Science.gov

Sample records for fast neutron therapy

  1. Radiation therapy with fast neutrons: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. T. L.; Wambersie, A.

    2007-09-01

    Because of their biological effects fast neutrons are most effective in treating large, slow-growing tumours which are resistant to conventional X-radiation. Patients are treated typically 3-4 times per week for 4-5 weeks (sometimes in combination with X-radiation) for a variety of conditions such as carcinomas of the head and neck, salivary gland, paranasal sinus and breast; soft tissue, bone and uterine sarcomas and malignant melanomas. It is estimated that about 27,000 patients have undergone fast neutron therapy to date.

  2. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-12-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm2 treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm2 collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm 10B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm2 fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm2 collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm2 tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm 10B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured

  4. First steps towards a fast-neutron therapy planning program

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was used to implement first steps towards a treatment planning program for fast-neutron therapy at the FRM II research reactor in Garching, Germany. Depth dose curves were calculated inside a water phantom using measured primary neutron and simulated primary photon spectra and compared with depth dose curves measured earlier. The calculations were performed with GEANT4 in two different ways, simulating a simple box geometry and splitting this box into millions of small voxels (this was done to validate the voxelisation procedure that was also used to voxelise the human body). Results In both cases, the dose distributions were very similar to those measured in the water phantom, up to a depth of 30 cm. In order to model the situation of patients treated at the FRM II MEDAPP therapy beamline for salivary gland tumors, a human voxel phantom was implemented in GEANT4 and irradiated with the implemented MEDAPP neutron and photon spectra. The 3D dose distribution calculated inside the head of the phantom was similar to the depth dose curves in the water phantom, with some differences that are explained by differences in elementary composition. The lateral dose distribution was studied at various depths. The calculated cumulative dose volume histograms for the voxel phantom show the exposure of organs at risk surrounding the tumor. Conclusions In order to minimize the dose to healthy tissue, a conformal treatment is necessary. This can only be accomplished with the help of an advanced treatment planning system like the one developed here. Although all calculations were done for absorbed dose only, any biological dose weighting can be implemented easily, to take into account the increased radiobiological effectiveness of neutrons compared to photons. PMID:22118299

  5. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  6. Modification of the University of Washington Neutron Radiotherapy Facility for optimization of neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Wemple, C A; Risler, R; Hartwell, J K; Harker, Y D; Laramore, G E

    2000-02-01

    A modified neutron production target assembly has been developed to provide improved performance of the proton-cyclotron-based neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington for applications involving neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy. The new target produces a neutron beam that yields essentially the same fast-neutron physical depth-dose distribution as is produced by the current UW clinical system, but that also has an increased fraction of BNCT enhancement relative to the total therapeutic dose. The modified target is composed of a 5-millimeter layer of beryllium, followed by a 2.5-millimeter layer of tungsten, with a water-cooled copper backing. Measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum of the beam produced by the new target were performed using activation foils with a direct spectral unfolding technique. Water phantom measurements were performed using a tissue-equivalent ion chamber to characterize the fast-neutron depth-dose curve and sodium activation in soda-lime glass beads to characterize the thermal-neutron flux (and thus the expected neutron capture dose enhancement) as a function of depth. The results of the various measurements were quite consistent with expectations based on the design calculations for the modified target. The spectrum of the neutron beam produced by the new target features an enhanced low-energy flux component relative to the spectrum of the beam produced by the standard UW target. However, it has essentially the same high-energy neutron flux, with a reduced flux component in the mid-range of the energy spectrum. As a result, the measured physical depth-dose curve in a large water phantom has the same shape compared to the case of the standard UW clinical beam, but approximately twice the level of BNCT enhancement per unit background neutron dose at depths of clinical interest. In-vivo clinical testing of BNCT-enhanced fast-neutron therapy for canine lung tumors using the new beam was recently

  7. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  8. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations.

  9. Microdosimetric investigations at the fast neutron therapy facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K.M.

    1997-12-01

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e., oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 {+-} 0.04 was determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e{sup *} and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e{sup *} and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated.

  10. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  11. Microdosimetric investigations at the Fast Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja Maria

    1997-01-01

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e. oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 ± 0.04 determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e* and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e* and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated. In the unmodified beam, a negligible enhancement for a 50 ppm boron loading was measured. To boost the boron dose enhancement to 3% it was necessary to change the primary proton energy from 66 MeV and to filter the beam by 90 mm of tungsten.

  12. Results of fast neutron therapy of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Prott, F J; Micke, O; Haverkamp, U; Willich, N; Schüller, P; Pötter, R

    2000-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) seem to have a better response to fast neutron irradiation than to photon beam therapy because of the higher relative biological effectiveness of neutron radiation. Between 1986 and 1995, 72 patients with ACC of the salivary glands were treated in Münster with fast neutrons. The median age was 54 years. All the patients had either recurrent or macroscopic rest tumor prior to neutron therapy. The median total dose was 15.03 Gy. Median follow-up was 50 months. 39.1% of the patients achieved a complete remission and 48.6% a partial remission. The survival probability was 86% after one year, 73% after two years and 53% after five years. The recurrence-free survival was 83% after one year, 71% after two years and 45% after five years. Neutron beam therapy seems to have been an effective treatment in these selected patients.

  13. Commissioning optically stimulated luminescence in vivo dosimeters for fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lori A. Sandison, George; Yang, Fei; Woodworth, Davis; McCormick, Zephyr

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Clinical in vivo dosimeters intended for use with photon and electron therapies have not been utilized for fast neutron therapy because they are highly susceptible to neutron damage. The objective of this work was to determine if a commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in vivo dosimetry system could be adapted for use in fast neutron therapy. Methods: A 50.5 MeV fast neutron beam generated by a clinical neutron therapy cyclotron was used to irradiate carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) optically simulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in a solid water phantom under standard calibration conditions, 150 cm SAD, 1.7 cm depth, and 10.3 × 10.0 cm field size. OSLD fading and electron trap depletion studies were performed with the OSLDs irradiated with 20 and 50 cGy and monitored over a 24-h period to determine the optimal time for reading the dosimeters during calibration. Four OSLDs per group were calibrated over a clinical dose range of 0–150 cGy. Results: OSLD measurement uncertainties were lowered to within ±2%–3% of the expected dose by minimizing the effect of transient fading that occurs with neutron irradiation and maintaining individual calibration factors for each dosimeter. Dose dependent luminescence fading extended beyond the manufacturer’s recommended 10 min period for irradiation with photon or electron beams. To minimize OSL variances caused by inconsistent fading among dosimeters, the observed optimal time for reading the OSLDs postirradiation was between 30 and 90 min. No field size, wedge factor, or gantry angle dependencies were observed in the OSLDs irradiated by the studied fast neutron beam. Conclusions: Measurements demonstrated that uncertainties less than ±3% were attainable in OSLDs irradiated with fast neutrons under clinical conditions. Accuracy and precision comparable to clinical OSL measurements observed with photons can be achieved by maintaining individual OSLD calibration factors and

  14. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  15. Routine operation of the University of Washington fast neutron therapy facility and plans for improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Risler, R.; Emery, R.; Laramore, G. E.

    1999-06-10

    The fast neutron therapy facility in Seattle is based on a cyclotron, which produces a 50.5 MeV proton beam. Neutrons are produced in a beryllium target installed in an isocentric gantry equipped with a multi-leaf collimator. The system has been in routine operation for 14 years and over 1800 patients have been treated. Downtime has been minimal, over the past 10 years less than 1.5% of the scheduled daily treatment sessions could not be delivered for equipment related reasons. Fast neutron therapy has been shown to be highly effective for the treatment of salivary gland tumors, sarcomas of bone and soft tissues and for certain prostate cancers. In addition there are situations such as non-small cell lung cancer, where results are promising, but success is limited by normal tissue complications. A relatively small selective increase in the tumor dose might lead to a significant clinical improvement in these situations. The use of a boron neutron capture (BNC) boost, utilizing the moderated slow neutrons naturally present in the tissue during fast neutron therapy, may be beneficial for such patients. Experimental work to adapt the facility for such a modified treatment modality is presently ongoing.

  16. Routine operation of the University of Washington fast neutron therapy facility and plans for improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risler, R.; Emery, R.; Laramore, G. E.

    1999-06-01

    The fast neutron therapy facility in Seattle is based on a cyclotron, which produces a 50.5 MeV proton beam. Neutrons are produced in a beryllium target installed in an isocentric gantry equipped with a multi-leaf collimator. The system has been in routine operation for 14 years and over 1800 patients have been treated. Downtime has been minimal, over the past 10 years less than 1.5% of the scheduled daily treatment sessions could not be delivered for equipment related reasons. Fast neutron therapy has been shown to be highly effective for the treatment of salivary gland tumors, sarcomas of bone and soft tissues and for certain prostate cancers. In addition there are situations such as non-small cell lung cancer, where results are promising, but success is limited by normal tissue complications. A relatively small selective increase in the tumor dose might lead to a significant clinical improvement in these situations. The use of a boron neutron capture (BNC) boost, utilizing the moderated slow neutrons naturally present in the tissue during fast neutron therapy, may be beneficial for such patients. Experimental work to adapt the facility for such a modified treatment modality is presently ongoing.

  17. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  18. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a "dual phantom technique" for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % 6LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % 6LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the depth dose distributions of the

  19. Feasibility of the Utilization of BNCT in the Fast Neutron Therapy Beam at Fermilab

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-01

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  20. Feasibility of the utilization of BNCT in the fast neutron therapy beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-23

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  1. SU-E-T-75: Commissioning Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeters for Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L; Yang, F; Sandison, G; Woodworth, D; McCormick, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Fast neutrons therapy used at the University of Washington is clinically proven to be more effective than photon therapy in treating salivary gland and other cancers. A nanodot optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system was chosen to be commissioned for patient in vivo dosimetry for neutron therapy. The OSL-based radiation detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage caused by neutrons compared to diodes or MOSFET systems. Methods: An In-Light microStar OSL system was commissioned for in vivo use by radiating Landauer nanodots with neutrons generated from 50.0 MeV protons accelerated onto a beryllium target. The OSLs were calibrated the depth of maximum dose in solid water localized to 150 cm SAD isocenter in a 10.3 cm square field. Linearity was tested over a typical clinical dose fractionation range i.e. 0 to 150 neutron-cGy. Correction factors for transient signal fading, trap depletion, gantry angle, field size, and wedge factor dependencies were also evaluated. The OSLs were photo-bleached between radiations using a tungsten-halogen lamp. Results: Landauer sensitivity factors published for each nanodot are valid for measuring photon and electron doses but do not apply for neutron irradiation. Individually calculated nanodot calibration factors exhibited a 2–5% improvement over calibration factors computed by the microStar InLight software. Transient fading effects had a significant impact on neutron dose reading accuracy compared to photon and electron in vivo dosimetry. Greater accuracy can be achieved by calibrating and reading each dosimeter within 1–2 hours after irradiation. No additional OSL correction factors were needed for field size, gantry angle, or wedge factors in solid water phantom measurements. Conclusion: OSL detectors are a useful for neutron beam in vivo dosimetry verification. Dosimetric accuracy comparable to conventional diode systems can be achieved. Accounting for transient fading effects during the neutron beam

  2. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  3. Neutron capture therapy (NCT) enhancement of fast neutron radiotherapy: Application to non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laramore, G. E.; Stelzer, K. J.; Risler, R.; Schwartz, J. L.; Douglas, J. J.; Einck, J. P.; Nigg, D. W.; Wemple, C. A.; Hartwell, J. K.; Harker, Y. D.; Gavin, P. R.; Hawthorne, M. F.

    2001-07-01

    Fast neutron radiotherapy utilizes neutrons in the energy range of several millions to several tens of millions of eV to treat human malignancies. These fast neutron beams produce a small cloud of "slow" neutrons as they penetrate the body. If one can selectively attach isotopes having large neutron capture cross sections (such as 10B) to cancer cells, these "slow" neutrons can be used to enhance the killing of tumors. We describe a multidisciplinary effort to apply this technique to the treatment of patients with inoperable, non-small cell lung cancers. Problems in target design, compound development, beam optimization, and radiobiological experiments are discussed.

  4. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.; Rush Univ., Chicago, IL; Science Applications International Corp., Princeton, NJ; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: Electromechanical design and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Blosser, E.; Brandon, J.; Horste, T.; Forman, J. D.

    2006-09-15

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30x30 cm{sup 2}. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 deg. and 60 deg. automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area.

  6. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: electromechanical design and validation.

    PubMed

    Farr, J B; Maughan, R L; Yudelev, M; Blosser, E; Brandon, J; Horste, T; Forman, J D

    2006-09-01

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30 x 30 cm2. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 degrees and 60 degrees automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area.

  7. Fast neutron therapy for squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region: results of a randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, W.; Orr, J.A.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-02-01

    A randomized trial of fast neuron therapy compared with 4MV photons for patients with head and neck cancer is reported. One hundred and sixty-eight patients were recruited between 1977 and 1984. The minimum follow-up is 2 years. Three patients were withdrawn before treatment began. Eighty-five were allocated to neutron therapy and 80 to receive photon therapy. All patients had squamous cell cancers in one of four primary sites: oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. Local tumor control was similar in both groups: 44.7% after neutrons and 45.0% after photons. Salvage surgery was performed on 18 patients in each treatment group for residual or recurrent cancer. Acute radiation reactions of the mucous membranes were significantly more severe after photons. The number of patients with serious late reactions was greater after neutron therapy but the difference was not statistically significant. There were six deaths related to late morbidity after neutron therapy but none after photon therapy. Survival was better after photon therapy but the difference compared with the neutron group failed to reach statistical significance. When intercurrent deaths are excluded, the difference is less marked. Photon therapy was clearly better in terms of disease-free survival giving a 2-year local disease-free rate of 41.3% (s.e. 5.5%) compared with 29.4% (s.e. 4.9%) after neutrons.

  8. Novel technologies and theoretical models in radiation therapy of cancer patients using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons produced by U-120 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A. Gribova, O. V. Velikaya, V. V.

    2016-08-02

    The analysis of clinical use of neutron therapy with 6 MeV fast neutrons compared to conventional radiation therapy was carried out. The experience of using neutron and mixed neutron and photon therapy in patients with different radio-resistant malignant tumors shows the necessity of further studies and development of the novel approaches to densely-ionizing radiation. The results of dosimetry and radiobiological studies have been the basis for planning clinical programs for neutron therapy. Clinical trials over the past 30 years have shown that neutron therapy successfully destroys radio-resistant cancers, including salivary gland tumors, adenoidcystic carcinoma, inoperable sarcomas, locally advanced head and neck tumors, and locally advanced prostate cancer. Radiation therapy with 6.3 MeV fast neutrons used alone and in combination with photon therapy resulted in improved long-term treatment outcomes in patients with radio-resistant malignant tumors.

  9. Novel technologies and theoretical models in radiation therapy of cancer patients using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons produced by U-120 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musabaeva, L. I.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Velikaya, V. V.; Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of clinical use of neutron therapy with 6 MeV fast neutrons compared to conventional radiation therapy was carried out. The experience of using neutron and mixed neutron and photon therapy in patients with different radio-resistant malignant tumors shows the necessity of further studies and development of the novel approaches to densely-ionizing radiation. The results of dosimetry and radiobiological studies have been the basis for planning clinical programs for neutron therapy. Clinical trials over the past 30 years have shown that neutron therapy successfully destroys radio-resistant cancers, including salivary gland tumors, adenoidcystic carcinoma, inoperable sarcomas, locally advanced head and neck tumors, and locally advanced prostate cancer. Radiation therapy with 6.3 MeV fast neutrons used alone and in combination with photon therapy resulted in improved long-term treatment outcomes in patients with radio-resistant malignant tumors.

  10. A facility for measurements of nuclear cross sections for fast neutron cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangtip, S.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Carlsson, G. A.; Söderberg, J.; Jonsson, O.; Nilsson, L.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Brun, C. L.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Lecolley, J.-F.; Varignon, C.; Eudes, P.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.

    2000-10-01

    A facility for measurements of neutron-induced double-differential light-ion production cross-sections, for application within, e.g., fast neutron cancer therapy, is described. The central detection elements are three-detector telescopes consisting of two silicon detectors and a CsI crystal. Use of /ΔE-ΔE-E techniques allows good particle identification for p, d, t, 3He and alpha particles over an energy range from a few MeV up to 100 MeV. Active plastic scintillator collimators are used to define the telescope solid angle. Measurements can be performed using up to eight telescopes at /20° intervals simultaneously, thus covering a wide angular range. The performance of the equipment is illustrated using experimental data taken with a carbon target at En=95 MeV. Distortions of the measured charged-particle spectra due to energy and particle losses in the target are corrected using a newly developed computer code. Results from such correction calculations are presented.

  11. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  12. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  13. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  14. Positron emission tomography-guided conformal fast neutron therapy for glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Keith J; Douglas, James G; Mankoff, David A; Silbergeld, Daniel L; Krohn, Kenneth A; Laramore, George E; Spence, Alexander M

    2008-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to be a difficult therapeutic challenge. Our study was conducted to determine whether improved survival and tumor control could be achieved with modern delivery of fast neutron radiation using three-dimensional treatment planning. Ten patients were enrolled. Eligibility criteria included pathologic diagnosis of GBM, age >or=18 years, and KPS >or=60. Patients underwent MRI and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG PET) as part of initial three-dimensional treatment planning. Sequential targets were treated with noncoplanar fields to a total dose of 18 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Median and 1-year overall survival were 55 weeks and 60%, respectively. One patient remains alive at last follow-up 255 weeks after diagnosis. Median progression-free survival was 16 weeks, and all patients had tumor progression by 39 weeks. Treatment was clinically well tolerated, but evidence of mild to moderate gliosis and microvascular sclerosis consistent with radiation injury was observed at autopsy in specimens taken from regions of contralateral brain that received approximately 6-10 Gy. Fast neutron radiation using modern imaging, treatment planning, and beam delivery was feasible to a total dose of 18 Gy, but tumor control probability was poor in comparison to that predicted from a dose-response model based on older studies. Steep dose-response curves for both tumor control and neurotoxicity continue to present a challenge to establishing a therapeutic window for fast neutron radiation in GBM, even with modern techniques.

  15. SU-E-T-484: In Vivo Dosimetry Tolerances in External Beam Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L; Gopan, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry with Landauer Al2O3:C nanodots was developed at our institution as a passive in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system for patients treated with fast neutron therapy. The purpose of this study was to establish clinically relevant tolerance limits for detecting treatment errors requiring further investigation. Methods: Tolerance levels were estimated by conducting a series of IVD expected dose calculations for square field sizes ranging between 2.8 and 28.8 cm. For each field size evaluated, doses were calculated for open and internal wedged fields with angles of 30°, 45°, or 60°. Theoretical errors were computed for variations of incorrect beam configurations. Dose errors, defined as the percent difference from the expected dose calculation, were measured with groups of three nanodots placed in a 30 x 30 cm solid water phantom, at beam isocenter (150 cm SAD, 1.7 cm Dmax). The tolerances were applied to IVD patient measurements. Results: The overall accuracy of the nanodot measurements is 2–3% for open fields. Measurement errors agreed with calculated errors to within 3%. Theoretical estimates of dosimetric errors showed that IVD measurements with OSL nanodots will detect the absence of an internal wedge or a wrong wedge angle. Incorrect nanodot placement on a wedged field is more likely to be caught if the offset is in the direction of the “toe” of the wedge where the dose difference in percentage is about 12%. Errors caused by an incorrect flattening filter size produced a 2% measurement error that is not detectable by IVD measurement alone. Conclusion: IVD with nanodots will detect treatment errors associated with the incorrect implementation of the internal wedge. The results of this study will streamline the physicists’ investigations in determining the root cause of an IVD reading that is out of normally accepted tolerances.

  16. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  17. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  18. Treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, M.

    1981-12-01

    The results of fast neutron therapy for malignant tumors of the salivary glands are very satisfactory and on present evidence, fast neutrons are the treatment of first choice for tumors in these sites, when compared with the results from surgery and conventional radiotherapy. In this article, confirmation of results of neutron therapy already published from Hammersmith are given by workers at the Fermi Laboratory.

  19. Fast neutron treatment of cervical lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    An editonal is presented which discusses a brief interim report of the prospective, randomized, RTOG study of fast neutron radiation therapy, mixed neutron and photon treatment and standard photon radiation therapy for inoperable, advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck excluding brain. The authors point out that neck nodes serve as an excellent in vivo test site to evaluate the results of fast neutron radiotherapy. The tumor volume is easily measured and the responses of both tumor and normal tissues are easily assessed. The editorial continues that it is all too rare to see the result of a randomized clinical trial in oncology which shows a statistically significant improvement, has a reasonably large number of patients, and is followed-up for a sufficiently long time. It is therefore a particular pleasure to see these three factors occurring together in the report of neutron treatments by Griffin.

  20. A novel fast neutron dosemeter based on fission chambers. Part I: Principles of operation and theoretical response in neutron therapy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Porter, D; Lawson, R C; Hannan, W J

    1975-05-01

    A novel method is proposed of accurately measuring fast neutron doses of interest in radiotherapy. The technique, which utilizes calculated neutron fluence-to-kerma conversion factors, is based upon the combination of measurements with calibrated neptunium-237 and uranium-238 pulse fission chambers to obtain a response which matches the variation of kerma with neutron energy. The theoretical performance of a practical instrument has been assessed for a variety of neutron spectra to evaluate the spectrum dependence of the dosemeter. The overall systematic uncertainty using this absolute method of determining the neutron dose under charged particle equilibrium conditions is comparable to that encountered with ionization chamber techniques.

  1. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  2. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  3. Experience with fast neutron therapy for unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abdulla, A.S.M.; Hussey, D.H.; Olson, M.H.; Wright, A.E.

    1981-02-01

    The records of 70 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas treated with radiotherapy were reviewed. Fifteen were treated with 50-MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons or a combination of 50-MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons and 25 to 32 MeV photons (neutron group), 30 with external beam photons alone (photon group), and 25 with radioactive gold-grain implantation (/sup 198/Au-implant group). The 12-month survival rate was 40% (6/15) for the neutron group; three patients in this group were living at the time of analysis, 16, 19, and 42 months from the date of diagnosis. By comparison, the 12-month survival rate was 23% (7/30) for the photon group and 32% (8/25) or the /sup 198/Au-implant group. The actuarial survival curve for the neutron group was significantly better than the survival curve for the photon group (Wilcoxon test/sup 7/: p = 0.3). Although the difference between the survival curves for the neutron and /sup 198/Au-implant groups is not statistically significant, the neutron patients presented more advanced disease than those treated with radioactive gold-grain implants. No radiotherapy complications were observed in the neutron group, whereas 3% (1/30) of patients in the photon group and 24% (6/25) of patients in the /sup 198/Au-implant group developed major complications.

  4. Paving the Road for Modern Particle Therapy – What Can We Learn from the Experience Gained with Fast Neutron Therapy in Munich?

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Hanno M.; Neff, Teresa; Reuschel, Waltraud; Wagner, Franz M.; Kampfer, Severin; Wilkens, Jan J.; Petry, Winfried; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2015-01-01

    While neutron therapy was a highly topical subject in the 70s and 80s, today there are only a few remaining facilities offering fast neutron therapy (FNT). Nevertheless, up to today more than 30,000 patients were treated with neutron therapy. For some indications like salivary gland tumors and malignant melanoma, there is clinical evidence that the addition of FNT leads to superior local control compared to photon treatment alone. FNT was available in Munich from 1985 until 2000 at the Reactor Neutron Therapy (RENT) facility. Patient treatment continued at the new research reactor FRM II in 2007 under improved treatment conditions, and today it can still be offered to selected patients as an individual treatment option. As there is a growing interest in high-linear energy transfer (LET) therapy with new hadron therapy centers emerging around the globe, the clinical data generated by neutron therapy might help to develop biologically driven treatment planning algorithms. Also FNT might experience its resurgence as a combinational partner of modern immunotherapies. PMID:26640777

  5. Treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer with Californium-252 fast-neutron brachytherapy and external photon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallion, H.H.; Maruyama, Y.; van Nagell, J.R. Jr.; Donaldson, E.S.; Rowley, K.C.; Yoneda, J.; Beach, J.L.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1987-05-15

    From January 1977 to July 1984, 32 patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy and external pelvic radiation. These patients received 4500 to 5000 rad external photon therapy and two or three outpatient Californium-252 (252Cf) implants, plus sidewall boost irradiation. Treatment results were compared retrospectively to those obtained in a historical control group of patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with external radiation and conventional photon brachytherapy from 1972 to 1976. Local or regional tumor recurrence developed in 53% of patients treated with neutron therapy and an additional 9% experienced distant metastases. Thirty-eight percent of patients remain free of disease 12 to 96 months (mean, 51 months) after therapy. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates of patients treated with neutron therapy were 53% and 36%, which were not significantly different than those obtained with photon brachytherapy (2-year survival, 61%; 5-year survival, 34%). Complications of neutron therapy were minimal and included proctitis (19%) and vaginal stenosis (9%). There were no cases of enteric fistulae. Outpatient neutron brachytherapy was cost effective and was well tolerated by patients.

  6. Treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer with Californium-252 fast-neutron brachytherapy and external photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Gallion, H H; Maruyama, Y; van Nagell, J R; Donaldson, E S; Rowley, K C; Yoneda, J; Beach, J L; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J

    1987-05-15

    From January 1977 to July 1984, 32 patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy and external pelvic radiation. These patients received 4500 to 5000 rad external photon therapy and two or three outpatient Californium-252 (252Cf) implants, plus sidewall boost irradiation. Treatment results were compared retrospectively to those obtained in a historical control group of patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with external radiation and conventional photon brachytherapy from 1972 to 1976. Local or regional tumor recurrence developed in 53% of patients treated with neutron therapy and an additional 9% experienced distant metastases. Thirty-eight percent of patients remain free of disease 12 to 96 months (mean, 51 months) after therapy. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates of patients treated with neutron therapy were 53% and 36%, which were not significantly different than those obtained with photon brachytherapy (2-year survival, 61%; 5-year survival, 34%). Complications of neutron therapy were minimal and included proctitis (19%) and vaginal stenosis (9%). There were no cases of enteric fistulae. Outpatient neutron brachytherapy was cost effective and was well tolerated by patients.

  7. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N.; Goods, Steven Howard; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  8. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  9. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  10. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  11. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  12. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  13. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  14. SU-C-204-05: Simulations of a Portal Imaging System for Conformal and Intensity Modulated Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    James, S St.; Argento, D; Stewart, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The University of Washington Medical Center offers neutron therapy for the palliative and definitive treatment of selected cancers. In vivo field verification has the potential to improve the safe and effective delivery of neutron therapy. We propose a portal imaging method that relies on the creation of positron emitting isotopes (11C and 15O) through (n, 2n) reactions with a PMMA plate placed below the patient. After field delivery, the plate is retrieved from the vault and imaged using a reader that detects annihilation photons. The spatial pattern of activity produced in the PMMA plate provides information to reconstruct the neutron fluence map needed to confirm treatment delivery. Methods: We used MCNP to simulate the accumulation of 11C activity in a slab of PMMA 2 mm thick, and GATE was used to simulate the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a prototype imaging system. BGO crystal thicknesses of 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm were simulated with detector separations of 2 cm. Crystal pitches of 2 mm and 4 mm were evaluated. Back-projection of the events was used to create a planar image. The spatial resolution was taken to be the FWHM of the reconstructed point source image. Results: The system sensitivity for a point source in the center of the field of view was found to range from 58% for 1 cm thick BGO with 2 mm crystal pitch to 74% for the 3 cm thick BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch. The spatial resolution at the center of the field of view was found to be 1.5 mm for the system with 2 mm crystal pitch and 2.8 mm for the system with the 4 mm crystal pitch. Conclusion: BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch and 3 cm length would offer the best sensitivity reader.

  15. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  16. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  17. Capture-Gated Fast Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, H. P.; Abdurashitov, J. N.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Gavrin, V. N.; Heimbach, C. R.; Langford, T. J.; Mendenhall, M.; Nico, J. S.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    We present recent developments in fast neutron detection using segmented spectrometers based on the principle of capture-gating. Our approach employs an organic scintillator to detect fast neutrons through their recoil interaction with protons in the scintillator. The neutrons that thermalize and are captured produce a signal indicating that the event was due to a neutron recoil and that the full energy of the neutron was deposited. The delayed neutron capture also serves to discriminate against uncorrelated background events. The segmentation permits reconstruction of the initial neutron energy despite the nonlinear response of the scintillator. We have constructed spectrometers using both He-3 proportional counters and Li-6 doping as capture agents in plastic and liquid organic scintillators. We discuss the operation of the spectrometers for the measurement of low levels of fast neutrons for several applications, including the detection of very low-activity neutron sources and the characterization of the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons at the Earth's surface and in the underground environment.

  18. Fast neutron dosemeter using pixelated detector Timepix.

    PubMed

    Bulanek, Boris; Ekendahl, Daniela; Prouza, Zdenek

    2014-10-01

    A Timepix detector covered with polyethylene convertors of different thicknesses is presented as a fast neutron real-time dosemeter. The application of different weighting factors in connection with the position of a signal in a Timepix detector enables one to obtain an energy-dependent signal equal to neutron dose equivalents. A simulation of a Timepix detector covered with polyethylene convertors using monoenergetic neutrons is presented. The experimental set-up of a dosemeter was also produced. The first results of detector response using different fast neutron sources are presented.

  19. Fast reactor neutrons for the treatment of superficial carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.M.; Koester, L. ); Auberger, T.; Reuschel, W.; Mayr, M.; Kneschaurek, P.; Breit, A. ); Schraube, H. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the fast neutron facility at the Munich Research Reactor (Forschungsreaktor Munchen (FRM)) is briefly described, and data about the beam quality are given. After a listing of the biological experiments performed before and in parallel to the clinical irradiations, the treatment scheme, selection of cases and results of the reactor neutron therapy are reported. More than 80% of patients-all with poor prognosis-show complete remission of the tumor or stoppage of growth for at least several months. Possibilities for a support by boron neutron capture therapy are outlined. Preliminary data of an upgraded thermal-to-fast neutron converter for the planned 20-MW reactor FRM-II are given.

  20. Boron neutron capture enhancement of fast neutron radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, K. J.; Laramore, G. E.; Risler, R.; Wiens, L.; Griffin, T. W.

    1997-02-01

    Clinical trials have revealed a therapeutic advantage for fast neutron radiation over conventional photon radiation for salivary gland cancer, prostate cancer, sarcoma, and a subgroup of lung cancer. Conversely, fast neutron treatment of high grade astrocytic brain tumors [glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)] resulted in tumor sterilization, but also caused significant brain injury such that no therapeutic gain was attained. This effect was important, however, in that photon radiation and other conventional treatments have not demonstrated sterilization of GBM at any dose. Recent laboratory studies demonstrated that the hospital-based fast neutron beam from the University of Washington cyclotron has a thermal neutron component that may be used in a boron-10 neutron capture (BNC) reaction to enhance cell kill. The degree of enhancement was approximately 10 fold, and was dependent upon the boron-10 concentration, the boron-10 carrier agent, and the fast neutron dose per fraction. The results of these experiments will be discussed in the context of creating a therapeutic window for treatment of glioblastoma using BNC-enhanced fast neutron radiation in a clinically tolerable regimen.

  1. Amorphization of solids irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, V.; Dubinin, S.; Teploukhov, S.; Goshchitskii, B.

    2000-03-01

    The diffraction patterns of amorphous solids produced by both a conventional technique and fast neutron irradiation were systematized. It is shown for the first time that neutron radiation-modified solids belong to the group of amorphous substances of a distortion type.

  2. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  3. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  4. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  5. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    2000-09-05

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data.

  6. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  7. Fast-neutron spectrometer developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moler, R. B.; Zagotta, W. E.; Baker, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Li6 sandwich-type neutron spectrometer is equipped with proportional counter for particle identification. System uses current-sensitive preamplifiers to minimize pile-up of gamma-ray and particle pulses.

  8. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  9. Comparison of Fast Neutron Detector Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Mckigney, Edward Allen

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work performed for the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection O ce as the project Fast Neutron Detection Evaluation under contract HSHQDC-14-X-00022. This study was performed as a follow-on to the project Study of Fast Neutron Signatures and Measurement Techniques for SNM Detection - DNDO CFP11-100 STA-01. That work compared various detector technologies in a portal monitor con guration, focusing on a comparison between a number of fast neutron detection techniques and two standard thermal neutron detection technologies. The conclusions of the earlier work are contained in the report Comparison of Fast Neutron Detector Technologies. This work is designed to address questions raised about assumptions underlying the models built for the earlier project. To that end, liquid scintillators of two di erent sizes{ one a commercial, o -the-shelf (COTS) model of standard dimensions and the other a large, planer module{were characterized at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results of those measurements were combined with the results of the earlier models to gain a more complete picture of the performance of liquid scintillator as a portal monitor technology.

  10. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gribova, O. V. Choynzonov, E. L.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A. Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  11. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  12. Review of reported trials of neutron beam therapy of malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Fast neutron beam therapy has been tested extensively in the past 10 years as a method to treat malignant gliomas. Thus far there has been no change in survival time using fast neutron beam vs. photon therapy. Autopsy and reoperative studies have revealed brain necrosis and specimens which are tumor-free in much higher frequency using neutrons compared to photon radiation.

  13. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.E.; Soloway, A.H. ); Fairchild, R.G. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook )

    1990-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of these two conditions at the site of a tumor releases intense radiation that can destroy malignant tissues. BNCT is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron 10 is irradiated with an absorbs neutrons. The neutrons that it takes up are called thermal, or slow, neutrons. They are of such low energy that they cause little tissue damage as compared with other forms of radiation such as protons, gamma rays and fast neutrons. When an atom of boron 10 captures a neutron, an unstable isotope, boron 11, forms. The boron 11 instantly fissions, yielding lithium 7 nuclei and energetic alpha particles. These heavy particles, which carry 2.79 million electron volts of energy, are a highly lethal form of radiation. If the treatment proceeds as intended, the destructive effects of the capture reaction would occur primarily in those cancer cells that have accumulated boron 10. Normal cells with low concentrations of boron would be spared.

  15. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  16. Portable fast-neutron spectrometer project

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The Special Projects Division of the Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a continuing project to develop neutron spectrometers for radiation-protection measurements. For the last three years we have received limited support from the DOE Personnel Neutron Dosimeter Evaluation and Upgrade Program through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories to build a portable fast-neutron spectrometer. This unit will cover the energy range from 0.5 to 16 MeV by using an organic liquid scintillator to detect the recoil proton produced by the neutrons. Our goal is to make the system compact, computer operated, and battery powered. During the previous two years we developed a pulse-shape discriminator suitable for portable powered. This year we designed a stable light pulser to control the gain of the system, a housing for the detector, and the circuit needed to bias the dynodes of the photomultiplier that detects the light produced by the scintillator. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  17. [The combination treatment of malignant bone tumors using fast neutrons].

    PubMed

    Chernichenko, V A; Tolstopiatov, B A; Konovalenko, V F; Monich, A Iu; Palivets, A Iu

    1990-01-01

    The study deals with results of a clinical trial evaluating treatment efficacy of a 6 MeV neutron beam produced by Y-120 cyclotron (Kiev). Procedures of preoperative radiotherapy and radical treatment are discussed. Radiotherapy was administered to 52 patients suffering chondrosarcoma (30 cases), osteogenic sarcoma (15) or chordoma (7). Combined treatment (radiation + surgery) was given to 22 patients whereas neutron beam therapy--to 30. All patients with osteogenic sarcoma received adjuvant combination chemotherapy. Three-year survival rate was compared to that observed in controls in whom combined treatment had included gamma-therapy. A significant increase in three-year survival rate was observed for osteogenic sarcoma and chordoma whereas for chondrosarcoma the improvement in survival proved insignificant. The use of fast neutrons in combined treatment of bone tumors was considered promising.

  18. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  19. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, David W.; Wemple, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  20. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  1. Advanced plastic scintillators for fast neutron discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Patrick L; Anstey, Mitchell; Doty, F. Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2014-09-01

    The present work addresses the need for solid-state, fast neutron discriminating scintillators that possess higher light yields and faster decay kinetics than existing organic scintillators. These respective attributes are of critical importance for improving the gamma-rejection capabilities and increasing the neutron discrimination performance under high-rate conditions. Two key applications that will benefit from these improvements include large-volume passive detection scenarios as well as active interrogation search for special nuclear materials. Molecular design principles were employed throughout this work, resulting in synthetically tailored materials that possess the targeted scintillation properties.

  2. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this system, objects as small as a coin and as large as a 19 liter container have been radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3 x 10[sup 10] neutrons/second with an average energy of 14. 5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available light-tight cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to produce protons from the neutron beam through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9 x 10[sup 7] n/cm[sup 2] to 3.8 x 10[sup 8] n/cm[sup 2] depending on the type of screen and film. The optimum source-to-film distance was found to be 150 cm. At this distance, the geometric unsharpness was determined to be approximately 2.2-2.3 mm and the smallest hole that could be resolved in a 1.25 cm thick sample had a diameter of 0.079 cm.

  3. Direct fast neutron detection: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Hansen, R.R.; Craig, R.A.; Hensley, W.K.; Hubbard, C.W.; Keller, P.E.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the status of efforts to develop direct fast-neutron detection via proton recoil within plastic scintillator. Since recording proton recoil events is of little practical use without a means to discriminate effectively against gamma-ray interactions, the present effort is concentrated on demonstrating a method that distinguishes between pulse types. The proposed method exploits the different pulse shapes that are to be expected primarily on the basis of the slower speed of the recoiling fission neutrons. Should this effort ultimately prove successful, the resulting novel technology will have the potential to significantly lower cost and increase capability for a number of critical neutron-detection applications. Considerable progress has been made toward a clear and compelling demonstration of this new technique. An exhaustive theoretical and numerical investigation of the method has been completed. The authors have been able to better understand the laboratory results and estimate the performance that could ultimately be achieved using the proposed technique. They have assessed the performance of a number of different algorithms for discriminating between neutron and gamma ray events. The results of this assessment will be critical when the construction of low-cost, field-portable neutron detectors becomes necessary. Finally, a laboratory effort to realize effective discrimination is well underway and has resulted in partial success.

  4. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  5. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  6. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  7. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. T. Kinlaw; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J. T. Johnsom; S. M. Watson

    2012-10-01

    This report documents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory and the University of Michigan in fiscal year (FY) 2012 to examine design parameters related to the use of fast-neutron multiplicity counting for assaying plutonium for materials protection, accountancy, and control purposes. This project seeks to develop a new type of neutron-measurement-based plutonium assay instrument suited for assaying advanced fuel cycle materials. Some current-concept advanced fuels contain high concentrations of plutonium; some of these concept fuels also contain other fissionable actinides besides plutonium. Because of these attributes the neutron emission rates of these new fuels may be much higher, and more difficult to interpret, than measurements made of plutonium-only materials. Fast neutron multiplicity analysis is one approach for assaying these advanced nuclear fuels. Studies have been performed to assess the conceptual performance capabilities of a fast-neutron multiplicity counter for assaying plutonium. Comparisons have been made to evaluate the potential improvements and benefits of fast-neutron multiplicity analyses versus traditional thermal-neutron counting systems. Fast-neutron instrumentation, using for example an array of liquid scintillators such as EJ-309, have the potential to either a) significantly reduce assay measurement times versus traditional approaches, for comparable measurement precision values, b) significantly improve assay precision values, for measurement durations comparable to current-generation technology, or c) moderating improve both measurement precision and measurement durations versus current-generation technology. Using the MCNPX-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation code, studies have been performed to assess the doubles-detection efficiency for a variety of counter layouts of cylindrical liquid scintillator detector cells over one, two, and three rows. Ignoring other considerations, the best detector design is the one with the most

  8. Methods and Instruments for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Cooper, Matthew W.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Warren, Glen A.

    2005-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the performance of a large-area (~0.7 m2) plastic scintillator time-of-flight (TOF) sensor for direct detection of fast neutrons. This type of sensor is a readily area-scalable technology that provides broad-area geometrical coverage at a reasonably low cost. It can yield intrinsic detection efficiencies that compare favorably with moderator-based detection methods. The timing resolution achievable should permit substantially more precise time windowing of return neutron flux than would otherwise be possible with moderated detectors. The energy-deposition threshold imposed on each scintillator contributing to the event-definition trigger in a TOF system can be set to blind the sensor to direct emission from the neutron generator. The primary technical challenge addressed in the project was to understand the capabilities of a neutron TOF sensor in the limit of large scintillator area and small scintillator separation, a size regime in which the neutral particle’s flight path between the two scintillators is not tightly constrained.

  9. Compositional terranes on Mercury: Information from fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Beck, Andrew W.; Feldman, William C.; Frank, Elizabeth A.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Nittler, Larry R.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the flux of fast neutrons at Mercury from 20ºS to the north pole. On the basis of neutron transport simulations and remotely sensed elemental compositions, cosmic-ray-induced fast neutrons are shown to provide a measure of average atomic mass, , a result consistent with earlier studies of the Moon and Vesta. The dynamic range of fast neutron flux at Mercury is 3%, which is smaller than the fast-neutron dynamic ranges of 30% and 6% at the Moon and Vesta, respectively. Fast-neutron data delineate compositional terranes on Mercury that are complementary to those identified with X-ray, gamma-ray, and slow-neutron data. Fast neutron measurements confirm the presence of a region with high , relative to the mean for the planet, that coincides with the previously identified high-Mg region and reveal the existence of at least two additional compositional terranes: a low- region within the northern smooth plains and a high- region near the equator centered near 90ºE longitude. Comparison of the fast-neutron map with elemental composition maps show that variations predicted from the combined element maps are not consistent with the measured variations in fast-neutron flux. This lack of consistency could be due to incomplete coverage for some elements or uncertainties in the interpretations of compositional and neutron data. Currently available data and analyses do not provide sufficient constraints to resolve these differences.

  10. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook; B.C.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues - spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  11. Fast neutron damage in silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Li, Z.; Poesnecker, K.U.

    1988-08-01

    Radiation effects of fast neutrons have been measured in silicon detectors of varying resistivity irradiated to approx. 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/ over periods of weeks. The principal damage effect is increased leakage current due to generation of carriers from defect levels in the depletion region. Damage and leakage current constants have been established for detector resistivities between 10 and 27,000 ohm-cm and lie in the range of 0.7 /minus/ 2 /times/ 10E7 sec/cm/sup 2/ (K) for PuBe neutrons. A slight increase in K was observed for higher resistivities which translates into somewhat improved radiation hardness. A fit of this data was attempted to a two-level recombination formulation of the damage constant. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kecker, K.H.; Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1975-07-22

    This patent relates to an improved fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter that does not require separation of materials before it can be read out, that utilizes materials that do not melt or otherwise degrade at about 300$sup 0$C readout temperature, that provides a more efficient dosimeter, and that can be reused. The dosimeters are fabricated by intimately mixing a TL material, such as CaSO$sub 4$:Dy, with a powdered polyphenyl, such as p-sexiphenyl, and hot- pressing the mixture to form pellets, followed by out-gassing in a vacuum furnace at 150$sup 0$C prior to first use dosimeters. (auth)

  13. Fast-neutron coincidence-counter manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, N.; Atwell, T.L.; Lee, D.M.; Erkkila, B.; Marshall, R.S.; Morgan, A.; Shonrock, C.; Tippens, B.; Van Lyssel, T.

    1982-03-01

    The fast neutron counter (FNC) described in this report is a computer-based assay system employing fast-pulse counting instrumentation. It is installed below a glove box in the metal electrorefining area of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Processing Facility. The instrument was designed to assay plutonium salts and residues from this process and to verify the mass of electrorefined metal. Los Alamos National Laboratory Groups Q-1, Q-3, and CMB-11 carried out a joint test and evaluation plan of this instrument between May 1978 and May 1979. The results of that evaluation, a description of the FNC, and operating instructions for further use are given in this report.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF A FAST NEUTRON MONITORING SYSTEM USING SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EFFECTS, PREAMPLIFIERS, INTEGRATED CIRCUITS, SOLAR CELLS, CALIFORNIUM , RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES, SENSITIVITY, GAMMA RAYS, TEMPERATURE, SILICON ALLOYS, GALLIUM ALLOYS, ARSENIC ALLOYS, CARBIDES, FAST NEUTRONS.

  15. Fast neutrons and misonidazole for malignant astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, P.D.; Pajak, T.F.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Nelson, J.S.; Mansell, J.; Cohen, L.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-five patients with proven malignant supratentorial astrocytomas were entered into a Phase I/II study of misonidazole combined with neutron radiation at Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) between August 1979 and April 1981. The main objectives were to determine tissue tolerance in terms of acute and late effects, and to estimate tumor clearance and survival rates. The total dose was 18.0 Gy given in weekly fractions of 3.0 Gy over 39 days. Four hours before each irradiation, 2.5 gm/m/sup 2/ misonidazole was administered orally. The median survival for the whole group was 12.0 months; 25% were alive at 18 months with some neurological compromise. Acute toxicity was within tolerable limits. Details of toxicity and tissue analysis from post mortems and second craniotomy samples are presented.

  16. [Fast neutron cross section measurements]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ``clean`` and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ``data production`` phase.

  17. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Prototype Development

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Chichester; S.A. Pozzi; J.L. Dolan; M.T. Kinlaw; S.J. Thompson; A.C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J.T. Johnson; S.M. Watson

    2013-09-01

    This document serves as both an FY2103 End-of-Year and End-of-Project report on efforts that resulted in the design of a prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter leveraged upon the findings of previous project efforts. The prototype design includes 32 liquid scintillator detectors with cubic volumes 7.62 cm in dimension configured into 4 stacked rings of 8 detectors. Detector signal collection for the system is handled with a pair of Struck Innovative Systeme 16-channel digitizers controlled by in-house developed software with built-in multiplicity analysis algorithms. Initial testing and familiarization of the currently obtained prototype components is underway, however full prototype construction is required for further optimization. Monte Carlo models of the prototype system were performed to estimate die-away and efficiency values. Analysis of these models resulted in the development of a software package capable of determining the effects of nearest-neighbor rejection methods for elimination of detector cross talk. A parameter study was performed using previously developed analytical methods for the estimation of assay mass variance for use as a figure-of-merit for system performance. A software package was developed to automate these calculations and ensure accuracy. The results of the parameter study show that the prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter design is very nearly optimized under the restraints of the parameter space.

  18. Epithermal neutron beams from the 7 Li(p,n) reaction near the threshold for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Pedrosa, M.; Esquinas, P.; L. Jiménez-Bonilla, P.

    2016-11-01

    Two applications for neutron capture therapy of epithermal neutron beams calculated from the 7Li ( p , n reaction are discussed. In particular, i) for a proton beam of 1920 keV of a 30 mA, a neutron beam of adequate features for BNCT is found at an angle of 80° from the forward direction; and ii) for a proton beam of 1910 keV, a neutron beam is obtained at the forward direction suitable for performing radiobiology experiments for the determination of the biological weighting factors of the fast dose component in neutron capture therapy.

  19. Radiologic validation of a fast neutron multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Blosser, E.; Brandon, J.; Horste, T.; Forman, J. D.

    2007-09-15

    Teletherapy with high linear energy transfer radiations (LET), perhaps more than with low LET types, requires careful beam collimation to limit effects to normal structures. Intensity modulated techniques may also hold promise in this regard. Accordingly, a remote computer-controlled, high-resolution multileaf collimator (MLC) is placed into service at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center's fast neutron therapy center of the Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan. Prior to clinical application the basic radiological properties of the fast neutron MLC are studied. Complicating the evaluation is the mixed neutron and gamma radiation field environment encountered with fast neutron beams. As a reference the MLC performance is compared to an existing multirod collimator (MRC) used at the facility for more than ten years. The MLC aggregate transmission is found to be about 4%, slightly outperforming the MRC. The measured gamma component for a closed collimator is 1.5 times higher for the MLC, compared with the MRC. The different materials used for attenuation, steel and tungsten, respectively account for the difference. The geometry for the MRC is double focused whereas that for the MLC is single focused. The resulting penumbrae agree between the focused axis of the MLC and both axes of the MRC. Penumbra differences between the focused and unfocused axes were not observable at small field sizes and a maximum of about 1 cm for a 25x25 cm{sup 2} field at 2.5 cm depth in water. For a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field the focused penumbra is 9 mm, and the unfocused is 12 mm. The many benefits of the fully automatic MLC over the semimanual MRC are considered to justify this compromise.

  20. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  1. Neutron Measurements for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, Nisy E.

    2000-04-21

    The beam-on time for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is increased significantly compared with conventional radiotherapy treatments. Further, the presence of beam modulation devices may potentially affect neutron production. Therefore, neutron measurements were performed for 15 MV photon beams on a Varian Clinac accelerator to determine the impact of IMRT on neutron dose equivalent to the patient.

  2. Development of fast neutron pinhole camera using nuclear emulsion for neutron emission profile measurement in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Y.; Tomita, H.; Nakayama, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Morishima, K.; Isobe, M.; Cheon, M. S.; Ogawa, K.; Nishitani, T.; Naka, T.; Nakano, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iguchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact fast neutron camera based on a stack of nuclear emulsion plates and a pinhole collimator. The camera was installed at J-port of Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research at National Fusion Research Institute, Republic of Korea. Fast neutron images agreed better with calculated ones based on Monte Carlo neutron simulation using the uniform distribution of Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) neutron source in a torus of 40 cm radius.

  3. Comparison of fast neutron rates for the NEOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y. J.; Jang, C. H.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Seo, K. M.; Han, B. Y.; Sun, G. M.; Jeon, E. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, M. H.; Oh, Y. M.; Park, K. S.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    The fast neutron rates are compared at the site of the NEOS (Neutrino Experiment Oscillation Short baseline) experiment, a short-baseline neutrino experiment located in a tendon gallery of a commercial nuclear power plant using a 0.78-liter liquid scintillator detector. A pulse shape discrimination technique is used to identify neutron signals. The measurements are performed during the nuclear reactor-on and -off periods, and the fast neutron rates are found to be consistent with each other. The fast neutron rate is also measured at an overground site with a negligible overburden and is found to be 100 times higher than that at the site of the NEOS experiment.

  4. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  5. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. A Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, C. C.; McMahan, M.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Johnson, M.

    2008-10-01

    We have built a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector for detection of fast neutrons at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The detector consists of a 0.0625 inch thick polypropylene neutron converter, three GEM foils and a grid of 16 readout pads on a printed circuit board. In this talk, we present images of the GEM detector, the results of tests with ^60Co, AmBe sources and our neutron beam, and a comparison between the proposed fast neutron GEM detector and a fast neutron ^238U fission chamber we purchased. One of the advantages of the GEM detector over the fission chamber is the fact that it provides the x-y position information of the neutrons.

  7. Improved Detection of Fast Neutrons with Solid-State Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, J.; Hassan, S. M.; Clark, E. L.; Talebitaher, A.; Lee, P.

    2014-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for alternative and improved detection of fast neutrons due to the renewed interest in neutron diagnostics applications. Some applications require heavily shielded neutron sources that emit a substantial proportion of their emission as fast neutrons and so require high performance fast neutron detectors. In some applications, the detection of neutron bursts from pulsed neutron sources has to be synchronized to the repetition rate of the source. Typical fast neutron detectors incorporate scintillators that are sensitive to all kinds of ionizing radiations as well as neutrons, and their efficiency is low. In this paper, we present a device based on the principle of neutron activation coupled to solid-state p-i-n diodes connected to a charge amplifier. The charge amplifier is specially developed to operate with high capacitance detectors and has been optimized by the aid of the SPICE program. A solid-state pulse shaping filter follows the charge amplifier, as an inexpensive solution, capable to provide pulses that can be counted by a digital counter.

  8. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  9. Neutron-Mirror-Neutron Oscillations: How Fast Might They Be?

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Zurab; Bento, Luis

    2006-03-03

    We discuss the phenomenological implications of the neutron (n) oscillation into the mirror neutron (n{sup '}), a hypothetical particle exactly degenerate in mass with the neutron but sterile to normal matter. We show that the present experimental data allow a maximal n-n{sup '} oscillation in vacuum with a characteristic time {tau} much shorter than the neutron lifetime, in fact as small as 1 sec. This phenomenon may manifest in neutron disappearance and regeneration experiments perfectly accessible to present experimental capabilities and may also have interesting astrophysical consequences, in particular, for the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  10. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER USING SPACED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR MEASURING TOTAL ENERGY OF NEUTRONS CAPTURED

    DOEpatents

    Love, T.A.; Murray, R.B.

    1964-04-14

    A fast neutron spectrometer was designed, which utilizes a pair of opposed detectors having a layer of /sup 6/LiF between to produce alpha and T pair for each neutron captured to provide signals, which, when combined, constitute a measure of neutron energy. (AEC)

  11. Fast neutron activation analysis by means of low voltage neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.

    A description of D-T neutron generator (NG) is presented. This machine can be used for fast neutron activation analysis applied to determine some selected elements, especially light elements, in different materials. Procedure of neutron flux determination and efficiency calculation is described. Examples of testing some Egyptian natural cosmetics are given.

  12. Monte Carlo Calculations for Neutron and Gamma Radiation Fields on a Fast Neutron Irradiation Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A.; Ramalho, A.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Fernandes, A.; Barradas, N.; Marques, J. G.; Prata, J.; Chaussy, Ch.

    We used the Monte Carlo program MCNP to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes on a fast neutron irradiation facility being installed on the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The purpose of this facility is to provide a fast neutron beam for irradiation of electronic circuits. The gamma dose should be minimized. This is achieved by placing a lead shield preceded by a thin layer of boral. A fast neutron flux of the order of 109 n/cm2s is expected at the exit of the tube, while the gamma radiation is kept below 20 Gy/h. We will present results of the neutron and gamma doses for several locations along the tube and different thickness of the lead shield. We found that the neutron beam is very collimated at the end of the tube with a dominant component on the fast region.

  13. A multipurpose fast neutron beam capability at the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dioni, Luca; Stout, Brian

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the possible future use of the CEA Cadarache MASURCA experimental fast reactor to generate a fairly high-intensity continuous beam of fast neutrons, having energies distributed in the 1 KeV to 5 MeV range. Such an extracted beam of fast neutrons, tailorable in intensity, size and energy, would be rather unique; it would be of interest to neutron-based research and could open a range of new applications at MASURCA. We report the results of numerical simulations which have been performed to evaluate the feasibility of such a beam port and to characterize it spectrally. (authors)

  14. The Use of Fast Neutron Detection for Materials Accountability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, L. F.; Chapline, G. F.; Glenn, A. M.; Kerr, P. L.; Kim, K. S.; Ouedraogo, S. A.; Prasad, M. K.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2014-02-01

    For many years at LLNL, we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) inherent in man-portable systems. Historically, thermal neutron detectors (mainly 3He) were used, taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections, but more recently we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics that respond over 1000 times faster (nanoseconds versus tens of microseconds) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages, since the inherent nanosecond production timescales of fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost in the thermalization of thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of high efficiency counters. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise in measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed neutron sources (e.g., Pu oxide or Mixed Cm and Pu). Here we report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array and promote the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator becomes competitive and even surpasses the precision of 3He counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  15. GEM-based detectors for thermal and fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Foggetta, L.; Muraro, A.; Valente, P.

    2015-06-01

    Lately the problem of 3He replacement for neutron detection stimulated an intense activity research on alternative technologies based on alternative neutron converters. This paper presents briefly the results obtained with new GEM detectors optimized for fast and thermal neutrons. For thermal neutrons, we realized a side-on GEM detector based on a series of boron-coated alumina sheets placed perpendicularly to the incident neutron beam direction. This prototype has been tested at n@BTF photo-production neutron facilty in order to test its effectiveness under a very high flux gamma background. For fast neutrons, we developed new GEM detectors (called nGEM) for the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER (RFX-Consortium, Italy) and as beam monitor for fast neutrons lines at spallation sources. The nGEM is a Triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with a polyethylene layer used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a medium size (30 × 25 cm2 active area) nGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beam line.

  16. Real-time detection of fast and thermal neutrons in radiotherapy with CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, Nicolas; Higueret, Stephane; Elazhar, Halima; Combe, Rodolphe; Meyer, Philippe; Dehaynin, Nicolas; Taupin, Florence; Husson, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    The peripheral dose distribution is a growing concern for the improvement of new external radiation modalities. Secondary particles, especially photo-neutrons produced by the accelerator, irradiate the patient more than tens of centimeters away from the tumor volume. However the out-of-field dose is still not estimated accurately by the treatment planning softwares. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a specially designed CMOS sensor for fast and thermal neutron monitoring in radiotherapy. The 14 microns-thick sensitive layer and the integrated electronic chain of the CMOS are particularly suitable for real-time measurements in γ/n mixed fields. An experimental field size dependency of the fast neutron production rate, supported by Monte Carlo simulations and CR-39 data, has been observed. This dependency points out the potential benefits of a real-time monitoring of fast and thermal neutron during beam intensity modulated radiation therapies.

  17. Development of fast neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chia Jia; Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high installation cost, the safety concern and the immobility of the research reactors, the neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator is proposed. Since the neutrons generated from a portable neutron generator are mostly the fast neutrons, the system is emphasized on using the fast neutrons for the purpose of conducting the radiography. In order to suppress the influence of X-ray produced by the neutron generator, a combination of a shielding material sandwiched between two identical imaging plates is used. A binary XOR operation is then applied for combining the information from the imaging plates. The raw images obtained confirm that the X-ray really has a large effect and that XOR operation can help enhance the effect of the neutrons.

  18. Development of fast neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Chia Jia Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai

    2016-01-22

    Due to the high installation cost, the safety concern and the immobility of the research reactors, the neutron radiography system based on portable neutron generator is proposed. Since the neutrons generated from a portable neutron generator are mostly the fast neutrons, the system is emphasized on using the fast neutrons for the purpose of conducting the radiography. In order to suppress the influence of X-ray produced by the neutron generator, a combination of a shielding material sandwiched between two identical imaging plates is used. A binary XOR operation is then applied for combining the information from the imaging plates. The raw images obtained confirm that the X-ray really has a large effect and that XOR operation can help enhance the effect of the neutrons.

  19. C7LYC Scintillators and Fast Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Brown, T.; Doucet, E.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; D'Olympia, N.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2016-09-01

    Cs2 LiYCl6 (CLYC) scintillators detect both gammas and neutrons with excellent pulse shape discrimination. At UML, fast neutron measurements with a 16-element 1''x1'' CLYC array show promise for low energy nuclear science. CLYC detects fast neutrons via the 35Cl (n,p) reaction (resolution < 10 % at < 8 MeV). In our 7Li-enriched C7LYC, the thermal neutron response from the 6Li(n, α)t reaction is virtually eliminated. The low intrinsic efficiency of CLYC for fast neutrons (< 1 %) is offset by increased solid angle with the array placed near the target, since TOF is not needed for energy resolution. The array was tested at LANL for measuring elastic and inelastic neutron scattering on 56Fe. The incident energy from the white neutron source was measured via TOF, and the scattered neutron energy via the pulse height in CLYC. The array was also tested at CARIBU for measuring beta-delayed neutrons. Larger CLYC crystals are now a reality. Measurements with the first 3'' x 3'' C7LYC crystal are in progress at UML. Results will be discussed in the context of constructing a C7LYC array at FRIB for reaction and decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich fragments. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008.

  20. Point Scattered Function (PScF) for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohamed H.

    2009-08-01

    Fast neutron radiography opened up a new range of possibilities to image extremely dense objects. The removal of the scattering effect is one of the most challenging problems in neutron imaging. Neutron scattering in fast neutron radiography did not receive much attention compared with X-ray and thermal neutron radiography. The purpose of this work is to investigate the behavior of the Point Scattered Function (PScF) as applied in fast neutron radiography. The PScF was calculated using MCNP as a spatial distribution of scattered neutrons over the detector surface for one emitting source element. Armament and explosives materials, namely, Rifle steel, brass, aluminum and trinitrotoluene (TNT) were simulated. Effect of various sample thickness and sample-to-detector distance were considered. Simulated sample geometries included a slab with varying thickness, a sphere with varying radii, and a cylinder with varying base radii. Different neutron sources, namely, Cf-252, DT as well as DD neutron sources were considered. Neutron beams with zero degree divergence angle; and beams with varying angles related to the normal to the source plane were simulated. Curve fitting of the obtained PScF, in the form of Gaussian function, were given to be used in future work using image restoration codes. Analytical representation of the height as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the obtained Gaussian functions eliminates the need to calculate the PScF for sample parameters that were not investigated in this study.

  1. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  2. A Compact Neutron Source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a neutron generator scheme based on a high-current ion source with electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation. The most promising application of this neutron generator is a medical one, namely, boron neutron capture therapy of oncological diseases. A possibility for using a multi-aperture extraction system for high-current ion beam generation to increase the total current is studied. It is shown that the parameters of the plasma flow leaving a magnetic trap permit the effective use of multi-aperture systems without a significant loss in the ion beam current density. Thus, the use of multi-aperture systems in the ion source of a neutron generator can significantly increase the total neutron yield.

  3. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  4. Spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons using pin diode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki Dizaji, H.; Kakavand, T.; Abbasi Davani, F.

    2014-03-01

    Elastic scattering of light nuclei, especially hydrogen, is widely used for detection of fast neutrons. Semiconductor devices based on silicon detectors are frequently used for different radiation detections. In this work, a neutron spectrometer consisting of a pin diode coupled with a polyethylene converter and aluminum degrader layers has been developed. Aluminum layers are used as discriminators of different neutron energies for detectors. The response of the converter-degrader-pin diode configuration, the optimum thickness of the converter and the degrader layers have been extracted using MCNP and SRIM simulation codes. The possibility of using this type of detector for fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry has been investigated. A fairly good agreement was seen between neutron energy spectrum and dose obtained from our configurations and these specifications from an 241Am-Be neutron source.

  5. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  6. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  7. Procedure developed for reporting fast-neutron exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Procedure for reporting fast-neutron exposure involves determination of the spectrum shape and absolute magnitude, selection of an energy weighting for the neutrons, and definition of a unit for reporting exposure. Using this method, comparisons of irradiation data from different reactors will be free from errors resulting from differences between the spectra.

  8. Packed rod neutron shield for fast nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Eck, John E.; Kasberg, Alvin H.

    1978-01-01

    A fast neutron nuclear reactor including a core and a plurality of vertically oriented neutron shield assemblies surrounding the core. Each assembly includes closely packed cylindrical rods within a polygonal metallic duct. The shield assemblies are less susceptible to thermal stresses and are less massive than solid shield assemblies, and are cooled by liquid coolant flow through interstices among the rods and duct.

  9. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  10. Computer dosimetry for flattened and wedged fast-neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Smith, A R; Almond, P R; Otte, V A; Smathers, J B

    1976-01-01

    Beam flattening by the use of polyethylene filters has been developed for the 50-MeV d in equilibrium Be fast-neutron therapy beam at the Texas A&M Variable-Energy Cyclotron (TAMVEC) as a result of the need for a more uniform dose distribution at depth within the patient. A computer algorithm has been developed that allows the use of a modified decrement line method to calculate dose distributions; standards decrement line methods do not apply because of off-axis peaking. The dose distributions for measured flattened beams are transformed into distributions that are physically equivalent to an unflattened distribution. In the transformed space, standard decrement line theory yields a distribution for any field size which, by applying the inverse transformation, generates the flattened dose distribution, including the off-axis peaking. A semiempirical model has been constructed that allows the calculation of dose distributions for wedged beams from open-beam data.

  11. Chemical weapons detection by fast neutron activation analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, P.; Ma, J. L.; Froment, D.; Jaureguy, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    A neutron diagnostic experimental apparatus has been tested for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions. Designed to potentially satisfy a significant number of van-mobile requirements, this equipment is based on an easy to use industrial sealed tube neutron generator that interrogates the munitions of interest with 14 MeV neutrons. Gamma ray spectra are detected with a high purity germanium detector, especially shielded from neutrons and gamma ray background. A mobile shell holder has been used. Possible configurations allow the detection, in continuous or in pulsed modes, of gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering, from thermal neutron capture, and from fast or thermal neutron activation. Tests on full scale sealed munitions with chemical simulants show that those with chlorine (old generation materials) are detectable in a few minutes, and those including phosphorus (new generation materials) in nearly the same time.

  12. Fast and thermal neutron radiographies based on a compact neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantidis, Jacob G.; Dimitrios, Bandekas V.; Constantinos, Potolias; Nick, Vordos

    2012-09-01

    Fast neutrons that are produced via compact neutron generators have been used for thermal and fast neutron radiographies. In order to investigate objects with different sizes and produce radiographs of variable qualities, the proposed facility has been considered with a wide range of values for the parameters characterizing the thermal and fast neutron radiographies. The proposed system is designed according to article 4 of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive 2002/95/EC, hence, excluded the use of cadmium and lead, and has been simulated using the MCNP4B code. The Monte Carlo calculations were carried out using three different neutron sources: deuterium-deuterium, deuterium-tritium, and tritium-tritium neutron generators.

  13. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  14. Pulsed thermal neutron source at the fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Grzegorz; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Krynicka, Ewa

    2009-06-01

    A small pulsed thermal neutron source has been designed based on results of the MCNP simulations of the thermalization of 14 MeV neutrons in a cluster-moderator which consists of small moderating cells decoupled by an absorber. Optimum dimensions of the single cell and of the whole cluster have been selected, considering the thermal neutron intensity and the short decay time of the thermal neutron flux. The source has been built and the test experiments have been performed. To ensure the response is not due to the choice of target for the experiments, calculations have been done to demonstrate the response is valid regardless of the thermalization properties of the target.

  15. Prompt Emission in Fission Induced with Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Halipré, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission data in fission integrates a large amount of information on the fission process and can shed light on the partition of energy. Measured emission spectra, average energies and multiplicities also provide important information for energy applications. While current reactors mostly use thermal neutron spectra, the future reactors of Generation IV will use fast neutron spectra for which little experimental prompt emission data exist. Initial investigations on prompt emission in fast neutron induced fission have recently been carried out at the LICORNE facility at the IPN Orsay, which exploits inverse reactions to produce naturally collimated, intense beams of neutrons. We report on first results with LICORNE to measure prompt fission gamma-ray spectra, average energies and multiplicities for 235U and 238U. Current improvements and upgrades being carried out on the LICORNE facility will also be described, including the development of a H2 gas target to reduce parasitic backgrounds and increase intensities, and the deployment of 11B beams to extend the effective LICORNE neutron energy range up to 12 MeV. Prospects for future experimental studies of prompt gamma-ray and neutron emission in fast neutron induced fission will be presented.

  16. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  17. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  18. The accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sycheva, T.; Taskaev, S.; Zaidi, L.

    2016-11-01

    The accelerator based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is proposed, created and used in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. In 2014, with the support of the Russian Science Foundation created the BNCT laboratory for the purpose to the end of 2016 get the neutron flux, suitable for BNCT. For getting 3 mA 2.3 MeV proton beam, was created a new type accelerator - tandem accelerator with vacuum isolation. On this moment, we have a stationary proton beam with 2.3 MeV and current 1.75 mA. Generation of neutrons is carried out by dropping proton beam on to lithium target as a result of threshold reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. Established facility is a unique scientific installation. It provides a generating of neutron flux, including a monochromatic energy neutrons, gamma radiation, alpha-particles and positrons, and may be used by other research groups for carrying out scientific researches. The article describes an accelerator neutron source, presents and discusses the result of experiments and declares future plans.

  19. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  20. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; ...

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV andmore » a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.« less

  1. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  2. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  3. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  4. Laser-based fast-neutron spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; Kishon, Itay; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Schanz, Victor A.; Tebartz, Alexandra; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald C.; Johnson, Randall Philip; Shimada, Tsutomu; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Roth, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Great progress has been made in recent years in realizing compact, laser-based neutron generators. These devices, however, are inapplicable for conducting energy-resolved fast-neutron radiography because of the electromagnetic noise produced by the interaction of a strong laser field with matter. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel neutron time-of-flight detector, largely immune to electromagnetic noise. The detector is based on plastic scintillator, only a few mm in size, which is coupled to a silicon photo-multiplier by a long optical fiber. I will present results we obtained at the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the summer of 2016. Using this detector, we recorded high resolution, low-background fast neutron spectra generated by the interaction of laser accelerated deuterons with Beryllium. The quality of these spectra was sufficient to resolve the unique neutron absorption spectra of different elements and thus it is the first demonstration of laser-based fast neutron spectroscopy. I will discuss how this achievement paves the way to realizing compact neutron radiography systems for research, security, and commercial applications.

  5. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  6. The radiation biology of boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Coderre, J A; Morris, G M

    1999-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a targeted radiation therapy that significantly increases the therapeutic ratio relative to conventional radiotherapeutic modalities. BNCT is a binary approach: A boron-10 (10B)-labeled compound is administered that delivers high concentrations of 10B to the target tumor relative to surrounding normal tissues. This is followed by irradiation with thermal neutrons or epithermal neutrons which become thermalized at depth in tissues. The short range (5-9 microm) of the alpha and 7Li particles released from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li neutron capture reaction make the microdistribution of 10B of critical importance in therapy. The radiation field in tissues during BNCT consists of a mixture of components with differing LET characteristics. Studies have been carried out in both normal and neoplastic tissues to characterize the relative biological effectiveness of each radiation component. The distribution patterns and radiobiological characteristics of the two 10B delivery agents in current clinical use, the amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and the sulfhydryl borane (BSH), have been evaluated in a range of normal tissues and tumor types. Considered overall, BSH-mediated BNCT elicits proportionately less damage to normal tissue than does BNCT mediated with BPA. However, BPA exhibits superior in vivo tumor targeting and has proven much more effective in the treatment of brain tumors in rats. In terms of fractionation effects, boron neutron capture irradiation modalities are comparable with other high-LET radiation modalities such as fast-neutron therapy. There was no appreciable advantage in increasing the number of daily fractions of thermal neutrons beyond two with regard to sparing of normal tissue in the rat spinal cord model. The experimental studies described in this review constitute the radiobiological basis for the new BNCT clinical trials for glioblastoma at Brookhaven National Laboratory, at the Massachusetts Institute of

  7. Fast Neutron Detection using Pixelated CdZnTe Spectrometers

    DOE PAGES

    Streicher, Michael; Goodman, David; Zhu, Yuefeng; ...

    2017-05-29

    One important important signature of special nuclear materials (SNM) are fast neutrons. Fast neutrons have a low natural background rate and readily penetrate high atomic number materials which easily shield gamma-ray signatures. Thus, fast neutrons provide a complementary signal to gamma rays for detecting shielded SNM. Scattering kinematics dictate that a large nucleus (such as Cd or Te) will recoil with small kinetic energy after an elastic collision with a fast neutron. Charge carrier recombination and quenching further reduce the recorded energy deposited. Thus, the energy threshold of CdZnTe detectors must be very low in order to sense the smallmore » signals from these recoils. Here, the threshold was reduced to less than 5 keVee to demonstrate that the 5.9 keV x-ray line from 55Fe could be separated from electronic noise. Elastic scattering neutron interactions were observed as small energy depositions (less than 20 keVee) using digitally-sampled pulse waveforms from pixelated CdZnTe detectors. Characteristic gamma-ray lines from inelastic neutron scattering were also observed.« less

  8. Biological effectiveness of fast neutrons on a murine osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of fast neutrons and gamma rays on a murine osteosarcoma was studied. The NROS tumor, a radiation-induced osteosarcoma in a C3H mouse, was transplanted into the right hind legs of syngeneic female mice and locally irradiated with single or four daily doses of either fast neutrons or gamma rays. The NROS contained 13-30% hypoxic cells. It took approximately 7 days for the NROS tumor to show apparent reoxygenation following gamma ray irradiations. Two assays were used to determine the neutrons' relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to gamma rays: tumor growth delay time and tumor control dose. The largest RBE of 4.5 was obtained at the smallest dose of neutrons examined, followed by a gradual decrease down to 2.3. The tumor growth delay assay indicated that the RBE values of 2.6-3.1 after single doses of fast neutrons increased to 3.1-4.5 after four daily fractions. The 50% tumor control doses were 78.5 Gy and 33.0 Gy after single doses of gamma rays and fast neutrons, resulting in an RBE of 2.3. Fractionated doses increased the RBE to 2.6. Mitotic cells disappeared shortly after irradiation but reappeared 7 days after irradiation.

  9. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B.; Belov, V.; Taskaev, S.

    2006-05-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy of cancer is under construction now at the Budker Institute. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target producing neutrons via threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at 10 mA proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, choice of target was substantiated. The main problems of lithium target were determined to be: 7Be radioactive isotope activation, keeping lithium layer solid, presence of photons resulted from proton inelastic scattering on lithium nuclei, and radiation blistering. The results of thermal testing of target prototype, investigation of radiation blistering and several simulations are presented. It becomes clear that water is preferable for cooling this target, and that the lithium target 10 cm in diameter is able to run up to 25 kW proton beam before melting. The conception of optimal target is proposed: thin and easy to detach metal disk 10 cm in diameter, evaporated with thin layer of pure lithium from the side of proton beam exposure: its back is intensively cooled with turbulent water flow to maintain lithium layer solid. Design of target for the neutron source constructed at BINP is shown. Conceptions of radiation protection and neutrons, γ-rays and α- particles diagnostics are presented. The immediate plans on obtaining epithermal neutron beam are declared.

  10. Lithium-containing scintillators for thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma detection

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Carman, M. Leslie; Faust, Michelle A.

    2016-03-01

    In one embodiment, a scintillator includes a scintillator material; a primary fluor, and a Li-containing compound, where the Li-containing compound is soluble in the primary fluor, and where the scintillator exhibits an optical response signature for thermal neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for fast neutrons and gamma rays.

  11. Approach to magnetic neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. . E-mail: spod@sky.chph.ras.ru; Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Filippov, Victor I.; Komissarova, Lubov Kh.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy can be described as a combination of two methods: magnetic localization of drugs using magnetically targeted carriers and neutron capture therapy itself. Methods and Materials: In this work, we produced and tested two types of particles for such therapy. Composite ultradispersed ferro-carbon (Fe-C) and iron-boron (Fe-B) particles were formed from vapors of respective materials. Results: Two-component ultradispersed particles, containing Fe and C, were tested as magnetic adsorbent of L-boronophenylalanine and borax and were shown that borax sorption could be effective for creation of high concentration of boron atoms in the area of tumor. Kinetics of boron release into the physiologic solution demonstrate that ultradispersed Fe-B (10%) could be applied for an effective magnetic neutron capture therapy. Conclusion: Both types of the particles have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, allow to form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  12. Response of six neutron survey meters in mixed fields of fast and thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Kim, B H; Chang, I; Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Pradhan, A S

    2013-10-01

    Calibration neutron fields have been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to study the responses of commonly used neutron survey meters in the presence of fast neutrons of energy around 10 MeV. The neutron fields were produced by using neutrons from the (241)Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile and a DT neutron generator. The spectral details and the ambient dose equivalent rates of the calibration fields were established, and the responses of six neutron survey meters were evaluated. Four single-moderator-based survey meters exhibited an under-responses ranging from ∼9 to 55 %. DINEUTRUN, commonly used in fields around nuclear reactors, exhibited an over-response by a factor of three in the thermal neutron field and an under-response of ∼85 % in the mixed fields. REM-500 (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) exhibited a response close to 1.0 in the fast neutron fields and an under-response of ∼50 % in the thermal neutron field.

  13. Digital Acquisition Development for Fast Neutron Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagren, T.; Mosby, S.; Mona Collaboration; Lansce P-27 Team

    2015-10-01

    The use of the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) at FRIB requires a thorough understanding of how neutrons propagate through the array. This leads to the increasing importance of accuracy in detector response simulations, particularly in the case of FRIB's higher beam energies. An upcoming experiment at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Lab will benchmark neutron propagation through the MoNA array and provide a more complete validation of the simulation software. LANSCE also hosts the Chi-Nu experiment, which seeks to measure fission output neutrons using the high-intensity neutron beams there. In both experiments, the instantaneous rate on the detectors involved is expected to be very high, due to the LANSCE/WNR beam structure. Therefore, waveform digitizers with on-board processing are required in order for the experiments to succeed. These digitizers provide on-board timing algorithms using FPGA firmware, and several tests were preformed in order to determine what the optimal timing filter settings were for a variety of detectors, including the plastic and liquid scintillators to be used in MoNA and Chi-Nu respectively. This work will inform the execution of the MoNA and Chi-Nu experiments at LANSCE. The details of the methods used and results will be presented. Supported by funding through Los Alamos National Lab and NSF Grant PHY-1506402.

  14. Fast neutron scattering near shell closures: Scandium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1992-08-01

    Neutron differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from [approx] 1.5 to 10 MeV with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior of the scattering processes. Neutrons corresponding to excitations of 465 [plus minus] 23, 737 [plus minus] 20, 1017 [plus minus] 34, 1251 [plus minus] 20, 1432 [plus minus] 23 and 1692 [plus minus] 25 keV are observed. It is shown that the observables, including the absorption cross section, are reasonably described with a conventional optical-statistical model having energy-dependent geometric parameters. These energy dependencies are alleviated when the model is extended to include the contributions of the dispersion relationship. The model parameters are conventional, with no indication of anomalous behavior of the neutron interaction with [sup 45]Sc, five nucleons from the doubly closed shell at [sup 40]Ca.

  15. Fast neutron scattering near shell closures: Scandium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1992-08-01

    Neutron differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from {approx} 1.5 to 10 MeV with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior of the scattering processes. Neutrons corresponding to excitations of 465 {plus_minus} 23, 737 {plus_minus} 20, 1017 {plus_minus} 34, 1251 {plus_minus} 20, 1432 {plus_minus} 23 and 1692 {plus_minus} 25 keV are observed. It is shown that the observables, including the absorption cross section, are reasonably described with a conventional optical-statistical model having energy-dependent geometric parameters. These energy dependencies are alleviated when the model is extended to include the contributions of the dispersion relationship. The model parameters are conventional, with no indication of anomalous behavior of the neutron interaction with {sup 45}Sc, five nucleons from the doubly closed shell at {sup 40}Ca.

  16. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  17. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Leal, B.; Martınez, H.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-01

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / μSv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ μSv, 0093 b/μSv, 0.14 b/μSv, 0.17 b/μSv, 0051 b/μSv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90° this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in μSv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression Ri = Bi / Si where Bi is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (Si) is given for each detector in (b / μSv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm-2), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 μSv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion devices.

  18. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Leal, B.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-03

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / {mu}Sv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ {mu}Sv, 0093 b/{mu}Sv, 0.14 b/{mu}Sv, 0.17 b/{mu}Sv, 0051 b/{mu}Sv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90 Degree-Sign this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in {mu}Sv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression R{sub i}= B{sub i} / S{sub i} where B{sub i} is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (S{sub i}) is given for each detector in (b / {mu}Sv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm{sup -2}), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 {mu}Sv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion

  19. A capture-gated fast neutron detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yang, Yi-Gang; Tai, Yang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    To address the problem of the shortage of neutron detectors used in radiation portal monitors (RPMs), caused by the 3He supply crisis, research on a cadmium-based capture-gated fast neutron detector is presented in this paper. The detector is composed of many 1 cm × 1 cm × 20 cm plastic scintillator cuboids covered by 0.1 mm thick film of cadmium. The detector uses cadmium to absorb thermal neutrons and produce capture γ-rays to indicate the detection of neutrons, and uses plastic scintillator to moderate neutrons and register γ-rays. This design removes the volume competing relationship in traditional 3He counter-based fast neutron detectors, which hinders enhancement of the neutron detection efficiency. Detection efficiency of 21.66% ± 1.22% has been achieved with a 40.4 cm × 40.4 cm × 20 cm overall detector volume. This detector can measure both neutrons and γ-rays simultaneously. A small detector (20.2 cm × 20.2 cm × 20 cm) demonstrated a 3.3 % false alarm rate for a 252Cf source with a neutron yield of 1841 n/s from 50 cm away within 15 s measurement time. It also demonstrated a very low (<0.06%) false alarm rate for a 3.21×105 Bq 137Cs source. This detector offers a potential single-detector replacement for both neutron and the γ-ray detectors in RPM systems. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175098, 11375095)

  20. A High-Sensitivity Fast Neutron Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, John E. M.; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Cabrera-Palmer, Belkis; Gerling, Mark D; Marleau, Peter; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Reyna, David

    2014-10-01

    A wide range of NSC (Neutron Scatter Camera) activities were conducted under this lifecycle plan. This document outlines the highlights of those activities, broadly characterized as system improvements, laboratory measurements, and deployments, and presents sample results in these areas. Additional information can be found in the documents that reside in WebPMIS.

  1. Constraints on Vesta's elemental composition: Fast neutron measurements by Dawn's gamma ray and neutron detector

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David J; Peplowski, Patrick N; Prettyman, Thomas H; Feldman, William C; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W; Reedy, Robert C; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surface composition information from Vesta is reported using fast neutron data collected by the gamma ray and neutron detector on the Dawn spacecraft. After correcting for variations due to hydrogen, fast neutrons show a compositional dynamic range and spatial variability that is consistent with variations in average atomic mass from howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites. These data provide additional compositional evidence that Vesta is the parent body to HED meteorites. A subset of fast neutron data having lower statistical precision show spatial variations that are consistent with a 400 ppm variability in hydrogen concentrations across Vesta and supports the idea that Vesta's hydrogen is due to long-term delivery of carbonaceous chondrite material. PMID:26074718

  2. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  3. MONDO: a neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Gasparini, L.; Mirabelli, R.; Pinci, D.; Patera, V.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.; Stoppa, D.; Traini, G.; Sarti, A.

    2017-04-01

    Tumour control is performed in particle therapy using particles and ions, whose high irradiation precision enhances the effectiveness of the treatment, while sparing the healthy tissue surrounding the target volume. Dose range monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interacting with the patient’s body have already been proposed, but no attempt has been made yet to exploit the detection of the abundant neutron component. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region, precise measurements of their flux, production energy and angle distributions are eagerly sought in order to improve the treatment planning system (TPS) software. It will thus be possible to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region, but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. The aforementioned issues underline the importance of an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterisation of neutron production, aimed at the measurement of their abundance, emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aimed at high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision are addressed within the MONDO (monitor for neutron dose in hadrontherapy) project, whose main goal is to develop a tracking detector that can target fast and ultrafast neutrons. A full reconstruction of two consecutive elastic scattering interactions undergone by the neutrons inside the detector material will be used to measure their energy and direction. The preliminary results of an MC simulation performed using the FLUKA software are presented here, together with the DSiPM (digital SiPM) readout implementation. New detector readout implementations specifically tailored to the MONDO tracker are also discussed, and the neutron detection efficiency attainable with the proposed neutron tracking strategy are reported.

  4. MONDO: a neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission characterisation.

    PubMed

    Marafini, M; Gasparini, L; Mirabelli, R; Pinci, D; Patera, V; Sciubba, A; Spiriti, E; Stoppa, D; Traini, G; Sarti, A

    2017-04-21

    Tumour control is performed in particle therapy using particles and ions, whose high irradiation precision enhances the effectiveness of the treatment, while sparing the healthy tissue surrounding the target volume. Dose range monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interacting with the patient's body have already been proposed, but no attempt has been made yet to exploit the detection of the abundant neutron component. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region, precise measurements of their flux, production energy and angle distributions are eagerly sought in order to improve the treatment planning system (TPS) software. It will thus be possible to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region, but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. The aforementioned issues underline the importance of an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterisation of neutron production, aimed at the measurement of their abundance, emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aimed at high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision are addressed within the MONDO (monitor for neutron dose in hadrontherapy) project, whose main goal is to develop a tracking detector that can target fast and ultrafast neutrons. A full reconstruction of two consecutive elastic scattering interactions undergone by the neutrons inside the detector material will be used to measure their energy and direction. The preliminary results of an MC simulation performed using the FLUKA software are presented here, together with the DSiPM (digital SiPM) readout implementation. New detector readout implementations specifically tailored to the MONDO tracker are also discussed, and the neutron detection efficiency attainable with the proposed neutron tracking strategy are reported.

  5. [Fast neutrons in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Chernichenko, V A; Tolstopiatov, B A; Monich, A Iu; Konovalenko, V F; Galakhin, K A; Palivets, A Iu; Vorona, A M

    1990-01-01

    Results of treatment of 101 cases of soft tissue sarcoma are presented in the paper. Preoperative irradiation technique and radical program of treatment are described. Combined radiation and surgical treatment was given to 45 patients whereas conservative--to 56. Sixty-three cases received adjuvant combination chemotherapy. Response and three-year survival rates were compared to those in control group treated by photons. The results observed in patients of combined and conservative treatment groups who had been irradiated with fast neutrons proved significantly better than in controls. These data suggest vistas in application of fast neutron irradiation for the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas.

  6. Coupled hydro-neutronic calculations for fast burst reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Paternoster, R.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.; McGhee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for determining the fully coupled neutronic/hydrodynamic response of fast burst reactors (FBR) under disruptive accident conditions. Two code systems, PAD (1 -D Lagrangian) and NIKE-PAGOSA (3-D Eulerian) were used to accomplish this. This is in contrast to the typical methodology that computes these responses by either single point kinetics or in a decoupled manner. This methodology is enabled by the use of modem supercomputers (CM-200). Two examples of this capability are presented: an unreflected metal fast burst assembly, and a reflected fast burst assembly typical of the Skua or SPR-III class of fast burst reactor.

  7. Geochemistry at 4 Vesta: Observations Using Fast Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Dawn is currently in orbit around the asteroid 4 Vesta, and one of the major objectives of the mission is to probe the relationship of Vesta to the Howardite, Eucrite, and Diogenite (HED) meteorites. As Vesta is an example of a differentiated planetary embryo, Dawn will also provide fundamental information about planetary evolution in the early solar system [1]. To help accomplish this overall goal, the Dawn spacecraft carries the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND). GRaND uses planetary gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy to measure the surface elemental composition of Vesta and will provide information that is unique and complementary to that provided by the other Dawn instruments and investigations. Gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy is a standard technique for measuring planetary compositions [2], having successfully made measurements at near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, Mercury and now Vesta. GRaND has made the first measurements of the neutron spectrum from any asteroid (previous asteroid measurements were only made with gamma-rays). Dawn has been collecting data at Vesta since July 2011. The prime data collection period for GRaND is the Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO), which started on 12 December 2011 and will last through spring 2012. During LAMO, the Dawn spacecraft orbits at an average altitude of 210 km above the surface of Vesta, which allows good neutron and gamma-ray signals to be detected from Vesta. A description of the overall goals of GRaND and a summary of the initial findings are given elsewhere [3,4]. The subject of this study is to present the information that will be returned from GRaND using fast neutron measurements. Here, we discuss what fast neutrons can reveal about Vesta s surface composition, how such data can address Dawn science goals, and describe fast neutron measurements made in the early portion of the Vesta LAMO phase.

  8. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; PL Reeder; RR Hansen

    1998-10-18

    It is widely acknowledged that Mure neutron-detection technologies will need to offer increased performance at lower cost. One clear route toward these goals is rapid and direct detection of fast neutrons prior to moderation. This report describes progress to date in an effort to achieve such neutron detection via proton recoil within plastic scintillator. Since recording proton-recoil events is of little practical use without a means to discriminate effectively against gamma-ray interactions, the present effort is concentrated on demonstrating a method that distinguishes between pulse types. The proposed method exploits the substantial difference in the speed of fission neutrons and gamma-ray photons. Should this effort ultimately prove successful, the resulting. technology would make a valuable contribution toward meeting the neutron-detection needs of the next century. This report describes the detailed investigations that have been part of Pacific Northwest National Laborato@s efforts to demonstrate direct fast-neutron detection in the laboratory. Our initial approach used a single, solid piece of scintillator along with the electronics needed for pulse-type differentiation. Work to date has led to the conclusion that faster scintillator and/or faster electronics will be necessary before satisfactory gamma-ray discrimination is achieved with this approach. Acquisition and testing of both faster scintillator and faster electronics are currently in progress. The "advanced" approach to direct fast-neutron detection uses a scintillating assembly with an overall density that is lower than that of ordinary plastic scintillator. The lower average density leads to longer interaction times for both neutrons and gamma rays, allowing easier discrimination. The modeling, optimization, and design of detection systems using this approach are described in detail.

  9. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-10

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed {approx}10{sup 3} yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  10. Fast Fossil Rotation of Neutron Star Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ~103 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  11. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nedunchezhian, Kavitaa; Thiruppathy, Manigandan; Thirugnanamurthy, Sarumathi

    2016-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiation science which is emerging as a hopeful tool in treating cancer, by selectively concentrating boron compounds in tumour cells and then subjecting the tumour cells to epithermal neutron beam radiation. BNCT bestows upon the nuclear reaction that occurs when Boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield α particles (Helium-4) and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. A large number of 10 Boron (10B) atoms have to be localized on or within neoplastic cells for BNCT to be effective, and an adequate number of thermal neutrons have to be absorbed by the 10B atoms to maintain a lethal 10B (n, α) lithium-7 reaction. The most exclusive property of BNCT is that it can deposit an immense dose gradient between the tumour cells and normal cells. BNCT integrates the fundamental focusing perception of chemotherapy and the gross anatomical localization proposition of traditional radiotherapy. PMID:28209015

  12. Fast neutrons produced by nuclear fragmentation in treatment irradiations with 12C beam.

    PubMed

    Gunzert-Marx, Konstanze; Schardt, Dieter; Simon, Reinhard S

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the heavy-ion tumour therapy project at GSI we investigated the nuclear fragmentation of 200 AMeV carbon ions stopping in a 12.78-cm thick water absorber. Fast neutrons and charged particles emerging from the target were registered at forward angles between 0 degrees and 30 degrees with a DeltaE-E-telescope consisting of an NE102 and a BaF2 scintillator. We obtained neutron energy spectra and angular distributions and derived the neutron yield in the energy range from 10 to 500 MeV in the forward hemisphere. In addition, we performed fragmentation measurements in actual patient treatment irradiations. The resulting angular distributions of neutrons and charged particles as well as their yields are similar to those obtained with the water absorber.

  13. Improved safety fast reactor with “reservoir” for delayed neutrons generating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Apse, V. A.; Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility to improve safety of fast reactors by using weak neutron absorber with large atomic weight as a material for external neutron reflector and for internal cavity in the reactor core (the neutron “reservoir”) where generation of some additional “delayed” neutron takes place. The effects produced by the external neutron reflector and the internal neutron “reservoir” on kinetic behavior of fast reactors are inter-compared. It is demonstrated that neutron kinetics of fast reactors with such external and internal zones becomes the quieter as compared with neutron kinetics of thermal reactors.

  14. Basic concepts underlying fast-neutron-based contraband interrogation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    All accelerator-based fast-neutron contraband interrogation systems have many closely interrelated subsystems, whose performance parameters will be critically interdependent. For optimal overall performance, a systems analysis design approach is required. This paper provides a general overview of the interrelationships and the tradeoffs to be considered for optimization of nonaccelerator subsystems.

  15. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  20. Measuring fluence of fast neutrons with planar silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamyatin, N. I.; Cheremukhin, A. E.; Shafronovskaya, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    The results of measurements of 1-MeV (Si) equivalent fast neutron fluence with silicon planar detectors are reported. The measurement method is based on the linear dependence of the reverse detector current increment on the neutron fluence: ΔI = α I × Φ × V. This technique provides an opportunity to measure the equivalent fluence in a wide dynamic range from 108 to 1016 cm-2 with an unknown neutron energy spectrum and without detector calibration. The proposed method was used for monitoring in radiation resistance tests of different detector types at channel no. 3 of IBR-2 and for determining the fluence of fission and leakage neutrons at the KVINTA setup.

  1. Fast radio bursts: the last sign of supramassive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Heino; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Context. Several fast radio bursts have been discovered recently, showing a bright, highly dispersed millisecond radio pulse. The pulses do not repeat and are not associated with a known pulsar or gamma-ray burst. The high dispersion suggests sources at cosmological distances, hence implying an extremely high radio luminosity, far larger than the power of single pulses from a pulsar. Aims: We suggest that a fast radio burst represents the final signal of a supramassive rotating neutron star that collapses to a black hole due to magnetic braking. The neutron star is initially above the critical mass for non-rotating models and is supported by rapid rotation. As magnetic braking constantly reduces the spin, the neutron star will suddenly collapse to a black hole several thousand to million years after its birth. Methods: We discuss several formation scenarios for supramassive neutron stars and estimate the possible observational signatures making use of the results of recent numerical general-relativistic calculations. Results: While the collapse will hide the stellar surface behind an event horizon, the magnetic-field lines will snap violently. This can turn an almost ordinary pulsar into a bright radio "blitzar": accelerated electrons from the travelling magnetic shock dissipate a significant fraction of the magnetosphere and produce a massive radio burst that is observable out to z > 0.7. Only a few per cent of the neutron stars need to be supramassive in order to explain the observed rate. Conclusions: We suggest the intriguing possibility that fast radio bursts might trace the solitary and almost silent formation of stellar mass black holes at high redshifts. These bursts could be an electromagnetic complement to gravitational-wave emission and reveal a new formation and evolutionary channel for black holes and neutron stars that are not seen as gamma-ray bursts. If supramassive neutron stars are formed at birth and not by accretion, radio observations of these

  2. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  3. System and plastic scintillator for discrimination of thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Carman, M. Leslie; Faust, Michelle A.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Martinez, H. Paul; Pawelczak, Iwona A.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2017-05-16

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a polymer matrix; a primary dye in the polymer matrix, the primary dye being a fluorescent dye, the primary dye being present in an amount of 3 wt % or more; and at least one component in the polymer matrix, the component being selected from a group consisting of B, Li, Gd, a B-containing compound, a Li-containing compound and a Gd-containing compound, wherein the scintillator material exhibits an optical response signature for thermal neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for fast neutrons and gamma rays. A system according to one embodiment includes a scintillator material as disclosed herein and a photodetector for detecting the response of the material to fast neutron, thermal neutron and gamma ray irradiation.

  4. Treatment experience with 15 MeV fast neutrons in the oral cavity and oropharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Herskovic, A.; Cox, E.B.; Fender, F.; Schell, M.; Henshaw, W.; Rogers, C.; Ornitz, R.

    1984-05-15

    All 86 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with fast neutrons at the Mid-Atlantic Neutron Therapy facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (MANTA) from its inception in 1976 until closing in 1979, are reported. Patients generally had advanced disease or have failed or were failing conventional treatment prior to being treated at MANTA. The fixed horizontal beam parameters were suboptimal. Patients were treated by either neutrons alone or various combinations of neutrons and photons. In patients with T3 or T4 primary carcinomas treated with less than 2100 neutron rad, only 37% (3/11) had a complete response at the primary compared to 57% (24/42) treated to a higher dose. However, there was a significant evidence of radiation related complication. The latter was expected in a phase I/II trial of a new modality such as fast neutrons. Isocentric hospital based cyclotrons should offer some hope of improvement in the future.

  5. Osteogenic Sarcoma of the Maxilla: Neutron Therapy for Unresectable Disease

    DOE PAGES

    Smoron, Geoffrey L.; Lennox, Arlene J.; Mcgee, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case study involving the use of fast neutron therapy to treat an extensive unresectable osteogenic sarcoma arising from the left maxilla. Patient. A 14-year-old male presented with a massive tumor producing severe distortion of his facial structures. He had already received six courses of chemotherapy, which had reduced his pain, but had not measurably reduced the tumor. Methods. The patient was treated with 66 MeV fast neutrons to a dose of 20.4 Gy in 13 fractions over 35 days. Results. CT assessments indicate gradually increasing calcification and noticeable reduction of soft-tissue disease in the frontalmore » sinus, orbit and maxillary antrum.There has been some recontouring of the facial structures.The boy conducts an active life, has no pain, and feels well. He was 17 years old at the last follow-up. Discussion. Fast neutrons have a greater biological effectiveness than conventional photon beams. Their use has been associated with improved chance for local control of unresectable disease.This case illustrates their effectiveness in controlling an unusual and aggressive osteogenic sarcoma of the facial bone and sinuses.« less

  6. Experimental setup for the determination of the correction factors of the neutron doseratemeters in fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Elena; Bercea, Sorin; Dudu, Dorin; Celarel, Aurelia

    2013-12-16

    The use of the U-120 Cyclotron of the IFIN-HH allowed to perform a testing bench with fast neutrons in order to determine the correction factors of the doseratemeters dedicated to neutron measurement. This paper deals with researchers performed in order to develop the irradiation facility testing the fast neutrons flux generated at the Cyclotron. This facility is presented, together with the results obtain in determining the correction factor for a doseratemeter dedicated to the neutron dose equivalent rate measurement.

  7. Tagged fast neutron beams En > 6 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Favela, F.; Huerta, A.; Santa Rita, P.; Ramos, A. T.; Lucio, O. de; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Araujo, V.; Chávez, E.; Acosta, L.; Murillo, G.; Policroniades, R.

    2015-07-23

    Controlled flux of neutrons are produced through the {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O nuclear reaction. Deuteron beams (2-4 MeV) are delivered by the CN-Van de Graaff accelerator and directed with full intensity to our Nitrogen target at SUGAR (SUpersonic GAs jet taRget). Each neutron is electronically tagged by the detection of the associated{sup 15}O. Its energy and direction are known and “beams” of fast monochromatic tagged neutrons (E{sub n}> 6 MeV) are available for basic research and applied work. MONDE is a large area (158 × 63 cm{sup 2}) plastic scintillating slab (5 cm thick), viewed by 16 PMTs from the sides. Fast neutrons (MeV) entering the detector will produce a recoiling proton that induces a light spark at the spot. Signals from the 16 detectors are processed to deduce the position of the spark. Time logic signals from both the {sup 15}O detector and MONDE are combined to deduce a time of flight (TOF) signal. Finally, the position information together with the TOF yields the full momentum vector of each detected neutron.

  8. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. nGEM fast neutron detectors for beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Pietropaolo, A.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Tollin, M.; Gorini, G.

    2013-08-01

    Fast neutron detectors with a sub-millimetric space resolution are required in order to qualify neutron beams in applications related to magnetically-controlled nuclear fusion plasmas and to spallation sources. A nGEM detector has been developed for the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER and as beam monitor for fast neutrons lines at spallation sources. The nGEM is a triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with polypropylene and polyethylene layers used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a nGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beam line. Beam profiles (σx=14.35 mm, σy=15.75 mm), nGEM counting efficiency (around 10-4 for 3 MeV

  10. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-07

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  11. Implications of improved treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors by fast neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, M.; Errington, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    The conventional treatment for cancer of the salivary glands is surgery, with or without X ray therapy. In advanced tumors (Stage III and IV), local control and 5-year survival rates are less than 35%. Radical surgery severs the facial nerve in the majority of operations on parotid gland tumors. Local control of unresectable salivary gland tumors was achieved, in 74% of cases, by fast neutron therapy. From the MRC cyclotron at Hammersmith Hospital neutrons were given to 65 patients, with locally advanced or recurrent tumors, 89% of which were Stage IV. Local control and 5-year survival rates were 72% and 50%, respectively. The facial nerve was not damaged by neutron therapy. In patients with parotid gland tumors, 77% regained or maintained function. Function was lost in 14% through recurrence and 9% remained paralyzed. The results were achieved using beams from primitive machines with serious disadvantages. The results from neutrons implicate improvements for locally advanced tumors of non-epidermal origin in other sites of the body, especially with the high energy neutrons now available from modern cyclotrons.

  12. The Adiabatic Fast Passage magnet for Ultracold Neutron spin manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; UCNA Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Ultracold Neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is used to investigate the weak interaction of the Standard Model through the decay of the free neutron, such as a precise measurement of the correlations between the decaying neutron's polarization and the emitted electron or neutrino momenta (the A and B correlation coefficients). These angular correlation measurements require precise control of the neutron polarization. The neutrons are polarized by a 7-Tesla magnetic field, and their spins are flipped by a radio-frequency birdcage resonator using the adiabatic fast passage technique in a 1-Tesla field. Precise knowledge of their polarization and spin-flip efficiency requires the achievement of greater than roughly 99% polarization and 99.9% spin-flipper efficiency. This target performance requires precise characterization and control of the static magnetic field profile in the spinflipper, and the resonator must produce large, uniform radio-frequency fields at 29.2 MHz. Studies of the static field profile in our spin-flipper and measurements of the performance of a modified resonator utilizing silver-coated components will be presented along with its impact of our measurements and the system's performance optimization.

  13. Fast neutrons compared with megavoltage x-rays in the treatment of patients with supratentorial glioblastoma: a controlled pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, M.; Bloom, H.J.G.; Ash, D.V.; Walsh, L.; Richardson, A.; Uttley, D.; Gowing, N.F.C.; Lewis, P.; Chaucer, B.

    1980-03-01

    The radioresistance of glioblastoma presumably results from the presence of hypoxic cells. In an attempt to overcome this problem, fast neutrons were compared in a controlled pilot study with conventional megavoltage x-rays (photons). 63 patients entered the study between January, 1973 and July, 1976, 30 patients received neutron and 33 received x-ray therapy. The overall mean survival was 11.4 months for those who received photon and 10 months for those who received neutron therapy. Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 72 and 36% respectively for photon treated patients, and 77 and 30% for those treated with neutrons. Although neutron therapy did not improve overall survival, examination of the histological material indicated a considerably greater antitumor effect after neutron therapy than after treatment with photons. In the neutron treated group, at post-mortem examination no tumor or only minimal tumor was found in 10 of 12 patients and in one of 4 patients where tissue was obtained from a second craniotomy. In some cases, there was evidence of diffuse damage to normal brain which was in keeping with a clinical syndrome of progressive dementia without localizing signs. Dose, time, and volume factors for neutron therapy to the brain and possible ways of improving results are discussed.

  14. Feasibility of a boron loaded scintillation detector for dose measurements related to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo; Egan, James J.; Kegel, Gunter H. R.; Desimone, David

    2002-04-01

    The feasibility of the use of a boron loaded scintillation detector in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dose estimates was evaluated. Several monoenergetic neutron groups were produced via the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target using the Van de Graaff accelerator at University of Massachusetts Lowell. The pulse-height spectra were taken from a natural boron loaded (10205-, 304-, 407-, 507-, 570-, 702-, and 780-keV incident neutrons. The results shows that a boron loaded scintillator could be used to distinguish the doses from different radiation sources in boron neutron capture therapy. This detector may be used in the estimation of doses due to fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium from ^10B(n,α)^7Li, and photons at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures.

  15. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  16. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  17. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  18. Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey Iv, Charles T; Prinja, Anil K

    2009-01-01

    We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

  19. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    compared the RBE characteristics of the MIT Reactor M67 clinical beam, The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor clinical beam (both of which were used in Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT) and the MIT LABA BNCS beam. Additional research initiated under this program involved an investigation of the potential of BNCT for the prevention of restenosis and the development of accelerator-based fast neutron brachytherapy. A total of 10 student research theses (2 Undergraduate, 4 Masters, and 4 Doctoral) were completed as part of this research program.

  20. Optimizing Dense Plasma Focus Neutron Yields with Fast Gas Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Matthew; Kueny, Christopher; Stein, Elizabeth; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We report a study using the particle-in-cell code LSP to perform fully kinetic simulations modeling dense plasma focus (DPF) devices with high density gas jets on axis. The high density jet models fast gas puffs which allow for more mass on axis while maintaining the optimal pressure for the DPF. As the density of the jet compared to the background fill increases we find the neutron yield increases, as does the variability in the neutron yield. Introducing perturbations in the jet density allow for consistent seeding of the m =0 instability leading to more consistent ion acceleration and higher neutron yields with less variability. Jets with higher on axis density are found to have the greatest yield. The optimal jet configuration is explored. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Fast Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections in THORIUM-232.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarcia, Christopher Albert

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for levels between 700-1550-keV excitation energy in the actinide nucleus, ('232)Th, have been measured using the (n,n') time-of-flight technique. Two series of measurements were undertaken using neutrons with a typical energy spread of 8-10 keV, generated by the ('7)Li(p,n)('7)Be reaction. These measurments for 125(DEGREES)-differential scattering cross sections were performed over the incident neutron energy regions of (i) 0.950-1.550 MeV, in 50-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.200 -0.400-MeV scattered neutrons and (ii) 1.200-2.000 MeV, in 100-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.400-0.800-MeV scattered neutrons. Over these scattered energy regions, an overall energy resolution of less than 15 keV was maintained. The relative neutron fluence was determined for each individual measurement, by positioning the main detector at 0(DEGREES) to view the primary neutron flux. Relative normalization was achieved by measuring the direct neutron flux from the lithium target with a fixed overhead monitor detector in both measurements. Main detector response was determined by comparison with a ('235)U fission chamber of known efficiency. Techniques for unfolding the complicated spectra obtained from these (n,n') studies were developed, employing user interactive computer codes to (i) generate simulated scattered neutron group response functions, (ii) subtract background effects from the measured spectra, (iii) approximate the background subtracted spectra in a weighted least-squares fashion by a superposition of response functions and (iv) make corrections for neutron absorption, finite scatterer size effects and multiple neutron scattering. Support codes consisting of graphics interaction packages, data file manipulation and transfer utility routines were created to assist in the spectral analysis procedure. Excitation function and angular distribution

  2. A high yield neutron target for cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    A rotating target was developed that has the potential for providing an initial yield of 10 to the 13th power neutrons per second by the T(d,n)He-4 reaction, and a useable lifetime in excess of 600 hours. This yield and lifetime are indicated for a 300 Kv and 30 mA deuteron accelerator and a 30 microns thick titanium tritide film formed of the stoichiometric compound TiT2. The potential for extended lifetime is made possible by incorporating a sputtering electrode that permits use of titanium tritide thicknesses much greater than the deuteron range. The electrode is used to remove in situ depleted titanium layers to expose fresh tritide beneath. The utilization of the rotating target as a source of fast neutrons for cancer therapy is discussed.

  3. Neutron dosimetry, moderated energy spectrum, and neutron capture therapy for californium-252 medical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, Mark Joseph

    Examination of neutron dosimetry for 252Cf has been conducted using calculative and experimental means. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used in a distributed computing environment as a parallel virtual machine (PVM) to determine the absorbed neutron dose and neutron energy spectrum from 252Cf in a variety of clinically relevant materials. Herein, a Maxwellian spectrum was used to model the 252Cf neutron emissions within these materials. 252Cf mixed-field dosimetry of Applicator Tube (AT) type sources was measured using 1.0 and 0.05 cm3 tissue-equivalent ion chambers and a miniature GM counter. A dosimetry protocol was formulated similar that of ICRU 45. The 252Cf AT neutron dosimetry was determined in the cylindrical coordinate system formalism recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43. These results demonstrated the overwhelming dependence of dosimetry on the source geometry factor as there was no significant neutron attenuation within the source or encapsulation. Gold foils and TLDs were used to measure the thermal flux in the vicinity of 252Cf AT sources to compare with the results calculated using MCNP. As the fast neutron energy spectrum did not markedly changed at increasing distances from the AT source, neutron dosimetry results obtained with paired ion chambers using fixed sensitivity factors agreed well with MCNP results and those in the literature. Calculations of moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectrum with various loadings of 10B and 157Gd were performed, in addition to analysis of neutron capture therapy dosimetry with these isotopes. Radiological concerns such as personnel exposure and shielding of 252Cf emissions were examined. Feasibility of a high specific-activity 252Cf HDR source was investigated through radiochemical and metallurgical studies using stand-ins such as Tb, Gd and 249Cf. Issues such as capsule burst strength due to helium production for a variety of proposed HDR sources were addressed. A recommended 252Cf source

  4. Performance study of polycrystalline CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arvind Kumar, Amit Topkar, Anita

    2014-04-24

    Diamond detectors using polycrystalline CVD diamond substrates of thickness 300μm and 100μm were fabricated for fast neutron monitoring application.. The characterization of detectors was carried out using various tests such as leakage current, capacitance and alpha particle response. The performance of detectors was evaluated for fast neutrons at different neutron yields. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the diamond detectors will be suitable for monitoring fast neutrons.

  5. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4).

  6. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.

    2015-03-15

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  7. Fast neutron radiography research at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.; Natale, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    Thirty-seven different elements were tested for their suitability as converter screens for direct and indirect fast neutron radiography. The use of commercial X-ray scintillator screens containing YTaO{sub 4}, LaOBr:Tm, YTaO{sub 4}:Nb, YTaO{sub 4}:Tm, CaWO{sub 4}, BaSO{sub 4}:Sr, and GdO{sub 2}S:Tb was also explored for direct fast neutron radiography. For the indirect radiographic process, only one element, holmium, was found to be better than copper. Iron was also found to work as well as copper. All other elements that were tested were inferior to copper for indirect fast neutron radiography. For direct fast neutron radiography, the results were markedly different. Copper was found to be a poor material to sue, as thirty-two of the elements performed better than the copper. Tantalum was found to be the best material to use. Several other materials that also performed remarkably well include, in order of decreasing utility, gold, lutetium, germanium, dysprosium, and thulium. Several interesting results were obtained for the commercial X-ray scintillator screens. Most notably, useful radiographs were produced with all of the various scintillation screens. However, the screens containing YTaO{sub 4}:Nb offered the greatest film densities for the shortest exposure times. Screens using GdSO{sub 4}:Tb provided the best resolution and clearest images at the sacrifice of exposure time. Also, as previous researchers found, scintillator screens offered significantly shorter exposure times than activation foils.

  8. Features of fast neutrons in dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodolsky, L.

    2011-09-01

    Diffractive scattering of "fast" or "high energy " neutrons can give low energy nuclear recoils in the signal region for dark matter searches. We present a discussion using the 'black disc' model. This permits a simple and general, although approximate, description of this possible background. We note a number of its features. In particular there are mass number A dependent aspects which can be studied in setups where events on different nuclei are observable at the same time. These include the recoil energy distributions, and the A behavior of the cross section. We define a parameter ERo which characterizes the recoil energy to be expected due to fast neutrons. It ranges from 100 keV on light nuclei to a few keV on heavy nuclei, and a general treatment is possible in terms of it, within the 'black disc' approximation. In addition the presence of inelastic processes on the nuclei at about the same level of elastic processes would be characteristic of fast neutrons.

  9. Wedge factor dependence with depth and field size for fast neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Alina; Risler, Ruedi

    2003-07-21

    The dependence of the wedge factors (WFs) on field size (FS) and depth for a fast neutron beam has been investigated. In a previous study (Popescu et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 541), a method was presented that allows a simple and accurate way of calculating the wedge-factor dependence on FS and depth in the case of a photon beam. The validity of a similar approach is tested in the present study for neutron beam dosimetry. The clinical neutron therapy system at the University of Washington (UW) has a flattening filter assembly consisting of two filters: a small field filter and a large field filter. Despite this complication, the approach presented in Popescu et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 541) can be used to describe the WF dependence on FS and depth (d).

  10. Neurobehavioral changes in mice exposed to fast neutrons in utero.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuka; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Takai, Nobuhiko; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Ogiu, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Tetsu; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that radiation causes brain development abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero. Rat and mouse studies have also shown that prenatal exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation induces developmental brain anomalies. Because the effects of prenatal irradiation on adult behavior patterns remain largely unknown, the present study investigated the effects of neutron exposure in utero on postnatal behavior patterns in mice. [C57BL/6J × C3H/He] hybrid (B6C3F1) mice were exposed to cyclotron-derived fast neutrons with peak energy of 10 MeV (0.02-0.2 Gy) or Cs-137 gamma-rays (0.2-1.5 Gy) on embryonic day 13.5. At 5.5-8 months of age, the neurobehavior of male offspring was examined by Rota-rod treadmill and locomotor activity. The accumulation of radio-labeled drug at muscarinic acetylcholine and serotonin receptors in mice from control and neutron-irradiated groups was determined by the tracer method. Locomotor activity during the dark period increased in the 0.02 Gy neutron-irradiated group. Furthermore, at 5.5 months of age, tracer binding in vivo to the muscarinic acetylcholine increased and to the serotonin receptors decreased in the 0.02 Gy neutron-irradiated group. In conclusion, the present study reveals that a certain "low-dose window" may exist for radiation-induced changes in neurobehavior and binding to neurotransmitter receptors, because there was correlation in neurobehavior and binding to neurotransmitter receptors in the 0.02 Gy neutron-irradiated group though there was not correlation in the neutron-irradiated groups more than 0.05 Gy.

  11. Accelerator requirements for fast-neutron interrogation of luggage and cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    Several different fast-neutron based techniques are being studied for the detection of contraband substances in luggage and cargo containers. The present work discusses the accelerator requirements for fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS), pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA), and 14-MeV neutron interrogation. These requirements are based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron or gamma detection rates. Accelerator requirements are driven by count-rate considerations, spatial resolution and acceptable uncertainties in elemental compositions. The authors have limited their analyses to luggage inspection with FNTS and to cargo inspection with PFNA or 14-MeV neutron interrogation.

  12. Neutron-beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, L.; Kashaeva, E. A.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Samarin, S. I.; Sycheva, T. V.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Frolov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron-beam-shaping assembly consisting of a moderator, a reflector, and an absorber is used to form a therapeutic neutron beam for the boron neutron-capture therapy of malignant tumors at accelerator neutron sources. A new structure of the moderator and reflector is proposed in the present article, and the results of a numerical simulation of the neutron spectrum and of the absorbed dose in a modified Snyder head phantom are presented. The application of a compositemoderator and of a composite reflector and the implementation of neutron production at the proton energy of 2.3MeVare shown to permit obtaining a high-quality therapeutic neutron beam.

  13. A high gain energy amplifier operated with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rubbia, C.

    1995-10-01

    The basic concept and the main practical considerations of an Energy Amplifier (EA) have been exhaustively described elsewhere. Here the concept of the EA is further explored and additional schemes are described which offer a higher gain, a larger maximum power density and an extended burn-up. All these benefits stem from the use of fast neutrons, instead of thermal or epithermal ones, which was the case in the original study. The higher gain is due both to a more efficient high energy target configuration and to a larger, practical value of the multiplication factor. The higher power density results from the higher permissible neutron flux, which in turn is related to the reduced rate of {sup 233}Pa neutron captures (which, as is well known, suppress the formation of the fissile {sup 233}U fuel) and the much smaller k variations after switch-off due to {sup 233}Pa decays for a given burn-up rate. Finally a longer integrated burn-up is made possible by reduced capture rate by fission fragments of fast neutrons. In practice a 20 MW proton beam (20 mA @ 1 GeV) accelerated by a cyclotron will suffice to operate a compact EA at the level of {approx} 1 GW{sub e}. The integrated fuel burn-up can be extended in excess of 100 GW d/ton, limited by the mechanical survival of the fuel elements. Radio-Toxicity accumulated at the end of the cycle is found to be largely inferior to the one of an ordinary Reactor for the same energy produced. Schemes are proposed which make a {open_quotes}melt-down{close_quotes} virtually impossible. The conversion ratio, namely the rate of production of {sup 233}U relative to consumption is generally larger than unity, which permits production of fuel for other uses. Alternatively the neutron excess can be used to transform unwanted {open_quotes}ashes{close_quotes} into more acceptable elements.

  14. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in: the development and testing of new gas mixtures more suitable for fast neutron dosimetry using the common A150-type Tissue-equivalent plastic ion chambers; comparison of photon doses determined with a graphite-walled proportional counter and with paired dosimeters irradiated by 14.8-MeV neutrons; a detector for the direct measurement of LET distributions from irradiation with fast neutrons; LET distributions from fast neutron irradiation of TE-plastic and graphite measured in a cylindrically symmetric geometry; progress in development of a tandem fast neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray source irradiation facility; an approach to the correlation of cellular response with lineal energy; calculated and measured HTO atmospheric dispersion rates within meters of a release site; application of cavity theory to fast neutrons; and fast neutron dosimetry by thermally stimulated currents in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (GHT)

  15. Note: Development of real-time epithermal neutron detector for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Takata, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kawabata, S.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.-I.; Taki, K.; Akabori, K.; Watanabe, K.; Ono, K.

    2017-05-01

    The real-time detection of epithermal neutrons forms an important aspect of boron neutron capture therapy. In this context, we developed an epithermal neutron detector based on the combination of a small Eu:LiCaAlF6 scintillator and a quartz fiber in order to fulfill the irradiation-field requirements for boron neutron capture therapy. The irradiation test is performed with the use of a reactor-based neutron source. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of our epithermal neutron detector are estimated to be 9.52 × 10-8 ± 1.59 × 10-8 cm2 and 1.20 × 10-6 cm2 ± 8.96 × 10-9 cm2, respectively. We also subject the developed epithermal neutron detector to actual irradiation fields, and we confirm that the epithermal neutron flux can be measured in realtime.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the response of ESR dosimeters added with gadolinium exposed to thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Basile, S; Brai, M; Longo, A

    2009-07-01

    Monte Carlo numerical calculations of the response of alanine and ammonium tartrate ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimeters exposed to neutron fields with different energy spectra are reported. Results have been obtained for various gadolinium concentrations inside the dosimeters. Furthermore, in order to simulate the in-phantom response we have carried out calculations by varying the depth of the dosimeter. We have found that a large enhancement is obtained for thermal neutrons, because of the very high capture cross section of gadolinium to thermal neutrons. A good enhancement was obtained for epithermal neutrons, whereas the sensitivity improvement in the case of fast neutron irradiation is poor. Furthermore, the simulations carried out by varying the depth suggests that an appreciable sensitivity to thermal and epithermal neutrons could be observed for in-phantom measurements in the 2-3 cm depth range. These results can provide useful insight for future experiments with epithermal neutron beams (such as those used in neutron capture therapy) and for future applications in neutron capture therapy dosimetry.

  17. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  18. Fast-Neutron Survey With Compact Plastic Scintillation Detectors.

    PubMed

    Preston, Rhys M; Tickner, James R

    2017-07-01

    With the rise of the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), it is now practical to build compact scintillation detectors well suited to portable use. A prototype survey meter for fast-neutrons and gamma-rays, based around an EJ-299-34 plastic scintillator with SiPM readout, has been developed and tested. A custom digital pulse processor was used to perform pulse shape discrimination on-the-fly. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated by means of two energy-dependent 'G-functions'. The sensitivity was calculated to be between 0.10 and 0.22 cps/(µSv/hr) for fast-neutrons with energies above 2.5 MeV. The prototype was used to survey various laboratory radiation fields, with the readings compared with commercial survey meters. The high sensitivity and lightweight nature of this detector makes it promising for rapid survey of the mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields encountered in industry and homeland security. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  20. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; ...

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated.more » Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.« less

  1. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  2. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  3. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  4. Research on Fast-Doppler-Broadening of neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A Fast-Doppler-Broadening method is developed in this work to broaden Continuous Energy neutron cross-sections for Monte Carlo calculations. Gauss integration algorithm and parallel computing are implemented in this method, which is unprecedented in the history of cross section processing. Compared to the traditional code (NJOY, SIGMA1, etc.), the new Fast-Doppler-Broadening method shows a remarkable speedup with keeping accuracy. The purpose of using Gauss integration is to avoid complex derivation of traditional broadening formula and heavy load of computing complementary error function that slows down the Doppler broadening process. The OpenMP environment is utilized in parallel computing which can take full advantage of modern multi-processor computers. Combination of the two can reduce processing time of main actinides (such as {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U) to an order of magnitude of 1{approx}2 seconds. This new method is fast enough to be applied to Online Doppler broadening. It can be combined or coupled with Monte Carlo transport code to solve temperature dependent problems and neutronics-thermal hydraulics coupled scheme which is a big challenge for the conventional NJOY-MCNP system. Examples are shown to determine the efficiency and relative errors compared with the NJOY results. A Godiva Benchmark is also used in order to test the ACE libraries produced by the new method. (authors)

  5. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. I. Fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of low-temperature quantum transport in Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by fast neutrons of about 14 MeV energy. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields decrease with increase in the concentrations of scatterers, such as ionized impurities, lattice defects, and interface roughness. On the other hand, under strong magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening associated with the Landau localized states, and the Shubnikov--de Hass (SdH) oscillation enhancement associated with the Landau extended states, increase markedly after fast-neutron irradiation.

  6. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  7. A novel detector assembly for detecting thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cester, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Stevanato, L.; Bonesso, I.; Turato, F.

    2016-09-01

    A new composite detector has been developed by combining two different commercial scintillators. The device has the capability to detect gamma rays as well as thermal and fast neutrons; the signal discrimination between the three types is performed on-line by means of waveform digitizers and PSD algorithms. This work describes the assembled detector and its discrimination performance to be employed in the applied field.

  8. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  9. Cyclotron Provides Neutron Therapy for Cancer Patients

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-21

    A cancer patient undergoes treatment in the Neutron Therapy Treatment Facility, or Cylotron, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. After World War II Lewis researchers became interested in nuclear energy for propulsion. The focused their efforts on thermodynamics and strength of materials after radiation. In 1950 an 80-person Nuclear Reactor Division was created, and a cyclotron was built behind the Materials and Structures Laboratory. An in-house nuclear school was established to train these researchers in their new field. NASA cancelled its entire nuclear program in January 1973, just as the cyclotron was about to resume operations after a major upgrade. In 1975 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation partnered with NASA Lewis to use the cyclotron for a new type of radiation treatment for cancer patients. The cyclotron split beryllium atoms which caused neutrons to be released. The neutrons were streamed directly at the patient’s tumor. The facility had a dual-beam system that could target the tumor both vertically and horizontally. Over the course of five years, the cyclotron was used to treat 1200 patients. It was found to be particularly effective on salivary gland, prostrate, and other tumors. It was not as successful with tumors of the central nervous system. The program was terminated in 1980 as the Clinic began concentrating on non-radiation treatments.

  10. Overview of US fast-neutron facilities and testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Jackson, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Rather than attempt a cataloging of the various fast neutron facilities developed and used in this country over the last 30 years, this paper will focus on those facilities which have been used to develop, proof test, and explore safety issues of fuels, materials and components for the breeder and fusion program. This survey paper will attempt to relate the evolution of facility capabilities with the evolution of development program which use the facilities. The work horse facilities for the breeder program are EBR-II, FFTF and TREAT. For the fusion program, RTNS-II and FMIT were selected.

  11. Head phantom experiment and calculation for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Aizawa, O

    1988-06-01

    Head phantom experiments with various neutron beams and calculations were carried out in order to provide useful information for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Thermal neutron beams for thermal neutron capture therapy were used for phantom experiments with various neutron collimator aperture sizes. The filtered beam neutrons of 24 and 144 keV generated with iron and silicon filters were also used to investigate the possible application of BNCT in the treatment of deep-seated cancers. Thermal neutron fluence and induced capture gamma dose distributions within the phantom were calculated with a transport code DOT 3.5 and compared with the experimental results. The results showed that the calculation used was consistent with the experimental results and provided useful information on BNCT. The filtered beam neutron may be very useful for the treatment of deep or widespread cancer, if there were a high power research reactor constructed for this purpose.

  12. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  13. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-15

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  15. Liposomal boron delivery for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons have an energy of 0.025 eV, clearly below the threshold energy required to ionize tissue components. However, neutron capture by (10)B produces lithium ion and helium (alpha-particles), which are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and dissipate their kinetic energy before traveling one cell diameter (5-9 microm) in biological tissues, ensuring their potential for precise cell killing. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer, and hepatoma using two boron compounds: sodium borocaptate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH; Na(2)(10)BSH) and l-p-boronophenylalanine (l-(10)BPA). These low molecular weight compounds are cleared easily from the cancer cells and blood. Therefore, high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage of adjacent healthy cells. Much attention has been focused on the liposomal drug delivery system (DDS) as an attractive, intelligent technology of targeting and controlled release of (10)B compounds. Two approaches have been investigated for incorporation of (10)B into liposomes: (1) encapsulation of (10)B compounds into liposomes and (2) incorporation of (10)B-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. Our laboratory has developed boron ion cluster lipids for application of the latter approach. In this chapter, our boron lipid liposome approaches as well as recent developments of the liposomal boron delivery system are summarized.

  16. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V.; Moore, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  17. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V. ); Moore, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  18. A method for fast evaluation of neutron spectra for BNCT based on in-phantom figure-of-merit calculation.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido

    2003-03-01

    In this paper a fast method to evaluate neutron spectra for brain BNCT is developed. The method is based on an algorithm to calculate dose distribution in the brain, for which a data matrix has been taken into account, containing weighted biological doses per position per incident energy and the incident neutron spectrum to be evaluated. To build the matrix, using the MCNP 4C code, nearly monoenergetic neutrons were transported into a head model. The doses were scored and an energy-dependent function to biologically weight the doses was used. To find the beam quality, dose distribution along the beam centerline was calculated. A neutron importance function for this therapy to bilaterally treat deep-seated tumors was constructed in terms of neutron energy. Neutrons in the energy range of a few tens of kilo-electron-volts were found to produce the best dose gain, defined as dose to tumor divided by maximum dose to healthy tissue. Various neutron spectra were evaluated through this method. An accelerator-based neutron source was found to be more reliable for this therapy in terms of therapeutic gain than reactors.

  19. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Characteristics comparison between a cyclotron-based neutron source and KUR-HWNIF for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.; Kinashi, Y.; Kashino, G.; Liu, Y.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Maruhashi, A.; Ono, K.

    2009-06-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), 275 clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been performed as of March 2006, and the effectiveness of BNCT has been revealed. In order to further develop BNCT, it is desirable to supply accelerator-based epithermal-neutron sources that can be installed near the hospital. We proposed the method of filtering and moderating fast neutrons, which are emitted from the reaction between a beryllium target and 30-MeV protons accelerated by a cyclotron accelerator, using an optimum moderator system composed of iron, lead, aluminum and calcium fluoride. At present, an epithermal-neutron source is under construction from June 2008. This system consists of a cyclotron accelerator, beam transport system, neutron-yielding target, filter, moderator and irradiation bed. In this article, an overview of this system and the properties of the treatment neutron beam optimized by the MCNPX Monte Carlo neutron transport code are presented. The distribution of biological effect weighted dose in a head phantom compared with that of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is shown. It is confirmed that for the accelerator, the biological effect weighted dose for a deeply situated tumor in the phantom is 18% larger than that for KUR, when the limit dose of the normal brain is 10 Gy-eq. The therapeutic time of the cyclotron-based neutron sources are nearly one-quarter of that of KUR. The cyclotron-based epithermal-neutron source is a promising alternative to reactor-based neutron sources for treatments by BNCT.

  1. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  2. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

  3. Fast fall-time ion beam in neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q.; Kwan, J.; Regis, M.; Wu, Y.; Wilde, S.B.; Wallig, J.

    2008-08-10

    Ion beam with a fast fall time is useful in building neutron generators for the application of detecting hidden, gamma-shielded SNM using differential die-away (DDA) technique. Typically a fall time of less than 1 {micro}s can't be achieved by just turning off the power to the ion source due to the slow decay of plasma density (partly determined by the fall time of the RF power in the circuit). In this paper, we discuss the method of using an array of mini-apertures (instead of one large aperture beam) such that gating the beamlets can be done with low voltage and a small gap. This geometry minimizes the problem of voltage breakdown as well as reducing the time of flight to produce fast gating. We have designed and fabricated an array of 16 apertures (4 x 4) for a beam extraction experiment. Using a gating voltage of 1400 V and a gap distance of 1 mm, the fall time of extracted ion beam pulses is less than 1 {micro}s at various beam energies ranging between 400 eV to 800 eV. Usually merging an array of beamlets suffers the loss of beam brightness, i.e., emittance growth, but that is not an important issue for neutron source applications.

  4. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  5. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John T.; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is inducedtypically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gapsbubblespropagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  6. Dose Calibration of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument has been fabricated by Southwest Research Institute and delivered to NASA for flight to the ISS in late 2015 or early 2016. ISS-RAD is essentially two instruments that share a common interface to ISS. The two instruments are the Charged Particle Detector (CPD), which is very similar to the MSL-RAD detector on Mars, and the Fast Neutron Detector (FND), which is a boron-loaded plastic scintillator with readout optimized for the 0.5 to 10 MeV energy range. As the FND is completely new, it has been necessary to develop methodology to allow it to be used to measure the neutron dose and dose equivalent. This talk will focus on the methods developed and their implementation using calibration data obtained in quasi-monoenergetic (QMN) neutron fields at the PTB facility in Braunschweig, Germany. The QMN data allow us to determine an approximate response function, from which we estimate dose and dose equivalent contributions per detected neutron as a function of the pulse height. We refer to these as the "pSv per count" curves for dose equivalent and the "pGy per count" curves for dose. The FND is required to provide a dose equivalent measurement with an accuracy of ?10% of the known value in a calibrated AmBe field. Four variants of the analysis method were developed, corresponding to two different approximations of the pSv per count curve, and two different implementations, one for real-time analysis onboard ISS and one for ground analysis. We will show that the preferred method, when applied in either real-time or ground analysis, yields good accuracy for the AmBe field. We find that the real-time algorithm is more susceptible to chance-coincidence background than is the algorithm used in ground analysis, so that the best estimates will come from the latter.

  7. The pilot experimental study of 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Zhou, Changgen; Huo, Heyong; Wu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Lou, Benchao; Sun, Yong

    2009-09-01

    14 MeV Fast neutrons has good penetrability and the 14 MeV fast neutron radiography can meet the need of Non-Destructive Test of the structure and lacuna of heavy-massive sample, whose shell is made of heavy metal and in which there are some hydrogen materials, and the study of fast neutron digital radiography just begins in China. By the use of a D-T accelerator, a digital imaging system made up of a fast neutron scintillation screen made of ZnS(Ag) and polypropylene, lens and a scientific grade CCD, the experimental study of fast neutron radiography has been done between 4.3×1010-6.8×1010 n/s of neutron yield. Some 14 MeV fast neutron digital radiographs have been gotten. According to experimental radiographs and their data, the performance of the fast neutron scintillation screen and the basic characters of 14 MeV fast neutron radiography are analyzed, and it is helpful for the further research.

  8. Design and characterization of an SRAM-based neutron detector for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S.; Velure, Arild; Larsen, Eivind F.; Stokkevåg, Camilla H.; Röhrich, Dieter; Brekke, Njål; Odland, Odd Harald

    2015-12-01

    A neutron detector based on registration of radiation effects in Static Random Access Memories (SRAMs) has been developed at the University of Bergen for applications in particle therapy. Nine different SRAMs were tested and a 16 Mibit SRAM from Cypress was chosen for the final detector. The SRAMs were irradiated in beam lines at PTB Braunschweig, the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory, The Svedberg Laboratory, The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE, Kjeller) and the CERN-EU high-energy reference field. The results from the measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using the selected SRAMs for neutron detection. The results indicate low or no sensitivity to thermal neutrons while the cross section for fast neutrons increases with neutron energy before reaching a more stable level at energies of several tenths of MeV.

  9. A scintillator-based approach to monitor secondary neutron production during proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Pryser, E; Wieger, B M; Pozzi, S A; Haelg, R A; Bashkirov, V A; Schulte, R W

    2016-11-01

    The primary objective of this work is to measure the secondary neutron field produced by an uncollimated proton pencil beam impinging on different tissue-equivalent phantom materials using organic scintillation detectors. Additionally, the Monte Carlo code mcnpx-PoliMi was used to simulate the detector response for comparison to the measured data. Comparison of the measured and simulated data will validate this approach for monitoring secondary neutron dose during proton therapy. Proton beams of 155- and 200-MeV were used to irradiate a variety of phantom materials and secondary particles were detected using organic liquid scintillators. These detectors are sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays: pulse shape discrimination was used to classify each detected pulse as either a neutron or a gamma ray. The mcnpx-PoliMi code was used to simulate the secondary neutron field produced during proton irradiation of the same tissue-equivalent phantom materials. An experiment was performed at the Loma Linda University Medical Center proton therapy research beam line and corresponding models were created using the mcnpx-PoliMi code. The authors' analysis showed agreement between the simulations and the measurements. The simulated detector response can be used to validate the simulations of neutron and gamma doses on a particular beam line with or without a phantom. The authors have demonstrated a method of monitoring the neutron component of the secondary radiation field produced by therapeutic protons. The method relies on direct detection of secondary neutrons and gamma rays using organic scintillation detectors. These detectors are sensitive over the full range of biologically relevant neutron energies above 0.5 MeV and allow effective discrimination between neutron and photon dose. Because the detector system is portable, the described system could be used in the future to evaluate secondary neutron and gamma doses on various clinical beam lines for commissioning and

  10. Comparison of measured parameters from a 24-keV and a broad spectrum epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy: an identification of consequential parameters.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, R G; Saraf, S K; Kalef-Ezra, J; Laster, B H

    1990-01-01

    Epithermal neutron beams are under development in a number of locations in the U.S. and abroad. The increased penetration in tissue provided by these neurons should circumvent problems associated with the rapid attenuation of thermal neutron beams encountered in previous clinical trials of neutron capture therapy (NCT). Physical and radiobiological experiments with two "intermediate energy" or "epithermal" beams have been reported. A comparison is made here between the 24-keV iron-filtered beam at Harwell, England, and the broad-spectrum Al2 O3 moderated beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In addition, parameters which are relevant for NCT, and which are best suited for evaluation and comparison of beams, are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the mean neutron energy which can be tolerated without significant reduction of therapeutic gain (TG), where TG is the ratio of tumor dose to maximum normal tissue dose. It is suggested that the simplest and most meaningful parameters for comparison of beam intensity and purity are the epithermal neutron fluence rate, and the fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron (4.2 X 10(-11) rad/neutron for the broad-spectrum beam and 29 X 10(-11) rad/neutron for the 24-keV beam). While the Al2O3 beam is close to optimal, the 24-keV beam produces a significant fast neutron dose which results in a lower TG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.M.S.; Gahbauer, R.A. ); Blue, T.E. ); Wambersie, A. )

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this paper is to address some aspects of the many considerations that need to go into a dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for brain tumors; and to describe some methods to incorporate knowledge from animal studies and other experiments into the process of dose prescription. Previously, an algorithm to estimate the normal tissue tolerance to mixed high and low linear energy transfer radiations in BNCT was proposed. The authors have developed mathematical formulations and computational methods to represent this algorithm. Generalized models to fit the central axis dose rate components for an epithermal neutron field were also developed. These formulations and beam fitting models were programmed into spreadsheets to simulate two treatment techniques which are expected to be used in BNCT: a two-field bilateral scheme and a single-field treatment scheme. Parameters in these spreadsheets can be varied to represent the fractionation scheme used, the [sup 10]B microdistribution in normal tissue, and the ratio of [sup 10]B in tumor to normal tissue. Most of these factors have to be determined for a given neutron field and [sup 10]B compound combination from large animal studies. The spreadsheets have been programmed to integrate all of the treatment-related information and calculate the location along the central axis where the normal tissue tolerance is exceeded first. This information is then used to compute the maximum treatment time allowable and the maximum tumor dose that may be delivered for a given BNCT treatment. The effect of different treatment variables on the treatment time and tumor dose has been shown to be very significant. It has also been shown that the location of D[sub max] shifts significantly, depending on some of the treatment variables-mainly the fractionation scheme used. These results further emphasize the fact that dose prescription in BNCT is very complicated and nonintuitive. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  13. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  14. Fast neutron measurements with 7Li and 6Li enriched CLYC scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Cattadori, C.; Ceruti, S.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Mattei, I.; Mentana, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Rebai, M.; Riboldi, S.; Salamida, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-07-01

    The recently developed Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) crystals are interesting scintillation detectors not only for their gamma energy resolution (<5% at 662 keV) but also for their capability to identify and measure the energy of both gamma rays and fast/thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons were detected by the 6Li(n,α)t reaction while for the fast neutrons the 35Cl(n,p)35S and 35Cl(n,α)32P neutron-capture reactions were exploited. The energy of the outgoing proton or α particle scales linearly with the incident neutron energy. The kinetic energy of the fast neutrons can be measured using both the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique and using the CLYC energy signal. In this work, the response to monochromatic fast neutrons (1.9-3.8 MeV) of two CLYC 1″×1″ crystals was measured using both the TOF and the energy signal. The observables were combined to identify fast neutrons, to subtract the thermal neutron background and to identify different fast neutron-capture reactions on 35Cl, in other words to understand if the detected particle is an α or a proton. We performed a dedicated measurement at the CN accelerator facility of the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (Italy), where the fast neutrons were produced by impinging a proton beam (4.5, 5.0 and 5.5 MeV) on a 7LiF target. We tested a CLYC detector 6Li-enriched at about 95%, which is ideal for thermal neutron measurements, in parallel with another CLYC detector 7Li-enriched at more than 99%, which is suitable for fast neutron measurements.

  15. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  16. Gamma radiation environment in a fast neutron irradiation facility for electronic parts testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, J.S.; Sandquist, G.M.; Hardy, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    A fast neutron irradiation facility has been constructed to provide a neutron irradiation environement for neutron hardness assurace testing of silicon and gallium arsenide based elctronic components. The facility is located adjacent to the core of the TRIGA research reactor at the University of Utaah. Facility specifics are described.

  17. Characteristics of malignant melanoma cells in the treatment with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Mori, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The radioresistance of malignant melanoma cells has been explained by the wide shoulder of the dose-cell-survival curve of the cells exposed to photon beams. Fast neutrons, 30 MeV d-Be, were used to treat patients who had malignant melanoma in order to confirm the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for tumor control. Seventy-two patients suffering from malignant melanoma participated in the clinical trials with fast neutrons between November 1975 and December 1986. Of 72 patients, 45 had melanoma of the skin, 20 had melanoma of the head and neck, and seven had choroidal melanoma. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had previously untreated melanoma of the skin was 61% and for patients who received postoperative irradiation, it was 35.7% whereas no patients who had recurrent tumor survived over 4 years. Of 22 patients who had melanoma of the skin, stage I, local control in four cases was achieved by irradiation alone, whereas local control was achieved in 17 of 18 patients who required salvage surgery after fast-neutron therapy. The results of pathological studies performed with specimens obtained from salvage surgery have shown that melanoma cells growing in intradermal tissue are radioresistant, compared with cells growing in intraepidermal tissue. This might suggest that melanoma cells acquire radioresistance when the connective tissue is involved. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had locally advanced melanoma of the head and neck, previously untreated, was 15.4%. Radiation therapy with accelerated protons was suitable for patients suffering from choroidal melanoma.

  18. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  19. Determination of the thermal neutron flux in a fast neutron beam by use of a boron-coated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, L; Matzen, T; Matzke, M; Schmidt, R; Scobel, W

    1995-11-01

    The thermal neutron distribution in slow and fast neutron beams is usually determined using the foil activation method. In this work a small magnesium walled ionization chamber, in which the inner surface of the wall has been coated with 10B to increase the sensitivity for thermal neutrons, is used to estimate the thermal neutron component of the beam. After calibration and determination of the directional response in a thermal neutron beam a comparison with foil activation at different depths in water was performed to investigate the reliability of the ionization measurements. The chamber was used in a computer controlled water phantom to measure the depth and lateral distribution of the thermal neutron dose. With this arrangement two-dimensional scans of the thermal neutrons could be performed quickly and with high accuracy.

  20. The progress in the neutron diagnostics in the Fast Ignition experiment with GEKKO XII and LFEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Yasunobu; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Sakata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    In the fast ignitor experiment the neutron diagnostics is very challenging due to too large backgrounds originated from hard X ray. In the Fast Ignition integrated experimental campaign held in 2010 in GEKKO XII and LFEX facility in Institute of Laser Engineering Osaka (ILE), the Xylen based new liquid scintillator coupled with the gated photomultiplier tube has successfully recorded neutron signal with heating the energy of up to 400 J. However there was significant large background in the signal originated from neutrons via (γ,n) reaction from the target chamber wall. The neutron collimator was developed and implemented to suppress these neutron backgrounds. We succeeded to record a very clear neutron signals in every shot in the fast ignitor experimental campaign held in July 2012 with the heating laser energy of around 1000 J with the pulse width of 2.2 ps. The details of the detector and the result of the fast ignition experiment will be presented.

  1. Genome resilience and prevalence of segmental duplications following fast neutron irradiation of soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fast neutron radiation has been used as a mutagen to develop extensive mutant collections. However, the genome-wide structural consequences of fast neutron radiation are not well understood. Here, we examine the genome-wide structural variants observed among 264 soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) pl...

  2. How resilient is the soybean genome? Insights from fast neutron mutagenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously, we described the development of a fast neutron mutant population resource in soybean and identified mutations of interest through phenotypic screening. Here, we consider the resiliency of the soybean genome by examining genomic rearrangements and mutations that arise from fast neutron ra...

  3. ANALYTICAL NEUTRONIC STUDIES CORRELATING FAST NEUTRON FLUENCE TO MATERIAL DAMAGE IN CARBON, SILICON, AND SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Sterbentz

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluates how fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV correlates to material damage (i.e., the total fluence spectrum folded with the respective material’s displacements-per- atom [dpa] damage response function) for the specific material fluence spectra encountered in Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) service and the irradiation tests conducted in material test reactors (MTRs) for the fuel materials addressed in the white paper. It also reports how the evaluated correlations of >0.1 MeV fluence to material damage vary between the different spectral conditions encountered in material service versus testing.

  4. Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography is a type of non-destructive analysis tool that offers its own benefits and drawbacks. Because cross-sections vary with energy, a different range of materials can be examined with fast neutrons than can be studied with thermal neutrons, epithermal neutrons, or x-rays. This paper details these differences through a comparative study of fast neutron radiography to the other types of radiography available. The most obvious difference among the different types of radiography is in the penetrability of the sources. Fast neutrons can probe much deeper and can therefore obtain details of the internals of thick objects. Good images have been obtained through as much as 15 cm of steel, 10 cm of water, and 15 cm of borated polyethylene. In addition, some objects were identifiable through as much as 25 cm of water or 30 cm of borated polyethylene. The most notable benefit of fast neutron radiography is in the types of materials that can be tested. Fast neutron radiography can view through materials that simply cannot be viewed by X rays, thermal neutrons, or epithermal neutrons due to the high cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients involved. Cadmium was totally transparent to the fast neutron source. Fast neutron radiography is not without drawbacks. The most pronounced drawback has been in the quality of radiograph produced. The image resolution is only about 0.8 mm for a 1.25 cm thick object, whereas, other forms of radiography have much better resolution.

  5. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with fast rotating neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate damping and growth times of the quadrupolar f mode for rapidly rotating stars and a variety of different polytropic equations of state in the Cowling approximation. This is the first study of the damping/growth time of these types of oscillations for fast-rotating neutron stars in a relativistic treatment where the spacetime degrees of freedom of the perturbations are neglected. We use these frequencies and damping/growth times to create robust empirical formulae which can be used for gravitational-wave asteroseismology. The estimation of the damping/growth time is based on the quadrupole formula and our results agree very well with Newtonian ones in the appropriate limit.

  6. Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; Baldwin, A.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis

    2005-05-17

    Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and {gamma}'s over the life of the facility [1]. While the linacs will be superconducting, there are still many uses for NdFeB in the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus. Our understanding of the situation for rare earth, permanent magnet materials was presented at PAC03 [2]. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented at EPAC04 [3]. We have extended the doses, included other manufacturer's samples, and measured induced radioactivities which are discussed in detail.

  7. Plutonium Measurements with a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer L. Dolan; Marek Flaska; Alexis Poitrasson-Riviere; Andreas Enqvist; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2014-11-01

    Measurements were performed at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy to field test a fast-neutron multiplicity counter developed at the University of Michigan. The measurements allowed the illustration of the system’s photon discrimination abilities, efficiency when measuring neutron multiplicity, ability to characterize 240Pueff mass, and performance relative to a currently deployed neutron coincidence counter. This work is motivated by the need to replace and improve upon 3He neutron detection systems for nuclear safeguards applications.

  8. Computational Neutronics Methods and Transmutation Performance Analyses for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ferrer; M. Asgari; S. Bays; B. Forget

    2007-03-01

    The once-through fuel cycle strategy in the United States for the past six decades has resulted in an accumulation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). This SNF contains considerable amounts of transuranic (TRU) elements that limit the volumetric capacity of the current planned repository strategy. A possible way of maximizing the volumetric utilization of the repository is to separate the TRU from the LWR SNF through a process such as UREX+1a, and convert it into fuel for a fast-spectrum Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR). The key advantage in this scenario is the assumption that recycling of TRU in the ABR (through pyroprocessing or some other approach), along with a low capture-to-fission probability in the fast reactor’s high-energy neutron spectrum, can effectively decrease the decay heat and toxicity of the waste being sent to the repository. The decay heat and toxicity reduction can thus minimize the need for multiple repositories. This report summarizes the work performed by the fuel cycle analysis group at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to establish the specific technical capability for performing fast reactor fuel cycle analysis and its application to a high-priority ABR concept. The high-priority ABR conceptual design selected is a metallic-fueled, 1000 MWth SuperPRISM (S-PRISM)-based ABR with a conversion ratio of 0.5. Results from the analysis showed excellent agreement with reference values. The independent model was subsequently used to study the effects of excluding curium from the transuranic (TRU) external feed coming from the LWR SNF and recycling the curium produced by the fast reactor itself through pyroprocessing. Current studies to be published this year focus on analyzing the effects of different separation strategies as well as heterogeneous TRU target systems.

  9. The MONDO project: A secondary neutron tracker detector for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, S. M.; Battistoni, G.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.; Marafini, M.

    2017-02-01

    During Particle Therapy treatments the patient irradiation produces, among different types of secondary radiation, an abundant flux of neutrons that can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region. A precise measurement of their flux, energy and angle distributions is eagerly needed in order to improve the Treatment Planning Systems software and to properly take into account the risk of late complications in the whole body. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aiming for high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision will be addressed within the MONDO project, whose main goal is to develop a tracking detector targeting fast and ultra-fast secondary neutrons. The neutron tracking principle is based on the reconstruction of two consequent elastic scattering interactions of a neutron with a target material. Reconstructing the recoiling protons it is hence possible to measure the energy and incoming direction of the neutron. Plastic scintillators will be used as scattering and detection media: the tracker is being developed as a matrix of squared scintillating fibres of 250 μm side. The light produced and collected in fibres will be amplified using a triple GEM-based image intensifier and acquired using CMOS Single Photon Avalanche Diode arrays. Using therapeutic beams, the principal detector goal will be the measurement of the neutron production yields, as a function of production angle and energy.

  10. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1999-06-10

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability.

  11. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  12. Gamma-ray bursts from fast, galactic neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Leonard, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    What makes a Galactic model of gamma-ray bursts (GBs) feasible is the observation of a new population of objects, fast neutron stars, that are isotropic with respect to the galaxy following a finite period, {approx}30 My, after their formation (1). Our Galactic model for the isotropic component of GBs is based upon high-velocity neutron stars (NSs) that have accretion disks. These fast NSs are formed in tidally locked binaries, producing a unique population of high velocity ({approx_gt}10{sup 3} kms{sup -1}) and slowly rotating (8 s) NSs. Tidal locking occurs due to the meridional circulation caused by the conservation of angular momentum of the tidal lobes. Following the collapse to a NS and the explosion, these lobes initially perturb the NS in the direction of the companion. Subsequent accretion (1 to 2 s) occurs on the rear side of the initial motion, resulting in a runaway acceleration of the NS by neutrino emission from the hot accreted matter. The recoil momentum of the relativistic neutrino emission from the localized, down flowing matter far exceeds the momentum drag of the accreted matter. The recoil of the NS is oriented towards the companion, but the NS misses because of the pre-explosion orbital motion. The near miss captures matter from the companion and forms a disk around the NS. Accretion onto the NS from this initially gaseous disk due to the ``alpha`` viscosity results in a soft gamma-ray repeater phase, which lasts {approx}10{sup 4} yr. Later, after the neutron star has moved {approx}30 kpc from its birthplace, solid bodies form in the disk, and accrete to planetoid size bodies after {approx}3{times}10{sup 7} years. Some of these planetoid bodies, with a mass of {approx}10{sup 21}{endash}10{sup 22} g, are perturbed into an orbit inside the tidal distortion radius of {approx_gt}10{sup 5} km. Of these {approx}1% are captured by the magnetic field of the NS at R{lt}2{times}10{sup 3} km to create GBs.

  13. The CLYC-6 and CLYC-7 response to γ-rays, fast and thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Pellegri, L.; Camera, F.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.; Cazzaniga, C.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-02-01

    The crystal Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) is a very interesting scintillator material because of its good energy resolution and its capability to identify γ-rays and fast/thermal neutrons. The crystal Cs2LiYCl6:Ce contains 6Li and 35Cl isotopes, therefore, it is possible to detect thermal neutrons through the reaction 6Li(n, α)t while 35Cl ions allow to measure fast neutrons through the reactions 35Cl(n, p)35S and 35Cl(n, α)32P. In this work two CLYC 1″×1″ crystals were used: the first crystal, enriched with 6Li at 95% (CLYC-6) is ideal for thermal neutron measurements while the second one, enriched with 7Li at >99% (CLYC-7) is suitable for fast neutron measurements. The response of CLYC scintillators was measured with different PMT models: timing or spectroscopic, with borosilicate glass or quartz window. The energy resolution, the neutron-γ discrimination and the internal activity are discussed. The capability of CLYC scintillators to discriminate γ rays from neutrons was tested with both thermal and fast neutrons. The thermal neutrons were measured with both detectors, using an AmBe source. The measurements of fast neutrons were performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator facility (Italy) where a deuterium beam was accelerated on a deuterium or on a tritium target, providing neutrons of 2.5 MeV or 14.1 MeV, respectively. The different sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons of a CLYC-6 and of a CLYC-7 was additionally studied.

  14. Neutron field of accelerator-driven p(35 MeV)+Be fast neutron source at NPI Rez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Bem, Pavel; Majerle, Mitja; Novak, Jan; Simeckova, Eva

    2017-09-01

    The accelerator driven fast neutron sources of the white- and quasi-monoenergetic spectra are operated at the NPI Rez Fast Neutron Facility utilizing the Be(thick), D2O(thick), and 7Li(C) target stations and the variable energy proton beam (up to 37 MeV) from the U-120M isochronous cyclotron. Recently, the design of beryllium target station was upgraded in order to provide the higher neutron flux at the modified positions of irradiated samples. Afterwards, the thick target neutron field of the p+Be source reaction was investigated for proton energy of 35 MeV. The spectral neutron flux for several target-to-sample distances was determined using the multi-foil activation technique. From measured reaction rates, new neutron spectra were reconstructed employing the SAND-II unfolding code and validated against the MCNPX predictions. The IFMIF-like (International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility) neutron field obtained from the p(35)+Be source is suitable for the neutron cross-sections validation within the IFMIF research program, radiation hardness tests of electronics, and neutron activation analysis experiments.

  15. Boron neutron capture enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron irradiation for glioblastoma: increase of thermal neutron flux with heavy material collimation, a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paquis, P; Pignol, J P; Lonjon, M; Brassart, N; Courdi, A; Chauvel, P; Grellier, P; Chatel, M

    1999-01-01

    Despite the fact that fast neutron irradiation of glioblastoma has shown on autopsies an ability to sterilize tumors, no therapeutic windows have been found for these particles due to their toxicity toward normal brain. Therefore, the Boron Neutron Capture Enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron beam has been suggested. This paper addresses the problem of fast neutron beam collimation, which induces a dramatic decrease of the thermal neutron flux in the depth of the tissues when smaller irradiation fields are used. Thermoluminescent dosimeter TLD-600 and TLD-700 were used to determine the thermal neutron flux within a Plexiglas phantom irradiated under the Nice Biomedical Cyclotron p(60)+Be(32) fast neutron beam. A BNCE of 4.6% in physical dose was determined for a 10 x 10 cm2 field, and of 10.4% for a 20 x 20 cm2 one. A Dose Modification Factor of 1.19 was calculated for CAL 58 glioblastoma cells irradiated thanks to the larger field. In order to increase the thermal flux in depth while shaping the beam, heavy material collimation was studied with Monte Carlo simulations using coupled FLUKA and MCNP-4A codes. The use of 20 cm width lead blocks allowed a 2 fold thermal neutron flux increase in the depth of the phantom, while shielding the fast neutron beam with a fast neutron dose transmission of 23%. Using the DMF of 1.19, a BNCE of 40% was calculated in the beam axis. This enhancement might be sufficient to open, at least theoretically, a therapeutic window.

  16. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, {alpha})7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,{gamma})2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning.

  17. Characterization of a ^6Li-loaded organic liquid scintillator for fast neutron spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, C. D.; Heimbach, C. R.; Nico, J. S.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Erwin, D.; Langford, T.; Rodrigues, A.

    2010-11-01

    Fast neutrons induced by natural radioactivity and cosmic rays are important sources of background for low-background searches of dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay, and solar neutrinos. One method for performing fast neutron spectroscopy involves a capture-gated coincidence between a fast neutron that thermalizes through elastic scattering within an organic scintillator and its subsequent capture on a nuclide having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. Thermalization within an organic scintillator occurs within a few ns, but the neutron capture time is typically of order 10s to 100s of μs. A capture signal preceded by a thermalization signal within a characteristic time can be used to select those fast neutrons that have deposited all of their kinetic energy into the scintillator, and the thermalization signal can provide spectroscopic information. We report on a number of measurements performed to characterize the properties of an organic liquid scintillator based on di-isopropyl naphthalene and loaded with ^6Li. This work has been carried out within a joint UMd and NIST project to develop a fast neutron spectrometer suitable for use in a deep underground, low-background laboratory. In particular, we report on measurements of optical properties, light yield, and fast neutron response.

  18. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and

  19. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

  20. Secondary neutron doses in a compact proton therapy system.

    PubMed

    Stichelbaut, F; Closset, M; Jongen, Y

    2014-10-01

    Proton therapy offers several advantages compared with classical radiotherapy owing to a better dose conformity to the tumour volume. However, proton interactions with beam transport elements and the human tissues lead to the production of secondary neutrons, resulting in an extra whole-body dose with some carcinogenic potential. In this study, the secondary neutron doses generated with an active beam scanning system and with two compact proton therapy systems recently appeared on the market are compared.

  1. Neutron capture therapy research in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.

    1989-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy research in Australia has continued to grow since the first Australia-Japan workshop in April, 1986. The support base has broadened and the wide range of contributing laboratories includes universities, research institutes, and hospitals. Considerable progress has been made in boron chemistry--an accurate boron assay technique has been developed, boron analogues of chlorpromazine and thiouracil have been synthesised or nearly so, and decaborane conjugation with monoclonal antibodies has been achieved to the required loadings. In vitro cell survival experiments are proceeding in the Moata reactor using human melanoma and mouse cell lines incubated with enriched boronophenylalanine and boron tetraphenyl porphyrins. Electron microscopy examination of radiation damaged morphology shows considerable differences between cell lines. Progress with the nude mouse human melanoma model has been slow because of the lack of a reliable in vivo melanotic melanoma line, and the B16 mouse line is found to be more efficacious. Tailored beam calculations for the 10 MW HIFAR reactor indicate the difficulty of obtaining a suitable therapeutic beam because of the generated gamma dose in the beam filters. A new approach to NCT utilises the enormous cross section of 157Gd and the induced-Auger effect which has been shown to cause double strand breaks in circular DNA. 34 references.

  2. Neutron capture therapy research in Australia.

    PubMed

    Allen, B J

    1989-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy research in Australia has continued to grow since the first Australia-Japan workshop in April, 1986. The support base has broadened and the wide range of contributing laboratories includes universities, research institutes, and hospitals. Considerable progress has been made in boron chemistry--an accurate boron assay technique has been developed, boron analogues of chlorpromazine and thiouracil have been synthesised or nearly so, and decaborane conjugation with monoclonal antibodies has been achieved to the required loadings. In vitro cell survival experiments are proceeding in the Moata reactor using human melanoma and mouse cell lines incubated with enriched boronophenylalanine and boron tetraphenyl porphyrins. Electron microscopy examination of radiation damaged morphology shows considerable differences between cell lines. Progress with the nude mouse human melanoma model has been slow because of the lack of a reliable in vivo melanotic melanoma line, and the B16 mouse line is found to be more efficacious. Tailored beam calculations for the 10 MW HIFAR reactor indicate the difficulty of obtaining a suitable therapeutic beam because of the generated gamma dose in the beam filters. A new approach to NCT utilises the enormous cross section of 157Gd and the induced-Auger effect which has been shown to cause double strand breaks in circular DNA.

  3. Development and Characterization of a High Sensitivity Segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    PubMed Central

    Langford, T.J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C.R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2. PMID:27226807

  4. Development and characterization of a high sensitivity segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, T. J.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C. R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2.

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  11. Radiation transport requirements for clinical applications of neutron capture therapy: The rtt-MC Monte Carlo module

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    The rtt-MC dose calculation module of the BNCT-Rtpe treatment planning system has been developed specifically for boron neutron cancer therapy. Due to the complicated nature of combined gamma, fast-, epithermal- and thermal-energy neutron transport in tissue, all approaches to treatment planning to date for this treatment modality rely on Monte Carlo or three-dimensional discrete ordinates methods. Simple, fast and accurate methods for this modality have simply not been developed. In this paper the authors discuss some of the unique attributes of this therapy and the approaches they have used to begin to merge into clinical applications. As this paper is under draft, the modern implementation of boron neutron cancer therapy in the US is being realized. Research of skin and tumor effect for superficial melanoma of the extremities has been initiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and brain cancer therapy (using this planning system) has begun at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  12. MONDO: A neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission fluxes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Cancer treatment is performed, in Particle Therapy, using accelerated charged particles whose high irradiation precision and conformity allows the tumor destruction while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Dose release monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interaction with the patient body have already been proposed, but no attempt based on the detection of the abundant secondary radiation neutron component has been made yet. The reduced attenuation length of neutrons yields a secondary particle sample that is larger in number when compared to photons and charged particles. Furthermore, neutrons allow for a backtracking of the emission point that is not affected by multiple scattering. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumor region, a precise measurement of their flux, production energy and angle distributions is eagerly needed in order to improve the Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) software, so to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. All the aforementioned issues underline the importance for an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterization of the neutron production gaining experimental access both to the emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aiming for a high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision will be addressed within the MONDO (MOnitor for Neutron Dose in hadrOntherapy) project. The MONDO's main goal is to develop a tracking detector targeting fast and ultrafast secondary neutrons. The tracker is composed by a scintillating fiber matrix (4 × 4 × 8cm3). The full reconstruction of protons, produced in elastic interactions, will be used to measure energy and direction of the impinging neutron. The neutron tracker will measure the neutron production yields, as a function of production angle and energy, using different

  13. [Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Kankaanranta, Leena; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2011-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy leads to a strong local radiotherapy effect. The efficacy of the method in cancer therapy requires sufficient accumulation of boron into and a fairly superficial location of the tumor. The efficacy and tolerability of this therapy has been investigated in Finland especially in locally recurring head and neck cancer. These tumors have responded favorably to boron neutron capture therapy and the treatment has been relatively well tolerated, although most cancers have recurred locally with few cases of durable complete remission.

  14. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, Matthew A; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  15. Evaluation of neutron dosimetry on pancreatic cancer phantom model for application of intraoperative boron neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Sakurai, Yosiyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Hisao; Ono, Koji; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult neoplasms to cure and there is a need for new combinated therapy. If sufficient boron compound can be targeted accurate to the tumour, Boron Neutron-Capture Therapy (BNCT) can be applied to pancreatic cancer. We administrated BNCT to a cancer with pancreatic cancer patient using intraoperative irradiation. In this study, we performed preliminary dosimetry of a phantom model of the abdominal cavity. The flux of 8>x10(7)n/cm(2)/s (0.1 ratio) was 4.5 cm in depth from the surface in the case of simple irradiation, and the field of thermal neutrons was spread as 13 cm and 11.5 cm were usage of Void and Void with LiF collimation, respectively in thermal (OO-0011) mode. In the case of epithermal (CO-0000) mode, epithermal and fast components are four times higher at the surface level. In the case of mixed beam (OO-0000) mode, thermal neutron flux was the same as thermal neutron mode at a depth of 10 cm, but the gamma-ray component was two times higher than that of thermal neutron mode. With the use of Void and LiF collimation, thermal neutrons were selectively applied to the tumour combined with the CT-imaging of the cancer patient. This means that we could irradiate the tumour selectively and safely as possible, reducing the effects on neighboring healthy tissues. High resolution whole body dosimetry will be necessary to extend the application of BNCT to pancreatic cancer.

  16. Recent Developments In Fast Neutron Detection And Multiplicity Counting With Verification With Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakae, L; Chapline, G; Glenn, A; Kerr, P; Kim, K; Ouedraogo, S; Prasad, M; Sheets, S; Snyderman, N; Verbeke, J; Wurtz, R

    2011-09-30

    For many years at LLNL, we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He), taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics which respond over 1000 times faster (nanoseconds versus tens of microseconds) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages, since the inherent nanosecond production time-scales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array, and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of {sup 3}He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  17. Recent Developments in Fast Neutron Detection and Multiplicity Counting with Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakae, L. F.; Chapline, G. F.; Glenn, A. M.; Kerr, P. L.; Kim, K. S.; Ouedraogo, S. A.; Prasad, M. K.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2011-12-13

    For many years, LLNL researchers have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of the techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He) were used, taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics that respond over 1000 times faster (ns versus tens of {mu}s) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages since the inherent ns production timescales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of {sup 3}He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  18. Upgrade of the DIANE: Performance improvement in thermalization of fast neutrons for radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Le Tourneur, P.; Dance, W. E.

    1997-02-01

    In a small neutron radiography system such as DIANE, which is based on a sealed-tube neutron generator, the maximum possible efficiency of fast neutron thermalization must be achieved, consistent with realistic industrial and manufacturing practices. To this end, MCNP simulations and experiments have been performed for further enhancing the performance of the moderator/collimator assembly* in the DIANE. These calculations and experiments have shown that a fast neutron reflector/multiplier can be useful in increasing the number of fast neutrons entering the moderator. Various heavy metals with high inelastic cross sections for fast neutrons and low capture cross sections have been tested. Results indicate that the best moderating materials for this application are beryllium, zirconium hydride, and high-density polyethylene, and the best reflector/multiplier material for this use is tungsten. The MCNP calculations indicate that for a fast neutron output of 4×1011n s-1 in 4π steradians, a DIANE can be fabricated which produces a thermal neutron beam for radiography having a flux of approximately 2.1×105n cm-2 s-1 at an effective collimator ratio of 30, or about 7.5×104n cm-2 s-1 at a collimator ratio of 50.

  19. Tissue composition effect on dose distribution in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Farhood, Bagher; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Hamzian, Nima; Moghaddam, Homa Rezaei; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to assess the effect of the compositions of various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials on dose distribution in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. Background Neutron brachytherapy and neutron capture therapy are two common radiotherapy modalities. Materials and methods Dose distributions were calculated around a low dose rate 252Cf source located in a spherical phantom with radius of 20.0 cm using the MCNPX code for seven soft tissues and three tissue-equivalent materials. Relative total dose rate, relative neutron dose rate, total dose rate, and neutron dose rate were calculated for each material. These values were determined at various radial distances ranging from 0.3 to 15.0 cm from the source. Results Among the soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials studied, adipose tissue and plexiglass demonstrated the greatest differences for total dose rate compared to 9-component soft tissue. The difference in dose rate with respect to 9-component soft tissue varied with compositions of the materials and the radial distance from the source. Furthermore, the total dose rate in water was different from that in 9-component soft tissue. Conclusion Taking the same composition for various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent media can lead to error in treatment planning in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. Since the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the total dosimetric uncertainty in dose delivery in radiotherapy should be within ±5%, the compositions of various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials should be considered in dose calculation and treatment planning in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. PMID:26900352

  20. Element-sensitive computed tomography with fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Overley, J C

    1983-02-01

    Neutrons and X-rays are mathematically equivalent as probes in computed tomography. However, structure in the energy dependence of neutron total cross sections and the feasibility of using time-of-flight techniques for energy sensitivity in neutron detection suggest that spatial distributions of specific substances can be determined from neutron transmission data. We demonstrate that this is possible by tomographically reconstructing from such data a phantom containing several different structural materials.

  1. Coded aperture Fast Neutron Analysis: Latest design advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Lanza, Richard C.

    2001-07-01

    Past studies have showed that materials of concern like explosives or narcotics can be identified in bulk from their atomic composition. Fast Neutron Analysis (FNA) is a nuclear method capable of providing this information even when considerable penetration is needed. Unfortunately, the cross sections of the nuclear phenomena and the solid angles involved are typically small, so that it is difficult to obtain high signal-to-noise ratios in short inspection times. CAFNAaims at combining the compound specificity of FNA with the potentially high SNR of Coded Apertures, an imaging method successfully used in far-field 2D applications. The transition to a near-field, 3D and high-energy problem prevents a straightforward application of Coded Apertures and demands a thorough optimization of the system. In this paper, the considerations involved in the design of a practical CAFNA system for contraband inspection, its conclusions, and an estimate of the performance of such a system are presented as the evolution of the ideas presented in previous expositions of the CAFNA concept.

  2. Delayed neutron signal characterization in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.C.; Strain, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques have been developed for delayed neutron (DN) signal analysis and characterization that can provide diagnostic information to augment data from cover-gas analyses in the detection and identification of breached elements in an LMFBR. Eleven flow reduction tests have been run in EBR-II to provide base data support for predicting DN signal characteristics during exposed fuel operation. Results from the tests demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of response-analysis techniques for determining the transit time, T/sub tr/, for DN emitters traveling from the core to the detector, and the isotopic holdup time, T/sub h/, of DN precursors in the fuel element. T/sub tr/ has been found to vary with the relative grid location of the DN source, and T/sub h/ is affected by the form of fuel exposed to the coolant as well as the condition of the breach site. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical formulism that enables one to compute for any exposed-fuel test an equivalent recoil area. This concept provides a basis for comparison of different run-beyond-cladding-breach tests in fast reactors.

  3. The fast neutron component in treatment irradiations with 12C beam.

    PubMed

    Gunzert-Marx, Konstanze; Schardt, Dieter; Simon, Reinhard S

    2004-12-01

    Using 12C beams of 200 AMeV kinetic energy the production of secondary fragments from nuclear reactions in a thick water absorber (12.78 cm) was investigated. Fast neutrons and energetic charged particles (p-, d-, t-, a-particles) emitted in the forward hemisphere were identified by a BaF2/plastic-scintillation detector telescope. Neutron energy spectra were recorded at various angles using time-of-flight techniques. The neutron emission is forward peaked and the energy spectrum shows a broad maximum about half the energy per nucleon of the primary 12C ions. The total yield of fast neutrons emitted into the forward hemisphere integrated over the energy range of 25 to 500 MeV was found to be 0.43 +/- 0.1 per primary ion. The dose contribution of fast neutrons in patient treatments with carbon ions is estimated to be less than 1% of the total treatment dose.

  4. Response of a Si-diode-based device to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Spurný, Frantisek

    2005-02-01

    Semiconductor devices based on a Si-detector are frequently used for charged particle's detection; one application being in the investigation of cosmic radiation fields. From the spectra of energy deposition events in such devices, the total energy deposited by the radiation in silicon can be derived. This contribution presents the results of studies concerning the response of this type of detector to fast neutrons. First, the spectrum of energy deposition was established in fast neutron radiation fields with average energies from 0.5 to 50 MeV. It was found that these spectra vary significantly with the neutron energy. The comparison with the spectra registered in photon beams permitted an estimation of the part of energy deposited that could be attributed to neutrons. It was found that this part increases rapidly with neutron energy. The possibilities to use this type of detector for neutron detection and dosimetry for radiation protection are analysed and discussed.

  5. Distinguishing Pu Metal from Pu Oxide and Determining alpha-ratio using Fast Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Chapline, G. F.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-01-07

    We describe a new method for determining the ratio of the rate of (α, n) source neutrons to the rate of spontaneous fission neutrons, the so called α-ratio. This method is made possible by fast neutron counting with liquid scintillator detectors, which can determine the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. The method utilizes the spectral difference between fission spectrum neutrons from Pu metal and the spectrum of (α, n) neutrons from PuO2. Our method is a generalization of the Cifarelli-Hage method for determining keff for fissile assemblies, and also simultaneously determines keff along with the α-ratio.

  6. Detection of fast neutrons from shielded nuclear materials using a semiconductor alpha detector.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R; Siiskonen, T

    2014-08-01

    The response of a semiconductor alpha detector to fast (>1 MeV) neutrons was investigated by using measurements and simulations. A polyethylene converter was placed in front of the detector to register recoil protons generated by elastic collisions between neutrons and hydrogen nuclei of the converter. The developed prototype equipment was tested with shielded radiation sources. The low background of the detector and insensitivity to high-energy gamma rays above 1 MeV are advantages when the detection of neutron-emitting nuclear materials is of importance. In the case of a (252)Cf neutron spectrum, the intrinsic efficiency of fast neutron detection was determined to be 2.5×10(-4), whereas three-fold greater efficiency was obtained for a (241)AmBe neutron spectrum.

  7. Fast Neutron Induced Autophagy Leads To Necrosis In Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Linda; Gladden, Samantha; Andorf, Christine; Kroc, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Fast neutrons are highly effective at killing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), U87 and U251 cells. The mode of cell death was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the fraction of irradiated U87 or U251 cells having morphological features of autophagy and/or necrosis. U87 or U251 cells were irradiated with 2 Gy fast neturons or 10 Gy {gamma} rays. A majority of U87 and U251 cells exhibit features of cell death with autophagy after irradiation with either 10 Gy {gamma} rays or 2 Gy fast neutrons. Very few {gamma} irradiated cells had features of necrosis (U87 or U251 cell samples processed for TEM 1 day after 10 Gy {gamma} irradiation). In contrast, a significant increase was observed in necrotic U87 and U251 cells irradiated with fast neutrons. These results show a greater percentage of cells exhibit morphological evidence of necrosis induced by a lower dose of fast neutron irradiation compared to {gamma} irradiation. Also, the evidence of necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells occurs in a background of autophagy. Since autophagy is observed before necrosis, autophagy may play a role in signaling programmed necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells.

  8. Contribution to Neutron Fluence and Neutron Absorbed Dose from Double Scattering Proton Therapy System Components

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, A.; Newhauser, W. D.; DeLuca, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy offers low integral dose and good tumor comformality in many deep-seated tumors. However, secondary particles generated during proton therapy, such as neutrons, are a concern, especially for passive scattering systems. In this type of system, the proton beam interacts with several components of the treatment nozzle that lie along the delivery path and can produce secondary neutrons. Neutron production along the beam's central axis in a double scattering passive system was examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Neutron fluence and energy distribution were determined downstream of the nozzle's major components at different radial distances from the central axis. In addition, the neutron absorbed dose per primary proton around the nozzle was investigated. Neutron fluence was highest immediately downstream of the range modulator wheel (RMW) but decreased as distance from the RMW increased. The nozzle's final collimator and snout also contributed to the production of high-energy neutrons. In fact, for the smallest treatment volume simulated, the neutron absorbed dose per proton at isocenter increased by a factor of 20 due to the snout presence when compared with a nozzle without a snout. The presented results can be used to design more effective local shielding components inside the treatment nozzle as well as to better understand the treatment room shielding requirements. PMID:20871789

  9. Fast-neutron and photon doses determined with proportional counters and ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Higgins, P.D.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A /sup 60/Co teletherapy source has recently been coupled to an existing source of fast neutrons. These sources may be operated to provide precise and controlled mixtures of photons and neutrons. In this work we report the application of paired miniature proportional counters to n/..gamma.. dose separation. Graphite- and A150 plastic-walled proportional counters were employed. Results are compared to dose values deduced from a cnventional A150 plastic ionization chamber and a neutron insensitive GM counter.

  10. Phenotypic and genomic analysis of a fast neutron mutant population resource in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutagenized populations have become indispensable resources for introducing variation and studying gene function in plant genomics research. We utilized fast neutron radiation to induce deletion mutations in the soybean genome and phenotypically screened the resulting population. We exposed approxim...

  11. A Numerical Model for Coupling of Neutron Diffusion and Thermomechanics in Fast Burst Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Dana A. Knoll; Cassiano De Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    We develop a numerical model for coupling of neutron diffusion adn termomechanics in order to stimulate transient behavior of a fast burst reactor. The problem involves solving a set of non-linear different equations which approximate neutron diffusion, temperature change, and material behavior. With this equation set we will model the transition from a supercritical to subcritical state and possible mechanical vibration.

  12. Time Evolving Fission Chain Theory and Fast Neutron and Gamma-Ray Counting Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Here, we solve a simple theoretical model of time evolving fission chains due to Feynman that generalizes and asymptotically approaches the point model theory. The point model theory has been used to analyze thermal neutron counting data. This extension of the theory underlies fast counting data for both neutrons and gamma rays from metal systems. Fast neutron and gamma-ray counting is now possible using liquid scintillator arrays with nanosecond time resolution. For individual fission chains, the differential equations describing three correlated probability distributions are solved: the time-dependent internal neutron population, accumulation of fissions in time, and accumulation of leaked neutrons in time. Explicit analytic formulas are given for correlated moments of the time evolving chain populations. The equations for random time gate fast neutron and gamma-ray counting distributions, due to randomly initiated chains, are presented. Correlated moment equations are given for both random time gate and triggered time gate counting. There are explicit formulas for all correlated moments are given up to triple order, for all combinations of correlated fast neutrons and gamma rays. The nonlinear differential equations for probabilities for time dependent fission chain populations have a remarkably simple Monte Carlo realization. A Monte Carlo code was developed for this theory and is shown to statistically realize the solutions to the fission chain theory probability distributions. Combined with random initiation of chains and detection of external quanta, the Monte Carlo code generates time tagged data for neutron and gamma-ray counting and from these data the counting distributions.

  13. Calculation of fast neutron removal cross sections for different lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellili, B.; Elmahroug, Y.; Souga, C.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) with the lunar surface produces secondary radiations as neutrons. The study of the production and attenuation of these neutrons in the lunar soil is very important to estimate the annual ambient dose equivalent on the lunar surface and for lunar nuclear spectroscopy. Also, understanding the attenuation of fast neutrons in lunar soils can help in measuring of the lunar neutron density profile and to measure the neutron flux on the lunar surface. In this paper, the attenuation of fast neutrons in different lunar soils is investigated. The macroscopic effective removal cross section (ΣR) of fast neutrons was theoretically calculated from the mass removal cross-section values (ΣR/ρ) for various elements in soils. The obtained values of (ΣR) were discussed according to the density. The results show that the attenuation of fast neutrons is more important in the landing sites of Apollo 12 and Luna 16 than the other landing sites of Apollo and Luna missions.

  14. Demonstration of two-dimensional time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.; Brubaker, E.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; McMillan, K.; Nowack, A.; Galloudec, N. Renard-Le; Sweany, M.

    2015-09-09

    Here, we present a neutron detector system based on time-encoded imaging, and demonstrate its applicability toward the spatial mapping of special nuclear material. We also demonstrate that two-dimensional fast-neutron imaging with 2° resolution at 2 m stand-off is feasible with only two instrumented detectors.

  15. Large aperture fast neutron imaging detector with 10-ns time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Y.; Matsubara, S.; Abe, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kishimoto, H.; Yogo, A.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Otake, Y.; Mima, K.; Honda, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Fast neutrons, which are neutrons with energies greater than 1 MeV, are expected to be a source of nondestructive inspection for a large-size infrastructure such as a bridge girder because of their mean free path exceeding the meter. A neutron-imaging device with 10-ns time resolution can discriminate pulsed neutrons from X-rays via time of flight. For this purpose, we require a fast-response neutron imager with large aperture and high image resolution. A neutron-imaging device with time resolution of 10 ns and aperture size of 40 cm × 60 cm was developed. It was filled with fast response liquid scintillator [1] in an aluminum honeycomb plate, which converts neutrons to optical light images. The scintillation light images were relayed using an optical lens and detected using a fast response image intensified CCD. The detector was tested at an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility in Osaka University. A short X-ray pulse (30 ps pulse duration) was generated using LINAC, and X-ray radiograph images were obtained with a 10- ns exposure time duration. The radiograph images were well attenuated within 10-ns from the X-ray injection. A high energy X-ray image and a neutron radiograph image of a 30-cm thick concrete block with iron blocks located behind it were successfully observed. This promising technique could facilitate nondestructive inspection of large concrete constructions.

  16. Demonstration of two-dimensional time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Brennan, J.; Brubaker, E.; Gerling, M.; ...

    2015-09-09

    Here, we present a neutron detector system based on time-encoded imaging, and demonstrate its applicability toward the spatial mapping of special nuclear material. We also demonstrate that two-dimensional fast-neutron imaging with 2° resolution at 2 m stand-off is feasible with only two instrumented detectors.

  17. Neutronic calculation of fast reactors by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltashev, D. A.; Stakhanova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article considers neutronic calculation of a fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code. The main goal of development and application of integrated codes is a nuclear power plant safety justification. EUCLID/V1 is integrated code designed for coupled neutronics, thermomechanical and thermohydraulic fast reactor calculations under normal and abnormal operating conditions. EUCLID/V1 code is being developed in the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The integrated code has a modular structure and consists of three main modules: thermohydraulic module HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1, thermomechanical module BERKUT and neutronic module DN3D. In addition, the integrated code includes databases with fuel, coolant and structural materials properties. Neutronic module DN3D provides full-scale simulation of neutronic processes in fast reactors. Heat sources distribution, control rods movement, reactivity level changes and other processes can be simulated. Neutron transport equation in multigroup diffusion approximation is solved. This paper contains some calculations implemented as a part of EUCLID/V1 code validation. A fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 transient simulation (fuel assembly floating, decompression of passive feedback system channel) and cross-validation with MCU-FR code results are presented in this paper. The calculations demonstrate EUCLID/V1 code application for BREST-OD-300 simulating and safety justification.

  18. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVneutron energies while discrepancies appear at higher neutron energies. The cross section for producing an isotope in fast neutron-induced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  19. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed.

  20. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  1. Neutron and proton therapy in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1996-08-01

    Several decades of clinical research have established that neutron and proton therapy constitute useful and practical additions to the radiation oncologist`s treatment modalities. This paper discusses the rationale for using these therapies and describes practical solutions to their implementation.

  2. Identification of the fast and thermal neutron characteristics of transuranic waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, B.H. Jr.; Bramblett, R.L.; Hensley, C.

    1997-11-01

    Fissile and spontaneously fissioning material in transuranic waste drums can be most sensitively assayed using an active and passive neutron assay system such as the Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay. Both the active and the passive assays are distorted by the presence of the waste matrix and containerization. For accurate assaying, this distortion must be characterized and accounted for. An External Matrix Probe technique has been developed that accomplishes this task. Correlations between in-drum neutron flux measurements and monitors in the Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay chamber with various matrix materials provide a non-invasive means of predicting the thermal neutron flux in waste drums. Similarly, measures of the transmission of fast neutrons emitted from sources in the drum. Results obtained using the Lockheed Martin Specialty Components Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay system are discussed. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  4. Modeling of Time-correlated Detection of Fast Neutrons Emitted in Induced SNM Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckes, Amber; Barzilov, Alexander; Richardson, Norman

    Neutron multiplicity methods are widely used in the assay of fissile materials. Fission reactions release multiple neutrons simultaneously. Time-correlated detection of neutrons provides a coincidence signature that is unique to fission,which enables distinguishing it from other events. In general, fission neutrons are fast. Thermal neutron sensors require the moderation of neutrons prior to a detection event; therefore, the neutron's energy and the event's timing information may be distorted, resulting in the wide time windows in the correlation analysis. Fastneutron sensing using scintillators allows shortening the time correlation window. In this study, four EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detectors with neutron/photon pulse shape discrimination properties were modeled usingthe MCNP6 code. This sensor array was studied for time-correlated detection of fast neutrons emitted inthe induced fission of 239Pu and (α,n) neutron sources. This paper presents the results of computational modeling of arrays of these plastic scintillator sensors as well as3He detectors equipped with a moderator.

  5. Theoretical and experimental physical methods of neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    This review is based to a substantial degree on our priority developments and research at the IR-8 reactor of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. New theoretical and experimental methods of neutron-capture therapy are developed and applied in practice; these are: A general analytical and semi-empiric theory of neutron-capture therapy (NCT) based on classical neutron physics and its main sections (elementary theories of moderation, diffuse, reflection, and absorption of neutrons) rather than on methods of mathematical simulation. The theory is, first of all, intended for practical application by physicists, engineers, biologists, and physicians. This theory can be mastered by anyone with a higher education of almost any kind and minimal experience in operating a personal computer.

  6. Order-of-Magnitude Estimate of Fast Neutron Recoil Rates in Proposed Neutrino Detector at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Erik B.

    2006-02-01

    Yuri Efremenko (UT-K) and Kate Scholberg (Duke) indicated, during discussions on 12 January 2006 with the SNS Neutronics Team, interest in a new type of neutrino detector to be placed within the proposed neutrino bunker at SNS, near beam-line 18, against the RTBT. The successful operation of this detector and its associated experiments would require fast-neutron recoil rates of approximately one event per day of operation or less. To this end, the author has attempted the following order-of-magnitude estimate of this recoil rate in order to judge whether or not a full calculation effort is needed or justified. For the purposes of this estimate, the author considers a one-dimensional slab geometry, in which fast and high-energy neutrons making up the general background in the target building are incident upon one side of an irbon slab. This iron slab represents the neutrino bunker walls. If we assume that a significant fraction of the dose rate throughout the target building is due to fast or high-energy neutrons, we can estimate the flux of such neutrons based upon existing shielding calculations performed for radiation protection purposes. In general, the dose rates within the target building are controlled to be less than 0.25 mrem per hour. A variety of calculations have indicated that these dose rates have significant fast and high-energy neutron components. Thus they can estimate the fast neutron flux incident on the neutrino bunker, and thereby the fast neutron flux inside that bunker. Finally, they can estimate the neutron recoil rate within a nominal detector volume. Such an estimate is outlined in Table 1.

  7. Accelerator driven gamma and fast neutron radiography test-bed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Rusnak, B.; Falabella, S.; Hawkins, S.; McCarrick, J. F.; Wang, H.; Hall, J. M.; Ellsworth, J.

    2013-04-19

    Accelerator driven fusion gammas and fast neutrons could provide unique radiography capabilities due to their ability to produce both high and low energy mono-energetic gammas and neutrons compared with broadband bremsstrahlung based x-ray sources. The possibility of simultaneously obtaining both gamma and neutron radiographs using one source could allow complex objects composed of a large range of low to high Z materials to be imaged. In this paper we review a 4 MV RFQ accelerator driven radiography test-bed at LLNL designed to study the physics involved in applying these dual output fusion reactions for radiography applications. First experimental neutron images from a carbon target are presented.

  8. Fast-neutron-induced fission of 242Pu at nELBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögler, Toni; Beyer, Roland; Dietz, Mirco; Junghans, Arnd R.; Lorenz, Christian; Müller, Stefan E.; Reinhardt, Tobias P.; Schmidt, Konrad; Schwengner, Ronald; Takacs, Marcell P.; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    The fast neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu was determined in the range of 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV relative to 235U(n,f) at the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE. The number of target nuclei was calculated by means of measuring the spontaneous fission rate of 242Pu. Neutron transport simulations with Geant4 and MCNP6 are used to correct the relative cross section for neutron scattering. The determined results are in good agreement with current experimental and evaluated data sets.

  9. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  10. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  11. A neutron dynamic therapy with a boron tracedrug UTX-51 using a compact neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hitoshi; Tada, Ryu; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiji; Morii, Takashi; Masuda, Kai

    2014-08-01

    We are developing a neutron dynamic therapy (NDT) with boron tracedrugs for a new mechanical-clearance treatment of pathotoxic misfolded, aggregated, and self-propagating prion-associated disease proteins. We present a compact neutron generator-based NDT using a boron tracedrug UTX-51. Our NDT is based on the weak thermal neutron-bombarded destructive action of UTX-51 on bovine serum albumin (BSA) using the neutron beams produced from a compact inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) neutron generator. BSA as an NDT molecular target was subjected to thermal neutron irradiation for eight hours using a compact neutron generator. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis pattern showed no protein band when 2 nmoles of BSA were irradiated with more than 100 nmoles of UTX-51, while BSA was not affected when irradiated without UTX-51. For the first time, we have succeeded in the molecular destruction of a prion-disease model protein, BSA, by NDT with a boron tracedrug, UTX-51, using a compact neutron generator. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Pathologic effects of fractionated fast neutrons or photons on the pancreas, pylorus and duodenum of dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1983-10-01

    Thirty-nine adult male Beagles received either fast neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons on normal pulmonary tissue. The right anterior abdomen was included in the field of radiation. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with an average energy of 15 MeV to total doses of 1000, 1500, 2250 or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for six weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. All neutron irradiated dogs receiving 3375 and 2250 rad and one receiving 1500 rad developed clinical signs of pancreatic, hepatic and gastrointestinal disturbances. The liver enzymes of these dogs became elevated and they died or were euthanized in extremis 47-367 days after irradiation. Only one 6750 rad photon dog developed similar signs and died 708 days post-irradiation. Five neutron and 10 photon exposed dogs died of other causes. Neutron-induced lesions in the stomach and duodenum included hemorrhages, erosions, ulcerations and fibrosis. Ulcers perforated the GI tract of five dogs. Pancreatic lesions included degranulation and necrosis of acinar cells, fibrosis and atrophy. Islet cells were not obviously damaged. All lesions were associated with degenerative and occlusive vascular changes. The RBE of fast neutrons, assessed by clinical signs, gross and microscopic pathology, is approximately 3-4.5 for pancreas and about 4.5 for pylorus and duodenum.

  13. Measurements of fast neutrons in Hiroshima by use of (39)Ar.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Eckehart; Rühm, Werner; Loosli, H Hugo; Tolstikhin, Igor; Kato, Kazuo; Huber, Thomas C; Egbert, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The survivors of the A-bomb explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field. To validate the high-energy portion of the neutron field and thus the neutron dose to the survivors, a method is described that allows retrospective assessment of the fast neutrons from the A-bombs. This is accomplished by the extraction of the noble gas argon from biotites separated from Hiroshima granite samples, and then the detection of the (39)Ar activity that was produced by the capture of the fast neutrons on potassium. Adjusted to the year 1945, activities measured in the first samples taken at distances of 94, 818, 992, and 1,173 m from the hypocenter were 6.9+/-0.2, 0.32+/-0.01, 0.14+/-0.02, and 0.09+/-0.01 mBq/g K, respectively. All signals were significantly above detector background and show low uncertainties. Considering their uncertainties they agree with the calculated (39)Ar activation in the samples, based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. It is concluded that this method can be used to investigate samples obtained from large distances in Hiroshima, where previous data on fast neutrons are characterized by considerable uncertainties. Additionally, the method can be used to reconstruct the fast neutron fluence in Nagasaki, where no experimental data exist.

  14. Characterization of Neutron Field in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-06-01

    In order to assure the reliability and accuracy of neutron flux and related characteristics such as dpa, helium production and fuel power in the irradiation test of JOYO, reactor dosimetry and neutronic calculation have been developed. The detailed calculation was conducted using transport and Monte Carlo codes with the core subassembly composition obtained by three dimensional diffusion theory. Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitor (HAFM) were also used to measure the neutron fluence. The calculation method was verified by the comparison of measured fuel power based on the PIE data and adjusted neutron flux using measured reaction rates. As a result, it was confirmed that the calculation with experimental correction can characterize the JOYO neutron field precisely and meet the specified accuracy set for each irradiation test.

  15. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  16. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  17. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles.

  18. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally.

  19. Detection of fast neutrons using detectors based on semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zat'ko, B.; Sedlačková, K.; Dubecký, F.; Boháček, P.; Sekáčová, M.; Nečas, V.

    2011-12-01

    Detectors with AuZn square Schottky contact of the area of 2.5 × 2.5 mm2 were fabricated. On the back side, the whole area AuGeNi eutectic ohmic contact was evaporated. The thickness of the base material (semi-insulating GaAs) was 220 μm. The connection of 4 detectors in parallel was tested to get the detection area of 25 mm2. The 239Pu-Be fast neutron source with energies between 0.5 and 12 MeV was used in experimental measurements. We have investigated the optimal thickness of HDPE (high-density polyethylene) conversion layer for fast neutron detection. The spectra of the neutrons were measured by detectors covered by HDPE converter of different thicknesses. The fast neutron detection efficiency proved experimentally was compared with results from simulations performed by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code.

  20. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  1. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  2. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  3. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Fast-neutron coded-aperture imaging of special nuclear material configurations

    SciTech Connect

    P. A. Hausladen; M. A. Blackston; E. Brubaker; D. L. Chichester; P. Marleau; R. J. Newby

    2012-07-01

    In the past year, a prototype fast-neutron coded-aperture imager has been developed that has sufficient efficiency and resolution to make the counting of warheads for possible future treaty confirmation scenarios via their fission-neutron emissions practical. The imager is constructed from custom-built pixelated liquid scintillator detectors. The liquid scintillator detectors enable neutron-gamma discrimination via pulse shape, and the pixelated construction enables a sufficient number of pixels for imaging in a compact detector with a manageable number of channels of readout electronics. The imager has been used to image neutron sources at ORNL, special nuclear material (SNM) sources at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility, and neutron source and shielding configurations at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper reports on the design and construction of the imager, characterization measurements with neutron sources at ORNL, and measurements with SNM at the INL ZPPR facility.

  5. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, YongHao; Chen, XiMeng; Lei, JiaRong; An, Li; Zhang, XiaoDong; Shao, JianXiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, XinHua

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of 241Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of 241Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded 241Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  6. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  7. FEASIBILITY OF MEASURING IRON IN VIVO USING FAST 14 MEV NEUTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.

    2005-05-01

    In this short report, I reassess the feasibility of measuring iron in vivo in the liver and heart of thalassemia patients undergoing chelation therapy. Despite the multiplicity of analytical methods for analyzing iron, only two, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic susceptibility, are suitable for in vivo applications, and these are limited to the liver because of the heart's beat. Previously, a nuclear method, gamma-resonance scattering, offered a quantitative measure of iron in these organs; however, it was abandoned because it necessitated a nuclear reactor to produce the radioactive source. I reviewed and reassessed the status of two alternative nuclear methods, based on iron spectroscopy of gamma rays induced by fast neutron inelastic scattering and delayed activation in iron. Both are quantitative methods with high specificity for iron and adequate penetrating power to measure it in organs sited deep within the human body. My experiments demonstrated that both modalities met the stated qualitative objectives to measure iron. However, neutron dosimetry revealed that the intensity of the neutron radiation field was too weak to reliably assess the minimum detection limits, and to allow quantitative extrapolations to measurements in people. A review of the literature, included in this report, showed that these findings agree qualitatively with the published results, although the doses reported were about three orders-of-magnitude higher than those I used. Reviewing the limitations of the present work, steps were outlined for overcoming some of the shortcomings. Due to a dearth of valid quantitative alternatives for determining iron in vivo, I conclude that nuclear methods remain the only viable option. However, from the lessons learned, further systematic work is required before embarking on clinical studies.

  8. Analytic estimates of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Anferov, V

    2010-12-21

    Proton beam losses in various components of a treatment nozzle generate secondary neutrons, which bring unwanted out of field dose during treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytic method for estimating neutron dose to a distant organ at risk during proton therapy. Based on radiation shielding calculation methods proposed by Sullivan, we developed an analytical model for converting the proton beam losses in the nozzle components and in the treatment volume into the secondary neutron dose at a point of interest. Using the MCNPx Monte Carlo code, we benchmarked the neutron dose rates generated by the proton beam stopped at various media. The Monte Carlo calculations confirmed the validity of the analytical model for simple beam stop geometry. The analytical model was then applied to neutron dose equivalent measurements performed on double scattering and uniform scanning nozzles at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI). Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the data measured at MPRI. This work provides a method for estimating analytically the neutron dose equivalent to a distant organ at risk. This method can be used as a tool for optimizing dose delivery techniques in proton therapy.

  9. Neutron-Activatable Needles for Radionuclide Therapy of Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Narayan, Roger J; Lu, Xiuling; Jay, Michael

    2017-08-14

    Various approaches have been undertaken to enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents, including tissue-killing radionuclides, into solid tumors. Here we describe the preparation of conical needles composed of Ti and Mo coated by pulsed laser deposition or chemical vapor deposition with elements (Ho and Re) that can readily yield radioactive isotopes following irradiation in a neutron flux. The radioactive needles, whose design were based on solid microneedle arrays used in transdermal drug delivery, can be produced with minimal handling of radioactivity and subsequently inserted into tumors as a means of internal radiation therapy. Ho and Re, were specifically chosen because of their large neutron capture cross-sections as well as the desirable radiotherapeutic properties of the resultant radionuclides. Neutron-absorbing shields were also developed to prevent the production of unwanted radionuclides after neutron irradiation of the needle base materials. Neutron activation calculations showed that therapeutically significant amounts of radionuclides can be produced for treating solid tumors. Stability studies demonstrated that Re did not leach off the Mo needles. These coated neutron-activatable needles offer a new approach to internal radiation therapy of tumors that allows precise tailoring of the absorbed radiation dose delivered to the tumor by controlling the coating thickness and the irradiation time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fast neutron spectroscopy with tensioned metastable fluid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, T. F.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes research into development of a rapid-turnaround, neutron-spectroscopy capable (gamma-beta blind), high intrinsic efficiency sensor system utilizing the tensioned metastable fluid detector (TMFD) architecture. The inability of prevailing theoretical models (developed successfully for the classical bubble chamber) to adequately predict detection thresholds for tensioned metastable fluid conditions is described. Techniques are presented to overcome these inherent shortcomings, leading thereafter, to allow successful neutron spectroscopy using TMFDs - via the newly developed Single Atom Spectroscopy (SAS) approach. SAS also allows for a unique means for rapidly determining neutron energy thresholds with TMFDs. This is accomplished by simplifying the problem of determining Cavitation Detection Events (CDEs) arising from neutron interactions with one in which several recoiling atom species contribute to CDEs, to one in which only one dominant recoil atom need be considered. The chosen fluid is Heptane (C7H16) for which only recoiling C atoms contribute to CDEs. Using the SAS approach, the threshold curve for Heptane was derived using isotope neutron source data, and then validated against experiments with mono-energetic (2.45/14 MeV) neutrons from D-D and D-T accelerators. Thereafter the threshold curves were used to produce the response matrix for various geometries. The response matrices were in turn combined with experimental data to recover the continuous spectra of fission (Cf-252) and (α,n) Pu-Be isotopic neutron sources via an unfolding algorithm. A generalized algorithm is also presented for performing neutron spectroscopy using any other TMFD fluid that meets the SAS approach assumptions.

  11. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  12. Determination of the neutron fluence spectra in the neutron therapy room of KIRAMS.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Kim, J L; Kim, Y S; Yang, T G; Lee, M Y

    2007-01-01

    High energy proton induced neutron fluence spectra were determined at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) using an extended Bonner Sphere (BS) set from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in a series of measurements to quantify the neutron field. At the facility of the MC50 cyclotron of KIRAMS, two Be targets of different thicknesses, 1.0 and 10.5 mm, were bombarded by 35 and 45-MeV protons to produce six kinds of neutron fields, which were classified according to the measurement position and the use or no use of a beam collimator such as the gantry of the neutron therapy unit. In order to obtain a priori information to unfold the measured BS data the MCNPX code was used to calculate the neutron spectrum, and the influence of the surrounding materials for cooling the target assembly were also reviewed through this calculation. Some dosimetric quantities were determined by using the spectra determined in this measurement. Dose equivalent rates of these neutron fields ranged from 0.21 to 5.66 mSv h(-1)nA(-1) and the neutron yields for a thick Be target were 3.05 and 4.77% in the case of using a 35 and a 45-MeV proton, respectively.

  13. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  14. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  15. Test of a prototype neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Ricco, G.; Caiffi, B.; Pompili, F.; Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cardarelli, R.; Argiro, S.

    2015-07-01

    A prototype of neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors has been developed. This prototype consists of a {sup 6}Li neutron converter sandwiched between two CVD diamond crystals. The radiation hardness of the diamond crystals makes it suitable for applications in low power research reactors, while a low sensitivity to gamma rays and low leakage current of the detector permit to reach good energy resolution. A fast coincidence between two crystals is used to reject background. The detector was read out using two different electronic chains connected to it by a few meters of cable. The first chain was based on conventional charge-sensitive amplifiers, the other used a custom fast charge amplifier developed for this purpose. The prototype has been tested at various neutron sources and showed its practicability. In particular, the detector was calibrated in a TRIGA thermal reactor (LENA laboratory, University of Pavia) with neutron fluxes of 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s and at the 3 MeV D-D monochromatic neutron source named FNG (ENEA, Rome) with neutron fluxes of 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}s. The neutron spectrum measurement was performed at the TAPIRO fast research reactor (ENEA, Casaccia) with fluxes of 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s. The obtained spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations, modeling detector response with MCNP and Geant4. (authors)

  16. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Bradley, D A; Saripan, M I; Ramli, A T; Wagiran, H

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of doped SiO(2) optical fibres subjected to (241)AmBe neutron irradiation. The TL materials, which comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres, were exposed in close contact with the (241)AmBe source to obtain fast neutron interactions through use of measurements obtained with and without a Cd filter (the filter being made to entirely enclose the fibres). The neutron irradiations were performed for exposure times of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5- and 7-days in a neutron tank filled with water. In this study, use was also made of the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 5 (V5) to simulate the neutron irradiations experiment. It was found that the commercially available Ge-doped and Al-doped optical fibres show a linear dose response subjected to fast neutrons from (241)AmBe source up to seven days of irradiations. The simulation performed using MCNP5 also exhibits a similar pattern, albeit differing in sensitivity. The TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre, the total absorption cross section for Ge in both the fast and thermal neutrons region being some ten times greater than that of Al.

  17. Dosimetry and fast neutron energies characterization of photoneutrons produced in some medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-12-01

    This work focusses on the estimation of induced photoneutrons energy, fluence, and strength using nuclear track detector (NTD) (CR-39). Photoneutron energy was estimated for three different linear accelerators, LINACs as an example for the commonly used accelerators. For high-energy linear accelerators, neutrons are produced as a consequence of photonuclear reactions in the target nuclei, accelerator head, field-flattening filters and beam collimators, and other irradiated objects. NTD (CR-39) is used to evaluate energy and fluence of the fast neutron. Track length is used to estimate fast photoneutrons energy for linear accelerators (Elekta 10 MV, Elekta 15 MV, and Varian 15 MV). Results show that the estimated neutron energies for the three chosen examples of LINACs reveals neutron energies in the range of 1-2 MeV for 10 and 15 MV X-ray beams. The fluence of neutrons at the isocenter (Φtotal) is found to be (4×106 n cm2 Gy-1) for Elekta machine 10 MV. The neutron source strengths Q are calculated. It was found to be 0.2×1012 n Gy-1 X-ray at the isocenter. This work represents simple, low cost, and accurate methods of measuring fast neutrons dose and energies.

  18. Fast neutron measurements at the nELBE time-of-flight facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghansa, A. R.; Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Hannaske, R.; Kögler, T.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-01

    The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf has been rebuilt. A new enlarged experimental hall with a flight path of up to 10 m is available for neutron time-of-flight experiments in the fast energy range from about 50 keV to 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver nuclear data of fast neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. The experimental programme consists of transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section measurements, and neutron induced fission cross sections. The inelastic scattering to the first few excited states in 56Fe was investigated by measuring the gamma production cross section with an HPGe detector. The neutron induced fission of 242Pu was studied using fast ionisation chambers with large homogeneous actinide deposits.

  19. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  20. A Sealed-Accelerator-Tube Neutron Generator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.-N.; Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.; Verbeke, J.M.; Vurjic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-06-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator applications. By using a 2.5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source and a computer designed 100 keV accelerator column, peak extractable hydrogen current exceeding 1 A from a 3-mm-diameter aperture, together with H{sup +} yields over 94% have been achieved. These experimental findings together with recent moderator design will enable one to develop compact 14 MeV neutron generators based on the D-T fusion reaction. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without pumping. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, it is estimated that a treatment time of {approx} 45 minutes is needed for boron neutron capture therapy.

  1. Development of a New Fast Neutron/Gamma Spectrometer Array Using CLYC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olympia, Nathan; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Neutron physics has long suffered from a lack of detectors that provide spectroscopic information without the need for inefficient time-of-flight techniques. Any headway made towards a spectrometer with good energy resolution and neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination represents an important step forward in the field. Recent investigations at the University of Massachusetts Lowell with Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) scintillators have demonstrated their potential for direct pulse-height measurements via the 35Cl(n,p) reaction. From this work, it was recognized that CLYC could be optimized for fast neutron detection by growing 6Li-depleted crystals to suppress the overwhelming thermal neutron response. A project is now underway to develop a versatile array of 16 1'' ×1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC detectors for measurements in nuclear astrophysics, reactor data, homeland security, and nuclear structure. Initial measurements of interest include prompt fission neutrons, β-delayed neutrons, and scattering cross sections. Characterizations of the neutron and gamma-ray response for the first two detectors of the array are being carried out at various facilities with both mono-energetic and continuous fast neutron beams. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant #DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  2. Radiation dose measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon reactions in a human head phantom for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo

    Dose measurements and radiation transport calculations were investigated for the interactions within the human brain of fast neutrons, slow neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons associated with accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT). To estimate the overall dose to the human brain, it is necessary to distinguish the doses from the different radiation sources. Using organic scintillators, human head phantom and detector assemblies were designed, constructed, and tested to determine the most appropriate dose estimation system to discriminate dose due to the different radiation sources that will ultimately be incorporated into a human head phantom to be used for dose measurements in ABNCT. Monoenergetic and continuous energy neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target near the reaction threshold using the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A human head phantom was built to measure and to distinguish the doses which result from proton recoils induced by fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium nuclei from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction, and photons generated in the 7Li accelerator target as well as those generated inside the head phantom through various nuclear reactions at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures. The phantom consists of two main parts to estimate dose to tumor and dose to healthy tissue as well: a 3.22 cm3 boron loaded plastic scintillator which simulates a boron containing tumor inside the brain and a 2664 cm3 cylindrical liquid scintillator which represents the surrounding healthy tissue in the head. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX(TM) was used for the simulation of radiation transport due to neutrons and photons and extended to investigate the effects of neutrons and other radiation on the brain at various depths.

  3. Neutron-Activatable Nanoparticles for Intraperitoneal Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Derek; Lu, Xiuling

    2017-01-01

    Intraperitoneal internal radiation therapy is a cancer treatment option that is employed in situations where surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy are not amenable for patients. However, exposure of noncancerous tissues to radiation continues to be a hindrance to safe and effective treatment of patients. In addition, reducing prolonged radiation exposure of personnel during preparation of internal radiation therapy agents makes their manufacture complicated and hazardous. Developments in nanotechnology have provided a platform for targeted treatments that combine dual imaging and treatment capabilities all in one package, while also being robust enough to withstand the intense stresses faced during neutron activation. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing neutron activatable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for use in radiotherapy of metastatic peritoneal cancers while limiting personal exposure to radioactive materials, limiting the leakage of radioactive isotopes caused by nanoparticle degradation during neutron activation, and increasing cancer tissue specificity of radiation.

  4. [Minimally invasive cytoselective radiation therapy using boron neutron capture reaction].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    The cell-killing effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, boron-10 ((10)B) and thermal neutrons, whose destructive effect is well observed in boron-loaded tissues. High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve efficient neutron capture therapy of cancers. This review focuses on liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) as a recent promising approach that meet these requirements for BNCT. BDS involves two strategies: (1) encapsulation of boron in the aqueous core of liposomes and (2) accumulation of boron in the liposomal bilayer. In this review, recent development of liposomal boron delivery system is summarized.

  5. Genome resilience and prevalence of segmental duplications following fast neutron irradiation of soybean.

    PubMed

    Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Stec, Adrian O; Michno, Jean-Michel; Roessler, Jeffrey; Bhaskar, Pudota B; Ries, Landon; Dobbels, Austin A; Campbell, Benjamin W; Young, Nathan P; Anderson, Justin E; Grant, David M; Orf, James H; Naeve, Seth L; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Vance, Carroll P; Stupar, Robert M

    2014-11-01

    Fast neutron radiation has been used as a mutagen to develop extensive mutant collections. However, the genome-wide structural consequences of fast neutron radiation are not well understood. Here, we examine the genome-wide structural variants observed among 264 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] plants sampled from a large fast neutron-mutagenized population. While deletion rates were similar to previous reports, surprisingly high rates of segmental duplication were also found throughout the genome. Duplication coverage extended across entire chromosomes and often prevailed at chromosome ends. High-throughput resequencing analysis of selected mutants resolved specific chromosomal events, including the rearrangement junctions for a large deletion, a tandem duplication, and a translocation. Genetic mapping associated a large deletion on chromosome 10 with a quantitative change in seed composition for one mutant. A tandem duplication event, located on chromosome 17 in a second mutant, was found to cosegregate with a short petiole mutant phenotype, and thus may serve as an example of a morphological change attributable to a DNA copy number gain. Overall, this study provides insight into the resilience of the soybean genome, the patterns of structural variation resulting from fast neutron mutagenesis, and the utility of fast neutron-irradiated mutants as a source of novel genetic losses and gains.

  6. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  7. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  8. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  9. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  10. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  11. Boron-neutron capture therapy in relation to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, H; Amano, K; Kamano, S; Fankhauser, H; Hanamura, T; Sano, K

    1978-01-01

    The essential feature of tumour therapy rests upon host-tumour interaction. To achieve therapeutic effects, a prerequisite to immunotherapy is the reduction of tumour cells in the host's body. Such measures should not be immunosuppressive. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is not appropriate in this regard. Supraradical surgery and non-specific radiotherapy are not desirable for preservation of nervous function, if their immunosuppression is not as severe as cytotoxic substances. Boron-neutron capture therapy is a highly specific and least immunosuppressive means of reducing tumour cells of the central nervous system. A brief introductory review of basic research is presented. The interim clinical results are: (i) Treatment of recurrent glioblastoma: Survival extension obtained by neutron capture therapy is 21.9 +/- 7.2 mos in contrast to that obtained by conventional treatments of 6.7 +/- 0.6 mos (p less than 0.001), (Total survival 26.3 +/- 6.7 mos); and (ii) only three patients including two glioblastoma cases were treated with neutron by the same surgeon who, by performing the first tumour operation, had the advantage in topographic knowledge for determining the radiation field. They survived 4, 5, and 6 years in almost fully active conditions. The new Musashi Institute of Technology Reactor Thermal Neutron Therapy Facility and the increased domestic production of boron-10 isotope have enlarged the therapeutic capacity to two dozen patients a year.

  12. Fast neutron beams--prospects for the coming decade.

    PubMed

    Blomgren, J

    2007-01-01

    The present status of neutron beam production techniques above 20 MeV is discussed. Presently, two main methods are used; white beams and quasi-monoenergetic beams. The performances of these two techniques are discussed, as well as the use of such facilities for measurements of nuclear data for fundamental and applied research. Recently, two novel ideas on how to produce extremely intense neutron beams in the 100-500 MeV range have been proposed. Decay in flight of beta delayed neutron-emitting nuclei could provide beam intensities five orders of magnitudes larger than present facilities. A typical neutron energy spectrum would be essentially monoenergetic, i.e., the energy spread is about 1 MeV with essentially no low-energy tail. A second option would be to produce beams of (6)He and dissociate the (6)He nuclei into alpha particles and neutrons. The basic features of these concepts are outlined, and the potential for improved nuclear data research is discussed.

  13. SWAN - Detection of explosives by means of fast neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierlik, M.; Borsuk, S.; Guzik, Z.; Iwanowska, J.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Korolczuk, S.; Kozłowski, T.; Krakowski, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Swiderski, L.; Szeptycka, M.; Szewiński, J.; Urban, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we report on SWAN, the experimental, portable device for explosives detection. The device was created as part of the EU Structural Funds Project "Accelerators & Detectors" (POIG.01.01.02-14-012/08-00), with the goal to increase beneficiary's expertise and competencies in the field of neutron activation analysis. Previous experiences and budged limitations lead toward a less advanced design based on fast neutron interactions and unsophisticated data analysis with the emphasis on the latest gamma detection and spectrometry solutions. The final device has been designed as a portable, fast neutron activation analyzer, with the software optimized for detection of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. SWAN's performance in the role of explosives detector is elaborated in this paper. We demonstrate that the unique features offered by neutron activation analysis might not be impressive enough when confronted with practical demands and expectations of a generic homeland security customer.

  14. Delayed neutron emission measurements from fast fission of U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.; Shinohara, Nubuo; Andoh, Masaki

    1996-09-01

    Experiments have been designed and conducted to measure the periods and yields of delayed neutrons from fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np. These measurements were performed in a pool type reactor using a fast flux in-core irradiation device. The energy dependent neutron flux spectrum within the irradiation device was characterized using a foil activation technique and the SAND-II unfolding code. Five delayed neutron groups were measured. The total yield (sum of the five group yields) for {sup 235}U was found to be 0.0141 {+-} 0. 0009. The total yield for {sup 237}Np was found to be 0.0102 {+-} 0. 0008. The total delayed neutron yield data were found to be in good agreement with previous measurements. The individual group yields reported here are preliminary and are being further refined.

  15. Fast neutrons for transmutation research within the EFNUDAT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Matic, A.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Weiss, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    As a Network for research on waste transmutation and on Generation IV nuclear systems within the 6th EU framework program funds are available for EFNUDAT: European effort to exploit up-to-date neutron beam technology for novel research on the transmutation of radioactive waste. They cover joint research activities on n-beams, targets, data collection and quality assurance as well as transnational access to 10 neutron research facilities. We intend to arouse interest in European research groups to approach the EFNUDAT consortium in case of interest in transmutation related research. As an example we give a brief overview of the new neutron beam of the Strahlungsquelle ELBE at Dresden-Rossendorf.

  16. Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Broekman, J. D.; Nigg, D. W.; Hawthorne, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

  17. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  18. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Larry Don; Miller, David Torbet

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  19. A New Neutron Calibration Technique with Fast Scintillators on DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Taylor, P. L.; Carrig, W.

    2015-11-01

    Absolute calibrations are necessary for conventional neutron measurements based on proportional counters and fission chambers, at regular intervals. For the DIII-D tokamak, the wide span of fusion rates, approximately between 1.e9 - 1.e17 neutrons per second, from pure Ohmic to high power auxiliary heating plasmas requires careful cross-calibrations of a variety of neutron detectors with stepwise and overlapped sensitivities, with an intense isotope neutron source, e.g. californium-252 and real plasmas. Scintillators have been successfully utilized for fast time resolved neutron detection for decades. A new calibration approach with the help of scintillators is shown to be straightforward, simpler and trustworthy while the conventional approach is complicated, time consuming and costly. Details on the calibration setup and results will be presented. Supported by US DOE SC-G903402 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. Fast neutrons detection in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, A. M.; Ashraf, O.; Rammah, Y. S.; Ashry, A. H.; Eisa, M.; Tsuruta, T.

    2015-03-01

    Fast detection of neutrons in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors were investigated using new etching conditions. The neutron irradiation is performed using a 5 mCi Am-Be source present at the National Institute of Standards (NIS) of Egypt. Using the new etching condition, irradiated CR-39 samples were etched for 4 h and DAM-ADC samples for 80 min. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data.The dependence of neutrons track density on the neutrons fluence is investigated. When etched under optimum conditions, the relationship between track density and fluence is determined which is found to be linear. Detection efficiency has been represented for both SSNTDs and found to be constant with fluence, which reflects the importance of using CR-39 and DAM-ADC detectors in the field of neutron dosimetry. Linear relationship between track density and effective dose is determined.

  1. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment.

    PubMed

    Holley, A T; Broussard, L J; Davis, J L; Hickerson, K; Ito, T M; Liu, C-Y; Lyles, J T M; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Mendenhall, M P; Morris, C L; Mortensen, R; Pattie, R W; Rios, R; Saunders, A; Young, A R

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be ̅ε=0.9985(4).

  2. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, A. T.; Broussard, L. J.; Davis, J. L.; Hickerson, K.; Ito, T. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Mammei, R. R.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Pattie, R. W.; Rios, R.; Saunders, A.; Young, A. R.

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be overline{ɛ }=0.9985(4).

  3. Capabilities, Calibration, and Impact of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitgab, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In the current NASA crew radiation health risk assessment framework, estimates for the neutron contributions to crew radiation exposure largely rely on simulated data with sizeable uncertainties due to the lack of experimental measurements inside the ISS. Integrated in the ISS-RAD instrument, the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND) will deploy to the ISS on one of the next cargo supply missions. Together with the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector, the FND will perform, for the first time, routine and precise direct neutron measurements inside the ISS between 0.5 and 80 MeV. The measurements will close the NASA Medical Operations Requirement to monitor neutrons inside the ISS and impact crew radiation health risk assessments by reducing uncertainties on the neutron contribution to crew exposure, enabling more efficient mission planning. The presentation will focus on the FND detection mechanism, calibration results and expectations about the FND's interaction with the mixed radiation field inside the ISS.

  4. Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S.; Park, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

  5. Fast neutron measurements using Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. B.; Achtzehn, T.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Forget, P.; Glodo, J.; Hawrami, R.; Ing, H.; O'Dougherty, P.; Shah, K. S.; Shirwadkar, U.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; Tower, J.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillator have been characterized using monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 4.1-5.5 MeV. Four crystals with dimensions (thickness×diameter) of 1″×1″, 1″×2″, and 2″×2″ were evaluated, including one crystal with natural concentrations of Li isotopes and three that were enriched in 6Li. The intrinsic efficiency of CLYC for fast-neutron detection has been determined for the natural-Li crystal. These measurements were translated into reaction cross-sections, and show good agreement with available cross-section data for neutron interactions with the 35Cl component of CLYC. Furthermore, it is shown that the charged-particle energy released in the fast-neutron reactions on 35Cl varies linearly with the energy of the incoming neutron. These results verify the efficacy of CLYC for fast-neutron spectroscopy in a range of applications.

  6. Prompt fission neutron spectra in fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Capote, R.

    2015-07-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) measurements for the neutron-induced fission of 238U are carried out at incident neutron energies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MeV, respectively. The time-of-flight technique is employed to determine the energy of fission neutrons. The prompt fission neutron energy spectra so obtained are analyzed using Watt parametrization to derive the neutron multiplicity and average prompt fission neutron energy. The present experimental PFNS data are compared with the evaluated spectra taken from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and the predictive calculations carried out using the empire-3.2 (Malta) code with built-in Los Alamos (LA) and Kornilov PFNS models. The sensitivity of the empire-3.2 LA model-calculated PFNS to the nuclear level density parameter of the average fission fragment and to the total kinetic energy is investigated. empire-3.2 LA model PFNS calculations that use Madland 2006-recommended values [D. G. Madland, Nucl. Phys. A 772, 113 (2006), 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2006.03.013] of the total kinetic energy and the level density parameter a =A /(10 ±0.5 ) compare very well to measured data at all incident neutron incident energies.

  7. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  8. Coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics numerical simulations of a Molten Fast Salt Reactor (MFSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laureau, A.; Rubiolo, P. R.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Brovchenko, M.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled neutronics and thermalhydraulic numerical analyses of a molten salt fast reactor are presented. These preliminary numerical simulations are carried-out using the Monte Carlo code MCNP and the Computation Fluid Dynamic code OpenFOAM. The main objectives of this analysis performed at steady-reactor conditions are to confirm the acceptability of the current neutronic and thermalhydraulic designs of the reactor, to study the effects of the reactor operating conditions on some of the key MSFR design parameters such as the temperature peaking factor. The effects of the precursor's motion on the reactor safety parameters such as the effective fraction of delayed neutrons have been evaluated.

  9. EPR analysis of the effects of accelerated carbon ion and fast neutron irradiations on table sugar.

    PubMed

    Mikou, M; Benzina, S; Bischoff, P; Denis, J M; Gueulette, J

    2009-09-01

    Table sugar samples were irradiated with accelerated carbon ions and fast neutrons. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis performed after the irradiation revealed a complex spectrum similar to that observed after gamma-ray irradiations. The total concentration of the paramagnetic centers induced by accelerated carbon ions and neutrons was proportional to the absorbed dose. Good stability of the produced free radicals was observed for a typical period of sugar storage. Sugar was more sensitive to accelerated carbon ions than to neutrons. The results show that table sugar can be a useful material for dosimetry in the case of a radiation accident.

  10. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  11. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-07

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  12. The A-711 high yield neutron generator and automated pneumatic transfer system for fast neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, James D.; Chichester, D. L.; Hill, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    To make fast neutron activation analysis (FNAA) of samples with short half-lives easier, Thermo Electron has updated and modernized its automatic pneumatic transfer system for activation laboratories. For example, with a separation of 10 m from the counting station and a transit speed of 15 m/s, oxygen can be analyzed with improved accuracy. The fast transit time is needed due to the short half-lives of 16N and 19O, 7 s and 27 s respectively, and oxygen-free polyethylene sample bottles are used to allow prompt counting and decrease background counts. Incorporating a dual-axis rotator at the irradiation station for sample and standard, the transfer system also incorporates stations for sample loading, disposal and counting as well as a station to incorporate a chemical neutron source such as Cf-252.

  13. Fast and thermal neutron intensity measurements at the KFUPM PGNAA setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jarallah, M. I.; Naqvi, A. A.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-jarad, F.

    2002-10-01

    Fast and thermal neutron intensity distributions have been measured at an accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The setup is built at the 350 keV accelerator laboratory of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The setup is mainly designed to carry out PGNAA elemental analysis via thermal neutron capture. In this study relative intensity of fast and thermal neutrons was measured as a function of the PGNAA moderator assembly parameters using nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The relative intensity of the neutrons was measured inside the sample region as a function of front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Measurements were carried out at the KFUPM 350 keV accelerator using 2.8 MeV pulsed neutron beam from D(d,n) reaction. The pulsed deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 30 kHz frequency was used to produce neutrons. Experimental results were compared with results of Monte Carlo design calculations of the PGNAA setup. A good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the calculations.

  14. Development and characterization of a D-D fast neutron generator for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert; Bort, Lorenz; Zboray, Robert; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2015-02-01

    The experimental characterization of a pulsed D-D fast neutron generator designed for fan-beam tomography applications is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulations the response of an LB6411 neutron probe was related to the neutron generator output. The yield was measured to be up to ∼10(7) neutrons/s. An aluminum block was moved stepwise between the source and a BC400 plastic scintillator detector in order to measure an edge response. This edge response was related to the neutron emitting spot size using Monte Carlo simulations and a simplified geometry-based model. The experimentally determined spot size of 2.2 mm agreed well with the simulated value of 1.5 mm. The time-dependence of pulsed output for various operating conditions was also measured. The neutron generator was found to satisfy design requirements for a planned fast neutron tomography arrangement based on a plastic scintillator detector array which is expected to be capable of producing 2D tomograms with a resolution of ∼1.5 mm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring fast neutrons in Hiroshima at distances relevant to atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Rugel, G; Marchetti, A A; Rühm, W; Korschinek, G; McAninch, J E; Carroll, K; Egbert, S; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Martinelli, R; Wallner, A; Wallner, C

    2003-07-31

    Data from the survivors of the atomic bombs serve as the major basis for risk calculations of radiation-induced cancer in humans. A controversy has existed for almost two decades, however, concerning the possibility that neutron doses in Hiroshima may have been much larger than estimated. This controversy was based on measurements of radioisotopes activated by thermal neutrons that suggested much higher fluences at larger distances than expected. For fast neutrons, which contributed almost all the neutron dose, clear measurement validation has so far proved impossible at the large distances (900 to 1,500 m) most relevant to survivor locations. Here, the first results are reported for the detection of 63Ni produced predominantly by fast neutrons (above about 1 MeV) in copper samples from Hiroshima. This breakthrough was made possible by the development of chemical extraction methods and major improvements in the sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry for detection of 63Ni atoms (refs 8-11). When results are compared with 63Ni activation predicted by neutron doses for Hiroshima survivors, good agreement is observed at the distances most relevant to survivor data. These findings provide, for the first time, clear measurement validation of the neutron doses to survivors in Hiroshima.

  16. FAST NEUTRON SOURCE DETECTION AT LONG DISTANCES USING DOUBLE SCATTER SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    FORMAN,L.VANIER,P.WELSH,K.

    2003-08-03

    Fast neutrons can be detected with relatively high efficiency, >15%, using two planes of hydrogenous scintillator detectors where a scatter in the first plane creates a start pulse and scatter in the second plane is separated by time-of-flight. Indeed, the neutron spectrum of the source can be determined as the sum of energy deposited by pulse height in the first added to the energy of the second found by time-of-flight to the second detector. Gamma rays can also create a double scatter by Compton interaction in the first with detection in the second, but these events occur in a single time window because the scattered photons all travel at the speed of light. Thus, gamma ray events can be separated from neutrons by the time-of-flight differences. We have studied this detection system with a Cf-252 source using Bicron 501A organic scintillators and report on the ability to efficiently detect fast neutrons with high neutron/gamma detection ratios. We have further studied cosmic-ray neutron background detection response that is the dominant background in long range detection. We have found that most of the neutrons are excluded from the time-of-flight window because they are either too high in energy, >10 keV, or too low, < 10 keV. Moreover, if the detection planes are position-sensitive, the angular direction of the source can be determined by the ratio of the energy of scattered protons in the first detector relative to the position and energy of the scattered neutron detected in the second. This ability to locate the source in theta is useful, but more importantly increases the signal to noise relative to cosmic-ray produced neutrons that are relatively isotropic. This technique may be used in large arrays to detect neutrons at ranges up to 0.5 kilometer.

  17. Towards epithermal Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    Progress in the treatment of local disseminating cancer such as high grade brain tumours is poor, and the ability to kill individual cancer cells in the midst of normal cells has not been achieved. Binary therapies hold the most promise of this, and of these Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is the most advanced. Epithermal neutron beams are essential for outpatient treatment of high grade brain tumours and these are now installed and being characterised in Europe and the USA, and are at the design stage in Australia. These beams would allow the bilateral irradiation of the entire brain, and as such are ideally suited for the prophylactic therapy of subclinical metastases. When coupled with appropriate cancer affined boron compounds, therapeutic ratios of 2-3 should be achieved. At present the only source of an epithermal neutron beam is a nuclear reactor. The Euratom reactor at Petten and the Brookhaven Medical Reactor have been retrofitted with filters to produce an epithermal neutron beam. These beams have been characterised and used in dose escalation studies with dogs to study normal tissue tolerance using borocaptate (BSH). Another beam is available at the MIT medical research reactor. Clinical trials at Petten for glioblastoma with BSH and at MIT using boronophenylalanine for melanoma metastases to the extremities are expected to commence this year. The state of the art of reactor based BNCT is reviewed and the potential for a major change in the prognosis of local control of disseminating cancer is explored.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Recent Fast Neutron Imaging Measurements with the Fieldable Nuclear Materials Identification System

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Thompson, Thad; Britton Jr, Charles L; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Carter, Jake

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes some recent fast neutron imaging measurements of the fieldable nuclear materials identification system (FNMIS) under development by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA-NA-22) for possible future use in arms control and nonproliferation applications. The general configuration of FNMIS has been previously described, and a description of the application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) electronics designed for FNMIS has been reported. This paper presents initial imaging measurements performed at ORNL with a Thermo Fisher API 120 DT generator and the fast-neutron imaging module of FNMIS.

  20. Irradiation performance of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon ®) in a mixed fast neutron and gamma radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harling, Otto K.; Kohse, Gordon E.; Riley, Kent J.

    2002-07-01

    Samples of polytetrafluoroethylene have been irradiated with a mixed field of fast neutrons and gamma rays using the MIT Research Reactor. Dose levels from ˜0.3 to ˜50×10 6 Gy for gamma and from ˜0.13 to 80×10 4 Gy for fast neutrons were used. Weight loss, fluorine loss, and swelling were measured quantitatively. Subjective mechanical property tests were also performed to assess embrittlement. Aside from high levels of embrittlement, no large changes, ≳1.5%, were observed in the properties which were assayed even at the highest doses.

  1. Time Evolving Fission Chain Theory and Fast Neutron and Gamma-Ray Counting Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; ...

    2015-11-01

    Here, we solve a simple theoretical model of time evolving fission chains due to Feynman that generalizes and asymptotically approaches the point model theory. The point model theory has been used to analyze thermal neutron counting data. This extension of the theory underlies fast counting data for both neutrons and gamma rays from metal systems. Fast neutron and gamma-ray counting is now possible using liquid scintillator arrays with nanosecond time resolution. For individual fission chains, the differential equations describing three correlated probability distributions are solved: the time-dependent internal neutron population, accumulation of fissions in time, and accumulation of leaked neutronsmore » in time. Explicit analytic formulas are given for correlated moments of the time evolving chain populations. The equations for random time gate fast neutron and gamma-ray counting distributions, due to randomly initiated chains, are presented. Correlated moment equations are given for both random time gate and triggered time gate counting. There are explicit formulas for all correlated moments are given up to triple order, for all combinations of correlated fast neutrons and gamma rays. The nonlinear differential equations for probabilities for time dependent fission chain populations have a remarkably simple Monte Carlo realization. A Monte Carlo code was developed for this theory and is shown to statistically realize the solutions to the fission chain theory probability distributions. Combined with random initiation of chains and detection of external quanta, the Monte Carlo code generates time tagged data for neutron and gamma-ray counting and from these data the counting distributions.« less

  2. Characterization of the internal background for thermal and fast neutron detection with CLLB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a set of experiments conducted to determine what effects, if any, the internal background in the CLLB scintillation detector has on the thermal neutron detection performance. We conducted source measurements using an unmoderated and moderated 252Cf neutron/γ-ray source and long (48-h), unshielded and shielded, background measurements to characterize the internal background with and without a source present. These measurements allowed us to determine the 2-d event selections needed to isolate the thermal neutron peak observed in pulse shape vs. energy space and apply those selections to our background measurements. Our results indicate that the thermal neutron detection capabilities of the CLLB are marginally affected by the presence of internal background. An unmoderated 113-μCi 252Cf source at 15 cm from the detector yields a thermal neutron rate of 8×10-2/s cm3, while moderating the source with 5 cm of polyethylene yields a thermal neutron rate of 5.5×10-1/s cm3. The measured background rate for events that fall within the selected thermal neutron region is 1.2×10-3/s cm3. Lastly, the potential for CLLB for detecting fast neutrons was investigated.

  3. Fast-neutron Induced Reactions at the nELBE Time-of-flight Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, A. R.; Beyer, R.; Elekes, Z.; Grosse, E.; Hannaske, R.; Kögler, T.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2014-05-01

    The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is being rebuilt and extended with a low-background experimental hall. The neutron radiator consists of a liquid lead circuit without additional neutron moderators. The useful neutron spectrum extends from some tens of keV to about 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver cross section data of fast-neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. Before the extension of the facility, the photon production cross section of 56Fe was measured with an HPGe detector and the inelastic neutron scattering cross section to the first few excited states in 56Fe was determined. The neutron total cross sections of Au and Ta were determined in the energy from 200 keV to 7 MeV in a transmission experiment.

  4. Deterministic and Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Calculations of the Dounreay Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Shahdatullah, Sabu; Eaton, Matthew D.; Oliviera, Cassiano R.E. de; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Pain, Christopher C.; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Fitzpatrick, James

    2004-12-15

    A homogenized whole-reactor cylindrical model of the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been constructed using both deterministic and Monte Carlo codes to determine neutron flux distributions inside the core and at various out-of-core components. The principal aim is to predict neutron-induced activation levels using both methods and make comparisons against the measured thermal reaction rates. Neutron transport calculations have been performed for a fixed source using a spatially lumped fission neutron distribution, which has been derived from measurements. The deterministic code used is based on the finite element approximation to the multigroup second-order even-parity neutron transport equation, which is implemented in the EVENT code. The Monte Carlo solutions were obtained using the MCNP4C code, in which neutron cross sections are represented in pointwise (or continuous) form. We have compared neutron spectra at various locations not only to show differences between using multigroup deterministic and continuous energy (point nuclear data) Monte Carlo methods but also to assess neutron-induced activation levels calculated using the spectra obtained from both methods. Results were also compared against experiments that were carried out to determine neutron-induced reaction rates. To determine activation levels, we employed the European Activation Code System FISPACT. We have found that the neutron spectra calculated at various in-core and out-of-core components show some differences, which mainly reflect the use of multigroup and point energy nuclear data libraries and methods employed, but these differences have not resulted in large errors on the calculated activation levels of materials that are important (such as steel components) for decommissioning studies of the reactor. The agreement of calculated reaction rates of thermal neutron detectors such as the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn against measurements was satisfactory.

  5. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental silver

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-05-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160/sup 0/. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at; 328 +- 13, 419 +- 50, 748 +- 25, 908 +- 26, 1150 +- 38, 1286 +- 25, 1507 +- 20, 1623 +- 30, 1835 +- 20 and 1944 +- 26 keV. The experimental results are used to derive an optical-statistical model that provides a good description of the observed cross sections. The measured values are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  6. Measuring fast-neutron flux by track-etch technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the measurement of neutron flux by the use of fissionable materials. Fission fragments emitted by the fissionable materials during neutron bombardment penetrate a suitable recording medium, such as plastic, glass, or mica, that is in contact with the fissionable material. Appropriate etching techniques render the path of the fragment in the recording medium visible under an optical microscope. Since measurement of the decay of radioisotopes is not involved in this method, irradiation times are limited only by the maximum number of fission fragment tracks that can be clearly distinguished without pile up: approximately 2 x 10/sup 5//cm/sup 2/. The method includes a discussion of apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, precision, and accuracy. (JMT)

  7. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A FAST NEUTRON TEST CONCEPT FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2008-06-01

    Since 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has provided state-of-the-art experimental irradiation testing capability. A unique design is investigated herein for the purpose of providing a fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. This new test capability could be brought on line in approximately 5 or 6 years, much sooner than a new test reactor could be built, to provide an interim fast-flux test capability in the timeframe before a fast-flux research reactor could be built. The proposed cost for this system is approximately $63M, much less than the cost of a new fast-flux test reactor. A concept has been developed to filter out a large portion of the thermal flux component by using a thermally conductive neutron absorber block. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of this experiment cooling concept.

  8. Fast-neutron elastic scattering from elemental vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Lawson, R.D.

    1988-03-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of vanadium were measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV. These results were combined with previous 1.5 to 4.0 MeV data from this laboratory, the 11.1 MeV elastic-scattering results obtained at Ohio University, and the reported neutron total cross sections to energies of approx.20.0 MeV, to form a data base which was interpreted in terms of the spherical optical-statistical model. A fit to the data was achieved by making both the strengths and geometries of the optical-model potential energy dependent. This energy dependence was large below approx.6.0 MeV. Above approx.6.0 MeV the energy dependencies are smaller, and similar to those characteristic of global models. Using the dispersion relationship and the method of moments, the optical-model potential energy deduced from 0.0 to 11.1 MeV neutron-scattering data was extrapolated to higher energies and to the bound-state regime. This extrapolation leads to predicted neutron total cross sections that are within 3% of the experimental values throughout the energy range 0.0 to 20.0 MeV. Furthermore, the values of the volume-integral-per-nucleon of the real potential are in excellent agreement with those needed to reproduce the observed binding energies of particle- and hole-states. The latter gives clear evidence of the Fermi surface anomaly. Using only the 0.0 to 11.1 MeV data, the predicted E < O behavior of the strength and radius of the real shell-model Woods-Saxon potential are somewhat different from those obtained by Mahaux and Sartor in their analysis of nuclei near closed shells. 61 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  10. A re-sequencing based assessment of genomic heterogeneity and fast neutron-induced deletions in a common bean cultivar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A small fast neutron mutant population has been established from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk. We leveraged the available P. vulgaris genome sequence and high throughput next generation DNA sequencing to examine the genomic structure of five Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk fast neutron mutants wi...

  11. Secondary Neutron Doses for Several Beam Configurations for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kwak, Jungwon; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong Park, Sung Yong; Park, Soah; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To compare possible neutron doses produced in scanning and scattering modes, with the latter assessed using a newly built passive-scattering proton beam line. Methods and Materials: A 40 x 30.5 x 30-cm water phantom was irradiated with 230-MeV proton beams using a gantry angle of 270{sup o}, a 10-cm-diameter snout, and a brass aperture with a diameter of 7 cm and a thickness of 6.5 cm. The secondary neutron doses during irradiation were measured at various points using CR-39 detectors, and these measurements were cross-checked using a neutron survey meter with a 22-cm range and a 5-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Results: The maximum doses due to secondary neutrons produced by a scattering beam-delivery system were on the order of 0.152 mSv/Gy and 1.17 mSv/Gy at 50 cm from the beam isocenter in the longitudinal (0{sup o}) and perpendicular (90{sup o}) directions, respectively. The neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose, measured from 10 cm to 100 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.071 mSv/Gy to 1.96 mSv/Gy in the direction of the beam line (i.e., {phi} = 0 deg.). The largest neutron dose, of 3.88 mSv/Gy, was observed at 135{sup o} and 25 cm from the isocenter. Conclusions: Although the secondary neutron doses in proton therapy were higher when a scattering mode rather than a scanning mode was used, they did not exceed the scattered photon dose in typical photon treatments.

  12. Secondary neutron doses for several beam configurations for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kwak, Jungwon; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Soah; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-05-01

    To compare possible neutron doses produced in scanning and scattering modes, with the latter assessed using a newly built passive-scattering proton beam line. A 40 x 30.5 x 30-cm water phantom was irradiated with 230-MeV proton beams using a gantry angle of 270 degrees , a 10-cm-diameter snout, and a brass aperture with a diameter of 7 cm and a thickness of 6.5 cm. The secondary neutron doses during irradiation were measured at various points using CR-39 detectors, and these measurements were cross-checked using a neutron survey meter with a 22-cm range and a 5-cm spread-out Bragg peak. The maximum doses due to secondary neutrons produced by a scattering beam-delivery system were on the order of 0.152 mSv/Gy and 1.17 mSv/Gy at 50 cm from the beam isocenter in the longitudinal (0 degrees ) and perpendicular (90 degrees ) directions, respectively. The neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose, measured from 10 cm to 100 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.071 mSv/Gy to 1.96 mSv/Gy in the direction of the beam line (i.e., phi = 0 degrees ). The largest neutron dose, of 3.88 mSv/Gy, was observed at 135 degrees and 25 cm from the isocenter. Although the secondary neutron doses in proton therapy were higher when a scattering mode rather than a scanning mode was used, they did not exceed the scattered photon dose in typical photon treatments.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): implications of neutron beam and boron compound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Nigg, D W; Capala, J; Watkins, P R; Vroegindeweij, C; Auterinen, I; Seppälä, T; Bleuel, D

    1999-07-01

    The potential efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma is a significant function of epithermal-neutron beam biophysical characteristics as well as boron compound biodistribution characteristics. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to evaluate the relative significance of these factors on theoretical tumor control using a standard model. The existing, well-characterized epithermal-neutron sources at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), and the Finnish Research Reactor (FiR-1) were compared. Results for a realistic accelerator design by the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are also compared. Also the characteristics of the compound p-Boronophenylaline Fructose (BPA-F) and a hypothetical next-generation compound were used in a comparison of the BMRR and a hypothetical improved reactor. All components of dose induced by an external epithermal-neutron beam fall off quite rapidly with depth in tissue. Delivery of dose to greater depths is limited by the healthy-tissue tolerance and a reduction in the hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose allow for longer irradiation and greater dose at a depth. Dose at depth can also be increased with a beam that has higher neutron energy (without too high a recoil dose) and a more forward peaked angular distribution. Of the existing facilities, the FiR-1 beam has the better quality (lower hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose) and a penetrating neutron spectrum and was found to deliver a higher value of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) than other existing beams at shallow depth. The greater forwardness and penetration of the HFR the FiR-1 at greater depths. The hypothetical reactor and accelerator beams outperform at both shallow and greater depths. In all cases, the hypothetical compound provides a significant improvement in efficacy but it is shown that the full benefit of improved compound is not realized until the neutron beam is fully

  14. MEASUREMENT OF SECONDARY NEUTRONS GENERATED DURING PROTON THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Vykydal, Z; Andrlík, M; Bártová, H; Králík, M; Šolc, J; Vondráček, V

    2016-12-01

    Measurements described in this article were carried out with the aim of evaluating risks of the patient exposure to secondary neutrons during treatment at the Proton Therapy Centre Prague. The neutron spectral fluence was measured by means of the extended Bonner sphere spectrometer (EBS). The article presents secondary neutron spectral fluences obtained by the EBS with passive thermoluminescent detectors, i.e. pairs of (6)LiF and (7)LiF chips. Measurements were performed in two positions: the first one behind the Nylon 6 phantom, and the second one close to the range shifter to evaluate their contribution to the generation of neutrons. Both the Nylon 6 phantom and the range shifter were irradiated with a pencil beam of protons 4 mm in diameter and the energy of 200 MeV. The results are supplemented with the values of effective dose derived from neutron spectral fluences. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, D L; Donahue, R J; Ludewigt, B A; Vujic, J

    1998-09-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF3, 7LiF, and D2O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF3 or 7LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to approximately 50% higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a 7LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq.

  16. Fast neutron background characterization with the Radiological Multi-sensor Analysis Platform (RadMAP)

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, John R.; Brubaker, Erik; Vetter, Kai

    2017-03-29

    In an effort to characterize the fast neutron radiation background, 16 EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells were installed in the Radiological Multi-sensor Analysis Platform (RadMAP) to collect data in the San Francisco Bay Area. Each fast neutron event was associated with specific weather metrics (pressure, temperature, absolute humidity) and GPS coordinates. Furthermore, the expected exponential dependence of the fast neutron count rate on atmospheric pressure was demonstrated and event rates were subsequently adjusted given the measured pressure at the time of detection. Pressure adjusted data was also used to investigate the influence of other environmental conditions on the neutron background rate.more » Using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) coastal area lidar data, an algorithm was implemented to approximate sky-view factors (the total fraction of visible sky) for points along RadMAPs route. In the three areas we analyzed, San Francisco, Downtown Oakland, and Berkeley, all demonstrated a suppression in the background rate of over 50% for the range of sky-view factors measured. This effect, which is due to the shielding of cosmic-ray produced neutrons by surrounding buildings, was comparable to the pressure influence which yielded a 32% suppression in the count rate over the range of pressures measured.« less

  17. Fast neutron background characterization with the Radiological Multi-sensor Analysis Platform (RadMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John R.; Brubaker, Erik; Vetter, Kai

    2017-06-01

    In an effort to characterize the fast neutron radiation background, 16 EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells were installed in the Radiological Multi-sensor Analysis Platform (RadMAP) to collect data in the San Francisco Bay Area. Each fast neutron event was associated with specific weather metrics (pressure, temperature, absolute humidity) and GPS coordinates. The expected exponential dependence of the fast neutron count rate on atmospheric pressure was demonstrated and event rates were subsequently adjusted given the measured pressure at the time of detection. Pressure adjusted data was also used to investigate the influence of other environmental conditions on the neutron background rate. Using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) coastal area lidar data, an algorithm was implemented to approximate sky-view factors (the total fraction of visible sky) for points along RadMAPs route. Three areas analyzed in San Francisco, Downtown Oakland, and Berkeley all demonstrated a suppression in the background rate of over 50% for the range of sky-view factors measured. This effect, which is due to the shielding of cosmic-ray produced neutrons by surrounding buildings, was comparable to the pressure influence which yielded a 32% suppression in the count rate over the range of pressures measured.

  18. Fast neutron detection with coincidence counting of recoil tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengar, I.; Skvarč, J.; Ilić, R.

    2002-06-01

    Unpredictable background is often the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with solid state nuclear track detectors. The problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence tracks in two detector foils that are in close contact during the irradiation. The detection of fast neutrons performed with a pair of CR-39 detector foils, subsequent chemical etching and evaluation of the etched tracks by an automatic track counting system was studied. After counting, only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei in the surface layers of both detector foils were taken into account. In this way, the background due to objects that cannot be separated from tracks by an automatic counting system was drastically reduced. Emphasis was given to determining the properties of such a coincidence fast neutron detector based on utilisation of CR-39. The response of the coincidence detector was found to be 3×10 -5 tracks/neutron and is comparable with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39. The lower neutron detection limit was found to be 2×10 4 cm -2 with a counting area of 10 cm 2, and is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39.

  19. Strategic planning workshop on research needs for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Feinendegen, L E

    1997-05-01

    The workshop 'Research Needs for Neutron Capture Therapy', held in Williamsburg, VA, May 9-12. 1995 addressed key issues and questions related to optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivery BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  20. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-05-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction.

  1. Design of a californium-based epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanch, J C; Kim, J K; Wilson, M J

    1993-08-01

    The potential of the spontaneously fissioning isotope, 252Cf, to provide epithermal neutrons for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to design an assembly composed of a 26 cm long, 11 cm radius cylindrical D2O moderator followed by a 64 cm long Al filter. Lithium filters are placed between the moderator and the filter and between the Al and the patient. A reflector surrounding the moderator/filter assembly is required in order to maintain adequate therapy flux at the patient position. An ellipsoidal phantom composed of skull- and brain-equivalent material was used to determine the dosimetric effect of this beam. It was found that both advantage depths and advantage ratios compare very favourably with reactor and accelerator epithermal neutron sources. The dose rate obtainable, on the other hand, is 4.1 RBE cGy min-1, based on a very large (1.0 g) source of 252Cf. This dose rate is two to five times lower than those provided by existing reactor beams and can be viewed as a drawback of using 252Cf as a neutron source. Radioisotope sources, however, do offer the advantage of in-hospital installation.

  2. A Method to Estimate the Fast-Neutron Fluence for the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tokushi; Imamura, Mineo; Shibata, Seiichi; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Ohkubo, Tohru; Satoh, Shinngo; Nogawa, Norio; Hasai, Hiromi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hoshi, Masaharu; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A new method to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb is proposed. 63Ni produced by the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction provides a unique measure by which to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombs, because the half-life of 63Ni is 100 years and 70% of the 63Ni produced in a copper piece presently exists after 50 years. Using the neutron spectrum given in DS86 and the estimated cross section, we found that a piece of copper of about 10 g which was exposed at a point around 100 m from the hypocenter gives a measurable amount of 63Ni using a low-background liquid scintillation counter. For the measurement of 63Ni, accelerator mass spectrometry also seems to be applicable.

  3. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1977-03-08

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  4. Fast neutron induced structural rearrangements at a soybean NAP1 locus result in gnarled trichomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) gnarled trichome mutant, exhibiting stunted trichomes compared to wild-type, was identified in a fast neutron mutant population. Genetic mapping using whole genome sequence-based bulked segregant analysis identified a 26.6 megabase interval on chromosome 20 that ...

  5. Fast neutron mutants database and web displays at SoyBase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    SoyBase, the USDA-ARS soybean genetics and genomics database, has been expanded to include data for the fast neutron mutants produced by Bolon, Vance, et al. In addition to the expected text and sequence homology searches and visualization of the indels in the context of the genome sequence viewer, ...

  6. Phenotypic and genomic analyses of a fast neutron mutant population resource in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutagenized populations have become indispensable resources for introducing variation and studying gene function in plant genomics research. In this study, fast neutron (FN) radiation was used to induce deletion mutations in the soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) genome. Approximately 120,000 soybea...

  7. Basic concepts underlying fast-neutron-based contraband interrogation technology. A systems viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    All accelerator-based fast-neutron contraband interrogation systems have many closely interrelated subsystems, whose performance parameters will be critically interdependent. For optimal overall performance, a systems analysis design approach is required. This paper provides a general overview of the interrelationships and the tradeoffs to be considered for optimization of nonaccelerator subsystems.

  8. Making vanadium-based radiation-resistant alloys for fast-neutron reactor pin sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votinov, S. N.; Kolotushkin, V. P.; Nikulin, S. A.; Turilina, V. Yu.

    2009-05-01

    The working conditions are considered for pin sheath materials for future fast-neutron reactors, as well as the scope for using various classes of material for the sheaths. Alloys of vanadium with titanium and chromium are found to have advantages for these conditions.

  9. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  10. Transmutation characteristics in thermal and fast neutron spectra: application to americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthou, V.; Degueldre, C.; Magill, J.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, a method is introduced which allows a quick and accurate evaluation of the overall transmutation rate of a nuclide in fast and thermal neutron spectra. The method is applied to 241Am, a main contributor to the waste toxicity in the nuclear fuel cycle. Results show good agreement with the detailed calculations using ORIGEN code.

  11. Fast neutron radiation induced Glu-B1 deficient lines of an elite bread wheat variety

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five isogenic wheat lines deficient in high-molecular weight subunit (HMW-GS) proteins encoded by the B-genome were identified from a fast-neutron radiation-mutagenized population of Summit, an elite variety of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The mutant lines differ from the wild-type progenit...

  12. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: an emerging therapeutic modality.

    PubMed

    Barth, R F; Soloway, A H; Goodman, J H; Gahbauer, R A; Gupta, N; Blue, T E; Yang, W; Tjarks, W

    1999-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. For BNCT to be successful, a large number of 10B atoms must be localized on or preferably within neoplastic cells, and a sufficient number of thermal neutrons must be absorbed by the 10B atoms to sustain a lethal 10B (n, alpha) lithium-7 reaction. There is a growing interest in using BNCT in combination with surgery to treat patients with high-grade gliomas and possibly metastatic brain tumors. The present review covers the biological and radiobiological considerations on which BNCT is based, boron-containing low- and high-molecular weight delivery agents, neutron sources, clinical studies, and future areas of research. Two boron compounds currently are being used clinically, sodium borocaptate and boronophenylalanine, and a number of new delivery agents are under investigation, including boronated porphyrins, nucleosides, amino acids, polyamines, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies, liposomes, and epidermal growth factor. These are discussed, as is optimization of their delivery. Nuclear reactors currently are the only source of neutrons for BNCT, and the fission reaction within the core produces a mixture of lower energy thermal and epithermal neutrons, fast or high-energy neutrons, and gamma-rays. Although thermal neutron beams have been used clinically in Japan to treat patients with brain tumors and cutaneous melanomas, epithermal neutron beams now are being used in the United States and Europe because of their superior tissue-penetrating properties. Currently, there are clinical trials in progress in the United States, Europe, and Japan using a combination of debulking surgery and then BNCT to treat patients with glioblastomas. The American and European studies are Phase I trials using boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate, respectively

  14. Perspectives on fast-neutron mutagenesis of human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, A

    1991-10-01

    The effects of low-fluence exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons (En = 4.2 MeV) have been studied in a sensitive human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6. Mutations were scored for two genetic loci, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) and thymidine kinase (tk), as a function of dose and dose rate. For exposures limited to less than one cell cycle, the mutation frequency for the hgprt locus was 1.92 X 10(-7)/cGy. When exposures were protracted over multiple cell generations, mutation yields were increased to 6.07 X 10(-7)/cGy. Similar yields were obtained for the induction of tk-deficient mutants with a normal cell generation time (tk-ng) when exposures were carried out at very low dose rates over multiple cell generations. In the series of data presented here, the results obtained for short-duration neutron exposures are compared with data obtained for monoenergetic heavy charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) produced at the BEVALAC accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. TK6 cells have been exposed to beams ranging in atomic number from 20Ne to 40Ar over an energy range from 330 to 670 MeV/amu. Mutation induction was evaluated for both loci for a subset of these beams. The results obtained with 20Ne ions of 425 MeV/amu (LET = 32 keV/microns) and 28Si ions of 670 MeV/amu (LET = 50 keV/microns) closely resemble the mutation yields obtained for brief exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons. The nature of alterations in DNA structure induced within the tk locus of tk-ng mutants is reviewed for a series of neutron-induced mutants and a series of mutants induced by exposure to 40Ar ions (470 MeV/amu, LET = 95 keV/microns). The mutational spectra for these two types of mutants were similar and were dominated by allele loss mutations. Multilocus deletions inclusive of the c-erbA1 locus were common among tk-deficient mutants induced by these densely ionizing radiations. For the mutants induced by 40Ar ions, it is likely that the mutations were produced by

  15. The Fast Neutron Imaging Telescope (FNIT) for Detection of Illicit Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard; Ryan, James; Bloser, Peter; Bravar, Ulisse; Legere, Jason; Macri, John; Mallik, Procheta; McConnell, Mark; Pirard, Benoit; Wood, Joshua

    2009-10-01

    We report on the characterization, modeling, and algorithm development for FNIT -- a Fast Neutron Imaging Telescope. Initially designed to measure solar neutrons in the inner heliosphere, it was later tailored to detect and measure clandestine special nuclear material (SNM) with unique spectral and directional information. To make such measurements, a double scatter telescope is needed. Laboratory testing with a FNIT prototype has been performed in order to characterize such instrumental parameters as time-of-flight, spatial, energy and angular resolutions. Extensive GEANT4 modeling has been performed in an effort to fully characterize the instrument response. These simulations, along with the tests performed with a strong Cf-252 fission neutron source, will allow us to develop efficient, on-line spectral de-convolution and imaging algorithms for a scaled-up, field ready portable neutron telescope. We will present the most recent analysis results.

  16. Measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction in a fast neutron reactor using the perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Jun; Yin, Yan-Peng; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zheng-Hong; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-06-01

    A perturbation method is proposed to obtain the effective delayed neutron fraction β eff of a cylindrical highly enriched uranium reactor. Based on reactivity measurements with and without a sample at a specified position using the positive period technique, the reactor reactivity perturbation Δρ of the sample in β eff units is measured. Simulations of the perturbation experiments are performed using the MCNP program. The PERT card is used to provide the difference dk of effective neutron multiplication factors with and without the sample inside the reactor. Based on the relationship between the effective multiplication factor and the reactivity, the equation β eff = dk/Δρ is derived. In this paper, the reactivity perturbations of 13 metal samples at the designable position of the reactor are measured and calculated. The average β eff value of the reactor is given as 0.00645, and the standard uncertainty is 3.0%. Additionally, the perturbation experiments for β eff can be used to evaluate the reliabilities of the delayed neutron parameters. This work shows that the delayed neutron data of 235U and 238U from G.R. Keepin’s publication are more reliable than those from ENDF-B6.0, ENDF-B7.0, JENDL3.3 and CENDL2.2. Supported by Foundation of Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012AA01, 2014AA01), National Natural Science Foundation (11375158, 91326104)

  17. Comet assay study of DNA damage and repair of tumour cells following boron neutron capture irradiation with fast d(14) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pöller, F; Bauch, T; Sauerwein, W; Böcker, W; Wittig, A; Streffer, C

    1996-11-01

    We compared the amount of radiation-induced DNA damage and the extent of DNA repair in human melanoma cells (MeWo) using the 'comet assay' after neutron, boron neutron capture and X-irradiation. Using a colony-forming assay it was shown earlier that lethal effects in tumour cells treated with fast neutrons may be increased by the neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li. The effectiveness of boron neutron capture in killing tumour cells depends on the number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumour, the subcellular distribution of 10B and the thermal neutron fluence at the side of the tumour. Using the 'comet assay' the DNA damage of fast neutrons (mean energy 5.8 MeV) was shown to be significantly greater than for the same absorbed dose of X-rays. The presence of 600 ppm 10B (boric acid H5 10BO3) in the cell medium during irradiation with d(14) + Be neutrons in a phantom enhances the DNA damage by 20% compared with neutron irradiation alone. After DNA damage induction by neutrons and neutron capture of boron, the DNA repair capacity of the MeWo cells is significantly reduced in comparison with X-irradiation resulting in proportionally more residual DNA damage after 180 min of repair time.

  18. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  19. Fast-neutron interaction with collective cadmium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1992-11-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental cadmium are measured from [approx] 1.5 to 10 MeV. From [approx] 1.5 to 3.0 MeV the measurements are made at [approx] 100 keV incident-neutron energy intervals and at 10 scattering angles distributed between [approx] 200 and 160[degree]. From 3 to 4 MeV the measurements are made at [approx] 200 MeV intervals and at 20 angles. Above 4 MeV the incident-energy interval is [approx] 0.5 MeV with [ge] 40 differential values at each incident energy, distributed between [approx] 18 and 160[degree]. Concurrently, differential cross sections for the excitation of observed levels'' at 0.589 [plus minus] 0.047, 1.291 [plus minus] 0.066 and 1.839 [plus minus] 0.57 MeV are determined, with attention to the direct excitation of the yrast 2[sup +] levels of the even isotopes ([approx] 75% abundant) and of the 3/2[sup +] and 5/2[sup +] levels of the odd isotopes ([approx] 75% abundant). Optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels interpretations are carried out and comparisons made with regional'' and global'' parameters. Consideration is given to the fundamental nature of the real potential in the vicinity of the Fermi Surface with implications on the equation of state and the reduced mass, in the context of the dispersive optical model.

  20. Performance of silicon microdosimetry detectors in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P D; Rosenfeld, A B; Allen, B; Coderre, J; Capala, J

    1999-03-01

    Reverse-biased silicon p-n junction arrays using Silicon-On-Insulator technology have been proposed as microdosimeters. The performance of such detectors in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is discussed. This work provides the first reported measurements using boron-coated silicon diode arrays as microdosimeters in BNCT. Results are in good agreement with measurements with gas proportional counters. Various boron-coating options are investigated along with device orientation effects. Finally, a 235U coating is tested to simulate the behavior of the device in a heavy-ion therapy beam.

  1. Fast neutron-gamma discrimination on neutron emission profile measurement on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Shinohara, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Baba, M.; Isobe, M.

    2010-10-15

    A digital signal processing (DSP) system is applied to stilbene scintillation detectors of the multichannel neutron emission profile monitor in JT-60U. Automatic analysis of the neutron-{gamma} pulse shape discrimination is a key issue to diminish the processing time in the DSP system, and it has been applied using the two-dimensional (2D) map. Linear discriminant function is used to determine the dividing line between neutron events and {gamma}-ray events on a 2D map. In order to verify the validity of the dividing line determination, the pulse shape discrimination quality is evaluated. As a result, the {gamma}-ray contamination in most of the beam heating phase was negligible compared with the statistical error with 10 ms time resolution.

  2. Fast detection of 14 MeV neutrons on the TFTR neutron collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Goeler, S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Johnson, L. C.; Bitter, M.; Diesso, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Long, D.; Strachan, J.

    1996-02-01

    Current mode operation of the NE451 ZnS scintillation detectors of the TFTR neutron collimator has enabled us to record the development of radial neutron emission profiles with much faster speed and higher accuracy than in the pulse counting mode. During high power deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, the intrinsic shot noise on the detector traces was so low that we could observe sawtooth instabilities and disruptions with good precision and, in addition, were able to identify precursor magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity and fishbone instabilities. These results demonstrate that in future tritium burning machines like ITER or TPX, the neutron collimator should be designed not only as a monitor of radial fusion power profiles but also as a wave detector for MHD activity.

  3. Fast detection of 14 MeV neutrons on the TFTR neutron collimator

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Bitter, M.; Diesso, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Long, D.; Strachan, J.

    1996-02-01

    Current mode operation of the NE451 ZnS scintillation detectors of the TFTR neutron collimator has enabled us to record the development of radial neutron emission profiles with much faster speed and higher accuracy than in the pulse counting mode. During high power deuterium{endash}tritium (DT) operation, the intrinsic shot noise on the detector traces was so low that we could observe sawtooth instabilities and disruptions with good precision and, in addition, were able to identify precursor magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity and fishbone instabilities. These results demonstrate that in future tritium burning machines like ITER or TPX, the neutron collimator should be designed not only as a monitor of radial fusion power profiles but also as a wave detector for MHD activity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Fast detection of 14 MeV neutrons on the TFTR neutron collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Goeler, S. von; Roquemore, A.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Bitter, M.; Diesso, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Long, D.; Strachan, J.

    1995-12-01

    Current mode operation of the NE451 ZnS Scintillation Detectors of the TFTR Neutron Collimator has enabled us to record the development of radial neutron emission profiles with much faster speed and higher accuracy than in the pulse counting mode. During high-power DT operation, the intrinsic shot noise on the detector traces was so low that the authors could observe sawtooth instabilities and disruptions with good precision and, in addition, were able to identify precursor MHD activity and fishbone instabilities. These results demonstrate that in future tritium burning machines like ITER or TPX, the neutron collimator should be designed not only as a monitor of radial fusion power profiles but also as a wave detector for MHD activity.

  5. Fast ion beta limit measurements by collimated neutron detection in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecchi, William; Anderson, Jay; Bonofiglo, Phillip; Kim, Jungha; Sears, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Fast ion orbits in the reversed field pinch (RFP) are well ordered and classically confined despite magnetic field stochasticity generated by multiple tearing modes. Classical TRANSP modeling of a 1MW tangentially injected hydrogen neutral beam in MST deuterium plasmas predicts a core-localized fast ion density that can be up to 25% of the electron density and a fast ion beta of many times the local thermal beta. However, neutral particle analysis of an NBI-driven mode (presumably driven by a fast ion pressure gradient) shows mode-induced transport of core-localized fast ions and a saturated fast ion density. The TRANSP modeling is presumed valid until the onset of the beam-driven mode and gives an initial estimate of the volume-averaged fast ion beta of 1-2% (local core value up to 10%). A collimated neutron detector for fusion product profile measurements will be used to determine the spatial distribution of fast ions, allowing for a first measurement of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required for mode destabilization. Testing/calibration data and initial fast-ion profiles will be presented. Characterization of both the local and global fast ion beta will be done for deuterium beam injection into deuterium plasmas for comparison to TRANSP predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  6. A fast neutron spectrum unfolding method using activation measurements and its application to restoration of a thermonuclear reactor blanket neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. M.; Shkurpelov, A. A.; Zagryadsky, V. A.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.; Shmonin, Yu. V.

    1982-12-01

    This article describes a fast neutron spectrum unfolding program. The program takes into account a priori information about the neutron spectrum, the experimental values of activation integrals errors and activation detector cross sections errors. The usefulness of the unfolding program was demonstrated by its application to the determination of neutron spectra from 1 to 14 MeV in the molten-salt blanket model of a thermonuclear reactor.

  7. A (13)C(d,n)-based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Capoulat, M E; Kreiner, A J

    2017-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) requires neutron sources suitable for in-hospital siting. Low-energy particle accelerators working in conjunction with a neutron producing reaction are the most appropriate choice for this purpose. One of the possible nuclear reactions is (13)C(d,n)(14)N. The aim of this work is to evaluate the therapeutic capabilities of the neutron beam produced by this reaction, through a 30mA beam of deuterons of 1.45MeV. A Beam Shaping Assembly design was computationally optimized. Depth dose profiles in a Snyder head phantom were simulated with the MCNP code for a number of BSA configurations. In order to optimize the treatment capabilities, the BSA configuration was determined as the one that allows maximizing both the tumor dose and the penetration depth while keeping doses to healthy tissues under the tolerance limits. Significant doses to tumor tissues were achieved up to ∼6cm in depth. Peak doses up to 57Gy-Eq can be delivered in a fractionated scheme of 2 irradiations of approximately 1h each. In a single 1h irradiation, lower but still acceptable doses to tumor are also feasible. Treatment capabilities obtained here are comparable to those achieved with other accelerator-based neutron sources, making of the (13)C(d,n)(14)N reaction a realistic option for producing therapeutic neutron beams through a low-energy particle accelerator. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The use of the neutronic calculation code CORNER for evaluating the protection of fast neutron reactor and CNFC equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhanova, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method of using neutronic calculation code CORNER to the analysis of experiments on the protection of fast neutron reactor and CNFC equipment. An example of Winfrith Graphite Benchmark experiment calculation using this approach is presented. This task can be considered as one step in the general theme of the safety analysis of FR with liquid metal coolant, their fuel cycles and related equipment. CORNER implement a solution of the kinetic equation with a source in the three-dimensional hexagonal geometry based on Sn-method. The purpose of this paper is a demonstration of the application of CORNER’s possibilities for the analysis of the actual reactor problems.

  9. Fast-neutron interaction with collective cadmium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1992-11-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental cadmium are measured from {approx} 1.5 to 10 MeV. From {approx} 1.5 to 3.0 MeV the measurements are made at {approx} 100 keV incident-neutron energy intervals and at 10 scattering angles distributed between {approx} 200 and 160{degree}. From 3 to 4 MeV the measurements are made at {approx} 200 MeV intervals and at 20 angles. Above 4 MeV the incident-energy interval is {approx} 0.5 MeV with {ge} 40 differential values at each incident energy, distributed between {approx} 18 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential cross sections for the excitation of observed ``levels`` at 0.589 {plus_minus} 0.047, 1.291 {plus_minus} 0.066 and 1.839 {plus_minus} 0.57 MeV are determined, with attention to the direct excitation of the yrast 2{sup +} levels of the even isotopes ({approx} 75% abundant) and of the 3/2{sup +} and 5/2{sup +} levels of the odd isotopes ({approx} 75% abundant). Optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels interpretations are carried out and comparisons made with ``regional`` and ``global`` parameters. Consideration is given to the fundamental nature of the real potential in the vicinity of the Fermi Surface with implications on the equation of state and the reduced mass, in the context of the dispersive optical model.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a 252Cf source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a 252Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  11. High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

    2014-06-22

    A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

  12. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  13. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, M; Dangendorf, V; Zboray, R; Prasser, H-M

    2014-07-01

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  14. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Zboray, R.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2014-07-01

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  15. [CYTOGENETIC EFFECTS IN MICE BONE MARROW AFTER IRRADIATION BY FAST NEUTRONS].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Ivanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of damaging mice bone marrow cells by 1.5 MeV neutrons at the dose of 25-250 cGy, dose rate of 23.9 cGy/s and γ-quants ⁶⁰Co as a standard radiation were studied. The mitotic index and aberrant mitoses in marrow preparations were counted in 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Coefficients of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons 24 and 72 hours post irradiation calculated from mitotic index reduction and aberrant mitoses formation were within the range from 4.1 ± 0.1 to 7.3 ± 0.1. Mean time of the existence of chromosomal aberrations in marrow cells was determined. For the specified doses from γ-rays, the period of aberrations existence was 1.4-1.1 cycles and for neutrons, 1.0-0.6 cycles. Morphologic analysis of neutron-induced damages and ratio of the most common breaks demonstrated a high production of bridges, which outnumbered cells with fragments in 3 to 4 times suggesting a more destructive effect on the genetic structures of cells. RBE of fast neutrons is a variable that grows with a radiation dose. Moreover, RBE estimated after 72 hours exceeded values it had 24 hours after irradiation.

  16. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  17. Determination of air/water ratio in pipes by fast neutrons: experiment and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    AboAlfaraj, Tareq; Abdul-Majid, Samir

    2012-04-01

    Fast neutron dose attenuation from a (252)Cf neutron source is used for the determination of air to water ratio in pipes. Such measurement of the two-phase flow volume fraction is important for many industrial plants such as desalination plants and oil refineries. Fast neutrons penetrate liquid more than slow neutrons or gamma rays. Using diameters from 11.5 cm to 20.76 cm and with wall thicknesses from 0.45 to 1.02 cm, attenuation was independent of pipe wall thicknesses and diameters. Experimental data was in good agreement with values calculated using MCNP codes. The measured neutron flux values decreased with increasing water levels in pipes up to about 14 cm, indicating that our system can be used successfully in desalination plants in pipes of different sizes. The experimental sensitivity was found to be about 0.015 mSv/hcm and the system can be used to measure water level changes down to few millimeters. Use of such a system in fixed positions in the plant can provide information on plant's overall performance and can detect loss of flow immediately before any consequences. A portable system could be designed to measure the air to water ratio in different locations in the plant in a relatively short time.

  18. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting.

  19. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  20. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  1. Influence of Neutron Sources and 10B Concentration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Shallow and Deeper Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Tang, Xiaobin; Shu, Diyun; Liu, Yuanhao; Geng, Changran; Gong, Chunhui; Hang, Shuang; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). It is considered a potential therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It could avoid the inaccurate treatment caused by the lung motion during radiotherapy, because the dose deposition mainly depends on the boron localization and neutron source. Thus, B concentration and neutron sources are both principal factors of BNCT, and they play significant roles in the curative effect of BNCT for different cases. The purpose was to explore the feasibility of BNCT treatment for NSCLC with either of two neutron sources (the epithermal reactor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology named "MIT source" and the accelerator neutron source designed in Argentina named "MEC source") and various boron concentrations. Shallow and deeper lung tumors were defined in the Chinese hybrid radiation phantom, and the Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dose to tumors and healthy organs. The MEC source was more appropriate to treat the shallow tumor (depth of 6 cm) with a shorter treatment time. However, the MIT source was more suitable for deep lung tumor (depth of 9 cm) treatment, as the MEC source is more likely to exceed the skin dose limit. Thus, a neutron source consisting of more fast neutrons is not necessarily suitable for deep treatment of lung tumors. Theoretical distribution of B in tumors and organs at risk (especially skin) was obtained to meet the treatable requirement of BNCT, which may provide the references to identify the feasibility of BNCT for the treatment of lung cancer using these two neutron sources in future clinical applications.

  2. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  3. Fast Neutron Dose Evaluation Using CR39 by Coincidence Counting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Eudice; Freitas, F. F. de; Brandao, J. O. C.; Santos, J. A. L.

    2008-08-07

    The solid state nuclear tracks detection (SSNTD) technique is widely used in the area of radiation dosimetry. Different materials can be used applying this technique as glass and the most used in the dosimetry field that are the polycarbonates, CR39 and Makrofol-DE. Both are very rich in hydrogenous, that enables the SSNTD to detect fast neutrons through recoils of protons in the own detector material, without need of converters. The low reproducibility of its backgroundhas often been the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with SSNTDs. This problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence of tracks in two detectors foils irradiated in close contact. After processing and counting only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei on the surfaces of both detectors are considered as a track. This procedure enables the reduction of the background counts in the response of the detectors. In this work a preliminary study on the application of the coincidence technique for neutron dosimetry is presented. The CR39 material was investigated aiming to achieve the personal dose equivalent for fast neutrons. Using this method of analysis a significant reduction on the lower detectable dose was observed resulting even one order of magnitude smaller value. Reading, however, needs to be automated due to the large areas necessary to achieve a satisfactory number of tracks for statistical significance of results.

  4. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: past history, current status, and future potential.

    PubMed

    Barth, R F; Soloway, A H; Brugger, R M

    1996-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. High-grade astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, and metastatic brain tumors constitute a major group of neoplasms for which there is no effective treatment. There is growing interest in using BNCT in combination with surgery to treat patients with primary, and possibly metastatic brain tumors. For BNCT to be successful, a large number of 10B atoms must be localized on or preferably within neoplastic cells, and a sufficient number of thermal neutrons must reach and be absorbed by the 10B atoms to sustain a lethal 10B(n, alpha)7 Li reaction. Two major questions will be addressed in this review. First, how can a large number of 10B atoms be delivered selectively to cancer cells? Second, how can a high fluence of neutrons be delivered to the tumor? Two boron compounds currently are being used clinically, sodium borocaptate (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA), and a number of new delivery agents are under investigation, including boronated porphyrins, nucleosides, amino acids, polyamines, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies, liposomes, and epidermal growth factor. These will be discussed, and potential problems associated with their use as boron delivery agents will be considered. Nuclear reactors, currently, are the only source of neutrons for BNCT, and the fission process within the core produces a mixture of lower-energy thermal and epithermal neutrons, fast or high (> 10,000 eV) energy neutrons, and gamma rays. Although thermal neutron beams have been used clinically in Japan to treat patients with brain tumors and cutaneous melanomas, epithermal neutron beams should be more useful because of their superior tissue-penetrating properties. Beam sources and characteristics will be discussed in the context of current and future BNCT trials. Finally, the past and present

  6. Effect of fast neutrons on the electric resistivity of porcelain for application in fast-neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fadel, M.A.; Abdel-Fattah, W.I.; Abdulla, A.A.; Kadum, A.A.

    1982-11-01

    The electric resistivity (rho) of quartz and alumina porcelain was measured before and after irradiation with different fluences (phi) of fission neutrons in the range of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2/ and at different temperatures in the range of 20-90/sup 0/C. The results showed that the activation energy (..delta..E) for quartz porcelain decreased progressively with the increase of phi, while it remained approximately constant for alumina porcelain. Moreover, the electric resistivity of alumina porcelain decreased with the increase of phi. However, there were no measureable effects of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. doses up to 0.6 Mrad on the electric resistivities of the samples. An empirical formula for calculating phi from the measured value of ..delta..E for quartz porcelain was achieved. A semiempirical formula for calculating phi for the resistivity data for the alumina porcelain is given. The effect of neutron energies on the induced changes in (rho) for the alumina porcelain was investigated. Additionally, the effect of storage at 50/sup 0/C for periods up to 3 weeks on these changes were also measured.

  7. Thermal and fast neutron detection in chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Lattanzi, D.; Pillon, M.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Recently, a compact solid-state neutron detector capable of simultaneously detecting thermal and fast neutrons was proposed [M. Marinelli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 143509 (2006)]. Its design is based on a p-type/intrinsic/metal layered structure obtained by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of homoepitaxial diamond followed by thermal evaporation of an Al contact and a {sup 6}LiF converting layer. Fast neutrons are directly detected in the CVD diamond bulk, since they have enough energy to produce the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be reaction in diamond. Thermal neutrons are instead converted into charged particles in the {sup 6}LiF layer through the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T nuclear reaction. These charged particles are then detected in the diamond layer. The thickness of the {sup 6}LiF converting layer and the CVD diamond sensing layer affect the counting efficiency and energy resolution of the detector both for low- (thermal) and high-energy neutrons. An analysis is carried out on the dynamics of the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T and the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be reactions products, and the distribution of the energy released inside the sensitive layer is calculated. The detector counting efficiency and energy resolution were accordingly derived as a function of the thickness of the {sup 6}LiF and CVD diamond layers, both for thermal and fast neutrons, thus allowing us to choose the optimum detector design for any particular application. Comparison with experimental results is also reported.

  8. Assessment of sensitivity of neutron-physical parameters of fast neutron reactor to purification of reprocessed fuel from minor actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherny, V. A.; Kochetkov, L. A.; Nevinitsa, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    The work is devoted to computational investigation of the dependence of basic physical parameters of fast neutron reactors on the degree of purification of plutonium from minor actinides obtained as a result of pyroelectrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and used for manufacturing MOX fuel to be reloaded into the reactors mentioned. The investigations have shown that, in order to preserve such important parameters of a BN-800 type reactor as the criticality, the sodium void reactivity effect, the Doppler effect, and the efficiency of safety rods, it is possible to use the reprocessed fuel without separation of minor actinides for refueling (recharging) the core.

  9. Detrimental effect of fast neutrons on cultured immature rat hippocampal cells: relative biological effectiveness of in vitro cell death indices.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Kim, J S; Son, Y; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S H; Kim, J C; Shin, T; Moon, C

    2011-09-01

    This in vitro study compared the detrimental effect and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-linear energy transfer (LET) fast neutrons on rat immature hippocampal cultured cells with those of low-LET γ rays. Immature hippocampal cells were exposed to fast neutrons or γ rays. Cytotoxicity and cell viability were analyzed using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-release assay and a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity and cell viability with fast neutrons or γ rays varied in a dose-dependent pattern. In the LDH release and MTT assay indices, the RBEs of fast neutrons were approximately 2.35 and 2.42, respectively. Fast neutrons markedly induced apoptotic changes in immature hippocampal cells with increased expression of active caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Increased cytotoxicity and decreased cell viability in immature hippocampal cells were seen in a dose-dependent pattern after fast-neutron and γ irradiation. Fast neutrons have a higher RBE for cell death indices than γ rays.

  10. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  11. Fast transimpedance preamplifier for a boron-coated multiwire proportional chamber neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Haiyang, Yan; Jie, Zhang; Zhijia, Sun; Ping, Cao; Qi, An; Jian, Gong

    2016-10-01

    A low-noise and fast preamplifier is needed for the new boron-coated multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) neutron detector with a delay line readout system to improve position resolution. A transimpedance preamplifier with a rise time of 30ns, a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 40dB, and an automatic gain control function are designed to meet the aforementioned requirements. On the other hand, we also compare it to commercial preamplifiers. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of commercial and in-house preamplifiers are analyzed. The preamplifier is used and tested on a MWPC neutron detector, and results are presented.

  12. Potentiation by caffeine of potentially lethal fast-neutron damage in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Furcinitti, P.S.; Todd, P.; Kukulinsky, N.E.

    1980-11-01

    Caffeine was found to potentiate single-dose fast-neutron-induced killing of human T-1 cells when present at 2 mM for 60 hr or more after (and 10 hr before) irradiation. Analyses of survival curves of cells treated with neutrons or X rays with and without caffeine indicate that only the linear, low-dose portion of survival curves is modified. Potentiation of lethality by caffeine is attributed mainly to its effects on single-hit potentially lethal lesions, possibly certain DNA double-strand breaks.

  13. Spot scanning proton therapy minimizes neutron dose in the setting of radiation therapy administered during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Poenisch, Falk; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ronald X; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michael T; Li, Jing; Grosshans, David

    2016-09-08

    This is a real case study to minimize the neutron dose equivalent (H) to a fetus using spot scanning proton beams with favorable beam energies and angles. Minimum neutron dose exposure to the fetus was achieved with iterative planning under the guidance of neutron H measurement. Two highly conformal treatment plans, each with three spot scanning beams, were planned to treat a 25-year-old pregnant female with aggressive recurrent chordoma of the base of skull who elected not to proceed with termination. Each plan was scheduled for delivery every other day for robust target coverage. Neutron H to the fetus was measured using a REM500 neutron survey meter placed at the fetus position of a patient simulating phantom. 4.1 and 44.1 μSv/fraction were measured for the two initial plans. A vertex beam with higher energy and the fetal position closer to its central axis was the cause for the plan that produced an order higher neutron H. Replacing the vertex beam with a lateral beam reduced neutron H to be comparable with the other plan. For a prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the total neutron H to the fetus was estimated to be 0.35 mSv based on final measurement in single fraction. In comparison, the passive scattering proton plan and photon plan had an estimation of 26 and 70 mSv, respectively, for this case. While radiation therapy in pregnant patients should be avoided if at all possible, our work demonstrated spot scanning beam limited the total neutron H to the fetus an order lower than the suggested 5 mSv regulation threshold. It is far superior than passive scattering beam and careful beam selection with lower energy and keeping fetus further away from beam axis are essential in minimizing the fetus neutron exposure. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Energy dependence of the neutron multiplicity P/sub nu/ in fast neutron induced fission of /sup 235,238/U and /sup 239/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Holden, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain applications require knowledge of the higher moments of the neutron multiplicity probability. It can be shown that the second factorial moment is proportional to the fission rate in the sample, and that the third factorial moment can be of use in disentangling spontaneous fission from induced fission. Using a source of unpublished work in which neutron multiplicities were derived for the fast neutron induced fission of U-235, U-238, and Pu-239, the multiplicity probability has been calculated as a function of neutron energy for the energy range 0 to 10 MeV. (DWL)

  15. Feeding of Rh and Ag isomers in fast-neutron-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Nelson, R. O.; Kawano, T.; Carroll, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    Background: In (n ,n' ) reactions on stable Ir and Au isotopes in the mass A =190 region, the experimentally established feeding of the isomers relative to the feeding of the corresponding ground states increases with increasing neutron energy, up to the neutron energy where the (n ,2 n ) reaction channel opens up, and then decreases. Purpose: In order to check for similar behavior in the mass A =100 region, the feeding of isomers and ground states in fast-neutron-induced reactions on stable isotopes in this mass region was studied. This is of especial interest for Rh which can be used as a radiochemical detector. Methods: Excited states were studied using the (n ,n'γ ), (n ,2 n γ ), and (n ,3 n γ ) reactions on 103Rh and 109Ag. A germanium detector array for γ -ray detection and the broad-spectrum pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility were used for the measurement. The energy of the incident neutrons was determined using the time-of-flight technique. Results: Absolute partial γ -ray cross sections were measured for 57 transitions feeding isomers and ground states in 101,102,103Rh and 107,108,109Ag. The feeding of the isomers was found to be very similar in the corresponding reaction channels and it is compared to the feeding determined for the ground states. Conclusions: The opening of reaction channels at higher neutron energies removes angular momentum from the residual nucleus and reduces the population of the higher-spin isomers relative to the feeding of the lower-spin ground states. Similar behavior was observed in the mass A =190 region in the feeding of higher-spin isomers, but the reverse behavior was observed in 176Lu with a lower-spin isomer and a higher-spin ground state.

  16. Feeding of Rh and Ag isomers in fast-neutron-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matthew James; Nelson, Ronald Owen; ...

    2016-10-17

    In (n,n') reactions on stable Ir and Au isotopes in the mass A=190 region, the experimentally established feeding of the isomers relative to the feeding of the corresponding ground states increases with increasing neutron energy, up to the neutron energy where the (n,2n) reaction channel opens up, and then decreases. In order to check for similar behavior in the mass A=100 region, the feeding of isomers and ground states in fast-neutron-induced reactions on stable isotopes in this mass region was studied. This is of especial interest for Rh which can be used as a radiochemical detector. Here, excited states weremore » studied using the (n,n'γ), (n,2nγ), and (n,3nγ) reactions on 103Rh and 109Ag. A germanium detector array for γ-ray detection and the broad-spectrum pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility were used for the measurement. The energy of the incident neutrons was determined using the time-of-flight technique. Absolute partial γ-ray cross sections were measured for 57 transitions feeding isomers and ground states in 101,102,103Rh and 107,108,109Ag. The feeding of the isomers was found to be very similar in the corresponding reaction channels and it is compared to the feeding determined for the ground states. In conclusion, the opening of reaction channels at higher neutron energies removes angular momentum from the residual nucleus and reduces the population of the higher-spin isomers relative to the feeding of the lower-spin ground states. Similar behavior was observed in the mass A=190 region in the feeding of higher-spin isomers, but the reverse behavior was observed in 176Lu with a lower-spin isomer and a higher-spin ground state.« less

  17. Feeding of Rh and Ag isomers in fast-neutron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matthew James; Nelson, Ronald Owen; Kawano, T.; Carroll, J. J.

    2016-10-17

    In (n,n') reactions on stable Ir and Au isotopes in the mass A=190 region, the experimentally established feeding of the isomers relative to the feeding of the corresponding ground states increases with increasing neutron energy, up to the neutron energy where the (n,2n) reaction channel opens up, and then decreases. In order to check for similar behavior in the mass A=100 region, the feeding of isomers and ground states in fast-neutron-induced reactions on stable isotopes in this mass region was studied. This is of especial interest for Rh which can be used as a radiochemical detector. Here, excited states were studied using the (n,n'γ), (n,2nγ), and (n,3nγ) reactions on 103Rh and 109Ag. A germanium detector array for γ-ray detection and the broad-spectrum pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility were used for the measurement. The energy of the incident neutrons was determined using the time-of-flight technique. Absolute partial γ-ray cross sections were measured for 57 transitions feeding isomers and ground states in 101,102,103Rh and 107,108,109Ag. The feeding of the isomers was found to be very similar in the corresponding reaction channels and it is compared to the feeding determined for the ground states. In conclusion, the opening of reaction channels at higher neutron energies removes angular momentum from the residual nucleus and reduces the population of the higher-spin isomers relative to the feeding of the lower-spin ground states. Similar behavior was observed in the mass A=190 region in the feeding of higher-spin isomers, but the reverse behavior was observed in 176Lu with a lower-spin isomer and a higher-spin ground state.

  18. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  19. Measurement of in-phantom neutron flux and gamma dose in Tehran research reactor boron neutron capture therapy beam line.

    PubMed

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    Determination of in-phantom quality factors of Tehran research reactor (TRR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beam. The doses from thermal neutron reactions with 14N and 10B are calculated by kinetic energy released per unit mass approach, after measuring thermal neutron flux using neutron activation technique. Gamma dose is measured using TLD-700 dosimeter. Different dose components have been measured in a head phantom which has been designed and constructed for BNCT purpose in TRR. Different in-phantom beam quality factors have also been determined. This study demonstrates that the TRR BNCT beam line has potential for treatment of superficial tumors.

  20. Used fuel storage monitoring using novel 4He scintillation fast neutron detectors and neutron energy discrimination analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ryan P.

    With an increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at power plants across the United States, the demand exists for a new method of cask monitoring. Certifying these casks for transportation and long-term storage is a unique dilemma: their sealed nature lends added security, but at the cost of requiring non-invasive measurement techniques to verify their contents. This research will design and develop a new method of passively scanning spent fuel casks using 4He scintillation detectors to make this process more accurate. 4He detectors are a relatively new technological development whose full capabilities have not yet been exploited. These detectors take advantage of the high 4He cross section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. If one of these elastic scattering interactions occurs within the detector, the 4He nucleus takes energy from the incident neutron, then de-excites by scintillation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) at either end of the detector tube convert this emitted light into an electrical signal. The goal of this research is to use the neutron spectroscopy features of 4He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This project will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.

  1. Passive assay of plutonium metal plates using a fast-neutron multiplicity counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Shin, T. H.; Jordan, T.; Sosa, C.; Ruch, M. L.; Clarke, S. D.; Chichester, D. L.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    We developed a fast-neutron multiplicity counter based on organic scintillators (EJ-309 liquid and stilbene). The system detects correlated photon and neutron multiplets emitted by fission reactions, within a gate time of tens of nanoseconds. The system was used at Idaho National Laboratory to assay a variety of plutonium metal plates. A coincidence counting strategy was used to quantify the 240Pu effective mass of the samples. Coincident neutrons, detected within a 40-ns coincidence window, show a monotonic trend, increasing with the 240Pu-effective mass (in this work, we tested the 0.005-0.5 kg range). After calibration, the system estimated the 240Pu effective mass of an unknown sample (240Pueff >50 g) with an uncertainty lower than 1% in a 4-min assay time.

  2. Study of proton-induced reactions and correlation with fast-neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1982-01-19

    The generation of cross sections for fast neutron-nucleon interactions obtained from elastic and charge-exchange proton data is discussed in terms of the Lane model formalism. A general description of the interaction of nucleons with nuclei is presented in terms of the optical model and the extended (or coupled-channel) optical model, together with the relation of these models to microscopic calculations of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Comparisons between neutron elastic data and calculations carried out with optical model potentials obtained from (p,p) and (p,n) data are presented for a large number of nuclei. The validity of the Lane model and the importance of coupled effects in the actinide region are shown in a detailed comparison of calculations for elastic and inelastic neutron differential cross sections and measurements for /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U.

  3. Understanding the physics limitations of PFNA — the nanosecond pulsed fast neutron analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1995-05-01

    The PFNA was conceived by Sawa, Gozani and Ryge, in late 1987 as a means to achieve the highest possible sensitivity for detecting small amounts of explosives concealed in luggage. This could be attained because 1) all the elements present in explosives, i.e., O,N,C (and H, indirectly) can be measured via the (n,n'γ) process with fast neutrons, 2) using nanosecond pulses of neutrons and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, a full direct imaging of the elements and hence all present materials can be obtained, and 3) the TOF assures the best signal to background ratio, as the signal-stimulated γ-rays are measured before the background — neutron interacting in the detector environment — arrives. The PFNA technology has made great strides since the autumn of 1987. It enables the detection of narcotics, explosives, many hazardous materials and most dutiable goods carried in trucks and containers.

  4. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  5. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  6. Fast neutrons-induced apoptosis is Fas-independent in lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Barbara; Benzina, Sami; Jeannequin, Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Jean-Marc; Gueulette, John; Bischoff, Pierre L. . E-mail: Pierre.Bischoff@ircad.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown that ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells differs according to their p53 status, and that caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID is involved in the p53-dependent pathway. In the present study, we investigated the role of Fas signaling in caspase 8 activation induced by fast neutrons irradiation in these cells. Fas and FasL expression was assessed by flow cytometry and by immunoblot. We also measured Fas aggregation after irradiation by fluorescence microscopy. We found a decrease of Fas expression after irradiation, but no change in Fas ligand expression. We also showed that, in contrast to the stimulation of Fas by an agonistic antibody, Fas aggregation did not occur after irradiation. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that fast neutrons induced-apoptosis is Fas-independent, even in p53-dependent apoptosis.

  7. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  8. CABRI Reactor: The fast neutron Hodoscope Calibration curves calculation with MORET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Chevalier, Vincent; Venanzi, Damiano

    2014-06-01

    This poster presents the Hodoscope calibration curves calculation with 3D Monte Carlo code MORET. The fast neutron hodoscope is a facility of the CABRI research reactor at Cadarache (FRANCE). This hodoscope is designed to measure the fuel motion during a RIA in a pressurized water reactor. The fuel motion is measured by counting fast fission neutrons emerging from the test fuel placed in an experimental loop functioning like a Pressurized Water Reactor (T=300°C and P=155 bar), at the center of the CABRI core. The detection system of the hodoscope measures a signal which is a function of the fuel motion. The calibration curves allow then to convert the signal in a fuel mass. In order to calculate these curves, we have developed a method based on a Monte Carlo calculation code.

  9. FAST NEUTRON DOSIMETER FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE OPERATION BY MEASUREMENT OF THE AMOUNT OF CESIUM 137 FORMED FROM A THORIUM WIRE

    DOEpatents

    McCune, D.A.

    1964-03-17

    A method and device for measurement of integrated fast neutron flux in the presence of a large thermal neutron field are described. The device comprises a thorium wire surrounded by a thermal neutron attenuator that is, in turn, enclosed by heat-resistant material. The method consists of irradiating the device in a neutron field whereby neutrons with energies in excess of 1.1 Mev cause fast fissions in the thorium, then removing the thorium wire, separating the cesium-137 fission product by chemical means from the thorium, and finally counting the radioactivity of the cesium to determine the number of fissions which have occurred so that the integrated fast flux may be obtained. (AEC)

  10. Time-resolved Fast Neutron Radiography of Air-water Two-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Bromberger, Benjamin; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    Neutron imaging, in general, is a useful technique for visualizing low-Z materials (such as water or plastics) obscured by high-Z materials. However, when significant amounts of both materials are present and full-bodied samples have to be examined, cold and thermal neutrons rapidly reach their applicability limit as the samples become opaque. In such cases one can benefit from the high penetrating power of fast neutrons. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of time-resolved, fast neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick flow channel with Aluminum walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. Exposure times down to 3.33 ms have been achieved at reasonable image quality and acceptable motion artifacts. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two-phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured.

  11. Neutron Detection With Ultra-Fast Digitizer and Pulse Identification Techniques on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Piglowski, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    A prototype system for neutron detection with an ultra-fast digitizer and pulse identification techniques has been implemented on the DIII-D tokamak. The system consists of a cylindrical neutron fission chamber, a charge sensitive amplifier, and a GaGe Octopus 12-bit CompuScope digitizer card installed in a Linux computer. Digital pulse identification techniques have been successfully performed at maximum data acquisition rate of 50 MSPS with on-board memory of 2 GS. Compared to the traditional approach with fast nuclear electronics for pulse counting, this straightforward digital solution has many advantages, including reduced expense, improved accuracy, higher counting rate, and easier maintenance. The system also provides the capability of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination and pulse height analysis. Plans for the upgrade of the old DIII-D neutron counting system with these techniques will be presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under SC-G903402, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Zaťko, Bohumír; Šagátová, Andrea; Nečas, Vladimír

    2013-05-01

    Several Monte Carlo all-particle transport codes are under active development around the world. In this paper we focused on the capabilities of the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) to follow the particle transport in semiconductor detector of fast neutrons. Semiconductor detector based on semi-insulating GaAs was the object of our investigation. As converter material capable to produce charged particles from the (n, p) interaction, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was employed. As the source of fast neutrons, the 239Pu-Be neutron source was used in the model. The simulations were performed using the MCNPX code which makes possible to track not only neutrons but also recoiled protons at all interesting energies. Hence, the MCNPX code enables seamless particle transport and no other computer program is needed to process the particle transport. The determination of the optimal thickness of the conversion layer and the minimum thickness of the active region of semiconductor detector as well as the energy spectra simulation were the principal goals of the computer modeling. Theoretical detector responses showed that the best detection efficiency can be achieved for 500 μm thick HDPE converter layer. The minimum detector active region thickness has been estimated to be about 400 μm.

  13. Inverse-kinematics one-neutron pickup with fast rare-isotope beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Baugher, T.; Brown, B. A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Bazin, D.; Campbell, C. M.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkler, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; Walsh, K. A.

    2011-05-15

    Measurements and reaction model calculations are reported for single-neutron pickup reactions onto a fast {sup 22}Mg secondary beam at 84 MeV per nucleon. Measurements made on both carbon and beryllium targets, having very different structures, were used to investigate the likely nature of the pickup reaction mechanism. The measurements involve thick reaction targets and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the projectile-like reaction residue for final-state resolution, which permit experiments with low incident beam rates compared to traditional low-energy transfer reactions. From measured longitudinal momentum distributions we show that the {sup 12}C({sup 22}Mg,{sup 23}Mg+{gamma})X reaction largely proceeds as a direct two-body reaction, with the neutron transfer producing bound {sup 11}C target residues. The corresponding reaction on the {sup 9}Be target seems to largely leave the {sup 8}Be residual nucleus unbound at excitation energies high in the continuum. We discuss the possible use of such fast-beam one-neutron pickup reactions to track single-particle strength in exotic nuclei and also their expected sensitivity to neutron high-l (intruder) states, which are often direct indicators of shell evolution and the disappearance of magic numbers in the exotic regime.

  14. Inverse-kinematics one-neutron pickup with fast rare-isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Glasmacher, T.; Grinyer, G. F.; McDaniel, S.; Meierbachtol, K.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Walsh, K. A.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkler, R.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements and reaction model calculations are reported for single-neutron pickup reactions onto a fast Mg22 secondary beam at 84 MeV per nucleon. Measurements made on both carbon and beryllium targets, having very different structures, were used to investigate the likely nature of the pickup reaction mechanism. The measurements involve thick reaction targets and γ-ray spectroscopy of the projectile-like reaction residue for final-state resolution, which permit experiments with low incident beam rates compared to traditional low-energy transfer reactions. From measured longitudinal momentum distributions we show that the 12C(22Mg,23Mg+γ)X reaction largely proceeds as a direct two-body reaction, with the neutron transfer producing bound C11 target residues. The corresponding reaction on the Be9 target seems to largely leave the Be8 residual nucleus unbound at excitation energies high in the continuum. We discuss the possible use of such fast-beam one-neutron pickup reactions to track single-particle strength in exotic nuclei and also their expected sensitivity to neutron high-ℓ (intruder) states, which are often direct indicators of shell evolution and the disappearance of magic numbers in the exotic regime.

  15. Quantitative fuel motion determination with the CABRI fast neutron hodoscope; Evaluation methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Baumung, K. ); Augier, G. )

    1991-12-01

    The fast neutron hodoscope installed at the CABRI reactor in Cadarache, France, is employed to provide quantitative fuel motion data during experiments in which single liquid-metal fast breeder reactor test pins are subjected to simulated accident conditions. Instrument design and performance are reviewed, the methods for the quantitative evaluation are presented, and error sources are discussed. The most important findings are the axial expansion as a function of time, phenomena related to pin failure (such as time, location, pin failure mode, and fuel mass ejected after failure), and linear fuel mass distributions with a 2-cm axial resolution. In this paper the hodoscope results of the CABRI-1 program are summarized.

  16. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  17. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  18. Nanodosimetric measurements and calculations in a neutron therapy beam.

    PubMed

    Grindborg, J-E; Lillhök, J E; Lindborg, L; Gudowska, I; Söderberg, J; Carlsson, G Alm; Nikjoo, H

    2007-01-01

    A comparison of calculated and measured values of the dose mean lineal energy (y(D)) for the former neutron therapy beam at Louvain-la-Neuve is reported. The measurements were made with wall-less tissue-equivalent proportional counters using the variance-covariance method and simulating spheres with diameters between 10 nm and 15 microm. The calculated y(D)-values were obtained from simulated energy distributions of neutrons and charged particles inside an A-150 phantom and from published y(D)-values for mono-energetic ions. The energy distributions of charged particles up to oxygen were determined with the SHIELD-HIT code using an MCNPX simulated neutron spectrum as an input. The mono-energetic ion y(D)-values in the range 3-100 nm were taken from track-structure simulations in water vapour done with PITS/KURBUC. The large influence on the dose mean lineal energy from the light ion (A > 4) absorbed dose fraction, may explain an observed difference between experiment and calculation. The latter being larger than earlier reported result. Below 50 nm, the experimental values increase while the calculated decrease.

  19. Boron-containing nucleosides for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, R.F.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.; Popenoe, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    There is widespread and increasing interest in the preparation of organoboron compounds for their potential medical application for neutron capture therapy (NCT). The authors approach was to synthesize a boron-containing pyrimidine nucleoside,5-dihydroxyboryl-2'-deoxyuridine (DBDU), which could act as a sensitizing agent in boron neutron-capture reactions. Irradiation of tumor cells that have incorporated boron nucleoside with neutrons would, therefore, principally destroy only tumor tissue. Since the nucleoside would be localized primarily in the nucleus, the greater biological efficacy would permit utilization of lower boron concentrations. Synthetic procedures to novel boron nucleosides and pyrimidines that could be of potential utility for NCT have been worked out. These include the synthesis of 2-thio-5-dihydroxyboryluracil and 2,4-dithio-5-dihydroxyboryluracil, which may be taken up selectively in melanoma cells as analogues of 2-thiouracil; and 6-dihydroxyborylpurine-2'-deoxyriboside, an analogue of 2'-deoxyadenosine. Studies with these compounds will allow the authors to determine the potential use of these boron nucleosides and pyrimidines for boron NCT, with the aim of reducing mortality and increasing life span of patients with diagnosed gliomas, melanomas and other tumors.

  20. Key research issues in the pulsed fast-neutron analysis technique for cargo inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-07-01

    Non-invasive inspection systems based on the use of fast neutrons are being studied for the inspection of large cargo containers. A key advantage of fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of explosives and narcotics. The high energy allows penetration of relatively large containers. The pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA) technique is currently the baseline system. A workshop on the PFNA technique involving industrial, government, and university participants was held at Argonne National Lab. in January 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to review the status of research on the key technical issues involved in PFNA, and to develop a list of those areas where additional modeling and/or experimentation were needed. The workshop also focused on development of a near-term experimental assessment program using existing prototypes and on development of a long-term test program at the Tacoma Testbed, where a PFNA prototype will be installed in 1995. A summary of conclusions reached at this workshop is presented. Results from analytic and Monte Carlo modeling of simplified PFNA systems are also presented.