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Sample records for fast observation architecture

  1. Fast notification architecture for wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hahk

    2013-03-01

    In an emergency, since it is vital to transmit the message to the users immediately after analysing the data to prevent disaster, this article presents the deployment of a fast notification architecture for a wireless sensor network. The sensor nodes of the proposed architecture can monitor an emergency situation periodically and transmit the sensing data, immediately to the sink node. We decide on the grade of fire situation according to the decision rule using the sensing values of temperature, CO, smoke density and temperature increasing rate. On the other hand, to estimate the grade of air pollution, the sensing data, such as dust, formaldehyde, NO2, CO2, is applied to the given knowledge model. Since the sink node in the architecture has a ZigBee interface, it can transmit the alert messages in real time according to analysed results received from the host server to the terminals equipped with a SIM card-type ZigBee module. Also, the host server notifies the situation to the registered users who have cellular phone through short message service server of the cellular network. Thus, the proposed architecture can adapt an emergency situation dynamically compared to the conventional architecture using video processing. In the testbed, after generating air pollution and fire data, the terminal receives the message in less than 3 s. In the test results, this system can also be applied to buildings and public areas where many people gather together, to prevent unexpected disasters in urban settings.

  2. Fast semivariogram computation using FPGA architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagadapati, Yamuna; Shirvaikar, Mukul; Dong, Xuanliang

    2015-02-01

    The semivariogram is a statistical measure of the spatial distribution of data and is based on Markov Random Fields (MRFs). Semivariogram analysis is a computationally intensive algorithm that has typically seen applications in the geosciences and remote sensing areas. Recently, applications in the area of medical imaging have been investigated, resulting in the need for efficient real time implementation of the algorithm. The semivariogram is a plot of semivariances for different lag distances between pixels. A semi-variance, γ(h), is defined as the half of the expected squared differences of pixel values between any two data locations with a lag distance of h. Due to the need to examine each pair of pixels in the image or sub-image being processed, the base algorithm complexity for an image window with n pixels is O(n2). Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are an attractive solution for such demanding applications due to their parallel processing capability. FPGAs also tend to operate at relatively modest clock rates measured in a few hundreds of megahertz, but they can perform tens of thousands of calculations per clock cycle while operating in the low range of power. This paper presents a technique for the fast computation of the semivariogram using two custom FPGA architectures. The design consists of several modules dedicated to the constituent computational tasks. A modular architecture approach is chosen to allow for replication of processing units. This allows for high throughput due to concurrent processing of pixel pairs. The current implementation is focused on isotropic semivariogram computations only. Anisotropic semivariogram implementation is anticipated to be an extension of the current architecture, ostensibly based on refinements to the current modules. The algorithm is benchmarked using VHDL on a Xilinx XUPV5-LX110T development Kit, which utilizes the Virtex5 FPGA. Medical image data from MRI scans are utilized for the experiments

  3. A Vertical Organic Transistor Architecture for Fast Nonvolatile Memory.

    PubMed

    She, Xiao-Jian; Gustafsson, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-02-01

    A new device architecture for fast organic transistor memory is developed, based on a vertical organic transistor configuration incorporating high-performance ambipolar conjugated polymers and unipolar small molecules as the transport layers, to achieve reliable and fast programming and erasing of the threshold voltage shift in less than 200 ns.

  4. A Massively Parallel Adaptive Fast Multipole Method on Heterogeneous Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, Ilya; Chandramowlishwaran, Aparna; Langston, Harper; Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Sampath, Rahul S; Shringarpure, Aashay; Vuduc, Richard; Ying, Lexing; Zorin, Denis; Biros, George

    2012-01-01

    We describe a parallel fast multipole method (FMM) for highly nonuniform distributions of particles. We employ both distributed memory parallelism (via MPI) and shared memory parallelism (via OpenMP and GPU acceleration) to rapidly evaluate two-body nonoscillatory potentials in three dimensions on heterogeneous high performance computing architectures. We have performed scalability tests with up to 30 billion particles on 196,608 cores on the AMD/CRAY-based Jaguar system at ORNL. On a GPU-enabled system (NSF's Keeneland at Georgia Tech/ORNL), we observed 30x speedup over a single core CPU and 7x speedup over a multicore CPU implementation. By combining GPUs with MPI, we achieve less than 10 ns/particle and six digits of accuracy for a run with 48 million nonuniformly distributed particles on 192 GPUs.

  5. A new architecture for fast ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cruza, J. F.; Camacho, J.; Moreno, J. M.; Medina, L.

    2014-02-18

    Some ultrasound imaging applications require high frame rate, for example 3D imaging and automated inspections of large components. Being the signal-processing throughput of the system the main bottleneck, parallel beamforming is required to achieve hundreds to thousands of images per second. Simultaneous A-scan line beamforming in all active channels is required to reach the intended high frame rate. To this purpose, a new parallel beamforming architecture that exploits the currently available processing resources available in state-of-the-art FPGAs is proposed. The work aims to get the optimal resource usage, high scalability and flexibility for different applications. To achieve these goals, the basic beamforming function is reformulated to be adapted to the DSP-cell architecture of state-of-the-art FPGAs. This allows performing simultaneous dynamic focusing on multiple A-scan lines. Some realistic examples are analyzed, evaluating resource requirements and maximum operating frequency. For example, a 128-channel system, with 128 scan lines and acquiring at 20 MSPS, can be built with 4 mid-range FPGAs, achieving up to 18000 frames per second, just limited by the maximum PRF. The gold standard Synthetic Transmit Aperture method (also called Total Focusing Method) can be carried out in real time at a processing rate of 140 high-resolution images per second (16 cm depth on steel)

  6. Fast packet switch architectures for broadband integrated services digital networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.

    1990-01-01

    Background information on networking and switching is provided, and the various architectures that have been considered for fast packet switches are described. The focus is solely on switches designed to be implemented electronically. A set of definitions and a brief description of the functionality required of fast packet switches are given. Three basic types of packet switches are identified: the shared-memory, shared-medium, and space-division types. Each of these is described, and examples are given.

  7. Fast Convolution Algorithms and Associated VHSIC Architectures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-23

    Idenftfy by block number) Finite field, Mersenne prime , Fermat number, primitive element, number- theoretic transform, cyclic convolution, polynomial...elements of order 2 P+p and 2k n in the finite field GF(q 2), where q = 2P-l is a Mersenne prime , p is a prime number, and n is a divisor of 2pl...Abstract - A high-radix f.f.t. algorithm for computing transforms over GF(q2), where q is a Mersenne prime , is developed to implement fast circular

  8. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The launch of spaceborne SARs during the 1980's is discussed. The satellite SARs require high quality and high throughput ground processors. Compression ratios in range and azimuth of greater than 500 and 150 respectively lead to frequency domain processing and data computation rates in excess of 2000 million real operations per second for C-band SARs under consideration. Various hardware architectures are examined and two promising candidates and proceeds to recommend a fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing are selected. Modularity and programmability are introduced as desirable attributes for the purpose of HTSP hardware selection.

  9. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  10. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Youcef

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block triangular matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconsistant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. Here, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches, including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational complexity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  11. Some fast elliptic solvers on parallel architectures and their complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallopoulos, E.; Saad, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The discretization of separable elliptic partial differential equations leads to linear systems with special block tridiagonal matrices. Several methods are known to solve these systems, the most general of which is the Block Cyclic Reduction (BCR) algorithm which handles equations with nonconstant coefficients. A method was recently proposed to parallelize and vectorize BCR. In this paper, the mapping of BCR on distributed memory architectures is discussed, and its complexity is compared with that of other approaches including the Alternating-Direction method. A fast parallel solver is also described, based on an explicit formula for the solution, which has parallel computational compelxity lower than that of parallel BCR.

  12. Fast-earth: A global image caching architecture for fast access to remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, B. G.; Talbot, L. M.

    We introduce Fast-Earth, a novel server architecture that enables rapid access to remote sensing data. Fast-Earth subdivides a WGS-84 model of the earth into small 400 × 400 meter regions with fixed locations, called plats. The resulting 3,187,932,913 indexed plats are accessed with a rapid look-up algorithm. Whereas many traditional databases store large original images as a series by collection time, requiring long searches and slow access times for user queries, the Fast-Earth architecture enables rapid access. We have prototyped a system in conjunction with a Fast-Responder mobile app to demonstrate and evaluate the concepts. We found that new data could be indexed rapidly in about 10 minutes/terabyte, high-resolution images could be chipped in less than a second, and 250 kB image chips could be delivered over a 3G network in about 3 seconds. The prototype server implemented on a very small computer could handle 100 users, but the concept is scalable. Fast-Earth enables dramatic advances in rapid dissemination of remote sensing data for mobile platforms as well as desktop enterprises.

  13. New architecture of fast parallel multiplier using fast parallel counter with FPA (first partial product addition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mike M.; Cho, Byung Lok

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new First Partial product Addition (FPA) architecture with new compressor (or parallel counter) to CSA tree built in the process of adding partial product for improving speed in the fast parallel multiplier to improve the speed of calculating partial product by about 20% compared with existing parallel counter using full Adder. The new circuit reduces the CLA bit finding final sum by N/2 using the novel FPA architecture. A 5.14ns of multiplication speed of the 16X16 multiplier is obtained using 0.25um CMOS technology. The architecture of the multiplier is easily opted for pipeline design and demonstrates high speed performance.

  14. Fast, parallel implementation of particle filtering on the GPU architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelencsér-Horváth, Anna; Tornai, Gábor János; Horváth, András; Cserey, György

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified cellular particle filter (CPF) which we mapped on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture. We developed this filter adaptation using a state-of-the art CPF technique. Mapping this filter realization on a highly parallel architecture entailed a shift in the logical representation of the particles. In this process, the original two-dimensional organization is reordered as a one-dimensional ring topology. We proposed a proof-of-concept measurement on two models with an NVIDIA Fermi architecture GPU. This design achieved a 411- μs kernel time per state and a 77-ms global running time for all states for 16,384 particles with a 256 neighbourhood size on a sequence of 24 states for a bearing-only tracking model. For a commonly used benchmark model at the same configuration, we achieved a 266- μs kernel time per state and a 124-ms global running time for all 100 states. Kernel time includes random number generation on the GPU with curand. These results attest to the effective and fast use of the particle filter in high-dimensional, real-time applications.

  15. On-board B-ISDN fast packet switching architectures. Phase 2: Development. Proof-of-concept architecture definition report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Dong-Jye; Redman, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    For the next-generation packet switched communications satellite system with onboard processing and spot-beam operation, a reliable onboard fast packet switch is essential to route packets from different uplink beams to different downlink beams. The rapid emergence of point-to-point services such as video distribution, and the large demand for video conference, distributed data processing, and network management makes the multicast function essential to a fast packet switch (FPS). The satellite's inherent broadcast features gives the satellite network an advantage over the terrestrial network in providing multicast services. This report evaluates alternate multicast FPS architectures for onboard baseband switching applications and selects a candidate for subsequent breadboard development. Architecture evaluation and selection will be based on the study performed in phase 1, 'Onboard B-ISDN Fast Packet Switching Architectures', and other switch architectures which have become commercially available as large scale integration (LSI) devices.

  16. Fast underdetermined BSS architecture design methodology for real time applications.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Suresh; Reddy, P Sreenivasa; Acharyya, Amit; Naik, Ganesh R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a high speed architecture design methodology for the Under-determined Blind Source Separation (UBSS) algorithm using our recently proposed high speed Discrete Hilbert Transform (DHT) targeting real time applications. In UBSS algorithm, unlike the typical BSS, the number of sensors are less than the number of the sources, which is of more interest in the real time applications. The DHT architecture has been implemented based on sub matrix multiplication method to compute M point DHT, which uses N point architecture recursively and where M is an integer multiples of N. The DHT architecture and state of the art architecture are coded in VHDL for 16 bit word length and ASIC implementation is carried out using UMC 90 - nm technology @V DD = 1V and @ 1MHZ clock frequency. The proposed architecture implementation and experimental comparison results show that the DHT design is two times faster than state of the art architecture.

  17. Contrasting genetic architectures of schizophrenia and other complex diseases using fast variance-components analysis.

    PubMed

    Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Pollack, Samuela J; de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Kendler, Kenneth S; O'Donovan, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2015-12-01

    Heritability analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. Here we analyze the genetic architectures of schizophrenia in 49,806 samples from the PGC and nine complex diseases in 54,734 samples from the GERA cohort. For schizophrenia, we infer an overwhelmingly polygenic disease architecture in which ≥71% of 1-Mb genomic regions harbor ≥1 variant influencing schizophrenia risk. We also observe significant enrichment of heritability in GC-rich regions and in higher-frequency SNPs for both schizophrenia and GERA diseases. In bivariate analyses, we observe significant genetic correlations (ranging from 0.18 to 0.85) for several pairs of GERA diseases; genetic correlations were on average 1.3 tunes stronger than the correlations of overall disease liabilities. To accomplish these analyses, we developed a fast algorithm for multicomponent, multi-trait variance-components analysis that overcomes prior computational barriers that made such analyses intractable at this scale.

  18. Qubit Architecture with High Coherence and Fast Tunable Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Leung, N.; Fang, M.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C. M.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Geller, Michael R.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a superconducting qubit architecture that combines high-coherence qubits and tunable qubit-qubit coupling. With the ability to set the coupling to zero, we demonstrate that this architecture is protected from the frequency crowding problems that arise from fixed coupling. More importantly, the coupling can be tuned dynamically with nanosecond resolution, making this architecture a versatile platform with applications ranging from quantum logic gates to quantum simulation. We illustrate the advantages of dynamical coupling by implementing a novel adiabatic controlled-z gate, with a speed approaching that of single-qubit gates. Integrating coherence and scalable control, the introduced qubit architecture provides a promising path towards large-scale quantum computation and simulation.

  19. On fast iterative mapping algorithms for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Gayatri; Patel, Krunalkumar; Pollard, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconfigurable devices have potential for great flexibility/efficiency, but mapping algorithms onto these architectures is a long-standing challenge. This paper addresses this challenge for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures (CGRAs) by drawing on insights from graph drawing. We adapt fast, iterative algorithms from hierarchical graph drawing to the problem of mapping to stripe based architectures. We find that global sifting is 98 times as fast as simulated annealing and produces very compact designs with 17% less area on average, at a cost of 5% greater wire length. Interleaving iterations of Sugiyama and global sifting is 40 times as fast as simulated annealing and achieves somewhat more compact designs with 1.8% less area on average, at a cost of only 1% greater wire length. These solutions can enable fast design space exploration, rapid performance testing, and flexible programming of CGRAs "in the field."

  20. Architecture of fast IP forwarding engine in gigabit ethernet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Han C.; Lee, Hyeong H.; Cha, Kyoon Hyun

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, Internet traffic has been increased rapidly as a result of the Internet which accommodates multimedia traffic such as IP telephony and video conference. Gigabit routing technology is one possible approach to handle such internet traffic. This paper presents an efficient IP forwarding architecture adequate for Gigabit Ethernet switching system. The presented IP forwarding architecture is based upon distributed and pipelined process, which can effectively facilitate searching, editing, traffic classification, forwarding, and traffic management in parallel. Additionally, it can also process packets at full wire-speed in the ASIC level.

  1. Quadrant architecture for fast in-place algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Besslich, P.W.; Kurowski, J.O.

    1983-10-01

    The architecture proposed is tailored to support Radix-2/sup k/ based in-place processing of pictorial data. The algorithms make use of signal-flow graphs to describe 2-dimensional in-place operations suitable for image processing. They may be executed on a general-purpose computer but may also be supported by a special parallel architecture. Major advantages of the scheme are in-place processing and parallel access to disjoint sections of memory only. A quadtree-like decomposition of the picture prevents blocking and queuing of private and common buses. 9 references.

  2. The Architectures of Planetary Systems from Transit Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Moorhead, A. V.; Morehead, R. C.; Ragozzine, D.; Steffen, J. H.; Koch, D.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    The architectures of multiple planet systems can provide valuable constraints on models of planet formation, including the extent and cause of orbital migration, eccentricity excitation and inclination excitation. NASA's Kepler mission has discovered a planetary system with multiple transiting planets (Holman et al. 2010) and several stars with multiple transiting planet candidates (Steffen et al. 2010). For each planet, transit photometry can measure the orbital period, orbital phase, transit duration, planet size (relative to the host star), and, in favorable cases, the orbital inclination. For systems with multiple transiting planets, one can begin to piece together the architecture of the planetary system, including key features such as the proximity to mean motion resonance, potential for significant secular interactions, and the likely relative inclinations. The set of potential architectures can often be further narrowed by incorporating the constraint of long-term orbital stability (for plausible mass-radius relations) and/or incorporating complimentary observations (e.g., radial velocities, Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, transit timing, out-of-transit light curve). We describe the methodology for characterizing the architecture transiting planet systems and present early results of such analyses for the Kepler-9 system, as well as candidate multiple planet systems previously identified by Kepler. Funding for Kepler is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate and for this research by the Kepler Participating Scientist Program.

  3. Large-scale monocular FastSLAM2.0 acceleration on an embedded heterogeneous architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzahir, Mohamed; Elouardi, Abdelhafid; Bouaziz, Samir; Latif, Rachid; Tajer, Abdelouahed

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is widely used in many robotic applications and autonomous navigation. This paper presents a study of FastSLAM2.0 computational complexity based on a monocular vision system. The algorithm is intended to operate with many particles in a large-scale environment. FastSLAM2.0 was partitioned into functional blocks allowing a hardware software matching on a CPU-GPGPU-based SoC architecture. Performances in terms of processing time and localization accuracy were evaluated using a real indoor dataset. Results demonstrate that an optimized and efficient CPU-GPGPU partitioning allows performing accurate localization results and high-speed execution of a monocular FastSLAM2.0-based embedded system operating under real-time constraints.

  4. A VLSI Architecture with Multiple Fast Store-Based Block Parallel Processing for Output Probability and Likelihood Score Computations in HMM-Based Isolated Word Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Shimazaki, Ryo; Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Takagi, Naofumi

    This paper presents a memory-efficient VLSI architecture for output probability computations (OPCs) of continuous hidden Markov models (HMMs) and likelihood score computations (LSCs). These computations are the most time consuming part of HMM-based isolated word recognition systems. We demonstrate multiple fast store-based block parallel processing (MultipleFastStoreBPP) for OPCs and LSCs and present a VLSI architecture that supports it. Compared with conventional fast store-based block parallel processing (FastStoreBPP) and stream-based block parallel processing (StreamBPP) architectures, the proposed architecture requires fewer registers and less processing time. The processing elements (PEs) used in the FastStoreBPP and StreamBPP architectures are identical to those used in the MultipleFastStoreBPP architecture. From a VLSI architectural viewpoint, a comparison shows that the proposed architecture is an improvement over the others, through efficient use of PEs and registers for storing input feature vectors.

  5. Climate Monitoring from Space - Architecture for Sustained Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.; Dowell, M.; Lecomte, P.; Schulz, J.

    2013-12-01

    The task of climate monitoring has requirements that extend beyond the current paradigm of one-time research missions and operational satellite systems in existence today. Recognizing these needs, international research (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites - CEOS) and operational (Coordination Group on Meteorological Satellites - CGMS) Space Agencies have formed a new Working Group on Climate that has defined an architecture that ensures delivery of sustained observations over the time frames required for analysis of the Earth's climate system. The Working Group has released a report, to be summarized at the Fall Meeting, which establishes a framework for international collaboration to address critical issues such as: In general, current observing systems have not been primarily designed with a climate perspective, therefore, inventories are needed to document the contributions of current and planned observing systems for climate purposes. Requirements for mission continuity and contingency need improvement through international collaboration of space agencies. Sustained Climate Data Record (CDR) programs will provide an avenue to replace heritage algorithms and data sets with improved versions once they are successfully demonstrated, validated and available. There is an imperative to ensure traceability along harmonized practices. Wordle of CEOS-CGMS Report on Strategy Towards an Architecture for Climate Monitoring from Space

  6. On-board B-ISDN fast packet switching architectures. Phase 1: Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faris, Faris; Inukai, Thomas; Lee, Fred; Paul, Dilip; Shyy, Dong-Jye

    1993-01-01

    The broadband integrate services digital network (B-ISDN) is an emerging telecommunications technology that will meet most of the telecommunications networking needs in the mid-1990's to early next century. The satellite-based system is well positioned for providing B-ISDN service with its inherent capabilities of point-to-multipoint and broadcast transmission, virtually unlimited connectivity between any two points within a beam coverage, short deployment time of communications facility, flexible and dynamic reallocation of space segment capacity, and distance insensitive cost. On-board processing satellites, particularly in a multiple spot beam environment, will provide enhanced connectivity, better performance, optimized access and transmission link design, and lower user service cost. The following are described: the user and network aspects of broadband services; the current development status in broadband services; various satellite network architectures including system design issues; and various fast packet switch architectures and their detail designs.

  7. Heterogeneous computing architecture for fast detection of SNP-SNP interactions.

    PubMed

    Sluga, Davor; Curk, Tomaz; Zupan, Blaz; Lotric, Uros

    2014-06-25

    The extent of data in a typical genome-wide association study (GWAS) poses considerable computational challenges to software tools for gene-gene interaction discovery. Exhaustive evaluation of all interactions among hundreds of thousands to millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may require weeks or even months of computation. Massively parallel hardware within a modern Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) and Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors can shorten the run time considerably. While the utility of GPU-based implementations in bioinformatics has been well studied, MIC architecture has been introduced only recently and may provide a number of comparative advantages that have yet to be explored and tested. We have developed a heterogeneous, GPU and Intel MIC-accelerated software module for SNP-SNP interaction discovery to replace the previously single-threaded computational core in the interactive web-based data exploration program SNPsyn. We report on differences between these two modern massively parallel architectures and their software environments. Their utility resulted in an order of magnitude shorter execution times when compared to the single-threaded CPU implementation. GPU implementation on a single Nvidia Tesla K20 runs twice as fast as that for the MIC architecture-based Xeon Phi P5110 coprocessor, but also requires considerably more programming effort. General purpose GPUs are a mature platform with large amounts of computing power capable of tackling inherently parallel problems, but can prove demanding for the programmer. On the other hand the new MIC architecture, albeit lacking in performance reduces the programming effort and makes it up with a more general architecture suitable for a wider range of problems.

  8. Fast 2D Convolutions and Cross-Correlations Using Scalable Architectures.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Cesar; Llamocca, Daniel; Pattichis, Marios

    2017-05-01

    The manuscript describes fast and scalable architectures and associated algorithms for computing convolutions and cross-correlations. The basic idea is to map 2D convolutions and cross-correlations to a collection of 1D convolutions and cross-correlations in the transform domain. This is accomplished through the use of the discrete periodic radon transform for general kernels and the use of singular value decomposition -LU decompositions for low-rank kernels. The approach uses scalable architectures that can be fitted into modern FPGA and Zynq-SOC devices. Based on different types of available resources, for P×P blocks, 2D convolutions and cross-correlations can be computed in just O(P) clock cycles up to O(P(2)) clock cycles. Thus, there is a trade-off between performance and required numbers and types of resources. We provide implementations of the proposed architectures using modern programmable devices (Virtex-7 and Zynq-SOC). Based on the amounts and types of required resources, we show that the proposed approaches significantly outperform current methods.

  9. Fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy using multi- and many-core CPU architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, Kevin Lee, John Aldo; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Accuracy in proton therapy treatment planning can be improved using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. However the long computation time of such methods hinders their use in clinical routine. This work aims to develop a fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation tool for proton therapy using massively parallel central processing unit (CPU) architectures. Methods: A new Monte Carlo, called MCsquare (many-core Monte Carlo), has been designed and optimized for the last generation of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. These massively parallel architectures offer the flexibility and the computational power suitable to MC methods. The class-II condensed history algorithm of MCsquare provides a fast and yet accurate method of simulating heavy charged particles such as protons, deuterons, and alphas inside voxelized geometries. Hard ionizations, with energy losses above a user-specified threshold, are simulated individually while soft events are regrouped in a multiple scattering theory. Elastic and inelastic nuclear interactions are sampled from ICRU 63 differential cross sections, thereby allowing for the computation of prompt gamma emission profiles. MCsquare has been benchmarked with the GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo application for homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Results: Comparisons with GATE/GEANT4 for various geometries show deviations within 2%–1 mm. In spite of the limited memory bandwidth of the coprocessor simulation time is below 25 s for 10{sup 7} primary 200 MeV protons in average soft tissues using all Xeon Phi and CPU resources embedded in a single desktop unit. Conclusions: MCsquare exploits the flexibility of CPU architectures to provide a multipurpose MC simulation tool. Optimized code enables the use of accurate MC calculation within a reasonable computation time, adequate for clinical practice. MCsquare also simulates prompt gamma emission and can thus be used also for in vivo range verification.

  10. Fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy using multi- and many-core CPU architectures.

    PubMed

    Souris, Kevin; Lee, John Aldo; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-04-01

    Accuracy in proton therapy treatment planning can be improved using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. However the long computation time of such methods hinders their use in clinical routine. This work aims to develop a fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation tool for proton therapy using massively parallel central processing unit (CPU) architectures. A new Monte Carlo, called MCsquare (many-core Monte Carlo), has been designed and optimized for the last generation of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. These massively parallel architectures offer the flexibility and the computational power suitable to MC methods. The class-II condensed history algorithm of MCsquare provides a fast and yet accurate method of simulating heavy charged particles such as protons, deuterons, and alphas inside voxelized geometries. Hard ionizations, with energy losses above a user-specified threshold, are simulated individually while soft events are regrouped in a multiple scattering theory. Elastic and inelastic nuclear interactions are sampled from ICRU 63 differential cross sections, thereby allowing for the computation of prompt gamma emission profiles. MCsquare has been benchmarked with the gate/geant4 Monte Carlo application for homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Comparisons with gate/geant4 for various geometries show deviations within 2%-1 mm. In spite of the limited memory bandwidth of the coprocessor simulation time is below 25 s for 10(7) primary 200 MeV protons in average soft tissues using all Xeon Phi and CPU resources embedded in a single desktop unit. MCsquare exploits the flexibility of CPU architectures to provide a multipurpose MC simulation tool. Optimized code enables the use of accurate MC calculation within a reasonable computation time, adequate for clinical practice. MCsquare also simulates prompt gamma emission and can thus be used also for in vivo range verification.

  11. Fast Construction of SAH BVHs on the Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture.

    PubMed

    Wald, I

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how to efficiently build bounding volume hierarchies (BVHs) with surface area heuristic (SAH) on the Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. To achieve maximum performance, we use four key concepts: progressive 10-bit quantization to reduce cache footprint with negligible loss in BVH quality; an AoSoA data layout that allows efficient streaming and SIMD processing; high-performance SIMD kernels for binning and partitioning; and a parallelization framework with several build-specific optimizations. The resulting system is more than an order of magnitude faster than today's high-end GPU builders for comparable BVHs; it is usually faster even than spatial median builders; it can build SAH BVHs almost as fast as existing GPUs and CPUs- and CPU-based approaches can build regular grids; and in aggregate "build+render" performance is significantly faster than the best published numbers for either of these systems, be it CPU or GPU, BVH, kd-tree, or grid.

  12. EZ-Rhizo: integrated software for the fast and accurate measurement of root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Patrick; Zambaux, Kevin; Hills, Adrian; Sulpice, Ronan; Pattison, Richard J; Blatt, Michael R; Amtmann, Anna

    2009-03-01

    The root system is essential for the growth and development of plants. In addition to anchoring the plant in the ground, it is the site of uptake of water and minerals from the soil. Plant root systems show an astonishing plasticity in their architecture, which allows for optimal exploitation of diverse soil structures and conditions. The signalling pathways that enable plants to sense and respond to changes in soil conditions, in particular nutrient supply, are a topic of intensive research, and root system architecture (RSA) is an important and obvious phenotypic output. At present, the quantitative description of RSA is labour intensive and time consuming, even using the currently available software, and the lack of a fast RSA measuring tool hampers forward and quantitative genetics studies. Here, we describe EZ-Rhizo: a Windows-integrated and semi-automated computer program designed to detect and quantify multiple RSA parameters from plants growing on a solid support medium. The method is non-invasive, enabling the user to follow RSA development over time. We have successfully applied EZ-Rhizo to evaluate natural variation in RSA across 23 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, and have identified new RSA determinants as a basis for future quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis.

  13. Fast Readout Architectures for Large Arrays of Digital Pixels: Examples and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Modern pixel detectors, particularly those designed and constructed for applications and experiments for high-energy physics, are commonly built implementing general readout architectures, not specifically optimized in terms of speed. High-energy physics experiments use bidimensional matrices of sensitive elements located on a silicon die. Sensors are read out via other integrated circuits bump bonded over the sensor dies. The speed of the readout electronics can significantly increase the overall performance of the system, and so here novel forms of readout architectures are studied and described. These circuits have been investigated in terms of speed and are particularly suited for large monolithic, low-pitch pixel detectors. The idea is to have a small simple structure that may be expanded to fit large matrices without affecting the layout complexity of the chip, while maintaining a reasonably high readout speed. The solutions might be applied to devices for applications not only in physics but also to general-purpose pixel detectors whenever online fast data sparsification is required. The paper presents also simulations on the efficiencies of the systems as proof of concept for the proposed ideas. PMID:24778588

  14. 128-point memory-based architecture for a fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuen-Yau; Huang, Chun-Kai

    2013-02-01

    In this article, we take advantage of the merits of a one-sixteenth circle storage technique, radix-2 and radix-2/4/8 algorithms to implement a 128-point memory-based architecture for a fast Fourier transform processor. The one-sixteenth circle storage technique results in reducing 50% of the size of a look-up table (LUT) for storing the twiddle factors. The combination of radix-2 and radix-2/4/8 algorithms results in reducing the number of twiddle factors and allowing the processor to possess a regular architecture which is suitable for hardware implementation. This design has been synthesised by Altera Quartus II 6.0. The experimental results indicate that this design needs only 65,169 ALUTs for LUT. The operating frequency is 59.76 MHz. The signal-to-noise ratios for the real and imaginary parts of the output signal are 67.72 dB and 68.55 dB, respectively.

  15. Observational Clues to the Origin of the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. D.; Doyle, J. G.; Banerjee, D.

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that the fast solar wind originates from coronal holes, but its source close to the solar 'surface' has been a matter of debate even in today's era of modern solar observations. Recently, it has been suggested that the fast solar wind outflow starts at about 10 kilometers per second in coronal funnels, which are located at the edges of the chromospheric magnetic network inside coronal holes. We present further evidence that the outflow might also originate from above 'explosive event' sites. These jets have a lifetime of about 5 minutes and are often seen reoccurring at the same location over intervals of typically 20-30 minutes. Although the expelled jets might actually extend high in the Sun's atmosphere, they are not seen in the intensity on the disk. Some of the transparent features might nevertheless appear as macrospicules at the Sun's edge. This observation itself is shedding new light onto another long- standing question regarding the nature of macrospicules. These results about the small-scale structures of coronal holes and their consequence on explaining the nature of the fast solar wind have been derived due to an innovative way of extracting information from the spectral data offered by SOHO’s highest resolution detector, SUMER. The 'secret' of our technique lies in understanding plasma properties from the signature it leaves in the shape and widths of the spectral lines.

  16. An End-to-End Architecture for Science Goal Driven Observing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Grosvenor, Sandy; Koratkar, Anuradha; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Wolf, Karl; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New observatories will have greater on-board storage capacity and on-board processing capabilities. The new bottleneck will be download capacity. The cost of downlink time and limitations of bandwidth will end the era where all exposure data is downloaded and all data processing is performed on the ground. In addition, observing campaigns involving inherently variable targets will need scheduling flexibility to focus observing time and data download on exposures that are scientifically interesting. The ability to quickly recognize and react to such events by re-prioritizing the observing schedule will be an essential characteristic for maximizing scientific returns. It will also be a step towards increasing spacecraft autonomy, a major goal of NASA's strategic plan. The science goal monitoring (SGM) system is a proof-of-concept effort to address these challenges. We are developing an interactive distributed system that will use on-board processing and storage combined with event-driven interfaces with ground-based processing and operations, to enable fast re-prioritization of observing schedules, and to minimize time spent on non-optimized observations. SGM is initially aimed towards time-tagged observing modes used frequently in spectroscopic studies of varying targets. In particular, the SGM is collaborating with the proposed MIDEX-class mission Kronos team. The variable targets that Kronos seeks to study make an adaptive system such as SGM particularly valuable for achieving mission goals. However, the architecture and interfaces will also be designed for easy adaptability to other observing platforms, including ground-based systems and to work with different scheduling and pipeline processing systems. This talk will focus on our strategy for developing SGM and the technical challenges that we have encountered. We will discuss the SGM architecture as it applies to the Kronos mission and explain how it is scalable to other missions.

  17. Observations of Fast Radio Bursts and perspectives at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.; Mottez, F.

    2016-12-01

    We briefly summarize the characteristics of the elusive Fast Radio Bursts from existing observations. Then we emphasize the interest of low-frequency observations, e.g. with NenuFAR. In order to define the best observing parameters and detection scheme, we have built a simulation program of FRB at low-frequencies, that proceeds in 2 steps: (i) FRB generation and dilution in a dynamic spectrum with given characteristics, and (ii) definition of the FRB spectrum, and detection on the galactic radio background by means of parametric dedispersion. We carry on a preliminary simulation study, that allows us to draw first conclusions, among which the possibility to detect Lorimer-like FRB with NenuFAR.

  18. A Framework for Fast Image Deconvolution With Incomplete Observations.

    PubMed

    Simoes, Miguel; Almeida, Luis B; Bioucas-Dias, Jose; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2016-11-01

    In image deconvolution problems, the diagonalization of the underlying operators by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) usually yields very large speedups. When there are incomplete observations (e.g., in the case of unknown boundaries), standard deconvolution techniques normally involve non-diagonalizable operators, resulting in rather slow methods or, otherwise, use inexact convolution models, resulting in the occurrence of artifacts in the enhanced images. In this paper, we propose a new deconvolution framework for images with incomplete observations that allows us to work with diagonalized convolution operators, and therefore is very fast. We iteratively alternate the estimation of the unknown pixels and of the deconvolved image, using, e.g., an FFT-based deconvolution method. This framework is an efficient, high-quality alternative to existing methods of dealing with the image boundaries, such as edge tapering. It can be used with any fast deconvolution method. We give an example in which a state-of-the-art method that assumes periodic boundary conditions is extended, using this framework, to unknown boundary conditions. Furthermore, we propose a specific implementation of this framework, based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). We provide a proof of convergence for the resulting algorithm, which can be seen as a "partial" ADMM, in which not all variables are dualized. We report experimental comparisons with other primal-dual methods, where the proposed one performed at the level of the state of the art. Four different kinds of applications were tested in the experiments: deconvolution, deconvolution with inpainting, superresolution, and demosaicing, all with unknown boundaries.

  19. A Services-Oriented Architecture for Water Observations Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.; Tarboton, D. G.; Whitenack, T.; Whiteaker, T.; Hooper, R.; Kirschtel, D.

    2009-04-01

    Water observations data are time series of measurements made at point locations of water level, flow, and quality and corresponding data for climatic observations at point locations such as gaged precipitation and weather variables. A services-oriented architecture has been built for such information for the United States that has three components: hydrologic information servers, hydrologic information clients, and a centralized metadata cataloging system. These are connected using web services for observations data and metadata defined by an XML-based language called WaterML. A Hydrologic Information Server can be built by storing observations data in a relational database schema in the CUAHSI Observations Data Model, in which case, web services access to the data and metadata is automatically provided by query functions for WaterML that are wrapped around the relational database within a web server. A Hydrologic Information Server can also be constructed by custom-programming an interface to an existing water agency web site so that responds to the same queries by producing data in WaterML as do the CUAHSI Observations Data Model based servers. A Hydrologic Information Client is one which can interpret and ingest WaterML metadata and data. We have two client applications for Excel and ArcGIS and have shown how WaterML web services can be ingested into programming environments such as Matlab and Visual Basic. HIS Central, maintained at the San Diego Supercomputer Center is a repository of observational metadata for WaterML web services which presently indexes 342 million data measured at 1.75 million locations. This is the largest catalog water observational data for the United States presently in existence. As more observation networks join what we term "CUAHSI Water Data Federation", and the system accommodates a growing number of sites, measured parameters, applications, and users, rapid and reliable access to large heterogeneous hydrologic data repositories

  20. Grid tied PV/battery system architecture and power management for fast electric vehicle charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Mohamed O.

    The prospective spread of Electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) arises the need for fast charging rates. Higher charging rates requirements lead to high power demands, which cant be always supported by the grid. Thus, the use of on-site sources alongside the electrical grid for EVs charging is a rising area of interest. In this dissertation, a photovoltaic (PV) source is used to support the high power EVs charging. However, the PV output power has an intermittent nature that is dependable on the weather conditions. Thus, battery storage are combined with the PV in a grid tied system, providing a steady source for on-site EVs use in a renewable energy based fast charging station. Verily, renewable energy based fast charging stations should be cost effective, efficient, and reliable to increase the penetration of EVs in the automotive market. Thus, this Dissertation proposes a novel power flow management topology that aims on decreasing the running cost along with innovative hardware solutions and control structures for the developed architecture. The developed power flow management topology operates the hybrid system at the minimum operating cost while extending the battery lifetime. An optimization problem is formulated and two stages of optimization, i.e online and offline stages, are adopted to optimize the batteries state of charge (SOC) scheduling and continuously compensate for the forecasting errors. The proposed power flow management topology is validated and tested with two metering systems, i.e unified and dual metering systems. The results suggested that minimal power flow is anticipated from the battery storage to the grid in the dual metering system. Thus, the power electronic interfacing system is designed accordingly. Interconnecting bi-directional DC/DC converters are analyzed, and a cascaded buck boost (CBB) converter is chosen and tested under 80 kW power flow rates. The need to perform power factor correction (PFC) on

  1. Fast camera observations of injected and intrinsic dust in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Erofeev, I.; Brochard, F.; Litnovsky, A.; Bozhenkov, S.; Bykov, I.; den Harder, N.; Sergienko, G.

    2015-12-01

    Stereoscopic fast camera observations of pre-characterized carbon and tungsten dust injection in TEXTOR are reported, along with the modelling of tungsten particle trajectories with MIGRAINe. Particle tracking analysis of the video data showed significant differences in dust dynamics: while carbon flakes were prone to agglomeration and explosive destruction, spherical tungsten particles followed quasi-inertial trajectories. Although this inertial nature prevented any validation of the force models used in MIGRAINe, comparisons between the experimental and simulated lifetimes provide a direct evidence of dust temperature overestimation in dust dynamics codes. Furthermore, wide-view observations of the TEXTOR interior revealed the main production mechanism of intrinsic carbon dust, as well as the location of probable dust remobilization sites.

  2. A Framework for Fast Image Deconvolution with Incomplete Observations.

    PubMed

    Simoes, Miguel; Almeida, Luis B; Bioucas-Dias, Jose; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2016-08-26

    In image deconvolution problems, the diagonalization of the underlying operators by means of the FFT usually yields very large speedups. When there are incomplete observations (e.g., in the case of unknown boundaries), standard deconvolution techniques normally involve non-diagonalizable operators, resulting in rather slow methods, or, otherwise, use inexact convolution models, resulting in the occurrence of artifacts in the enhanced images. In this paper, we propose a new deconvolution framework for images with incomplete observations that allows us to work with diagonalized convolution operators, and therefore is very fast. We iteratively alternate the estimation of the unknown pixels and of the deconvolved image, using, e.g., an FFT-based deconvolution method. This framework is an efficient, high-quality alternative to existing methods of dealing with the image boundaries, such as edge tapering. It can be used with any fast deconvolution method. We give an example in which a state-of-the-art method that assumes periodic boundary conditions is extended, through the use of this framework, to unknown boundary conditions. Furthermore, we propose a specific implementation of this framework, based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). We provide a proof of convergence for the resulting algorithm, which can be seen as a "partial" ADMM, in which not all variables are dualized. We report experimental comparisons with other primal-dual methods, where the proposed one performed at the level of the state of the art. Four different kinds of applications were tested in the experiments: deconvolution, deconvolution with inpainting, superresolution, and demosaicing, all with unknown boundaries.

  3. Multiple self-protected spanning-trees-based architecture for fast recovery and load balance in metro ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wentao; Zhong, Xian; Jin, Depeng; Zeng, Lieguang

    2007-11-01

    Ethernet is now expanding into the metro area networks. To address the fast recovery and load balance issues in Metro Ethernet, we propose a multiple self-protected spanning trees based architecture. A self-protected spanning tree can recover from the link failure without the help the other spanning trees, which is different from the spanning trees in all the previously advocated Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) based architectures. The Single Link Replace Mechanism (SLRM) is the essential of the proposed architecture. The SLRM transforms a self-protected spanning tree into another spanning tree by only replacing one link in the tree with another link out of the tree. The SLRM provides a recovery mechanism by replacing the failed link in the self-protected spanning tree with the normal link out of the tree, and makes a two-edge connected network survives any single link failure. It also provides an additional load balance mechanism by changing the topology of the spanning tree, which can not be implemented in the traditional MSTP-based architectures. The recovery and load balance mechanisms using the SLRM are detailed illustrated and evaluated using the sample networks. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the SLRM in achieving fast recovery and dynamic load balance.

  4. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better

  5. Limb Event Brightenings and Fast Ejection Using IRIS Mission Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.; Golub, L.

    2015-10-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the recently commissioned NASA small explorer mission provides significantly more complete and higher resolution spectral coverage of the dynamical conditions inside the chromosphere and transition region (TR) than has been available ever before. High temporal, spatial (0.3'') and spectral resolution observations from the ultraviolet IRIS spectra near the solar limb reveal high-energy limb event brightenings (LEBs) at low chromospheric heights at about 1 Mm above the limb. They can be characterized as explosive events producing jets. We selected two events showing spectra of a confined eruption just off or near the quiet-Sun limb, the jet part showing obvious moving material with short-duration large Doppler shifts in three directions that were identified as macrospicules on slit-jaw (SJ) images in Si iv and He ii 304 Å. The events were analyzed from a sequence of very close rasters taken near the central meridian and the South Pole limb. We analyzed the processed SJ images and the simultaneously observed fast spectral sequences, which have large Doppler shifts, with a pair of redshifted elements together with a faster blueshifted element from almost the same position. Shifts correspond to velocities of up to 100 km s^{-1} in projection on the plane of the sky. Erupting spicules and macrospicules from these regions are visible in images taken before and after the spectra. The cool low first ionization potential (FIP) element simultaneous line emissions of the Mg ii h and k resonance lines do not clearly show a similar signature because of optical thickness effects, but the Si iv broadband SJ images do. The bidirectional plasma jets ejected from a small reconnection site are interpreted to be the result of coronal loop-loop interactions that lead to reconnection in nearby sites.

  6. NOAA Observing System Integrated Analysis (NOSIA): development and support to the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reining, R. C.; Cantrell, L. E., Jr.; Helms, D.; LaJoie, M.; Pratt, A. S.; Ries, V.; Taylor, J.; Yuen-Murphy, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is a deep relationship between NOSIA-II and the Federal Earth Observation Assessment (EOA) efforts (EOA 2012 and 2016) chartered under the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability, co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NASA, NOAA, and USGS. NOSIA-1, which was conducted with a limited scope internal to NOAA in 2010, developed the methodology and toolset that was adopted for EOA 2012, and NOAA staffed the team that conducted the data collection, modeling, and analysis effort for EOA 2012. EOA 2012 was the first-ever integrated analysis of the relative impact of 379 observing systems and data sources contributing to the key objectives identified for 13 Societal Benefit Areas (SBA) including Weather, Climate, Disasters, Oceans and Coastal Resources, and Water Resources. This effort culminated in the first National Plan for Civil Earth Observations. NOAA conducted NOSIA-II starting in 2012 to extend the NOSIA methodology across all of NOAA's Mission Service Areas, covering a representative sample (over 1000) of NOAA's products and services. The detailed information from NOSIA-II is being integrated into EOA 2016 to underpin a broad array of Key Products, Services, and (science) Objectives (KPSO) identified by the inter-agency SBA teams. EOA 2016 is expected to provide substantially greater insight into the cross-agency impacts of observing systems contributing to a wide array of KPSOs, and by extension, to societal benefits flowing from these public-facing products. NOSIA-II is being adopted by NOAA as a corporate decision-analysis and support capability to inform leadership decisions on its integrated observing systems portfolio. Application examples include assessing the agency-wide impacts of planned decommissioning of ships and aircraft in NOAA's fleet, and the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative space-based architectures in the post-GOES-R and JPSS era

  7. Description and Simulation of a Fast Packet Switch Architecture for Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Jorge A.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been developing the architecture for a multichannel communications signal processing satellite (MCSPS) as part of a flexible, low-cost meshed-VSAT (very small aperture terminal) network. The MCSPS architecture is based on a multifrequency, time-division-multiple-access (MF-TDMA) uplink and a time-division multiplex (TDM) downlink. There are eight uplink MF-TDMA beams, and eight downlink TDM beams, with eight downlink dwells per beam. The information-switching processor, which decodes, stores, and transmits each packet of user data to the appropriate downlink dwell onboard the satellite, has been fully described by using VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated-Circuit) Hardware Description Language (VHDL). This VHDL code, which was developed in-house to simulate the information switching processor, showed that the architecture is both feasible and viable. This paper describes a shared-memory-per-beam architecture, its VHDL implementation, and the simulation efforts.

  8. Development of a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of school food-choice architecture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Orgul D; McInnes, Melayne M; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Jones, Sonya J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of the food-choice architecture that can be used to identify key points for behavioral economic intervention intended to improve the health quality of children's diets. We use an ethnographic approach with observations at twelve elementary schools to construct our survey instrument. Elements of the structured observational method include decision environment, salience, accessibility/convenience, defaults/verbal prompts, number of choices, serving ware/method/packaging, and social/physical eating environment. Our survey reveals important "nudgeable" components of the elementary school food-choice architecture, including precommitment and default options on the lunch line.

  9. State-based scheduling: An architecture for telescope observation scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Smith, Stephen F.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of constraint-based scheduling, a methodology previously developed and validated in the domain of factory scheduling, is extended to problem domains that require attendance to a wider range of state-dependent constraints. The problem of constructing and maintaining a short-term observation schedule for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which typifies this type of domain is the focus of interest. The nature of the constraints encountered in the HST domain is examined, system requirements are discussed with respect to utilization of a constraint-based scheduling methodology in such domains, and a general framework for state-based scheduling is presented.

  10. Resource efficient hardware architecture for fast computation of running max/min filters.

    PubMed

    Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Running max/min filters on rectangular kernels are widely used in many digital signal and image processing applications. Filtering with a k × k kernel requires of k(2) - 1 comparisons per sample for a direct implementation; thus, performance scales expensively with the kernel size k. Faster computations can be achieved by kernel decomposition and using constant time one-dimensional algorithms on custom hardware. This paper presents a hardware architecture for real-time computation of running max/min filters based on the van Herk/Gil-Werman (HGW) algorithm. The proposed architecture design uses less computation and memory resources than previously reported architectures when targeted to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Implementation results show that the architecture is able to compute max/min filters, on 1024 × 1024 images with up to 255 × 255 kernels, in around 8.4 milliseconds, 120 frames per second, at a clock frequency of 250 MHz. The implementation is highly scalable for the kernel size with good performance/area tradeoff suitable for embedded applications. The applicability of the architecture is shown for local adaptive image thresholding.

  11. Resource Efficient Hardware Architecture for Fast Computation of Running Max/Min Filters

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Running max/min filters on rectangular kernels are widely used in many digital signal and image processing applications. Filtering with a k × k kernel requires of k2 − 1 comparisons per sample for a direct implementation; thus, performance scales expensively with the kernel size k. Faster computations can be achieved by kernel decomposition and using constant time one-dimensional algorithms on custom hardware. This paper presents a hardware architecture for real-time computation of running max/min filters based on the van Herk/Gil-Werman (HGW) algorithm. The proposed architecture design uses less computation and memory resources than previously reported architectures when targeted to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. Implementation results show that the architecture is able to compute max/min filters, on 1024 × 1024 images with up to 255 × 255 kernels, in around 8.4 milliseconds, 120 frames per second, at a clock frequency of 250 MHz. The implementation is highly scalable for the kernel size with good performance/area tradeoff suitable for embedded applications. The applicability of the architecture is shown for local adaptive image thresholding. PMID:24288456

  12. Geochemistry at 4 Vesta: Observations Using Fast Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Dawn is currently in orbit around the asteroid 4 Vesta, and one of the major objectives of the mission is to probe the relationship of Vesta to the Howardite, Eucrite, and Diogenite (HED) meteorites. As Vesta is an example of a differentiated planetary embryo, Dawn will also provide fundamental information about planetary evolution in the early solar system [1]. To help accomplish this overall goal, the Dawn spacecraft carries the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND). GRaND uses planetary gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy to measure the surface elemental composition of Vesta and will provide information that is unique and complementary to that provided by the other Dawn instruments and investigations. Gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy is a standard technique for measuring planetary compositions [2], having successfully made measurements at near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, Mercury and now Vesta. GRaND has made the first measurements of the neutron spectrum from any asteroid (previous asteroid measurements were only made with gamma-rays). Dawn has been collecting data at Vesta since July 2011. The prime data collection period for GRaND is the Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO), which started on 12 December 2011 and will last through spring 2012. During LAMO, the Dawn spacecraft orbits at an average altitude of 210 km above the surface of Vesta, which allows good neutron and gamma-ray signals to be detected from Vesta. A description of the overall goals of GRaND and a summary of the initial findings are given elsewhere [3,4]. The subject of this study is to present the information that will be returned from GRaND using fast neutron measurements. Here, we discuss what fast neutrons can reveal about Vesta s surface composition, how such data can address Dawn science goals, and describe fast neutron measurements made in the early portion of the Vesta LAMO phase.

  13. Knowledge-intensive global optimization of Earth observing system architectures: a climate-centric case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, D.

    2014-10-01

    Requirements from the different disciplines of the Earth sciences on satellite missions have become considerably more stringent in the past decade, while budgets in space organizations have not increased to support the implementation of new systems meeting these requirements. At the same time, new technologies such as optical communications, electrical propulsion, nanosatellite technology, and new commercial agents and models such as hosted payloads are now available. The technical and programmatic environment is thus ideal to conduct architectural studies that look with renewed breadth and adequate depth to the myriad of new possible architectures for Earth Observing Systems. Such studies are challenging tasks, since they require formidable amounts of data and expert knowledge in order to be conducted. Indeed, trade-offs between hundreds or thousands of requirements from different disciplines need to be considered, and millions of combinations of instrument technologies and orbits are possible. This paper presents a framework and tool to support the exploration of such large architectural tradespaces. The framework can be seen as a model-based, executable science traceability matrix that can be used to compare the relative value of millions of different possible architectures. It is demonstrated with an operational climate-centric case study. Ultimately, this framework can be used to assess opportunities for international collaboration and look at architectures for a global Earth observing system, including space, air, and ground assets.

  14. Ultra-fast data-mining hardware architecture based on stochastic computing.

    PubMed

    Morro, Antoni; Canals, Vincent; Oliver, Antoni; Alomar, Miquel L; Rossello, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hardware implementations able to cope with the processing of large amounts of data in reasonable times are highly desired in our information-driven society. In this work we review the application of stochastic computing to probabilistic-based pattern-recognition analysis of huge database sets. The proposed technique consists in the hardware implementation of a parallel architecture implementing a similarity search of data with respect to different pre-stored categories. We design pulse-based stochastic-logic blocks to obtain an efficient pattern recognition system. The proposed architecture speeds up the screening process of huge databases by a factor of 7 when compared to a conventional digital implementation using the same hardware area.

  15. Intelligent Platform Management Controller Software Architecture in ATCA Modules for Fast Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. P.; Correia, M.; Batista, A.; Carvalho, P. F.; Santos, B.; Carvalho, B. B.; Sousa, J.; Gonçalves, B.; Correia, C. M. B.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2014-08-01

    The Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC) is one of the main elements for hardware management in an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) crate. Hardware failure detection, redundancy procedures, and hot insertion/removal of the boards are tasks that ensure high availability to a control and data acquisition system. Therefore, the Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear of the Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa (IPFN/IST) decided to develop software to an IPMC sodimm module from CoreIPM and integrate it in the ATCA boards that are being developed. The objective is to include those boards in the instrumentation catalogue of the tokamak International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the architecture and the main tasks performed by the IPMC software module.

  16. Ultra-Fast Data-Mining Hardware Architecture Based on Stochastic Computing

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Antoni; Alomar, Miquel L.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hardware implementations able to cope with the processing of large amounts of data in reasonable times are highly desired in our information-driven society. In this work we review the application of stochastic computing to probabilistic-based pattern-recognition analysis of huge database sets. The proposed technique consists in the hardware implementation of a parallel architecture implementing a similarity search of data with respect to different pre-stored categories. We design pulse-based stochastic-logic blocks to obtain an efficient pattern recognition system. The proposed architecture speeds up the screening process of huge databases by a factor of 7 when compared to a conventional digital implementation using the same hardware area. PMID:25955274

  17. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for the processing of spaceborne SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high-throughput SAR processors (HTSPs) for the spaceborne SARs being planned by NASA, ESA, DFVLR, NASDA, and the Canadian Radarsat Project is discussed. The basic parameters and data-processing requirements of the SARs are listed in tables, and the principal problems are identified as real-operations rates in excess of 2 x 10 to the 9th/sec, I/O rates in excess of 8 x 10 to the 6th samples/sec, and control computation loads (as for range cell migration correction) as high as 1.4 x 10 to the 6th instructions/sec. A number of possible HTSP architectures are reviewed; host/array-processor (H/AP) and distributed-control/data-path (DCDP) architectures are examined in detail and illustrated with block diagrams; and a cost/speed comparison of these two architectures is presented. The H/AP approach is found to be adequate and economical for speeds below 1/200 of real time, while DCDP is more cost-effective above 1/50 of real time.

  18. 4. "ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANELEVATIONSSECTIONS, OBSERVATION BUNKERS." Specifications No. ENG (NASA)04353631; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLAN-ELEVATIONS-SECTIONS, OBSERVATION BUNKERS." Specifications No. ENG (NASA)04-353-63-1; Drawing No. 60-09-34; sheet 325. Ref. No. A-13. D.O. SERIES 1597/87. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunker 1-D-3, Test Area 1-125, northwest end of Altair Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. A Lean, Fast Mars Round-trip Mission Architecture: Using Current Technologies for a Human Mission in the 2030s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Lora; Folta, David; Barbee, Brent W.; Vaughn, Frank; Kirchman, Frank; Englander, Jacob; Campbell, Bruce; Thronson, Harley; Lin, Tzu Yu

    2013-01-01

    We present a lean fast-transfer architecture concept for a first human mission to Mars that utilizes current technologies and two pivotal parameters: an end-to-end Mars mission duration of approximately one year, and a deep space habitat of approximately 50 metric tons. These parameters were formulated by a 2012 deep space habitat study conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that focused on a subset of recognized high- engineering-risk factors that may otherwise limit space travel to destinations such as Mars or near-Earth asteroid (NEA)s. With these constraints, we model and promote Mars mission opportunities in the 2030s enabled by a combination of on-orbit staging, mission element pre-positioning, and unique round-trip trajectories identified by state-of-the-art astrodynamics algorithms.

  20. Differences in capillary architecture, hemodynamics, and angiogenic factors in rat slow and fast plantarflexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Murakami, Shinichiro; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Takeda, Isao; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R

    2012-02-01

    The capillary architecture in skeletal muscles is unique in that it has anastomoses that interconnect individual capillaries. We used new techniques to measure velocity of red blood cells (V(RBC) ) in both capillaries and anastomoses in situ. The volume of capillaries/anastomoses was determined, and the levels of several angiogenic regulators were compared between the soleus and the superficial gastrocnemius (LG(sup) ). The V(RBC) in both capillaries and anastomoses was slower in soleus than in LG(sup) . The numbers of capillaries and anastomoses were higher, diameter of capillaries smaller, and tortuosity greater in soleus than in LG(sup) . Consequently, the capillary/anastomoses volume was larger in soleus than in LG(sup) . Furthermore, several angiogenic regulators (HIF-1α, VEGF, Flt-1, KDR, angiopoietin-1 and -2, and Tie-2) were higher in soleus than in LG(sup) . The differences in microvascular architecture, V(RBC) , and levels of angiogenic regulators between soleus and LG(sup) reflect the greater oxygen demands of the highly active soleus muscle. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Architecture of a flagellar apparatus in the fast-swimming magnetotactic bacterium MO-1.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Juanfang; Kato, Takayuki; Santini, Claire-Lise; Miyata, Tomoko; Kawamoto, Akihiro; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Bernadac, Alain; Wu, Long-Fei; Namba, Keiichi

    2012-12-11

    The bacterial flagellum is a motility organelle that consists of a rotary motor and a helical propeller. The flagella usually work individually or by forming a loose bundle to produce thrust. However, the flagellar apparatus of marine bacterium MO-1 is a tight bundle of seven flagellar filaments enveloped in a sheath, and it has been a mystery as to how the flagella rotate smoothly in coordination. Here we have used electron cryotomography to visualize the 3D architecture of the sheathed flagella. The seven filaments are enveloped with 24 fibrils in the sheath, and their basal bodies are arranged in an intertwined hexagonal array similar to the thick and thin filaments of vertebrate skeletal muscles. This complex and exquisite architecture strongly suggests that the fibrils counter-rotate between flagella in direct contact to minimize the friction of high-speed rotation of individual flagella in the tight bundle within the sheath to enable MO-1 cells to swim at about 300 µm/s.

  2. Attitude determination using vector observations: A fast optimal matrix algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1993-01-01

    The attitude matrix minimizing Wahba's loss function is computed directly by a method that is competitive with the fastest known algorithm for finding this optimal estimate. The method also provides an estimate of the attitude error covariance matrix. Analysis of the special case of two vector observations identifies those cases for which the TRIAD or algebraic method minimizes Wahba's loss function.

  3. Protein domain architectures provide a fast, efficient and scalable alternative to sequence-based methods for comparative functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Saccenti, Edoardo; Schaap, Peter J.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Suarez-Diez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    A functional comparative genome analysis is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying bacterial evolution and adaptation. Detection of functional orthologs using standard global sequence similarity methods faces several problems; the need for defining arbitrary acceptance thresholds for similarity and alignment length, lateral gene acquisition and the high computational cost for finding bi-directional best matches at a large scale. We investigated the use of protein domain architectures for large scale functional comparative analysis as an alternative method. The performance of both approaches was assessed through functional comparison of 446 bacterial genomes sampled at different taxonomic levels. We show that protein domain architectures provide a fast and efficient alternative to methods based on sequence similarity to identify groups of functionally equivalent proteins within and across taxonomic boundaries. As the computational cost scales linearly, and not quadratically with the number of genomes, it is suitable for large scale comparative analysis. Running both methods in parallel pinpoints potential functional adaptations that may add to bacterial fitness. PMID:27703668

  4. Optical observations of the fast nova V2491 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Mikolajewski, M.; Ragan, E.; Swierczynski, E.; Wychudzki, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report on optical spectral observations and UBVRI brightness estimations obtained with 60/90 cm Schmidt and 60 cm Cassegrain telescopes of the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland). The nova V2491 Cyg was discovered on Apr. 10.728 UT with about 7.7 mag on unfiltered CCD frames (IAUC#8934). Additionally, the X-ray emission was detected for the prenova several months ago (ATel#1473).

  5. Commissioning and first observations with Wide FastCam at the Telescopio Carlos Sánchez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Sergio; Etxegarai, Urtats; Oscoz, Alejandro; López, Roberto L.; Puga, Marta; Murga, Gaizka; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Pallé, Enric; Ricci, Davide; Ayuso, Ismael; Hernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Truant, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    The FastCam instrument platform, jointly developed by the IAC and the UPCT, allows, in real-time, acquisition, selection and storage of images with a resolution that reaches the diffraction limit of medium-sized telescopes. FastCam incorporates a specially designed software package to analyse series of tens of thousands of images in parallel with the data acquisition at the telescope. Wide FastCam is a new instrument that, using the same software for data acquisition, does not look for lucky imaging but fast observations in a much larger field of view. Here we describe the commissioning process and first observations with Wide FastCam at the Telescopio Carlos Sanchez (TCS) in the Observatorio del Teide.

  6. Optoelectronic analogs of self-programming neural nets - Architecture and methodologies for implementing fast stochastic learning by simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    1987-01-01

    Self-organization and learning is a distinctive feature of neural nets and processors that sets them apart from conventional approaches to signal processing. It leads to self-programmability which alleviates the problem of programming complexity in artificial neural nets. In this paper architectures for partitioning an optoelectronic analog of a neural net into distinct layers with prescribed interconnectivity pattern to enable stochastic learning by simulated annealing in the context of a Boltzmann machine are presented. Stochastic learning is of interest because of its relevance to the role of noise in biological neural nets. Practical considerations and methodologies for appreciably accelerating stochastic learning in such a multilayered net are described. These include the use of parallel optical computing of the global energy of the net, the use of fast nonvolatile programmable spatial light modulators to realize fast plasticity, optical generation of random number arrays, and an adaptive noisy thresholding scheme that also makes stochastic learning more biologically plausible. The findings reported predict optoelectronic chips that can be used in the realization of optical learning machines.

  7. Optoelectronic analogs of self-programming neural nets - Architecture and methodologies for implementing fast stochastic learning by simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    1987-01-01

    Self-organization and learning is a distinctive feature of neural nets and processors that sets them apart from conventional approaches to signal processing. It leads to self-programmability which alleviates the problem of programming complexity in artificial neural nets. In this paper architectures for partitioning an optoelectronic analog of a neural net into distinct layers with prescribed interconnectivity pattern to enable stochastic learning by simulated annealing in the context of a Boltzmann machine are presented. Stochastic learning is of interest because of its relevance to the role of noise in biological neural nets. Practical considerations and methodologies for appreciably accelerating stochastic learning in such a multilayered net are described. These include the use of parallel optical computing of the global energy of the net, the use of fast nonvolatile programmable spatial light modulators to realize fast plasticity, optical generation of random number arrays, and an adaptive noisy thresholding scheme that also makes stochastic learning more biologically plausible. The findings reported predict optoelectronic chips that can be used in the realization of optical learning machines.

  8. Optoelectronic analogs of self-programming neural nets: architecture and methodologies for implementing fast stochastic learning by simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N H

    1987-12-01

    Self-organization and learning is a distinctive feature of neural nets and processors that sets them apart from conventional approaches to signal processing. It leads to self-programmability which alleviates the problem of programming complexity in artificial neural nets. In this paper architectures for partitioning an optoelectronic analog of a neural net into distinct layers with prescribed interconnectivity pattern to enable stochastic learning by simulated annealing in the context of a Boltzmann machine are presented. Stochastic learning is of interest because of its relevance to the role of noise in biological neural nets. Practical considerations and methodologies for appreciably accelerating stochastic learning in such a multilayered net are described. These include the use of parallel optical computing of the global energy of the net, the use of fast nonvolatile programmable spatial light modulators to realize fast plasticity, optical generation of random number arrays, and an adaptive noisy thresholding scheme that also makes stochastic learning more biologically plausible. The findings reported predict optoelectronic chips that can be used in the realization of optical learning machines.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  10. Synoptic Observations for Physical Characterization of Fast Rotator NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2014-11-01

    NEOs can be studied not only dynamically, to learn about their impact hazard, but also physically, to establish various properties important both to better address their potential hazard and also to understand what they can tell us about the origin of the solar system and its ongoing processes.Taking advantage of the two-meter-class telescopes around Tucson, we plan to observe NEOs synoptically using telescopes at three different locations: VATT (Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope) at Mount Graham (longitude: -109.8719, latitude: 32.7016, elevation: 10469 feet), Bok 2.3 m at Kitt Peak (longitude: -111.6004, latitude: 31.9629, elevation: 6795 feet) and Kuiper 1.5-m at Mount Bigelow (longitude: -110.7345, latitude: 32.4165, elevation: 8235 feet). All three telescopes will aim simultaneously at the same object, each with a different instrument. The three telescopes will be part of the Arizona Robotic Telescope (ART) network, a University of Arizona initiative to provide near real-time observations of Target of Opportunity objects across the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The VATT-4K optical imager mounted on the VATT has already been used for photometry. In the future we plan to utilize the BCSpec (Boller & Chivens Spectrograph) for visible spectroscopy on Bok 2.3 meter and a near-infrared instrument on Kuiper 1.5 meter. We report here the preliminary results of several NEOs whose rotation rate and color have been estimated using photometry with images recorded with VATT-4K. 2009 SQ104 has a rotation rate of 6.85+/- 0.03 h, 2014 AY28 has a rotation rate of 0.91 +/- 0.02 h, 2014 EC of 0.54 +/-0.04 h, 2014 FA44 of 3.45 +/- 0.05 h, and 2014 KS40 of 1.11 +/- 0.06 h.

  11. Observations of the Performance of the U.S. Laboratory Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Rod

    2002-01-01

    The United States Laboratory Module "Destiny" was the product of many architectural, technology, manufacturing, schedule and cost constraints which spanned 15 years. Requirements for the Space Station pressurized elements were developed and baselined in the mid to late '80's. Although the station program went through several design changes the fundamental requirements that drove the architecture did not change. Manufacturing of the U.S. Laboratory began in the early 90's. Final assembly and checkout testing completed in December of 2000. Destiny was launched, mated to the International Space Station and successfully activated on the STS-98 mission in February of 2001. The purpose of this paper is to identify key requirements, which directly or indirectly established the architecture of the U.S. Laboratory. Provide an overview of how that architecture affected the manufacture, assembly, test, and activation of the module on-orbit. And finally, through observations made during the last year of operation, provide considerations in the development of future requirements and mission integration controls for space habitats.

  12. Observation and modelling of fast ion loss in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinches, S. D.; Kiptily, V. G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; García-Muñoz, M.; Reich, M.; Strumberger, E.; Werner, A.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2006-10-01

    The confinement of fast particles is of crucial importance for the success of future burning plasma experiments. On JET, the confinement of ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) accelerated fast hydrogen ions with energies exceeding 5 MeV has been measured using the characteristic γ-rays emitted through their inelastic scattering with carbon impurities, 12C(p,p'γ)12C. Recent experiments have shown a significant decrease in this γ-ray emission (by a factor of 2) during so-called tornado mode activity (core-localized toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) within the q = 1 surface) in sawtoothing plasmas. This is indicative of a significant loss or extensive re-distribution of these (>5 MeV) particles from the plasma core. In this paper, mechanisms responsible for the radial transport and loss of these fast ions are investigated and identified using the HAGIS code, which describes the interaction of the fast ions and the TAE observed. The calculations show that the overlap of wave-particle resonances in phase-space leads to an enhanced radial transport and loss. On both JET and ASDEX Upgrade, new fast ion loss detectors have been installed to further investigate the loss of such particles. On JET, fast ion loss detectors based around an array of Faraday cups and a scintillator probe have been installed as part of a suite of diagnostic enhancements. On ASDEX Upgrade, a new fast ion loss detector has been mounted on the mid-plane manipulator allowing high resolution measurements in pitch angle, energy and time. This has enabled the direct observation of fast ion losses during various magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena to be studied in detail. Edge localised mode (ELM) induced fast ion losses have been directly observed along with the enhancement of fast ion losses from specific areas of phase-space in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and TAEs.

  13. A fast and scalable content transfer protocol (FSCTP) for VANET based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, A. F.; Scala, F.; Sottile, C.; Tropea, M.; Raimondo, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the modern Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks (VANET) based systems even more applications require lot of data to be exchanged among vehicles and infrastructure entities. Due to mobility issues and unplanned events that may occurs it is important that contents should be transferred as fast as possible by taking into account consistence of the exchanged data and reliability of the connections. In order to face with these issues, in this work we propose a new transfer data protocol called Fast and Scalable Content Transfer Protocol (FSCTP). This protocol allows a data transfer by using a bidirectional channel among content suppliers and receivers exploiting several cooperative sessions. Each session will be based on User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to start and manage data transfer. Often in urban area the VANET scenario is composed of several vehicle and infrastructures points. The main idea is to exploit ad-hoc connections between vehicles to reach content suppliers. Moreover, in order to obtain a faster data transfer, more than one session is exploited to achieve a higher transfer rate. Of course it is important to manage data transfer between suppliers to avoid redundancy and resource wastages. The main goal is to instantiate a cooperative multi-session layer efficiently managed in a VANET environment exploiting the wide coverage area and avoiding common issues known in this kind of scenario. High mobility and unstable connections between nodes are some of the most common issues to address, thus a cooperative work between network, transport and application layers needs to be designed.

  14. Fast AdaBoost-Based Face Detection System on a Dynamically Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jian; Zhang, Jinguo; Zhu, Min; Yang, Jun; Shi, Longxing

    An AdaBoost-based face detection system is proposed, on a Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture (CGRA) named “REMUS-II”. Our work is quite distinguished from previous ones in three aspects. First, a new hardware-software partition method is proposed and the whole face detection system is divided into several parallel tasks implemented on two Reconfigurable Processing Units (RPU) and one micro Processors Unit (µPU) according to their relationships. These tasks communicate with each other by a mailbox mechanism. Second, a strong classifier is treated as a smallest phase of the detection system, and every phase needs to be executed by these tasks in order. A phase of Haar classifier is dynamically mapped onto a Reconfigurable Cell Array (RCA) only when needed, and it's quite different from traditional Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) methods in which all the classifiers are fabricated statically. Third, optimized data and configuration word pre-fetch mechanisms are employed to improve the whole system performance. Implementation results show that our approach under 200MHz clock rate can process up-to 17 frames per second on VGA size images, and the detection rate is over 95%. Our system consumes 194mW, and the die size of fabricated chip is 23mm2 using TSMC 65nm standard cell based technology. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first implementation of the cascade Haar classifier algorithm on a dynamically CGRA platform presented in the literature.

  15. A Distributed, Cross-Agency Software Architecture for Sharing Climate Models and Observational Data Sets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Mattmann, C. A.; Braverman, A. J.; Cinquini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing a distributed infrastructure to supporting access and sharing of Earth Science observational data sets with climate models to support model-to-data intercomparison for climate research. The Climate Data Exchange (CDX), a framework for linking distributed repositories coupled with tailored distributed services to support the intercomparison, provides mechanisms to discover, access, transform and share observational and model output data [2]. These services are critical to allowing data to remain distributed, but be pulled together to support analysis. The architecture itself provides a services-based approach allowing for integrating and working with other computing infrastructures through well-defined software interfaces. Specifically, JPL has worked very closely with the Earth System Grid (ESG) and the Program for Climate Model Diagnostics and Intercomparisons (PCMDI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to integrate NASA science data systems with the Earth System Grid to support federation across organizational and agency boundaries [1]. Of particular interest near-term is enabling access to NASA observational data along-side climate models for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project known as CMIP5. CMIP5 is the protocol that will be used for the next International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR5) on climate change. JPL and NASA are currently engaged in a project to ensure that observational data are available to the climate research community through the Earth System Grid. By both developing a software architecture and working with the key architects for the ESG, JPL has been successful at building a prototype for AR5. This presentation will review the software architecture including core principles, models and interfaces, the Climate Data Exchange project and specific goals to support access to both observational data and models for AR5. It will highlight the progress

  16. IMAGE Observations of Sounder Stimulated and Naturally Occurring Fast Z mode Cavity Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Taylor, C.; Reddy, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report first observations of sounder stimulated and naturally occurring fast Z mode (ZM) cavity noise detected by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite. The fast Z mode cavity noise is a banded, structure-less radio emission trapped inside fast Z mode cavities, which are characterized by a minimum (fz,min) in fast Z mode cut-off frequency (fz) along a geomagnetic field line [Gurnett et al., JGR, 1983]. Fast Z mode waves reflect at fz ~ f, where f is the wave frequency. Waves in the frequency range fz,min < f < fz,max, where fz,max is the maximum fz above fz,min altitude, are trapped within the cavity as they bounce back and forth between reflection altitudes (fz ~ f) above and below the fz,min altitude. These trapped waves will be observed by a satellite passing through the cavity. The observed cavity noise lower cutoff is at the local Z mode cut-off frequency (fz,Sat) and the upper cut-off is presumably close to fz,max. The cavity noise is observed typically inside the plasmasphere. Comparison of cavity noise as observed on the plasmagram obtained during active sounding with that observed on the dynamic spectra obtained from the interspersed passive wave measurements indicate that the cavity noise is either stimulated by transmissions from the sounder (RPI) or is of natural origin. The sounder stimulated noise is often accompanied by fast Z mode echoes. The naturally occurring cavity noise is observed on both the plasmagram and the dynamic spectra. We believe the stimulated cavity noise is generated due to scattering from small-scale irregularities of waves transmitted by RPI. One potential candidate for the source of naturally occurring Z mode cavity noise is the ring current electrons that can generate fast ZM waves via higher order cyclotron resonance [Nishimura et al., Earth Planets Space, 2007].

  17. Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis and Functional Annotation Illuminates the Genetic Architecture of Fasting Glucose and Insulin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Raghavan, Sridharan; Maruthur, Nisa; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Hong, Jaeyoung; Ng, Maggie C Y; Hivert, Marie-France; Lu, Yingchang; An, Ping; Bentley, Amy R; Drolet, Anne M; Gaulton, Kyle J; Guo, Xiuqing; Armstrong, Loren L; Irvin, Marguerite R; Li, Man; Lipovich, Leonard; Rybin, Denis V; Taylor, Kent D; Agyemang, Charles; Palmer, Nicholette D; Cade, Brian E; Chen, Wei-Min; Dauriz, Marco; Delaney, Joseph A C; Edwards, Todd L; Evans, Daniel S; Evans, Michele K; Lange, Leslie A; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Yongmei; Nayak, Uma; Patel, Sanjay R; Porneala, Bianca C; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Snijder, Marieke B; Stallings, Sarah C; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhao, Wei; Becker, Diane M; Bielak, Lawrence F; Biggs, Mary L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Chen, Guanjie; Correa, Adolfo; Couper, David J; Crawford, Dana C; Cushman, Mary; Eicher, John D; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Fu, Yi-Ping; Goodarzi, Mark O; Gottesman, Omri; Hara, Kazuo; Harris, Tamara B; Jensen, Richard A; Johnson, Andrew D; Jhun, Min A; Karter, Andrew J; Keller, Margaux F; Kho, Abel N; Kizer, Jorge R; Krauss, Ronald M; Langefeld, Carl D; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jingling; Liu, Simin; Lowe, William L; Mosley, Thomas H; North, Kari E; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Peyser, Patricia A; Patrick, Alan L; Rice, Kenneth M; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sims, Mario; Smith, Jennifer A; Tajuddin, Salman M; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Wren, Mary P; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Julie T; Zmuda, Joseph M; Zonderman, Alan B; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kardia, Sharon L R; Miljkovic, Iva; Pankow, James S; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Arnett, Donna K; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Nalls, Michael A; Province, Michael A; Kao, W H Linda; Siscovick, David S; Psaty, Bruce M; Wilson, James G; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Rich, Stephen S; Florez, Jose C; Rotter, Jerome I; Morris, Andrew P; Meigs, James B

    2016-07-07

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of the type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related quantitative traits fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) in African ancestry (AA) individuals has been limited. In non-diabetic subjects of AA (n = 20,209) and European ancestry (EA; n = 57,292), we performed trans-ethnic (AA+EA) fine-mapping of 54 established EA FG or FI loci with detailed functional annotation, assessed their relevance in AA individuals, and sought previously undescribed loci through trans-ethnic (AA+EA) meta-analysis. We narrowed credible sets of variants driving association signals for 22/54 EA-associated loci; 18/22 credible sets overlapped with active islet-specific enhancers or transcription factor (TF) binding sites, and 21/22 contained at least one TF motif. Of the 54 EA-associated loci, 23 were shared between EA and AA. Replication with an additional 10,096 AA individuals identified two previously undescribed FI loci, chrX FAM133A (rs213676) and chr5 PELO (rs6450057). Trans-ethnic analyses with regulatory annotation illuminate the genetic architecture of glycemic traits and suggest gene regulation as a target to advance precision medicine for T2D. Our approach to utilize state-of-the-art functional annotation and implement trans-ethnic association analysis for discovery and fine-mapping offers a framework for further follow-up and characterization of GWAS signals of complex trait loci.

  18. A parallel-pipeline architecture of the fast polynomial transform for computing a two-dimensional cyclic convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Liu, K. Y.; Reed, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the two-dimensional cyclic convolution is a useful tool for many two-dimensional digital signal processing applications. Two important applications are related to spaceborne high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing and image processing. Nussbaumer and Quandalle (1978) showed that a radix-2 polynomial transform analogous to the conventional radix-2 FFT algorithm can be used to compute a two-dimensional cyclic convolution. On the basis of results reported by Arambepola and Rayner (1979), a radix-2 polynomial transform can be defined to compute a multidimensional cyclic convolution. Truong et al. (1981) used the considered ideas together with the Chinese Theorem to further reduce the complexity of the radix-2 fast polynomial transform (FPT). Reed et al. (1981) demonstrated that such a new FPT algorithm is significantly faster than the FFT algorithm for computing a two-dimensional convolution. In the present investigation, a parallel-pipeline architecture is considered for implementing the FPT developed by Truong et al.

  19. The functional architecture of S1 during touch observation described with 7 T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Esther; Mueller, Karsten; Turner, Robert; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is active not only when touch is physically perceived but also when it is merely observed to be experienced by another person. This social responsivity of S1 has important implications for our understanding of S1 functioning. However, S1 activity during touch observation has not been characterized in great detail to date. We focused on two features of the S1 functional architecture during touch observation, namely the topographical arrangement of index and middle finger receptive fields (RFs), and their dynamic shrinkage during concurrent activation. Both features have important implications for human behavior. We conducted two fMRI studies at 7 T, one where touch was physically perceived, and one where touch was observed. In the two experiments, participants either had their index finger and/or middle finger stimulated using paintbrushes, or just observed similar touch events on video. Our data show that observing and physically experiencing touch elicits overlapping activity changes in S1. In addition, observing touch to the index finger or the middle finger alone evoked topographically arranged activation foci in S1. Importantly, when co-activated, the index and middle finger RFs not only shrank during physical touch perception, but also during touch observation. Our data, therefore, indicate a similarity between the functional architecture of S1 during touch observation and physical touch perception with respect to single-digit topography and RF shrinkage. These results may allow the tentative conclusion that even primary somatosensory experiences, such as physical touch perception, can be shared amongst individuals.

  20. Towards an open geospatial service architecture supporting heterogeneous Earth observation missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usländer, Thomas; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Coene, Yves

    2011-11-01

    Heterogeneous Earth Observation missions pose the problem that each of them offers its own way and technology of how to search for and access to mission results such as Earth observation datasets. Typically, these tasks are provided by ground segment software services which may be called through corresponding interfaces by client geospatial software applications. This paper presents the design and the architecture of the Heterogeneous Mission Accessibility (HMA) which is an interoperability initiative of the European/Canadian Ground Segment Coordination Body. The final objective of HMA is to leverage the idea of a service-oriented architectural style. This means, that the individual ground segment systems shall be loosely-coupled by means of an HMA Service Network. The paper is an excerpt of the comprehensive "HMA cookbook" to be published soon by the European Space Agency (ESA). It describes the HMA approach for user authentication and authorization based upon standard Web services and the discovery of, the access to and the presentation of datasets by means of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. It is outlined how the feasibility analysis of sensor observation tasks and the ordering of products may be expressed by the service and information models of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement initiative. The paper concludes with a discussion about the follow-on research topic of service-oriented design of Earth observation applications.

  1. Architectures of astronomical observation: From Sternwarte Kassel (circa 1560) to the Radcliffe Observatory (1772)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair Marcus

    Historical observatories did not merely shelter astronomers and their instruments, but interacted with them to shape the range and outcome of astronomical observations. This claim is demonstrated through both improvised and purpose-built observatories from the late sixteenth century to the late eighteenth. The improvised observatories involve various grades of architectural intervention from simple re-purposing of a generic space through to radical renovation and customisation. Some of the observatories examined were never built, and some survive only in textual and visual representations, but all nonetheless reflect astronomers' thinking about what observatories needed to provide, and allow us to reconstruct aspects of what it was like to work in them. Historical observatories hence offer a physical record of observational practices. Reconstructing lost practices and the tacit knowledge involved shows how observatories actively contributed to observations by accommodating, supporting and sheltering observers and instruments. We also see how observatories compromised observations by constraining views and free movement, by failing to provide sufficient support, by being expensive or otherwise difficult to obtain, modify or replace. Some observatories were modified many times, accumulating layers of renovation and addition that reflect both advancement and succession of multiple research programs. Such observatories materially and spatially manifest how observational astronomy developed and also also how observatories, like other buildings, respond to changing needs. Examining observatories for their architectural functions and functional shortcomings connects observational practices, spatial configurations and astronomical instrumentation. Such examination shows that spatial contexts, and hence the buildings that define them, are not passive: to the contrary, observatories are active protagonists in the development and practise of observational astronomy.

  2. Orion Flight Test 1 Architecture: Observed Benefits of a Model Based Engineering Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Kimberly A.; Sindiy, Oleg V.; McVittie, Thomas I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper details how a NASA-led team is using a model-based systems engineering approach to capture, analyze and communicate the end-to-end information system architecture supporting the first unmanned orbital flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Exploration Vehicle. Along with a brief overview of the approach and its products, the paper focuses on the observed program-level benefits, challenges, and lessons learned; all of which may be applied to improve system engineering tasks for characteristically similarly challenges

  3. Orion Flight Test 1 Architecture: Observed Benefits of a Model Based Engineering Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Kimberly A.; Sindiy, Oleg V.; McVittie, Thomas I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper details how a NASA-led team is using a model-based systems engineering approach to capture, analyze and communicate the end-to-end information system architecture supporting the first unmanned orbital flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Exploration Vehicle. Along with a brief overview of the approach and its products, the paper focuses on the observed program-level benefits, challenges, and lessons learned; all of which may be applied to improve system engineering tasks for characteristically similarly challenges

  4. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Vincena, S.; Carter, T. A.; Gekelman, W.; Leneman, D.; Pribyl, P.

    2008-10-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance ({omega}-k{sub z}v{sub z}={omega}{sub f}) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated ({omega}, wave frequency; k{sub z}, axial wavenumber; v{sub z}, fast-ion axial speed; {omega}{sub f}, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li{sup +} source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude {delta} B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8{omega}{sub ci}. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  5. Flows along arch filaments observed in the GRIS `very fast spectroscopic mode'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Manrique, S. J.; Denker, C.; Kuckein, C.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Collados, M.; Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Diercke, A.; Fischer, C. E.; Gömöry, P.; Bello González, N.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Cubas Armas, M.; Berkefeld, T.; Feller, A.; Hoch, S.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the `very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the `very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.

  6. Observation of mode conversion of m = minus 1 fast waves on the Alfven resonance layer

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y. )

    1990-03-12

    Fast waves or MHD surface waves of {ital m}={minus}1 (poloidal mode number of left-hand rotation) have been observed to be mode converted on the Alfven resonance layer. The converted waves are a quasielectrostatic form of the shear Alfven waves, i.e., kinetic Alfven wave and/or the resistive mode.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the microvascular architecture observed on magnification endoscopy in cancerous and benign gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, A; Niwa, Y; Ohmiya, N; Miyahara, R; Itoh, A; Hirooka, Y; Goto, H

    2005-12-01

    Gastric cancer remains a common malignant tumor in Japan. The aim of this study was to attempt a quantitative evaluation of the microvascular architecture observed by magnification endoscopy using image analysis, and to investigate whether this method is able to distinguish between gastric cancers and benign lesions. A total of 132 patients were studied using magnification endoscopy, and image analysis was performed in 71 patients (32 patients with early gastric cancer, 39 patients with benign lesions). Analysis was not possible in the other 61 patients because the quality of the image was not good enough. A square region of interest was selected from the magnified images of the gastric mucosa. From this we extracted the vascular images corresponding to microvessels and calculated the mean caliber of vessels in the region of interest. Image analysis provided good-quality images of microvessels and enabled evaluation of the microvascular architecture. The mean caliber of vessels was 4.454 pixels in 17 differentiated adenocarcinomas, 4.319 pixels in 15 undifferentiated adenocarcinomas, and 4.034 pixels in the 39 benign lesions. This represented a significant difference between gastric cancers and benign lesions (P<0.0001). Histopathological investigation of surgically resected tumors demonstrated the mean caliber of microvessels in cancerous lesions to be greater than that of microvessels in the surrounding mucosa. Image analysis was useful for evaluating the microvascular architecture of the gastric mucosa, and calculation of the mean caliber of the vessels may prove helpful in the differential diagnosis of gastric cancers. However, analysis was not possible in 61 of the 132 patients studied because of inadequate image quality, and this represents a significant limitation of this diagnostic method.

  8. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  9. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  10. Development and Reliability Testing of a Fast-Food Restaurant Observation Form.

    PubMed

    Rimkus, Leah; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Powell, Lisa M; Zenk, Shannon N; Quinn, Christopher M; Barker, Dianne C; Pugach, Oksana; Resnick, Elissa A; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    To develop a reliable observational data collection instrument to measure characteristics of the fast-food restaurant environment likely to influence consumer behaviors, including product availability, pricing, and promotion. The study used observational data collection. Restaurants were in the Chicago Metropolitan Statistical Area. A total of 131 chain fast-food restaurant outlets were included. Interrater reliability was measured for product availability, pricing, and promotion measures on a fast-food restaurant observational data collection instrument. Analysis was done with Cohen's κ coefficient and proportion of overall agreement for categorical variables and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables. Interrater reliability, as measured by average κ coefficient, was .79 for menu characteristics, .84 for kids' menu characteristics, .92 for food availability and sizes, .85 for beverage availability and sizes, .78 for measures on the availability of nutrition information,.75 for characteristics of exterior advertisements, and .62 and .90 for exterior and interior characteristics measures, respectively. For continuous measures, average ICC was .88 for food pricing measures, .83 for beverage prices, and .65 for counts of exterior advertisements. Over 85% of measures demonstrated substantial or almost perfect agreement. Although some measures required revision or protocol clarification, results from this study suggest that the instrument may be used to reliably measure the fast-food restaurant environment.

  11. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Blasi, M. G.; Venafra, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007.

  12. Evidence for fast, low-level motor resonance to action observation: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Hein T; Koelewijn, Thomas; Jensen, Ole; Oostenveld, Robert; Maris, Eric; Bekkering, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Lateralized magnetic fields were recorded from 12 subjects using a 151 channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system to investigate temporal and functional properties of motor activation to the observation of goal-directed hand movements by a virtual actor. Observation of left and right hand movements generated a neuromagnetic lateralized readiness field (LRF) over contralateral motor cortex. The early onset of the LRF and the fact that the evoked component was insensitive to the correctness of the observed action suggest the operation of a fast and automatic form of motor resonance that may precede higher levels of action understanding.

  13. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  14. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  15. Observational constraints on dark energy with a fast varying equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Nesseris, Savvas; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2012-05-01

    We place observational constraints on models with the late-time cosmic acceleration based on a number of parametrizations allowing fast transitions for the equation of state of dark energy. In addition to the model of Linder and Huterer where the dark energy equation of state w monotonically grows or decreases in time, we propose two new parametrizations in which w has an extremum. We carry out the likelihood analysis with the three parametrizations by using the observational data of supernovae type Ia, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Although the transient cosmic acceleration models with fast transitions can give rise to the total chi square smaller than that in the Λ-Cold-Dark-Matter (ΛCDM) model, these models are not favored over ΛCDM when one uses the Akaike information criterion which penalizes the extra degrees of freedom present in the parametrizations.

  16. Coastal Ocean Observing Network - Open Source Architecture for Data Management and Web-Based Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabhi Rama Rao, E.; Venkat Shesu, R.; Udaya Bhaskar, T. V. S.

    2012-07-01

    The observations from the oceans are the backbone for any kind of operational services, viz. potential fishing zone advisory services, ocean state forecast, storm surges, cyclones, monsoon variability, tsunami, etc. Though it is important to monitor open Ocean, it is equally important to acquire sufficient data in the coastal ocean through coastal ocean observing systems for re-analysis, analysis and forecast of coastal ocean by assimilating different ocean variables, especially sub-surface information; validation of remote sensing data, ocean and atmosphere model/analysis and to understand the processes related to air-sea interaction and ocean physics. Accurate information and forecast of the state of the coastal ocean at different time scales is vital for the wellbeing of the coastal population as well as for the socio-economic development of the country through shipping, offshore oil and energy etc. Considering the importance of ocean observations in terms of understanding our ocean environment and utilize them for operational oceanography, a large number of platforms were deployed in the Indian Ocean including coastal observatories, to acquire data on ocean variables in and around Indian Seas. The coastal observation network includes HF Radars, wave rider buoys, sea level gauges, etc. The surface meteorological and oceanographic data generated by these observing networks are being translated into ocean information services through analysis and modelling. Centralized data management system is a critical component in providing timely delivery of Ocean information and advisory services. In this paper, we describe about the development of open-source architecture for real-time data reception from the coastal observation network, processing, quality control, database generation and web-based data services that includes on-line data visualization and data downloads by various means.

  17. Observations of fast magnetosonic shocks from the solar wind to the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    This talk will review some current and planned observations of fast magnetosonic shocks from the corona, through the inner heliosphere, and into interplanetary space in the solar wind, and the application of these observations to the understanding of shock formation, particle acceleration, and space weather. The first half of the talk will focus on an online database of interplanetary shocks observed by spacecraft including Wind, ACE, and DSCOVR from the first Lagrange point near Earth and the value of statistical studies of shocks. Examples will be provided on the use of these observations to understand dissipation, particle acceleration, and the generation of intense radio emission by shocks. The second half will cover three examples of future observations of shocks closer to the Sun which will provide essential new knowledge of the shocks in the inner heliosphere. Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter, which are just two years from launch, will be discussed in the context of shock observations. The proposed Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE), a low frequency imaging radio array in space that would provide the first images of radio emission and acceleration by fast shocks in the outer corona will also be presented.

  18. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Drifting Quasi-Periodic Modulation of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode: Van Allen Probe Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Kurth, W. S.; Wygant, J. R.; MacDonald, E.

    2014-12-01

    The fast magnetosonic mode is one of the dominant wave modes in the Earth's radiation belts. These waves influence the ring current by scattering ions in energy in the 10's of keV range, and are believed to be a heat source for radiation belt electrons. The fast magnetosonic mode observed around the Earth's inner equatorial magnetosphere sometimes exhibits quasi-periodic modulation as detected by the Van Allen probes. During each modulation the wave frequency exhibits a strong drifting (dispersive) signature characterized by a rising tone. Each tone is composed of harmonics with spacing close to the proton cyclotron frequency. The tones are band limited in frequency and mainly observed above the 20th harmonic of the local proton cyclotron frequency. We observe this modulation mainly outside the plasmapause, but it has also been observed to penetrate down to 1.5 RE. The modulation is observed up to magnetic latitudes of ±17º, at all magnetic local times, but its signatures are more pronounced on the dayside. For events where lower frequency ULF waves are detected, the period of the ULF wave is about twice the modulation period of the fast magnetosonic mode, suggesting strong wave-wave interactions. The modulation period varies from 50 to 200 s and its duration ranges from 0.2 to 3 h, with the maximum duration limited by the spacecraft orbit. We hypothesize that the rising tone is produced by changing Alfven velocities created by steepened density fluctuations due to plasma modification by an underlying ULF wave.

  20. Properties of Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients as Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Krimm, H. A.; Esposito, P.; Cusumano, C.; LaParola, V.; Mangano, V.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Pagani, C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present the most recent results from our investigation on Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients, a class of High-Mass X-ray Binaries, with a possible counterpart in the gamma-ray energy band. Since 2007 Swift has contributed to this new field by detecting outbursts from these fast transients with the BAT and by following them for days with the XRT. Thus, we demonstrated that while the brightest phase of the outburst only lasts a few hours, further activity is observed at lower fluxes for a remarkably longer time, up to weeks. Furthermore, we have performed several campaigns of intense monitoring with the XRT, assessing the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity.

  1. Fast Variability in Selected Chromospherically Active Dwarf Stars and Observational Equipment for Their Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovski, Rumen G.

    2015-06-01

    The observations of variable stars, especially those which show fast changes in their brightness, require high speed and high precision photometry. In order to study events like low amplitude optical oscillations and small scale fluctuations in the light curves, synchronous observations are required. These observations have to be carried out simultaneously at two or more, preferably distant, sites (Romanyuk et al., 2001), which allows the identification and elimination of artifacts produced by the equipment and the atmospheric interferences. In this way the fine structure of the light curve is revealed with a significant certainty. In order to study these events a new high speed time synchronized photometric system had to be designed, which addresses the requirements of the observations of high frequency subtle phenomena during stellar flares. It provides remote automatedand centralized control of the photometric equipment over a computer network,as well as remotemonitoring. Furthermore, some preliminary data processing can be performed at the time the data is obtained.

  2. Effects of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown that Ramadan fasting has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors, however there are controversies. In the present study, the effect of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors has been investigated. Method This is a prospective observational study that was carried out in a group of patients with at least one cardiovascular risk factor (including history of documented previous history of either coronary artery disease (CAD), metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease in past 10 y). Eighty two volunteers including 38 male and 44 female, aged 29–70 y, mean 54.0 ± 10 y, with a previous history of either coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease were recruited. Subjects attended the metabolic unit after at least 10 h fasting, before and after Ramadan who were been fasting for at least 10 days. A fasting blood sample was obtained, blood pressure was measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Lipids profile, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and insulin, homocysteine (hcy), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and complete blood count (CBC) were analyzed on all blood samples. Results A significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk (based on Framingham risk score) was found (13.0 ± 8 before Ramadan and 10.8 ±7 after Ramadan, P <0.001, t test).There was a significant higher HDL-c, WBC, RBC and platelet count (PLT), and lower plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-c, VLDL-c, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and waist circumference after Ramadan (P <0.05, t test). The changes in FBS, insulin,Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), hcy, hs-CRP and diastolic blood pressure before and after Ramadan were not significant (P >0.05, t test). Conclusions This study shows a significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk score and other cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids profile, systolic blood

  3. Architectural design and physical activity: an observational study of staircase and elevator use in different buildings.

    PubMed

    Bassett, David R; Browning, Ray; Conger, Scott A; Wolff, Dana L; Flynn, Jennifer I

    2013-05-01

    The indoor built environment has the potential to influence levels of physical activity. However, the extent to which architectural design in commercial buildings can influence the percentage of people choosing to use the stairs versus elevators is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if buildings with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases result in a greater percentage of people taking the stairs. Direct observations of stair and elevator use were conducted in 3 buildings on a university campus. One of the buildings had a bank of 4 centrally located elevators and a fire escape stairwell behind a steel door. The other 2 buildings had centrally located staircases and out-of-the-way elevators. The percentage of people who ascended the stairs was 8.1% in the elevator-centric building, compared with 72.8% and 81.1% in the 2 stair-centric buildings (P < .001). In addition, the percentage of people who descended the stairs was 10.8% in the first building, compared with 89.5% and 93.7% in the stair-centric buildings (P < .001). The results of the current study suggest that if buildings are constructed with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases, a greater percentage of people will choose to take the stairs.

  4. Fasting, Diabetes, and Optimizing Health Outcomes for Ramadan Observers: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Hadi A; Chaar, Betty; Saini, Bandana

    2017-04-01

    Globally, and in Australia, diabetes has become a common chronic health condition. Diabetes is also quite prevalent in culturally and linguistically diverse pockets of the Australian population, including Muslims. There are over 90 million Muslims with diabetes worldwide. Diabetes management and medication use can be affected by religious practices such as fasting during Ramadan. During Ramadan, Muslims refrain from oral or intravenous substances from sunrise to sunset. This may lead to many potential health or medication-related risks for patients with diabetes who observe this religious practice. This literature review aimed to explore (1) health care-related interventions and (2) intentions, perspectives, or needs of health care professionals (HCPs) to provide clinical services to patients with diabetes while fasting during Ramadan with a view to improve health outcomes for those patients. Using a scoping review approach, a comprehensive search was conducted. Databases searched systematically included PubMed, Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Studies published in English that described interventions or intentions to provide interventions regarding diabetes and Ramadan fasting were included. Fourteen published articles that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved and content analyzed. Of those, nine intervention studies regarded diabetes management education. Five studies described professional service intention, four of which were related to the role of pharmacists in diabetes management in Qatar, Australia, and Egypt, and one French study examined the general practitioners' (GPs) experiences in diabetes management for Ramadan observers. The intervention studies had promising outcomes for diabetes management during Ramadan. Effect sizes for improvement in HbA1c post intervention ranged widely from -1.14 to 1.7. Pharmacists appeared to be willing to participate in programs to help fasting patients with diabetes achieve a safe

  5. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  6. Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Detected by SDO/AIA: Recent Observational Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Downs, Cooper; Ofman, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered by SDO/AIA in extreme ultraviolet (EUV). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing QFPs. In particular, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. We also found that different local magnetic and plasma environments can lead to two distinct types of QFPs located in different spatial domains with respect to their accompanying coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a statistical survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  7. Transient Reconnection as Observed in the Cusp by Cluster and FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Dunlop, M. W.; Balogh, A.; Cargill, P.; Glassmeier, K.; Mussmann, G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Cattell, C. A.; Fazakerly, A.; Reme, H.

    2001-12-01

    In the interval from 23:10 UT on 20 February through at least 00:30 on 21 February, 2001, Cluster was inbound crossing the southern cusp. The four spacecraft were first in a northward magnetosheath field with |B| ~ 35 - 40 nT, BZ > 0, and BY < 0. However, lagged solar wind observations from ACE reveal that the magnetosheath field turned southward just before Cluster entered the cusp, identified as a region of lower average field strength (10 - 20 nT). Then the spacecraft entered the tail lobe, with southwardly-oriented field and velocity dispersed ions traveling tailward. The cusp traversal lasted roughly 15 minutes, during which large field excursions and significant ion flow changes occurred. Three distinct southward ion flow bursts (Δ VZ ~ 130 km/s) were observed, each lasting 2 - 3 minutes, each associated with northward field excursions (Δ BZ ~ 40 nT). In the first two bursts there are also large BY variations as well. The distinctive magnetic field and ion plasma flow changes suggest that these events may be related to transient reconnection due to the new southward orientation of the IMF. Between 2310 and 2350 UT, FAST crossed from the dayside plasma sheet through boundary layer/polar cap in the early afternoon sector at altitudes between 3000 and 4000 km. Though not at the cusp, the FAST magnetic stress/ionospheric convection observations qualitatively agree with the Weimer convection model for the southward IMF conditions at this time.

  8. Fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected electrons observed above a bright auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.

    1983-01-01

    Rocket-borne electron beam experiments confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes were observed at pitch angles from 9 to 10 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Of these, 102 echoes are unambiguously related to preceding accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 msec. When echoes are present in both energy channels, higher energy electrons lead lower energy ones by 50 to 70 msec. Adiabatic theory applied to the observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km.

  9. Observations of microwave ultra-fast absorption phenomena above solar active region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiajuan; Ji, Shuchen

    1999-12-01

    While the authors process observational data of the flares 22, two rare phenomena of microwave ultra-fast absorption (MUFA) are found. They occurred at 3.67 GHz and 4.00 GHz in the atmospheric layers above both active regions of NOAA/USAF 4808 and 5060 in the interval 05h50m17s - 05h50m25sUT on May 19, 1987 and 07h38m50s - 07h38m58sUT on June 29, 1988, respectively. These absorption phenomena were observed with Phoenix II Microwave Spectrometer at three frequencies (1.42, 2.84 and 3.67 GHz) and (1.42, 2.84 and 4.00 GHz) at Yunnan Observatory. Spike emissions appeared at both 2.84 GHz and 1.42 GHz. The notable observational characteristics of both absorption phenomena are given. A possible absorption mechanism of MUFA is discussed.

  10. A Model-Based Study of On-Board Data Processing Architecture for Balloon-Borne Aurora Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Chester

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of ISAAC design methodology to a balloon-borne payload electronic system for aurora observation. The methodology is composed of two phases, high level design and low level implementation, the focus of this paper is on the high level design. This paper puts the system architecture in the context of a balloon based application but it can be generalized to any airborne/space-borne application. The system architecture includes a front-end detector, its corresponding data processing unit, and a controller. VisualSim has been used to perform modeling and simulations to explore the entire design space, finding optimal solutions that meet system requirements.

  11. Fast coeff_token decoding method and new memory architecture design for an efficient H.264/AVC context-based adaptive variable length coding decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Yong Ho; Yoon, Kun Su; Ha, Seok Wun

    2009-12-01

    A fast coeff_token decoding method based on new memory architecture is proposed to implement an efficient context-based adaptive variable length-coding (CAVLC) decoder. The heavy memory access needed in CAVLC decoding is a significant issue in designing a real system, such as digital multimedia broadcasting players, portable media players, and mobile phones with video, because it results in high power consumption and delay in operations. Recently, a new coeff_token variable-length decoding method has been suggested to achieve memory access reduction. However, it still requires a large portion of the total memory access in CAVLC decoding. In this work, an effective memory architecture is designed through careful examination of codewords in variable-length code tables. In addition, a novel fast decoding method is proposed to further reduce the memory accesses required for reconstructing the coeff_token element. Only one memory access is used for reconstructing each coeff_token element in the proposed method.

  12. Observations of Early/Fast VLF Events on Vieques Island, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.; Inan, U. S.; Wood, T. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Mathews, J. D.; George, J. J.; Fong, N. T.

    2002-12-01

    Early/Fast VLF events are registered as sudden (i.e., "fast" < 20 ms) subionospheric VLF signal changes, occurring simultaneously (i.e., "early", <20 ms) with lightning discharges [e.g., Inan et al., GRL, 20, 2355, 1993]. These events constitute evidence of the direct energetic coupling between tropospheric thunderstorms and the overlying mesospheric and lower ionospheric regions. In August-September 2001 Penn State University organized an experimental campaign in Puerto Rico to perform correlative studies of lightning and lightning-induced ionospheric effects. A set of instruments employed for these studies included Arecibo Observatory 430 MHz UHF radar, New Mexico Tech Interferometer, and a video system. As part of this campaign Stanford University deployed broadband and narrowband VLF receivers at Casa Cielo, Vieques Island, Puerto Rico (18.12 deg N, 65.50 deg W), which were operated continuously during the time period August 21- September 15, 2001. The narrowband measurements of the NAU (Aguadilla, Puerto Rico), NLK (Jim Creek, Washington) and NAA (Cutler, Maine) signals were performed every day from 1500UT to 1400UT while broadband recordings were made 1 minute out of every 5 minutes from 1630UT to 1000UT. In this talk we report observations of spectacular early/fast VLF events, which were detected on the 40.75 kHz NAU signal on multiple occasions during August 31, September 1, 2 and 13, 2001. The observed signal amplitude changes ranged from a fraction of a dB up to 19 dB, with both positive and negative field changes. The unusually large events were superposed on top of a very high degree of variability of signal amplitude, caused by the fact that the magnetic loop antenna was aligned to null the ground signal and was thus disposed to only detect the sky wave signal. Some of the observed events exhibited recovery signatures with duration on the order of several tens of seconds, while a subset of events did not exhibit clear recovery signatures, possibly

  13. Observation of Ion Cyclotron Heating in a Fast-flowing Plasma for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hatanaka, Motoi; Shibata, Masaki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Kunihiko; Inutake, Masaaki

    2004-11-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project in NASA, the combined system of the ion cyclotron heating and the magnetic nozzle is proposed to control a ratio of specific impulse to thrust at constant power. In order to establish the advanced plasma thruster, experiments of an ion heating and plasma acceleration by a magnetic nozzle are performed in a fast-flowing plasma in the HITOP device. A fast-flowing He plasma is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA) operated with an externally-applied magnetic field up to 1kG. RF waves with an ion cyclotron range of frequency (f=20-300kHz) is excited by a helically-wound antenna located downstream of the MPDA. Increases of an ion temperature and plasma stored energy measured by a diamagnetic coil clearly observed during the RF pulse. The heating efficiency is compared for various magnetic field configurations and strengths. There appears no indication of cyclotron resonance in a high density plasma where the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one is below unity, because an ion-ion collisional effect is dominant. When the density becomes low and the ratio of ion cyclotron frequency to ion-ion collision one becomes high, features of ion cyclotron resonance are clearly appeared. The optimum magnetic field strength for the ion heating is slightly lower than that of the cyclotron resonance, which is caused by the Doppler effect due to the fast-flowing plasma. An ion energy distribution function is measured at a magnetic nozzle region by an electrostatic analyzer and increase of the parallel velocity is also observed.

  14. Particle and field characteristics of broadband electrons observed by the FAST satellite during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Seki, K.; Strangeway, R. J.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.

    2007-06-01

    Broadband electrons (BBEs) are remarkable flux enhancements (>1013 eV cm-2 s-1) of precipitating electrons over a broad energy range (0.03-30 keV) near the equatorward edge of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms. We show characteristics of particles (energy spectra and pitch angle distribution) and fields (electric field, magnetic field, and wave spectra) during a BBE event observed by the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) satellite. The BBEs were observed at an altitude of ˜2000 km at 59°-61° invariant latitudes (ILATs) and 21 h magnetic local time (MLT). The event was observed at ˜7 min after the onset of a substorm during the main phase of the Bastille Day geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = -301 nT) on 15 July 2000. The precipitation region of the BBEs corresponded to a localized intensification of auroral emission, lasting ˜14 min, observed by the Polar UVI images at 50°-60° geomagnetic latitudes (MLATs) and 20-21 MLTs. These results suggest that rapid particle acceleration was occurring in the inner magnetosphere associated with a storm-time substorm. The pitch angle distribution of BBEs was isotropic except for a loss cone feature around the field-aligned upward direction at a higher energy range above ˜1 keV, while field-aligned electron fluxes were larger than the perpendicular fluxes below ˜1 keV. These results imply that a higher energy part of the BBEs originated from higher altitudes in the inner magnetosphere and that a lower energy part was accelerated parallel to the local magnetic field at lower altitudes near the satellite. Intense fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields were observed during this BBE event. From these results, we discuss possible acceleration of the lower energy part of BBEs through wave-particle interaction.

  15. Fast O(sup +) ion flow observed around Venus at low altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasprzak, W. T.; Niemann, H. B.

    1988-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter Neutral Mass Spectrometer (ONMS) has observed fast O(+) ions with an energy exceeding 40 eV in the spacecraft reference frame. The orbit of the spacecraft is nearly polar with periapsis near the equator. The ONMS is mounted at an angle to the spin axis which, in turn, is perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. From the spin modulated data the direction of the ion flow in that plane can be determined. Data from the first 11 diurnal cycles (orbits 1 to 2475) are vector averaged in order to display the general flow pattern. Plots of the averaged data are presented. On the dayside and near the terminators, where fast O(+) is observed near the ionopause, the directions are more or less parallel to the planet's surface with evidence of an asymmetry about the Sun-Venus line. On the nightside below 2000 km and near the equator there is a preferred dawn to dusk direction while at higher altitudes (lower solar zenith angles and higher latitudes) the flow direction is more antisunward. The averaged flux for this time period is 8x10 to the 5th/sq cm/s with a maximum of 5x10 to the 8th.

  16. Fast multicamera video stitching for underwater wide field-of-view observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Zhong; Zhang, Yang; Zang, Feng-Ni

    2014-03-01

    Underwater robots equipped with a single forward-looking camera usually have a very limited visual range or field-of-view (FOV) due to the light absorption and scattering effects in the underwater environment, which greatly limit their applications for underwater video-based inspection, navigation, and so on. Although underwater robots using multicamera imaging systems can achieve wide FOV of surroundings, parallax distortion and time-consuming stitching computation are encountered, especially for short-distance observation. To overcome these problems, we present a fast multicamera video-stitching algorithm based on adaptive adjustment of image transformation matrix between adjacent images. The proposed method uses a fast and adaptive optimization algorithm to search the optimal parameters of transformation matrix that can minimize the parallax distortion due to short-distance imaging and maximize the matching degree between adjacent overlapping image areas. The advantage of the proposed stitching method lies in that it avoids the complex and time-consuming computations for feature-point extraction and matching. The experimental results show that the proposed method can construct multicamera-based wide FOV video effectively and meets the real-time requirement of wide FOV video observation for both indoor and underwater scenes.

  17. A Fast Radio Burst Occurs Every Second throughout the Observable Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Recent multi-telescope observations of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) FRB 121102 reveal a Gaussian-like spectral profile and associate the event with a dwarf metal-poor galaxy at a cosmological redshift of 0.19. Assuming that this event represents the entire FRB population, we make predictions for the expected number counts of FRBs observable by future radio telescopes between 50 MHz and 3.5 GHz. We vary our model assumptions to bracket the expected rate of FRBs and find that it exceeds one FRB per second per sky when accounting for faint sources. We show that future low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, could detect more than one FRB per minute over the entire sky originating from the epoch of reionization.

  18. An explanation for experimental observations of harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Horton, W.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1993-09-01

    An explanation, supported by numerical simulations and analytical theory, is given for the harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions in tokamak plasmas - particular, for the emission observed at low harmonics in deuterium-deuterium md deuterium-tritium experiments in the Joint European Tokamak. We show that the first proton harmonic is one of the highest spectral peaks whereas the first alpha is weak. We also compare the relative spectral amplitudes of different harmonics. Our results axe consistent with the experimental observations. The simulations verify that the instabilities are caused by a weak relativistic mass effect. Simulation that a nonuniform magnetic field leads to no appreciable change in the growth and saturation amplitude of the waves.

  19. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; White, R. B.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion D α spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  20. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Collins, C S; Heidbrink, W W; Austin, M E; Kramer, G J; Pace, D C; Petty, C C; Stagner, L; Van Zeeland, M A; White, R B; Zhu, Y B

    2016-03-04

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion Dα spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  1. Observational and Theoretical Challenges to Wave or Turbulence Accelerations of the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2008-01-01

    We use both observations and theoretical considerations to show that hydromagnetic waves or turbulence cannot produce the acceleration of the fast solar wind and the related heating of the open solar corona. Waves do exist as shown by Hinode and other observations, and can play a role in the differential heating and acceleration of minor ions but their amplitudes are not sufficient to power the wind, as demonstrated by extrapolation of magnetic spectra from Helios and Ulysses observations. Dissipation mechanisms invoked to circumvent this conclusion cannot be effective for a variety of reasons. In particular, turbulence does not play a strong role in the corona as shown by both eclipse observations of coronal striations and theoretical considerations of line-tying to a nonturbulent photosphere, nonlocality of interactions, and the nature of kinetic dissipation. In the absence of wave heating and acceleration, the chromosphere and transition region become the natural source of open coronal energization. We suggest a variant of the velocity filtration approach in which the emergence and complex churning of the magnetic flux in the chromosphere and transition region continuously and ubiquitously produces the nonthermal distributions required. These particles are then released by magnetic carpet reconnection at a wide range of scales and produce the wind as described in kinetic approaches. Since the carpet reconnection is not the main source of the energization of the plasma, there is no expectation of an observable release of energy in nanoflares.

  2. Observational and Theoretical Challenges to Wave or Turbulence Accelerations of the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2008-01-01

    We use both observations and theoretical considerations to show that hydromagnetic waves or turbulence cannot produce the acceleration of the fast solar wind and the related heating of the open solar corona. Waves do exist as shown by Hinode and other observations, and can play a role in the differential heating and acceleration of minor ions but their amplitudes are not sufficient to power the wind, as demonstrated by extrapolation of magnetic spectra from Helios and Ulysses observations. Dissipation mechanisms invoked to circumvent this conclusion cannot be effective for a variety of reasons. In particular, turbulence does not play a strong role in the corona as shown by both eclipse observations of coronal striations and theoretical considerations of line-tying to a nonturbulent photosphere, nonlocality of interactions, and the nature of kinetic dissipation. In the absence of wave heating and acceleration, the chromosphere and transition region become the natural source of open coronal energization. We suggest a variant of the velocity filtration approach in which the emergence and complex churning of the magnetic flux in the chromosphere and transition region continuously and ubiquitously produces the nonthermal distributions required. These particles are then released by magnetic carpet reconnection at a wide range of scales and produce the wind as described in kinetic approaches. Since the carpet reconnection is not the main source of the energization of the plasma, there is no expectation of an observable release of energy in nanoflares.

  3. New approaches to observation and modeling of fast-moving glaciers and ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Trantow, T.; Markle, M. J.; Medley, G.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we will give an overview of several new approaches to remote-sensing observations and analysis and to modeling of fast glacier flow. The approaches will be applied in case studies of different types of fast-moving glaciers: (1) The Bering-Bagley Glacier System, Alaska (a surge-type glacier system), (2) Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland (a tide-water terminating fjord glacier and outlet of the Greenland Inland Ice), and (3) Icelandic Ice Caps (manifestations of the interaction of volcanic and glaciologic processes). On the observational side, we will compare the capabilities of lidar and radar altimeters, including ICESat's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), CryoSat-2's Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) and the future ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), especially regarding retrieval of surface heights over crevassed regions as typical of spatial and temporal acceleration. Properties that can be expected from ICESat-2 ATLAS data will be illustrated based on analyses of data from ICESat-2 simulator instruments: the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Information from altimeter data will be augmented by an automated surface classification based on image data, which includes satellite imagery such as LANDSAT and WorldView as well as airborne video imagery of ice surfaces. Numerical experiments using Elmer/Ice will be employed to link parameters derived in observations to physical processes during the surge of the Bering Bagley Glacier System. This allows identification of processes that can be explained in an existing framework and processes that may require new concepts for glacier evolution. Topics include zonation of surge progression in a complex glacier system and crevassing as an indication, storage of glacial water, influence of basal topography and the role of friction laws.

  4. Observations and modelling of fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay, Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Makshtas, Aleksandr; Grubiy, Andrey; Kustov, Vasiliy

    2016-04-01

    Fast ice is one of the main features of sea ice cover in the Laptev Sea. The formation of this immobile ice which occupies up to 30% of the sea area and significantly affects the intensity of air-sea energy exchange in the coastal zones had been investigated during winter 2014-2015 in the Tiksi Bay (Buor-Khaya Gulf). The temperature measurements within sea ice thickness and under-ice sea layer using GeoPrecision thermistor string of 10 sensors together with measurements of snow and ice thicknesses were carried out at the distance of 0.5 km from the shore at the 3.5 m water depth. According to measurements temperature variations qualitatively repeat air temperature variations and, damping with depth, approach to sea water freezing temperature. Vertical temperature distributions allow to recognize snow, ice and water layers by profile inclination in each layer. The temperature profiles within growing ice were quasi-linear, indicating permanence of heat flux inside ice. The linearity of temperature profiles increased during ice growth. For calculations of fast ice evolution one-dimensional thermodynamic model was used. Besides the empirical formulae, based on frost degree-days, developed in 1930th for the Tiksi Bay was applied. Numerical experiments were carried out with constant values of thermal properties of all media and 10 ppt water salinity, as initial condition. The daily average data from Hydrometeorological Observatory Tiksi, located approximately 1 km from the site of ice observations, were used as atmospheric forcing. For the examined area evolutions of ice cover thickness estimated from direct measurements, the thermodynamic model and the empirical formulae were almost identical. The result indicates stability of hydrological and meteorological conditions, determining fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay during last 75 years. Model simulations showed that in shallow waters the growth of ice thickness is stabilized due to increase of sub-ice water layer

  5. Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere Derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of approximately 3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  6. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  7. Active Region Coronal Rain Event Observed by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph on the NST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Song, Donguk; Yang, Heesu; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda; Park, Hyungmin; Nah, Jakyung; Jang, Bi-Ho; Park, Young-Deuk

    2014-11-01

    The Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS) is being operated on the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. It simultaneously records spectra of Hα and Ca ii 8542 Å lines, and this dual-spectra measurement provides an estimate of the temperature and nonthermal speed components. We observed a loop structure in AR 11305 using the FISS, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI in 304 Å, and found plasma material falling along the loop from a coronal height into the umbra of a sunspot, which accelerated up to 80 km s-1. We also observed C2 and C7 flare events near the loop. The temperature of the downflows was in the range of 10 000 - 33 000 K, increasing toward the umbra. The temperature of the flow varied with time, and the temperature near the footpoint rose immediately after the C7 flare, but the temperature toward the umbra remained the same. There seemed to be a temporal correlation between the amount of downflow material and the observed C-class flares. The downflows decreased gradually soon after the flares and then increased after a few hours. These high-speed red-shift events occurred continuously during the observations. The flows observed on-disk in Hα and Ca ii 8542 Å appeared as fragmented, fuzzy condensed material falling from the coronal heights when seen off-limb with STEREO/EUVI at 304 Å. Based on these observations, we propose that these flows were an on-disk signature of coronal rain.

  8. Fast emission estimates in China and South Africa constrained by satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijling, Bas; van der A, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for emerging economies such as China and South Africa, where rapid economic growth change emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. However, constraining emissions from observations of concentrations is computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project (part of the Data User Element programme of ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China and South Africa, using the CHIMERE chemical transport model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e

  9. Genetic selection for fast growth generates bone architecture characterised by enhanced periosteal expansion and limited consolidation of the cortices but a diminution in the early responses to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Rawlinson, Simon C F; Murray, Dianne H; Mosley, John R; Wright, Chris D P; Bredl, John C; Saxon, Leanne K; Loveridge, Nigel; Leterrier, Christine; Constantin, Paul; Farquharson, Colin; Pitsillides, Andrew A

    2009-08-01

    Bone strength is, in part, dependent on a mechanical input that regulates the (re)modelling of skeletal elements to an appropriate size and architecture to resist fracture during habitual use. The rate of longitudinal bone growth in juveniles can also affect fracture incidence in adulthood, suggesting an influence of growth rate on later bone quality. We have compared the effects of fast and slow growth on bone strength and architecture in the tibiotarsi of embryonic and juvenile birds. The loading-related biochemical responses (intracellular G6PD activity and NO release) to mechanical load were also determined. Further, we have analysed the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of primary tibiotarsal osteoblasts from fast and slow-growing strains. We found that bones from chicks with divergent growth rates display equal resistance to applied loads, but weight-correction revealed that the bones from juvenile fast growth birds are weaker, with reduced stiffness and lower resistance to fracture. Primary osteoblasts from slow-growing juvenile birds proliferated more rapidly and had lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Bones from fast-growing embryonic chicks display rapid radial expansion and incomplete osteonal infilling but, importantly, lack mechanical responsiveness. These findings are further evidence that the ability to respond to mechanical inputs is crucial to adapt skeletal architecture to generate a functionally appropriate bone structure and that fast embryonic and juvenile growth rates may predispose bone to particular architectures with increased fragility in the adult.

  10. Fast low-level light pulses from the night sky observed with the SKYFLASH program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Franz, R. C.; Nemzek, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents further discussion of and new data on fast subvisual increases in the luminosity of the night sky described in our previous papers. A detailed technical description of the simple telescopic photometers used in the project SKYFLASH and their mode of operation including the detection of polarized Rayleigh-scattered flashes is provided. Distant lightning storms account for many of the events, and the complex relations between short and long luminous pulses with and without sferics are shown by examples from a new computerized data system, supplemented by two low-light-level TV cameras. Of particular interest are the previously observed 'long' events having a slow rise and fall, 20-ms duration, and showing small polarization and no coincident sferic. A group of such events on September 22-23 during the invasion of U.S. coasts by Hurricane Hugo, is discussed in detail. The recently observed 'plume' cloud-top-to-stratosphere lightning event is suggested as a possible source type for these flashes. An alternative source may be exploding meteors, recently identified during SKYFLASH observations by low-light-level television techniques as the origin of some sky-wide flash events described herein.

  11. Investigation of the broadband ELF turbulence by observations of the FAST satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskaya, I. V.; Kozelov, B. V.; Despirak, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    Scaling properties of variable electric fields in the topside ionosphere have been investigated on scales s from ˜30 m to 2 km by FAST electric field observations with sample rate of 512 s-1, in sixteen events of the broadband ELF turbulence. It is shown that down to scales of a few hundred meters, the power of turbulent electric fluctuations is a power law, ˜ s α. Scaling index α derived from the slope of logarithmic diagrams (LD) constructed by the discrete wavelet transform of data can be estimated as α = 2.2 ± 0.3, which is close to α estimate earlier reported for scales 1-30 km by electric field observations of the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite. The behavior of α index is analyzed near the scale of the order of electron inertial length λe = c/ω0 (ω0 being the electron plasma frequency). At altitudes considered (700-2500 km), λe makes 100-900 m. We demonstrate that at scales ≤λe, a decrease of LD slope and deviation from the power law are typically observed. As pointed out in the discussion, this feature cannot be identified as a transition to the diffusion range, where dissipation of the turbulence occurs.

  12. Fast low-level light pulses from the night sky observed with the SKYFLASH program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Franz, R. C.; Nemzek, R. J.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents further discussion of and new data on fast subvisual increases in the luminosity of the night sky described in our previous papers. A detailed technical description of the simple telescopic photometers used in the project SKYFLASH and their mode of operation including the detection of polarized Rayleigh-scattered flashes is provided. Distant lightning storms account for many of the events, and the complex relations between short and long luminous pulses with and without sferics are shown by examples from a new computerized data system, supplemented by two low-light-level TV cameras. Of particular interest are the previously observed 'long' events having a slow rise and fall, 20-ms duration, and showing small polarization and no coincident sferic. A group of such events on September 22-23 during the invasion of U.S. coasts by Hurricane Hugo, is discussed in detail. The recently observed 'plume' cloud-top-to-stratosphere lightning event is suggested as a possible source type for these flashes. An alternative source may be exploding meteors, recently identified during SKYFLASH observations by low-light-level television techniques as the origin of some sky-wide flash events described herein.

  13. Searching for color variation on fast rotating asteroids with simultaneous V-J observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, David; Moskovitz, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Motivation: Boulders, rocks and regolith on fast rotating asteroids (~2.5 hours) might slide towards the equator due to a strong centrifugal force and a low cohesion force, as described by models (Walsh et al. 2008, Sánchez & Scheeres 2014). As a result, a fresh material might be exposed, if the surface consists of weathered ordinary chondrite (S-complex). Detecting color variation, due to the exposure of fresh material, will allow us to model the mass shedding process, its extent and age, and thus support or reject hypotheses of rotational-fission.Method: Detecting color variation on small and fast rotating asteroids is difficult with spectroscopy since color differences are mild while the exposure time must be short to measure a narrow rotational phase. Broadband photometry is also problematic since it introduces large systematic errors when images in different filters are calibrated with standard stars. We describe a novel technique in which the asteroid is simultaneously observed in the visible and near-IR wavelength ranges. This technique is possible if a dichroic split the light into two beams that hit two detectors. In this technique atmospheric interference are self-calibrated between the visible and the near-IR image. We use a V and a J filters since the distinction between fresh and weathered surfaces are most prominent in these wavelengths and range between 10-20%.Observations: We observed 3 asteroids with CTIO’s 1.3m telescope and ANDICAM detector. The asteroids were observed during 2 rotational cycles to confirm features on the color-curve. There is ~5% variation of the mean color. There are a few measurements with a larger/smaller color in the range of ~10%, but these do not repeat in a second rotation cycle and we cannot confirm them as real. Therefore, we cannot detect fresh colors (as seen on Q-type asteroids) on the surface. This suggests one of the following statements: 1. No landslides occurred within the timescale of space weathering. 2

  14. A fast band–Krylov eigensolver for macromolecular functional motion simulation on multicore architectures and graphics processors

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga, José I.; Alonso, Pedro; Badía, José M.; Chacón, Pablo; Davidović, Davor; López-Blanco, José R.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.

    2016-03-15

    We introduce a new iterative Krylov subspace-based eigensolver for the simulation of macromolecular motions on desktop multithreaded platforms equipped with multicore processors and, possibly, a graphics accelerator (GPU). The method consists of two stages, with the original problem first reduced into a simpler band-structured form by means of a high-performance compute-intensive procedure. This is followed by a memory-intensive but low-cost Krylov iteration, which is off-loaded to be computed on the GPU by means of an efficient data-parallel kernel. The experimental results reveal the performance of the new eigensolver. Concretely, when applied to the simulation of macromolecules with a few thousands degrees of freedom and the number of eigenpairs to be computed is small to moderate, the new solver outperforms other methods implemented as part of high-performance numerical linear algebra packages for multithreaded architectures.

  15. Investigation of the motions of fast stars based on observations with the Pulkovo normal astrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrutskaya, E. V.; Berezhnoi, A. A.; Khovrichev, M. Yu.

    2011-06-01

    Astrometric CCD observations of 1123 stars with large proper motions (µ > 300 mas yr-1) from the LSPM (I/298) catalog in the declination zone +30°-+70° have been carried out with the Pulkovo normal astrograph since 2006. The observational program includes mostly stars that previously have not entered into high-accuracy projects to determine the proper motions. Our studies are aimed at determining new proper motions of fast stars in the HCRF/UCAC3 system and searching for stars with invisible companions in the immediate Galactic neighborhoods of the Sun. Having analyzed about 10 000 CCD frames, we have obtained the equatorial coordinates of 414 program stars in the HCRF/UCAC3 system at an accuracy level of 10-50 mas and determined their new proper motions. To derive the proper motions, we have used the data from several star catalogs and surveys (M2000, CMC14, 2MASS, SDSS) as early epochs. The epoch differences range from 5 to 13 years (on average, about 10 years); the mean accuracy of the derived proper motions is 4-5 mas yr-1. For 70 stars, we have revealed significant differences between the derived proper motions and those from the LSPM and I/306A catalogs (these proper motions characterize the mean motion of the photocenter in 50 years or more). Apart from systematic errors, these differences can result from the existence of invisible components of the program stars.

  16. Error-Based Observer of a Charge Couple Device Tracking Loop for Fast Steering Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Deng, Chao; Yang, Tao; Zhong, Daijun; Ren, Ge; Huang, Yongmei; Fu, Chengyu

    2017-01-01

    The charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop of a fast steering mirror (FSM) is usually used to stabilize line of sight (LOS). High closed-loop bandwidth facilitates good performance. However, low-rate sample and time delay of the CCD greatly limit the high control bandwidth. This paper proposes an error-based observer (EBO) to improve the low-frequency performance of the CCD tracking system. The basic idea is by combining LOS error from the CCD and the controller output to produce the high-gain observer, forwarding into the originally closed-loop control system. This proposed EBO can improve the system both in target tracking and disturbance suppression due to LOS error from the CCD’s sensing of the two signals. From a practical engineering view, the closed-loop stability and robustness of the EBO system are investigated on the condition of gain margin and phase margin of the open-loop transfer function. Two simulations of CCD experiments are provided to verify the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28264504

  17. Plasma distribution in Mercury's magnetosphere inferred from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2013-12-01

    We present average plasma distributions in Mercury's magnetosphere inferred independently from magnetic field and plasma measurements by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. Plasma distributions were derived from magnetic pressure deficits measured during the first 10 months of MESSENGER orbital operations under the assumption of constant total pressure. Statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were also derived from Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations during the same period. The pressures inferred from magnetic pressure deficits and the plasma data agree on average, although they differ by a factor of ~2 for individual events. The spatial distributions of magnetic pressure deficits derived from Magnetometer observations compare favorably with the distribution of proton pressure deduced from the FIPS observations. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics than the magnetic depression data in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and magnetic pressure deficits are difficult to identify definitively. The plasma data reveal features not previously identified in the Magnetometer data, such as an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks indicating entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. On nightside closed field lines, plasma pressures in the south are much greater than they are in the north. Locations of low plasma pressure in the north correspond to sample altitudes that map to southern conjugate locations below the planetary surface. The asymmetry is attributed to particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's magnetic field. The plasma observations confirm the northward offset in the planetary dipole.

  18. Observed sex differences in fast-food consumption and nutrition self-assessments and beliefs of college students.

    PubMed

    Morse, Kristin L; Driskell, Judy A

    2009-03-01

    Americans frequently eat fast foods, but do college students? The objective was to determine the influence of sex on fast-food consumption and nutrition self-assessments and beliefs of a group of college students. The hypothesis was that some sex differences would be observed. Volunteers, 101 men and 158 women, 19 to 24 years of age, enrolled at a Midwestern university served as subjects. The subjects completed a 12-item written questionnaire. Five and seven percent of the students typically ate lunch and dinner, respectively, at a fast-food restaurant. The predominant reasons given for eating at fast-food restaurants were "limited time," "enjoy taste," "eat with family/friends," and "inexpensive and economical." A larger (P = .0592) percentage of men than women reported eating at fast-food restaurants because they thought these restaurants were "inexpensive and economical." Most of the subjects reported eating at fast-food restaurants 1 to 3 times weekly. The frequency of eating at fast-food restaurants was significantly different for men than for women (P < .01) as was the response distribution for considering the energy content of items on a fast-food menu when making their selections (P < .0001). Body mass indices of men were significantly higher (P < .0001) than those of women. A significantly higher (P < .0001) percentage of women than men strongly agreed with the statement that "the nutrition content of food is important to me." Several sex differences were observed in the fast-food consumption and nutrition beliefs of these college students.

  19. SCTPmx: An SCTP Fast Handover Mechanism Using a Single Interface Based on a Cross-Layer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yunsop; Teraoka, Fumio

    Recently, SCTP is attracting attention to support mobility in the Internet because it does not require additional equipment such as the Home Agent of Mobile IP. This paper focuses on an SCTP fast handover mechanism using a single interface because it is assumed that small mobile devices have a single interface per communication medium such as IEEE802.11b due to hardware limitations. The proposed mechanism called SCTPmx employs a cross layer control information exchange system called LIESto predict handover. LIES was originally designed to achieve network layer fast handover and then it was extended by adding the network layer primitives for efficient interaction among the link layer, the network layer, and the transport layer. Prior to handover, SCTPmx can generate a new address that will be used after handover and can execute duplicate address detection of IPv6. SCTPmx can suppress the delay caused by channel scanning at the link layer by employing selective background scanning mechanism which allows to continue data communication during channel scanning. In addition, SCTPmx can notify the correspondent node of the new address before handover. SCTPmx was implemented on FreeBSD. SCTPmx achieved better than 25 times lower handover latency (100msec) and 2 times higher throughput than previous proposals.

  20. Seismic observations of large-scale deformation at the bottom of fast-moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, Eric; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-05-01

    We present a new tomographic model of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle and discuss in details the geodynamical causes of this anisotropy. Our model improves upon DKP2005 seismic model (Debayle et al., 2005) through a larger dataset (expanded by a factor ~ 4) and a new approach which allows us to better extract fundamental and higher mode information. Our results confirm that on average, azimuthal anisotropy is only significant in the uppermost 200-250 km of the upper mantle where it decreases regularly with depth. We do not see a significant difference in the amplitude of anisotropy beneath fast oceanic plates, slow oceanic plates or continents. The anisotropy projected onto the direction of present plate motion shows a very specific relation with the plate velocity; it peaks in the asthenosphere around 150 km depth, it is very weak for plate velocities smaller than 3 cm yr-1, increases significantly between 3 and 5 cm yr-1, and saturates for plate velocities larger than 5 cm yr-1. Plate-scale present-day deformation is remarkably well and uniformly recorded beneath the fastest moving plates (India, Coco, Nazca, Australia, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates). Beneath slower plates, plate-motion parallel anisotropy is only observed locally, which suggests that the mantle flow below these plates is not controlled by the lithospheric motion (a minimum plate velocity of around 4 cm yr-1 is necessary for a plate to organize the flow in its underlying asthenosphere). The correlation of oceanic anisotropy with the actual plate motion in the shallow lithosphere is very weak. A better correlation is obtained with the fossil accretion velocity recorded by the gradient of local seafloor age. The transition between frozen-in and active anisotropy occurs across the typical age- isotherm that defines the bottom of the thermal lithosphere around 1100 °C. Under fast continents (mostly under Australia and India), the present day velocity orients also the anisotropy in a

  1. Seismic observations of large-scale deformation at the bottom of fast-moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, Eric; Ricard, Yanick

    2013-08-01

    We present a new tomographic model of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle, DR2012, and discuss in details the geodynamical causes of this anisotropy. Our model improves upon DKP2005 seismic model (Debayle et al., 2005) through a larger dataset (expanded by a factor ˜3.7) and a new approach which allows us to better extract fundamental and higher-mode information. Our results confirm that on average, azimuthal anisotropy is only significant in the uppermost 200-250 km of the upper mantle where it decreases regularly with depth. We do not see a significant difference in the amplitude of anisotropy beneath fast oceanic plates, slow oceanic plates or continents. The anisotropy projected onto the direction of present plate motion shows a very specific relation with the plate velocity; it peaks in the asthenosphere around 150 km depth, it is very weak for plate velocities smaller than 3 cm yr, increases significantly between 3 and 5 cm yr, and saturates for plate velocities larger than 5 cm yr. Plate-scale present-day deformation is remarkably well and uniformly recorded beneath the fastest-moving plates (India, Coco, Nazca, Australia, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates). Beneath slower plates, plate-motion parallel anisotropy is only observed locally, which suggests that the mantle flow below these plates is not controlled by the lithospheric motion (a minimum plate velocity of around 4 cm yr is necessary for a plate to organize the flow in its underlying asthenosphere). The correlation of oceanic anisotropy with the actual plate motion in the shallow lithosphere is very weak. A better correlation is obtained with the fossil accretion velocity recorded by the gradient of local seafloor age. The transition between frozen-in and active anisotropy occurs across the typical √{age} isotherm that defines the bottom of the thermal lithosphere around 1100 °C. Under fast continents (mostly under Australia and India), the present-day velocity orients also the anisotropy

  2. The Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102: Multi-wavelength Observations and Additional Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Spitler, L. G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Wharton, R. S.; Bassa, C. G.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mickaliger, M.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tendulkar, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz with the Arecibo Observatory, for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value (˜559 pc cm-3) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic contribution. The 2 GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2 GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5σ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined with archival Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 22 μm and IPHAS Hα surveys, rules out the presence of an intervening Galactic H ii region. We update our estimate of the FRB detection rate in the PALFA survey to be {1.1}-1.0+3.7× {10}4 FRBs sky-1 day-1 (95% confidence) for peak flux density at 1.4 GHz above 300 mJy. We find that the intrinsic widths of the 12 FRB 121102 bursts from Arecibo are, on average, significantly longer than the intrinsic widths of the 13 single-component FRBs detected with the Parkes telescope.

  3. Observation and suppression of a new fast ion driven micro burst instability in a field-reversed configuration plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, B. H.; Korepanov, S.; Belova, E.; Douglass, J.; Beall, M.; Binderbauer, M.; Clary, R.; Detrick, S.; Garate, E.; Gota, H.; Granstedt, E.; Magee, R.; Necas, A.; Putvinski, S.; Roche, T.; Smirnov, A.; Tajima, T.; Thompson, M.; Tuszewski, M.; van Drie, A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The C-2U experiment offers a unique plasma environment combining a high beta field reversed configuration (FRC) embedded in a low beta magnetic mirror with high power neutral beam injection. The beams are injected tangentially into a modest magnetic field so that the orbits of the resulting fast ions encircle the entire plasma. The dominant population of large orbit fast ions sustains and stabilizes the FRC, suppresses turbulence, and makes a dramatic beneficial impact on the overall plasma performance. Abundant interesting new physics phenomena are observed in this high performance FRC operation regime, including micro bursts, which are benign, periodic bursting small amplitude down chirping fluctuations seen by several diagnostics. Detailed analysis of the micro bursts measurement data, bulk plasma equilibrium profiles, and fast ion orbit characteristics show that the micro bursts might be driven by a small number of resonant fast ions, and can be suppressed when the number of resonant particles is reduced.

  4. Development of GPU-based Monte Carlo code for fast CT imaging dose calculation on CUDA Fermi architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Du, X.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo photon transport code, ARCHER{sub GPU}, to perform CT imaging dose calculations with good accuracy and performance. The code simulates interactions of photons with heterogeneous materials. It contains a detailed CT scanner model and a family of patient phantoms. Several techniques are used to optimize the code for the GPU architecture. In the accuracy and performance test, a 142 kg adult male phantom was selected, and the CT scan protocol involved a whole-body axial scan, 20-mm x-ray beam collimation, 120 kVp and a pitch of 1. A total of 9 x 108 photons were simulated and the absorbed doses to 28 radiosensitive organs/tissues were calculated. The average percentage difference of the results obtained by the general-purpose production code MCNPX and ARCHER{sub GPU} was found to be less than 0.38%, indicating an excellent agreement. The total computation time was found to be 8,689, 139 and 56 minutes for MCNPX, ARCHER{sub CPU} (6-core) and ARCHER{sub GPU}, respectively, indicating a decent speedup. Under a recent grant funding from the NIH, the project aims at developing a Monte Carlo code with the capability of sub-minute CT organ dose calculations. (authors)

  5. Estimating spatially variable representative elementary scales in fractured architecture using hydraulic head observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2005-03-01

    Water resources within large-scale fractured aquifers are typically evaluated using continuum models. While any arbitrary scale of continuum can be imposed to represent fracture architecture, using the representative elementary volume eliminates errors that result from estimating network connectivity. In traditional theory, representative elementary scales (RES) are equal in magnitude and geometry throughout a domain and are normally determined using a structural indicator such as porosity or effective hydraulic conductivity. We present a fluid-based methodology, analyzing scale-dependent energy variation, to estimate RES using relatively low cost, readily available hydraulic head data. Hydraulic head predictions of RES (HYRES) reveal a spatial variation in elementary scale consistent with the flow field and fracture architecture. Porosity predictions of RES (PORRES) incorporate the structural effect of disconnected fracture regions but do not account for fluid behavior. RES estimated from hydraulic conductivity (KRES) are sensitive to fracture connectivity, which controls fluid movement, but are difficult to quantify because of scale and spatial variability. HYRES may be the superior approach for evaluating water resources because it is sensitive to fracture connectivity and avoids complications with scale and spatially dependent averaging. Our method is sensitive to fracture density, clustering, connectivity, and flow direction, but is insensitive to the magnitude of hydraulic gradient. HYRES is a novel approach to estimating spatially variable RES that improves water resource evaluation and flow characterization in fractured aquifers.

  6. Ultrastructure of the horse tongue: further observations on the lingual integumentary architecture.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C J; Levin, M; Lopes, M A

    2000-03-01

    This investigation examined primarily epidermal specializations of the adult horse tongue by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Samples were collected from seven regions of the normal tongue of various breeds of horse. The filiform papillae, present on the dorsal and lateral aspects but not the ventral aspect of the tongue, were short, slender and finger-like structures with variable-shaped terminae. The epidermal thickness and height of dermal ridges were reduced on fungiform and vallate papillae, but tissue architecture and keratinocyte ultrastructure of most of the lingual epidermis corresponded to the common mammalian epidermal paradigm. One unique finding was the highly localized clustering of epidermal cells with exceptionally high content of PAS-negative trichohyalin cytoplasmic granules at a location atop the dermal ridges and beneath the base of filiform papillae. These granular cells were immediately subjacent to clusters of clear, non-granulated epidermal cells. It is believed that this integumentary specialization may enhance the structural strength at this localized site of the tissue architecture, in relationship to the mechanical papillae.

  7. Fast Turn-Off Times Observed in Experimental 4H SiC Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Room temperature measurements of the turn-off time (t(sub q)) are reported for several packaged, npnp developmental power thyristors based on 4H-type SiC and rated 400 V, 2 A. Turn-off is effected by a 50 V pulse of applied reverse voltage, from a state of a steady 1 A forward current. Plots of t(sub q) against the ramp rate (dV(sub AK)/dt) of reapplied forward voltage are presented for preset values of limiting anode-to-cathode voltage (V(sub AK,max)). The lowest t(sub q) measured was about 180 ns. A rapid rise of these t(sub q) curves was observed for values of V(sub AK,max) that are only about a fifth of the rated voltage, whereas comparative t(sub q) plots for a commercial, fast turn-off, Si-based thyristor at a proportionately reduced V(sub AK,max) showed no such behavior. Hence these SiC thyristors may have problems arising from material defects or surface passivation. The influence the R-C-D gate bypass circuit that was used is briefly discussed.

  8. A fast method for quantifying observational selection effects in asteroid surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce; Granvik, Mikael; Beshore, Ed

    2016-03-01

    We present a fast method to calculate an asteroid survey's 'bias' - essentially a correction factor from the observed number of objects to the actual number in the population. The method builds upon the work of Jedicke and Metcalfe (Jedicke, R., Metcalfe, T.S. [1998]. Icaurs 131, 245-260) and Granvik et al. (Granvik, M., Vaubaillon, J., Jedicke, R. [2012]. Icarus 218, 262-277) and essentially efficiently maps out the phase space of orbit elements that can appear in a field-of-view. It does so by 'integrating' outwards in geocentric distance along a field's boresite from the topocentric location of the survey and calculating the allowable angular elements for each desired combination of semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. We then use a contour algorithm to map out the orbit elements that place an object at the edge of the field-of-view. We illustrate the method's application to calculate the bias correction for near Earth Objects detected with the Catalina Sky Survey (Christensen, E. et al. [2012]. AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts, vol. 44, p. 210.13; Larson, S. et al. [1998]. Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, vol. 30, p. 1037).

  9. A state observer for using a slow camera as a sensor for fast control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahleitner, Reinhard; Schagerl, Martin

    2013-03-01

    This contribution concerns about a problem that often arises in vision based control, when a camera is used as a sensor for fast control applications, or more precisely, when the sample rate of the control loop is higher than the frame rate of the camera. In control applications for mechanical axes, e.g. in robotics or automated production, a camera and some image processing can be used as a sensor to detect positions or angles. The sample time in these applications is typically in the range of a few milliseconds or less and this demands the use of a camera with a high frame rate up to 1000 fps. The presented solution is a special state observer that can work with a slower and therefore cheaper camera to estimate the state variables at the higher sample rate of the control loop. To simplify the image processing for the determination of positions or angles and make it more robust, some LED markers are applied to the plant. Simulation and experimental results show that the concept can be used even if the plant is unstable like the inverted pendulum.

  10. MICA: A fast short-read aligner that takes full advantage of Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-read aligners have recently gained a lot of speed by exploiting the massive parallelism of GPU. An uprising alterative to GPU is Intel MIC; supercomputers like Tianhe-2, currently top of TOP500, is built with 48,000 MIC boards to offer ~55 PFLOPS. The CPU-like architecture of MIC allows CPU-based software to be parallelized easily; however, the performance is often inferior to GPU counterparts as an MIC card contains only ~60 cores (while a GPU card typically has over a thousand cores). Results To better utilize MIC-enabled computers for NGS data analysis, we developed a new short-read aligner MICA that is optimized in view of MIC's limitation and the extra parallelism inside each MIC core. By utilizing the 512-bit vector units in the MIC and implementing a new seeding strategy, experiments on aligning 150 bp paired-end reads show that MICA using one MIC card is 4.9 times faster than BWA-MEM (using 6 cores of a top-end CPU), and slightly faster than SOAP3-dp (using a GPU). Furthermore, MICA's simplicity allows very efficient scale-up when multiple MIC cards are used in a node (3 cards give a 14.1-fold speedup over BWA-MEM). Summary MICA can be readily used by MIC-enabled supercomputers for production purpose. We have tested MICA on Tianhe-2 with 90 WGS samples (17.47 Tera-bases), which can be aligned in an hour using 400 nodes. MICA has impressive performance even though MIC is only in its initial stage of development. Availability and implementation MICA's source code is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mica-aligner under GPL v3. Supplementary information Supplementary information is available as "Additional File 1". Datasets are available at www.bio8.cs.hku.hk/dataset/mica. PMID:25952019

  11. MICA: A fast short-read aligner that takes full advantage of Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC).

    PubMed

    Luo, Ruibang; Cheung, Jeanno; Wu, Edward; Wang, Heng; Chan, Sze-Hang; Law, Wai-Chun; He, Guangzhu; Yu, Chang; Liu, Chi-Man; Zhou, Dazong; Li, Yingrui; Li, Ruiqiang; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Peng, Shaoliang; Lam, Tak-Wah

    2015-01-01

    Short-read aligners have recently gained a lot of speed by exploiting the massive parallelism of GPU. An uprising alterative to GPU is Intel MIC; supercomputers like Tianhe-2, currently top of TOP500, is built with 48,000 MIC boards to offer ~55 PFLOPS. The CPU-like architecture of MIC allows CPU-based software to be parallelized easily; however, the performance is often inferior to GPU counterparts as an MIC card contains only ~60 cores (while a GPU card typically has over a thousand cores). To better utilize MIC-enabled computers for NGS data analysis, we developed a new short-read aligner MICA that is optimized in view of MIC's limitation and the extra parallelism inside each MIC core. By utilizing the 512-bit vector units in the MIC and implementing a new seeding strategy, experiments on aligning 150 bp paired-end reads show that MICA using one MIC card is 4.9 times faster than BWA-MEM (using 6 cores of a top-end CPU), and slightly faster than SOAP3-dp (using a GPU). Furthermore, MICA's simplicity allows very efficient scale-up when multiple MIC cards are used in a node (3 cards give a 14.1-fold speedup over BWA-MEM). MICA can be readily used by MIC-enabled supercomputers for production purpose. We have tested MICA on Tianhe-2 with 90 WGS samples (17.47 Tera-bases), which can be aligned in an hour using 400 nodes. MICA has impressive performance even though MIC is only in its initial stage of development. MICA's source code is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mica-aligner under GPL v3. Supplementary information is available as "Additional File 1". Datasets are available at www.bio8.cs.hku.hk/dataset/mica.

  12. STEREO Observations of Fast Magnetosonic Waves in the Extended Solar Corona Associated with EIT/EUV Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Ofman, Leon; Olmedo, Oscar; Kramar, Maxim; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-03-01

    We report white-light observations of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO/SECCHI/COR1 inner coronagraphs on 2011 August 4. The wave front is observed in the form of density compression passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. Together with measured electron densities determined with STEREO COR1 and Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data, we use our kinematic measurements of the wave front to calculate coronal magnetic fields and find that the measured speeds are consistent with characteristic fast magnetosonic speeds in the corona. In addition, the wave front turns out to be the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI traveling against the solar coronal disk; moreover, stationary fronts of the EIT wave are found to be located at the footpoints of deflected streamers and boundaries of coronal holes, after the wave front in the upper solar corona passes through open magnetic field lines in the streamers. Our findings suggest that the observed EIT wave should be in fact a fast magnetosonic shock/wave traveling in the inhomogeneous solar corona, as part of the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the extended solar corona.

  13. STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA ASSOCIATED WITH EIT/EUV WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Ofman, Leon; Kramar, Maxim; Olmedo, Oscar; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-03-20

    We report white-light observations of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO/SECCHI/COR1 inner coronagraphs on 2011 August 4. The wave front is observed in the form of density compression passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. Together with measured electron densities determined with STEREO COR1 and Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data, we use our kinematic measurements of the wave front to calculate coronal magnetic fields and find that the measured speeds are consistent with characteristic fast magnetosonic speeds in the corona. In addition, the wave front turns out to be the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI traveling against the solar coronal disk; moreover, stationary fronts of the EIT wave are found to be located at the footpoints of deflected streamers and boundaries of coronal holes, after the wave front in the upper solar corona passes through open magnetic field lines in the streamers. Our findings suggest that the observed EIT wave should be in fact a fast magnetosonic shock/wave traveling in the inhomogeneous solar corona, as part of the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the extended solar corona.

  14. Cardiovascular response to short-term fasting in menstrual phases in young women: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kumiko; Okita, Yoshimitsu; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Mase, Tomoki; Miyawaki, Chiemi; Nakamura, Harunobu

    2015-08-28

    Menstrual cycle-related symptoms are an important health issue for many women, and some may affect cardiac autonomic regulation. In the present study, we evaluated the cardiovascular and physiological stress response to 12-h short-term fasting in the menstrual phases of healthy young women. We performed a randomized crossover study. Subjects were seven female university students (age: 22.3 ± 1.0 years). The experiments comprised four sessions: meal intake in the follicular phase, meal intake in the luteal phase, fasting in the follicular phase, and fasting in the luteal phase. All subjects participated in a total of four experimental sessions during two successive phases (follicular and luteal phase in the same menstrual cycle, or luteal phase and follicular phase in the next menstrual cycle) according to a randomized crossover design. R-R intervals were continuously recorded before and after meals, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed. Other physiological data were obtained before and 20, 40, 60, and 80 min after meal intake or after the corresponding time point of meal intake (fasting in the follicular or luteal phase). Heart rate decreased during fasting in the follicular and luteal phases. High frequency power increased during fasting in the follicular and luteal phases. In addition, salivary cortisol concentrations decreased during fasting in the luteal phase. In the present study, short-term fasting resulted in higher parasympathetic activity and lower cortisol levels in the luteal phase in these young women. These results indicate a possibility to produce an anti-stress effect in the luteal phase, which may reduce menstrual symptoms.

  15. Development of Observation Techniques in Reactor Vessel of Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Imaizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Akinori; Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Yukimoto

    In-Vessel Observations (IVO) techniques for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. And several IVO equipments for an SFR are developed. However, in order to secure the reliability of IVO techniques, it was necessary to demonstrate the performance under the actual reactor environment with high temperature, high radiation dose and remained sodium. During the investigation of an incident that occurred with Joyo, IVO using a standard Video Camera (VC) and a Radiation-Resistant Fiberscope (RRF) took place at (1) the top of the Sub-Assemblies (S/As) and the In-Vessel Storage rack (IVS), (2) the bottom face of the Upper Core Structure (UCS). A simple 6 m overhead view of each S/A, through the fuel handling or inspection holes etc, was photographed using a VC for making observations of the top of S/As and IVS. About 650 photographs were required to create a composite photograph of the top of the entire S/As and IVS, and a resolution was estimated to be approximately 1mm. In order to observe the bottom face of the UCS, a Remote Handling Device (RHD) equipped with RRFs (approximately 13 m long) was specifically developed for Joyo with a tip that could be inserted into the 70 mm gap between the top of the S/As and the bottom of the UCS. A total of about 35,000 photographs were needed for the full investigation. Regarding the resolution, the sodium flow regulating grid of 0.8mm in thickness could be discriminated. The performance of IVO equipments under the actual reactor environment was successfully confirmed. And the results provided useful information on incident investigations. In addition, fundamental findings and the experience gained during this study, which included the design of equipment, operating procedures, resolution, lighting adjustments, photograph composition and the durability of the RRF under radiation exposure, provided valuable insights into further improvements and verifications for IVO techniques to

  16. Elemental and charge state composition of the fast solar wind observed with SMS instruments on WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Fisk, L. A.; Wilken, B.

    1995-01-01

    The elemental composition and charge state distributions of heavy ions of the solar wind provide essential information about: (1) atom-ion separation processes in the solar atmosphere leading to the 'FIP effect' (the overabundance of low First Ionization potential (FIP) elements in the solar wind compared to the photosphere); and (2) coronal temperature profiles, as well as mechanisms which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. This information is required for solar wind acceleration models. The SWICS instrument on Ulysses measures for all solar wind flow conditions the relative abundance of about 8 elements and 20 charge states of the solar wind. Furthermore, the Ulysses high-latitude orbit provides an unprecedented look at the solar wind from the polar coronal holes near solar minimum conditions. The MASS instrument on the WIND spacecraft is a high-mass resolution solar wind ion mass spectrometer that will provide routinely not only the abundances and charge state of all elements easily measured with SWICS, but also of N, Mg, S. The MASS sensor was fully operational at the end of 1994 and has sampled the in-ecliptic solar wind composition in both the slow and the corotating fast streams. This unique combination of SWICS on Ulysses and MASS on WIND allows us to view for the first time the solar wind from two regions of the large coronal hole. Observations with SWICS in the coronal hole wind: (1) indicate that the FIP effect is small; and (2) allow us determine the altitude of the maximum in the electron temperature profile, and indicate a maximum temperature of approximately 1.5 MK. New results from the SMS instruments on Wind will be compared with results from SWICS on Ulysses.

  17. The three-dimensional architecture of the notochordal nucleus pulposus: novel observations on cell structures in the canine intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christopher J; Matyas, John R; Duncan, Neil A

    2003-03-01

    Cells from the nucleus pulposus of young (< 2 years) and old (> 5 years) non-chondrodystrophoid dogs were studied using routine histology, confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The architecture of cell structures--from the tissue scale down to subcellular scale--was reported. Clusters of notochordal cells were observed in young nuclei pulposi, ranging from 10 to 426 cells each. These clusters resisted mechanical disruption and showed evidence of cell-cell signalling via gap junctions. Cells (30-40 microm in diameter) within the clusters had a physaliferous appearance, containing numerous large inclusions which ranged from 1 to 20 microm in diameter. The inclusions were surrounded by a dense actin cortex but were not contained by a lipid bilayer. The contents of the inclusions were determined not to be predominantly carbohydrate or neutral lipid as assessed by histochemical staining, but the exact composition of the contents remained uncertain. There were striking differences in the cell architecture of young vs. old nuclei pulposi, with a loss of both cell clusters and physaliferous cells during ageing. These observations demonstrate unique cell structures, which may influence our understanding of the differences between notochordal and chondrocytic cells in the nucleus pulposus. Such differences could have substantial impact upon how we think about development, degeneration and repair of the intervertebral disc.

  18. Using compute unified device architecture-enabled graphic processing unit to accelerate fast Fourier transform-based regression Kriging interpolation on a MODIS land surface temperature image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongda; Shu, Hong; Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Jianhui

    2016-04-01

    Kriging interpolation provides the best linear unbiased estimation for unobserved locations, but its heavy computation limits the manageable problem size in practice. To address this issue, an efficient interpolation procedure incorporating the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was developed. Extending this efficient approach, we propose an FFT-based parallel algorithm to accelerate regression Kriging interpolation on an NVIDIA® compute unified device architecture (CUDA)-enabled graphic processing unit (GPU). A high-performance cuFFT library in the CUDA toolkit was introduced to execute computation-intensive FFTs on the GPU, and three time-consuming processes were redesigned as kernel functions and executed on the CUDA cores. A MODIS land surface temperature 8-day image tile at a resolution of 1 km was resampled to create experimental datasets at eight different output resolutions. These datasets were used as the interpolation grids with different sizes in a comparative experiment. Experimental results show that speedup of the FFT-based regression Kriging interpolation accelerated by GPU can exceed 1000 when processing datasets with large grid sizes, as compared to the traditional Kriging interpolation running on the CPU. These results demonstrate that the combination of FFT methods and GPU-based parallel computing techniques greatly improves the computational performance without loss of precision.

  19. Statistical analysis of fast hard X-ray bursts by SMM observations and microwave bursts by ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Shu-Ying

    1986-01-01

    In order to understand the relationship between fast hard X-ray bursts (HXRB) and microwave bursts (MWB), data were used from the following publications: NASA Technical Memorandum 84998; Solar Geological Data (1980 to 1983); monthly report of Solar Radio Emission; and NASA and NSF: Solar Geophysical Data (1980 to 1983). For analyzing individual events, the criterion of the same event for HXRB and MWB is determined by peak time difference. There is a good linear correlation between the physical parameter of HXRB and MWB.

  20. Statistical analysis of fast hard X-ray bursts by SMM observations and microwave bursts by ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Shu-Ying

    In order to understand the relationship between fast hard X-ray bursts (HXRB) and microwave bursts (MWB), data were used from the following publications: NASA Technical Memorandum 84998; Solar Geological Data (1980 to 1983); monthly report of Solar Radio Emission; and NASA and NSF: Solar Geophysical Data (1980 to 1983). For analyzing individual events, the criterion of the same event for HXRB and MWB is determined by peak time difference. There is a good linear correlation between the physical parameter of HXRB and MWB.

  1. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Chae, Jongchul; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma β are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma β falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma β are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  2. Fast-ion deuterium alpha spectroscopic observations of the effects of fishbones in the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Michael, C. A.; McClements, K. G.; Conway, N. J.; Crowley, B.; Akers, R. J.; Lake, R. J.; Pinches, S. D.; the MAST Team

    2013-08-01

    Using the recently installed fast-ion deuterium alpha (FIDA) spectrometer, the effects of low-frequency (20-50 kHz) chirping energetic particle modes with toroidal mode number n ⩾ 1 on the neutral beam injection-driven fast-ion population in Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasmas are considered. Results from the FIDA diagnostic are presented and discussed in the light of the present theoretical understanding of these modes, known as fishbones, in plasmas with reversed shear. Measurements of the fast-ion population reveal strong redistribution of fast ions in both real and velocity space as a result of the fishbones. Time-resolved measurements throughout the evolution of a fishbone show radial redistribution of fast ions with energies up to 95% of the primary beam injection energy. Correlations between changes in the FIDA signal and the peak time derivative of the magnetic field perturbation are observed in a limited range of operating scenarios. The transient reduction in signal caused by a fishbone may in some cases reach 50% of the signal intensity before mode onset.

  3. Marine vehicle sensor network architecture and protocol designs for ocean observation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaowei; Yu, Jiancheng; Zhang, Aiqun; Yang, Lei; Shu, Yeqiang

    2012-01-01

    The micro-scale and meso-scale ocean dynamic processes which are nonlinear and have large variability, have a significant impact on the fisheries, natural resources, and marine climatology. A rapid, refined and sophisticated observation system is therefore needed in marine scientific research. The maneuverability and controllability of mobile sensor platforms make them a preferred choice to establish ocean observing networks, compared to the static sensor observing platform. In this study, marine vehicles are utilized as the nodes of mobile sensor networks for coverage sampling of a regional ocean area and ocean feature tracking. A synoptic analysis about marine vehicle dynamic control, multi vehicles mission assignment and path planning methods, and ocean feature tracking and observing techniques is given. Combined with the observation plan in the South China Sea, we provide an overview of the mobile sensor networks established with marine vehicles, and the corresponding simulation results.

  4. Marine Vehicle Sensor Network Architecture and Protocol Designs for Ocean Observation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaowei; Yu, Jiancheng; Zhang, Aiqun; Yang, Lei; Shu, Yeqiang

    2012-01-01

    The micro-scale and meso-scale ocean dynamic processes which are nonlinear and have large variability, have a significant impact on the fisheries, natural resources, and marine climatology. A rapid, refined and sophisticated observation system is therefore needed in marine scientific research. The maneuverability and controllability of mobile sensor platforms make them a preferred choice to establish ocean observing networks, compared to the static sensor observing platform. In this study, marine vehicles are utilized as the nodes of mobile sensor networks for coverage sampling of a regional ocean area and ocean feature tracking. A synoptic analysis about marine vehicle dynamic control, multi vehicles mission assignment and path planning methods, and ocean feature tracking and observing techniques is given. Combined with the observation plan in the South China Sea, we provide an overview of the mobile sensor networks established with marine vehicles, and the corresponding simulation results. PMID:22368475

  5. Consumers' estimation of calorie content at fast food restaurants: cross sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Block, Jason P; Condon, Suzanne K; Kleinman, Ken; Mullen, Jewel; Linakis, Stephanie; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Gillman, Matthew W

    2013-05-23

    To investigate estimation of calorie (energy) content of meals from fast food restaurants in adults, adolescents, and school age children. Cross sectional study of repeated visits to fast food restaurant chains. 89 fast food restaurants in four cities in New England, United States: McDonald's, Burger King, Subway, Wendy's, KFC, Dunkin' Donuts. 1877 adults and 330 school age children visiting restaurants at dinnertime (evening meal) in 2010 and 2011; 1178 adolescents visiting restaurants after school or at lunchtime in 2010 and 2011. Estimated calorie content of purchased meals. Among adults, adolescents, and school age children, the mean actual calorie content of meals was 836 calories (SD 465), 756 calories (SD 455), and 733 calories (SD 359), respectively. A calorie is equivalent to 4.18 kJ. Compared with the actual figures, participants underestimated calorie content by means of 175 calories (95% confidence interval 145 to 205), 259 calories (227 to 291), and 175 calories (108 to 242), respectively. In multivariable linear regression models, underestimation of calorie content increased substantially as the actual meal calorie content increased. Adults and adolescents eating at Subway estimated 20% and 25% lower calorie content than McDonald's diners (relative change 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 0.96; 0.75, 0.57 to 0.99). People eating at fast food restaurants underestimate the calorie content of meals, especially large meals. Education of consumers through calorie menu labeling and other outreach efforts might reduce the large degree of underestimation.

  6. Volcano-tectonic architecture of a Caldera Complex, Karthala volcano, Grande Comore: new field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, S.; Kervyn, M.; Soulé, H.; Cnudde, V.; De Kock, T.; Jacobs, P.

    2012-04-01

    fed small-scale eruptive cones, vertical degassing fissures and former caldera levels. Fissures with active fumaroles inside the two explosive craters and in the area between Choungou Chahalé and Changouméni are indicating a focus area in the hydrothermal activity. It is this hydrothermal system that is suggested to have controlled the phreatic nature of recent eruptions (1991, 2005 and 2007). Several pyroclastic beds and cones affected by block and bomb impacts inside the caldera complex and around the summit area testify the high explosive nature of these recent eruptions, in contrast with the effusive Hawaiian-style character generally associated with Karthala. The orientation of caldera-bounding structures, eruption and fumarolic fissures, dykes as well as the orientation of intra-caldera extensional faults indicate one minor (E-W) and two major volcano-tectonic directions (N-S and N135°S). The latter are concurring with previously identified regional stress orientations and rift zone's orientations on Karthala flanks. Upcoming field work will be dedicated to the exhaustive structural and stratigraphic mapping of Karthala caldera as it provides exceptional exposure to document the internal architecture of an alkali basalt shield volcano and a complex caldera subsidence chronology.

  7. Stars with fast Galactic rotation observed in Gaia TGAS: a signature driven by the Perseus arm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Kawata, Daisuke; Monari, Giacomo; Grand, Robert J. J.; Famaey, Benoit; Siebert, Arnaud

    2017-05-01

    We report on the detection of a small overdensity of stars in velocity space with systematically higher Galactocentric rotation velocity than the Sun by about 20 km s-1 in the Gaia Data Release 1 Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution data. We find these fast Galactic rotators more clearly outside of the Solar radius, compared to inside of the Solar radius. In addition, the velocity of the fast Galactic rotators is independent of the Galactocentric distance up to R - R0 ˜ 0.6 kpc. Comparing with numerical models, we qualitatively discuss that a possible cause of this feature is the co-rotation resonance of the Perseus spiral arm, where the stars in the peri-centre phase in the trailing side of the Perseus spiral arm experience an extended period of acceleration owing to the torque from the Perseus arm.

  8. Consumers’ estimation of calorie content at fast food restaurants: cross sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Suzanne K; Kleinman, Ken; Mullen, Jewel; Linakis, Stephanie; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Gillman, Matthew W

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate estimation of calorie (energy) content of meals from fast food restaurants in adults, adolescents, and school age children. Design Cross sectional study of repeated visits to fast food restaurant chains. Setting 89 fast food restaurants in four cities in New England, United States: McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, Wendy’s, KFC, Dunkin’ Donuts. Participants 1877 adults and 330 school age children visiting restaurants at dinnertime (evening meal) in 2010 and 2011; 1178 adolescents visiting restaurants after school or at lunchtime in 2010 and 2011. Main outcome measure Estimated calorie content of purchased meals. Results Among adults, adolescents, and school age children, the mean actual calorie content of meals was 836 calories (SD 465), 756 calories (SD 455), and 733 calories (SD 359), respectively. A calorie is equivalent to 4.18 kJ. Compared with the actual figures, participants underestimated calorie content by means of 175 calories (95% confidence interval 145 to 205), 259 calories (227 to 291), and 175 calories (108 to 242), respectively. In multivariable linear regression models, underestimation of calorie content increased substantially as the actual meal calorie content increased. Adults and adolescents eating at Subway estimated 20% and 25% lower calorie content than McDonald’s diners (relative change 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 0.96; 0.75, 0.57 to 0.99). Conclusions People eating at fast food restaurants underestimate the calorie content of meals, especially large meals. Education of consumers through calorie menu labeling and other outreach efforts might reduce the large degree of underestimation. PMID:23704170

  9. Architecture and morphology of coral reef sequences. Modeling and observations from uplifting islands of SE Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Husson, Laurent; Bezos, Antoine; Pedoja, Kevin; Elliot, Mary; Hafidz, Abdul; Imran, Muhammad; Lacroix, Pascal; Robert, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    During the Late Neogene, sea level oscillations have profoundly shaped the morphology of the coastlines of intertropical zones, wherein relative sea level simultaneously controlled reef expansion and erosion of earlier reef bodies. In uplifted domains like SE Sulawesi, the sequences of fossil reefs display a variety of fossil morphologies. Similarly, the morphologies of the modern reefs are highly variable, including cliff notches, narrow fringing reefs, wide flat terraces, and barriers reefs. In this region, where uplift rates vary rapidly laterally, the entire set of morphologies is displayed within short distances. We developed a numerical model that predicts the architecture of fossil reefs sequences and apply it to observations from SE Sulawesi, accounting -amongst other parameters- for reef growth, coastal erosion, and uplift rates. The observations that we use to calibrate our models are mostly the morphology of both the onshore (dGPS and high-resolution Pleiades DEM) and offshore (sonar) coast, as well as U-Th radiometrically dated coral samples. Our method allows unravelling the spatial and temporal evolution of large domains on map view. Our analysis indicates that the architecture and morphology of uplifting coastlines is almost systematically polyphased (as attested by samples of different ages within a unique terrace), which assigns a primordial role to erosion, comparable to reef growth. Our models also reproduce the variety of modern morphologies, which are chiefly dictated by the uplift rates of the pre-existing morphology of the substratum, itself responding to the joint effects of reef building and subsequent erosion. In turn, we find that fossil and modern morphologies can be returned to uplift rates rather precisely, as the parametric window of each specific morphology is often narrow.

  10. An Architecture and Analysis Environment for Model to Observational Data Intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.; Williams, D.; Braverman, A. J.; Crichton, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has within the last year initiated an effort to increase the use of its observational data in the improvement and analysis of climate model outputs. This effort, known as the Climate Data eXchange (CDX), is a multi-institutional collaboration involving representatives from JPL and from the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparisions (PCMDI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our early focus in the context of CDX has been on NASA Level 2 observational data products. These products vary in a number of ways incl.: (1) format - many of the products are stored in the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), others in netCDF, with variation even between software versions that generated these output files within the same format; (2) geographic distribution - most observational data products are co-located with their scientific discipline expertise, to increase the yield of promising scientific results and to cut down on the effort for a science user to make progress; (3) data access mechanism - some data products are available from sophisticated web service interfaces, e.g., OPeNDAP -- others are not, requiring a user to fill on an online web ordering ``cart'', and have an email notification indicating availability at a later date; and (4) size - depending on the frequency of the instrument's orbit, and the characteristics of the mission including the way that the instrument ``sees'' the Earth, the sheer volume of the Level 2 data can widely vary, ranging from megabytes (MB) per product, to gigabytes (GB). These four dimensions are just a sampling of the characteristics of Level 2 observational data. The goal of CDX is to deliver an open source software toolkit that allows science users to alleviate as much of the complexity of dealing with Level 2 observational data as possible, and to facilitate its comparison to model outputs. In this fashion, there are two fundamental subsystems within CDX: (1) a Client Toolkit

  11. Geopotential Error Analysis from Satellite Gradiometer and Global Positioning System Observables on Parallel Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.; Baker, Gregory A.

    1997-01-01

    The recovery of a high resolution geopotential from satellite gradiometer observations motivates the examination of high performance computational techniques. The primary subject matter addresses specifically the use of satellite gradiometer and GPS observations to form and invert the normal matrix associated with a large degree and order geopotential solution. Memory resident and out-of-core parallel linear algebra techniques along with data parallel batch algorithms form the foundation of the least squares application structure. A secondary topic includes the adoption of object oriented programming techniques to enhance modularity and reusability of code. Applications implementing the parallel and object oriented methods successfully calculate the degree variance for a degree and order 110 geopotential solution on 32 processors of the Cray T3E. The memory resident gradiometer application exhibits an overall application performance of 5.4 Gflops, and the out-of-core linear solver exhibits an overall performance of 2.4 Gflops. The combination solution derived from a sun synchronous gradiometer orbit produce average geoid height variances of 17 millimeters.

  12. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee1, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2013-12-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small spacecraft observatory. The UFFO is equipped with a fast-response Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) which uses rapidly moving mirror or mirror arrays to redirect the optical beam rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs with a sub-second response, for the first time, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and transient studies, the only GRB system which can point and measure on these time scales. Its fast response measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will provide unique probes of the burst mechanism, shock breakouts in core-collapse supernovae, tidal disruptions around black holes, test Lorentz violation, be the electromagnetic counterpart to neutrino and gravitational wave signatures of the violent universe, and verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle potentially opening up the z>10 universe. As a first step, we employ a motorized slewing stage in SMT which can point to the event within 1s after X-ray trigger, in the UFFO-pathfinder payload onboard the Lomonosov satellite to be launched in 2012. The pathfinder was a small and limited, yet remarkably powerful micro-observatory for rapid optical response to bright gamma-ray bursts, the first part of our GRB and rapid-response long-term program. We describe the early photon science, the space mission of UFFO-pathfinder, and our plan for the next step.

  13. Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating magnetosonic waves observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves are scare in previous studies due to the relative low temporal and spatial resolution of past telescopes. Recently, they are detected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Here, two cases of QFP waves are presented. The analysis results indicate that QFP waves are tightly associated with the associated flares. It is indicate that QFP waves and the associated flares are possibly driven by the same physic process such as quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection process in producing flares.

  14. Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-10-15

    Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

  15. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  16. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  17. Obscura telescope with a MEMS micromirror array for space observation of transient luminous phenomena or fast-moving objects.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Garipov, G K; Jeon, J A; Khrenov, B A; Kim, J E; Kim, M; Kim, Y K; Lee, C-H; Lee, J; Na, G W; Nam, S; Park, I H; Park, Y-S

    2008-12-08

    We introduce a novel telescope consisting of a pinhole-like camera with rotatable MEMS micromirrors substituting for pinholes. The design is ideal for observations of transient luminous phenomena or fast-moving objects, such as upper atmospheric lightning and bright gamma ray bursts. The advantage of the MEMS "obscura telescope" over conventional cameras is that it is capable both of searching for events over a wide field of view, and fast zooming to allow detailed investigation of the structure of events. It is also able to track the triggering object to investigate its space-time development, and to center the interesting portion of the image on the photodetector array. We present the proposed system and the test results for the MEMS obscura telescope which has a field of view of 11.3 degrees, sixteen times zoom-in and tracking within 1 ms.

  18. Turbulence spectrum observed by a fast-rotating wind-turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, J.R.

    1980-06-01

    The spectrum of turbulence encountered by a point on a fast-rotating wind turbine blade is shown to be possibly quite different from that measured by a stationary anemometer. The physically reasonable expectations are supported quantitatively by experiments using Pacific Northwest Laboratory's vertical-plane anemometer array. The measurements indicate that the blade encounters energy densities in two regions of the turbulence spectrum much different than those seen by stationary anemometers. For typical turbine types and wind conditions, the spectral energy redistribution phenomenon may be significant only for turbine blade diameters larger than 10 m. The spectral shift should also affect gust statistics for rotting blades; the duration of gusts that are smaller than the diameter of the disk of blade rotation will decrease. Correspondingly, the rise rate will increase by a factor of about ten.

  19. Ramadan fasting in diabetes patients on insulin pump therapy augmented by continuous glucose monitoring: an observational real-life study.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ali Bernard; Beshyah, Salem A; Abu Awad, Samar M; Benbarka, Mahmoud M; Haddad, Marcil; Al-Hassan, Dana; Kahwatih, Marwa; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2012-09-01

    Hypoglycemia during the daytime of Ramadan fasting is the most feared complication of diabetes. Insulin pump therapy has been proposed as the ideal "theoretical" method for insulin delivery. We report a prospective observational, single-center study of insulin-treated patients using insulin pump therapy during Ramadan 2011. Twenty-one patients (10 males and 11 females) were selected; median age was 26 years. They adjusted their insulin as per their usual practices. Outcome measures obtained before and during Ramadan included body weight, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, total insulin dose differences, overriding tendency, suspension time during fasting, and number of hypoglycemic episodes. The patients fasted for a median of 29 days. The observed changes during Ramadan were overall not significant quantitatively, but some trends were noted. The total insulin administered during Ramadan was not different from that in the pre-Ramadan period, but there was a redistribution of insulin over a 24-h period in relation to the changes in the daily lifestyle and eating patterns. Basal insulin was decreased during the daytime by 5-20% from before Ramadan and increased during the nighttime. The mean change in the overall amount of basal insulin was not significant. A larger than usual amount of insulin bolus was given at the meals Iftar, Fowala, and Suhur; the change in the total amount of bolus insulin as a percentage change from total insulin was also not significant. No major hypoglycemic episodes were reported. Minor hypoglcemic episodes were equally distributed between daytime and nighttime and were managed by either basal insulin adjustment or suspension from the pump. This study confirms the advantages provided by insulin pump use in patients with diabetes were enhanced by the use of continuous glucose monitoring. We provided more evidence-based advice on how best to adjust the insulin pump during fasting.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL TEST OF STOCHASTIC HEATING IN LOW-{beta} FAST-SOLAR-WIND STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2013-09-10

    Spacecraft measurements show that protons undergo substantial perpendicular heating during their transit from the Sun to the outer heliosphere. In this paper, we use Helios 2 measurements to investigate whether stochastic heating by low-frequency turbulence is capable of explaining this perpendicular heating. We analyze Helios 2 magnetic field measurements in low-{beta} fast-solar-wind streams between heliocentric distances r = 0.29 AU and r = 0.64 AU to determine the rms amplitude of the fluctuating magnetic field, {delta}B{sub p}, near the proton gyroradius scale {rho}{sub p}. We then evaluate the stochastic heating rate Q{sub stoch} using the measured value of {delta}B{sub p} and a previously published analytical formula for Q{sub stoch}. Using Helios measurements we estimate the ''empirical'' perpendicular heating rate Q{sub Up-Tack emp} = (k{sub B}/m{sub p}) BV (d/dr) (T{sub Up-Tack p}/B) that is needed to explain the T{sub p} profile. We find that Q{sub stoch} {approx} Q{sub emp}, but only if a key dimensionless constant appearing in the formula for Q{sub stoch} lies within a certain range of values. This range is approximately the same throughout the radial interval that we analyze and is consistent with the results of numerical simulations of the stochastic heating of test particles in reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. These results support the hypothesis that stochastic heating accounts for much of the perpendicular proton heating occurring in low-{beta} fast-wind streams.

  1. CRBLASTER: A Fast Parallel-Processing Program for Cosmic Ray Rejection in Space-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, K.

    Many astronomical image analysis tasks are based on algorithms that can be described as being embarrassingly parallel - where the analysis of one subimage generally does not affect the analysis of another subimage. Yet few parallel-processing astrophysical image-analysis programs exist that can easily take full advantage of today's fast multi-core servers costing a few thousands of dollars. One reason for the shortage of state-of-the-art parallel processing astrophysical image-analysis codes is that the writing of parallel codes has been perceived to be difficult. I describe a new fast parallel-processing image-analysis program called CRBLASTER which does cosmic ray rejection using van Dokkum's L.A.Cosmic algorithm. CRBLASTER is written in C using the industry standard Message Passing Interface library. Processing a single 800 x 800 Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image takes 1.9 seconds using 4 processors on an Apple Xserve with two dual-core 3.0-GHz Intel Xeons; the efficiency of the program running with the 4 cores is 82%. The code has been designed to be used as a software framework for the easy development of parallel-processing image-analysis programs using embarrassing parallel algorithms; all that needs to be done is to replace the core image processing task (in this case the C function that performs the L.A.Cosmic algorithm) with an alternative image analysis task based on a single processor algorithm. I describe the design and implementation of the program and then discuss how it could possibly be used to quickly do time-critical analysis applications such as those involved with space surveillance or do complex calibration tasks as part of the pipeline processing of images from large focal plane arrays.

  2. Magnetic rotor flux observer of induction motors with fast convergence and less transient oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Jung-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an observer design for the estimation of magnetic rotor flux of induction motors. We characterize the class of MIMO induction motor systems that consists of the linear observable and the nonlinear part with a block triangular structure. The similarity transformation that plays an important role in proving the convergence of the proposed observer is generalized to the systems. Since the gain of the proposed observer minimizes a nonlinear part of the system to suppress for the stability of the error dynamics, it improves the transient performance of the high gain observer. Moreover, by using the generalized similarity transformation, it is shown that under some observability and boundedness conditions, the proposed observer guarantees the global exponential convergence to zero of the estimation error. Since the proposed scheme minimizes the nonlinearity of an induction motor system, it improves the transient performance of the observer and guarantees the global exponential convergence to zero of the estimation error. The estimation results of magnetic rotor fluxes through experiments are shown and it is presented that the proposed magnetic flux observer exhibits less transient oscillation and faster convergence time than the general observer.

  3. Wide-bandwidth drift-scan pulsar surveys of globular clusters: application to early science observations with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hobbs, George; Li, Di; Lorimer, Duncan; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Meng; Yue, You-Ling; Wang, Pei; Pan, Zhi-Chen; Dai, Shi

    2016-10-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) will begin its early-science operations during 2016. Drift-scan pulsar surveys will be carried out during this period using an ultra-wide-band receiver system (covering ˜ 270 to 1620 MHz). We describe a method for accounting for the changes in the telescope beam shape and the pulsar parameters when searching for pulsars over such a wide bandwidth. We applied this method to simulated data sets of pulsars in globular clusters that are visible to FAST and found that a representative observation would have a sensitivity of ˜ 40 μJy. Our results showed that a single drift-scan (lasting less than a minute) is likely to find at least one pulsar for observations of four globular clusters. Repeated observations will increase the likely number of detections. We found that pulsars in ˜16 clusters are likely to be found if the data from 100 drift-scan observations of each cluster are incoherently combined.

  4. NICER Observation of Fast X-ray Flares in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, R.; Gendreau, K.; Altamirano, D.; Gandhi, P.; Steiner, J.; Pasham, D.; Charkrabarty, D.; Fabian, A.; Neilsen, J.; Miller, J.; Cackett, E.; Homan, J.; Uttley, P.; Corcoran, M.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2017-10-01

    In response to the optical alert reporting the beginning of a new outburst in the black hole binary GX339-4 (D. Russell et al., Atel 10797), a series of NICER observations began on 2017 September 29. The first five observations, conducted through October 1, netted 8.3 ks of exposure.

  5. Optical observations of the fast declining Type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G. C.; Sahu, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    We present optical UBVRI photometry and medium resolution spectroscopy of the Type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn, spanning a phase of ˜-13 d to +71 d with respect to B-band maximum. The post-maximum decline rates indicate a fast decline with Δm15(B) = 1.82. Correcting for a Galactic extinction E(B - V)MW = 0.045 and host galaxy extinction of E(B - V)host = 0.17, the absolute V-band magnitude peaks at MV = -17.23 ± 0.20. The bolometric light curve indicates that ˜0.09 M⊙ of 56Ni was synthesized in the explosion. The earliest spectrum (-13 d) shows the presence of He I 5876 Å feature at a velocity of ˜15 000 km s-1, which falls rapidly by the time the SN approaches the epoch of B-band maximum. The photospheric velocity near maximum light, as indicated by the Fe II 5169 Å feature, is ˜9000 km s-1. The estimate for the 56Ni mass, together with the estimates for the ejected mass (Mej) and kinetic energy of the explosion (Ek) indicate that iPTF13bvn is a low-luminosity Type Ib supernova, with a lower than average ejected mass and kinetic energy. Our results suggest that the progenitor of iPTF13bvn is inconsistent with a single Wolf-Rayet star.

  6. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  7. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D.; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. PMID:25100314

  8. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

  9. A Web 2.0 and OGC Standards Enabled Sensor Web Architecture for Global Earth Observing System of Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Unger, Stephen; Ames, Troy; Frye, Stuart; Chien, Steve; Cappelaere, Pat; Tran, Danny; Derezinski, Linda; Paules, Granville

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the progress of a 3 year research award from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) that began October 1, 2006, in response to a NASA Announcement of Research Opportunity on the topic of sensor webs. The key goal of this research is to prototype an interoperable sensor architecture that will enable interoperability between a heterogeneous set of space-based, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)-based and ground based sensors. Among the key capabilities being pursued is the ability to automatically discover and task the sensors via the Internet and to automatically discover and assemble the necessary science processing algorithms into workflows in order to transform the sensor data into valuable science products. Our first set of sensor web demonstrations will prototype science products useful in managing wildfires and will use such assets as the Earth Observing 1 spacecraft, managed out of NASA/GSFC, a UASbased instrument, managed out of Ames and some automated ground weather stations, managed by the Forest Service. Also, we are collaborating with some of the other ESTO awardees to expand this demonstration and create synergy between our research efforts. Finally, we are making use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) suite of standards and some Web 2.0 capabilities to Beverage emerging technologies and standards. This research will demonstrate and validate a path for rapid, low cost sensor integration, which is not tied to a particular system, and thus be able to absorb new assets in an easily evolvable, coordinated manner. This in turn will help to facilitate the United States contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), as agreed by the U.S. and 60 other countries at the third Earth Observation Summit held in February of 2005.

  10. Covariance approximation for fast and accurate computation of channelized Hotelling observer statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetto, Paola; Qi, Jinyi; Leahy, Richard M.

    1999-10-01

    We describe a method for computing linear observer statistics for maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructions of PET images. The method is based on a theoretical approximation for the mean and covariance of MAP reconstructions. In particular, we derive here a closed form for the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) statistic applied to 2D MAP images. We show reasonably good correspondence between these theoretical results and Monte Carlo studies. The accuracy and low computational cost of the approximation allow us to analyze the observer performance over a wide range of operating conditions and parameter settings for the MAP reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. An observational study of consumer use of fast-food restaurant drive-through lanes: implications for menu labelling policy.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Hoffnagle, Elena; Bragg, Marie A; Brownell, Kelly D

    2010-11-01

    Some versions of restaurant menu labelling legislation do not require energy information to be posted on menus for drive-through lanes. The present study was designed to quantify the number of customers who purchase fast food through drive-in windows as a means of informing legislative labelling efforts. This was an observational study. The study took place at two McDonald's and Burger King restaurants, and single Dairy Queen, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell and Wendy's restaurants. The number of customers entering the chain restaurants and purchasing food via the drive-through lane were recorded. A total of 3549 patrons were observed. The percentage of customers who made their purchases at drive-throughs was fifty-seven. The overall average (57 %) is likely a conservative estimate because some fast-food restaurants have late-night hours when only the drive-throughs are open. Since nearly six in ten customers purchase food via the drive-through lanes, menu labelling legislation should mandate the inclusion of menu labels on drive-through menu boards to maximise the impact of this public health intervention.

  13. GroundBIRD: observations of CMB polarization with fast scan modulation and MKIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Shugo; Choi, Jihoon; Damayanthi, Thushara; Hattori, Makoto; Hazumi, Masashi; Ishitsuka, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Kenji; Koyano, Ryo; Kutsuma, Hiroki; Lee, Kyungmin; Mima, Satoru; Minowa, Makoto; Nagai, Makoto; Nagasaki, Taketo; Otani, Chiko; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Semoto, Munehisa; Suzuki, Jun'ya; Taino, Tohru; Tajima, Osamu; Tomita, Nozomu; Won, Eunil; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Polarized patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation contains rich knowledge for early stage of the universe. In particular their odd-parity patterns at large angular scale (> 1°), primordial B-modes, are smoking-gun evidence for the cosmic inflation. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to detect these B-modes with a ground-based apparatus that includes several novel devices: a high-speed rotational scan system, cold optics, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). We plan to start observations in the Canary Islands in 2017. In this paper, we present the status of the development of our instruments. We established an environment that allows operation of our MKIDs in an optical configuration, in which the MKIDs observe radiations from the outside of the telescope aperture. We have also constructed MKID prototypes, and we are testing them in the optical configuration.

  14. Fast printing and in situ morphology observation of organic photovoltaics using slot-die coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Ferdous, Sunzida; Schaible, Eric; Hexemer, Alexander; Church, Matthew; Ding, Xiaodong; Wang, Cheng; Russell, Thomas P

    2015-02-04

    The mini-slot-die coater offers a simple, convenient, materials-efficient route to print bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that show efficiencies similar to spin-coating. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and GI small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) methods are used in real time to characterize the active-layer formation during printing. A polymer-aggregation-phase-separation-crystallization mechanism for the evolution of the morphology describes the observations.

  15. 2D turbulence structure observed by a fast framing camera system in linear magnetized device PANTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdachi, Satoshi; Inagaki, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Goto, Motoshi

    2017-04-01

    Two dimensional turbulence observed in the linear magnetized device PANTA is studied using a visible high speed camera system. When the fluctuation component are decomposed with Fourier-Bessel expansion, complex density fluctuations are recognized as the superposition of the several mode having low mode number, e.g., m = 1, 2, and 3. The phase relations between waves indicate that they are non-linearly coupled.

  16. Online fault detection of permanent magnet demagnetization for IPMSMs by nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai-Hui; Chen, Te-Fang; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Gang

    2014-12-05

    To prevent irreversible demagnetization of a permanent magnet (PM) for interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSMs) by flux-weakening control, a robust PM flux-linkage nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer (NFTSMO) is proposed to detect demagnetization faults. First, the IPMSM mathematical model of demagnetization is presented. Second, the construction of the NFTSMO to estimate PM demagnetization faults in IPMSM is described, and a proof of observer stability is given. The fault decision criteria and fault-processing method are also presented. Finally, the proposed scheme was simulated using MATLAB/Simulink and implemented on the RT-LAB platform. A number of robustness tests have been carried out. The scheme shows good performance in spite of speed fluctuations, torque ripples and the uncertainties of stator resistance.

  17. Online Fault Detection of Permanent Magnet Demagnetization for IPMSMs by Nonsingular Fast Terminal-Sliding-Mode Observer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai-Hui; Chen, Te-Fang; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    To prevent irreversible demagnetization of a permanent magnet (PM) for interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSMs) by flux-weakening control, a robust PM flux-linkage nonsingular fast terminal-sliding-mode observer (NFTSMO) is proposed to detect demagnetization faults. First, the IPMSM mathematical model of demagnetization is presented. Second, the construction of the NFTSMO to estimate PM demagnetization faults in IPMSM is described, and a proof of observer stability is given. The fault decision criteria and fault-processing method are also presented. Finally, the proposed scheme was simulated using MATLAB/Simulink and implemented on the RT-LAB platform. A number of robustness tests have been carried out. The scheme shows good performance in spite of speed fluctuations, torque ripples and the uncertainties of stator resistance. PMID:25490582

  18. GPS Observation of Fast-moving Continent-size Traveling TEC Pulsations at the Start of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Valladares, C. E.; Doherty, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Using network of GPS receiver stations in North and South America, we have recently observed fast-moving continent-size traveling plasma disturbances in the mapped total electron content (TEC) data. These space plasma disturbances occurred at the beginning of geomagnetic storms, immediately after the storm's suddent commencement (SSC) and prior to the appearance of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) from the auroral regions. More specifically, these supersize TEC perturbations were observed when the IMF Bz was oscillating between northward and southward directions. They were found to propagate zonally westward with a propagation speed of 2-3 km/s, if projected onto an ionospheric-equivalent altitude of 350 km. Based on their general characteristics and comparison with ground-based ionosonde data, we interpret these TEC pulsations as ion drift waves in the magnetosphere/plasmasphere that propagate azimuthally inside the GPS orbit.

  19. Hitomi Observations of the LMC SNR N132D: Fast and Asymmetric Iron-rich Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.

    2017-08-01

    We present Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) observations of N132D, a young, ~2500 year-old, X-ray bright, O-rich core-collapse supernova remnant in the LMC. Despite a very short observation of only 3.7 ksec, the SXS easily detects the line complexes of He-like S K and Fe K with 16-17 counts in each. The Fe K feature is measured for the first time at high spectral resolution, and we find that the Fe K-emitting material is highly redshifted at ~1200 km/s compared to the local LMC ISM, indicating (1) that it arises from the SN ejecta, and (2) that this ejecta is highly asymmetric, since no corresponding blue-shifted component is found. The S K-emitting material has a velocity consistent with the local LMC ISM, and is likely swept-up ISM material. These results are consistent with spatial mapping of these emission lines with XMM-Newton and Chandra, which show the Fe K concentrated in the interior of the remnant and the S K tracing the outer shell. Most importantly, they highlight the power of high-spectral-resolution imaging observations, and demonstrate the new window that has been opened with Hitomi and will be greatly widened with future missions such as the X-ray Astronomy Recovery Mission (XARM) and Athena.

  20. Photometric and polarimetric observations of fast declining Type II supernovae 2013hj and 2014G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Misra, Kuntal; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kumar, Brajesh; Singh, Mridweeka; Fukushima, Daiki; Kawabata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    We present broad-band photometric and polarimetric observations of two Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013hj and 2014G. SN 2014G is a spectroscopically classified Type IIL event, which we also confirm photometrically because its light curve shows characteristic features - a plateau slope of 2.55 mag (100 d)-1 in the V band and a duration of ˜77 d - of a generic Type IIL SN. However, SN 2013hj also shows a high plateau decline rate of 1.5 mag (100 d)-1 in the V band, similar to SNe IIL, but marginally lower than SNe IIL template light curves. Our high cadence photometric observations of SNe 2013hj and 2014G enables us to cover all characteristic phases up to the radioactive tail of optical light curves. Broad-band polarimetric observations reveal some polarization in SN 2013hj with subtle enhancement as the SN evolves towards the plateau end. However, the polarization angle remains constant throughout the evolution. This characteristic is consistent with the idea that the evolving SN with recombining hydrogen envelope is slowly revealing a more asymmetric central region of explosion. Modelling of the bolometric light curve yields a progenitor mass of ˜11 M⊙ with a radius of ˜700 R⊙ for SN 2013hj, while for the SN 2014G model estimated progenitor mass is ˜9 M⊙ with a radius of ˜630 R⊙, both having a typical energy budget of ˜2 × 1051 erg.

  1. Fast damping of poloidal Alfven waves by bounce-resonant ions: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations can excite intense ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere. An analysis of two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001 shows that the poloidal waves excited in these events are damped away rapidly in tens of minutes. This damping is the result of wave-particle interactions involving H+ and O+ ions with energies in the range of several to a few tens of keV [Wang et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2015]. Damping is found to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the relatively higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exists in that region. In the November 2004 shock event it has been suggested that energy-dispersed ions observed travelling parallel and anti-parallel direction to the geomagnetic field immediately after the shockare locally accelerated rather than originating from Earth's ionosphere. We use test-particle simulations to show that adiabatic advection of the particle differential flux caused bydrift-bounce-resonance with ULF waves is responsible for the energy-dispersed ions observed in these events. In the simulations,Liouville's theorem is used to reconstruct the iondistribution function and differential flux in a model dipole magnetosphere.It is shown that flux modulations of H and O ions can be reproduced when test-particle ions are advanced in the electric fields of the 3D ULF wave model we have developed.

  2. The HEXITEC Hard X-Ray Pixelated CdTe Imager for Fast Solar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Christe, Steven D.; Ryan, Daniel; Inglis, Andrew R.; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Wilson, Matt; Seller, Paul; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar and astrophysics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in our solar system and beyond, such as solar flares, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. However, such observations require a new breed of solid state detectors sensitive to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to sub-sample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. For solar observations in particular, they must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pile up and saturation in present generation detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector system, called HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 80 x 80 array of 250 micron independent pixels sensitive in the 2-200 keV band and capable of a high full frame read out rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out CdTe pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. We show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, energy resolution, high read out rate, and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments.

  3. The HEXITEC hard x-ray pixelated CdTe imager for fast solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Christe, Steven D.; Ryan, Daniel F.; Inglis, Andrew R.; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Wilson, Matt; Seller, Paul; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar and astrophysics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in our solar system and beyond, such as solar flares, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. However, such observations require a new breed of solid state detectors sensitive to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to sub-sample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. For solar observations in particular, they must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pile up and saturation in present generation detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector system, called HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 8080 array of 250 μm independent pixels sensitive in the 2-200 keV band and capable of a high full frame read out rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out CdTe pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. We show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, energy resolution, high read out rate, and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments.

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Fast Transients. Multi-wavelength Observations and Multi-messenger Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, R.; Mészáros, P.

    2017-07-01

    The current status of observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts and some other related transients, including ultra-long bursts and tidal disruption events, is reviewed. We consider the impact of multi-wavelength data on the formulation and development of theoretical models for the prompt and afterglow emission including the standard fireball model utilizing internal shocks and external shocks, photospheric emission, the role of the magnetic field and hadronic processes. In addition, we discuss some of the prospects for non-photonic multi-messenger detection and for future instrumentation, and comment on some of the outstanding issues in the field.

  5. Energy-dense fast food products cost less: an observational study of the energy density and energy cost of Australian fast foods.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Lyndal; Havill, Michelle; Hughes, Clare; Watson, Wendy L; Chapman, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    To examine the association between energy cost and energy density of fast food products. Twenty Sydney outlets of the five largest fast food chains were surveyed four times. Price and kilojoule data were collected for all limited-time-only menu items (n=54) and a sample of standard items (n=67). Energy cost ($/kilojoule) and energy density (kilojoules/gram) of menu items were calculated. There was a significant inverse relationship between menu item energy density and energy cost (p<0.001). Salads had the highest energy cost, while value items, meals that included a dessert and family meals had the lowest. Fast food chains could provide a wider range of affordable, lower-energy foods, use proportional pricing of larger serve sizes, or change defaults in meals to healthier options. More research is required to determine the most effective strategy to reduce the negative impact of fast food on the population's diet. Current pricing in the fast food environment may encourage unhealthier purchases. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  6. Can model observers be developed to reproduce radiologists' diagnostic performances? Our study says not so fast!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhun; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Reiser, Ingrid; Boone, John M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiologists' diagnostic performances on different image reconstruction algorithms that could be used to optimize image-based model observers. We included a total of 102 pathology proven breast computed tomography (CT) cases (62 malignant). An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain 24 reconstructions with different image appearance for each image. Using quantitative image feature analysis, three IIRs and one clinical reconstruction of 50 lesions (25 malignant) were selected for a reader study. The reconstructions spanned a range of smooth-low noise to sharp-high noise image appearance. The trained classifiers' AUCs on the above reconstructions ranged from 0.61 (for smooth reconstruction) to 0.95 (for sharp reconstruction). Six experienced MQSA radiologists read 200 cases (50 lesions times 4 reconstructions) and provided the likelihood of malignancy of each lesion. Radiologists' diagnostic performances (AUC) ranged from 0.7 to 0.89. However, there was no agreement among the six radiologists on which image appearance was the best, in terms of radiologists' having the highest diagnostic performances. Specifically, two radiologists indicated sharper image appearance was diagnostically superior, another two radiologists indicated smoother image appearance was diagnostically superior, and another two radiologists indicated all image appearances were diagnostically similar to each other. Due to the poor agreement among radiologists on the diagnostic ranking of images, it may not be possible to develop a model observer for this particular imaging task.

  7. Hysteresis in Lanthanide Aluminum Oxides Observed by Fast Pulse CV Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Lu, Qifeng; Yan, Xiaoyi; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxide materials with large dielectric constants (so-called high-k dielectrics) have attracted much attention due to their potential use as gate dielectrics in Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). A novel characterization (pulse capacitance-voltage) method was proposed in detail. The pulse capacitance-voltage technique was employed to characterize oxide traps of high-k dielectrics based on the Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure. The variation of flat-band voltages of the MOS structure was observed and discussed accordingly. Some interesting trapping/detrapping results related to the lanthanide aluminum oxide traps were identified for possible application in Flash memory technology. After understanding the trapping/detrapping mechanism of the high-k oxides, a solid foundation was prepared for further exploration into charge-trapping non-volatile memory in the future. PMID:28788225

  8. NuSTAR AND SWIFT Observations of the Fast Rotating Magnetized White Dwarf AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaguchi, Takao; An, Hongjun; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hayashi, Takayuki; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Rana, Vikram R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Will W.

    2014-01-01

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P(sub spin) = 33.08 s). Compared to many intermediate polars, AE Aquarii shows a soft X-ray spectrum with a very low luminosity (LX (is) approximately 10(exp 31) erg per second). We have analyzed overlapping observations of this system with the NuSTAR and the Swift X-ray observatories in 2012 September. We find the 0.5-30 keV spectra to be well fitted by either an optically thin thermal plasma model with three temperatures of 0.75(+0.18 / -0.45), 2.29(+0.96 / -0.82), and 9.33 (+6.07 / -2.18) keV, or an optically thin thermal plasma model with two temperatures of 1.00 (+0.34 / -0.23) and 4.64 (+1.58 / -0.84) keV plus a power-law component with photon index of 2.50 (+0.17 / -0.23). The pulse profile in the 3-20 keV band is broad and approximately sinusoidal, with a pulsed fraction of 16.6% +/- 2.3%. We do not find any evidence for a previously reported sharp feature in the pulse profile.

  9. NuStar and Swift Observations of the Fast Rotating Magnetized White Dwarf AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaguchi, Takao; An, Hongjun; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hayashi, Takayuki; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Rana, Vikram R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Will W.

    2014-01-01

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P(sub spin) = 33.08 s). Compared to many intermediate polars, AE Aquarii shows a soft X-ray spectrum with a very low luminosity (LX (is) approximately 10(exp 31) erg per second). We have analyzed overlapping observations of this system with the NuSTAR and the Swift X-ray observatories in 2012 September. We find the 0.5-30 keV spectra to be well fitted by either an optically thin thermal plasma model with three temperatures of 0.75(+0.18 / -0.45), 2.29(+0.96 / -0.82), and 9.33 (+6.07 / -2.18) keV, or an optically thin thermal plasma model with two temperatures of 1.00 (+0.34 / -0.23) and 4.64 (+1.58 / -0.84) keV plus a power-law component with photon index of 2.50 (+0.17 / -0.23). The pulse profile in the 3-20 keV band is broad and approximately sinusoidal, with a pulsed fraction of 16.6% +/- 2.3%. We do not find any evidence for a previously reported sharp feature in the pulse profile.

  10. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  11. FAST TRACK PAPER: Regional observations of the second North Korean nuclear test on 2009 May 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jin Soo; Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Geunyoung

    2010-01-01

    The suspicious seismic event that occurred in the northern Korean Peninsula on 2009 May 25 was declared to be the second underground nuclear test (NK2ND) by North Korea. We investigated the characteristics of NK2ND using seismic signals recorded at regional-distance stations in South Korea and China. The Pn/Lg ratios of NK2ND definitely discriminate this event from two nearby natural earthquakes at frequencies above 4 Hz. Full moment tensor inversion of full waveform data shows that NK2ND had a very large isotropic component. Pure isotropic moment tensor inversion also resulted in good recovery of observed waveforms, with clear indication that NK2ND was explosive in origin. The moment magnitude (Mw) from the full moment tensor inversion was estimated to be 4.5 and network-averaged values of 4.6 and 3.6 were calculated for rms mb(Lg) and Ms(VMAX), respectively. Although mb - Ms signature has been considered one of the most reliable discriminants for separating explosions and earthquakes, this signature showed poor discrimination in the case of NK2ND. The Pn/Lg ratios and moment tensor inversion give more reliable evidence than does the mb - Ms for classifying the suspicious event in the northern Korean Peninsula as a possible explosion. The characteristics of NK2ND are also quite similar to those of the first North Korean nuclear test on 2006 October 9.

  12. NuSTAR and swift observations of the fast rotating magnetized white dwarf AE Aquarii

    SciTech Connect

    Kitaguchi, Takao; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J.; Hayashi, Takayuki; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Will W.

    2014-02-10

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P {sub spin} = 33.08 s). Compared to many intermediate polars, AE Aquarii shows a soft X-ray spectrum with a very low luminosity (L {sub X} ∼ 10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1}). We have analyzed overlapping observations of this system with the NuSTAR and the Swift X-ray observatories in 2012 September. We find the 0.5-30 keV spectra to be well fitted by either an optically thin thermal plasma model with three temperatures of 0.75{sub −0.45}{sup +0.18}, 2.29{sub −0.82}{sup +0.96}, and 9.33{sub −2.18}{sup +6.07} keV, or an optically thin thermal plasma model with two temperatures of 1.00{sub −0.23}{sup +0.34} and 4.64{sub −0.84}{sup +1.58} keV plus a power-law component with photon index of 2.50{sub −0.23}{sup +0.17}. The pulse profile in the 3-20 keV band is broad and approximately sinusoidal, with a pulsed fraction of 16.6% ± 2.3%. We do not find any evidence for a previously reported sharp feature in the pulse profile.

  13. Design of fast state observers using a backstepping-like approach with application to synchronization of chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Ashraf A

    2008-06-01

    A simple technique is introduced to build fast state observers for chaotic systems when only a scalar time series of the output is available. This technique relies on using a backstepping-like approach via introducing new virtual states that can be observed using the drive-response synchronization mechanism. The proposed dynamic structure of the virtual states allows for employing control parameters that can adjust the convergence rate of the observed states. In addition, these control parameters can be used to improve the transient performance of the response system to accommodate small and large variations of the initial conditions, thus achieving superior performance to conventional synchronization techniques. Simple Lyapunov functions are used to estimate the range of the control parameters that guarantees stable operation of the proposed technique. Three benchmark chaotic systems are considered for illustration; namely, the Lorenz, Chua, and Rossler systems. The conflict between stability and agility of the states observer is analyzed and a simple tuning mechanism is introduced. Implementation of the proposed technique in both analog and digital forms is also addressed and experimental results are reported ensuring feasibility and real-time applicability. Finally, advantages and limitations are discussed and a comparison with conventional synchronization methods is investigated.

  14. Chandra observation of the fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619: evidence for a neutron star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2005-10-01

    IGR J17544-2619 belongs to a distinct group of at least seven fast X-ray transients that cannot readily be associated with nearby flare stars or pre-main sequence stars and most probably are X-ray binaries with wind accretion. Sofar, the nature of the accretor has been determined in only one case (SAX J1819.3-2525/V4641 Sgr). We carried out a 20 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of IGR J17544-2619 which shows the source in quiescence going into outburst. The Chandra position confirms the previous tentative identification of the optical counterpart, a blue O9Ib supergiant at 3 to 4 kpc (Pellizza, Chaty & Negueruela, in prep.). This is the first detection of a fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The quiescent spectrum is very soft. The photon index of 5.9±1.2 (90% confidence error margin) is much softer than 6 quiescent black hole candidates that were observed with Chandra ACIS-S (Kong et al. 2002, ApJ, 570, 277; Tomsick et al. 2003, ApJ, 599, L133). Assuming that a significant fraction of the quiescent photons comes from the accretor and not the donor star, we infer that the accretor probably is a neutron star. A fit to the quiescent spectrum of the neutron star atmosphere model developed by Pavlov et al. (1994, A&A, 289, 837) and Zavlin et al. (1996, A&A, 315, 141) implies an unabsorbed quiescent 0.5-10 keV luminosity of (5.2±1.3)×1032 erg s-1. We speculate on the nature of the brief outbursts.

  15. Simultaneous X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Radio Observations of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lynch, R. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Bower, G. C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Michilli, D.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5σ upper limit of 3 × 10‑11 erg cm‑2 on the 0.5–10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations < 700 ms, which corresponds to a burst energy of 4 × 1045 erg at the measured distance of FRB 121102. We also place limits on the 0.5–10 keV fluence of 5 × 10‑10 and 1 × 10‑9 erg cm‑2 for bursts emitted at any time during the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, assuming a typical X-ray burst duration of 5 ms. We analyze data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and place a 5σ upper limit on the 10–100 keV fluence of 4 × 10‑9 erg cm‑2 (5 × 1047 erg at the distance of FRB 121102) for gamma-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts. We also present a deep search for a persistent X-ray source using all of the X-ray observations taken to date and place a 5σ upper limit on the 0.5–10 keV flux of 4 × 10‑15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 (3 × 1041 erg s‑1 at the distance of FRB 121102). We discuss these non-detections in the context of the host environment of FRB 121102 and of possible sources of fast radio bursts in general.

  16. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  17. Development of the Large-Scale Statistical Analysis System of Satellites Observations Data with Grid Datafarm Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Murata, K.; Kimura, E.; Honda, R.

    2006-12-01

    In the Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP) field, the amount of satellite observation data has been increasing every year. It is necessary to solve the following three problems to achieve large-scale statistical analyses of plenty of data. (i) More CPU power and larger memory and disk size are required. However, total powers of personal computers are not enough to analyze such amount of data. Super-computers provide a high performance CPU and rich memory area, but they are usually separated from the Internet or connected only for the purpose of programming or data file transfer. (ii) Most of the observation data files are managed at distributed data sites over the Internet. Users have to know where the data files are located. (iii) Since no common data format in the STP field is available now, users have to prepare reading program for each data by themselves. To overcome the problems (i) and (ii), we constructed a parallel and distributed data analysis environment based on the Gfarm reference implementation of the Grid Datafarm architecture. The Gfarm shares both computational resources and perform parallel distributed processings. In addition, the Gfarm provides the Gfarm filesystem which can be as virtual directory tree among nodes. The Gfarm environment is composed of three parts; a metadata server to manage distributed files information, filesystem nodes to provide computational resources and a client to throw a job into metadata server and manages data processing schedulings. In the present study, both data files and data processes are parallelized on the Gfarm with 6 file system nodes: CPU clock frequency of each node is Pentium V 1GHz, 256MB memory and40GB disk. To evaluate performances of the present Gfarm system, we scanned plenty of data files, the size of which is about 300MB for each, in three processing methods: sequential processing in one node, sequential processing by each node and parallel processing by each node. As a result, in comparison between the

  18. Construction of a High Temporal-spectral Resolution Spectrometer for Detection of Fast Transients from Observations of the Sun at 1.4 GHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas-Perez, G. A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Perez-Enriquez, R.

    2014-12-01

    Transients explosive events with time durations from nanoseconds to several hours, are observed in the Sun at high energy bands such as gamma ray and xray. In the radio band, several types of radio bursts are commonly detected from the ground. A few observations of the Sun in the past have also detected a new class of fast transients which are known to have short-live electromagnetic emissions with durations less than 100 ms. The mechanisms that produce such fast transiets remain unclear. Observations of such fast transients over a wide bandwidth is necessary to uderstand the underlying physical process that produce such fast transients. Due to their very large flux densities, fast radio transients can be observed at high time resolution using small antennas in combination with digital signal processing techniques. In this work we report the progress of an spectrometer that is currently in construction at the Observatorio de la Luz of the Universidad de Guanajuato. The instrument which will have the purpose of detecting solar fast radio transients, involves the use of digital devices such as FPGA and ADC cards, in addition with a receiver with high temporal-spectral resolution centered at 1.4 GHz and a pair of 2.3 m satellite dish.

  19. Observation of high coherence in Josephson junction qubits measured in a three-dimensional circuit QED architecture.

    PubMed

    Paik, Hanhee; Schuster, D I; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L I; Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-12-09

    Superconducting quantum circuits based on Josephson junctions have made rapid progress in demonstrating quantum behavior and scalability. However, the future prospects ultimately depend upon the intrinsic coherence of Josephson junctions, and whether superconducting qubits can be adequately isolated from their environment. We introduce a new architecture for superconducting quantum circuits employing a three-dimensional resonator that suppresses qubit decoherence while maintaining sufficient coupling to the control signal. With the new architecture, we demonstrate that Josephson junction qubits are highly coherent, with T2 ∼ 10 to 20  μs without the use of spin echo, and highly stable, showing no evidence for 1/f critical current noise. These results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions in these qubits will allow error rates of a few 10(-4), approaching the error correction threshold.

  20. Evaluation of observable phase space by fast ion loss detector by calculating particle orbits in consideration of plasma facing components and three dimensional magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Kouji; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, Tongnyeol

    2016-11-01

    The orbits of lost ions can be calculated from the information obtained by a fast ion loss detector (FILD). The orbits suggest a source of the lost fast ions in a phase space. However, it is not obvious whether an observable set of orbits, or phase space, of a FILD appropriately covers the region of interest to be investigated since the observable phase space can be affected by plasma facing components (PFCs) and a magnetic configuration. A tool has been developed to evaluate the observable phase space of FILD diagnostic by calculating particle orbits by taking the PFCs and 3D magnetic field into account.

  1. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells.

    PubMed

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-12-28

    In plants, a complex cell wall protects cells and defines their shape. Cellulose fibrils form a multilayered network inside the cell-wall matrix that plays a direct role in controlling cell expansion. Resolving the structure of this network will allow us to comprehend the relationship of cellulose fibril orientation and growth.The fluorescent dye Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS (PFS) was shown to stain cellulose with high specificity and could be used to visualize cellulose bundles in cell walls of Arabidopsis root epidermal cells with confocal microscopy. The resolution limit of confocal microscopy of some 200 nm in xy and 550 nm in z for green light, restricts the direct visualization of cellulose to relatively large bundles, whereas the structure of cellulose microfibrils with their diameter below 10 nm remains unresolved. Over the last decade, several so-called super-resolution microscopy approaches have been developed; in this paper we explore the potential of such approaches for the direct visualization of cellulose. To ensure optimal imaging we determined the spectral properties of PFS-stained tissue. PFS was found not to affect cell viability in the onion bulb scale epidermis. We present the first super-resolution images of cellulose bundles in the plant cell wall produced by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Since TIRF limits observation to the cell surface, we tested as alternatives 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and confocal microscopy, combined with image deconvolution. Both methods offer lower resolution than STORM, but enable 3D imaging. While 3D-SIM produced strong artifacts, deconvolution gave good results. The resolution was improved over conventional confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications

  2. Hybrid on-axis plus ridge-perpendicular circulation reconciles hydrothermal flow observations at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Theissen-Krah, S.; Rupke, L.; Morgan, J.; Iyer, K. H.; Petersen, S.; Devey, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present crustal-scale 3D numerical calculations of hydrothermal fluid flow at fast spreading ridges. The model domain covers 5 km along-axis, 20 km across-axis and extends down to Moho depth. We observe that a complex hydrothermal system develops that extends over the entire crustal thickness and forms a series of on-axis vent fields with an average along-ridge spacing of 500-1000m. This hydrothermal system comprises two distinct flow components: (1) An on-axis circulation above the melt lens with recharging flow surrounding the hot up-flow zones. (2) A ridge-perpendicular circulation with recharge areas located kilometers away from the ridge. Here fluids penetrate the crust down to Moho depth and travel at temperatures of 400-600°C towards the ridge where they merge with the on-axis circulation in a reaction zone above the axial melt lens. Fluids released at the seafloor are a mixture of both components, with an average ratio between proximately- and distally-sourced fluids of about 2:1. This hybrid hydrothermal system reconciles previously incompatible observations that support either on-axis or ridge-perpendicular circulation patterns. The potential co-existence of two interacting hydrothermal circulations at fast spreading ridges is of importance for the interpretation of chemical signatures at hydrothermal vents and the quantification of the mass and energy exchange between ocean and solid earth: (1) A vertically and laterally extended ridge-perpendicular circulation will expose a much larger volume of oceanic crust to high-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Especially the lower crust would also be exposed to significant hydrothermal fluid flow and thus geochemical mining. (2) Fluids that migrate ridge-perpendicular and undergo phase separation at depth are likely to separate gravitationally from the denser and highly saline brine phase. Only the vapor-like phase may migrate up-slope towards the top of the melt lens, where these fluids would provide a

  3. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): Fast-Scan Single-Dish Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Iwai, K.; Phillips, N. M.; Hills, R. E.; Hirota, A.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T. S.; Hales, A. S.; Sawada, T.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Marson, R. G.; Kawasaki, W.; Muller, E.; Nakazato, T.; Sugimoto, K.; Brajša, R.; Skokić, I.; Bárta, M.; Kim, S.; Remijan, A. J.; de Gregorio, I.; Corder, S. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Loukitcheva, M.; Chen, B.; De Pontieu, B.; Fleishmann, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kobelski, A.; Wedemeyer, S.; Yan, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope has commenced science observations of the Sun starting in late 2016. Since the Sun is much larger than the field of view of individual ALMA dishes, the ALMA interferometer is unable to measure the background level of solar emission when observing the solar disk. The absolute temperature scale is a critical measurement for much of ALMA solar science, including the understanding of energy transfer through the solar atmosphere, the properties of prominences, and the study of shock heating in the chromosphere. In order to provide an absolute temperature scale, ALMA solar observing will take advantage of the remarkable fast-scanning capabilities of the ALMA 12 m dishes to make single-dish maps of the full Sun. This article reports on the results of an extensive commissioning effort to optimize the mapping procedure, and it describes the nature of the resulting data. Amplitude calibration is discussed in detail: a path that uses the two loads in the ALMA calibration system as well as sky measurements is described and applied to commissioning data. Inspection of a large number of single-dish datasets shows significant variation in the resulting temperatures, and based on the temperature distributions, we derive quiet-Sun values at disk center of 7300 K at λ = 3 mm and 5900 K at λ = 1.3 mm. These values have statistical uncertainties of about 100 K, but systematic uncertainties in the temperature scale that may be significantly larger. Example images are presented from two periods with very different levels of solar activity. At a resolution of about 25'', the 1.3 mm wavelength images show temperatures on the disk that vary over about a 2000 K range. Active regions and plages are among the hotter features, while a large sunspot umbra shows up as a depression, and filament channels are relatively cool. Prominences above the solar limb are a common feature of the single-dish images.

  4. Impact of preoperative fasting times on blood glucose concentration, ketone bodies and acid-base balance in children younger than 36 months: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Nils; Beck, Christiane; Huber, Dirk; Nickel, Katja; Sander, Björn; Witt, Lars-Henrik; Boethig, Dietmar; Sümpelmann, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to preoperative fasting guidelines in paediatric anaesthesia, actual fasting times are often too long. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative fasting on glucose concentration, ketone bodies and acid-base balance in children. A prospective, noninterventional, clinical observational study. A single-centre trial, study period from June 2014 to November 2014. One hundred children aged 0 to 36 months scheduled for elective paediatric surgery. Patient demographics, fasting times, haemodynamic data, glucose and ketone body concentrations, and acid-base parameters after induction of anaesthesia were documented using a standardised case report form. Mean fasting period was 7.8 ± 4.5 (3.5 to 20) h, and deviation from guideline (ΔGL) was 3.3 ± 3.2 (-2 to 14) h. Linear regression showed a significant correlation between fasting times and ketone bodies, anion gap, base excess, osmolality as well as bicarbonate (for each, P < 0.05), but not glucose or lactate. In children with ΔGL more than 2 h (54%), ketone bodies, osmolality and anion gap were significantly higher and base excess significantly lower than children with ΔGL less than 2 h (for each, P < 0.05). After prolonged preoperative fasting, children younger than 36 months can present with ketoacidosis and (low) normal blood glucose concentrations. Actual fasting times should be optimised according to existing guidelines. In small infants, deviations from fasting guidelines should be as short as possible and not longer than 2 h.

  5. MEMS Inertial Sensors-Based Multi-Loop Control Enhanced by Disturbance Observation and Compensation for Fast Steering Mirror System.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Mao, Yao; Ren, Ge

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, an approach to improve the disturbance suppression performance of a fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors is proposed. The disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) control method is recommended to enhance the classical multi-loop feedback control (MFC) for line-of-sight (LOS) stabilization in the FSM system. MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes have been used in the FSM system tentatively to implement MFC instead of fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOG) because of its smaller, lighter, cheaper features and gradually improved performance. However, the stabilization performance of FSM is still suffering a large number of mechanical resonances and time delay induced by a low CCD sampling rate, which causes insufficient error attenuation when suffering uncertain disturbances. Thus, in order to make further improvements on the stabilization performance, a cascaded MFC enhanced by DOC method is proposed. The sensitivity of this method shows the significant improvement of the conventional MFC system. Simultaneously, the analysis of stabilization accuracy is also presented. A series of comparative experimental results demonstrate the disturbance suppression performance of the FSM control system based on the MEMS inertial sensors can be effectively improved by the proposed approach.

  6. Prioritization for Downlink of Scientific Observations for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Using Trigger Parameters from the Fast Plasma Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, W. R.; Barrie, A. C.; Boardsen, S. A.; Giles, B. L.; Ergun, R.; Avanov, L. A.; Chandler, M. O.; Coffey, V. N.; Dorelli, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Lavraud, B.; Mackler, D. A.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C.; Rager, A. C.; Saito, Y.; Smith, S. E.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) acquires measurements of charged particles and electric and magnetic fields from 4 spacecraft observatories for the purpose of understanding magnetic reconnection. High temporal resolution measurements from the instrument suite are required for resolving physical processes within the electron and ion reconnection diffusion regions, which are small and typically moving at high speed with respect to the spacecraft. Telemetry is limited, though, and ultimately just a small fraction of the high-rate data can be transmitted to the ground. For that reason, it is necessary to prioritize observations for storage on the spacecraft and subsequent downlink based on limited information. To facilitate selection of measurements, the Fast Plasma Instrumentation (FPI) produces a set of trigger parameters that partially characterize the measurements and are sufficiently compact that they can be sent to the ground at full temporal resolution. In this presentation, we report on the use of these data and complementary data from other instruments for selection of intervals with high potential for addressing the scientific objectives of the mission.

  7. Fast and slow ion diffusion processes in lithium ion pouch cells during cycling observed with fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Lars Wilko; Kiesel, Peter; Ganguli, Anurag; Lochbaum, Alexander; Saha, Bhaskar; Schwartz, Julian; Bae, Chang-Jun; Alamgir, Mohamed; Raghavan, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Cell monitoring for safe capacity utilization while maximizing pack life and performance is a key requirement for effective battery management and encouraging their adoption for clean-energy technologies. A key cell failure mode is the build-up of residual electrode strain over time, which affects both cell performance and life. Our team has been exploring the use of fiber optic (FO) sensors as a new alternative for cell state monitoring. In this present study, various charge-cycling experiments were performed on Lithium-ion pouch cells with a particular class of FO sensors, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), that were externally attached to the cells. An overshooting of the volume change at high SOC that recovers during rest can be observed. This phenomenon originates from the interplay between a fast and a slow Li ion diffusion process, which leads to non-homogeneous intercalation of Li ions. This paper focuses on the strain relaxation processes that occur after switching from charge to no-load phases. The correlation of the excess volume and subsequent relaxation to SOC as well as temperature is discussed. The implications of being able to monitor this phenomenon to control battery utilization for long life are also discussed.

  8. Combined Multipoint Remote and in situ Observations of the Asymmetric Evolution of a Fast Solar Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollett, T.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Frahm, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Veronig, A. M.; Vršnak, B.; Amerstorfer, U. V.; Farrugia, C. J.; Žic, T.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012 March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind, and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ~2700 km s-1 at 15 R ⊙ to ~1500 km s-1 at 154 R ⊙), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R ⊙ (from ~1700 to ~900 km s-1). After that, it was propagating with a quasi-constant speed in the wake of a preceding event. Our results highlight the importance of studies concerning the unequal evolution of CMEs. Forecasting can only be improved if conditions in the solar wind are properly taken into account and if attention is also paid to large events preceding the one being studied.

  9. MEMS Inertial Sensors-Based Multi-Loop Control Enhanced by Disturbance Observation and Compensation for Fast Steering Mirror System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chao; Mao, Yao; Ren, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to improve the disturbance suppression performance of a fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors is proposed. The disturbance observation and compensation (DOC) control method is recommended to enhance the classical multi-loop feedback control (MFC) for line-of-sight (LOS) stabilization in the FSM system. MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes have been used in the FSM system tentatively to implement MFC instead of fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOG) because of its smaller, lighter, cheaper features and gradually improved performance. However, the stabilization performance of FSM is still suffering a large number of mechanical resonances and time delay induced by a low CCD sampling rate, which causes insufficient error attenuation when suffering uncertain disturbances. Thus, in order to make further improvements on the stabilization performance, a cascaded MFC enhanced by DOC method is proposed. The sensitivity of this method shows the significant improvement of the conventional MFC system. Simultaneously, the analysis of stabilization accuracy is also presented. A series of comparative experimental results demonstrate the disturbance suppression performance of the FSM control system based on the MEMS inertial sensors can be effectively improved by the proposed approach. PMID:27854293

  10. Fast in-situ annealing stage coupled with EBSD: A suitable tool to observe quick recrystallization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzolo, N. Jacomet, S.; Loge, R.E.

    2012-08-15

    A heating stage has been developed to perform in-situ annealing in a SEM equipped with an EBSD system in order to study recrystallization mechanisms. High temperature treatments could then be performed inside the SEM, up to 1180 Degree-Sign C and with high heating and cooling rates ({approx} 100 Degree-Sign C s{sup -1}). Samples were cooled down to room temperature to perform EBSD orientation mapping in between successive short-duration heat treatments. Microstructure evolution snapshots obtained this way allow gaining an insight into recrystallization mechanisms. The interest of such experiments is shown for two examples: static recrystallization of cold deformed pure tantalum and post-dynamic evolution of hot-deformed Zircaloy4. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating stage for in-SEM annealing at high temperature (up to 1200 Degree-Sign C). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High heating and cooling rates (100 Degree-Sign C s{sup -1}), no temperature overshoot. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential observation of very fast recrystallization mechanisms.

  11. DISCOVERY OF ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOWS IN A SAMPLE OF BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Cappi, M.

    2010-08-10

    We present the results of a uniform and systematic search for blueshifted Fe K absorption lines in the X-ray spectra of five bright broad-line radio galaxies observed with Suzaku. We detect, for the first time in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at X-rays, several absorption lines at energies greater than 7 keV in three out of five sources, namely, 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3. The lines are detected with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Their likely interpretation as blueshifted Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines implies an origin from highly ionized gas outflowing with mildly relativistic velocities, in the range v {approx_equal} 0.04-0.15c. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters in the range log {xi} {approx_equal} 4-5.6 erg s{sup -1} cm and column densities of N {sub H} {approx_equal} 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. These characteristics are very similar to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet AGNs. Their estimated location within {approx}0.01-0.3 pc of the central super-massive black hole suggests a likely origin related with accretion disk winds/outflows. Depending on the absorber covering fraction, the mass outflow rate of these UFOs can be comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, these UFOs can play a significant role in the expected feedback from the AGN to the surrounding environment and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets in both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGNs.

  12. Discovery of Ultra-fast Outflows in a Sample of Broad-line Radio Galaxies Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Gofford, J.; Cappi, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of a uniform and systematic search for blueshifted Fe K absorption lines in the X-ray spectra of five bright broad-line radio galaxies observed with Suzaku. We detect, for the first time in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at X-rays, several absorption lines at energies greater than 7 keV in three out of five sources, namely, 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3. The lines are detected with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Their likely interpretation as blueshifted Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines implies an origin from highly ionized gas outflowing with mildly relativistic velocities, in the range v ~= 0.04-0.15c. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters in the range log ξ ~= 4-5.6 erg s-1 cm and column densities of N H ~= 1022-1023 cm-2. These characteristics are very similar to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet AGNs. Their estimated location within ~0.01-0.3 pc of the central super-massive black hole suggests a likely origin related with accretion disk winds/outflows. Depending on the absorber covering fraction, the mass outflow rate of these UFOs can be comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, these UFOs can play a significant role in the expected feedback from the AGN to the surrounding environment and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets in both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGNs.

  13. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  14. COMBINED MULTIPOINT REMOTE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS OF THE ASYMMETRIC EVOLUTION OF A FAST SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, T.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Amerstorfer, U. V.; Frahm, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Farrugia, C. J.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-07-20

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012  March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind, and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ∼2700 km s{sup –1} at 15 R {sub ☉} to ∼1500 km s{sup –1} at 154 R {sub ☉}), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R {sub ☉} (from ∼1700 to ∼900 km s{sup –1}). After that, it was propagating with a quasi-constant speed in the wake of a preceding event. Our results highlight the importance of studies concerning the unequal evolution of CMEs. Forecasting can only be improved if conditions in the solar wind are properly taken into account and if attention is also paid to large events preceding the one being studied.

  15. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  16. ALMA Observations Show Major Mergers Among the Host Galaxies of Fast-growing, High-redshift​ Supermassive​ Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lira, Paulina; Netzer, Hagai; Cicone, Claudia; Maiolino, Roberto; Shemmer, Ohad

    2017-02-01

    We present new ALMA band-7 data for a sample of six luminous quasars at z≃ 4.8, powered by fast-growing supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with rather uniform properties: the typical accretion rates and black hole masses are L/{L}{Edd}≃ 0.7 and {M}{BH}≃ {10}9 {M}ȯ . Our sample consists of three “FIR-bright” sources, which were individually detected in previous Herschel/SPIRE observations, with star formation rates of {SFR}> 1000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1, and three “FIR-faint” sources for which Herschel stacking analysis implies a typical SFR of ∼400 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1. The dusty interstellar medium in the hosts of all six quasars is clearly detected in the ALMA data and resolved on scales of ∼2 kpc, in both continuum ({λ }{rest}∼ 150 μ {{m}}) and [{{C}} {{II}}] λ 157.74 μ {{m}} line emission. The continuum emission is in good agreement with the expectations from the Herschel data, confirming the intense SF activity in the quasar hosts. Importantly, we detect companion sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) for three sources—one FIR-bright and two FIR-faint, separated by ∼ 14{--}45 {kpc} and < 450 {km} {{{s}}}-1 from the quasar hosts. The [{{C}} {{II}}]-based dynamical mass estimates for the interacting SMGs are within a factor of ∼3 of the quasar hosts’ masses, while the continuum emission implies {{SFR}}{quasar}∼ (2{--}11)× {{SFR}}{SMG}. Our ALMA data therefore clearly support the idea that major mergers are important drivers for rapid early SMBH growth. However, the fact that not all high-SFR quasar hosts are accompanied by interacting SMGs and the gas kinematics as observed by ALMA suggest that other processes may be fueling these systems. Our analysis thus demonstrates the diversity of host galaxy properties and gas accretion mechanisms associated with early and rapid SMBH growth.

  17. Fast events and waves in an active region of the Sun observed in Hα with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Andrade Nuño, B.; Bello González, N.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Kneer, F.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    Context: We study the chromosphere of an active region of the Sun in the Hα line. Aims: The development of new instrumentation and new methods of data analysis allows to scrutinize the dynamics of the solar chromosphere with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. The observations we present shed light on some magneto-dynamic processes occurring above an active region in the chromosphere. Methods: We took a time series of 55 min in Hα from AR 10875 at θ≈36°. We used the “Göttingen” Fabry-Perot spectrometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife, to obtain two-dimensional spectrograms in Hα. Adaptive optics and image reconstruction yielded a spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec throughout the time sequence. From the wealth of structures, we selected areas of interest to study further, in detail, some ongoing processes. Results: A small straight surge developed aside of a pore with upward phase speed of 100 km s-1 and line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of 15 km s-1. The surge retreated rapidly with LOS velocity of 45 km s-1 at its mouth. It underwent a rebound and fell back again. Two sympathetic mini-flares were observed that lasted only approximately 40 s, but showed strong Hα emission. We found magnetoacoustic waves in long fibrils as mainly short wave trains, short packets or pulses, i.e., solitary waves consisting of small (1´´-2´´) blobs. They start at either end of the fibrils and travel with phase speeds of 12-14 km s-1, i.e., close to the tube speed and approximately the sound velocity for sufficiently large magnetic field strengths. Some waves speed up to reach velocities of the order of 30 km s-1. This is much lower than the expected Alfvén velocity of ≥200 km s-1 for reasonable magnetic field strengths and mass densities. We suggest that slow waves are not purely longitudinal, but possess gas velocities perpendicular to the direction of propagation of few km s-1. Also, fast waves travel along sinuous

  18. On variation of outer radiation belt electrons and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere during large magnetic storms: FAST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.; McFadden, J. P.; Elphic, R. C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Reeves, G. D.; Yao, Y.; Lund, E. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Carlson, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    ~~It is observationally known that the O+ ion population becomes an important contributor to the ring current during large magnetic storms. Its importance in terms of energy density increases with increasing geomagnetic activity. On the other hand, the processes responsible for this dramatic composition change of the ring current are still under debate. Enhanced polar outflows during geomagnetically active periods are considered responsible for the composition change. However, the link between the outflows and high-energy ring current is not clear due to the lack of low-energy ion observations in the inner magnetosphere inside GEO (L~6.6 Re). ~~The electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) and the time-of-flight energy angle mass spectrometer (TEAMS) onboard the FAST satellite had been operated in the mid-latitude regions above ~45 degrees for the past 7 years and observed ions below 30 keV. Contaminations due to penetrating radiation-belt electrons into the ESA instrument needs to be corrected before calculating the moments of these low-energy ions. The radiation belt contamination is almost uniform in energy. Utilizing this feature, we developed an automated method to subtract the radiation contamination from ESA data. Comparison between the estimated background and energetic particle data at GEO (L~6.6 Re) orbits indicates that electrons with energies of 0.5-1.5 MeV are the main contributor to the background. The background count variation during several magnetic storms indicates that the outer radiation belt electron fluxes decreased dramatically during the storm main phase, recovered from the inner L shells during the rapid recovery phase, and the peak flux location finally moved to higher latitudes (close to the pre-storm position). This time evolution is consistent with previous observations of the outer radiation belt. ~~The data after the background correction show that O+ becomes the major ion component in the inner magnetosphere during

  19. Acute heart failure presentations and outcomes during the fasting month of Ramadan: an observational report from seven Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    Salam, Amar M; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Singh, Rajvir; Asaad, Nidal; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Salim, Imtiaz; AlHabib, Khalid F; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; AlMahmeed, Wael; Bulbanat, Bassam; Ridha, Mustafa; Bazargani, Nooshin; Amin, Haitham; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Al Faleh, Husam; Albackr, Hanan; Panduranga, Prashanth; Shehab, Abdulla; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2017-10-03

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is practiced by over 1.5 billion Muslims worldwide. It remains unclear, however, how this change in lifestyle affects heart failure, a condition that has reached epidemic dimensions. This study examined the effects of fasting in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) using data from a large multi-center heart failure registry. Data were derived from Gulf CARE (Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry), a prospective multi-center study of consecutive patients hospitalized with AHF during February-November 2012. The study included 4,157 patients, of which 306 (7.4%) were hospitalized with AHF in the fasting month of Ramadan, while 3,851 patients (92.6%) were hospitalized in other days. Clinical characteristics, precipitating factors, management, and outcome were compared among the two groups. Patients admitted during Ramadan had significantly lower prevalence of symptoms and signs of volume overload compared to patients hospitalized in other months. Atrial arrhythmias were significantly less frequent and cholesterol levels were significantly lower in Ramadan. Hospitalization in Ramadan was not independently associated with increased immediate or 1-year mortality. The current study represents the largest evaluation of the effects of fasting on AHF. It reports an improved volume status in fasting patients. There were also favorable effects on atrial arrhythmia and total cholesterol and no effects on immediate or long-term outcomes.

  20. Optical and near-IR observations of the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova 2010ae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Hsiao, E.; Valenti, S.; Taddia, F.; Rivera-Thorsen, T. J.; Leloudas, G.; Maeda, K.; Pastorello, A.; Phillips, M. M.; Pignata, G.; Baron, E.; Burns, C. R.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Hamuy, M.; Höflich, P.; Morrell, N.; Prieto, J. L.; Benetti, S.; Campillay, A.; Haislip, J. B.; LaClutze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Reichart, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy is presented for the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova (SN) 2010ae. Contingent on the adopted value of host extinction, SN 2010ae reached a peak brightness of -13.8 > MV > -15.3 mag, while modeling of the UVOIR light curve suggests it produced 0.003-0.007 M⊙ of 56Ni, ejected 0.30-0.60 M⊙ of material, and had an explosion energy of 0.04-0.30 × 1051 erg. The values of these explosion parameters are similar to the peculiar SN 2008ha -for which we also present previously unpublished early phase optical and NIR light curves - and places these two transients at the faint end of the 2002cx-like SN population. Detailed inspection of the post-maximum NIR spectroscopic sequence indicates the presence of a multitude of spectral features, which are identified through SYNAPPS modeling to be mainly attributed to Co ii. Comparison with a collection of published and unpublished NIR spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe, reveals that a Co ii footprint is ubiquitous to this subclass of transients, providing a link to Type Ia SNe. A visual-wavelength spectrum of SN 2010ae obtained at +252 days past maximum shows a striking resemblance to a similar epoch spectrum of SN 2002cx. However, subtle differences in the strength and ratio of calcium emission features, as well as diversity among similar epoch spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe indicates a range of physical conditions of the ejecta, highlighting the heterogeneous nature of thispeculiar class of transients. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programs 082.A-0526, 084.D-0719, 088.D-0222, 184.D-1140, and 386.D-0966); the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Programs GS-2010A-Q-14 and GS-2010A-Q-38); the Magellan 6.5 m telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory; and the SOAR telescope.Tables 1-5 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http

  1. Direct observation of the core/double-shell architecture of intense dual-mode luminescent tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Jang, Ho Seong

    2016-05-21

    Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors-Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4-and the C/D-S structure has been proved by extensive scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. Colloidal LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors with a tetragonal bipyramidal shape are synthesized for the first time and they show intense DC green light via energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) under illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors show 65 times higher photoluminescence intensity than LiYF4:Tb nanophosphors under illumination with UV light and the LiYF4:Ce,Tb is adapted into a luminescent shell of the tetragonal bipyramidal C/D-S nanophosphors. The formation of the DC shell on the core significantly enhances UC luminescence from the UC core under irradiation of near infrared light and concurrently generates DC luminescence from the core/shell nanophosphors under UV light. Coating with an inert inorganic shell further enhances the UC-DC dual-mode luminescence by suppressing the surface quenching effect. The C/D-S nanophosphors show 3.8% UC quantum efficiency (QE) at 239 W cm(-2) and 73.0 ± 0.1% DC QE. The designed C/D-S architecture in tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors is rigorously verified by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, with the assistance of line profile simulation, using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a high-efficiency EDX. The feasibility of these C/D-S nanophosphors for transparent display devices is also considered.

  2. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  3. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  4. Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

  5. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  6. Direct observation of the core/double-shell architecture of intense dual-mode luminescent tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jang, Ho Seong

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors--Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4--and the C/D-S structure has been proved by extensive scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. Colloidal LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors with a tetragonal bipyramidal shape are synthesized for the first time and they show intense DC green light via energy transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ under illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors show 65 times higher photoluminescence intensity than LiYF4:Tb nanophosphors under illumination with UV light and the LiYF4:Ce,Tb is adapted into a luminescent shell of the tetragonal bipyramidal C/D-S nanophosphors. The formation of the DC shell on the core significantly enhances UC luminescence from the UC core under irradiation of near infrared light and concurrently generates DC luminescence from the core/shell nanophosphors under UV light. Coating with an inert inorganic shell further enhances the UC-DC dual-mode luminescence by suppressing the surface quenching effect. The C/D-S nanophosphors show 3.8% UC quantum efficiency (QE) at 239 W cm-2 and 73.0 +/- 0.1% DC QE. The designed C/D-S architecture in tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors is rigorously verified by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, with the assistance of line profile simulation, using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a high-efficiency EDX. The feasibility of these C/D-S nanophosphors for transparent display devices is also considered.Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors--Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4--and the C/D-S structure

  7. Crustal architecture and tectonic evolution in the South Pole frontier, East Antarctica, in light of recent aerogeophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Forsberg, Rene; Olesen, Arne; Eagles, Graeme; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Casal, Tania

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of interior East Antarctica has increased significantly in recent years, aided by major aerogeophysical exploration efforts conducted by the geosciences community since the International Polar Year. Aerogeophysical and satellite imaging is helping unveil cryptic crustal provinces and this is enabling new studies of the major tectonic process that shaped East Antarctica through the supercontinent cycle (e.g. Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; Aitken et al., 2014, GRL). However, the South Pole itself has remained one of the largest "poles of ignorance", as very little data have been acquired here since pioneering aerogeophysical surveys performed in the 1970's and a single more detailed US survey flown in the late 1990's from the Transantarctic Mountains to South Pole (Studinger et al., 2006, EPSL). During the 2015-2016 Antarctic campaign we flew a major aerogeophysical survey over the South Pole frontier, collecting ca 30,000 line km of new radio echo sounding, laser altimetry, airborne gravity and aeromagnetic data. The main aim of the PolarGAP project, supported by the European Space Agency was to fill in the data void in GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) satellite gravity south of 83.3°S. Here we present the new ice thickness, bedrock topography, and gravity and magnetic anomaly images derived from the survey and interpret them to investigate the crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of the South Pole region. The Free-air gravity and radar data reveal the form and extent of the Pensacola-Pole Subglacial Basin that stretches from the Weddell Sea to South Pole. Linear free-air gravity lows within the basin are interpreted here as a system of glacially overdeepened grabens flanked by uplifted horst blocks, including the Pensacola Mountains, Patuxent Range and the Argentine Range. The grabens are inferred to be linked to the Jurassic Transantarctic rift system, which at regional to continental-scale, is associated

  8. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B.; ...

    2015-12-16

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. We observed several geometric parameters in order to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. Additionally, the architecture offers a route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials.

  9. Does Ramadan fasting affect sleep?

    PubMed

    Bahammam, A

    2006-12-01

    Experimental fasting has been shown to alter the sleep-wakefulness pattern in various species. As fasting during Ramadan is distinct from experimental fasting, the physiological and behavioural changes occurring during Ramadan fasting may differ from those occurring during experimental fasting. There has been increased interest in recent years in sleep changes and daytime sleepiness during Ramadan. Moreover, many of those who fast during Ramadan associate this fasting with increased daytime sleepiness and decreased performance. This raises the question of whether Ramadan fasting affects sleep. In this review, we discuss the findings of research conducted to assess changes in sleep pattern, chronobiology, circadian rhythms, daytime sleepiness and function and sleep architecture during the month of Ramadan. Where applicable, these findings are compared with those obtained during experimental fasting.

  10. Observation of fast and slow interatomic Coulombic decay in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueguang; Miteva, Tsveta; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Dorn, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization (E0=90 eV ) using a multiparticle coincidence experiment in which the momentum vectors and, consequently, the kinetic energies for electrons and fragment ions are determined. The signature of the ICD process is obtained from a correlation map between ejected electron energy and kinetic energy release (KER) for Ar++Ar+ fragment ions where low-energy ICD electrons can be identified. Furthermore, two types of ICD processes, termed fast and slow interatomic decay, are separated by the ICD initial-state energies and projectile energy losses. The dependence of the energies of emitted low-energy ICD electrons on the initial-state energy is studied. ICD electron energy spectra and KER spectra are obtained separately for fast and slow decay processes where the KER spectra for the slow decay channel are strongly influenced by nuclear motion. The KER and ICD electron energy spectra are well reproduced by ab initio calculations.

  11. Interaction of the Bow Shock with a Tangential Discontinuity and Solar-Wind Density Decrease: Observations of Predicted Fast Mode Waves and Magnetosheath Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Ober, D. M.; Farrugia, C. J.; Kucharek, H.; Lester, M.; Mozer, F. S.; Russell, C. T.; Siebert, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    Shortly after 06:00 UT on 7 April 2000 a tangential discontinuity (TD) in the solar wind passed the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite (ACE). It was characterized by a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) by ~145° and more than a factor-of-two decrease in the plasma density. About 50 minutes later Polar encountered more complex manifestations of the discontinuity near noon in the magnetosheath outside the northern hemisphere cusp. Based on Polar observations, theoretical modeling, and MHD simulations we interpret the event as demonstrating that: (1) a fast-mode rarefaction wave was generated during the TD-bow shock interaction, (2) the fast wave carried a significant fraction of the density change to the magnetopause while the remainder stayed with the transmitted discontinuity, and (3) magnetic merging occurred between IMF field lines within the magnetosheath on opposite sides of the discontinuity's surface as it approached the magnetopause. Before the discontinuity passed the spacecraft, Polar detected ions accelerated anti-parallel to B in the fast wave and perpendicular to B in a weak slow-mode structure located adjacent to and just downstream of the fast wave. The anti-parallel accelerated ions in the fast wave had no measurable ion-velocity dispersion signature, placing their source a few RE equatorward of Polar. Simulation results, a Walén test, detections of wave Poynting flux parallel to B, bi-directional electron heat flux, and ion velocity enhancements all indicate that the three ion bursts associated with the passage of the discontinuity were signatures of time- dependent, magnetic merging events within the magnetosheath.

  12. Strategies to Make Ramadan Fasting Safer in Type 2 Diabetics: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lee, Jun Yang; Tan, Christina San San; Wong, Chee Piau

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is the holy month for Muslims whereby they fast from predawn to after sunset and is observed by all healthy Muslim adults as well as a large population of type 2 diabetic Muslims.To determine the comparative effectiveness of various strategies that have been used for type 2 diabetic Muslim who fast during Ramadan.A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies (RCT) as well as observational studies for patients with type 2 diabetes who fasted during Ramadan was conducted. Eight databases were searched from January 1980 through October 2015 for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened and assessed study for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. A network meta-analysis for each outcome was fitted separately, combining direct and indirect evidence for each comparison.Twenty-nine studies, 16 RCTs and 13 observational studies each met the inclusion criteria. The most common strategy used was drug changes during the Ramadan period, which found that the use of DPP-4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor -4) inhibitors were associated with a reduction in incidence of experiencing hypoglycemia during Ramadan in both RCTs (pooled relative risk: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.44-0.72) as well as in observational studies (pooled relative risk: 0.27; 0.09-0.75). Ramadan-focused education was shown to be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in observational studies but not RCTs (0.25 versus 1.00). Network meta-analyses suggest that incretin mimetics can reduce the risk of hypoglycemia by nearly 1.5 times.The newer antidiabetic agents appear to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control when compared with sulfonylureas. Ramadan-focused education shows to be a promising strategy but more rigorous examination from RCTs are required.

  13. Observation of fast expansion velocity with insulating tungsten wires on ∼80 kA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Li, Y.; Zhang, J. H.; Sun, T. P.; Wang, L. P.; Sheng, L.; Qiu, M. T.; Mao, W. T.; Wu, J. Li, X. W.

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents experimental results on the effects of insulating coatings on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches on an 80 kA, 100 ns current facility. Expansion velocity is obviously increased from ∼0.25 km/s to ∼3.5 km/s by using the insulating coatings. It can be inferred that the wire cores are in gaseous state with this fast expansion velocity. An optical framing camera and laser probing images show that the standard wire arrays have typical ablation process which is similar to their behaviors on mega-ampere facilities. The ablation process and precursor plasma are suppressed for dielectric tungsten wires. The wire array implosion might be improved if these phenomena can be reproduced on Mega-ampere facilities.

  14. Do English healthcare settings use 'Choice Architecture' principles in promoting healthy lifestyles for people with psoriasis? An observational study.

    PubMed

    Keyworth, Chris; Nelson, Pauline A; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Cordingley, Lis; Bundy, Chris

    2015-06-02

    The influence of environmental factors in shaping behaviour is becoming increasingly prominent in public health policy, but whether health promotion strategies use this knowledge is unknown. Health promotion is important in the management of psoriasis, a long-term inflammatory skin condition, and health centre waiting areas are ideal places to promote health information to such patients. We systematically examined patient information materials containing either general, or specific, health messages for patients with psoriasis. An observation schedule was used to record the frequency and quality of leaflets and posters addressing lifestyle behaviour change in health centre waiting areas. Content analysis was used to analyse: frequency, characteristics and standard of the materials. Across 24 health centres 262 sources of lifestyle information were recorded (median per site = 10; range = 0-40). These were mainly: generic posters/displays of lifestyle support (n = 113); and generic materials in waiting areas (n = 98). Information quality was poor and poorly displayed, with no high quality psoriasis-specific patient materials evident. There is little attempt to promote healthy lifestyle as an important aspect of psoriasis management in the clinic environment. Evidence about using environmental cues/techniques to prompt behaviour change in people with psoriasis does not currently inform the design and display of such information in standard health centre settings, which are prime locations for communicating messages about healthy lifestyle. Future research should test the efficacy and impact of theory-informed, high quality health promotion messages on health outcomes for patients with psoriasis.

  15. Open-source Peer-to-Peer Environment to Enable Sensor Web Architecture: Application to Geomagnetic Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M.; Pulkkinen, A.

    2007-12-01

    -reported values. Remote "browsing" peers access these modeling-run results within the Environment, but also have the option to access the sensors directly. We expect that this preparatory work will benefit the LWS/Geospace program, as real-time geomagnetic observations are relevant to Sun-Earth Connection studies.

  16. SYNCHROTRON HEATING BY A FAST RADIO BURST IN A SELF-ABSORBED SYNCHROTRON NEBULA AND ITS OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Dai, Zi-Gao; Zhang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are mysterious transient sources. If extragalactic, as suggested by their relative large dispersion measures, their brightness temperatures must be extremely high. Some FRB models (e.g., young pulsar model, magnetar giant flare model, or supra-massive neutron star collapse model) suggest that they may be associated with a synchrotron nebula. Here we study a synchrotron-heating process by an FRB in a self-absorbed synchrotron nebula. If the FRB frequency is below the synchrotron self-absorption frequency of the nebula, electrons in the nebula would absorb FRB photons, leading to a harder electron spectrum and enhanced self-absorbed synchrotron emission. In the meantime, the FRB flux is absorbed by the nebula electrons. We calculate the spectra of FRB-heated synchrotron nebulae, and show that the nebula spectra would show a significant hump in several decades near the self-absorption frequency. Identifying such a spectral feature would reveal an embedded FRB in a synchrotron nebula.

  17. In Situ TEM Observations of Sn-Containing Silicon Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Pore Formation Due to Fast Lithiation/Delithiation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaotang; Bogart, Timothy D.; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian

    2015-09-03

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out to observe directly in real time the lithiation and delithiation of silicon (Si) nanowires with significant amounts of tin (Sn). The incorporation of Sn significantly enhances the lithiation rate compared to typical Si nanowires. For instance, surface diffusion is enhanced by two orders of magnitude and the bulk lithiation rate by one order of magnitude, resulting in a sequential surface-then-core lithiation mechanism. Pore formation was observed in the nanowires during delithiation, most likely as a result of the fast delithiation kinetics of the nanowires. Pore formation was reversible and the pores disappeared during subsequent lithiation. When an amorphous Si shell was applied to the nanowires, pore formation was not observed during the in situ TEM experimences. Ex situ TEM analysis of Sn-containing Si nanowires cycled in coin cell batteries also showed that the application of an a-Si shell significantly retards pore formation in these nanowires.

  18. EOF-based regression algorithm for the fast retrieval of atmospheric CO2 total column amount from the GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bril, Andrey; Maksyutov, Shamil; Belikov, Dmitry; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Yoshida, Yukio; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Griffith, David; Hase, Frank; Kivi, Rigel; Morino, Isamu; Notholt, Justus; Pollard, David F.; Sussmann, Ralf; Velazco, Voltaire A.; Warneke, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a novel retrieval algorithm for the rapid retrieval of the carbon dioxide total column amounts from high resolution spectra in the short wave infrared (SWIR) range observations by the Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The algorithm performs EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function)-based decomposition of the measured spectral radiance and derives the relationship of limited number of the decomposition coefficients in terms of the principal components with target gas amount and a priori data such as airmass, surface pressure, etc. The regression formulae for retrieving target gas amounts are derived using training sets of collocated GOSAT and ground-based observations. The precision/accuracy characteristics of the algorithm are analyzed by the comparison of the retrievals with those from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements and with the modeled data, and appear similar to those achieved by full-physics retrieval algorithms.

  19. Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2001-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

  20. Preliminary Results From Observing The Fast Stardust Sample Return Capsule Entry In Earth's Atmosphere On January 15, 2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Jordan, D.; Kontinos, D.; Wright, M.; Olejniczak, J.; Raiche, G.; Wercinski, P.; Schilling, E.; Taylor, M.; Rairden, R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; McHarg, M. G.; Abe, S.; Winter, M.

    2006-08-01

    In order for NASA's Stardust mission to return a comet sample to Earth, the probe was put in an orbit similar to that of Near Earth Asteroids. As a result, the reentry in Earth's atmosphere on January 15, 2006, was the fastest entry ever for a NASA spacecraft, with a speed of 12.8 km/s, similar to that of natural fireballs. A new thermal protection material, PICA, was used to protect the sample, a material that may have a future as thermal protection for the Crew Return Vehicle or for future planetary missions. An airborne and ground-based observing campaign, the "Stardust Hyperseed MAC", was organized to observe the reentry under good observing conditions, with spectroscopic and imaging techniques commonly used for meteor observations (http:// reentry.arc.nasa.gov). A spectacular video of the reentry was obtained. The spectroscopic observations measure how much light was generated in the shock wave, how that radiation added to heating the surface, how the PICA ablated as a function of altitude, and how the carbon reacted with the shock wave to form CN, a possible marker of prebiotic chemistry in natural meteors. In addition, the observations measured a transient signal of zinc and potassium early in the trajectory, from the ablation of a white paint layer that had been applied to the heat shield for thermal control. Implications for sample return and the exploration of atmospheres in future planetary missions will be discussed.

  1. Consumer underestimation of sodium in fast food restaurant meals: Results from a cross-sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Alyssa J; Ramirez, Maricelle; Block, Jason P

    2017-02-21

    Restaurants are key venues for reducing sodium intake in the U.S. but little is known about consumer perceptions of sodium in restaurant foods. This study quantifies the difference between estimated and actual sodium content of restaurant meals and examines predictors of underestimation in adult and adolescent diners at fast food restaurants. In 2013 and 2014, meal receipts and questionnaires were collected from adults and adolescents dining at six restaurant chains in four New England cities. The sample included 993 adults surveyed during 229 dinnertime visits to 44 restaurants and 794 adolescents surveyed during 298 visits to 49 restaurants after school or at lunchtime. Diners were asked to estimate the amount of sodium (mg) in the meal they had just purchased. Sodium estimates were compared with actual sodium in the meal, calculated by matching all items that the respondent purchased for personal consumption to sodium information on chain restaurant websites. Mean (SD) actual sodium (mg) content of meals was 1292 (970) for adults and 1128 (891) for adolescents. One-quarter of diners (176 (23%) adults, 155 (25%) adolescents) were unable or unwilling to provide estimates of the sodium content of their meals. Of those who provided estimates, 90% of adults and 88% of adolescents underestimated sodium in their meals, with adults underestimating sodium by a mean (SD) of 1013 mg (1,055) and adolescents underestimating by 876 mg (1,021). Respondents underestimated sodium content more for meals with greater sodium content. Education about sodium at point-of-purchase, such as provision of sodium information on restaurant menu boards, may help correct consumer underestimation, particularly for meals of high sodium content.

  2. How Fast Is Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Abe

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to answer for themselves the question of how fast a body must travel before the nonrelativistic expression must be replaced with the correct relativistic expression by deciding on the accuracy required in describing the kinetic energy of a body. (ZWH)

  3. Experimental Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology at the University of Manitoba, including the educational context and design goals. Includes building plans and photographs. (EV)

  4. Detection of special nuclear material by observation of delayed neutrons with a novel fast neutron composite detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Nattress, Jason; Barhoumi Meddeb, Amira; Foster, Albert; Trivelpiece, Cory; Rose, Paul; Erickson, Anna; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Detection of shielded special nuclear material is crucial to countering nuclear terrorism and proliferation, but its detection is challenging. By observing the emission of delayed neutrons, which is a unique signature of nuclear fission, the presence of nuclear material can be inferred. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from natural uranium by using monoenergetic photons and neutrons to induce fission. An interrogating beam of 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and neutrons was produced using the 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction and used to probe different targets. Neutron detectors with complementary Cherenkov detectors then discriminate material undergoing fission. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite neutron detector was used, which displays excellent n/ γ discrimination even at low energies, to observe delayed neutrons from uranium fission. Delayed neutrons have relatively low energies (~0.5 MeV) compared to prompt neutrons, which makes them difficult to detect using recoil-based detectors. Neutrons were counted and timed after the beam was turned off to observe the characteristic decaying time profile of delayed neutrons. The expected decay of neutron emission rate is in agreement with the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups.

  5. FAST EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DIMMING ASSOCIATED WITH A CORONAL JET SEEN IN MULTI-WAVELENGTH AND STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Innes, D. E.; Shibata, K.; Park, Y.-D.

    2013-03-20

    We have investigated a coronal jet observed near the limb on 2010 June 27 by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS), and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), and by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and on the disk by STEREO-A/EUVI. From EUV (AIA and EIS) and soft X-ray (XRT) images we have identified both cool and hot jets. There was a small loop eruption seen in Ca II images of the SOT before the jet eruption. We found that the hot jet preceded its associated cool jet by about 2 minutes. The cool jet showed helical-like structures during the rising period which was supported by the spectroscopic analysis of the jet's emission. The STEREO observation, which enabled us to observe the jet projected against the disk, showed dimming at 195 A along a large loop connected to the jet. We measured a propagation speed of {approx}800 km s{sup -1} for the dimming front. This is comparable to the Alfven speed in the loop computed from a magnetic field extrapolation of the photospheric field measured five days earlier by the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the loop densities obtained from EIS Fe XIV {lambda}264.79/274.20 line ratios. We interpret the dimming as indicating the presence of Alfvenic waves initiated by reconnection in the upper chromosphere.

  6. How fast is the middle-lower crust flowing in eastern Tibet? A constraint from geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Sun, Wenke

    2016-09-01

    Various geophysical observations, including seismological and magnetotelluric imaging, have implied that the deep crust beneath eastern Tibet may be partially melted and flowing faster than the brittle upper crust. However, it is still unclear how much faster the deep crust is flowing. Geodetic observations, which are more sensitive to dynamic changes, provide constraints on the flow rate of the middle and lower crust (MLC). Three-dimensional GPS velocities show that deformation within the brittle upper crust contributes little (0.02 ± 0.02 mm/yr) to the overall surface uplift (2.7 ± 0.3 mm/yr). Therefore, two plausible models for the surface uplift are discussed, which are consistent with the geodetic constraints. In the deep crustal flow model, crustal thickening requires the horizontal flow rate of the MLC to be 330%-710% of the rate of motion of the upper crust, and the deepening of the Moho is only up to 35% of that required to maintain isostatic balance; isostasy may not be maintained over the geodetic timescale. In the hybrid model of deep crustal flow and convective lithospheric detachment, the Moho is uprising, and only weak or moderate (130%-250%) deep crustal flow is required, which results in moderate present-day crustal thickening beneath eastern Tibet. This result improves our understanding of the plateau construction and dynamics and also offers advice for numerical simulations.

  7. PICNIC Architecture.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source.

  8. IMF control of small-scale Alfvén wave activity in the magnetosphere-ionosphere transition region: FAST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, S.; Labelle, J. W.; Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Chaston, C. C.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the nature and extent of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) control of Alfvénic activity in the high-latitude transition region between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere using FAST satellite observations of small-scale Alfvén waves. We find statistical evidence supporting the prediction of Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global MHD simulations that southward IMF conditions are associated with the greatest Alfvén wave activity, and that the longitudinal dependence of the dayside region of Alfvenic activity on IMF By component is inverted relative to the well-known longitudinal dependence of the locus of the cusp proper on the By component of the IMF. The Alfvénic response to northward IMF Bz is non-negligible, however, and may reflect processes not captured by global MHD simulations. On the basis of simulation and observational statistics we additionally present observations of Alfvén wave-associated broadband electron number flux that longitudinally bifurcates across noon when IMF By is large, as well as observations of asymmetric signatures of Alfvénic activity in each hemisphere. These observations support several recent ground-based studies of the effect of IMF By on auroral activity.

  9. Very high swelling and embrittlement observed in a Fe-18Cr-10Ni-Ti hexagonal fuel wrapper irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Neustroev, V. S.; Garner, Francis A.

    2008-09-01

    The highest void swelling level ever observed in an operating fast reactor component has been found after irradiation in BOR-60 with swelling in Kh18H10T (Fe-18Cr-10Ni-Ti) austenitic steel exceeding 50%. At such high swelling levels the steel has reached a terminal swelling rate of ~1%/dpa after a transient that depends on both dpa rate and irradiation temperature. The transient duration at the higher irradiation temperatures is as small as 10-13 dpa depending on which face was examined. When irradiated in a fast reactor such as BOR-60 with a rather low inlet temperature, most of the swelling occurs above the core center-plane and produces a highly asymmetric swelling loop when plotted vs. dpa. Voids initially harden the alloy but as the swelling level becomes significant the elastic moduli of the alloy decreases strongly with swelling, leading to the consequence that the steel actually softens with increasing swelling. This softening occurs even as the elongation decreases as a result of void linkage during deformation. Finally, the elongation decreases to zero with further increases of swelling. This very brittle failure is known to arise from segregation of nickel to void surfaces which induces a martensitic instability leading to a zero tearing modulus and zero deformation.

  10. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  11. Microscale Relationships Between Fault Rock Fabric and Structural Style in Megathrusts - Observations from Tohoku-Oki Via J-Fast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, V. G.; Fagereng, A.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Remitti, F.; Rowe, C. D.; Ujiie, K.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recovered plate boundary thrust material from the site of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake rupture contains both distributed and localized fabrics. We1 infer these reflect two end members of behavior, namely steady state creep of weak, velocity/strain-hardening materials versus episodic, seismic failure of strong, velocity/strain-weakening materials. Core and downhole observations and mechanical tests demonstrate the fault rock is primarily smectite and has very low frictional strength (μk~0.08) 2,3,4,5. Additional observations of the recovered core indicate microscale fabrics affect mechanical properties. The fault zone fabric is defined mostly by anastomosing dark surfaces surrounding phacoids. Phacoid size and intensity of dark surfaces vary, probably reflecting differences in total strain. Phacoids contain foliations at angles to their long axes and bounding surfaces. Remnant bedding can be recognized in places, based on variation in phyllosilicate colour or clastic:phyllosilicate ratio (although other colour variations result from alteration1). Anastomosing shear surfaces may coincide with bedding but also commonly truncate it, indicating little primary lithological/rheological control on fabric formation. However, in late mm-thickness, through going, more intensely sheared zones, lithologic contrast more strongly defines phacoids while dark seams may be absent. A transition from distributed shear in phyllosilicates to localized shear on dark surfaces requires local change in stress or strain rate. If the orientation of clay fabrics change due to folding ('turbulent' flow), then weak basal planes of phyllosilicates rotated into unfavourable orientations may act as 'stress risers' promoting localization around phacoids containing poorly oriented fabrics. This mechanism is indicated by the presence of the most folded layering in plate boundary core adjacent to the most distinct through-going surfaces1,2. Alternatively, locally well-oriented fabrics may

  12. The XMM-Newton1 and INTEGRAL2 Observations of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient IGR J16328-4726

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Sguera, V.; Bird, A. J.; Boon, C. M.; Persi, P.; Piro, L.

    2016-10-01

    The accretion mechanism producing the short flares observed from the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) is still highly debated and forms a major part in our attempts to place these X-ray binaries in the wider context of the High Mass X-ray Binaries. We report on a 216 ks INTEGRAL observation of the SFXT IGR J16328-4726 (2014 August 24-27) simultaneous with two fixed-time observations with XMM-Newton (33 and 20 ks) performed around the putative periastron passage, in order to investigate the accretion regime and the wind properties during this orbital phase. During these observations, the source has shown luminosity variations, from ˜ 4× {10}34 to ˜ {10}36 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, linked to spectral properties changes. The soft X-ray continuum is well modeled by a power law with a photon index varying from ˜1.2 up to ˜1.7 and with high values of the column density in the range of ˜ 2{--}4× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. We report on the presence of iron lines at ˜6.8-7.1 keV, suggesting that the X-ray flux is produced by the accretion of matter from the companion wind characterized by density and temperature inhomogeneities.

  13. Functional pools of fast and slow twitch fibers observed by /sup 31/P-NMR during exercise of flexor wrist muscles in man

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Park, C.R.; Brown, R.L.; Chance, B.

    1987-05-01

    Functional compartments of fast and slow twitch fibers have been observed by /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy during exercise of the wrist flexor muscles in a sedentary, young male subject. Values of Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenine nucleotides were determined at rest and during an exercise protocol. The subject flexed his wrist muscles at 20% of maximum strength every 5 sec for 6 min and then increased his effort in the next two 6 min intervals to 40% and 60% of maximum. With exercise, the Pi/PCr rose rapidly to the exceptionally high value of 2.2 at 60% effort. As the Pi increased, the initial single peak (pH 7.0-6.9) split into two distinct components with pH values of 6.8 and 6.3. Quantitatively, distribution of the Pi was 40% in the pH 6.8 peak and 60% in the pH 6.3 peak as determined by area estimation following curve fitting. This presumably reflects two pools of Pi corresponding to the oxidative (slow twitch, high pH) and glycolytic (fast twitch, low pH) fibers. In the second identical exercise sequence which followed immediately, only one Pi peak (pH 6.8-6.9) appeared. This suggested that the glycolytic contribution to energy production was largely exhausted and the residual energy was derived from oxidative metabolism. During exercise at high levels, total phosphate decreased due primarily to loss of NMR visible adenine nucleotides. Similar phenomena have been observed in three other sedentary individuals, but not in trained athletes.

  14. Architectural Drafting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ronald; Yancey, Bruce

    Designed to be used as a supplement to a two-book course in basic drafting, these instructional materials consisting of 14 units cover the process of drawing all working drawings necessary for residential buildings. The following topics are covered in the individual units: introduction to architectural drafting, lettering and tools, site…

  15. Box Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Project offers grades 3-8 students hands-on design practice creating built environments to solve a society-based architectural problem. Students plan buildings, draw floor plans, and make scale models of the structures that are then used in related interdisciplinary activities. (Author)

  16. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  17. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  18. Architectural Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doornek, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

  19. Architecture? Absolutely!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1973

    1973-01-01

    By designing processes to translate social needs into physical terms, the Urban Center at the University of Louisville is turning out its own unique brand of architecture -- one that produces no buildings but that has a real effect on the future of the physical environment. (Author)

  20. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  1. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  2. Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Zhigang; Chua, Leon O; Yang, Xiao; Helian, Na; Tetzlaff, Ronald; Schmidt, Torsten; Li, Caroline; Carrasco, Jose Manuel Garcia; Chen, Wanlong; Chu, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    We designed Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA) that self-adjusts its inherent parameters (for instance, the resonant frequency) naturally following the stimuli frequency. Such an architecture is required for brain-like engineered systems because some parameters of the stimuli (for instance, the stimuli frequency) are not known in advance. Such adaptivity comes from a circuit element with memory, namely mem-inductor or mem-capacitor (memristor's sisters), which is history-dependent in its behavior. As a hardware model of biological systems, ANA can be used to adaptively reproduce the observed biological phenomena in amoebae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A reconfigurable multicarrier demodulator architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwatra, S. C.; Jamali, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    An architecture based on parallel and pipline design approaches has been developed for the Frequency Division Multiple Access/Time Domain Multiplexed (FDMA/TDM) conversion system. The architecture has two main modules namely the transmultiplexer and the demodulator. The transmultiplexer has two pipelined modules. These are the shared multiplexed polyphase filter and the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The demodulator consists of carrier, clock, and data recovery modules which are interactive. Progress on the design of the MultiCarrier Demodulator (MCD) using commercially available chips and Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) and simulation studies using Viewlogic software will be presented at the conference.

  4. DUAL TRIGGER OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A PROMINENCE BY EUV FAST AND SLOW CORONAL WAVES: SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.; Foullon, C.

    2012-12-20

    We analyze flare-associated transverse oscillations in a quiescent solar prominence on 2010 September 8-9. Both the flaring active region and the prominence were located near the west limb, with a favorable configuration and viewing angle. The full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory show flare-associated lateral oscillations of the prominence sheet. The STEREO-A spacecraft, 81.{sup 0}5 ahead of the Sun-Earth line, provides an on-disk view of the flare-associated coronal disturbances. We derive the temporal profile of the lateral displacement of the prominence sheet by using the image cross-correlation technique. The displacement curve was de-trended and the residual oscillatory pattern was derived. We fit these oscillations with a damped cosine function with a variable period and find that the period is increasing. The initial oscillation period (P{sub 0}) is {approx}28.2 minutes and the damping time ({tau}{sub D}) {approx} 44 minutes. We confirm the presence of fast and slow EUV wave components. Using STEREO-A observations, we derive a propagation speed of {approx}250 km s{sup -1} for the slow EUV wave by applying the time-slice technique to the running difference images. We propose that the prominence oscillations are excited by the fast EUV wave while the increase in oscillation period of the prominence is an apparent effect, related to a phase change due to the slow EUV wave acting as a secondary trigger. We discuss implications of the dual trigger effect for coronal prominence seismology and scaling law studies of damping mechanisms.

  5. FastMag: Fast micromagnetic simulator for complex magnetic structures (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R.; Li, S.; Lubarda, M. V.; Livshitz, B.; Lomakin, V.

    2011-04-01

    A fast micromagnetic simulator (FastMag) for general problems is presented. FastMag solves the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and can handle multiscale problems with a high computational efficiency. The simulator derives its high performance from efficient methods for evaluating the effective field and from implementations on massively parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) architectures. FastMag discretizes the computational domain into tetrahedral elements and therefore is highly flexible for general problems. The magnetostatic field is computed via the superposition principle for both volume and surface parts of the computational domain. This is accomplished by implementing efficient quadrature rules and analytical integration for overlapping elements in which the integral kernel is singular. Thus, discretized superposition integrals are computed using a nonuniform grid interpolation method, which evaluates the field from N sources at N collocated observers in O(N) operations. This approach allows handling objects of arbitrary shape, allows easily calculating of the field outside the magnetized domains, does not require solving a linear system of equations, and requires little memory. FastMag is implemented on GPUs with ?> GPU-central processing unit speed-ups of 2 orders of magnitude. Simulations are shown of a large array of magnetic dots and a recording head fully discretized down to the exchange length, with over a hundred million tetrahedral elements on an inexpensive desktop computer.

  6. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) < 1.33 × 10-8 m-2 s-1. Differential flux upper limits as function of the photon energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  7. Seasonal variations of 3.0˜3.8-day ultra-fast Kelvin waves observed with a meteor wind radar and radiosonde in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Tsuda, T.; Shimizu, A.; Nakamura, T.

    1999-07-01

    This paper is concerned with observations of the long-term behavior of Kelvin waves with the wave period ranging from 3 to 4 days, which are generally called an ultra-fast Kelvin (UFK) wave. Horizontal wind velocity at 74-110 km altitudes observed with a meteor wind radar (MWR) near Jakarta (6.4°S, 106.7°E) for five years during November 1992 and December 1997 and daily radiosonde profiles in Bandung (6.9°S, 107.6°E) collected between October 1993 and March 1996 and have been analyzed. In the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region, the UFK wave activity, defined by the spectral density of zonal wind perturbations at the 3.0-3.8 day period, is strongly enhanced twice a year. An interaction between UFK waves and a semiannual oscillation in the mesosphere (MSAO) can be suggested, although an exact mechanism is uncertain. We also have investigated seasonal variation of 3.0-3.8 day oscillations of zonal winds in the stratosphere, excluding gravity wave components, but, we have not detected an evidence of semiannual periodicity. The UFK wave activity in the MLT region exhibited intraseasonal variations, which showed some correlation with the amplitudes of zonal wind in the troposphere.

  8. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  9. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  10. Reduction in the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer presenting as an emergency following the introduction of fast-track flexible sigmoidoscopy: a three-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Davies, R J; Collins, C D; Vickery, C J; Eyre-Brook, I; Welbourn, R

    2004-07-01

    We established a fast-track flexible sigmoidoscopy service to meet the two-week target for colorectal cancer, and have performed a prospective observational study over three years to assess its impact on the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer presenting as an emergency. The fast-track system was established on 1 November 1999 using six screening criteria to select high-risk patients. Data on all high-risk patients referred through the fast-track system and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were recorded prospectively in two time periods: six months before fast-track (1 November 1998 to 30 April 1999, Period 1) and three years following fast-track (1 November 1999 to 31 October 2002, Period 2). In Period 2, 2294 fast-track referrals were received. A total of 635 cases (321 male, 314 female) of colorectal cancer were diagnosed in Period 2 vs. 84 cases (43 male, 41 female) in Period 1. In Period 1, 30 patients with colorectal cancer (35.7% of the total) presented as an emergency vs. 165 patients (25.9%) in Period 2 (P = 0.059, chi(2)test). Introduction of a fast-track service to meet the two-week target has resulted in a trend towards fewer emergency presentations with colorectal cancer.

  11. Wafer-scale boundary value integrated circuit architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Frias, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) technology offers the potential for improving speed and reliability of a large integrated circuit system. An architecture is presented for a boundary value integrated circuit engine which lends itself to implementation in WSI. The philosophy underpinning this architecture includes local communication, cell regularity, and fault tolerance. The research described here proposes, investigates, and simulates this computer architecture and its flaw avoidance schemes for a WSI implementation. Boundary value differential equation computations are utilized in a number of scientific and engineering applications. A boundary value machine is ideally suited for solutions of finite difference and finite element problems with specified boundary values. The architecture is a 2-D array of computational cells. Each basic cell has four bit serial processing elements (PEs) and a local memory. Most communications is limited to transfer between adjacent PEs to reduce complexity, avoid long delays, and localize the effects of silicon flaws. Memory access time is kept short by restricting memory service to PEs in the same cell. I/O operation is performed by means of a row multiple single line I/O bus, which allows fast, reliable and independent data transference. WSI yield losses are due to gross defects and random defects. Gross defects which affect large portions of the wafer are usually fatal for any WSI implementation. Overcoming random defects which cover either a small area or points is achieved by defect avoidance schemes that are developed for this architecture. Those schemes are provided at array, cell, and communication level. Capabilities and limitations of the proposed WSI architecture can be observed through the simulations. Speed degradation of the array and the PE due to silicon defects is observed by means of simulation. Also, module and bus utilization are computed and presented.

  12. A Suzaku X-ray Observation of One Orbit of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16479-4514

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Sguera, V.; Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Ramano, P.; Wilms, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 250 ks long X-ray observation of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J16479-4514 performed with Suzaku in 2012 February. During this observation, about 80% of the short orbital period (P(sub orb) approximates 3.32 days) was covered as continuously as possible for the first time. The source light curve displays variability of more than two orders of magnitude, starting with a very low emission state (10(exp -13) erg / sq cm/s; 1-10 keV) lasting the first 46 ks, consistent with being due to the X-ray eclipse by the supergiant companion. The transition to the uneclipsed X-ray emission is energy dependent. Outside the eclipse, the source spends most of the time at a level of 6-7X10)(exp-12) erg/sq. cm/s) punctuated by two structured faint flares with a duration of about 10 and 15 ks, respectively, reaching a peak flux of 3-4X10(exp -11) erg/sq. cm./S, separated by about 0.2 in orbital phase. Remarkably, the first faint flare occurs at a similar orbital phase of the bright flares previously observed in the system. This indicates the presence of a phase-locked large scale structure in the supergiant wind, driving a higher accretion rate onto the compact object. The average X-ray spectrum is hard and highly absorbed, with a column density, NH, of 10*exp 23)/sq cm, clearly in excess of the interstellar absorption. There is no evidence for variability of the absorbing column density, except that during the eclipse, where a less absorbed X-ray spectrum is observed. A narrow Fe K-alpha emission line at 6.4 keV is viewed along the whole orbit, with an intensity which correlates with the continuum emission above 7 keV. The scattered component visible during the X-ray eclipse allowed us to directly probe the wind density at the orbital separation, resulting in rho(sub w)=7X10(exp -14) g/cubic cm. Assuming a spherical geometry for the supergiant wind, the derived wind density translates into a ratio M(sub w)/v(sub infinity) = 7X10(exp -17) Solar M

  13. A next generation Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO-100) for IR/optical observations of the rise phase of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. B.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; De La Taille, C.; Eyles, C.; Hermann, I.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.; Zhao, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observatory responds to GRB triggers with optical observations in ~ 100 s, butcannot respond faster than ~ 60 s. While some rapid-response ground-based telescopes have responded quickly, thenumber of sub-60 s detections remains small. In 2013 June, the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-Pathfinder is expected tobe launched on the Lomonosov spacecraft to investigate early optical GRB emission. Though possessing uniquecapability for optical rapid-response, this pathfinder mission is necessarily limited in sensitivity and event rate; here wediscuss the next generation of rapid-response space observatory instruments. We list science topics motivating ourinstruments, those that require rapid optical-IR GRB response, including: A survey of GRB rise shapes/times,measurements of optical bulk Lorentz factors, investigation of magnetic dominated (vs. non-magnetic) jet models,internal vs. external shock origin of prompt optical emission, the use of GRBs for cosmology, and dust evaporation inthe GRB environment. We also address the impacts of the characteristics of GRB observing on our instrument andobservatory design. We describe our instrument designs and choices for a next generation space observatory as a secondinstrument on a low-earth orbit spacecraft, with a 120 kg instrument mass budget. Restricted to relatively modest mass,power, and launch resources, we find that a coded mask X-ray camera with 1024 cm2 of detector area could rapidlylocate about 64 GRB triggers/year. Responding to the locations from the X-ray camera, a 30 cm aperture telescope witha beam-steering system for rapid (~ 1 s) response and a near-IR camera should detect ~ 29 GRB, given Swift GRBproperties. The additional optical camera would permit the measurement of a broadband optical-IR slope, allowingbetter characterization of the emission, and dynamic measurement of dust extinction at the source, for the first time.

  14. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  15. A Dual-Porosity, In Situ Crystallisation Model For Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Chambers Based Upon Direct Observation From Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Lissenberg, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a revised magma chamber model for fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges based upon a synthesis of new data from a complete section of lower crust from the East Pacific Rise, reconstructed from samples collected from the Hess Deep rift valley during cruise JC21. Our investigation includes detailed sampling across critical transitions in the upper part of the plutonic section, including the inferred axial melt lens (AML) within the dyke-gabbro transition. We find that an overall petrological progression, from troctolite and primitive gabbro at the base up into evolved (oxide) gabbro and gabbronorite at the top of the lower crustal section, is mirrored by a progressive upward chemical fractionation as recorded in bulk rock and mineral compositions. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured using EBSD show that the downward increase in deformation of mush required in crystal subsidence models is not observed. Together these observations are consistent only with a model in which crystallisation of upward migrating evolving melts occurs in situ in the lower crust. Over-enrichment in incompatible trace element concentrations and ratios above that possible by fractional crystallisation is ubiquitous. This implies redistribution of incompatible trace elements in the lower crust by low porosity, near-pervasive reactive porous flow of interstitial melt moving continuously upward through the mush pile. Mass balance calculations reveal a significant proportion of this trace element enriched melt is trapped at mid-crustal levels. Mineral compositions in the upper third to half of the plutonic section are too evolved to represent the crystal residues of MORB. Erupted MORB therefore must be fed from melts sourced in the deeper part of the crystal mush pile, and which must ascend rapidly without significant modification in the upper plutonics or AML. From physical models of mush processes we posit that primitive melts are transported through transient, high porosity

  16. Fast protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Fast-folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast-folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms, which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well <1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even 'slow' folding processes: fast folders are small; relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast-folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast-folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general, as well as some work that is left to do.

  17. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  18. Interplanetary Fast Shocks and Associated Drivers Observed through the Twenty-Third Solar Minimum by WIND Over its First 2.5 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.; Berdichevsky, D.; Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Vinas, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    A list of the interplanetary (IP) shocks observed by WIND from its launch (in November 1994) to May 1997 is presented. Forty two shocks were identified. The magnetohydrodynamic nature of the shocks is investigated, and the associated shock parameters and their uncertainties are accurately computed using a practical scheme which combines two techniques. These techniques are a combination of the "pre-averaged" magnetic-coplanarity, velocity-coplanarity, and the Abraham-Schrauner-mixed methods, on the one hand, and the Vinas and Scudder [1986] technique for solving the non-linear least-squares Rankine-Hugoniot shock equations, on the other. Within acceptable limits these two techniques generally gave the same results, with some exceptions. The reasons for the exceptions are discussed. It is found that the mean strength and rate of occurrence of the shocks appears to correlated with the solar cycle. Both showed a decrease in 1996 coincident with the time of the lowest ultraviolet solar radiance, indicative of solar minimum and start of solar cycle 23, which began around June 1996. Eighteen shocks appeared to be associated with corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The distribution of their shock normals showed a mean direction peaking in the ecliptic plane and with a longitude (phi(sub n)) in that plane between perpendicular to the Parker spiral and radial from the Sun. When grouped according to the sense of the direction of propagation of the shocks the mean azimuthal (longitude) angle in GSE coordinates was approximately 194 deg for the fast-forward and approximately 20 deg for the fast-reverse shocks. Another 16 shocks were determined to be driven by solar transients, including magnetic clouds. These shocks had a broader distribution of normal directions than those of the CIR cases with a mean direction close to the Sun-Earth line. Eight shocks of unknown origin had normal orientation well off the ecliptic plane. No shock propagated with longitude phi(sub n) >= 220

  19. FAST Construction Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, R. D.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, L.; Cai, W. J.; Liu, N.; Xie, J. T.; Zhang, S. X.

    2016-11-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. A unique karst depression in Guizhou province has been selected as the site to build an active reflector radio telescope with a diameter of 500 m and three outstanding aspects, which enables FAST to have a large sky coverage and the ability of observing astronomical targets with a high precision. Chinese Academy of Sciences and Guizhou province are in charge of FAST construction. The first light of the telescope was expected on September 25, 2016.

  20. Fasting and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, E; Lewis, N L; Garza, C; Shulman, R J

    The effects of short-term fasting (skipping breakfast) on the problem-solving performance of 9 to 11 yr old children were studied under the controlled conditions of a metabolic ward. The behavioral test battery included an assessment of IQ, the Matching Familiar Figure Test and Hagen Central Incidental Test. Glucose and insulin levels were measured in blood. All assessments were made under fasting and non-fasting conditions. Skipping breakfast was found to have adverse effects on the children's late morning problem-solving performance. These findings support observations that the timing and nutrient composition of meals have acute and demonstrable effects on behavior.

  1. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  2. FAST Maser Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    FAST, the Five-hundred meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope, will become the largest operating single-dish telescope in the coming years. It has many advantages: much better sensitivity for its largest collecting area; large sky coverage due to its innovative design of the active primary surface; extremely radio quiet from its unique location, etc. In this work, I will highlight the future capabilities of FAST to discover and observe both galactic and extragalactic masers.

  3. Advanced algorithms and architectures for signal processing III

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, F.T.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers proceedings on advanced algorithms and architectures for signal processing III. Topics covered include: Fast QR-based array-processing algorithm; Model for the analysis of fault-tolerant signal processing architecture; Parallel VLSI direction finding algorithm; and Self-calibration techniques for high-resolution array processing.

  4. Convolutional Architecture Exploration for Action Recognition and Image Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Convolutional Architecture Exploration for Action Recognition and Image Classification JT Turner∗1, David Aha2, Leslie Smith2, and Kalyan Moy Gupta1...Intelligence; Naval Research Laboratory (Code 5514); Washington, DC 20375 Abstract Convolutional Architecture for Fast Feature Encoding (CAFFE) [11] is a soft...This is especially true with convolutional neural networks which depend upon the architecture to detect edges and objects in the same way the human

  5. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinowski, E. J.; Behnke, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a comprehensive distributed system designed to support NASA's Earth Science missions. Designed in the early 1990’s, EOSDIS has been archiving, managing, and distributing Earth science data since 1994. During that time the system has evolved and adapted with new technology, additional data sources, and expanded services and products. EOSDIS supports the collection and management of a variety of Earth science data within a single system. We present the EOSDIS as a reference architecture for managing Earth science data. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture identifies areas of functionality, their interactions, and how they collectively serve to make Earth science data and data products available to users. It establishes a common terminology to identify the system elements, connections, styles and processes with which to discuss the variety of implementations across EOSDIS. Many of the system and subsystem elements used in EOSDIS are candidates for re-use by other existing or planned applications. Scenarios based on the diversity of data collection are presented and are used to describe representative implementations of the current system. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture serves as a template to facilitate future implementations of science data system functions and the incorporation of additional data providers (e.g., missions, instruments, or campaigns) into EOSDIS.

  6. Mediterranean diet or extended fasting's influence on changing the intestinal microflora, immunoglobulin A secretion and clinical outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Andreas; Riegert, Markus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Bäcker, Marcus; Langhorst, Jost; Schwickert, Myriam; Dobos, Gustav J

    2005-01-01

    Background Alterations in the intestinal bacterial flora are believed to be contributing factors to many chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases including rheumatic diseases. While microbiological fecal culture analysis is now increasingly used, little is known about the relationship of changes in intestinal flora, dietary patterns and clinical outcome in specific diseases. To clarify the role of microbiological culture analysis we aimed to evaluate whether in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or fibromyalgia (FM) a Mediterranean diet or an 8-day fasting period are associated with changes in fecal flora and whether changes in fecal flora are associated with clinical outcome. Methods During a two-months-period 51 consecutive patients from an Integrative Medicine hospital department with an established diagnosis of RA (n = 16) or FM (n = 35) were included in the study. According to predefined clinical criteria and the subjects' choice the patients received a mostly vegetarian Mediterranean diet (n = 21; mean age 50.9 +/-13.3 y) or participated in an intermittent modified 8-day fasting therapy (n = 30; mean age 53.7 +/- 9.4 y). Quantitative aerob and anaerob bacterial flora, stool pH and concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) were analysed from stool samples at the beginning, at the end of the 2-week hospital stay and at a 3-months follow-up. Clinical outcome was assessed with the DAS 28 for RA patients and with a disease severity rating scale in FM patients. Results We found no significant changes in the fecal bacterial counts following the two dietary interventions within and between groups, nor were significant differences found in the analysis of sIgA and stool ph. Clinical improvement at the end of the hospital stay tended to be greater in fasting vs. non-fasting patients with RA (p = 0.09). Clinical outcome was not related to alterations in the intestinal flora. Conclusion Neither Mediterranean diet nor fasting treatments affect the

  7. Aerobot Autonomy Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfes, Alberto; Hall, Jeffery L.; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Morfopoulos, Arin C.; Clouse, Daniel S.; Montgomery, James F.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Machuzak, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    An architecture for autonomous operation of an aerobot (i.e., a robotic blimp) to be used in scientific exploration of planets and moons in the Solar system with an atmosphere (such as Titan and Venus) is undergoing development. This architecture is also applicable to autonomous airships that could be flown in the terrestrial atmosphere for scientific exploration, military reconnaissance and surveillance, and as radio-communication relay stations in disaster areas. The architecture was conceived to satisfy requirements to perform the following functions: a) Vehicle safing, that is, ensuring the integrity of the aerobot during its entire mission, including during extended communication blackouts. b) Accurate and robust autonomous flight control during operation in diverse modes, including launch, deployment of scientific instruments, long traverses, hovering or station-keeping, and maneuvers for touch-and-go surface sampling. c) Mapping and self-localization in the absence of a global positioning system. d) Advanced recognition of hazards and targets in conjunction with tracking of, and visual servoing toward, targets, all to enable the aerobot to detect and avoid atmospheric and topographic hazards and to identify, home in on, and hover over predefined terrain features or other targets of scientific interest. The architecture is an integrated combination of systems for accurate and robust vehicle and flight trajectory control; estimation of the state of the aerobot; perception-based detection and avoidance of hazards; monitoring of the integrity and functionality ("health") of the aerobot; reflexive safing actions; multi-modal localization and mapping; autonomous planning and execution of scientific observations; and long-range planning and monitoring of the mission of the aerobot. The prototype JPL aerobot (see figure) has been tested extensively in various areas in the California Mojave desert.

  8. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  9. Architecture as Design Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  10. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  11. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  12. Glycemic management during Jain fasts

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep; Sachan, Alok; Bajaj, Sarita; Sahay, Rakesh; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet; Saboo, Banshi; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Baruah, Manash P.; Parmar, Girish; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the various fasts observed by adherents of the Jain religion. It attempts to classify them according to their suitability for people with diabetes and suggests appropriate regime and dose modification for those observing these fasts. The review is an endeavor to encourage rational and evidence-based management in this field of diabetology. PMID:28217525

  13. Fast valve

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  14. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  15. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma peptide-YY levels are elevated in critical illness and associated with feed intolerance: an observational, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert JL; Chapman, Marianne; Bryant, Laura K; Wishart, Judith; Holloway, Richard H; Horowitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Delayed gastric emptying and feed intolerance occur frequently in the critically ill. In these patients, gastric motor responses to nutrients are disturbed. Peptide YY (PYY) slows gastric emptying. The aim of this study was to determine fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations and their relationship to cholecystokinin (CCK) in critically ill patients. Methods Studies were performed in 19 unselected mechanically ventilated critically ill patients (12 males; 48 ± 7 years old) in a randomised, single-blind fashion. Subjects received a 60-minute duodenal infusion of Ensure® at either 1 or 2 kcal/minute. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 20, 40, 60, and 180 minutes following commencement of the nutrient infusion for the measurement of plasma PYY and CCK concentrations (using radioimmunoassay). Patient data were compared to 24 healthy subjects (17 males; 43 ± 2 years old). Results Fasting PYY concentration was higher in patients (P < 0.05), particularly in those with feed intolerance (P < 0.05). Plasma PYY concentrations were higher in patients during nutrient infusion (area under the curve [AUC] at 1 kcal/minute: 2,265 ± 718 versus 1,125 ± 138 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05; at 2 kcal/minute: 2,276 ± 303 versus 1,378 ± 210 pmol/l.min, P = 0.01) compared to healthy subjects. The magnitude of PYY elevation was greater in patients during the 1 kcal/minute infusion (AUC: 441 ± 153 versus 186 ± 58 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05), but not the 2 kcal/minute infusion. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma CCK concentrations were higher in patients (P < 0.05). There was a relationship between plasma PYY and CCK concentrations during fasting (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and nutrient infusion (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Conclusion In critical illness, both fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations are elevated, particularly in patients with feed intolerance, in conjunction with increased CCK concentrations. PMID:17173662

  16. An Architecture to Enable Future Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Caffrey, Robert; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Hess, Melissa; Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Davies, Ashley; Hayden, Sandra; Sweet, Adam

    2004-01-01

    A sensor web is a coherent set of distributed 'nodes', interconnected by a communications fabric, that collectively behave as a single dynamic observing system. A 'plug and play' mission architecture enables progressive mission autonomy and rapid assembly and thereby enables sensor webs. This viewgraph presentation addresses: Target mission messaging architecture; Strategy to establish architecture; Progressive autonomy with onboard sensor web; EO-1; Adaptive array antennas (smart antennas) for satellite ground stations.

  17. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  18. Fast CRCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    or any other computing topic, please visit our Digital Library at www.computer.org/publications/ dlib . NGUYEN: FAST CRCS 1331 Authorized licensed use... Library at http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ TC.2009.83. The notation ðk; l; dÞ denotes a systematic code with k ¼ the total bit length of

  19. Fasting and sport: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J

    2010-06-01

    Most humans observe an overnight fast on a daily basis, and the human body copes well with short duration fasting. Periodic fasting is widely practised for cultural, religious or health reasons. Fasting may take many different forms. Prolonged restriction of food and fluid is harmful to health and performance, and it is often automatically assumed that intermittent fasting will lead to decrements in exercise performance. Athletes who choose to fast during training or competitions may therefore be at a disadvantage. The available evidence does not entirely support this view, but there is little or no information on the effects on elite athletes competing in challenging environments. Prolonged periods of training in the fasted state may not allow optimum adaptation of muscles and other tissues. Further research on a wide range of athletes with special nutrition needs is urgently required. In events where performance might be affected, other strategies to eliminate or minimise any effects must be sought.

  20. The Slow and Fast Solar Wind Boundary, Corotating Interaction Regions, and Coronal Mass Ejection observations with Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions have as part of their goals to understand the source regions of the solar wind and of the heliospheric magnetic field. In the heliosphere, the solar wind is made up of interacting fast and slow solar wind streams as well as a clearly intermittent source of flow and field, arising from coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this presentation a summary of the questions associated with the distibution of wind speeds and magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere and their origin on the sun will be summarized. Where and how does the sharp gradient in speeds develop close to the Sun? Is the wind source for fast and slow the same, and is there a steady component or is its origin always intermittent in nature? Where does the heliospheric current sheet form and how stable is it close to the Sun? What is the distribution of CME origins and is there a continuum from large CMEs to small blobs of plasma? We will describe our current knowledge and discuss how SPP and SO will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the sources of the solar wind and magnetic fields in the heliosphere.

  1. Optimized preoperative fasting times decrease ketone body concentration and stabilize mean arterial blood pressure during induction of anesthesia in children younger than 36 months: a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dennhardt, Nils; Beck, Christiane; Huber, Dirk; Sander, Bjoern; Boehne, Martin; Boethig, Dietmar; Leffler, Andreas; Sümpelmann, Robert

    2016-08-01

    In pediatric anesthesia, preoperative fasting guidelines are still often exceeded. The objective of this noninterventional clinical observational cohort study was to evaluate the effect of an optimized preoperative fasting management (OPT) on glucose concentration, ketone bodies, acid-base balance, and change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during induction of anesthesia in children. Children aged 0-36 months scheduled for elective surgery with OPT (n = 50) were compared with peers studied before optimizing preoperative fasting time (OLD) (n = 50) who were matched for weight, age, and height. In children with OPT (n = 50), mean fasting time (6.0 ± 1.9 h vs 8.5 ± 3.5 h, P < 0.001), deviation from guideline (ΔGL) (1.2 ± 1.4 h vs 3.7 ± 3.1 h, P < 0.001, ΔGL>2 h 8% vs 70%), ketone bodies (0.2 ± 0.2 mmol·l(-1) vs 0.6 ± 0.6 mmol·l(-1) , P < 0.001), and incidence of hypotension (MAP <40 mmHg, 0 vs 5, P = 0.022) were statistically significantly lower and MAP after induction was statistically significantly higher (55.2 ± 9.5 mmHg vs 50.3 ± 9.8 mmHg, P = 0.015) as compared to children in the OLD (n = 50) group. Glucose, lactate, bicarbonate, base excess, and anion gap did not significantly differ. Optimized fasting times improve the metabolic and hemodynamic condition during induction of anesthesia in children younger than 36 months of age. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Efficient algorithm and systolic architecture for modular division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanpeng; Qin, Zhongping

    2011-06-01

    A new efficient modular division algorithm suitable for systolic implementation and its systolic architecture is proposed in this article. With a new exit condition of while loop and a new updating method of a control variable, the new algorithm reduces the average of iteration numbers by more than 14.3% compared to the algorithm proposed by Chen, Bai and Chen. Based on the new algorithm, we design a fast systolic architecture with an optimised core computing cell. Compared to the architecture proposed by Chen, Bai and Chen, our systolic architecture has reduced the critical path delay by about 18% and the total computational time for one modular division by almost 30%, with the cost of about 1% more cells. Moreover, by the addition of a flag signal and three logic gates, the proposed systolic architecture can also perform Montgomery modular multiplication and a fast unified modular divider/multiplier is realised.

  3. Safety profile of fast-track extubation in pediatric congenital heart disease surgery patients in a tertiary care hospital of a developing country: An observational prospective study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohammad Irfan; Hamid, Mohammad; Minai, Fauzia; Wali, Amina Rehmat; Anwar-Ul-Haq; Aman-Ullah, Muneer; Ahsan, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    Early extubation after cardiac operations is an important aspect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia. In order to reduce or eliminate the adverse effects of prolonged ventilation in pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) surgical patients, the concept of early extubation has been analyzed at our tertiary care hospital. The current study was carried out to record the data to validate the importance and safety of fast-track extubation (FTE) with evidence. A total of 71 patients, including male and female aged 6 months to 18 years belonging to risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery-1 category 1, 2, and 3 were included in this study. All patients were anesthetized with a standardized technique and surgery performed by the same surgeon. At the end of operation, the included patients were assessed for FTE and standard extubation criteria were used for decision making. Of the total 71 patients included in the study, 26 patients (36.62%) were extubated in the operating room, 29 (40.85%) were extubated within 6 h of arrival in cardiovascular intensive care unit and 16 (22.54%) were unable to get extubated within 6 h due to multiple reasons. Hence, overall success rate was 77.47%. The reasons for delayed extubation were significant bleeding in 5 (31.3%) cases, hemodynamic instability (low cardiac output syndrome) in 4 (25%) cases, respiratory complication in 2 (12.5%), bleeding plus hemodynamic instability in 2 (12.5) cases, hemodynamic instability, and respiratory complication in 2 (12.5%) cases and triad of hemodynamic instability, bleeding and respiratory complication in 1 (6.5%) case. There was no reintubation in the FTE cases. On the basis of the current study results, it is recommended to use FTE in pediatric CHD surgical patients safely with multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Detecting the oligomeric state of Escherichia coli MutS from its geometric architecture observed by an atomic force microscope at a single molecular level.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Li; Meng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Zi-Mou; Jiang, Yong

    2014-08-07

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), which provides true 3D surface topography, can also be used to determine the geometric parameters of proteins quantitatively at a single molecular level. In this paper, two different kinds of Escherichia coli MutS (MutS) protein were observed using AFM, and the geometric parameters of the proteins such as height, perimeter, area, and volume were measured. On the basis of these measurements, the molecular weight, association constant, oligomeric state, and orientation of MutS proteins on a mica surface were deduced. The oligomerization mechanism of MutS was analyzed in detail, and the results show that two different kinds of interactions between MutS protein may be involved in oligomerization. Our results also show that AFM imaging is an accurate method for analyzing the geometric structures of a single protein quantitatively at a single-molecule level.

  5. Advanced HF anti-jam network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. M.; Horner, Robert W.; Cai, Khiem V.

    The Hughes HF2000 system was developed using a flexible architecture which utilizes a wideband RF front-end and extensive digital signal processing. The HF2000 antijamming (AJ) mode was field tested via an HF skywave path between Fullerton, CA and Carlsbad, CA (about 100 miles), and it was shown that reliable fast frequency-hopping data transmission is feasible at 2400 b/s without adaptive equalization. The necessary requirements of an HF communication network are discussed, and how the HF2000 AJ mode can be used to support those requirements is shown. The Hughes HF2000 AJ mode system architecture is presented.

  6. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    2007 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative Mark Klein Third Annual SATURN Workshop May 2007 Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User

  7. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Central anomaly magnetization high: constraints on the volcanic construction and architecture of seismic layer 2A at a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge, the EPR at 9°30'-50'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Hans; Tivey, Maurice A.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Cochran, James R.

    1999-05-01

    The central anomaly magnetization high (CAMH) is a zone of high crustal magnetization centered on the axis of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and many other segments of the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR). The CAMH is thought to reflect the presence of recently emplaced and highly magnetic lavas. Forward models show that the complicated character of the near-bottom CAMH can be successfully reproduced by the convolution of a lava deposition distribution with a lava magnetization function that describes the variation in lava magnetization intensity with age. This lava magnetization function is the product of geomagnetic paleofield intensity, which has increased by a factor of 2 over the last 40 kyr, and low-temperature alteration which decreases the remanence of lava with exposure to seawater. The success of the forward modeling justifies the inverse approach: deconvolution of the magnetic data for lava distribution and integration of that distribution for magnetic layer thickness. This approach is tested on two near-bottom magnetic profiles AL2767 and AL2771, collected using Alvin across the EPR axis at 9°31'N and 9°50'N. Our analysis of these data produces an estimate of the relative thickness of the magnetic lava layer which is remarkably consistent with existing multichannel estimates of layer 2A thickness from lines CDP31 and CDP27. The similarity between magnetic layer and seismic layer 2A at the 9°-10°N segment of the EPR crest provides independent support to the notion that seismic layer 2A in young oceanic crust represents the highly magnetic lava layer, and that the velocity gradient at the base of layer 2A is related to the increasing number of higher-velocity dikes with depth in the lava-dike transition zone. The near-bottom magnetic anomaly character of the CAMH is a powerful indicator of the emplacement history of upper crust at MORs which allows prediction of the relative thickness and architecture of the extrusive lavas independent of other constraints.

  9. The effect of using limited scene-dependent averaging kernels approximations for the implementation of fast Observing System Simulation Experiments targeted on lower tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Cuesta, J.; Peuch, V.-H.; Eldering, A.; Edwards, D. P.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2013-03-01

    Practical implementations of chemical OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments) usually rely on approximations of the pseudo-observations by means of a prior parametrization of the averaging kernels, which describe the sensitivity of the observing systems to the target atmospheric species. This is intended to avoid the need for use of a computationally expensive pseudo-observations simulator that relies on full radiative transfer calculations. Here we present an investigation on how no, or limited, scene dependent averaging kernels parametrizations may misrepresent the sensitivity of an observing system, and thus possibly lead to inaccurate results of OSSEs. We carried out the full radiative transfer calculation for a three-days period over Europe, to produce reference pseudo-observations of lower tropospheric ozone, as they would be observed by a concept geostationary observing system called MAGEAQ (Monitoring the Atmosphere from Geostationary orbit for European Air Quality). The selected spatiotemporal interval is characterized by a peculiar ozone pollution event. We then compared our reference with approximated pseudo-observations, following existing simulation exercises made for both the MAGEAQ and GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) missions. We found that approximated averaging kernels may fail to replicate the variability of the full radiative transfer calculations. Then, we compared the full radiative transfer and the approximated pseudo-observations during a pollution event. We found that the approximations substantially overestimate the capability of the MAGEAQ to follow the spatiotemporal variations of the lower tropospheric ozone in selected areas. We conclude that such approximations may lead to false conclusions if used in an OSSE. Thus, we recommend to use comprehensive scene-dependent approximations of the averaging kernels, in cases where the full radiative transfer is computationally too costly for the OSSE being

  10. Experimental observation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on the EAST tokamak in fast-electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Chen, W.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhou, R. J.; Zhong, G. Q.; Shi, T. H.; Xu, L. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Y. W.; Lin, S. Y.; Shen, B.; the EAST Team

    2013-06-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes are investigated on the EAST tokamak systematically, and the relation between the BAE frequencies and plasma parameters such as electron density \\bar{n}_e , ion temperature Ti, the profile of safety factor q(ρ) or the intensity of \\dot{B}_\\theta (the width of the magnetic island w) is given in detail during the injection of the power of lower hybrid wave (LHW) (or is also accompanied by the injection of ion cyclotron resonance frequency) comprehensively. All the conditions show that the values of BAE frequencies f_BAE \\propto (T_\\rme + \\frac{7}{4} T_\\rmi)^{1/2} are in agreement with the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation, and the activities of the BAEs have a strong interaction with the process of magnetic reconnection. The BAEs are formed during the injection of the power of LHW, and disappear immediately when the power of LHW is turned off on the EAST tokamak. The LHW plasmas or the runaway discharge in Ohmic plasmas can increase the population of fast electrons, which plays a role in the activities of BAEs and a possible excitation mechanism for the BAEs during the strong tearing mode activities.

  11. A fast template periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; VanderPlas, Jake; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár

    2017-09-01

    This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as "template periodograms" or "periodic matched filters," but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The "fast template periodogram" presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ˜a few for small test cases (O(10) observations), and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104) observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf), where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf), where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  12. The effect of using limited scene-dependent averaging kernels approximations for the implementation of fast observing system simulation experiments targeted on lower tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Cuesta, J.; Peuch, V.-H.; Eldering, A.; Edwards, D. P.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2013-08-01

    Practical implementations of chemical OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments) usually rely on approximations of the pseudo-observations by means of a predefined parametrization of the averaging kernels, which describe the sensitivity of the observing system to the target atmospheric species. This is intended to avoid the use of a computationally expensive pseudo-observations simulator, that relies on full radiative transfer calculations. Here we present an investigation on how no, or limited, scene dependent averaging kernels parametrizations may misrepresent the sensitivity of an observing system. We carried out the full radiative transfer calculation for a three-days period over Europe, to produce reference pseudo-observations of lower tropospheric ozone, as they would be observed by a concept geostationary observing system called MAGEAQ (Monitoring the Atmosphere from Geostationary orbit for European Air Quality). The selected spatio-temporal interval is characterised by an ozone pollution event. We then compared our reference with approximated pseudo-observations, following existing simulation exercises made for both the MAGEAQ and GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) missions. We found that approximated averaging kernels may fail to replicate the variability of the full radiative transfer calculations. In addition, we found that the approximations substantially overestimate the capability of MAGEAQ to follow the spatio-temporal variations of the lower tropospheric ozone in selected areas, during the mentioned pollution event. We conclude that such approximations may lead to false conclusions if used in an OSSE. Thus, we recommend to use comprehensive scene-dependent approximations of the averaging kernels, in cases where the full radiative transfer is computationally too costly for the OSSE being investigated.

  13. Design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Lee, C. William; Strickland, Michael J.; Torkelson, Thomas C.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture is described. The design is based on a prevalidation methodology that uses both reliability and performance. A detailed account is given for the testing associated with a subset of the architecture and concludes with general observations of applying the methodology to the architecture.

  14. Observation of CN [ital A][r arrow][ital X] and [ital B][r arrow][ital X] emissions in gas-phase collisions of fast O([sup 3][ital P]) atoms with HCN

    SciTech Connect

    Orient, O.J.; Chutjian, A.; Martus, K.E. ); Murad, E. )

    1993-07-01

    Optical emissions in single-collision reactions of fast (5--25-eV translational energy) O([sup 3][ital P]) atoms with HCN have been measured in a crossed-beam geometry. The emissions were observed in the wavelength range 345--430 and 550--825 nm, and were identified as the CN([ital B] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][r arrow][ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +]) and CN([ital A] [sup 2][Pi][sub [ital i

  15. Synoptic and fast events on the sun according to observations at the center and wings of the Ca II K line at the Kislovodsk Mountain station patrol telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Kirpichev, R. V.; Pashchenko, M. P.; Shramko, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations performed at the solar telescope-spectroheliograph, which has continuously automatically operated at MAS MAO RAS, were analyzed. Measurements of the activity index in the Ca II K line, which were performed according to the program of synoptic observations, are presented. The development of the solar flares observed at the center and on the wings of the Ca II K line was compared with observations in the X-ray and radio bands. It was shown that the time variations in the intensity in the 1-8 Å range according to the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellites' (GOES) data and in the Ca II K line are close to each other and that the total X-ray flux and Ca II K intensity amplitude substantially correlate during the entire flare.

  16. Evolution of Genome Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Charles Darwin believed that all traits of organisms have been honed to near perfection by natural selection. The empirical basis underlying Darwin’s conclusions consisted of numerous observations made by him and other naturalists on the exquisite adaptations of animals and plants to their natural habitats and on the impressive results of artificial selection. Darwin fully appreciated the importance of heredity but was unaware of the nature and, in fact, the very existence of genomes. A century and a half after the publication of the “Origin”, we have the opportunity to draw conclusions from the comparisons of hundreds of genome sequences from all walks of life. These comparisons suggest that the dominant mode of genome evolution is quite different from that of the phenotypic evolution. The genomes of vertebrates, those purported paragons of biological perfection, turned out to be veritable junkyards of selfish genetic elements where only a small fraction of the genetic material is dedicated to encoding biologically relevant information. In sharp contrast, genomes of microbes and viruses are incomparably more compact, with most of the genetic material assigned to distinct biological functions. However, even in these genomes, the specific genome organization (gene order) is poorly conserved. The results of comparative genomics lead to the conclusion that the genome architecture is not a straightforward result of continuous adaptation but rather is determined by the balance between the selection pressure, that is itself dependent on the effective population size and mutation rate, the level of recombination, and the activity of selfish elements. Although genes and, in many cases, multigene regions of genomes possess elaborate architectures that ensure regulation of expression, these arrangements are evolutionarily volatile and typically change substantially even on short evolutionary scales when gene sequences diverge minimally. Thus, the observed genome

  17. RASSP signal processing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Fred; Bassett, Bob; Letellier, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    The rapid prototyping of application specific signal processors (RASSP) program is an ARPA/tri-service effort to dramatically improve the process by which complex digital systems, particularly embedded signal processors, are specified, designed, documented, manufactured, and supported. The domain of embedded signal processing was chosen because it is important to a variety of military and commercial applications as well as for the challenge it presents in terms of complexity and performance demands. The principal effort is being performed by two major contractors, Lockheed Sanders (Nashua, NH) and Martin Marietta (Camden, NJ). For both, improvements in methodology are to be exercised and refined through the performance of individual 'Demonstration' efforts. The Lockheed Sanders' Demonstration effort is to develop an infrared search and track (IRST) processor. In addition, both contractors' results are being measured by a series of externally administered (by Lincoln Labs) six-month Benchmark programs that measure process improvement as a function of time. The first two Benchmark programs are designing and implementing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor. Our demonstration team is using commercially available VME modules from Mercury Computer to assemble a multiprocessor system scalable from one to hundreds of Intel i860 microprocessors. Custom modules for the sensor interface and display driver are also being developed. This system implements either proprietary or Navy owned algorithms to perform the compute-intensive IRST function in real time in an avionics environment. Our Benchmark team is designing custom modules using commercially available processor ship sets, communication submodules, and reconfigurable logic devices. One of the modules contains multiple vector processors optimized for fast Fourier transform processing. Another module is a fiberoptic interface that accepts high-rate input data from the sensors and provides video-rate output data to a

  18. Nanorobot architecture for medical target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Adriano; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Freitas, Robert A., Jr.; Hogg, Tad

    2008-01-01

    This work has an innovative approach for the development of nanorobots with sensors for medicine. The nanorobots operate in a virtual environment comparing random, thermal and chemical control techniques. The nanorobot architecture model has nanobioelectronics as the basis for manufacturing integrated system devices with embedded nanobiosensors and actuators, which facilitates its application for medical target identification and drug delivery. The nanorobot interaction with the described workspace shows how time actuation is improved based on sensor capabilities. Therefore, our work addresses the control and the architecture design for developing practical molecular machines. Advances in nanotechnology are enabling manufacturing nanosensors and actuators through nanobioelectronics and biologically inspired devices. Analysis of integrated system modeling is one important aspect for supporting nanotechnology in the fast development towards one of the most challenging new fields of science: molecular machines. The use of 3D simulation can provide interactive tools for addressing nanorobot choices on sensing, hardware architecture design, manufacturing approaches, and control methodology investigation.

  19. Association of prediabetes by fasting glucose and/or haemoglobin A1c levels with subclinical atherosclerosis and impaired renal function: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Frank Y F; Neeland, Ian J; Gore, M Odette; Ayers, Colby R; Paixao, Andre R M; Turer, Aslan T; Berry, Jarett D; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K

    2014-01-01

    Prediabetes defined by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) predicts incident diabetes, but their individual and joint associations with micro- and macro-vascular risk remain poorly defined. FPG, HbA1c, coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid wall thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were measured in adults free from prior diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Dallas Heart Study 2 (DHS-2), a population-based cohort study. Prediabetes was defined by FPG 100-125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse associations of HbA1c and/or FPG in the prediabetes range with subclinical atherosclerosis and renal measures. The study comprised 2340 participants, median age = 49 years; 60% women and 50% black. Those with prediabetes were older (52 vs 48 years), more often men (63% vs 53%), black (53% vs 47%) and obese (58% vs 40%; p < 0.001 for each). Prediabetes was captured by FPG alone (43%), HbA1c alone (30%) or both (27%). Those with prediabetes by HbA1c or FPG versus normal HbA1c/FPG had more CAC [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], higher carotid wall thickness (1.32 vs 1.29 mm, p < 0.001), eGFR < 60 mL/min [OR = 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1-2.4)], UACR > 30 mg/dL [OR = 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.7)] and a higher odds for the composite eGFR + UACR [chronic kidney disease (CKD) ≥ 2] [OR = 1.9 (95% CI = 1.5-2.6)]. After multivariable adjustment, none of these associations remained significant. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c and/or FPG criteria is crudely associated with markers of diabetic macro- and micro-vascular disease, but not after statistical adjustment, suggesting the relationships are attributable to other characteristics of the prediabetes population.

  20. Fast Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Observed for a High-Fidelity Structural and Functional [2Fe–2S] Rieske Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rieske cofactors have a [2Fe–2S] cluster with unique {His2Cys2} ligation and distinct Fe subsites. The histidine ligands are functionally relevant, since they allow for coupling of electron and proton transfer (PCET) during quinol oxidation in respiratory and photosynthetic ET chains. Here we present the highest fidelity synthetic analogue for the Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster reported so far. This synthetic analogue 5x– emulates the heteroleptic {His2Cys2} ligation of the [2Fe–2S] core, and it also serves as a functional model that undergoes fast concerted proton and electron transfer (CPET) upon reaction of the mixed-valent (ferrous/ferric) protonated 5H2– with TEMPO. The thermodynamics of the PCET square scheme for 5x– have been determined, and three species (diferric 52–, protonated diferric 5H–, and mixed-valent 53–) have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. pKa values for 5H– and 5H2– differ by about 4 units, and the reduction potential of 5H– is shifted anodically by about +230 mV compared to that of 52–. While the N–H bond dissociation free energy of 5H2– (60.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol–1) and the free energy, ΔG°CPET, of its reaction with TEMPO (−6.3 kcal mol–1) are similar to values recently reported for a homoleptic {N2/N2}-coordinated [2Fe–2S] cluster, CPET is significantly faster for 5H2– with biomimetic {N2/S2} ligation (k = (9.5 ± 1.2) × 104 M–1 s–1, ΔH‡ = 8.7 ± 1.0 kJ mol–1, ΔS‡ = −120 ± 40 J mol–1 K–1, and ΔG‡ = 43.8 ± 0.3 kJ mol–1 at 293 K). These parameters, and the comparison with homoleptic analogues, provide important information and new perspectives for the mechanistic understanding of the biological Rieske cofactor. PMID:24506804

  1. Style grammars for interactive visualization of architecture.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Daniel G; Rosen, Paul A; Bekins, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    Interactive visualization of architecture provides a way to quickly visualize existing or novel buildings and structures. Such applications require both fast rendering and an effortless input regimen for creating and changing architecture using high-level editing operations that automatically fill in the necessary details. Procedural modeling and synthesis is a powerful paradigm that yields high data amplification and can be coupled with fast-rendering techniques to quickly generate plausible details of a scene without much or any user interaction. Previously, forward generating procedural methods have been proposed where a procedure is explicitly created to generate particular content. In this paper, we present our work in inverse procedural modeling of buildings and describe how to use an extracted repertoire of building grammars to facilitate the visualization and quick modification of architectural structures and buildings. We demonstrate an interactive application where the user draws simple building blocks and, using our system, can automatically complete the building "in the style of" other buildings using view-dependent texture mapping or nonphotorealistic rendering techniques. Our system supports an arbitrary number of building grammars created from user subdivided building models and captured photographs. Using only edit, copy, and paste metaphors, the entire building styles can be altered and transferred from one building to another in a few operations, enhancing the ability to modify an existing architectural structure or to visualize a novel building in the style of the others.

  2. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; ...

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externallymore » applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.« less

  3. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Navratil, Gerald A.

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.

  4. Fast word reading in pure alexia: "fast, yet serial".

    PubMed

    Bormann, Tobias; Wolfer, Sascha; Hachmann, Wibke; Neubauer, Claudia; Konieczny, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pure alexia is a severe impairment of word reading in which individuals process letters serially with a pronounced length effect. Yet, there is considerable variation in the performance of alexic readers with generally very slow, but also occasionally fast responses, an observation addressed rarely in previous reports. It has been suggested that "fast" responses in pure alexia reflect residual parallel letter processing or that they may even be subserved by an independent reading system. Four experiments assessed fast and slow reading in a participant (DN) with pure alexia. Two behavioral experiments investigated frequency, neighborhood, and length effects in forced fast reading. Two further experiments measured eye movements when DN was forced to read quickly, or could respond faster because words were easier to process. Taken together, there was little support for the proposal that "qualitatively different" mechanisms or reading strategies underlie both types of responses in DN. Instead, fast responses are argued to be generated by the same serial-reading strategy.

  5. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Akshaya; Lorimer, Duncan

    2017-09-01

    We summarize our current state of knowledge of fast radio bursts (FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and rotating radio transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the context of repeat bursts before moving on to review propagation effects on FRB signals, FRB progenitor models and an outlook on FRBs as potential cosmological tools.

  6. An Active Noise Control (ACN) system for a commercially available HVAC using feedback architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbekar, Prashanth

    This thesis report discusses design of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system for a commercially available HVAC using Feedback architecture. Reducing noise in living environments is an important problem to create quieter residential and work places. The main contributions of this thesis include development of a real time, stable and fast single channel Feedback ANC prototype ANC using a FPGA to cancel the compressor noise. Based on observations from the real time implementation a multichannel Feedback ANC with novel delayless subband architecture has been developed to reduce computational complexity and to improve performance. This work represents an important step in developing an ANC system for the HVAC due to application of novel delayless subband multichannel Feedback ANC algorithm on real data collected from the HVAC system. It also discusses the practical issues involved in developing an ANC system prototype using a FPGA.

  7. Production of a long-term global water vapor and liquid water data set using ultra-fast methods to assimilate multi-satellite and radiosonde observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, Thomas H.; Randel, David L.; Reinke, Donald L.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Ringerud, Mark A.; Combs, Cynthia L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.; Wittmeyer, Ian L.

    1995-01-01

    There is a well-documented requirement for a comprehensive and accurate global moisture data set to assist many important studies in atmospheric science. Currently, atmospheric water vapor measurements are made from a variety of sources including radiosondes, aircraft and surface observations, and in recent years, by various satellite instruments. Creating a global data set from a single measuring system produces results that are useful and accurate only in specific situations and/or areas. Therefore, an accurate global moisture data set has been derived from a combination of these measurement systems. Under a NASA peer-reviewed contract, STC-METSAT produced two 5-yr (1988-1992) global data sets. One is the total column (integrated) water vapor data set and the other, a global layered water vapor data set using a combination of radiosonde observations, Television and Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Satellite (TOVS), and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data sets. STC-METSAT also produced a companion, global, integrated liquid water data set. The complete data set (all three products) has been named NVAP, an anachronym for NASA Water Vapor Project. STC-METSAT developed methods to process the data at a daily time scale and 1 x 1 deg spatial resolution.

  8. A computer program for fast non-LTE analysis of interstellar line spectra. With diagnostic plots to interpret observed line intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Black, J. H.; Schöier, F. L.; Jansen, D. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The large quantity and high quality of modern radio and infrared line observations require efficient modeling techniques to infer physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, density, and molecular abundances. Methods: We present a computer program to calculate the intensities of atomic and molecular lines produced in a uniform medium, based on statistical equilibrium calculations involving collisional and radiative processes and including radiation from background sources. Optical depth effects are treated with an escape probability method. The program is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.sron.rug.nl/~vdtak/radex/index.shtml. The program makes use of molecular data files maintained in the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA), which will continue to be improved and expanded. Results: The performance of the program is compared with more approximate and with more sophisticated methods. An Appendix provides diagnostic plots to estimate physical parameters from line intensity ratios of commonly observed molecules. Conclusions: This program should form an important tool in analyzing observations from current and future radio and infrared telescopes. Appendices A-D, are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    writes a cache bank block of data to USB controller .......34 Fig. 29 Process stack example...Architecture Block Diagram Data Bus Program Address Bus Data Address Bus Read/ Write Program Memory Extended Harvard Processor Architecture Program...Bus Data Memory Data Address Bus Read/ Write Data Address Bus Read/ Write Register Mem Pipeline State Mem OS Friendly Architecture B us se s B us se

  10. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    2008 Carnegie Mellon University 2008 PLS March 2008 © 2008 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative SATURN 2008...SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop, 30 Apr ? 1 May 2008, Pittsburgh, PA. 14

  11. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  12. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  13. Thermal Hotspots in CPU Die and It's Future Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Hu, Fu-Yuan

    Owing to the increasing core frequency and chip integration and the limited die dimension, the power densities in CPU chip have been increasing fastly. The high temperature on chip resulted by power densities threats the processor's performance and chip's reliability. This paper analyzed the thermal hotspots in die and their properties. A new architecture of function units in die - - hot units distributed architecture is suggested to cope with the problems of high power densities for future processor chip.

  14. The architecture of respiratory supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Letts, James A; Fiedorczuk, Karol; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-09-29

    Mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes are organized into supercomplexes responsible for carrying out cellular respiration. Here we present three architectures of mammalian (ovine) supercomplexes determined by cryo-electron microscopy. We identify two distinct arrangements of supercomplex CICIII2CIV (the respirasome)-a major 'tight' form and a minor 'loose' form (resolved at the resolution of 5.8 Å and 6.7 Å, respectively), which may represent different stages in supercomplex assembly or disassembly. We have also determined an architecture of supercomplex CICIII2 at 7.8 Å resolution. All observed density can be attributed to the known 80 subunits of the individual complexes, including 132 transmembrane helices. The individual complexes form tight interactions that vary between the architectures, with complex IV subunit COX7a switching contact from complex III to complex I. The arrangement of active sites within the supercomplex may help control reactive oxygen species production. To our knowledge, these are the first complete architectures of the dominant, physiologically relevant state of the electron transport chain.

  15. Observing the Fast X-ray Spectral Variability of NLS1 1H1934-063 with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Sara; Kara, Erin; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    The most variable active galactic nuclei (AGN), taken together, are a compelling wellspring of interesting accretion-related phenomena. They can exhibit dramatic variability in the X-ray band on a range of timescales down to a few minutes. We present the exemplifying case study of 1H1934-063 (z = 0.0102), a narrow-line Seyfert I (NLS1) that is among the most variable AGN ever observed with XMM-Newton. We present spectral and temporal analyses of a concurrent XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observation taken in 2015 and lasting 120 ks, during which the source exhibited a steep (factor of 1.5) plummet and subsequent full recovery of flux that we explore in detail here. Combined spectral and timing results point to a dramatic change in the continuum on timescales as short as a few ks. Similar to other highly variable Seyfert 1s, this AGN is quite X-ray bright and displays strong reflection spectral features. We find agreement with a change in the continuum, and we rule out absorption as the cause for this dramatic variability observed even at NuSTAR energies. We compare detailed time-resolved spectral fitting with Fourier-based timing analysis in order to constrain coronal geometry, dynamics, and emission/absorption processes dictating the nature of this variability. We also announce the discovery of a Fe-K time lag between the hard X-ray continuum emission (1 - 4 keV) and its relativistically-blurred reflection off the inner accretion flow (0.3 - 1 keV).

  16. Fast and Efficient Fragment-Based Lead Generation by Fully Automated Processing and Analysis of Ligand-Observed NMR Binding Data.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chen; Frommlet, Alexandra; Perez, Manuel; Cobas, Carlos; Blechschmidt, Anke; Dominguez, Santiago; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-04-14

    NMR binding assays are routinely applied in hit finding and validation during early stages of drug discovery, particularly for fragment-based lead generation. To this end, compound libraries are screened by ligand-observed NMR experiments such as STD, T1ρ, and CPMG to identify molecules interacting with a target. The analysis of a high number of complex spectra is performed largely manually and therefore represents a limiting step in hit generation campaigns. Here we report a novel integrated computational procedure that processes and analyzes ligand-observed proton and fluorine NMR binding data in a fully automated fashion. A performance evaluation comparing automated and manual analysis results on (19)F- and (1)H-detected data sets shows that the program delivers robust, high-confidence hit lists in a fraction of the time needed for manual analysis and greatly facilitates visual inspection of the associated NMR spectra. These features enable considerably higher throughput, the assessment of larger libraries, and shorter turn-around times.

  17. Observation of fast collinear partitioning of the {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au system into three and four fragments of comparable size

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, J.; Swiderski, L.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Guidara, E. La; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Colonna, M.; Toro, M. Di; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Auditore, L.

    2010-02-15

    Collisions of a very heavy nonfusing nuclear system {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au were studied at an energy of 15 MeV/nucleon. An interesting process of violent reseparation of this heavy system into three or four fragments of comparable size was observed. In the case of ternary partitioning, either the projectile-like fragment (PLF) or target-like fragment (TLF) breaks up almost collinearly with the PLF-TLF separation axis. In the case of quaternary reactions, both PLF and TLF were observed breaking up along this direction. By comparison with a dynamical model of deep inelastic collisions it was concluded that the ternary and quaternary reactions occur in semiperipheral collisions, in a range of angular momenta corresponding to about 0.5-0.7 of the maximum L value for grazing collisions. The time elapsing from the scission of the binary PLF + TLF system to the secondary scission of PLF or TLF was estimated to be of about 70-80 fm/c for the ternary reactions and 80-100 fm/c for the quaternary reactions.

  18. Production of long-term global water vapor and liquid water data set using ultra-fast methods to assimilate multi-satellite and radiosonde observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, Thomas H.; Randel, David L.; Reinke, Donald L.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Ringerud, Mark A.; Combs, Cynthia L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.; Wittmeyer, Ian L.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years climate research scientists have recognized the need for increased time and space resolution precipitable and liquid water data sets. This project is designed to meet those needs. Specifically, NASA is funding STC-METSAT to develop a total integrated column and layered precipitable water data set. This is complemented by a total column liquid water data set. These data are global in extent, 1 deg x 1 deg in resolution, with daily grids produced. Precipitable water is measured by a combination of in situ radiosonde observations and satellite derived infrared and microwave retrievals from four satellites. This project combines these data into a coherent merged product for use in global climate research. This report is the Year 2 Annual Report from this NASA-sponsored project and includes progress-to-date on the assigned tasks.

  19. Fast Parallel Computation Of Manipulator Inverse Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Method for fast parallel computation of inverse dynamics problem, essential for real-time dynamic control and simulation of robot manipulators, undergoing development. Enables exploitation of high degree of parallelism and, achievement of significant computational efficiency, while minimizing various communication and synchronization overheads as well as complexity of required computer architecture. Universal real-time robotic controller and simulator (URRCS) consists of internal host processor and several SIMD processors with ring topology. Architecture modular and expandable: more SIMD processors added to match size of problem. Operate asynchronously and in MIMD fashion.

  20. FAST TRACK PAPER: Observational analysis of correlations between aftershock productivities and regional conditions in the context of a damage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzheng; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2009-05-01

    Aftershock sequences are commonly observed but their properties vary from region to region. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky developed a solution for aftershocks decay in a damage rheology model. The solution indicates that the productivity of aftershocks decreases with increasing value of a non-dimensional material parameter R, given by the ratio of timescale for brittle deformation to timescale for viscous relaxation. The parameter R is inversely proportional to the degree of seismic coupling and is expected to increase primarily with increasing temperature and also with existence of sedimentary rocks at seismogenic depth. To test these predictions, we use aftershock sequences from several southern California regions. We first analyse properties of individual aftershock sequences generated by the 1992 Landers and 1987 Superstition Hills earthquakes. The results show that the ratio of aftershock productivities in these sequences spanning four orders of event magnitudes is similar to the ratio of the average heat flow in the two regions. To perform stronger statistical tests, we systematically analyse the average properties of stacked aftershock sequences in five regions. In each region, we consider events with magnitudes between 4.0 and 6.0 to be main shocks. For each main shock, we consider events to be aftershocks if they occur in the subsequent 50 d, within a circular region that scales with the magnitude of the main shock and in the magnitude range between that of the main shock and 2 units lower. This procedure produces 28-196 aftershock sequences in each of the five regions. We stack the aftershock sequences in each region and analyse the properties of the stacked data. The results indicate that the productivities of the stacked sequences are inversely correlated with the heat flow and existence of deep sedimentary covers, in agreement with the damage model predictions. Using the observed ratios of aftershock productivities, along with simple expressions based on the

  1. Towards a trustworthy distributed architecture for complex sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Heidi; Luke, Jahn A.

    2012-06-01

    Fast, efficient distributed computing enables much more capable sensing systems for defense and commercial applications. However, distributed systems face distributed threats. These threats can be countered with a distributed trustworthiness architecture that measures and enforces trust across a network. Currently, there are no designs for distributed trust architectures suitable for complex systems. We present such an architecture, which measures nodes' trustworthiness before they join the network and while they are operational. In order to facilitate the computation and enforcement of trust, a distributed sensing network has to integrate a new type of component. We define the trust agents in terms of capabilities that support trustworthiness measurements.

  2. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  3. ESPC Common Model Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    support for the Intel MIC architecture, the Apple Clang/LLVM C++ compiler is supported on both Linux and Darwin , and ESMF’s dependency on the NetCDF C...compiler on both Linux and Darwin systems. • Support was added to compile the ESMF library for the Intel MIC architecture under Linux. This allows

  4. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  5. Applying neuroscience to architecture.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, John P

    2009-06-25

    Architectural practice and neuroscience research use our brains and minds in much the same way. However, the link between neuroscience knowledge and architectural design--with rare exceptions--has yet to be made. The concept of linking these two fields is a challenge worth considering.

  6. Generic POCC architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a generic POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) architecture based upon current POCC software practice, and several refinements to the architecture based upon object-oriented design principles and expected developments in teleoperations. The current-technology generic architecture is an abstraction based upon close analysis of the ERBS, COBE, and GRO POCC's. A series of three refinements is presented: these may be viewed as an approach to a phased transition to the recommended architecture. The third refinement constitutes the recommended architecture, which, together with associated rationales, will form the basis of the rapid synthesis environment to be developed in the remainder of this task. The document is organized into two parts. The first part describes the current generic architecture using several graphical as well as tabular representations or 'views.' The second part presents an analysis of the generic architecture in terms of object-oriented principles. On the basis of this discussion, refinements to the generic architecture are presented, again using a combination of graphical and tabular representations.

  7. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel Architecture (RIK-A) is a multi-level architecture that supports a dynamic autonomy structure. The RIK-A is used to coalesce hardware for sensing and action as well as software components for perception, communication, behavior and world modeling into a framework that can be used to create behaviors for humans to interact with the robot.

  8. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  9. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  10. Architecture--a Celebration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ivor

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of architecture to society and the quality of life is explored in these areas: context, routes, environment, groupings, and interface. Architecture that grows out of interrelationships imposes order on a confused world and makes possible effective problem solving. (LBH)

  11. Emerging supercomputer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. VLSI and computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, R.; Fernandez, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a sense of realism concerning the potential of actual design principles and techniques for computer systems implemented in VLSI. With the knowledge gained from this book, the reader will be better able to understand and utilize the architectures that have been produced by the use of these techniques. Topics covered include Superconductive electronics, Multiprocessing, and Object-oriented architectures.

  13. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  14. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  15. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  16. De-Architecturization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wines, James

    1975-01-01

    De-architecturization is art about architecture, a catalyst suggesting that public art does not have to respond to formalist doctrine; but rather, may evolve from the informational reservoirs of the city environment, where phenomenology and structure become the fabric of its existence. (Author/RK)

  17. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  18. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  19. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  20. Can architecture be barbaric?

    PubMed

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity.

  1. The Simulation Intranet Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, V.P.; Linebarger, J.M.; Miller, D.J.; Vandewart, R.L.

    1998-12-02

    The Simdarion Infranet (S1) is a term which is being used to dcscribc one element of a multidisciplinary distributed and distance computing initiative known as DisCom2 at Sandia National Laboratory (http ct al. 1998). The Simulation Intranet is an architecture for satisfying Sandia's long term goal of providing an end- to-end set of scrviccs for high fidelity full physics simu- lations in a high performance, distributed, and distance computing environment. The Intranet Architecture group was formed to apply current distributed object technologies to this problcm. For the hardware architec- tures and software models involved with the current simulation process, a CORBA-based architecture is best suited to meet Sandia's needs. This paper presents the initial desi-a and implementation of this Intranct based on a three-tier Network Computing Architecture(NCA). The major parts of the architecture include: the Web Cli- ent, the Business Objects, and Data Persistence.

  2. Assessment of Alternative Europa Mission Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langmaier, Jerry; Elliott, John; Clark, Karla; Pappalardo, Robert; Reh, Kim; Spilker, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the science merit, technical risk and qualitative assessment of relative cost of alternative architectural implementations as applied to a first dedicated mission to Europa. The objective was accomplished through an examination of mission concepts resulting from previous and ongoing studies. Key architectural elements that were considered include moon orbiters, flybys (single flybys like New Horizons and multiple flybys similar to the ongoing Jupiter System Observer study), sample return and in situ landers and penetrators.

  3. Assessment of Alternative Europa Mission Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langmaier, Jerry; Elliott, John; Clark, Karla; Pappalardo, Robert; Reh, Kim; Spilker, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the science merit, technical risk and qualitative assessment of relative cost of alternative architectural implementations as applied to a first dedicated mission to Europa. The objective was accomplished through an examination of mission concepts resulting from previous and ongoing studies. Key architectural elements that were considered include moon orbiters, flybys (single flybys like New Horizons and multiple flybys similar to the ongoing Jupiter System Observer study), sample return and in situ landers and penetrators.

  4. Observation of CH A->X, Cn B->X, and NH A->X Emissions in Gas-phase Collisions of Fast O ((sup 3)P) Atoms with Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical emissions in single-collision reactions of fast (20 eV laboratory translational energy) O((sup 3)P) atoms with hydrazine, methylhydrazine, and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine have been measured in a crossed-beams geometry. The emissions were observed in the wavelength range 325-440 nm, and were identified as the CH (A 2(sub A))-->X(sup 2)pi(sub r), (for methylhydrazine), CN (B sup 2) Sigma(sup +) --> X(sup 2) Sigma(sup +) (for methylhydrazine)and NH(A(sup 3)pi --> X(sup3 Sigma) transitions (for all three hydraz vibration-rotation bands were fit to a synthetic spectrum of CH, CN and NH with given vibrational and rotational temperatures.

  5. A Video Broadcast Architecture with Server Placement Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Ma, Xiangjie; Zhang, Weili; Guo, Yunfei; Liu, Wenbo

    We propose a hybrid architecture MTreeTV to support fast channel switching. MTreeTV combines the use of P2P networks with dedicated streaming servers, and was proposed to build on the advantages of both P2P and CDN paradigms. We study the placement of the servers with constraints on the client to server paths and evaluate the effect of the server parameters. Through analysis and simulation, we show that MTreeTV supports fast channel switching (<4s).

  6. Architecture of the parallel hierarchical network for fast image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Leonid; Wójcik, Waldemar; Kokriatskaia, Natalia; Kutaev, Yuriy; Ivasyuk, Igor; Kotyra, Andrzej; Smailova, Saule

    2016-09-01

    Multistage integration of visual information in the brain allows humans to respond quickly to most significant stimuli while maintaining their ability to recognize small details in the image. Implementation of this principle in technical systems can lead to more efficient processing procedures. The multistage approach to image processing includes main types of cortical multistage convergence. The input images are mapped into a flexible hierarchy that reflects complexity of image data. Procedures of the temporal image decomposition and hierarchy formation are described in mathematical expressions. The multistage system highlights spatial regularities, which are passed through a number of transformational levels to generate a coded representation of the image that encapsulates a structure on different hierarchical levels in the image. At each processing stage a single output result is computed to allow a quick response of the system. The result is presented as an activity pattern, which can be compared with previously computed patterns on the basis of the closest match. With regard to the forecasting method, its idea lies in the following. In the results synchronization block, network-processed data arrive to the database where a sample of most correlated data is drawn using service parameters of the parallel-hierarchical network.

  7. A spatially localized architecture for fast and modular DNA computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Dalchau, Neil; Muscat, Richard A.; Phillips, Andrew; Seelig, Georg

    2017-09-01

    Cells use spatial constraints to control and accelerate the flow of information in enzyme cascades and signalling networks. Synthetic silicon-based circuitry similarly relies on spatial constraints to process information. Here, we show that spatial organization can be a similarly powerful design principle for overcoming limitations of speed and modularity in engineered molecular circuits. We create logic gates and signal transmission lines by spatially arranging reactive DNA hairpins on a DNA origami. Signal propagation is demonstrated across transmission lines of different lengths and orientations and logic gates are modularly combined into circuits that establish the universality of our approach. Because reactions preferentially occur between neighbours, identical DNA hairpins can be reused across circuits. Co-localization of circuit elements decreases computation time from hours to minutes compared to circuits with diffusible components. Detailed computational models enable predictive circuit design. We anticipate our approach will motivate using spatial constraints for future molecular control circuit designs.

  8. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  9. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  10. High Performance Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Kaewpijit, Sinthop

    1998-01-01

    Traditional remote sensing instruments are multispectral, where observations are collected at a few different spectral bands. Recently, many hyperspectral instruments, that can collect observations at hundreds of bands, have been operational. Furthermore, there have been ongoing research efforts on ultraspectral instruments that can produce observations at thousands of spectral bands. While these remote sensing technology developments hold great promise for new findings in the area of Earth and space science, they present many challenges. These include the need for faster processing of such increased data volumes, and methods for data reduction. Dimension Reduction is a spectral transformation, aimed at concentrating the vital information and discarding redundant data. One such transformation, which is widely used in remote sensing, is the Principal Components Analysis (PCA). This report summarizes our progress on the development of a parallel PCA and its implementation on two Beowulf cluster configuration; one with fast Ethernet switch and the other with a Myrinet interconnection. Details of the implementation and performance results, for typical sets of multispectral and hyperspectral NASA remote sensing data, are presented and analyzed based on the algorithm requirements and the underlying machine configuration. It will be shown that the PCA application is quite challenging and hard to scale on Ethernet-based clusters. However, the measurements also show that a high- performance interconnection network, such as Myrinet, better matches the high communication demand of PCA and can lead to a more efficient PCA execution.

  11. High Performance Parallel Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Kaewpijit, Sinthop

    1998-01-01

    Traditional remote sensing instruments are multispectral, where observations are collected at a few different spectral bands. Recently, many hyperspectral instruments, that can collect observations at hundreds of bands, have been operational. Furthermore, there have been ongoing research efforts on ultraspectral instruments that can produce observations at thousands of spectral bands. While these remote sensing technology developments hold great promise for new findings in the area of Earth and space science, they present many challenges. These include the need for faster processing of such increased data volumes, and methods for data reduction. Dimension Reduction is a spectral transformation, aimed at concentrating the vital information and discarding redundant data. One such transformation, which is widely used in remote sensing, is the Principal Components Analysis (PCA). This report summarizes our progress on the development of a parallel PCA and its implementation on two Beowulf cluster configuration; one with fast Ethernet switch and the other with a Myrinet interconnection. Details of the implementation and performance results, for typical sets of multispectral and hyperspectral NASA remote sensing data, are presented and analyzed based on the algorithm requirements and the underlying machine configuration. It will be shown that the PCA application is quite challenging and hard to scale on Ethernet-based clusters. However, the measurements also show that a high- performance interconnection network, such as Myrinet, better matches the high communication demand of PCA and can lead to a more efficient PCA execution.

  12. Architecture for Verifiable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

  13. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  14. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  15. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  16. Architectures for Nanostructured Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubloff, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructures offer profound opportunities for advancement in electrochemical energy storage, particularly with regard to power. However, their design and integration must balance ion transport, electron transport, and stability under charge/discharge cycling, involving fundamental physical, chemical and electrochemical mechanisms at nano length scales and across disparate time scales. In our group and in our DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (www.efrc.umd.edu) we have investigated single nanostructures and regular nanostructure arrays as batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and electrostatic capacitors to understand limiting mechanisms, using a variety of synthesis and characterization strategies. Primary lithiation pathways in heterogeneous nanostructures have been observed to include surface, interface, and both isotropic and anisotropic diffusion, depending on materials. Integrating current collection layers at the nano scale with active ion storage layers enhances power and can improve stability during cycling. For densely packed nanostructures as required for storage applications, we investigate both ``regular'' and ``random'' architectures consistent with transport requirements for spatial connectivity. Such configurations raise further important questions at the meso scale, such as dynamic ion and electron transport in narrow and tortuous channels, and the role of defect structures and their evolution during charge cycling. Supported as part of the Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160

  17. Lipid metabolism during fasting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ekberg, K; Landau, B R

    2001-10-01

    These studies were conducted to understand the relationship between measures of systemic free fatty acid (FFA) reesterification and regional FFA, glycerol, and triglyceride metabolism during fasting. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure fatty acid oxidation in six men after a 60-h fast. Systemic and regional (splanchnic, renal, and leg) FFA ([(3)H]palmitate) and glycerol ([(3)H]glycerol) kinetics, as well as splanchnic triglyceride release, were measured. The rate of systemic FFA reesterification was 366 +/- 93 micromol/min, which was greater (P < 0.05) than splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output (64 +/- 6 micromol/min), a measure of VLDL triglyceride fatty acid export. The majority of glycerol uptake occurred in the splanchnic and renal beds, although some leg glycerol uptake was detected. Systemic FFA release was approximately double that usually present in overnight postabsorptive men, yet the regional FFA release rates were of the same proportions previously observed in overnight postabsorptive men. In conclusion, FFA reesterification at rest during fasting far exceeds splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output. This indicates that nonhepatic sites of FFA reesterification are important, and that peripheral reesterification of FFA exceeds the rate of simultaneous intracellular triglyceride fatty acid oxidation.

  18. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    one year. FastSat HSV01 also deployed a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deployer (PPOD) for a separate nano ]satellite class spacecraft (Cubesat: Nano Sail Demonstration) in partnership with Ames Research Center. The Robotic lunar lander is a MSFC JHU APL partnership that led to the development of a flexible architecture for landers to support robotic missions to a wide range of lunar and asteroid destinations. The team started with the goal of meeting NASA agency directives that led to the creation of a test bed focusing on GN&C and software to demonstrate the descent and landing on any airless body for the final 30 to 60 meters. The team created a complex technology demonstration as well as Guidance Control and Navigation (GN&C) algorithms providing autonomous control of the lander. The team uses a green propellant of 90% hydrogen peroxide and has completed 18 successful test flights. The International Space Station (ISS) SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System (ISERV) is a technology demonstration payload to assist the SERVIR project with environmental monitoring for disaster relief and humanitarian efforts. The ISERV project was a partnership with TBE. The ISERV payload consists of a commercial off the shelf camera, telescope, and MSFC developed power distribution box and interfaces on ISS with the Window Observational Research Facility in the US Lab. MSFC has identified three key areas that enabled the low cost mission success to include culture, partnering, and cost/schedule control. This paper will briefly discuss these three Class D efforts, FastSat HSV-01, the Robotic Lunar Lander and the ISERV camera system, the lessons learned, their successes and challenges.

  19. Dynamics and Design Principles of a Basic Regulatory Architecture Controlling Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Emmitt R; DeRisi, Joe; Li, Hao

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic features of a genetic network's response to environmental fluctuations represent essential functional specifications and thus may constrain the possible choices of network architecture and kinetic parameters. To explore the connection between dynamics and network design, we have analyzed a general regulatory architecture that is commonly found in many metabolic pathways. Such architecture is characterized by a dual control mechanism, with end product feedback inhibition and transcriptional regulation mediated by an intermediate metabolite. As a case study, we measured with high temporal resolution the induction profiles of the enzymes in the leucine biosynthetic pathway in response to leucine depletion, using an automated system for monitoring protein expression levels in single cells. All the genes in the pathway are known to be coregulated by the same transcription factors, but we observed drastically different dynamic responses for enzymes upstream and immediately downstream of the key control point—the intermediate metabolite α-isopropylmalate (αIPM), which couples metabolic activity to transcriptional regulation. Analysis based on genetic perturbations suggests that the observed dynamics are due to differential regulation by the leucine branch-specific transcription factor Leu3, and that the downstream enzymes are strictly controlled and highly expressed only when αIPM is available. These observations allow us to build a simplified mathematical model that accounts for the observed dynamics and can correctly predict the pathway's response to new perturbations. Our model also suggests that transient dynamics and steady state can be separately tuned and that the high induction levels of the downstream enzymes are necessary for fast leucine recovery. It is likely that principles emerging from this work can reveal how gene regulation has evolved to optimize performance in other metabolic pathways with similar architecture. PMID:18563967

  20. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  1. Construct a Management Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    Task: Consider management architecture options that better align functional and budget responsibility consistent with comprehensive strategic ... planning . Scope the leadership hierarchy to the appropriate management responsibilities, reduce layers of management and move decision making closer to issue identification.

  2. Robot Electronics Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Michael; Magnone, Lee; Aghazarian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Kennedy, Brett

    2008-01-01

    An electronics architecture has been developed to enable the rapid construction and testing of prototypes of robotic systems. This architecture is designed to be a research vehicle of great stability, reliability, and versatility. A system according to this architecture can easily be reconfigured (including expanded or contracted) to satisfy a variety of needs with respect to input, output, processing of data, sensing, actuation, and power. The architecture affords a variety of expandable input/output options that enable ready integration of instruments, actuators, sensors, and other devices as independent modular units. The separation of different electrical functions onto independent circuit boards facilitates the development of corresponding simple and modular software interfaces. As a result, both hardware and software can be made to expand or contract in modular fashion while expending a minimum of time and effort.

  3. Architectural Knowledge in an SOA Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Olaf; Kopp, Petra; Pappe, Stefan

    In this chapter, we present an industrial case study for the creation and usage of architectural knowledge. We first introduce the business domain, service portfolio, and knowledge management approach of the company involved in the case. Next, we introduce a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) infrastructure reference architecture as a primary carrier of architectural knowledge in this company. Moreover, we present how we harvested architectural knowledge from industry projects to create this reference architecture. We also present feedback from early reference architecture users. Finally, we conclude and give an outlook to future work.

  4. NPOESS System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnant, F.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD and will provide continuity for the NASA Earth Observation System with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project. This poster will provide a top level status update of the program, as well as an overview of the NPOESS system architecture, which includes four segments. The space segment includes satellites in two orbits that carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS system design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users through a Command, Control, and Communication Segment (C3S). The data processing for NPOESS is accomplished through an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS)/Field Terminal Segment (FTS) that processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government as well as remote terminal users. The Launch Support Segment completes the four segments that make up the NPOESS system that will enhance the connectivity between research and operations and provide critical operational and scientific environmental measurements to military, civil, and scientific users until 2026.

  5. Embedded Instrumentation Systems Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and continuous test and evaluation. The architecture can also be useful in monitoring, diagnostics, and health management, as well as protection in...section describes the demonstration platform used in the effort to validate the first reference instantiation of the architecture. It included...advantage of the IEEE 1451 family of standards for smart sensors and transducers (Lee and Song 2003; Song and Lee 2006). The EI Node uses the IEEE 1451.X

  6. A Modular Robotic Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    DATES COVERED AD-A232 007 Januar 1991 professional paper5 FUNOING NUMBERS A MODULAR ROBOTIC ARCHITECTURE PR: ZE92 WU: DN300029 PE: 0602936N - S. AUTHOR...mobile robots will help alleviate these problems, and, if made widely available, will promote standardization and compatibility among systems throughout...the industry. The Modular Robotic Architecture (MRA) is a generic control system that meets the above needs by providing developers with a standard set

  7. Dynamic Architecture Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Tecnology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Accession...architecture. The review assured that this study did not duplicate previous studies and provided the background information for this study. 4 Analysis of...a dynamic architecture computer based on the information obtained from the analysis outlined in the steps above. Analysis of Results. This concluding

  8. Languages for parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

  9. Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, C.P.

    1999-05-14

    A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

  10. Neural architectures for robot intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ritter, H; Steil, J J; Nölker, C; Röthling, F; McGuire, P

    2003-01-01

    We argue that direct experimental approaches to elucidate the architecture of higher brains may benefit from insights gained from exploring the possibilities and limits of artificial control architectures for robot systems. We present some of our recent work that has been motivated by that view and that is centered around the study of various aspects of hand actions since these are intimately linked with many higher cognitive abilities. As examples, we report on the development of a modular system for the recognition of continuous hand postures based on neural nets, the use of vision and tactile sensing for guiding prehensile movements of a multifingered hand, and the recognition and use of hand gestures for robot teaching. Regarding the issue of learning, we propose to view real-world learning from the perspective of data-mining and to focus more strongly on the imitation of observed actions instead of purely reinforcement-based exploration. As a concrete example of such an effort we report on the status of an ongoing project in our laboratory in which a robot equipped with an attention system with a neurally inspired architecture is taught actions by using hand gestures in conjunction with speech commands. We point out some of the lessons learnt from this system, and discuss how systems of this kind can contribute to the study of issues at the junction between natural and artificial cognitive systems.

  11. Predicting and Modeling RNA Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Westhof, Eric; Masquida, Benoît; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A general approach for modeling the architecture of large and structured RNA molecules is described. The method exploits the modularity and the hierarchical folding of RNA architecture that is viewed as the assembly of preformed double-stranded helices defined by Watson-Crick base pairs and RNA modules maintained by non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Despite the extensive molecular neutrality observed in RNA structures, specificity in RNA folding is achieved through global constraints like lengths of helices, coaxiality of helical stacks, and structures adopted at the junctions of helices. The Assemble integrated suite of computer tools allows for sequence and structure analysis as well as interactive modeling by homology or ab initio assembly with possibilities for fitting within electronic density maps. The local key role of non-Watson-Crick pairs guides RNA architecture formation and offers metrics for assessing the accuracy of three-dimensional models in a more useful way than usual root mean square deviation (RMSD) values. PMID:20504963

  12. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  13. Physiological Responses to Fasting and Estivation for the Three-Toed Amphiuma (Amphiuma tridactylum).

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew E; Secor, Stephen M

    Species of Amphiuma enter a state of subterranean estivation with the drying of their aquatic habitat. Characteristic of amphibian fasting and estivation is an initial depression of metabolism and tissue mass and function with fasting, followed by a more pronounced adaptive decrease in metabolism and tissue function with estivation. We hypothesized that Amphiuma likewise experiences a two-stage set of responses to estivation. Therefore, we examined the physiological responses of the three-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma tridactylum) to fasting and estivation treatments. Recently fed A. tridactylum served as controls for fasting treatments of 1, 3, and 6 mo (in water) and estivation treatments of 3 and 6 mo (buried in dried substrate). After a 1-mo fast, A. tridactylum experienced no further depression of metabolic rate following 3 or 6 mo of fasting or estivation. For all fasting and estivation trials, A. tridactylum maintained blood chemistry homeostasis, with the exception of an increase in blood urea following 6 mo of estivation. Compared with fed controls, the mass of most organs did not vary even after 6 mo of fasting and estivation. Only the small intestine (decreasing) and the full gall bladder (increasing) experienced significant changes in mass with fasting or estivation. The fasting decrease in small intestinal mass was in part due to enterocyte atrophy, which resulted in a decrease in mucosa/submucosa thickness. In contrast to many estivating anurans and the ecologically convergent sirens, A. tridactylum does not surround itself in a cocoon of dried skin or mucus during estivation. The thickness and architecture of their skin remains unchanged even after 6 mo of estivation. Following months of fasting or estivation, individuals still maintain gastric acid production, pancreatic enzyme activity, and intestinal enzyme and transporter activities. Contrary to our hypothesis that A. tridactylum experiences two stages of metabolic depression and tissue downregulation

  14. LIBRA: A high-performance balanced computer architecture for Prolog

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Four reduced-instruction-set computer (RISC) architectures for Prolog are presented: the Simple Abstract Machine (SAM), the Logic Programming Windowed RISC I (LOW RISC I), the LOW RISC II, and the Logical Inference Balanced RISC Architecture (LIBRA). An informal methodology for the semantic-based design of computer architectures relates the design of each architecture to its predecessor. The suitability of each architecture for Prolog is evaluated using macro expansions for each WAM instruction, from which execution speed, code density, memory usage, branch frequency, standard logical inferences per second, benchmark logical inferences per second and the semantic gap of each architecture relative to Prolog are calculated. The final design, the LIBRA, is 2.3 times as fast as the Berkeley PLM without interleaved memory, and 15 times as fast with eight-way instruction and data memory interleaving, reaching an estimated execution speed of 7.5 million standard logical inferences per second. The LIBRA's performance is due to parallelized tag and data operations, pipelining, reduced branch frequency, and complex single-cycle instructions.

  15. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  16. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  17. Comparing root architectural models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  18. The architectural relevance of cybernetics

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    This title is taken from an article by Gordon Pask in Architectural Design September 1969. It raises a number of questions which this article attempts to answer. How did Gordon come to be writing for an architectural publication? What was his contribution to architecture? How does he now come to be on the faculty of a school of architecture? And what indeed is the architectural relevance of cybernetics? 12 refs.

  19. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan: does it affect sleep?

    PubMed

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Almushailhi, Khalid; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M

    2014-02-01

    Islamic intermittent fasting is distinct from regular voluntary or experimental fasting. We hypothesised that if a regimen of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake is followed during intermittent fasting, the effects of fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness will be minimal. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of Islamic intermittent fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness. Eight healthy volunteers reported to the Sleep Disorders Centre on five occasions for polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests: (1) during adaptation; (2) 3 weeks before Ramadan, after having performed Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting); (3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline); (4) 2 weeks into Ramadan (Ramadan); and (5) 2 weeks after Ramadan (non-fasting; Recovery). Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the multiple sleep latency test. The participants had a mean age of 26.6 ± 4.9 years, a body mass index of 23.7 ± 3.5 kg m(-2) and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 7.3 ± 2.7. There was no change in weight or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the four study periods. The rapid eye movement sleep percentage was significantly lower during fasting. There was no difference in sleep latency, non-rapid eye movement sleep percentage, arousal index and sleep efficiency. The multiple sleep latency test analysis revealed no difference in the sleep latency between the 'non-fasting baseline', 'baseline fasting', 'Ramadan' and 'Recovery' time points. Under conditions of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake, Islamic intermittent fasting results in decreased rapid eye movement sleep with no impact on other sleep stages, the arousal index or daytime sleepiness.

  20. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay.

  1. Performance Comparison Between Adaptive Line Enhancers and FFT for Fast Carrier Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H-G.; Nguyen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures, namely conventional ALE, ALE with Double Filtering (ALEDF), and ALE with Coherent Accumulation (ALECA) are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in time-domain.

  2. HI Intensity Mapping with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Chen, T.; Dickinson, C.; Harper, S.; Maffei, B.; Olivari, L. C.; Wilkinsondagger, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST 19-beam L-band receivers (1.05-1.45 GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters (w0,wa) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is 6000 deg2. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift (0.95-1.35 GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than 2 σ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  3. Efficient VLSI architecture for training radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhe-Cheng; Hwang, Wen-Jyi

    2013-03-19

    This paper presents a novel VLSI architecture for the training of radial basis function (RBF) networks. The architecture contains the circuits for fuzzy C-means (FCM) and the recursive Least Mean Square (LMS) operations. The FCM circuit is designed for the training of centers in the hidden layer of the RBF network. The recursive LMS circuit is adopted for the training of connecting weights in the output layer. The architecture is implemented by the field programmable gate array (FPGA). It is used as a hardware accelerator in a system on programmable chip (SOPC) for real-time training and classification. Experimental results reveal that the proposed RBF architecture is an effective alternative for applications where fast and efficient RBF training is desired.

  4. Efficient Phase Unwrapping Architecture for Digital Holographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Cheng, Shih-Chang; Cheng, Chau-Jern

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel phase unwrapping architecture for accelerating the computational speed of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based phase unwrapping algorithm providing a minimum squared error solution is adopted for hardware implementation because of its simplicity and robustness to noise. The proposed architecture is realized in a pipeline fashion to maximize throughput of the computation. Moreover, the number of hardware multipliers and dividers are minimized to reduce the hardware costs. The proposed architecture is used as a custom user logic in a system on programmable chip (SOPC) for physical performance measurement. Experimental results reveal that the proposed architecture is effective for expediting the computational speed while consuming low hardware resources for designing an embedded DHM system. PMID:22163688

  5. Fastphylo: Fast tools for phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Distance methods are ubiquitous tools in phylogenetics. Their primary purpose may be to reconstruct evolutionary history, but they are also used as components in bioinformatic pipelines. However, poor computational efficiency has been a constraint on the applicability of distance methods on very large problem instances. Results We present fastphylo, a software package containing implementations of efficient algorithms for two common problems in phylogenetics: estimating DNA/protein sequence distances and reconstructing a phylogeny from a distance matrix. We compare fastphylo with other neighbor joining based methods and report the results in terms of speed and memory efficiency. Conclusions Fastphylo is a fast, memory efficient, and easy to use software suite. Due to its modular architecture, fastphylo is a flexible tool for many phylogenetic studies. PMID:24255987

  6. Integrated architectures for a horticultural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Natalie R.; Rodrigo, T. Surangi

    1998-10-01

    For many applications, which involve the processing and handling of highly variable natural products, conventional automation techniques are inadequate. Field applications involving the processing and handling of these products have the additional complication of dealing with a dynamically changing environment. Automated systems for these applications must be capable of sensing the variability of each product item and adjusting the way each product item is processed to accommodate that variability. For automation to be feasible, both fast processing of sensor information and fast determination of how product items are handled, is vital. The combination of sensor equipped mobile robotic systems with artificial intelligence techniques is a potential solution for the automation of many of these applications. The aim of this research is to develop a software architecture which incorporates robotic task planning and control for a variety of applications involving the processing of naturally varying products. In this paper we discuss the results from the initial laboratory trials for an asparagus harvesting application.

  7. Color education in architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unver, Rengin

    2002-06-01

    Architecture is an interdisciplinary profession that combines and uses the elements of various major fields such as humanities, social and physical sciences, technology and creative arts. The main aim of architectural education is to enable students acquire the skills to create designs sufficient both aesthetically and technically. The goals of the under graduate program can be summarized as; the information transfer on subjects and problems related to the application of the profession, the acquisition of relevant skills, and information on specialist subjects. Color is one of the most important design parameters every architect has to use. Architect candidates should be equipped in the field of color just as they are in other relevant subjects. This paper deals with the significance, goals, methods and the place of color education in the undergraduate program of architectural education.

  8. Avionics System Architecture Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

  9. Advanced ground station architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillig, David; Benjamin, Ted

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new station architecture for NASA's Ground Network (GN). The architecture makes efficient use of emerging technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, operational complexity, and operational and maintenance costs. The architecture, which is based on recent receiver work sponsored by the Office of Space Communications Advanced Systems Program, allows integration of both GN and Space Network (SN) modes of operation in the same electronics system. It is highly configurable through software and the use of charged coupled device (CCD) technology to provide a wide range of operating modes. Moreover, it affords modularity of features which are optional depending on the application. The resulting system incorporates advanced RF, digital, and remote control technology capable of introducing significant operational, performance, and cost benefits to a variety of NASA communications and tracking applications.

  10. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  11. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  12. Processor architecture and data buffering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Hans; Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A set of architectures from three major architecture families: stack, register, and memory-to-memory is discussed. It is shown that scalable architectures are not applicable for low-density technologies because they require at least 32 words of local memory. Software support is shown to be capable of bridging the performance gap between scalable and nonscalable architectures. A register architecture with 32 words of local memory allocated interprocedurally outperforms scalable architectures with equal sizes local memories and even some with larger size local memories. The performance advantage of unscalable architectures becomes significant when in addition to quality compile-time support, a small cache is added to an unscalable architecture. A 32-register architecture with 512 byte cache executes 20 percent less cycles when compared with an 8-set multiple overlapping set organization.

  13. Lunar architecture and urbanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

  14. Synergetics and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.; Maslova, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    A series of phenomena pertaining to economics, quantum physics, language, literary criticism, and especially architecture is studied from the standpoint of synergetics (the study of self-organizing complex systems). It turns out that a whole series of concrete formulas describing these phenomena is identical in these different situations. This is the case of formulas relating to the Bose-Einstein distribution of particles and the distribution of words from a frequency dictionary. This also allows to apply a "quantized" from of the Zipf law to the problem of the authorship of Quiet Flows the Don and to the "blending in" of new architectural structures in an existing environment.

  15. Modulation of Gene Expression using Electrospun Scaffolds with Templated Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y-N; Sanders, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of biomimetic scaffolds is a critical component to fulfill the promise of functional tissue engineered materials. We describe herein a simple technique, based on printed circuit board manufacturing, to produce novel templates for electrospinning scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. This technique facilitates fabrication of electrospun scaffolds with templated architecture, which we defined as a scaffold's bulk mechanical properties being driven by its fiber architecture. Electrospun scaffolds with templated architectures were characterized with regard to fiber alignment and mechanical properties. Fast Fourier transform analysis revealed a high degree of fiber alignment along the conducting traces of the templates. Mechanical testing showed that scaffolds demonstrated tunable mechanical properties as a function of templated architecture. Fibroblast seeded scaffolds were subjected to a peak strain of 3% or 10% at 0.5 Hz for 1 hour. Exposing seeded scaffolds to the low strain magnitude (3%) significantly increased collagen I gene expression compared to the high strain magnitude (10%) in a scaffold architecture dependent manner. These experiments indicate that scaffolds with templated architectures can be produced and modulation of gene expression is possible with templated architectures. This technology holds promise for the long term goal of creating tissue engineered replacements with the biomechanical and biochemical make-up of native tissues. PMID:22447576

  16. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  17. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  18. Fasts, feasts and festivals in diabetes-1: Glycemic management during Hindu fasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Bajaj, Sarita; Gupta, Yashdeep; Agarwal, Pankaj; Singh, S. K.; Julka, Sandeep; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet

    2015-01-01

    This communication is the first of a series on South Asian fasts, festivals, and diabetes, designed to spread awareness and stimulate research on this aspect of diabetes and metabolic care. It describes the various fasts observed as part of Hindu religion and offers a classification scheme for them, labeling them as infrequent and frequent. The infrequent fasts are further sub-classified as brief and prolonged, to facilitate a scientific approach to glycemic management during these fasts. Pre-fast counseling, non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological modification, and post-fast debriefing are discussed in detail. All available drug classes and molecules are covered in this article, which provides guidance about necessary changes in dosage and timing of administration. While in no way exhaustive, the brief review offers a basic framework which diabetes care professionals can use to counsel and manage persons in their care who wish to observe various Hindu fasts. PMID:25729681

  19. Hadl: HUMS Architectural Description Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Adavi, V.; Agarwal, N.; Gullapalli, S.; Kumar, P.; Sundaram, P.

    2004-01-01

    Specification of architectures is an important prerequisite for evaluation of architectures. With the increase m the growth of health usage and monitoring systems (HUMS) in commercial and military domains, the need far the design and evaluation of HUMS architectures has also been on the increase. In this paper, we describe HADL, HUMS Architectural Description Language, that we have designed for this purpose. In particular, we describe the features of the language, illustrate them with examples, and show how we use it in designing domain-specific HUMS architectures. A companion paper contains details on our design methodology of HUMS architectures.

  20. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  1. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated ...

  2. Fault-tolerant computers. Multiprocessor architecture tunes in to transaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, K.I.

    1983-01-27

    The availability of fast, low-cost 16- and 32-bit microprocessors makes it possible at last to build a truly cost-effective generation of fault-tolerant computers. One such system employs a multiprocessor architecture optimized for transaction-oriented applications. Called the synapse expansion architecture, it is tolerant of component failures, may easily be economically expanded in small increments, and is not tied to any one microprocessor instruction set. Yet thanks to the specially developed operating software, neither operators nor programmers are aware of the architecture's uniqueness. The author looks at the architecture of the synapse expansion general purpose computer.

  3. Information network architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    Graphs, charts, diagrams and outlines of information relative to information network architectures for advanced aerospace missions, such as the Space Station, are presented. Local area information networks are considered a likely technology solution. The principle needs for the network are listed.

  4. Symbolic Architectures for Cognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    on the communitie- in which the are raised and reside (von Cranach, Foppa , Lepinie,. and Ploog 1070). Fhe addtiLunal capabilities tor low-level...Learning. Los Altos. CA: Morgan Kaufm X_ VanLehn. K., ed. 1989 Architectures for Inteligence. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. von Cranach. M., Foppa , K

  5. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  6. [Architecture, budget and dignity].

    PubMed

    Morel, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on its dynamic strengths, a psychiatric unit develops various projects and care techniques. In this framework, the institute director must make a number of choices with regard to architecture. Why renovate the psychiatry building? What financial investments are required? What criteria should be followed? What if the major argument was based on the respect of the patient's dignity?

  7. [Architecture and movement].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  8. INL Generic Robot Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The INL Generic Robot Architecture is a generic, extensible software framework that can be applied across a variety of different robot geometries, sensor suites and low-level proprietary control application programming interfaces (e.g. mobility, aria, aware, player, etc.).

  9. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  10. Can Architecture Be Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Lucien; Mikellides, Byron

    1981-01-01

    The academic world is seen as remote from day-to-day reality. A practicing architect's experiences teaching architecture students at the Saint-Luc School in Brussels are described, in which role playing was used to bring reality to the classroom. (MLW)

  11. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  12. GNU debugger internal architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Nessett, D.; Pizzi, R.

    1993-12-16

    This document describes the internal and architecture and implementation of the GNU debugger, gdb. Topics include inferior process management, command execution, symbol table management and remote debugging. Call graphs for specific functions are supplied. This document is not a complete description but offers a developer an overview which is the place to start before modification.

  13. Emulating an MIMD architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Su Bogong; Grishman, R.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research effort in parallel processor architecture and programming, the ultracomputer group at New York University has performed extensive simulation of parallel programs. To speed up these simulations, a parallel processor emulator, using the microprogrammable Puma computer system previously designed and built at NYU, has been developed. 8 references.

  14. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  15. The logic of architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, W.J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book features a discussion of languages of architectural form, their specification by means of formal grammars, their interpretation and their role in structuring design reasoning. The author re-examines central issues of design theory in the light of recent advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and the theory of computation.

  16. Decentralized Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    to describe software. Thus, the essential anthropocentrism of the term’s tradi- tional definition suggests exploring a social process that illustrates...and disagreement outside it. The anthropocentrism of the concept may seem irrelevant to the concerns of software architecture, but the missing link

  17. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  18. Transforming Space Missions into Service Oriented Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the vision of the sensor web enablement via a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). An generic example is given of a user finding a service through the Web, and initiating a request for the desired observation. The parts that comprise this system and how they interact are reviewed. The advantages of the use of SOA are reviewed.

  19. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  20. 11. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and Cartographic Branch Alexandria, Va.) 'Non-Com-Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster General's Office Standard Plan 82, sheet 1. Lithograph on linen architectural drawing. April 1893 3 ELEVATIONS, 3 PLANS AND A PARTIAL SECTION - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  1. 12. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and Cartographic Branch, Alexandria, Va.) 'Non-Com-Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster Generals Office Standard Plan 82, sheet 2, April 1893. Lithograph on linen architectural drawing. DETAILS - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  2. Fast positive breakdown in lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. G.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Lapierre, J.; Wu, T.; Stanley, M. A.; Edens, H. E.

    2017-08-01

    VHF radiation sources produced by positive breakdown during lightning discharges are generally considered to be both weak and slowly propagating. However, as VHF lightning mapping systems have become more sensitive, even this weak radiation can be mapped. In addition to being a faint process, positive breakdown often produces bursts of energetic activity. During the bursts, the VHF emission is extremely bright, and the breakdown propagates at much higher speeds. Here we present VHF interferometric and time-of-arrival measurements of such fast positive breakdown events produced during three example flashes. Electric field change measurements show that the fast breakdown process carries positive charge. The extent and velocity of the breakdown is estimated by converting the angular source locations provided by the interferometer into Cartesian coordinates using three-dimensional lightning mapping observations of the flash as a guide. Fast positive breakdown events are found to extend 100-2400 m into virgin air beyond the tip of the preceding positive leader, at speeds of 0.9-9 ×107 m s-1. The observations expand upon earlier observations of such breakdown and are similar to recently reported results that fast positive breakdown is the cause of high-power narrow bipolar events.

  3. Shaping plant architecture

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Thomas; Muhr, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Plants exhibit phenotypical plasticity. Their general body plan is genetically determined, but plant architecture and branching patterns are variable and can be adjusted to the prevailing environmental conditions. The modular design of the plant facilitates such morphological adaptations. The prerequisite for the formation of a branch is the initiation of an axillary meristem. Here, we review the current knowledge about this process. After its establishment, the meristem can develop into a bud which can either become dormant or grow out and form a branch. Many endogenous factors, such as photoassimilate availability, and exogenous factors like nutrient availability or shading, have to be integrated in the decision whether a branch is formed. The underlying regulatory network is complex and involves phytohormones and transcription factors. The hormone auxin is derived from the shoot apex and inhibits bud outgrowth indirectly in a process termed apical dominance. Strigolactones appear to modulate apical dominance by modification of auxin fluxes. Furthermore, the transcription factor BRANCHED1 plays a central role. The exact interplay of all these factors still remains obscure and there are alternative models. We discuss recent findings in the field along with the major models. Plant architecture is economically significant because it affects important traits of crop and ornamental plants, as well as trees cultivated in forestry or on short rotation coppices. As a consequence, plant architecture has been modified during plant domestication. Research revealed that only few key genes have been the target of selection during plant domestication and in breeding programs. Here, we discuss such findings on the basis of various examples. Architectural ideotypes that provide advantages for crop plant management and yield are described. We also outline the potential of breeding and biotechnological approaches to further modify and improve plant architecture for economic needs

  4. An Experiment in Architectural Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvorak, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the application of the PLATO IV computer-based educational system to a one-semester basic drawing course for freshman architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design students and relates student reactions to the experience. (RAO)

  5. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  6. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  7. Evolution and development of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Erasmus, Yvette; Lane, Brendan; Harder, Lawrence D; Coen, Enrico

    2007-06-08

    To understand the constraints on biological diversity, we analyzed how selection and development interact to control the evolution of inflorescences, the branching structures that bear flowers. We show that a single developmental model accounts for the restricted range of inflorescence types observed in nature and that this model is supported by molecular genetic studies. The model predicts associations between inflorescence architecture, climate, and life history, which we validated empirically. Paths, or evolutionary wormholes, link different architectures in a multidimensional fitness space, but the rate of evolution along these paths is constrained by genetic and environmental factors, which explains why some evolutionary transitions are rare between closely related plant taxa.

  8. Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration operations architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Farzana I.; Robinson, Bryan S.; Semprucci, Marilyn D.; Boroson, Don M.

    2015-06-01

    Radio waves have been the standard method for deep-space communications since the earliest days of space exploration. However, the recent success of the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) program will clearly revolutionize the way data is sent and received from deep space. LLCD demonstrated record-breaking optical up/downlinks between Earth and the Lunar Lasercom Space Terminal (LLST) payload on NASA's Lunar Atmosphere Environment Explorer (LADEE) satellite orbiting the Moon. A space-to-ground optical downlink as fast as 622 Mbps was demonstrated as well as a ground-to-space uplink as fast as 20 Mbps. The LLCD operations architecture was designed to support a wide range of operations conditions, multiple ground terminals with varying designs and capabilities, short contact times including energy and thermal constraints, and limited viewing opportunities. This paper will explore the operations architecture used for the LLCD as well as present ideas on how best to make future laser communications operations routine and suitable for wide-scale deployment.

  9. Compositional Specification of Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes our experience using parameterized algebraic specifications to model properties of software architectures. The goal is to model the decomposition of requirements independent of the style used to implement the architecture. We begin by providing an overview of the role of architecture specification in software development. We then describe how architecture specifications are build up from component and connector specifications and give an overview of insights gained from a case study used to validate the method.

  10. Memory performance of Prolog architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tick, E.

    1988-01-01

    Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures addresses these problems and reports dynamic data and instruction referencing characteristics of both sequential and parallel prolog architectures and corresponding uni-processor and multi-processor memory-hierarchy performance tradeoffs. Computer designers and logic programmers will find this work to be a valuable reference with many practical applications. Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures will also serve as an important textbook for graduate level courses in computer architecture and/or performance analysis.

  11. Automated evaluation of service oriented architecture systems: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Hesham; Gilliam, Antonio; Guleyupoglu, Suleyman; Russell, Stephen M.

    2017-05-01

    The Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) model is fast gaining dominance in how software applications are built. They allow organizations to capitalize on existing services and share data amongst distributed applications. The automatic evaluation of SOA systems poses a challenging problem due to three factors: technological complexity, organizational incompatibility, and integration into existing development pipelines. In this paper we describe our experience in developing and deploying an automated evaluation capability for the Marine Corps' Tactical Service Oriented Architecture (TSOA). We outline the technological, policy, and operational challenges we face and how we are addressing them.

  12. On-board processing satellite network architectures for broadband ISDN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inukai, Thomas; Faris, Faris; Shyy, Dong-Jye

    1992-01-01

    Onboard baseband processing architectures for future satellite broadband integrated services digital networks (B-ISDN's) are addressed. To assess the feasibility of implementing satellite B-ISDN services, critical design issues, such as B-ISDN traffic characteristics, transmission link design, and a trade-off between onboard circuit and fast packet switching, are analyzed. Examples of the two types of switching mechanisms and potential onboard network control functions are presented. A sample network architecture is also included to illustrate a potential onboard processing system.

  13. Architectural Adventures in Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to architecture's complexity, it can be challenging to develop lessons for the students, and consequently, the teaching of architecture is frequently overlooked. Every community has an architectural history. For example, the community in which the author's students live has a variety of historic houses from when the community originated (the…

  14. Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a tutorial overview of cognitive architectures that can form a theoretical foundation for designing multimedia instruction. Cognitive architectures include a description of memory stores, memory codes, and cognitive operations. Architectures that are relevant to multimedia learning include Paivio's dual coding theory,…

  15. Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet; Sen, Ranjan K.

    1989-01-01

    The Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER) project is essentially research oriented towards technology insertion issues for NASA's unmanned planetary probes. It was initiated to complement and augment the long-term efforts for space exploration with particular reference to NASA/LaRC's (NASA Langley Research Center) research needs for planetary exploration missions of the mid and late 1990s. The requirements for space missions as given in the somewhat dated Advanced Information Processing Systems (AIPS) requirements document are contrasted with the new requirements from JPL/Caltech involving sensor data capture and scene analysis. It is shown that more stringent requirements have arisen as a result of technological advancements. Two possible architectures, the AIPS Proof of Concept (POC) configuration and the MAX Fault-tolerant dataflow multiprocessor, were evaluated. The main observation was that the AIPS design is biased towards fault tolerance and may not be an ideal architecture for planetary and deep space probes due to high cost and complexity. The MAX concepts appears to be a promising candidate, except that more detailed information is required. The feasibility for adding neural computation capability to this architecture needs to be studied. Key impact issues for architectural design of computing systems meant for planetary missions were also identified.

  16. Impact of Ramadan intermittent fasting on cognitive function in trained cyclists: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chamari, K; Briki, W; Farooq, A; Patrick, T; Belfekih, T; Herrera, C P

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed selected measures of cognitive function in trained cyclists who observed daylight fasting during Ramadan. Eleven cyclists volunteered to participate (age: 21.6±4.8 years, VO2max: 57.7±5.6 ml kg(-1)·min(-1)) and were followed for 2 months. Cognitive function (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), Reaction Time index (RTI) and Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP) tests) and sleep architecture (ambulatory EEG) were assessed: before Ramadan (BR), in the 1st week (RA1) and 4th week of Ramadan (RA4), and 2 weeks post-Ramadan (PR). Both cognitive tests were performed twice per day: before and after Ramadan at 8-10 a.m. and 4-6 p.m., and during Ramadan at 4-6 p.m. and 0-2 a.m., respectively. Training load (TL) by the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) method and wellness (Hooper index) were measured daily. If the TL increased over the study period, this variable was stable during Ramadan. The perceived fatigue and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) increased at RA4. Sleep patterns and architecture showed clear disturbances, with significant increases in the number of awakenings and light sleep durations during Ramadan (RA1 and RA4), together with decreased durations of deep and REM sleep stages at PR. RTI (simple and multiple reaction index) reaction and movement times did not vary over the study period. The RVP test showed reduced false alarms during Ramadan, suggesting reduced impulsivity. Overall accuracy significantly increased at RA1, RA4 and PR compared to baseline. At RA4, the accuracy was higher at 0-2 a.m. compared to 4-6 p.m. Despite the observed disturbances in sleep architecture, Ramadan fasting did not negatively impact the cognitive performance of trained cyclists from the Middle East.

  17. Impact of Ramadan intermittent fasting on cognitive function in trained cyclists: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Briki, W; Farooq, A; Patrick, T; Belfekih, T; Herrera, CP

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed selected measures of cognitive function in trained cyclists who observed daylight fasting during Ramadan. Eleven cyclists volunteered to participate (age: 21.6±4.8 years, VO2max: 57.7±5.6 ml kg−1·min−1) and were followed for 2 months. Cognitive function (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), Reaction Time index (RTI) and Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP) tests) and sleep architecture (ambulatory EEG) were assessed: before Ramadan (BR), in the 1st week (RA1) and 4th week of Ramadan (RA4), and 2 weeks post-Ramadan (PR). Both cognitive tests were performed twice per day: before and after Ramadan at 8-10 a.m. and 4-6 p.m., and during Ramadan at 4-6 p.m. and 0-2 a.m., respectively. Training load (TL) by the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) method and wellness (Hooper index) were measured daily. If the TL increased over the study period, this variable was stable during Ramadan. The perceived fatigue and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) increased at RA4. Sleep patterns and architecture showed clear disturbances, with significant increases in the number of awakenings and light sleep durations during Ramadan (RA1 and RA4), together with decreased durations of deep and REM sleep stages at PR. RTI (simple and multiple reaction index) reaction and movement times did not vary over the study period. The RVP test showed reduced false alarms during Ramadan, suggesting reduced impulsivity. Overall accuracy significantly increased at RA1, RA4 and PR compared to baseline. At RA4, the accuracy was higher at 0-2 a.m. compared to 4-6 p.m. Despite the observed disturbances in sleep architecture, Ramadan fasting did not negatively impact the cognitive performance of trained cyclists from the Middle East. PMID:26985134

  18. Architecture for autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broten, Gregory S.; Monckton, Simon P.; Collier, Jack; Giesbrecht, Jared

    2006-05-01

    In 2002 Defence R&D Canada changed research direction from pure tele-operated land vehicles to general autonomy for land, air, and sea craft. The unique constraints of the military environment coupled with the complexity of autonomous systems drove DRDC to carefully plan a research and development infrastructure that would provide state of the art tools without restricting research scope. DRDC's long term objectives for its autonomy program address disparate unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), unattended ground sensor (UGS), air (UAV), and subsea and surface (UUV and USV) vehicles operating together with minimal human oversight. Individually, these systems will range in complexity from simple reconnaissance mini-UAVs streaming video to sophisticated autonomous combat UGVs exploiting embedded and remote sensing. Together, these systems can provide low risk, long endurance, battlefield services assuming they can communicate and cooperate with manned and unmanned systems. A key enabling technology for this new research is a software architecture capable of meeting both DRDC's current and future requirements. DRDC built upon recent advances in the computing science field while developing its software architecture know as the Architecture for Autonomy (AFA). Although a well established practice in computing science, frameworks have only recently entered common use by unmanned vehicles. For industry and government, the complexity, cost, and time to re-implement stable systems often exceeds the perceived benefits of adopting a modern software infrastructure. Thus, most persevere with legacy software, adapting and modifying software when and wherever possible or necessary -- adopting strategic software frameworks only when no justifiable legacy exists. Conversely, academic programs with short one or two year projects frequently exploit strategic software frameworks but with little enduring impact. The open-source movement radically changes this picture. Academic frameworks

  19. Architecture and Monumental (Study About form in Architecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pane, I. F.; Suwantoro, H.; Zahrah, W.; Sianipar, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    The architecture develops along with the development of human history. So architecture is the field of study related to human physically and non-physically. The development of architecture is a long process within the culture the architecture develops. Physically, architecture has different shape from every historical phase. The different shape has different historical background. The important building on one period is always impressed. This impression still remains until now, in this postmodern era. From the phenomena appear in architecture so this study focused on the monumental buildings by analyzing the form of the building in this era. The objects of the study are the buildings in Medan which represent the monumental impression (Maimun Palace). The qualitative approach is applied to give more knowledge in history, theory, and criticsm of architecture. The results of this study described that the monumental impression of the object of study and forms of building support that impression.

  20. Neural architectures for stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew J; Smith, Jackson E T; Krug, Kristine

    2016-06-19

    Stereoscopic vision delivers a sense of depth based on binocular information but additionally acts as a mechanism for achieving correspondence between patterns arriving at the left and right eyes. We analyse quantitatively the cortical architecture for stereoscopic vision in two areas of macaque visual cortex. For primary visual cortex V1, the result is consistent with a module that is isotropic in cortical space with a diameter of at least 3 mm in surface extent. This implies that the module for stereo is larger than the repeat distance between ocular dominance columns in V1. By contrast, in the extrastriate cortical area V5/MT, which has a specialized architecture for stereo depth, the module for representation of stereo is about 1 mm in surface extent, so the representation of stereo in V5/MT is more compressed than V1 in terms of neural wiring of the neocortex. The surface extent estimated for stereo in V5/MT is consistent with measurements of its specialized domains for binocular disparity. Within V1, we suggest that long-range horizontal, anatomical connections form functional modules that serve both binocular and monocular pattern recognition: this common function may explain the distortion and disruption of monocular pattern vision observed in amblyopia.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Neural architectures for stereo vision

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereoscopic vision delivers a sense of depth based on binocular information but additionally acts as a mechanism for achieving correspondence between patterns arriving at the left and right eyes. We analyse quantitatively the cortical architecture for stereoscopic vision in two areas of macaque visual cortex. For primary visual cortex V1, the result is consistent with a module that is isotropic in cortical space with a diameter of at least 3 mm in surface extent. This implies that the module for stereo is larger than the repeat distance between ocular dominance columns in V1. By contrast, in the extrastriate cortical area V5/MT, which has a specialized architecture for stereo depth, the module for representation of stereo is about 1 mm in surface extent, so the representation of stereo in V5/MT is more compressed than V1 in terms of neural wiring of the neocortex. The surface extent estimated for stereo in V5/MT is consistent with measurements of its specialized domains for binocular disparity. Within V1, we suggest that long-range horizontal, anatomical connections form functional modules that serve both binocular and monocular pattern recognition: this common function may explain the distortion and disruption of monocular pattern vision observed in amblyopia. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269604

  2. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  3. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  4. Generic robot architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  5. Open architecture CNC system

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, J.; Lopez, A.; Edwards, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an alternative solution to the traditional CNC machine tool controller has been introduced. Software and hardware modules have been described and their incorporation in a CNC control system has been outlined. This type of CNC machine tool controller demonstrates that technology is accessible and can be readily implemented into an open architecture machine tool controller. Benefit to the user is greater controller flexibility, while being economically achievable. PC based, motion as well as non-motion features will provide flexibility through a Windows environment. Up-grading this type of controller system through software revisions will keep the machine tool in a competitive state with minimal effort. Software and hardware modules are mass produced permitting competitive procurement and incorporation. Open architecture CNC systems provide diagnostics thus enhancing maintainability, and machine tool up-time. A major concern of traditional CNC systems has been operator training time. Training time can be greatly minimized by making use of Windows environment features.

  6. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  7. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  8. Architectural compendium for environmental education

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.J.; Rigdon, B.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents educational resources being developed at the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan, for teaching environmental sustainability and pollution prevention in architecture. The educational resources consist of a collection of modularized units, called building blocks, in the areas of Building Materials, Sustainable Building Design, Case-Studies of Sustainable Design, Environmental Cost of Building, and Recycling and Reuse of Architectural Resources. The assembly of these building blocks is called an Architectural Compendium for Environmental Education (ACEE). The conceptual framework for the educational resources are outlined. The objectives and the scope of the architectural compendium are discussed.

  9. Robust Software Architecture for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghazanian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Robust Real-Time Reconfigurable Robotics Software Architecture (R4SA) is the name of both a software architecture and software that embodies the architecture. The architecture was conceived in the spirit of current practice in designing modular, hard, realtime aerospace systems. The architecture facilitates the integration of new sensory, motor, and control software modules into the software of a given robotic system. R4SA was developed for initial application aboard exploratory mobile robots on Mars, but is adaptable to terrestrial robotic systems, real-time embedded computing systems in general, and robotic toys.

  10. Survivable Loosely Coupled Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 291–303, Pune, India, September 2000. [6] Saddek Bensalem, Marius Bozga, Jean - Claude Fernandez, Lucian...IEEE Computer Society. [5] John Rushby. An overview of formal verification for the time-triggered architecture. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger...Agathe Merceron. Parametric verification of a group membership algo- rithm. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger Olderog, editors, Formal Techniques in Real

  11. The PARTI Architecture Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    example safety critical system, 2, Issues Guidance Papers ( IGPs ) that further explain key concepts or requirements of the STAN- DARD, The guidance...Organisation (2009) IGP -OOl: Guidance Notes for Project Offices. Published as part of [20]. 4. Defence Material Organisation (2009) IGP -002: Methodsfor Safety...Architecture Analysis. Published as part of [20]. 5. Defence Material Organisation (2009) IGP -003: Methods for Design Assurance. Published as part of

  12. Enterprise Information Technology Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    ARCHITECTURES OPR: HQ AFCA/ ITAI (Mr. Kenneth Fore) Certified by: HQ USAF/SCXX (Lt Col Terry G. Pricer, Sr.) Pages: 15 Distribution: F This...coordinating their drafts with Headquarters Air Force Communications Agency (HQ AFCA/ ITAI ), 203 W. Losey Street, Room 1065, Scott AFB IL 62225-5224. Send...Communications and Information Center (HQ AFCIC/ ITAI ), 1250 Air Force Pentagon, Washington DC 20330-1250. Use AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change

  13. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  14. Architectural Methodology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The establishment of conventions between two communicating entities in the end systems is essential for communications. Examples of the kind of decisions that need to be made in establishing a protocol convention include the nature of the data representation, the for-mat and the speed of the date representation over the communications path, and the sequence of control messages (if any) which are sent. One of the main functions of a protocol is to establish a standard path between the communicating entities. This is necessary to create a virtual communications medium with certain desirable characteristics. In essence, it is the function of the protocol to transform the characteristics of the physical communications environment into a more useful virtual communications model. The final function of a protocol is to establish standard data elements for communications over the path; that is, the protocol serves to create a virtual data element for exchange. Other systems may be constructed in which the transferred element is a program or a job. Finally, there are special purpose applications in which the element to be transferred may be a complex structure such as all or part of a graphic display. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to describe the methodologies used in developing a protocol architecture for an in-space Internet node. The node would support NASA:s four mission areas: Earth Science; Space Science; Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS); Aerospace Technology. This report presents the methodology for developing the protocol architecture. The methodology addresses the architecture for a computer communications environment. It does not address an analog voice architecture.

  15. Instrumented Architectural Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs...attribute of the underlying Lisp base of the simulation system that changes in these definitions have immediate effect even during a simulation run...methods for a component, the concerns surrounding component design are effectively partitioned from component instrumentation. Panels are put together

  16. En-Gauging Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    publication. APPROVED: /s/ RAYMOND A. LIUZZI Project Engineer FOR THE DIRECTOR: /s/ JAMES A. COLLINS...raise an implementation-level “port access failed exception” in the latter case. Notice that nothing about the architecture itself changed during...Crane et al] Crane, S., Dulay, N., Fossa, H., Kramer, J., Magee, J., Sloman , M., and Twidle, K.: “Configuration Management for Distributed Systems

  17. Irregular Applications: Architectures & Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, John T.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone

    2012-02-06

    Irregular applications are characterized by irregular data structures, control and communication patterns. Novel irregular high performance applications which deal with large data sets and require have recently appeared. Unfortunately, current high performance systems and software infrastructures executes irregular algorithms poorly. Only coordinated efforts by end user, area specialists and computer scientists that consider both the architecture and the software stack may be able to provide solutions to the challenges of modern irregular applications.

  18. Vetronics Reference Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Model 4 Captures system intelligence such that computational processes can be allocated to system processing components (e.g. human, robotic, man in the...loop) • Systems Architecture (Cross product of RA, TA, and Intelligent Domain Model ) 4 Defines interconnected systems components organized to...iterate iterate Requirements System Intelligent Domain Model Use Cases Need to focus on refining RA, TA, and Intelligent Domain Model to derive a

  19. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  20. A prospective audit of preprocedural fasting practices on a transplant ward: when fasting becomes starving.

    PubMed

    Vidot, Helen; Teevan, Kate; Carey, Sharon; Strasser, Simone; Shackel, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence and duration of preprocedural medically ordered fasting during a period of hospitalisation in an Australian population of patients with hepatic cirrhosis or following liver transplantation and to identify potential solutions to reduce fasting times. Protein-energy malnutrition is a common finding in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can impact significantly on survival and quality of life. Protein and energy requirements in patients with cirrhosis are higher than those of healthy individuals. A significant feature of cirrhosis is the induction of starvation metabolism following seven to eight hours of food deprivation. Many investigative and interventional procedures for patients with cirrhosis necessitate a period of fasting to comply with anaesthesia guidelines. An observational study of the fasting episodes for 34 hospitalised patients with hepatic cirrhosis or following liver transplantation. Nutritional status was estimated using subjective global assessment and handgrip strength. The prevalence and duration of fasting practices for diagnostic or investigational procedures were estimated using electronic records and patient notes. Thirty-three patients (97%) were malnourished. Twenty-two patients (65%) were fasted during the observation period. There were 43 occasions of fasting with a median fasting time of 13·5 hours. On 40 occasions fasting times exceeded the maximum six-hour guideline recommended prior to the administration of anaesthesia by the majority of Anaesthesiology Societies. The majority of procedures (77%) requiring fasting occurred after midday. Eating breakfast on the day of the procedure reduced fasting time by 45%. Medically ordered preprocedural fasting times almost always exceed existing guidelines in this nutritionally compromised group. Adherence to fasting guidelines and eating breakfast before the procedure can reduce fasting times significantly and avoid the potential induction of starvation metabolism