instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE(i)), derived from gas exchange parameters, did not differ among families, whereas foliage stable isotope composition (delta(13)C) values suggested that TX families exhibited lower WUE than more mesic ACP families. Although there were no diurnal effects on foliar starch concentrations, needles exhibited pronounced seasonal changes in absolute concentrations of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC), starch and soluble sugars, and in partitioning of TNC to starch and sugars, mirroring seasonal changes in photosynthesis and shoot and root growth. In all families, foliar starch concentrations peaked in May and decreased to a minimum in winter, whereas reducing sugar concentrations were highest in winter. Some family and treatment differences in partitioning of recently assimilated carbon in needles were observed, with the two TX families exhibiting higher concentrations of TNC and starch and enhanced starch partitioning compared

  17. Fast and slow ion diffusion processes in lithium ion pouch cells during cycling observed with fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Lars Wilko; Kiesel, Peter; Ganguli, Anurag; Lochbaum, Alexander; Saha, Bhaskar; Schwartz, Julian; Bae, Chang-Jun; Alamgir, Mohamed; Raghavan, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Cell monitoring for safe capacity utilization while maximizing pack life and performance is a key requirement for effective battery management and encouraging their adoption for clean-energy technologies. A key cell failure mode is the build-up of residual electrode strain over time, which affects both cell performance and life. Our team has been exploring the use of fiber optic (FO) sensors as a new alternative for cell state monitoring. In this present study, various charge-cycling experiments were performed on Lithium-ion pouch cells with a particular class of FO sensors, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), that were externally attached to the cells. An overshooting of the volume change at high SOC that recovers during rest can be observed. This phenomenon originates from the interplay between a fast and a slow Li ion diffusion process, which leads to non-homogeneous intercalation of Li ions. This paper focuses on the strain relaxation processes that occur after switching from charge to no-load phases. The correlation of the excess volume and subsequent relaxation to SOC as well as temperature is discussed. The implications of being able to monitor this phenomenon to control battery utilization for long life are also discussed.

  18. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Huang, Yueheng; Wang, Xueyi; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-15

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ∼ 3ω{sub LH}, where ω{sub LH} represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ∼ 1.3ω{sub LH}), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  19. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P < 0.05); i.e., 3 time points were significantly higher than control and 6 were significantly less than control. These data suggest that the cAMP concentration of untrained skeletal muscle after a single bout of endurance-type exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  20. Actions of lyotropic anions on the mechanical properties of fast and slow twitch rat muscles at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wondmikun, Y; Soukup, T; Asmussen, G

    2003-01-01

    The effects of lyotropic (swelling) anions (Cl(-), Br(-), NO(3)(-) and I(-)) on contractile properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscles were investigated in vitro at 20 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Isolated muscles bathed in anionic Tyrode solution were stimulated directly and isometric single twitches and fused tetanic contractions were recorded. In a Cl(-)Tyrode solution a decrease of the bathing temperature led to a cold potentiation of the twitch tension (P(t)) in EDL muscles, however, to a cold depression in SOL muscles, in both muscles combined with a prolongation of contraction (CT) and half relaxation (HRT) times. The extent and order of the potentiating effect of lyotropic anions on the P(t), CT and HRT in EDL and SOL were quite similar and increased in the order: Cl(-)< Br(-)< NO(3)(-)< I(-). Since the lyotropic anions did not influence tetanic tensions, the twitch-tetanus ratio (TTR) was increased in NO(3)(-) and I(-)solutions. All effects of the anions were rapidly and completely reversed in both muscles when the test solution was replaced by the normal one. The temperature decrease caused no significant alteration in the potentiation capacity of the anions or in the kinetics of their action and reversibility.

  1. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  2. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 in cultivable soil by fast and slow pyrolysis-generated biochar.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Boateng, Akwasi A; Han, Yanxue Helen; Douds, David D

    2014-03-01

    An exploratory study was performed to determine the influence of fast pyrolysis (FP) and slow pyrolysis (SP) biochars on enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) in soil. Soil + EHEC (inoculated at 7 log colony-forming units [CFU]/g of soil) + 1 of 12 types of biochar (10% total weight:weight in soil) was stored at 22°C and sampled for 8 weeks. FP switchgrass and FP horse litter biochars inactivated 2.8 and 2.1 log CFU/g more EHEC than no-biochar soils by day 14. EHEC was undetectable by surface plating at weeks 4 and 5 in standard FP switchgrass, FP oak, and FP switchgrass pellet biochars. Conversely, EHEC populations in no-biochar control samples remained as high as 5.8 and 4.0 log CFU/g at weeks 4 and 5, respectively. Additionally, three more SP hardwood pellet biochars (generated at 500°C for 1 h, or 2 h, or generated at 700°C for 30 min) inactivated greater numbers of EHEC than did the no-biochar control samples during weeks 4 and 5. These results suggest that biochar can inactivate E. coli O157:H7 in cultivable soil, which might mitigate risks associated with EHEC contamination on fresh produce.

  3. Task-dependent inhibition of slow-twitch soleus and excitation of fast-twitch gastrocnemius do not require high movement speed and velocity-dependent sensory feedback

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ricky; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2014-01-01

    Although individual heads of triceps surae, soleus (SO) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, are often considered close functional synergists, previous studies have shown distinct activity patterns between them in some motor behaviors. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses explaining inhibition of slow SO with respect to fast MG: (1) inhibition occurs at high movement velocities and mediated by velocity-dependent sensory feedback and (2) inhibition depends on the ankle-knee joint moment combination and does not require high movement velocities. The hypotheses were tested by comparing the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio during fast and slow motor behaviors (cat paw shake responses vs. back, straight leg load lifting in humans), which had the same ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; and during fast and slow behaviors with the ankle extension-knee extension moment combination (human vertical jumping and stance phase of walking in cats and leg load lifting in humans). In addition, SO EMG/MG EMG ratio was determined during cat paw shake responses and walking before and after removal of stretch velocity-dependent sensory feedback by self-reinnervating SO and/or gastrocnemius. We found the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG below 1 (p < 0.05) during fast paw shake responses and slow back load lifting, requiring the ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; whereas the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG was above 1 (p < 0.05) during fast vertical jumping and slow tasks of walking and leg load lifting, requiring ankle extension-knee extension moments. Removal of velocity-dependent sensory feedback did not affect the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio in cats. We concluded that the relative inhibition of SO does not require high muscle velocities, depends on ankle-knee moment combinations, and is mechanically advantageous for allowing a greater MG contribution to ankle extension and knee flexion moments. PMID:25389407

  4. Fast Movements, Slow Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This semester, for the second time in the last couple of years, the author is leading a graduate seminar on histories of rhetoric. Little scholarship traces the development of multilingual composition in antiquity (with Brian Ray's article as a clear and excellent exception), so the author typically feels like students hit a rich but untapped…

  5. Tuning the Sensitivity of an Optical Cavity with Slow and Fast Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, H.; Toftul, A.; Schambeau, C.; Odutola, J. A.; Diels, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured mode pushing by the dispersion of a rubidium vapor in a Fabry-Perot cavity and have shown that the scale factor and sensitivity of a passive cavity can be strongly enhanced by the presence of such an anomalous dispersion medium. The enhancement is the result of the atom-cavity coupling, which provides a positive feedback to the cavity response. The cavity sensitivity can also be controlled and tuned through a pole by a second, optical pumping, beam applied transverse to the cavity. Alternatively, the sensitivity can be controlled by the introduction of a second counter-propagating input beam that interferes with the first beam, coherently increasing the cavity absorptance. We show that the pole in the sensitivity occurs when the sum of the effective group index and an additional cavity delay factor that accounts for mode reshaping goes to zero, and is an example of an exceptional point, commonly associated with coupled non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems. Additionally we show that a normal dispersion feature can decrease the cavity scale factor and can be generated through velocity selective optical pumping

  6. Time delay generation at high frequency using SOA based slow and fast light.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2011-10-24

    We show how Up-converted Coherent Population Oscillations (UpCPO) enable to get rid of the intrinsic limitation of the carrier lifetime, leading to the generation of time delays at any high frequencies in a single SOA device. The linear dependence of the RF phase shift with respect to the RF frequency is theoretically predicted and experimentally evidenced at 16 and 35 GHz.

  7. Wideband and low-dispersion engineered slow light using liquid infiltration of a modified photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Mohammad; Karimkhani, Arash; Nazari, Fakhroddin

    2016-12-10

    We present a wideband and low-dispersion slow-light photonic crystal waveguide with a large normalized delay-bandwidth product that can be exploited in many ultra-compact all-optical devices, such as modulators and switches. The proposed new approach is based on infiltrating optical fluid into the first and second rows of the shifted air holes adjacent to the line-defect waveguide in a hexagonal lattice of photonic crystal. The simulation results show that the normalized delay-bandwidth product can be enhanced to a large value of 0.469 with a wide bandwidth operation of 36.8 nm in the C-band frequency optical communication window. Furthermore, by means of two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations, the low-dispersion slow-light propagation is demonstrated by simulating the temporal Gaussian pulse width broadening.

  8. Wideband and low dispersion slow-light waveguide based on a photonic crystal with crescent-shaped air holes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bo; Wang, Ling-ling; Huang, Wei-qing; Li, Xiao-fei; Zhai, Xiang; Zhang, Hong

    2012-08-10

    We present a procedure to generate slow light with a large group index, wideband, and low dispersion in our suggested photonic crystal waveguide. By modulation of the declinations in the first two rows of air holes, the group index, the bandwidth, and the dispersion can be tuned effectively. Utilizing the two-dimensional plane wave expansion method (PWE) and the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD), we demonstrate slow light with the group indices of 23, 35, and 45, respectively, while restricting the group-index variation within a 10% range. We accordingly attain an available bandwidth of 40.7, 23.7, and 5.1 nm, respectively. Meanwhile, the normalized delay-bandwidth product stays around 0.45, with minimal dispersion less than 0.2 (ps2/m) for all the cases.

  9. Molecular recognition by thrombin. Role of the slow-->fast transition, site-specific ion binding energetics and thermodynamic mapping of structural components.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Y; Di Cera, E

    1994-01-14

    The interaction of thrombin with the potent natural inhibitor hirudin is controlled in a complex fashion by the binding of Na+ and Cl- to the enzyme and allosteric transitions. Binding of hirudin is positively linked to Na+ binding, but is opposed in a competitive fashion by the binding of Cl-. Since Na+ binding induces the slow-->fast transition of thrombin, it follows from linkage principles that hirudin binds to the fast form with higher affinity. Hence, the slow-->fast transition is a key component of molecular recognition of hirudin by thrombin. We propose a three-step mechanism for molecular recognition of hirudin by thrombin, which is also relevant for recognition of fibrinogen and possibly the platelet receptor and thrombomodulin. First, the C-terminal acidic tail of hirudin binds to the fibrinogen recognition site of thrombin displacing one Cl ion from the thrombin surface. Then, the enzyme undergoes a conformational transition that gives rise to increased accessibility of the catalytic pocket to small synthetic substrates through movement of the Trp148 loop. The changes in the catalytic moiety triggered allosterically by binding to the fibrinogen recognition site are linked to the uptake of Na+ and are similar to, if not identical with, those observed in the Na(+)-induced slow-->fast transition. Finally, the compact N-terminal domain is accommodated in the region surrounding the catalytic pocket. Hirudin binding is also used as a probe of site-specific ion-binding interactions of Na+ and Cl- with the enzyme, characterized by cooperativity between the Na+ and Cl- binding domains. The structural components directly involved or linked to Na+ and Cl- binding have been explored in terms of free energy perturbations of the binding of hirudin and a number of ligands. The fibrinogen recognition site stores most of the free energy of coupling with Cl- binding, while regions surrounding the access to the catalytic pocket provide most of the free energy of coupling

  10. Improved slow-light performance of 10 Gb/s NRZ, PSBT and DPSK signals in fiber broadband SBS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lilin; Jaouen, Yves; Hu, Weisheng; Su, Yikai; Bigo, Sébastien

    2007-12-10

    We have demonstrated error-free operations of slow-light via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fiber for 10-Gb/s signals with different modulation formats, including non-return-to-zero (NRZ), phase-shaped binary transmission (PSBT) and differential phase-shiftkeying (DPSK). The SBS gain bandwidth is broadened by using current noise modulation of the pump laser diode. The gain shape is simply controlled by the noise density function. Super-Gaussian noise modulation of the Brillouin pump allows a flat-top and sharp-edge SBS gain spectrum, which can reduce slow-light induced distortion in case of 10-Gb/s NRZ signal. The corresponding maximal delay-time with error-free operation is 35 ps. Then we propose the PSBT format to minimize distortions resulting from SBS filtering effect and dispersion accompanied with slow light because of its high spectral efficiency and strong dispersion tolerance. The sensitivity of the 10-Gb/s PSBT signal is 5.2 dB better than the NRZ case with a same 35-ps delay. The maximal delay of 51 ps with error-free operation has been achieved. Futhermore, the DPSK format is directly demodulated through a Gaussian-shaped SBS gain, which is achieved using Gaussian-noise modulation of the Brillouin pump. The maximal error-free time delay after demodulation of a 10-Gb/s DPSK signal is as high as 81.5 ps, which is the best demonstrated result for 10-Gb/s slow-light.

  11. Beam steering using optical parametric amplification in Kerr medium: a space-time analogy of parametric slow-light.

    PubMed

    Fanjoux, Gil; Lantz, Eric; Michaud, Jérémy; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2012-11-19

    In a way analogous to a light pulse that can be optically delayed via slow light propagation in Kerr-type nonlinear media, we theoretically demonstrate that beam steering and spatial walk-off compensation can be achieved in noncollinear optical parametric amplification. We identify this effect as a result of the quadratic phase shift induced by parametric amplification that leads to the cancellation of the spatial walk-off and collinear propagation of all beams though they have different wavevectors. Experimental evidence is reported of a soliton array steering in a Kerr slab waveguide.

  12. Sniff rhythm-paced fast and slow gamma-oscillations in the olfactory bulb: relation to tufted and mitral cells and behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Hiroyuki; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-10-01

    Odor signals are conveyed from the olfactory bulb (OB) to the olfactory cortex by two types of projection neurons, tufted cells and mitral cells, which differ in signal timing and firing frequency in response to odor inhalation. Whereas tufted cells respond with early-onset high-frequency burst discharges starting at the middle of the inhalation phase of sniff, mitral cells show odor responses with later-onset lower-frequency burst discharges. Since odor inhalation induces prominent gamma-oscillations of local field potentials (LFPs) in the OB during the transition period from inhalation to exhalation that accompany synchronized spike discharges of tufted cells and mitral cells, we addressed the question of whether the odor-induced gamma-oscillations encompass two distinct gamma-oscillatory sources, tufted cell and mitral cell subsystems, by simultaneously recording the sniff rhythms and LFPs in the OB of freely behaving rats. We observed that individual sniffs induced nested gamma-oscillations with two distinct parts during the inhalation-exhalation transition period: early-onset fast gamma-oscillations followed by later-onset slow gamma-oscillations. These results suggest that tufted cells carry odor signals with early-onset fast gamma-synchronization at the early phase of sniff, whereas mitral cells send them with later-onset slow gamma-synchronization. We also observed that each sniff typically induced both fast and slow gamma-oscillations during awake, whereas respiration during slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye-movement sleep failed to induce these oscillations. These results suggest that behavioral states regulate the generation of sniff rhythm-paced fast and slow gamma-oscillations in the OB.

  13. Effects of blockade of fast and slow inward current channels on ventricular fibrillation in the pig heart.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. J.; Allen, J. D.; Devine, A. B.; Adgey, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of fast and slow inward channels to the electrocardiogram (ECG) of ventricular fibrillation. METHODS: Ventricular fibrillation was induced by endocardial electrical stimulation in pigs anaesthetised with pentobarbitone sodium (30 mg/kg intravenously). ECGs simultaneously recorded from the body surface (lead II) and from the endocardium were studied by power spectrum analysis (0-40 Hz). RESULTS: The mean (SEM) dominant frequency of fibrillation (9.0 (1.1) Hz in lead II at 0-40 s) did not change significantly with time in pigs given intravenous saline. However, the dominant frequency was significantly reduced by intravenous pretreatment with the class I antiarrhythmic drugs, lignocaine (3 mg/kg, 6.5 (0.5) Hz; 10 mg/kg, 4.2 (0.6) Hz), mexiletine (3 mg/kg, 6.2 (0.4) Hz; 10 mg/kg, 5.5 (0.4) Hz), and disopyramide (2.5 mg/kg, 5.4 (0.6) Hz). After flecainide (3 mg/kg, 6.9 (0.5) Hz) the reduction in frequency was not significant. Similar data were obtained with endocardial recordings. In contrast pre-treatment with verapamil (0.2 mg/kg, 11.7 (0.8) Hz; and 1.0 mg/kg, 12.9 (1.6) Hz) produced a significantly higher dominant frequency of fibrillation than saline and widened the bandwidth of frequencies around the dominant frequency. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that voltage-dependent sodium channel currents contribute to the rapid frequencies of ventricular fibrillation. Blockade of L-type inward calcium channel activity increases the fibrillation frequency and fractionates the frequencies of the fibrillation wavefronts. PMID:9014801

  14. Magnesium Sensitizes Slow Vacuolar Channels to Physiological Cytosolic Calcium and Inhibits Fast Vacuolar Channels in Fava Bean Guard Cell Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Pei; Ward; Schroeder

    1999-11-01

    Vacuolar ion channels in guard cells play important roles during stomatal movement and are regulated by many factors including Ca(2+), calmodulin, protein kinases, and phosphatases. We report that physiological cytosolic and luminal Mg(2+) levels strongly regulate vacuolar ion channels in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells. Luminal Mg(2+) inhibited fast vacuolar (FV) currents with a K(i) of approximately 0.23 mM in a voltage-dependent manner at positive potentials on the cytoplasmic side. Cytosolic Mg(2+) at 1 mM also inhibited FV currents. Furthermore, in the absence of cytosolic Mg(2+), cytosolic Ca(2+) at less than 10 µM did not activate slow vacuolar (SV) currents. However, when cytosolic Mg(2+) was present, submicromolar concentrations of cytosolic Ca(2+) activated SV currents with a K(d) of approximately 227 nM, suggesting a synergistic Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) effect. The activation potential of SV currents was shifted toward physiological potentials in the presence of cytosolic Mg(2+) concentrations. The direction of SV currents could also be changed from outward to both outward and inward currents. Our data predict a model for SV channel regulation, including a cytosolic binding site for Ca(2+) with an affinity in the submicromolar range and a cytosolic low-affinity Mg(2+)-Ca(2+) binding site. SV channels are predicted to contain a third binding site on the vacuolar luminal side, which binds Ca(2+) and is inhibitory. In conclusion, cytosolic Mg(2+) sensitizes SV channels to physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Furthermore, we propose that cytosolic and vacuolar Mg(2+) concentrations ensure that FV channels do not function as a continuous vacuolar K(+) leak, which would prohibit stomatal opening.

  15. Denervation produces different single fiber phenotypes in fast- and slow-twitch hindlimb muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M F; Stephenson, G M M; Stephenson, D G

    2006-09-01

    Using a single, mechanically skinned fiber approach, we tested the hypothesis that denervation (0 to 50 days) of skeletal muscles that do not overlap in fiber type composition [extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of Long-Evans hooded rats] leads to development of different fiber phenotypes. Denervation (50 day) was accompanied by 1) a marked increase in the proportion of hybrid IIB/D fibers (EDL) and I/IIA fibers (SOL) from 30% to >75% in both muscles, and a corresponding decrease in the proportion of pure fibers expressing only one myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform; 2) complex muscle- and fiber-type specific changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-loading level at physiological pCa approximately 7.1, with EDL fibers displaying more consistent changes than SOL fibers; 3) decrease by approximately 50% in specific force of all fiber types; 4) decrease in sensitivity to Ca(2+), particularly for SOL fibers (by approximately 40%); 5) decrease in the maximum steepness of the force-pCa curves, particularly for the hybrid I/IIA SOL fibers (by approximately 35%); and 6) increased occurrence of biphasic behavior with respect to Sr(2+) activation in SOL fibers, indicating the presence of both slow and fast troponin C isoforms. No fiber types common to the two muscles were detected at any time points (day 7, 21, and 50) after denervation. The results provide strong evidence that not only neural factors, but also the intrinsic properties of a muscle fiber, influence the structural and functional properties of a particular muscle cell and explain important functional changes induced by denervation at both whole muscle and single cell levels.

  16. Quantifying Ca2+ release and inactivation of Ca2+ release in fast- and slow-twitch muscles.

    PubMed

    Barclay, C J

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the Ca(2+) release underlying twitch contractions of mammalian fast- and slow-twitch muscle and to comprehensively describe the transient inactivation of Ca(2+) release following a stimulus. Experiments were performed using bundles of fibres from mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ca(2+) release was quantified from the amount of ATP used to remove Ca(2+) from the myoplasm following stimulation. ATP turnover by crossbridges was blocked pharmacologically (N-benzyl-p-toluenesulphonamide for EDL, blebbistatin for soleus) and muscle heat production was used as an index of Ca(2+) pump ATP turnover. At 20°C, Ca(2+) release in response to a single stimulus was 34 and 84 μmol (kg muscle)(-1) for soleus and EDL, respectively, and increased with temperature (30°C: soleus, 61 μmol kg(-1); EDL, 168 μmol kg(-1)). Delivery of another stimulus within 100 ms of the first produced a smaller Ca(2+) release. The maximum magnitude of the decrease in Ca(2+) release was greater in EDL than soleus. Ca(2+) release recovered with an exponential time course which was faster in EDL (mean time constant at 20°C, 32.1 ms) than soleus (65.6 ms) and faster at 30°C than at 20°C. The amounts of Ca(2+) released and crossbridge cycles performed are consistent with a scheme in which Ca(2+) binding to troponin-C allowed an average of ∼1.7 crossbridge cycles in the two muscles.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide modulates Ca2+-activation of single permeabilized fibres from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats.

    PubMed

    Plant, D R; Lynch, G S; Williams, D A

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of redox modulation on single membrane-permeabilized fibre segments from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of adult rats to determine whether the contractile apparatus was the redox target responsible for the increased contractility of muscles exposed to low concentrations of H2O2. The effects of H2O2 on maximum Ca2+-activated force were dose-dependent with 30 min exposure to 5 mM H2O2 causing a progressive decrease by 22+/-3 and 13+/-2% in soleus and EDL permeabilized muscle fibres, respectively. Lower concentrations of exogenous H2O2 (100 microM and 1 mM) had no effect on maximum Ca2+-activated force. Subsequent exposure to the reductant dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mM, 10 min) fully reversed the H2O2-induced depression of force in EDL, but not in soleus muscle fibres. Incubation with DTT alone for 10 min did not alter Ca2+-activated force in either soleus or EDL muscle fibres. The sensitivity of the contractile filaments to Ca2+ (pCa50) was not altered by exposure to any concentration of exogenous H2O2. However, all concentrations of H2O2 diminished the Hill coefficient in permeabilized fibres from the EDL muscle, indicating that the cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to troponin is altered. H2O2 (5 mM) did not affect rigor force, which indicates that the number of crossbridges participating in contraction was not reduced. In conclusion, H2O2 may reduce the maximum Ca2+ activated force production in skinned muscle fibres by decreasing the force per crossbridge.

  18. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Axelsson, M.; Baring, M. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Iyyani, S.; Kocevski, D. E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov E-mail: baring@rice.edu; and others

    2014-03-20

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  19. Slow VO2 off-kinetics in skeletal muscle is associated with fast PCr off-kinetics--and inversely.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2013-09-01

    The computer model of the bioenergetic system in skeletal muscle, developed previously, was used to study the effect of the characteristic decay time of the parallel activation of oxidative phosphorylation [τ(OFF)] during muscle recovery on the muscle oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) work-to-rest transition (off)-kinetics and on the relationship between the Vo2 and PCr rest-to-work transition (on)- and off-kinetics in moderate and heavy exercise. An increase in τ(OFF) slows down the initial phase of the muscle Vo2 off-kinetics and accelerates the PCr off-kinetics. As a result, the relationship between the initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics (lasting approximately 3-60 s in computer simulations) and the PCr off-kinetics is inverse: the slower the former, the faster the latter. A faster initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics is associated with a slower late phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics, and as a result, the integral of Vo2 above baseline during recovery, representing the oxygen debt, is identical in all cases [values of τ(OFF)] for a given PCr decrease. Depending on τ(OFF), the muscle Vo2 on-kinetics was either equally fast or slower than the Vo2 off-kinetics in moderate exercise and always slower in heavy exercise. PCr on-kinetics was always faster than PCr off-kinetics. This study clearly demonstrates that τ(OFF) has a pronounced impact on the mutual relations between the muscle Vo2 and PCr on- and off-kinetics.

  20. In Vivo Molecular Responses of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibers to Lipopolysaccharide in a Teleost Fish, the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Leonardo J.; Roher, Nerea; Crespo, Diego; Krasnov, Aleksei; Planas, Josep V.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological consequences of the activation of the immune system in skeletal muscle in fish are not completely understood. To study the consequences of the activation of the immune system by bacterial pathogens on skeletal muscle function, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an active component of Gram-negative bacteria, in rainbow trout and performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in skeletal muscle. We examined changes in gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscle in rainbow trout at 24 and 72 h after LPS treatment (8 mg/kg) by microarray analysis. At the transcriptional level, we observed important changes in metabolic, mitochondrial and structural genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle. In slow skeletal muscle, LPS caused marked changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, while in fast skeletal muscle LPS administration caused major changes in the expression of genes coding for glycolytic enzymes. We also evaluated the effects of LPS administration on the fast skeletal muscle proteome and identified 14 proteins that were differentially induced in LPS-treated trout, primarily corresponding to glycolytic enzymes. Our results evidence a robust and tissue-specific response of skeletal muscle to an acute inflammatory challenge, affecting energy utilization and possibly growth in rainbow trout. PMID:25658438

  1. A preliminary investigation comparing one and eight channels at fast and slow rates on music appraisal in adults with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tyler, R S; Gfeller, K; Mehr, M A

    2000-09-01

    Music perception is important to cochlear implant patients, but little effort has been devoted to improving signal processing for music. In this preliminary investigation, we probed the importance of number of channels and stimulus rate. We asked eight users of the Clarion cochlear implant to rate music quality on a scale from 0 to 100 on three different types of music (country and western, pop and classical). Patients rated eight- and one-channel processors running at a fast and slow rate. The stimulus rate was 200 pps for the slow rate. For the eight-channel condition, the fast rate varied from 394 to 765 pps. For the one-channel condition, the fast rate varied from 2601 to 4335 pps. Results indicated that the eight-channel condition was uniformly rated higher than the one-channel condition. However, the results for stimulus rate were less clear. No patients assigned higher ratings with the slow rate, but only three subjects assigned higher ratings with the fast rate. We conclude that music perception can be influenced and probably improved by signal processing. The number of channels, or perhaps spectral representation, is critical for music appreciation by cochlear implant recipients.

  2. Fast white-light interferometry with Hilbert transform evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavliček, Pavel; Mikeska, Erik

    2016-12-01

    White-light interferometry is an established method for the measurement of the shape of objects. Unlike to the classical interferometry, white-light interferometry can measure the shape of objects with rough surface. A major disadvantage of white-light interferometry is the low scanning speed and thus the long measurement time. This disadvantage can be overcome by a strong undersampling and Hilbert transform evaluation. We propose a system that measures the shape of objects with rough surface with the scanning speed of more than 100 μm/s with the standard frame rate of 25 fps. The measurement uncertainty is comparable with that obtained with standard design.

  3. Effects of fast and slow squat exercises on the muscle activity of the paretic lower extremity in patients with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the speed of squat exercises on paretic lower extremity muscle activity in patients with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Ten stroke patients performed fast and slow squat exercises for 2 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. The muscle activities of the paretic and non-paretic sides of the rectus femoris muscle, the biceps femoris muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle were assessed and compared using surface electromyography. [Results] The paretic side of the rectus femoris muscle showed statistically significant differences in the fast squat exercise group, which demonstrated the highest muscle activity during the rapid return to the upright position. [Conclusion] The rectus femoris muscle showed the highest muscle activity during the return to the upright position during the fast squat exercise, which indicates that the rectus femoris muscle is highly active during the fast squat exercise. PMID:26356385

  4. Effects of fast and slow squat exercises on the muscle activity of the paretic lower extremity in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Yeop

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the speed of squat exercises on paretic lower extremity muscle activity in patients with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Ten stroke patients performed fast and slow squat exercises for 2 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. The muscle activities of the paretic and non-paretic sides of the rectus femoris muscle, the biceps femoris muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle were assessed and compared using surface electromyography. [Results] The paretic side of the rectus femoris muscle showed statistically significant differences in the fast squat exercise group, which demonstrated the highest muscle activity during the rapid return to the upright position. [Conclusion] The rectus femoris muscle showed the highest muscle activity during the return to the upright position during the fast squat exercise, which indicates that the rectus femoris muscle is highly active during the fast squat exercise.

  5. The fast and slow kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction in plants, algae and cyanobacteria: a viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, George C; Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2007-01-01

    The light-induced/dark-reversible changes in the chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence of photosynthetic cells and membranes in the mus-to-several min time window (fluorescence induction, FI; or Kautsky transient) reflect quantum yield changes (quenching/de-quenching) as well as changes in the number of Chls a in photosystem II (PS II; state transitions). Both relate to excitation trapping in PS II and the ensuing photosynthetic electron transport (PSET), and to secondary PSET effects, such as ion translocation across thylakoid membranes and filling or depletion of post-PS II and post-PS I pools of metabolites. In addition, high actinic light doses may depress Chl a fluorescence irreversibly (photoinhibitory lowering; q(I)). FI has been studied quite extensively in plants an algae (less so in cyanobacteria) as it affords a low resolution panoramic view of the photosynthesis process. Total FI comprises two transients, a fast initial (OPS; for Origin, Peak, Steady state) and a second slower transient (SMT; for Steady state, Maximum, Terminal state), whose details are characteristically different in eukaryotic (plants and algae) and prokaryotic (cyanobacteria) oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. In the former, maximal fluorescence output occurs at peak P, with peak M lying much lower or being absent, in which case the PSMT phases are replaced by a monotonous PT fluorescence decay. In contrast, in phycobilisome (PBS)-containing cyanobacteria maximal fluorescence occurs at M which lies much higher than peak P. It will be argued that this difference is caused by a fluorescence lowering trend (state 1 --> 2 transition) that dominates the FI pattern of plants and algae, and correspondingly by a fluorescence increasing trend (state 2 --> 1 transition) that dominates the FI of PBS-containing cyanobacteria. Characteristically, however, the FI pattern of the PBS-minus cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina resembles the FI patterns of algae and plants and not of the PBS

  6. Effect of spaceflight on the maximal shortening velocity, morphology, and enzyme profile of fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; De La Cruz, L.; Widrick, J. J.; Desplanches, D.

    2000-01-01

    Weightlessness has been shown to cause limb muscle wasting and a reduced peak force and power in the antigravity soleus muscle. Despite a reduced peak power, Caiozzo et al. observed an increased maximal shortening velocity in the rat soleus muscle following a 14-day space flight. The major purpose of the present investigation was to determine if weightlessness induced an elevated velocity in the antigravity slow type I fibers of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), as well as to establish a cellular mechanism for the effect. Spaceflight or models of weightlessness have been shown to increase glucose uptake, elevate muscle glycogen content, and increase fatigability of the soleus muscle. The latter appears to be in part caused by a reduced ability of the slow oxidative fibers to oxidize fats. A second goal of this study was to establish the extent to which weightlessness altered the substrate profile and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme capacity of individual slow- and fast-twitch fibers.

  7. Comparisons of the Effects of Elevated Vapor Pressure Deficit on Gene Expression in Leaves among Two Fast-Wilting and a Slow-Wilting Soybean.

    PubMed

    Devi, Mura Jyostna; Sinclair, Thomas R; Taliercio, Earl

    2015-01-01

    Limiting the transpiration rate (TR) of a plant under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) has the potential to improve crop yield under drought conditions. The effects of elevated VPD on the expression of genes in the leaves of three soybean accessions, Plant Introduction (PI) 416937, PI 471938 and Hutcheson (PI 518664) were investigated because these accessions have contrasting responses to VPD changes. Hutcheson, a fast-wilting soybean, and PI 471938, a slow-wilting soybean, respond to increased VPD with a linear increase in TR. TR of the slow-wilting PI 416937 is limited when VPD increases to greater than about 2 kPa. The objective of this study was to identify the response of the transcriptome of these accessions to elevated VPD under well-watered conditions and identify responses that are unique to the slow-wilting accessions. Gene expression analysis in leaves of genotypes PI 471938 and Hutcheson showed that 22 and 1 genes, respectively, were differentially expressed under high VPD. In contrast, there were 944 genes differentially expressed in PI 416937 with the same increase in VPD. The increased alteration of the transcriptome of PI 416937 in response to elevated VPD clearly distinguished it from the other slow-wilting PI 471938 and the fast-wilting Hutcheson. The inventory and analysis of differentially expressed genes in PI 416937 in response to VPD is a foundation for further investigation to extend the current understanding of plant hydraulic conductivity in drought environments.

  8. Initiation of the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament by Localized Emerging Magnetic Field via Microflaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    EUV data from EIT show that a filament of 2001 February 28 underwent a slow-rise phase lasting about 6 hrs, before rapidly erupting in a fast-rise phase. Concurrent images in soft X-rays (SXRs) from Yohkoh/SXT show that a series of three microflares, prominent in SXT images but weak in EIT approx.195 Ang EUV images, occurred near one end of the filament. The first and last microflares occurred respectively in conjunction with the start of the slow-rise phase and the start of the fast-rise phase, and the second microflare corresponded to a kink in the filament trajectory. Beginning within 10 hours of the start of the slow rise, new magnetic flux emerged at the location of the microflaring. This localized new flux emergence and the resulting microflares, consistent with reconnection between the emerging field and the sheared sigmoid core magnetic field holding the filament, apparently caused the slow rise of this field and the transition to explosive eruption. For the first time in such detail, the observations show this direct action of localized emerging flux in the progressive destabilization of a sheared core field in the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME). Similar processes may have occurred in other recently-studied events, NASA supported this work through NASA SR&T and SEC GI grants.

  9. Fast mapping algorithm of lighting spectrum and GPS coordinates for a large area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Ke-Fang; Hwang, Jung-Min

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we propose a fast rebuild technology for evaluating light quality in large areas. Outdoor light quality, which is measured by illuminance uniformity and the color rendering index, is difficult to conform after improvement. We develop an algorithm for a lighting quality mapping system and coordinates using a micro spectrometer and GPS tracker integrated with a quadcopter or unmanned aerial vehicle. After cruising at a constant altitude, lighting quality data is transmitted and immediately mapped to evaluate the light quality in a large area.

  10. Light phase-restricted feeding slows basal heart rate to exaggerate the type-3 long QT syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Burgess, Don E; Manning, Cody L; Zhao, Yihua; Moss, Arthur J; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Elayi, Claude S; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2014-12-15

    Long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) is caused by mutations in the SCN5A-encoded Nav1.5 channel. LQT3 patients exhibit time of day-associated abnormal increases in their heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals and risk for life-threatening episodes. This study determines the effects of uncoupling environmental time cues that entrain circadian rhythms (time of light and time of feeding) on heart rate and ventricular repolarization in wild-type (WT) or transgenic LQT3 mice (Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ)). We used an established light phase-restricted feeding paradigm that disrupts the alignment among the circadian rhythms in the central pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues including heart. Circadian analysis of the RR and QT intervals showed the Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice had QT rhythms with larger amplitudes and 24-h midline means and a more pronounced slowing of the heart rate. For both WT and Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice, light phase-restricted feeding shifted the RR and QT rhythms ~12 h, increased their amplitudes greater than twofold, and raised the 24-h midline mean by ~10%. In contrast to WT mice, the QTc interval in Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice exhibited time-of-day prolongation that was flipped after light phase-restricted feeding. The time-of-day changes in the QTc intervals of Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice were secondary to a steeper power relation between their QT and RR intervals. We conclude that uncoupling time of feeding from normal light cues can dramatically slow heart rate to unmask genotype-specific differences in the QT intervals and aggravate the LQT3-related phenotype.

  11. Graphene based silicon-air grating structure to realize electromagnetically-induced-transparency and slow light effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Buzheng; Liu, Huaiqing; Ren, Guobin; Yang, Yuguang; Ye, Shen; Pei, Li; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-01-01

    A broad band tunable graphene based silicon-air grating structure is proposed. Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) window can be successfully tuned by virtually setting the desired Fermi energy levels on graphene sheets. Carrier mobility plays an important role in modulating the resonant depth. Furthermore, by changing the grating periods, light can be trapped at corresponding resonant positions where slow down factor is relatively larger than in the previous works. This structure can be used as a highly tunable optoelectronic device such as optical filter, broad-band modulator, plasmonic switches and buffers.

  12. Ultracompact 160 Gbaud all-optical demultiplexing exploiting slow light in an engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Bill; Pelusi, Mark D; Monat, Christelle; Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate all-optical demultiplexing of a high-bandwidth, time-division multiplexed 160 Gbit/s signal to 10 Gbit/s channels, exploiting slow light enhanced four-wave mixing in a dispersion engineered, 96 μm long planar photonic crystal waveguide. We report error-free (bit error rate<10⁻⁹) operation of all 16 demultiplexed channels, with a power penalty of 2.2-2.4 dB, highlighting the potential of these structures as a platform for ultracompact all-optical nonlinear processes.

  13. A laboratory analogue of the event horizon using slow light in an atomic medium.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2002-01-24

    Singularities underlie many optical phenomena. The rainbow, for example, involves a particular type of singularity-a ray catastrophe-in which light rays become infinitely intense. In practice, the wave nature of light resolves these infinities, producing interference patterns. At the event horizon of a black hole, time stands still and waves oscillate with infinitely small wavelengths. However, the quantum nature of light results in evasion of the catastrophe and the emission of Hawking radiation. Here I report a theoretical laboratory analogue of an event horizon: a parabolic profile of the group velocity of light brought to a standstill in an atomic medium can cause a wave singularity similar to that associated with black holes. In turn, the quantum vacuum is forced to create photon pairs with a characteristic spectrum, a phenomenon related to Hawking radiation. The idea may initiate a theory of 'quantum' catastrophes, extending classical catastrophe theory.

  14. The Selective Nav1.7 Inhibitor, PF-05089771, Interacts Equivalently with Fast and Slow Inactivated Nav1.7 Channels.

    PubMed

    Theile, Jonathan W; Fuller, Matthew D; Chapman, Mark L

    2016-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel inhibitors are used clinically as analgesics and local anesthetics. However, the absence of Nav channel isoform selectivity of current treatment options can result in adverse cardiac and central nervous system side effects, limiting their therapeutic utility. Human hereditary gain- or loss-of-pain disorders have demonstrated an essential role of Nav1.7 sodium channels in the sensation of pain, thus making this channel an attractive target for new pain therapies. We previously identified a novel, state-dependent human Nav1.7 selective inhibitor (PF-05089771, IC50 = 11 nM) that interacts with the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of domain IV. We further characterized the state-dependent interaction of PF-05089771 by systematically varying the voltage, frequency, and duration of conditioning prepulses to provide access to closed, open, and fast- or slow-inactivated states. The current study demonstrates that PF-05089771 exhibits a slow onset of block that is depolarization and concentration dependent, with a similarly slow recovery from block. Furthermore, the onset of block by PF-05089771 develops with similar rates using protocols that bias channels into predominantly fast- or slow-inactivated states, suggesting that channel inhibition is less dependent on the availability of a particular inactivated state than the relative time that the channel is depolarized. Taken together, the inhibitory profile of PF-05089771 suggests that a conformational change in the domain IV VSD after depolarization is necessary and sufficient to reveal a high-affinity binding site with which PF-05089771 interacts, stabilizing the channel in a nonconducting conformation from which recovery is slow.

  15. Differential epigenetic modifications of histones at the myosin heavy chain genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers and in response to muscle unloading.

    PubMed

    Pandorf, Clay E; Haddad, Fadia; Wright, Carola; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in chromatin biology have enhanced our understanding of gene regulation. It is now widely appreciated that gene regulation is dependent upon post-translational modifications to the histones which package genes in the nucleus of cells. Active genes are known to be associated with acetylation of histones (H3ac) and trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined histone modifications at the myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes expressed in fast vs. slow fiber-type skeletal muscle, and in a model of muscle unloading, which results in a shift to fast MHC gene expression in slow muscles. Both H3ac and H3K4me3 varied directly with the transcriptional activity of the MHC genes in fast fiber-type plantaris and slow fiber-type soleus. During MHC transitions with muscle unloading, histone H3 at the type I MHC becomes de-acetylated in correspondence with down-regulation of that gene, while upregulation of the fast type IIx and IIb MHCs occurs in conjunction with enhanced H3ac in those MHCs. Enrichment of H3K4me3 is also increased at the type IIx and IIb MHCs when these genes are induced with muscle unloading. Downregulation of IIa MHC, however, was not associated with corresponding loss of H3ac or H3K4me3. These observations demonstrate the feasibility of using the ChIP assay to understand the native chromatin environment in adult skeletal muscle, and also suggest that the transcriptional state of types I, IIx and IIb MHC genes are sensitive to histone modifications both in different muscle fiber-types and in response to altered loading states.

  16. Characteristics of slow and fast phases of the optocollic reflex (OCR) in head free pigeons (Columba livia): influence of flight behaviour.

    PubMed

    Gioanni, H; Sansonetti, A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of behavioural context on the properties of slow and fast phases of the horizontal optocollic reflex (OCR) were investigated in head free pigeons for two situations, i.e.: (i) animals were hung in a harness ('resting condition'); (ii) animals were additionally submitted to a frontal airflow that provoked a flight posture ('flying condition') [Bilo and Bilo (1983) J. Comp. Physiol., 153, 111]. A 'transient flight' was also provoked in the 'resting condition' by tapping the breastbone region. Stimuli consisted either of velocity steps (30-300 degrees/s) or of an increasing velocity stimulus (0-300 degrees/s). The amplitude of nystagmic beats and the OCR gain increased in the 'flying condition' and during 'transient flight' as compared to the 'resting condition'. The OCR working range was considerably extended toward high velocities by the flying behaviour. In the 'resting condition', spontaneous head oscillations generally triggered a high-gain OCR, close to that obtained in the 'flying condition'. One-third of the animals showed a higher gain in response to an increasing velocity stimulus than with step stimuli, in the high velocity range. The linear relation between amplitude and peak velocity of OCR fast phases was independent of the stimulation velocity in the 'resting condition', whereas the amplitude and peak velocity increased with the stimulation velocity in the 'flying condition'. In this condition, the fast phase velocity was correlated with the slow phase velocity, but not with the retinal slip velocity. Thus, both the slow and fast phases of the OCR are dependent on the behavioural context.

  17. Design and analysis of single-mode tellurite photonic crystal fibers for stimulated Brillouin scattering based slow-light generation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Varsha; Sharma, Shubham; Saini, Than Singh; Kumar, Ajeet; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically examine two designs of single-mode (i) Er-doped tellurite and (ii) undoped tellurite photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for generation of slow light with tunable features based on stimulated Brillouin scattering. We obtained (i) Brillouin gain up to 91 dB and time delay of ∼145  ns at maximum allowable pump power of ∼775  mW in a 2 m Er-doped tellurite PCF and (ii) Brillouin gain up to ∼88  dB and time delay of ∼154  ns at maximum allowable pump power ∼21  mW in a 100 m undoped tellurite photonic crystal fiber. Simulated results clearly indicate that the doped tellurite PCF with Er enhances the maximum allowable pump power and comparable time delay can be obtained even with reduced photonic crystal fiber length. We believe that the carried out examination and simulation have potential impact on design and development of slow-light-based photonic devices applicable in telecommunication systems, enhancement of optical forces, and quantum computing.

  18. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  19. A versatile and light-weight slow control system for small-scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, P.; Bütikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; von Sivers, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present an open source slow control system for small and medium scale projects. Thanks to its modular and flexible design, where the various instruments are read and controlled by independent plugins, Doberman (Detector OBsERving and Monitoring ApplicatioN) can be quickly adapted for many applications, also making use of existing code or proprietary components. The system uses a SQL database to store the data from the instruments and provides an online application to display and browse through the data. It allows the modification of device settings while the program is running and features a protocol to handle exceptions, including the automated distribution of alarm messages. We present two case studies from astroparticle physics, on which Doberman is successfully deployed: a low-background screening facility installed in a remote underground laboratory and a detector R&D platform using cryogenic liquid xenon.

  20. Mathematical analysis of depolarization block mediated by slow inactivation of fast sodium channels in midbrain dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Kun; Yu, Na; Tucker, Kristal R.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurons in freely moving rats often fire behaviorally relevant high-frequency bursts, but depolarization block limits the maximum steady firing rate of dopamine neurons in vitro to ∼10 Hz. Using a reduced model that faithfully reproduces the sodium current measured in these neurons, we show that adding an additional slow component of sodium channel inactivation, recently observed in these neurons, qualitatively changes in two different ways how the model enters into depolarization block. First, the slow time course of inactivation allows multiple spikes to be elicited during a strong depolarization prior to entry into depolarization block. Second, depolarization block occurs near or below the spike threshold, which ranges from −45 to −30 mV in vitro, because the additional slow component of inactivation negates the sodium window current. In the absence of the additional slow component of inactivation, this window current produces an N-shaped steady-state current-voltage (I-V) curve that prevents depolarization block in the experimentally observed voltage range near −40 mV. The time constant of recovery from slow inactivation during the interspike interval limits the maximum steady firing rate observed prior to entry into depolarization block. These qualitative features of the entry into depolarization block can be reversed experimentally by replacing the native sodium conductance with a virtual conductance lacking the slow component of inactivation. We show that the activation of NMDA and AMPA receptors can affect bursting and depolarization block in different ways, depending upon their relative contributions to depolarization versus to the total linear/nonlinear conductance. PMID:25185810

  1. Master equation approach for interacting slow- and stationary-light polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Kiffner, M.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2010-09-15

    A master equation approach for the description of dark-state polaritons in coherently driven atomic media is presented. This technique provides a description of light-matter interactions under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) that is well suited for the treatment of polariton losses. The master equation approach allows us to describe general polariton-polariton interactions that may be conservative, dissipative, or a mixture of both. In particular, it enables us to study dissipation-induced correlations as a means for the creation of strongly correlated polariton systems. Our technique reveals a loss mechanism for stationary-light polaritons that has not been discussed so far. We find that polariton losses in level configurations with nondegenerate ground states can be a multiple of those in level schemes with degenerate ground states.

  2. Light sleep versus slow wave sleep in memory consolidation: a question of global versus local processes?

    PubMed

    Genzel, Lisa; Kroes, Marijn C W; Dresler, Martin; Battaglia, Francesco P

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is strongly involved in memory consolidation, but its role remains unclear. 'Sleep replay', the active potentiation of relevant synaptic connections via reactivation of patterns of network activity that occurred during previous experience, has received considerable attention. Alternatively, sleep has been suggested to regulate synaptic weights homeostatically and nonspecifically, thereby improving the signal:noise ratio of memory traces. Here, we reconcile these theories by highlighting the distinction between light and deep nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Specifically, we draw on recent studies to suggest a link between light NREM and active potentiation, and between deep NREM and homeostatic regulation. This framework could serve as a key for interpreting the physiology of sleep stages and reconciling inconsistencies in terminology in this field.

  3. Leading edge vortices in lesser long-nosed bats occurring at slow but not fast flight speeds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Christoffer Johansson, L; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Slow and hovering animal flight creates high demands on the lift production of animal wings. Steady state aerodynamics is unable to explain the forces required and the most commonly used mechanism to enhance the lift production is a leading edge vortex (LEV). Although LEVs increase the lift, they come at the cost of high drag. Here we determine the flow above the wing of lesser long-nosed bats at slow and cruising speed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that a prominent LEV is present during the downstroke at slow speed, but not at cruising speed. Comparison with previously published LEV data from a robotic flapper inspired by lesser long-nosed bats suggests that bats should be able to generate LEVs at cruising speeds, but that they avoid doing so, probably to increase flight efficiency. In addition, at slow flight speeds we find LEVs of opposite spin at the inner and outer wing during the upstroke, potentially providing a control challenge to the animal. We also note that the LEV stays attached to the wing throughout the downstoke and does not show the complex structures found in insects. This suggests that bats are able to control the development of the LEV and potential control mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Field-programmable gate array based arbitrary signal generator and oscilloscope for use in slow light and storage of light experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Stanko N.; Batić, Viktor; Panić, Bratimir; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based device that simultaneously generates two arbitrary analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 1.25 MHz and acquires two analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 2.5 MHz. All signals are synchronized with internal FPGA clock. The personal computer application developed for controlling and communicating with FPGA chip provides the shaping of the output signals by mathematical expressions and real-time monitoring of the input signals. The main advantages of FPGA based digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital cards are high speed, rapid reconfigurability, friendly user interface, and low cost. We use this module in slow light and storage of light experiments performed in Rb buffer gas cell.

  5. Field-programmable gate array based arbitrary signal generator and oscilloscope for use in slow light and storage of light experiments.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Stanko N; Batić, Viktor; Panić, Bratimir; Jelenković, Branislav M

    2013-06-01

    We present a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based device that simultaneously generates two arbitrary analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 1.25 MHz and acquires two analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 2.5 MHz. All signals are synchronized with internal FPGA clock. The personal computer application developed for controlling and communicating with FPGA chip provides the shaping of the output signals by mathematical expressions and real-time monitoring of the input signals. The main advantages of FPGA based digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital cards are high speed, rapid reconfigurability, friendly user interface, and low cost. We use this module in slow light and storage of light experiments performed in Rb buffer gas cell.

  6. A neuro-mechanical model of a single leg joint highlighting the basic physiological role of fast and slow muscle fibres of an insect muscle system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1) positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2) the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3) there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles.

  7. In situ hybridisation of a large repertoire of muscle-specific transcripts in fish larvae: the new superficial slow-twitch fibres exhibit characteristics of fast-twitch differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, F; Ralliere, C; Cauty, C; Rescan, P Y

    2006-01-01

    Much of the present information on muscle differentiation in fish concerns the early embryonic stages. To learn more about the maturation and the diversification of the fish myotomal fibres in later stages of ontogeny, we investigated, by means of in situ hybridisation, the developmental expression of a large repertoire of muscle-specific genes in trout larvae from hatching to yolk resorption. At hatching, transcripts for fast and slow muscle protein isoforms, namely myosins, tropomyosins, troponins and myosin binding protein C were present in the deep fast and the superficial slow areas of the myotome, respectively. During myotome expansion that follows hatching, the expression of fast isoforms became progressively confined to the borders of the fast muscle mass, whereas, in contrast, slow muscle isoform transcripts were uniformly expressed in all the slow fibres. Transcripts for several enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism such as citrate synthase, cytochrome oxidase component IV and succinate dehydrogenase, were present throughout the whole myotome of hatching embryos but in later stages became concentrated in slow fibre as well as in lateral fast fibres. Surprisingly, the slow fibres that are added externally to the single superficial layer of the embryonic (original) slow muscle fibres expressed not only slow twitch muscle isoforms but also, transiently, a subset of fast twitch muscle isoforms including MyLC1, MyLC3, MyHC and myosin binding protein C. Taken together these observations show that the growth of the myotome of the fish larvae is associated with complex patterns of muscular gene expression and demonstrate the unexpected presence of fast muscle isoform-expressing fibres in the most superficial part of the slow muscle.

  8. Long-Time Variation of Magnetic Structure in (PrxLa1-x)Co2Si2: Coexistence of Slow and Fast Processes in Magnetic Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Hagihala, Masato; Shigeoka, Toru; Pajerowski, Daniel; Matsuda, Masaaki

    2017-04-01

    Long-time variations of the magnetic structure in PrCo2Si2 and (Pr0.98La0.02)Co2Si2 were studied by magnetization and time-resolved neutron scattering measurements. The amplitudes of magnetic Bragg peaks showed marked time variations after cooling or heating across the magnetic transition temperature T1 between two different antiferromagnetic phases. However, the amplitude of the time variation decreased rapidly with increasing distance from T1. We analyzed the results on the basis of a phase transition model that includes the coexistence of fast and slow processes.

  9. Long-Time Variation of Magnetic Structure in (PrxLa1-x)Co2Si2: Coexistence of Slow and Fast Processes in Magnetic Phase Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Hagihala, Masato; Shigeoka, Toru; ...

    2017-03-14

    In this paper, long-time variations of the magnetic structure in PrCo2Si2 and (Pr0.98La0.02)Co2Si2 were studied by magnetization and time-resolved neutron scattering measurements. The amplitudes of magnetic Bragg peaks showed marked time variations after cooling or heating across the magnetic transition temperature T1 between two different antiferromagnetic phases. However, the amplitude of the time variation decreased rapidly with increasing distance from T1. Finally, we analyzed the results on the basis of a phase transition model that includes the coexistence of fast and slow processes.

  10. Vanishing Electronic Energy Loss of Very Slow Light Ions in Insulators with Large Band Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, S. N.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2009-09-11

    Electronic energy loss of light ions in nanometer films of materials with large band gaps has been studied for very low velocities. For LiF, a threshold velocity is observed at 0.1 a.u. (250 eV/u), below which the ions move without transferring energy to the electronic system. For KCl, a lower (extrapolated) threshold velocity is found, identical for H and He ions. For SiO{sub 2}, no clear velocity threshold is observed for He particles. For protons and deuterons, electronic stopping is found to perfectly fulfill velocity scaling, as expected for binary ion-electron interaction.

  11. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2001-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  12. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2000-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  13. Enhancing light slow-down in semiconductor optical amplifiers by optical filtering.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Ohman, Filip; Sales, Salvador; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-05-15

    We show that the degree of light-speed control in a semiconductor optical amplifier can be significantly extended by the introduction of optical filtering. We achieve a phase shift of approximately 150 degrees at 19 GHz modulation frequency, corresponding to a several-fold increase of the absolute phase shift as well as the achievable bandwidth. We show good quantitative agreement with numerical simulations, including the effects of population oscillations and four-wave mixing, and provide a simple physical explanation based on an analytical perturbation approach.

  14. A comparative analysis of phenylpropanoid metabolism, N utilization, and carbon partitioning in fast- and slow-growing Populus hybrid clones

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Scott A.; Jarvie, Michelle M.; Lindroth, Richard L.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthetic costs of phenylpropanoid-derived condensed tannins (CTs) and phenolic glycosides (PGs) are substantial. However, despite reports of negative correlations between leaf phenolic content and growth of Populus, it remains unclear whether or how foliar biosynthesis of CT/PG interferes with tree growth. A comparison was made of carbon partitioning and N content in developmentally staged leaves, stems, and roots of two closely related Populus hybrid genotypes. The genotypes were selected as two of the most phytochemically divergent from a series of seven previously analysed clones that exhibit a range of height growth rates and foliar amino acid, CT, and PG concentrations. The objective was to analyse the relationship between leaf phenolic content and plant growth, using whole-plant carbon partitioning and N distribution data from the two divergent clones. Total N as a percentage of tissue dry mass was comparatively low, and CT and PG accrual comparatively high in leaves of the slow-growing clone. Phenylpropanoid accrual and N content were comparatively high in stems of the slow-growing clone. Carbon partitioning within phenylpropanoid and carbohydrate networks in developing stems differed sharply between clones. The results did not support the idea that foliar production of phenylpropanoid defence chemicals was the primary cause of reduced plant growth in the slow-growing clone. The findings are discussed in the context of metabolic mechanism(s) which may contribute to reduced N delivery from roots to leaves, thereby compromising tree growth and promoting leaf phenolic accrual in the slow-growing clone. PMID:19516073

  15. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  16. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-08-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy.

  17. Broadband true time delay for microwave signal processing, using slow light based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sanghoon; Thévenaz, Luc; Sancho, Juan; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Dolfi, Daniel

    2010-10-11

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel technique to process broadband microwave signals, using all-optically tunable true time delay in optical fibers. The configuration to achieve true time delay basically consists of two main stages: photonic RF phase shifter and slow light, based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in fibers. Dispersion properties of fibers are controlled, separately at optical carrier frequency and in the vicinity of microwave signal bandwidth. This way time delay induced within the signal bandwidth can be manipulated to correctly act as true time delay with a proper phase compensation introduced to the optical carrier. We completely analyzed the generated true time delay as a promising solution to feed phased array antenna for radar systems and to develop dynamically reconfigurable microwave photonic filters.

  18. Theoretical study of the spurious-free dynamic range of a tunable delay line based on slow light in SOA.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2009-10-26

    We developed a predictive model describing harmonic generation and intermodulation distortions in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). This model takes into account the variations of the saturation parameters along the propagation axis inside the SOA, and uses a rigorous expression of the gain oscillations harmonics. We derived the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of a slow light delay line based on coherent population oscillation (CPO) effects, in a frequency range covering radar applications (from 40 kHz up to 30 GHz), and for a large range of injected currents. The influence of the high order distortions in the input microwave spectrum is discussed, and in particular, an interpretation of the SFDR improvement of a Mach-Zehnder modulator by CPOs effects in a SOA is given.

  19. Simultaneous conduction over the fast and slow pathways during induction of atrioventricular nodal reentrant arrhythmia with a rate of less than 100 bpm and infra-His block after radiofrequency ablation of the slow pathway.

    PubMed

    Amasyalı, Basri; Köktürk, Bülent; Otomo, Kiyoshi; Köse, Sedat

    2011-04-01

    Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) is the most common form of paroxysmal regular supraventricular tachycardia in adults. It is typically induced with an anterograde block over the fast pathway (FP) and conduction over the slow pathway (SP), with subsequent retrograde conduction over the FP. Rarely, a simultaneous conduction of a premature atrial complex occurs over the FP and SP to induce AVNRT and is called "one for two phenomenon". We present a 46-year-old woman with atrioventricular nodal rhythm with a rate of 95 beats per minute with distinct electrophysiological characteristics showing simultaneous conduction over the FP and SP during induction of tachycardia and an infra-His block after radiofrequency ablation of the SP.

  20. Phonon-mediated interactions and polaron formation of slow-light polaritons in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Hanna-Lena; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We study the motion of dark-state polaritons (DSP) in a Bose-Einstein condensate. DSPs are formed in an atomic ensemble interacting in a Λ-type configuration with two light fields under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. In particular, we consider the ground-state atoms to form a BEC which can be well described by a macroscopic Gross-Pitaevskii wavefunction. Taking into account the interaction of pairs of ground-state atoms and between ground and spin-state atoms leads to the formation of polaronic quasi-particles consisting of DSPs and Bogoliubov phonons. In additon, the coupling to phonons results into a coupling between dark and bright-state polaritons as well as into phonon-mediated interactions between DSPs.

  1. The First Slow Step: Differential Effects of Object and Word-Form Familiarization on Retention of Fast-Mapped Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucker, Sarah C.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research demonstrated that although 24-month-old infants do well on the initial pairing of a novel word and novel object in fast-mapping tasks, they are unable to retain the mapping after a 5 min delay. The current study examines the role of familiarity with the objects and words on infants' ability to bridge between the initial fast…

  2. Unlocking genetic secrets of the fast/slow growth in rainbow trout with next-generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Fast-growth is the most desired trait affecting the profitability of food animal production including aquaculture species. Traditional phenotype-based selection is typically used to select for growth traits, however, it does not allow for optimal control over all phenotypic characterist...

  3. Fast-slow life history is correlated with individual differences in movements and prey selection in an aquatic predator in the wild.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Rapp, Tobias; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Fast and slow life histories are proposed to covary with consistent individual differences in behaviour, but little is known whether it holds in the wild, where individuals experience natural fluctuations of the environment. We investigated whether individual differences in behaviour, such as movement traits and prey selection, are linked to variation in life-history traits in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) in the wild. Using high-resolution acoustic telemetry, we collected the positional data of fish in a whole natural lake and estimated individual movement traits by fitting a two-state correlated random walk model. Prey selection was inferred from stable isotope analysis using scale samples. Life-history traits were estimated by fitting a biphasic growth model to an individual growth trajectory back-calculated from scale samples. Life-history traits were correlated with behavioural traits such as movements and prey selection. Individuals with higher reproductive effort were found to switch more frequently between active and inactive modes and show greater reliance on prey from pelagic pathways (indicated by lower δ(13) C). Further, individuals with faster juvenile growth were found to stay active for a longer time during the adult stage. Our results demonstrate the link between individual behavioural differences and fast-slow life-history traits under ecologically relevant conditions.

  4. The Slow and Fast Solar Wind Boundary, Corotating Interaction Regions, and Coronal Mass Ejection observations with Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions have as part of their goals to understand the source regions of the solar wind and of the heliospheric magnetic field. In the heliosphere, the solar wind is made up of interacting fast and slow solar wind streams as well as a clearly intermittent source of flow and field, arising from coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this presentation a summary of the questions associated with the distibution of wind speeds and magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere and their origin on the sun will be summarized. Where and how does the sharp gradient in speeds develop close to the Sun? Is the wind source for fast and slow the same, and is there a steady component or is its origin always intermittent in nature? Where does the heliospheric current sheet form and how stable is it close to the Sun? What is the distribution of CME origins and is there a continuum from large CMEs to small blobs of plasma? We will describe our current knowledge and discuss how SPP and SO will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the sources of the solar wind and magnetic fields in the heliosphere.

  5. Novel slow- and fast-type drug release round-window microimplants for local drug application to the cochlea: an experimental study in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Wolfgang; Senn, Pascal; Hennig, Michael; Michaelis, Christiane; Deingruber, Kerstin; Scheler, Renate; Steinhoff, Hans-Joachim; Riphagen, Frits; Lamm, Kerstin

    2005-01-01

    Novel drug release microimplants (0.8 x 1.14 mm; custom-made by Leiras, now Schering OY, Finland) of slow- and fast-release types containing either 0.9 mg beclomethasone or no drug at all were placed unilaterally onto the round-window membrane (RWM) of 45 guinea pigs for a maximum duration of 28 days. The following parameters were tested on days 1, 14 and 28 after implantation: threshold levels of beclomethasone in the perilymph of the scala tympani, auditory brain stem responses (ABR thresholds and ABR threshold shifts), RWM morphology and hair cell loss (cytocochleograms). None of the animals in the non-implanted control group (n = 5) or placebo implant group (n = 15), but all animals in the slow-release-type implant group (n = 15) and fast-release-type implant group (n = 15) revealed the presence of beclomethasone on day 1 (34.9 and 64.3 pg/microl, respectively), day 14 (43.8 and 46.9 pg/microl, respectively) and day 28 after implantation (4.7 and 60.5 pg/microl, respectively). Histology of the RWMs appeared normal, and cytocochleograms revealed no inner hair cell loss and outer hair cell loss within normal ranges (from 0.5 +/- 0.4 to 0.8 +/- 0.2% per cochlea) in both ears in all experimental groups at any time during examination (days 1, 14 and 28). Initial values of ABR thresholds at 3, 6, 9 and 12 kHz did not differ significantly in any of the experimental groups. In non-implanted controls, no significant differences of ABR thresholds were observed in all frequencies tested in either ear on days 1, 14 and 28 compared to initial values, and ABR threshold shifts ranged from -3 +/- 5 dB (min.) to +5 +/- 7 dB (max.). On day 28 after implantation, there were no significant differences of ABR threshold shifts between this and the implant groups, except for 6 kHz of the slow-release device. Therefore, the placebo implants, the slow-release and the fast-release beclomethasone implants appear suitable for further experiments.

  6. Nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) is a relatively consistent parameter for defining fast-evolving and slow-evolving protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammalian genome sequence data are being acquired in large quantities and at enormous speeds. We now have a tremendous opportunity to better understand which genes are the most variable or conserved, and what their particular functions and evolutionary dynamics are, through comparative genomics. Results We chose human and eleven other high-coverage mammalian genome data–as well as an avian genome as an outgroup–to analyze orthologous protein-coding genes using nonsynonymous (Ka) and synonymous (Ks) substitution rates. After evaluating eight commonly-used methods of Ka and Ks calculation, we observed that these methods yielded a nearly uniform result when estimating Ka, but not Ks (or Ka/Ks). When sorting genes based on Ka, we noticed that fast-evolving and slow-evolving genes often belonged to different functional classes, with respect to species-specificity and lineage-specificity. In particular, we identified two functional classes of genes in the acquired immune system. Fast-evolving genes coded for signal-transducing proteins, such as receptors, ligands, cytokines, and CDs (cluster of differentiation, mostly surface proteins), whereas the slow-evolving genes were for function-modulating proteins, such as kinases and adaptor proteins. In addition, among slow-evolving genes that had functions related to the central nervous system, neurodegenerative disease-related pathways were enriched significantly in most mammalian species. We also confirmed that gene expression was negatively correlated with evolution rate, i.e. slow-evolving genes were expressed at higher levels than fast-evolving genes. Our results indicated that the functional specializations of the three major mammalian clades were: sensory perception and oncogenesis in primates, reproduction and hormone regulation in large mammals, and immunity and angiotensin in rodents. Conclusion Our study suggests that Ka calculation, which is less biased compared to Ks and Ka/Ks, can be used as a

  7. Slow light in mass-produced, dispersion-engineered photonic crystal ring resonators.

    PubMed

    McGarvey-Lechable, Kathleen; Hamidfar, Tabassom; Patel, David; Xu, Luhua; Plant, David V; Bianucci, Pablo

    2017-02-20

    We present experimental results of photonic crystal ring resonators (PhCRRs) fabricated on the CMOS-compatible, silicon-on-insulator platform via 193-nm deep-UV lithography. Our dispersion-engineering design approach is compared to experimental results, showing very good agreement between theory and measurements. Specifically, we report a mean photonic band-edge wavelength of 1546.2 ± 5.8 nm, a 0.2% variation from our targeted band-edge wavelength of 1550 nm. Methods for the direct calculation of the experimental, discrete dispersion relation and extraction of intrinsic quality factors for a highly-dispersive resonator are discussed. A maximum intrinsic quality factor of ≈83,800 is reported, substantiating our design method and indicating that high-throughput optical lithography is a viable candidate for PhCRR fabrication. Finally, through comparison of the mean intrinsic quality and slowdown factors of the PhCRRs and standard ring resonators, we present evidence of an increase in light-matter interaction strength with simultaneous preservation of microcavity lifetimes.

  8. Tunable Polarons of Slow-Light Polaritons in a Two-Dimensional Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2016-02-01

    When an impurity interacts with a bath of phonons it forms a polaron. For increasing interaction strengths the mass of the polaron increases and it can become self-trapped. For impurity atoms inside an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) the nature of this transition is not understood. While Feynman's variational approach to the Fröhlich model predicts a sharp transition for light impurities, renormalization group studies always predict an extended intermediate-coupling region characterized by large phonon correlations. To investigate this intricate regime and to test polaron physics beyond the validity of the Fröhlich model we suggest a versatile experimental setup that allows us to tune both the mass of the impurity and its interactions with the BEC. The impurity is realized as a dark-state polariton (DSP) inside a quasi-two-dimensional BEC. We show that its interactions with the Bogoliubov phonons lead to photonic polarons, described by the Bogoliubov-Fröhlich Hamiltonian, and make theoretical predictions using an extension of a recently introduced renormalization group approach to Fröhlich polarons.

  9. An Optically Stabilized Fast-Switching Light Emitting Diode as a Light Source for Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience research increasingly relies on optical methods for evoking neuronal activity as well as for measuring it, making bright and stable light sources critical building blocks of modern experimental setups. This paper presents a method to control the brightness of a high-power light emitting diode (LED) light source to an unprecedented level of stability. By continuously monitoring the actual light output of the LED with a photodiode and feeding the result back to the LED's driver by way of a proportional-integral controller, drift was reduced to as little as 0.007% per hour over a 12-h period, and short-term fluctuations to 0.005% root-mean-square over 10 seconds. The LED can be switched on and off completely within 100 s, a feature that is crucial when visual stimuli and light for optical recording need to be interleaved to obtain artifact-free recordings. The utility of the system is demonstrated by recording visual responses in the central nervous system of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana using voltage-sensitive dyes. PMID:22238663

  10. An optically stabilized fast-switching light emitting diode as a light source for functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience research increasingly relies on optical methods for evoking neuronal activity as well as for measuring it, making bright and stable light sources critical building blocks of modern experimental setups. This paper presents a method to control the brightness of a high-power light emitting diode (LED) light source to an unprecedented level of stability. By continuously monitoring the actual light output of the LED with a photodiode and feeding the result back to the LED's driver by way of a proportional-integral controller, drift was reduced to as little as 0.007% per hour over a 12-h period, and short-term fluctuations to 0.005% root-mean-square over 10 seconds. The LED can be switched on and off completely within 100 μs, a feature that is crucial when visual stimuli and light for optical recording need to be interleaved to obtain artifact-free recordings. The utility of the system is demonstrated by recording visual responses in the central nervous system of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana using voltage-sensitive dyes.

  11. DUAL TRIGGER OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A PROMINENCE BY EUV FAST AND SLOW CORONAL WAVES: SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Foullon, C.

    2012-12-20

    We analyze flare-associated transverse oscillations in a quiescent solar prominence on 2010 September 8-9. Both the flaring active region and the prominence were located near the west limb, with a favorable configuration and viewing angle. The full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory show flare-associated lateral oscillations of the prominence sheet. The STEREO-A spacecraft, 81.{sup 0}5 ahead of the Sun-Earth line, provides an on-disk view of the flare-associated coronal disturbances. We derive the temporal profile of the lateral displacement of the prominence sheet by using the image cross-correlation technique. The displacement curve was de-trended and the residual oscillatory pattern was derived. We fit these oscillations with a damped cosine function with a variable period and find that the period is increasing. The initial oscillation period (P{sub 0}) is {approx}28.2 minutes and the damping time ({tau}{sub D}) {approx} 44 minutes. We confirm the presence of fast and slow EUV wave components. Using STEREO-A observations, we derive a propagation speed of {approx}250 km s{sup -1} for the slow EUV wave by applying the time-slice technique to the running difference images. We propose that the prominence oscillations are excited by the fast EUV wave while the increase in oscillation period of the prominence is an apparent effect, related to a phase change due to the slow EUV wave acting as a secondary trigger. We discuss implications of the dual trigger effect for coronal prominence seismology and scaling law studies of damping mechanisms.