Science.gov

Sample records for fast optical flaring

  1. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, A.; Kanbach, G.; Greiner, J.; Slowikowska, A.; McBreen, S.; Sala, G.

    2009-05-25

    Rapid optical flaring of an unprecedented type was detected from a transient Galactic high-energy source, SWIFT J195509.6+261406[1]. On June 10, 2007, Swift-BAT triggered on GRB 070610, which turned out to be a previously unknown X-ray transient in the Galaxy. Optical emission following this transient was observed after only 421 s with the high-time-resolution single-photon counting photometer OPTIMA. Measurements continued for the following 5 nights.We detected very strong optical flares (>6 mag) with extremely short timescales: duration of individual flares 2-100 s, shortest variability timescales 0.4 s. The scale and magnitude of the observed variability combined with a distance estimate of 4-8 kpc indicate a non-thermal origin of the observed radiation. The morphology of the optical flares is reminiscent of X-ray outbursts of SGRs. The time resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio during the brightest optical outbursts allow to compute their Fourier power spectral density. Features similar to QPOs appear at periods of 6-8 seconds, typical rotational periods for magnetars. X-ray observations independent from our optical analysis show hints of periodicity at a coinciding frequency. We conclude that the timing properties of the fast, bright outbursts of SWIFT J1955 suggest a connection between this transient and magnetars flaring in the optical.

  2. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  4. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  5. Fast optical pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, Ared

    1988-01-01

    Design and operation of accurate millisecond and microsecond resolution optical pyrometers developed at the National Bureau of Standards during the last two decades are described. Results of tests are presented and estimates of uncertainties in temperature measurements are given. Calibration methods are discussed and examples of applications of fast pyrometry are given. Ongoing research in developing fast multiwavelength and spatial scanning pyrometers are summarized.

  6. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  7. Optical flare observed in the flaring gamma-ray blazar S5 1044+71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Blay, Pere; Telting, John; Ojha, Roopesh

    2017-01-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar S5 1044+71, obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma, to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux (ATel#9928).

  8. Hot-Wiring Flare Stars: Optical Flare Rates and Properties from Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A.

    Flares are thought to result from the reconnection of magnetic fields in the upper layers (coronae) of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. Due to their high flare rates and energies combined with a large contrast against the background quiescent emission, the low-mass M dwarfs are the primary target for studying flare rates in the Galaxy. However, high-precision monitoring campaigns using Kepler and the Hubble Space Telescope have recently revealed important information on the flare rates of earlier- type, more massive stars. In this talk, I will focus on the properties of flares and flare stars in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes as revealed from time-domain surveys, such as the repeat observations of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys Stripe 82. I will discuss the importance of spectroscopic follow-up characterization of the quiescent and flare emission, and I will highlight new radiative-hydrodynamic modeling results that have enhanced our understanding of impulsive phase U-band flare emission.

  9. Optical microflaring on the nearby flare star binary UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Steinle, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present extremely high time resolution observations of the visual flare star binary UV Cet obtained with the Optical Pulsar Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA) at the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory (SKO) in Crete, Greece. OPTIMA is a fiber-fed optical instrument that uses Single Photon Avalanche Diodes to measure the arrival times of individual optical photons. The time resolution of the observations presented here was 4 μs, allowing to resolve the typical millisecond variability time scales associated with stellar flares. We report the detection of very short impulsive bursts in the blue band with well resolved rise and decay time scales of about 2 s. The overall energetics put these flares at the lower end of the known flare distribution of UV Cet.

  10. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  11. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  12. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  13. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  14. Meeting the Challenge from Bright and Fast Gamma-Ray Flares of 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Cavaliere, A.

    2017-07-01

    Bright and fast gamma-ray flares with hard spectra have been recently detected from the blazar 3C 279, with apparent GeV luminosities up to 1049 erg s-1. The source is observed to flicker on timescales of minutes with no comparable optical-UV counterparts. Such observations challenge current models of high-energy emissions from 3C 279 and similar blazar sources that are dominated by relativistic jets along our line of sight with bulk Lorentz factors up to Γ ˜ 20 launched by supermassive black holes. We compute and discuss a model based on a clumpy jet comprising strings of compact plasmoids as indicated by radio observations. We follow the path of the synchrotron radiations emitted in the optical-UV bands by relativistic electrons accelerated around the plasmoids to isotropic Lorentz factors γ ˜ {10}3. These primary emissions are partly reflected back by a leading member in the string that acts as a moving mirror for the approaching companions. Around the plasmoids, shrinking gap transient overdensities of seed photons build up. These are upscattered into the GeV range by inverse Compton interactions with the relativistic electrons accelerated in situ. We show that such a combined process produces bright gamma-ray flares with minor optical to X-ray enhancements. Main features of our model include: bright gamma-ray flares with risetimes as short as a few minutes, occurring at distances of order 1018 cm from the central black hole; Compton dominance at GeV energies by factors up to some 102; minimal reabsorption from local photon-photon interactions.

  15. An unprecedented UV/optical flare in TV Columbae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, P.; Mateo, M.

    1984-01-01

    A surprising, 2 mag, short time scale (hr) outburst of TV Col (2A 0526-328) was observed simultaneously at IUE and optical wavelengths in 1982 November. During this 'flare', the IUE emission lines of N v 1240, C IV 1550, and He II 1640, intensified by more than an order of magnitude and developed P Cygni profiles, indicating mass loss. Continuum fits with a power-law plus a blackbody from the UV through the optical showed a steepening of the UV power-law component and an increase in the temperature and size of the blackbody component during the flare activity. This unusual behavior is discussed in terms of an accretion disk instability.

  16. Fast-mode Coronal EUV Wave Trains Associated with Solar Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Downs, Cooper; Karlicky, Marian; Chen, Bin

    2017-08-01

    As a new observational phenomenon, Quasi-periodic, Fast Propagating EUV wave trains (QFPs) are fast-mode magnetosonic waves closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations commonly detected in solar flares (traditionally with non-imaging observations). They can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. We report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs, including evidence of heating and cooling cycles revealed with differential emission measure (DEM) analysis that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic waves. Through a statistical survey, we found a preferential association of QFPs with eruptive flares (with CMEs) rather than confined flares (without CMEs). We also identified some correlation with quasi-periodic radio bursts observed at JVLA and Ondrejov observatories. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating and energy transport.

  17. Fast X-ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. Serendipitous observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of the two most recent flares resulted in the discovery of high frequency oscillations in their X-ray fluxes. The frequencies of these oscillations range from approx. 20 Hz to as high as 1800 Hz, and may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. Here I will present an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and discuss how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  18. Radio Optical Multiwavelength Stellar Flares and Constraints on the Electron Population from a Joint Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel; Kowalski, Adam

    2017-05-01

    The accelerated particles produced in stellar magnetic reconnection events are important in shaping the habitable environment around the star. Radio gyrosynchrotron flares trace the presence and action of accelerated electrons high in the stellar atmosphere, while flares observed at optical wavelengths probe the response lower in the stellar atmosphere to the heating provided by electron beams. We present the results of a several day multi wavelength observing campaign on the nearby flare star EV Lac. The multifrequency radio observations probe the non thermal particle energy and its dependence on the index of the power-law distribution of particle energy as well as the magnetic field strength, while optical observations constrain optical radiated energy and limits on total bolometric flare radiated energy. We discuss how the spectral shape of the optical flares can potentially constrain the lower limit of the electron population, and what the coincidence or lack thereof of simultaneously observed flares tells us about the generalness of flare processes.

  19. High-Cadence B-Band Search for Optical Flares on BY Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Haagen, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The high-cadence search at 50 and 100 samples/sec of BY Dra revealed very short-duration B-band flares. A statistical criterion was used to isolate the short-duration optical flares from random photon events. Three flares, ranging in duration from 60 to 130 ms, with peaks 0.30-0.43 magnitude above the mean, were detected within the 80.2 hours of periodic monitoring from July 2012 through October 2015. This represents a flare rate of 0.04 flares/hour.

  20. THE FAST FILAMENT ERUPTION LEADING TO THE X-FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, Lucia; Battaglia, Marina; Krucker, Säm; Reardon, Kevin; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Young, Peter R.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the sequence of events leading to the solar X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48. Because of the unprecedented joint observations of an X-flare with the ground-based Dunn Solar Telescope and the spacecraft IRIS, Hinode, RHESSI, STEREO, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we can sample many solar layers from the photosphere to the corona. A filament eruption was observed above a region of previous flux emergence, which possibly led to a change in magnetic field configuration, causing the X-flare. This was concluded from the timing and location of the hard X-ray emission, which started to increase slightly less than a minute after the filament accelerated. The filament showed Doppler velocities of ∼2–5 km s{sup −1} at chromospheric temperatures for at least one hour before the flare occurred, mostly blueshifts, but also redshifts near its footpoints. Fifteen minutes before the flare, its chromospheric Doppler shifts increased to ∼6–10 km s{sup −1} and plasma heating could be observed before it lifted off with at least 600 km s{sup −1} as seen in IRIS data. Compared to previous studies, this acceleration (∼3–5 km s{sup −2}) is very fast, while the velocities are in the common range for coronal mass ejections. An interesting feature was a low-lying twisted second filament near the erupting filament, which did not seem to participate in the eruption. After the flare ribbons started on each of the second filament’s sides, it seems to have untangled and vanished during the flare. These observations are some of the highest resolution data of an X-class flare to date and reveal some small-scale features yet to be explained.

  1. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  2. Reconnection-driven plasmoids in blazars: fast flares on a slow envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-05-01

    TeV flares of a duration of ˜10 min have been observed in several blazars. The fast flaring requires compact regions in the jet that boost their emission towards the observer at an extreme Doppler factor of δem ≳ 50. For ˜100 GeV photons to avoid annihilation in the broad-line region of PKS 1222+216, the flares must come from large (pc) scales, challenging most models proposed to explain them. Here I elaborate on the magnetic reconnection minijet model for the blazar flaring, focusing on the inherently time-dependent aspects of the process of magnetic reconnection. I argue that, for the physical conditions prevailing in blazar jets, the reconnection layer fragments, leading to the formation a large number of plasmoids. Occasionally, a plasmoid grows to become a large, `monster' plasmoid. I show that radiation emitted from the reconnection event can account for the observed `envelope' of day-long blazar activity, while radiation from monster plasmoids can power the fastest TeV flares. The model is applied to several blazars with observed fast flaring. The inferred distance of the dissipation zone from the black hole and the typical size of the reconnection regions are Rdiss ˜ 0.3-1 pc and l' ≲ 1016 cm, respectively. The required magnetization of the jet at this distance is modest: σ ˜ a few. Such distance Rdiss and reconnection size l' are expected if the jet contains field structures with a size of the order of the black hole horizon.

  3. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Rest, A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova

  4. Simultaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio observations of the flare star Proxima Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Slee, O. B.; Siegman, B. C.; Nikoloff, I.; Candy, M.; Harwood, D.; Verveer, A.; Quinn, P. J.; Wilson, I.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of coordinated program of observations in the X-ray, UV, optical and radio regions of the dM5e flare star Proxima Centauri are presented. Simultaneous observations of the star were obtained on March 6 and March 7, 1979, by the Einstein Observatory IPC, the IUE SWP and LWR cameras at low dispersion, three ground-based optical telescopes in Australia and the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A total of 10 radio bursts and six optical flares was detected during three nights of simultaneous radio and optical observations, which appear to be broadly correlated. A major X-ray flare event was detected with temperatures of 1.7 x 10 to the 7th and 1.2 x 10 to the 7th K during the rise and decay phases, respectively, respective X-ray fluxes of 3.0 x 10 to the -11th and 3.7 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm per sec, and changes in spectral flux distribution. No radio, optical or UV flare emission corresponding to the X-ray flare was detected. The X-ray flare is interpreted in terms of an arch model with cooling predominantly by X-ray radiation, with an electron density of 1.0 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm during the decay phase and a total arch length comparable to the size of the star itself. The X-ray flare observed is thus more similar to a typical strong solar flare than heretofore seen on a flare star.

  5. Optical flare events on the RS Canum Venaticorum star UX Arietis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dong-Tao; Gu, Sheng-Hong

    2017-05-01

    Based on long-term high-resolution spectroscopic observations obtained during five observing runs from 2001 to 2004, we study optical flare events and chromospheric activity variability of the very active RS CVn star UX Ari. By means of the spectral subtraction technique, several optical chromospheric activity indicators (including the He i D3, Na i D1, D2 doublet, Hα and Ca ii IRT lines) covered in our echelle spectra were analyzed. Four large optical flare events were detected on UX Ari during our observations, which show prominent He i D3 line emission together with great enhancement in emission of the Hα and Ca ii IRT lines and strong filled-in or emission reversal features in the Na i D1, D2 doublet lines. The newly detected flares are much more energetic than previous discoveries, especially for the flare identified during the 2002 December observing run. Optical flare events on UX Ari are more likely to be observed around two quadratures of the system, except for our optical flares detected during the 2004 November observing run. Moreover, we have found rotational modulation of chromospheric activity in the Hα and Ca ii IRT lines, which suggests the presence of chromospherically active longitudes over the surface of UX Ari. The change in chromospherically active longitudes among our observing runs, as well as the variation in chromospheric activity level from 2001 to 2004, indicates a long-term evolution of active regions.

  6. Investigation of X-ray and optical solar flare activities during solar cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Bushueva, T. P.

    2003-02-01

    Daily X-ray flare indices (XFI) for the interval from January 1986 till June 2002 were calculated. The XFI behaviour during solar cycles 22 and 23 was studied. We compare the daily XFI with the daily optical flare indices (OFI) and with the International Relative Sunspot Numbers. The energy emitted by X-ray flares during 77 months of solar cycle 22 is shown to be about five times larger than the analogous value for the present solar cycle. We revealed statistically significant maxima in power spectra of the XFI and OFI. They correspond to periods of 25.5, 36.5, 73, 116, and 150d which presumably are appropriate to characteristic frequencies of the solar flare activity. A hypothesis on an possible effect of Mercury's variable electric charge on the origin of solar flares is proposed and corresponding estimates were made.

  7. The starting conditions for an optically small solar gamma ray flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simnett, G. M.; Ryan, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that optically small gamma-ray flares result from gradual pre-flare acceleration of protons over approximately 1,000 s by a series of magnetohydrodynamic shocks in the low corona. A fraction of the accelerated protons are trapped in the corona where they form a seed population for future acceleration. If the shock acceleration is sufficiently rapid proton energies may exceed the gamma-ray production threshold and trigger gamma-ray emission. This occurs without the total flare energy being necessarily large. Magnetic field geometry is an important parameter.

  8. Optical Polarimetry Campaign on Markarian 421 during the 2012 Large Flaring Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barres de Almeida, Ulisses; Jermak, Helen; Lindfors, Elina; Mundell, Carole; Nilsson, Kari; Steele, Iain

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, Fermi/LAT gamma-ray and radio observations registered the largest flaring episodes ever recorded from the blazar Markarian 421. The unprecedented activity state of the source has remained high and much above the normal emission state seem from the source also for the year 2013, characterising a dramatic and long-lasting, albeit puzzling, change of behaviour in the emission of this object. This unique event has been followed by observations over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, showing extreme signatures in all bands, from radio to VHE gamma-rays. Polarisation monitoring of the source has nevertheless been somewhat more scarce, and direct observation of the peak activity in 2012 was prevented by the source's proximity to the Sun at that time. As part of our continuous monitoring programme of VHE-emitting blazars in optical polarimetry at the Liverpool Telescope, which used the RINGO2 fast polarimeter and lasted from 2010 to 2013, we have observed Mkn 421 with regular coverage and a sub-weekly cadence for over two years. This continued monitoring allowed us to continually follow the polarisation behaviour of the source for a long time and up to the days preceding the dramatic flare event in 2012. In the weeks before the extreme 2012 outbursts, Mrk 421 underwent an unprecedented increase in its degree of polarisation, which rose by a factor of 5, not witnessed in decades from this object. The source also showed a large rotation of its polarisation angle, by over 180 degrees, which has never been registered before for this objetc. In this talk we will present our entire dataset on Mkn 421, concentrating in discussing the unprecedented events in optical polarisation that preceded the high-energy outburst. The main question we put ourselves is if what we have seen could be regarded as a polarimetric precursor to the high activity that followed. And if yes, what connections can we establish between them, and what remains mysterious to us about it?

  9. VLBI observations of flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao; Cui, Yu-Zhu; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sándor; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Gabányi, Krisztina É.

    2016-10-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift (z = 2.133) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached -30.0 during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15-GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22- and 43-GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. However, these high-resolution VLBI observations revealed only the milliarcsecond-scale compact "core" that was known in the quasar from earlier VLBI images, and showed no sign of any extended jet structure. Neither the size nor the flux density of the "core" changed considerably after the flare, according to our VLBI monitoring. The results suggest that any putative radio ejecta associated with the major optical and radio flare could not yet be separated from the "core" component, or the newly-born jet was short-lived.

  10. Optical Photometry of the flaring gamma-ray blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Losada, Illa R.; Messa, Matteo; Gafton, Emanuel; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-03-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar AO 0235+164 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux seen in the public lightcurve of the Fermi/LAT instrument: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/glast/data/lat/catalogs/asp/current/lightcurves/0235+164_86400.png Fermi/LAT first reported a detection of gamma-ray activity from this source in Sep, 2008 (ATel#1744) and a short timescale flare in Oct 14, 2008 (ATel#1784).

  11. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  12. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ≤0.''5 (10{sup 15} cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  13. Optical Spectral Observations of a Flickering White-light Kernel in a C1 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, <=0.''5 (1015 cm2) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a "blue continuum bump" in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  14. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  15. Radio Nondetection of the SGR 1806-20 Giant Flare and Implications for Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Patel, Chitrang

    2016-08-01

    We analyze archival data from the Parkes radio telescope, which was observing a location 35.°6 away from SGR 1806-20 during its giant γ-ray flare of 2004 December 27. We show that no fast radio burst (FRB)-like burst counterpart was detected, and set a radio limit of 110 MJy at 1.4 GHz, including the estimated 70 dB suppression of the signal due to its location in the far sidelobe of Parkes and the predicted scattering from the interstellar medium. The upper limit for the ratio of magnetar giant flare radio to γ-ray fluence is η SGR ≲ 107 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. Based on the nondetection of a short and prompt γ-ray counterpart of 15 FRBs in γ-ray transient monitors, we set a lower limit on the fluence ratios of FRBs to be η FRB ≳ 107-9 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. The fluence ratio limit for SGR 1806-20 is inconsistent with all but one of the 15 FRBs. We discuss possible variations in the magnetar-FRB emission mechanism and observational caveats that may reconcile the theory with observations.

  16. Fast transients - A search in X-rays for short flares, bursts, and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The HEAO 1 A-2 database on fast high energy X-ray transients was examined for any discernible regularities. The data were taken over the interval 1977-79 with six collimated multiwire, multilayer, proportional counters that had a sensitivity sufficient for detecting events lasting 1-5 sec at energies as low as 8-120 keV. The entire sky was surveyed completely three times in the observational period. Best-fit position, error box corners, mean transient flux and quiescent flux data are provided for all six of the type 3 events that were found. All the sources were within the Galaxy. The duration of the events ranged from 60-2000 sec. The limited number of events observed leads to estimates of 10,000-200,000 events per year. It is suggested that all the events originate from hard flares occurring at a rate of 20,000/yr on dMe/dKe stars.

  17. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  18. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  19. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  20. Nature and optical identification of the flaring x-ray source FXP 0520-66

    SciTech Connect

    Kumkova, I.I.; Mitrofanov, I.G.

    1980-03-01

    The possibility that the flaring x-ray pulsar in Dorado may be a galactic object is examined. The bursts of 1979 March 6 and April 4 and 24 may have been of thermonuclear origin. A search should be conducted for the optical component of the binary system; some candidates for such an identification are given.

  1. Coordinated optical and YOHKOH observations of 26 June 1992 flare loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Kotrč, P.; Schmieder, B.; Hiei, E.; Anwar, B.

    1994-10-01

    Optical spectra of large flare loops were detected by the Ondřejov Multichannel Flare Spectrograph (MFS) during coordinated observations with MSDP at Pic du Midi (Hα) and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. The CCD video images taken by the MFS slit-jaw camera document the time-development of the flare loops as seen through the Hα filter. Preliminary analysis of the MSDP images shows the intensity structure of the cool flare loops and their velocity fields. From the spectra we can clearly see the intensity variations along the cool loops. SXT images show the structure of hot X-ray loops similar to that of cool loops. Special attention is devoted to the bright tops, simultaneously observed in X-rays, Hα and other optical lines. Based on a preliminary analysis of the optical spectra, we speculate about possible mechanisms leading to an observed bright emission at the tops of cool loops. We suggest that direct soft X-ray irradiation of cool loops at their tops could be, at least partly, responsible for such a strong brightening.

  2. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  3. Ultra-fast wave-optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haist, Tobias

    2008-08-01

    I present a method for optical computing based on white-light interferometry. The problem to be solved is coded by optical path lengths and the superposition of all possible paths that a photon can travel is used for computing the solution. The solution itself is chosen by interference with the reference light. Several gedankenexperiments demonstrate how this method can be used for solving computational hard problems. Especially, I will introduce the basic principle with two maze-type puzzles and then concentrate on how the method can be employed for performing ultra-fast (sub-ps) digital-optical arithmetic with arbitrary precision.

  4. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  5. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong; Lue Houjun; Gao He; Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan; Yi Shuangxi E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-10-10

    Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

  6. Long-term Optical Activity of the Hard X-ray Flaring Star DG CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, V.

    2017-04-01

    DG CVn is a young late-type star which displayed an X-ray and optical superflare in 2014. This paper presents an analysis of the long-term activity of this object in the optical band. I used the photographic data from DASCH (Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard). These measurements from the years 1895-1989 cover the blue spectral region. CCD V-band ASAS data were used for several UV Cet-type stars to place the activity of DG CVn in the context of flaring stars. I show that three large brightenings (flares) of DG CVn by more than 1 mag were detected on the DASCH plates. The character of the long-term activity (regarding the histogram of brightness) of DG CVn is compatible with those of flaring stars UV Cet and V371 Ori. The flares brighter than ˜ 0.4 mag represent less than 1 percent of the observed data in all three objects

  7. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  8. Optical follow-up of the gamma-ray flare from the FSRQ 3C 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, M.; Calcidese, P.; Chen, S.; Congiu, E.

    2017-06-01

    As a follow-up of the flaring activity of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 345 (z = 0.5928, Lynds, C.R., et al., 1965, ApJ, 142, 1667) in gamma rays, we observed the source in optical with the 81cm telescope of the Osservatorio astronomico della Regione Autonoma Valle d'Aosta (Italy), and the 1.22m telescope of the Asiago Astrophysical Observatory (Italy).

  9. Correlated Optical and X-Ray Flares in the Afterglow of XRF 071031

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; McBreen, S.; Klose, S.; Rossi, A.; Afonso, P.; Clemens, C.; Filgas, R.; Yoldaş, A. Küpcü; Szokoly, G. P.; Yoldaş, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present a densely sampled early light curve of the optical/near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of the X-Ray Flash (XRF) 071031 at z = 2.692. Simultaneous and continuous observations in seven photometric bands from g' to KS with GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-InfraRed Detector) at the 2.2-m MPI/ESO telescope on LaSilla were performed between 4 minutes and 7 hr after the burst. The light curve consists of 547 individual points which allows us to study the early evolution of the optical transient associated with XRF 071031 in great detail. The optical/NIR light curve is dominated by an early increase in brightness which can be attributed to the apparent onset of the forward shock emission. There are several bumps which are superimposed onto the overall rise and decay. Significant flaring is also visible in the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curve from early to late times. The availability of high-quality, broadband data enables detailed studies of the connection between the X-ray and optical/NIR afterglow and its color evolution during the first night postburst. We find evidence of spectral hardening in the optical bands contemporaneous with the emergence of the bumps from an underlying afterglow component. The bumps in the optical/NIR light curve can be associated with flares in the X-ray regime suggesting late central engine activity as the common origin.

  10. Extended Optical Flaring of the Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. S.; Miller, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The blazar, 3C 279, was previously reported to be undergoing a major optical outburst (ATEL#10121 and ATEL#10161). We report optical observations of 3C 279 on March 19 when it was observed with the 24-inch telescope at Georgia State University's Hard Labor Creek Observatory with R=13.46+/-0.01 mag. These observations indicate that 3C 279 continues to be in an extremely bright state.

  11. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  12. Coordinated X-ray, optical, and radio observations of flaring activity on YZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Liller, W.; Seward, F.; Vaiana, G.; Lovell, B.; Davis, R. J.; Spencer, R. E.; Whitehouse, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The YZ Canis Minoris (Gliese 285), a late-type dwarf star with Balmer emission (dM4.5e), is a member of the UV Ceti class of flare stars. Obtaining good X-ray observations of a dMe star flare is important not only for understanding the physics of flares but also for testing current ideas regarding the similarity between stellar and solar flares. The Einstein X-ray Observatory has made it possible to conduct X-ray observations of dMe stars with unprecedented sensitivity. A description is presented of the results of a program of ground-based optical and radio observations of YZ CMi coordinated with those of the Einstein Observatory. The observations were carried out as part of a coordinated program on October 25, 26, and 27, 1979, when YZ CMi was on the dawn side of the earth. Comprehensive observational data were obtained of an event detected in all three wavelength regions on October 25, 1979.

  13. Coordinated X-ray, optical, and radio observations of flaring activity on YZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Liller, W.; Seward, F.; Vaiana, G.; Lovell, B.; Davis, R. J.; Spencer, R. E.; Whitehouse, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The YZ Canis Minoris (Gliese 285), a late-type dwarf star with Balmer emission (dM4.5e), is a member of the UV Ceti class of flare stars. Obtaining good X-ray observations of a dMe star flare is important not only for understanding the physics of flares but also for testing current ideas regarding the similarity between stellar and solar flares. The Einstein X-ray Observatory has made it possible to conduct X-ray observations of dMe stars with unprecedented sensitivity. A description is presented of the results of a program of ground-based optical and radio observations of YZ CMi coordinated with those of the Einstein Observatory. The observations were carried out as part of a coordinated program on October 25, 26, and 27, 1979, when YZ CMi was on the dawn side of the earth. Comprehensive observational data were obtained of an event detected in all three wavelength regions on October 25, 1979.

  14. Fast launch speeds in radio flares, from a new determination of the intrinsic motions of SS 433's jet bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Robert M.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Trushkin, Sergei A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2016-09-01

    We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 d after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. We also apply this method to an earlier sequence of 39 short daily VLBA observations, which cover a period in which SS 433 moved from quiescence into a flare. In both data sets we find, for the first time at radio wavebands, clear evidence that the launch speeds of the milliarcsecond-scale jets rise as high as 0.32c during flaring episodes. By comparing these images of SS 433 with photometric radio monitoring from the RATAN-600 telescope, we explore further properties of these radio flares.

  15. Giant radio flare of SS 433 recorded in optical range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Zharova, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    We continue optical monitoring of SS 433 at the Special Astrophysical Observatory and at the Crimean Station of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute using different telescopes and devices, and have partly covered the radio event reported in ATel #6492 with multicolor photometry.

  16. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  17. Fast optical measurement of intraocular straylight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Harilaos; Sahin, Onurcan; Artal, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Light scattering in the human eye can deteriorate image quality and limit visual performance especially at the presence of a glare source. Optical measurement of straylight in the human eye is a challenging task where issues related to various inherent artifacts must be addressed. We report on a novel instrument based on the principle of double-pass optical integration that has been adapted for fast measurements suitable for a clinical setting. The instrument utilizes a light source formed by an array of green light emitting diodes that is projected onto the ocular fundus. The source has two concentric parts, a disk (field angle 0-3 degrees) and an annulus (3 - 8 degrees) that are modulated at different frequencies. A silicon photomultiplier receives the light reflected from the central part of the fundus and the Fourier transform of the signal reveals the contribution of each part of the source. Their relative amplitude is used to quantify light scattering by means of the straylight parameter. The instrument was initially validated using known diffusers. Straylight in a cohort of cataract patients (N=39) was measured. The optically measured straylight parameter was correlated to the clinical cataract grade as well to the psychophysically estimated value. The measurement method, utilizing rotational symmetry and coding filed angles with different frequencies eliminates the need for a highperformance camera and allows fast measurements. This approach can be further advanced with multiple wavelengths and field angles to perform other measurements such as that of the macular pigment density.

  18. Fast Optical Imaging of Human Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Great advancements in brain imaging during the last few decades have opened a large number of new possibilities for neuroscientists. The most dominant methodologies (electrophysiological and magnetic resonance-based methods) emphasize temporal and spatial information, respectively. However, theorizing about brain function has recently emphasized the importance of rapid (within 100 ms or so) interactions between different elements of complex neuronal networks. Fast optical imaging, and in particular the event-related optical signal (EROS, a technology that has emerged over the last 15 years) may provide descriptions of localized (to sub-cm level) brain activity with a temporal resolution of less than 100 ms. The main limitations of EROS are its limited penetration, which allows us to image cortical structures not deeper than 3 cm from the surface of the head, and its low signal-to-noise ratio. Advantages include the fact that EROS is compatible with most other imaging methods, including electrophysiological, magnetic resonance, and trans-cranial magnetic stimulation techniques, with which can be recorded concurrently. In this paper we present a summary of the research that has been conducted so far on fast optical imaging, including evidence for the possibility of recording neuronal signals with this method, the properties of the signals, and various examples of applications to the study of human cognitive neuroscience. Extant issues, controversies, and possible future developments are also discussed. PMID:20631845

  19. G-2 and CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2001-06-01

    The following projects are discussed: (A) Operation of the muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab (Experiment E821), especially the pulsed laser calibration system, to test the standard model of forces, and to see if new forces may exist in the vacuum. (B) The second part of this project developed fast optical forward Cerenkov jet calorimetry used in the CMS experiment collaboration (US lead organization FermiLab) at CERN on the Large Hadron Collider, designed to detect new physics at the TeV scale, such as supersymmetry and the Higgs boson.

  20. Optical flare of the Quasar 3C279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana; Savchenko, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    The quasar 3C279 shows significant activity at optical wavelengths. According to our observations at the Perkins telescope of Lowell Obs. (Flagstaff, AZ) on February 23 R band magnitude of the quasar reached 14.088+-0.004 with the degree of polarization P=8.82+-0.11%, while observations at the AZT-8 telescope of Crimean Astrophysical Obs. show that the source was more than 1 mag fainter on February 20, R=15.237+-0.005, with P=6.45+0.88%.

  1. An ultraviolet-optical flare from the tidal disruption of a helium-rich stellar core.

    PubMed

    Gezari, S; Chornock, R; Rest, A; Huber, M E; Forster, K; Berger, E; Challis, P J; Neill, J D; Martin, D C; Heckman, T; Lawrence, A; Norman, C; Narayan, G; Foley, R J; Marion, G H; Scolnic, D; Chomiuk, L; Soderberg, A; Smith, K; Kirshner, R P; Riess, A G; Smartt, S J; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Grav, T; Heasley, J N; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R-P; Magnier, E A; Morgan, J S; Price, P A

    2012-05-02

    The flare of radiation from the tidal disruption and accretion of a star can be used as a marker for supermassive black holes that otherwise lie dormant and undetected in the centres of distant galaxies. Previous candidate flares have had declining light curves in good agreement with expectations, but with poor constraints on the time of disruption and the type of star disrupted, because the rising emission was not observed. Recently, two 'relativistic' candidate tidal disruption events were discovered, each of whose extreme X-ray luminosity and synchrotron radio emission were interpreted as the onset of emission from a relativistic jet. Here we report a luminous ultraviolet-optical flare from the nuclear region of an inactive galaxy at a redshift of 0.1696. The observed continuum is cooler than expected for a simple accreting debris disk, but the well-sampled rise and decay of the light curve follow the predicted mass accretion rate and can be modelled to determine the time of disruption to an accuracy of two days. The black hole has a mass of about two million solar masses, modulo a factor dependent on the mass and radius of the star disrupted. On the basis of the spectroscopic signature of ionized helium from the unbound debris, we determine that the disrupted star was a helium-rich stellar core.

  2. Understanding extreme quasar optical variability with CRTS - I. Major AGN flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Stern, Daniel; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Glikman, Eilat; Larson, Steve; Christensen, Eric

    2017-10-01

    There is a large degree of variety in the optical variability of quasars and it is unclear whether this is all attributable to a single (set of) physical mechanism(s). We present the results of a systematic search for major flares in active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey as part of a broader study into extreme quasar variability. Such flares are defined in a quantitative manner as being atop of the normal, stochastic variability of quasars. We have identified 51 events from over 900 000 known quasars and high-probability quasar candidates, typically lasting 900 d and with a median peak amplitude of Δm = 1.25 mag. Characterizing the flare profile with a Weibull distribution, we find that nine of the sources are well described by a single-point single-lens model. This supports the proposal by Lawrence et al. that microlensing is a plausible physical mechanism for extreme variability. However, we attribute the majority of our events to explosive stellar-related activity in the accretion disc: superluminous supernovae, tidal disruption events and mergers of stellar mass black holes.

  3. An optical flare of GB6 1310+4844 observed with the Kanata telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, R.; Yamanaka, M.; Sasada, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Uemura, M.; Kawabata, K. S.; Takahashi, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kuwada, Y.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Kanata Team

    2009-12-01

    Following the Fermi/LAT detection of the gamma-ray flare from GB6 B1310+4844 (ATEL #2316), we performed optical photometric observation with the Kanata 1.5-m telescope at Higashi-Hiroshima Observatory. Our preliminary analysis shows that I and R-band magnitudes of GB6 B1310+4844 were R=20.1+/-0.3 and I=18.8+/-0.2 on 2009 Nov. 28.8(UT). We adopted a nearby star at RA=13:12:54.1 and DEC=+48:27:58.2 (R=16.019,I=15.657 in UCAC3) as the photometric reference.

  4. Simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer and Optical Observations of Ad Leonis: Evidence for Large Coronal Loops and the Neupert Effect in Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.; Simon, Theodore; Cully, Scott L.; Deustua, Susana E.; Jablonski, Marek; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Smith, Verne; Spiesman, William J.; hide

    1995-01-01

    We report on the first simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and optical observations of flares on the dMe flare star AD Leonis. The data show the following features: (1) Two flares (one large and one of moderate size) of several hours duration were observed in the EUV wavelength range; (2) Flare emission observed in the optical precedes the emission seen with EUVE; and (3) Several diminutions (DIMs) in the optical continuum were observed during the period of optical flare activity. To interpret these data, we develop a technique for deriving the coronal loop length from the observed rise and decay behavior of the EUV flare. The technique is generally applicable to existing and future coronal observations of stellar flares. We also determine the pressure, column depth, emission measure, loop cross-sectional area, and peak thermal energy during the two EUV flares, and the temperature, area coverage, and energy of the optical continuum emission. When the optical and coronal data are combined, we find convincing evidence of a stellar 'Neupert effect' which is a strong signature of chromospheric evaporation models. We then argue that the known spatial correlation of white-light emission with hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and the identification of the hard X-ray emission with nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by accelerated electrons, provides evidence that flare heating on dMe stars is produced by the same electron precipitation mechanism that is inferred to occur on the Sun. We provide a thorough picture of the physical processes that are operative during the largest EUV flare, compare and contrast this picture with the canonical solar flare model, and conclude that the coronal loop length may be the most important factor in determining the flare rise time and energetics.

  5. Fast magneto-optical spectrometry by spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, G. X.; Saito, S.; Takahashi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Time efficient measurement of the spectroscopic magneto-optical (MO) activity of materials has always been desirable. In conventional MO systems, the monochromator produces quasi-monochromatic light in a narrow wavelength window. Therefore, to measure the spectroscopic MO activity, a large number of measurements over the full spectra is required to obtain satisfactory wavelength resolution and thus is very time consuming. Here, we develop a novel system that is capable of fast measurement of the MO activity by only one white light source, two polarizers, one achromatic quarter-wave plate, and one spectrometer. This system is flexible from UV to IR region, only depending on the power spectra of light source and sensitivity of the detector at the corresponding wavelengths. As examples, we measured the intriguing optic and MO activity in glass, ferromagnetic thin film, and bulk GaAs in the visible to near infrared region. The results of glass demonstrated a minimum resolvable Faraday rotation angle of 0.004° by the currently equipped system.

  6. Fast rise-time, fiber optic pin

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1998-05-12

    A reliable, simple fast-rise-time diagnostic has been developed for measuring the breakout time of the detonation wave in a detonating high explosive. The intrinsic rise time of the signals generated is less than one nanosecond. The technique, called FAT (Fiber Arrival Time), consists of an optical fiber with one end coated with ~1500 Å Aluminum. The coated end is placed in intimate contact with the surface of the explosive. The detonation wave interacting with the Al surface causes a prompt flash of light which is recorded at the output end of the fiber. The active area of the FAT probe end is 100 µm in diameter and centered to within ±10 µm also giving excellent spatial precision. When used in this mode, FAT overcomes difficulties of electronic and past fiber optic pins. When looking at a flyer plate arrival the time response appears to be a function of the metal plate velocity.

  7. Discovery of the Sub-second Linearly Polarized Spikes of Synchrotron Origin in the UV Ceti Giant Optical Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Stepanov, A.; Tsap, Yu.

    2017-01-01

    During our optical monitoring of UV Ceti, iconic late-type flaring star, with high temporal resolution using the Russian 6-m telescope in 2008, we detected a giant flare with the amplitude of about 3 magnitudes in U band. Near flare maximum, more than a dozen of spike bursts have been discovered with triangular shapes and durations from 0.6 to 1.2 s and maximal luminosities in the range (1.5-8) × 1027 erg s-1. For the half of these events, the linear polarization exceeds 35% with significance better than 5σ. We argue that these events are synchrotron emission of electron streams with the energies of several hundred MeV moving in the magnetic field of about 1.4 kG. Emission from such ultra-relativistic (with energies far exceeding 10 MeV) particles is being routinely observed in solar flares, but has never been detected from UV Ceti-type stars. This is the first ever detection of linearly polarized optical light from the UV Ceti-type stars which indicates that at least some fraction of the flaring events on these stars is powered by a non-thermal synchrotron emission mechanism.

  8. Optical/UV-to-X-Ray Echoes from the Tidal Disruption Flare ASASSN-14li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Sadowski, Aleksander; Guillochon, James; Stone, Nicholas C.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Cannizzo, John K.

    2017-03-01

    We carried out the first multi-wavelength (optical/UV and X-ray) photometric reverberation mapping of a tidal disruption flare (TDF) ASASSN-14li. We find that its X-ray variations are correlated with and lag the optical/UV fluctuations by 32 ± 4 days. Based on the direction and the magnitude of the X-ray time lag, we rule out X-ray reprocessing and direct emission from a standard circular thin disk as the dominant source of its optical/UV emission. The lag magnitude also rules out an AGN disk-driven instability as the origin of ASASSN-14li and thus strongly supports the tidal disruption picture for this event and similar objects. We suggest that the majority of the optical/UV emission likely originates from debris stream self-interactions. Perturbations at the self-interaction sites produce optical/UV variability and travel down to the black hole where they modulate the X-rays. The time lag between the optical/UV and the X-rays variations thus correspond to the time taken by these fluctuations to travel from the self-interaction site to close to the black hole. We further discuss these time lags within the context of the three variants of the self-interaction model. High-cadence monitoring observations of future TDFs will be sensitive enough to detect these echoes and would allow us to establish the origin of optical/UV emission in TDFs in general.

  9. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, H.; Henze, M.; Birkle, K.; Pietsch, W.; Williams, B.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Nesci, R.; Ertel, S.; Hinze, A.; Bertold, T.; Kaminsky, B.

    2012-12-01

    We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ˜ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame). We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t-5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ˜10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  10. All-optical fast random number generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2010-09-13

    We propose a scheme of all-optical random number generator (RNG), which consists of an ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) chaotic laser, an all-optical sampler and an all-optical comparator. Free from the electric-device bandwidth, it can generate 10Gbit/s random numbers in our simulation. The high-speed bit sequences can pass standard statistical tests for randomness after all-optical exclusive-or (XOR) operation.

  11. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Cassak, Paul A.; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s‑1. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  12. Mirroring of fast solar flare electrons on a downstream corotating interaction region

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.A.; Sommers, J.; Lin, R.P.; Pick, M.; Chaizy, P.; Murphy, N.; Smith, E.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss an example of confinement of fast solar electrons by a discrete solar wind-interplanetary magnetic field structure on February 22, 1991. The structure is about 190,000 km in width and is clearly defined by changes in the direction of the magnetic field at the Ulysses spacecraft. This structure carries electrons moving toward the Sun as well as away from the Sun. A loss cone in the angular distribution of the fast electrons shows that mirroring, presumably magnetic, takes place downstream from the spacecraft. Following passage of this narrow structure, the return flux vanishes for 21 min after which time the mirroring resumes and persists for several hours. The authors identify the enhanced magnetic field region lying downstream from the Ulysses spacecraft that is responsible for the mirroring to be a corotating stream interaction region. Backstreaming suprathermal electron measurements by the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft support this interpretation. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  13. NICER Observation of Fast X-ray Flares in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, R.; Gendreau, K.; Altamirano, D.; Gandhi, P.; Steiner, J.; Pasham, D.; Charkrabarty, D.; Fabian, A.; Neilsen, J.; Miller, J.; Cackett, E.; Homan, J.; Uttley, P.; Corcoran, M.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2017-10-01

    In response to the optical alert reporting the beginning of a new outburst in the black hole binary GX339-4 (D. Russell et al., Atel 10797), a series of NICER observations began on 2017 September 29. The first five observations, conducted through October 1, netted 8.3 ks of exposure.

  14. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro ExposureTool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 {micro}m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features.

  15. Optical polarization map of the Polaris Flare with RoboPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G.; Tassis, K.; Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; King, O. G.; Paleologou, E.; Ramaprakash, A.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H. K.; Feiler, R.; Hovatta, T.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Liodakis, I.; Mahabal, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Papadakis, I.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T. J.; Rajarshi, C.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Zensus, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    The stages before the formation of stars in molecular clouds are poorly understood. Insights can be gained by studying the properties of quiescent clouds, such as their magnetic field structure. The plane-of-the-sky orientation of the field can be traced by polarized starlight. We present the first extended, wide-field (˜10 deg2) map of the Polaris Flare cloud in dust-absorption induced optical polarization of background stars, using the Robotic Polarimeter (RoboPol) polarimeter at the Skinakas Observatory. This is the first application of the wide-field imaging capabilities of RoboPol. The data were taken in the R band and analysed with the automated reduction pipeline of the instrument. We present in detail optimizations in the reduction pipeline specific to wide-field observations. Our analysis resulted in reliable measurements of 641 stars with median fractional linear polarization 1.3 per cent. The projected magnetic field shows a large-scale ordered pattern. At high longitudes it appears to align with faint striations seen in the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) map of dust emission (250 μm), while in the central 4-5 deg2 it shows an eddy-like feature. The overall polarization pattern we obtain is in good agreement with large-scale measurements by Planck of the dust emission polarization in the same area of the sky.

  16. A Lyman-alpha tunable acousto-optic filter for detecting superthermal flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickey, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop and characterize a narrow-band, tunable filter for use near the Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen at 121.6 nm. Such a filter could form the critical component of an instrument to observe asymmetries in the solar Lyman-alpha line, caused by energetic protons accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Characteristic charge-exchange nonthermal emission at Lyman alpha should be produced when sub-MeV protons are injected into the chromosphere, but no instrument suitable for their detection has been developed. Such an instrument would require a narrow-band (less than 0.01 nm) tunable filter with aperture and throughput consistent with imaging a solar active region at 0.1 second intervals. The development of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) suitable for use as compact, simple tunable filters for astronomical work suggested an investigation into the use of an AOTF at Lyman-alpha.

  17. Fast serial link using optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    In virtue of offering complete immunity from EMI, fiber-optics links for digital data are useful in the isolation of sensitive detecting apparatus from noisy digital computers. Attention is presently given to one such serial data link employing commercially available transmitter, receiver, cable and connector components together with an encoder/decoder circuit employing standard TTL digital logic components. Although designed for high speed fiber-optic operation, the circuit is equally well suited to medium- or low-speed operation over wires and does not have to transmit a separate clock. A data error rate is measured through operation of the link for a lengthy period of time.

  18. Chirp-enhanced fast light in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, F G; Pesala, Bala; Uskov, Alexander V; Chang-Hasnain, C J

    2007-12-24

    We present a novel scheme to increase the THz-bandwidth fast light effect in semiconductor optical amplifiers and increase the number of advanced pulses. By introducing a linear chirp to the input pulses before the SOA and recompressing at the output with an opposite chirp, the advance-bandwidth product reached 3.5 at room temperature, 1.55 microm wavelength. This is the largest number reported, to the best of our knowledge, for a semiconductor slow/fast light device.

  19. Fast dynamics for atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Mateusz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2013-02-08

    Cold atoms in optical lattices allow for accurate studies of many body dynamics. Rapid time-dependent modifications of optical lattice potentials may result in significant excitations in atomic systems. The dynamics in such a case is frequently quite incompletely described by standard applications of tight-binding models (such as, e.g., Bose-Hubbard model or its extensions) that typically neglect the effect of the dynamics on the transformation between the real space and the tight-binding basis. We illustrate the importance of a proper quantum mechanical description using a multiband extended Bose-Hubbard model with time-dependent Wannier functions. We apply it to situations directly related to experiments.

  20. Fast Asynchronous Data Communication Via Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Tell, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Transmitter and receiver devised for asynchronous digital communication via optical fiber at rates above 100 Mb/s. Transmitter converts parallel data to serial for high-speed transmission; receiver recovers clock signal and converts data back to parallel. No phase-lock loops used. New receiver design avoids over-sampling altogether. Local sampling oscillator operating nominally at clock frequency generates N clock signals of equally spaced phase, used to clock incoming data into N separate shift registers.

  1. Fast Asynchronous Data Communication Via Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Tell, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Transmitter and receiver devised for asynchronous digital communication via optical fiber at rates above 100 Mb/s. Transmitter converts parallel data to serial for high-speed transmission; receiver recovers clock signal and converts data back to parallel. No phase-lock loops used. New receiver design avoids over-sampling altogether. Local sampling oscillator operating nominally at clock frequency generates N clock signals of equally spaced phase, used to clock incoming data into N separate shift registers.

  2. DENSE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED MONITORING OF CTA 102 DURING HIGH STATE IN 2012 WITH OISTER: DETECTION OF INTRA-NIGHT ''ORPHAN POLARIZED FLUX FLARE''

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Abe, Yuhei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Arai, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hori, Takafumi; Nakata, Chikako; Isogai, Mizuki; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Jumpei; Oasa, Yumiko; and others

    2013-05-10

    CTA 102, classified as a flat spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.037, produced an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2012 September. Following the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of enhanced {gamma}-ray activity, we closely monitored this source in the optical and near-infrared bands for the 10 subsequent nights using 12 telescopes in Japan and South Africa. On MJD 56197 (2012 September 27, four to five days after the peak of bright {gamma}-ray flare), polarized flux showed a transient increase, while total flux and polarization angle (PA) remained almost constant during the ''orphan polarized-flux flare.'' We also detected an intra-night and prominent flare on MJD 56202. The total and polarized fluxes showed quite similar temporal variations, but the PA again remained constant during the flare. Interestingly, the PAs during the two flares were significantly different from the jet direction. The emergence of a new emission component with a high polarization degree (PD) up to 40% would be responsible for the observed two flares, and such a high PD indicates the presence of a highly ordered magnetic field at the emission site. We argue that the well-ordered magnetic field and even the observed directions of the PA, which is grossly perpendicular to the jet, are reasonably accounted for by transverse shock(s) propagating down the jet.

  3. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  4. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  5. Fast optical limiting on volatilizable metallic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, Inna M.; Kislyakov, Ivan M.; Leonov, Nikita B.; Venediktova, Anastasia V.; Vartanyan, Tigran A.

    2017-08-01

    We report on the investigation into an optical limiter, utilizing ablation destruction of a thin-film metallic mirror affected by high-intensity laser irradiation with nanosecond pulse duration. Its limiting threshold and dynamic range showed up being dependent on both the type of a material used and the thickness of the metallic film, as well as the type of the substrate material. An aluminum film deposited onto a polycarbonate substrate with reflection coefficient of weak irradiation being 90% has a limiting threshold 30 mJ/cm2, whilst reflection coefficient drops down to 1% at pulse energy density 200 J/cm2, wavelength being 1.06 μm.

  6. Fast, compact, autonomous holographic adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Geoff; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul; Gaddipati, Ravi; Gaddipati, Phani; Ghebremichael, Fassil

    2014-04-21

    We present a closed-loop adaptive optics system based on a holographic sensing method. The system uses a multiplexed holographic recording of the response functions of each actuator in a deformable mirror. By comparing the output intensity measured in a pair of photodiodes, the absolute phase can be measured over each actuator location. From this a feedback correction signal is applied to the input beam without need for a computer. The sensing and correction is applied to each actuator in parallel, so the bandwidth is independent of the number of actuator. We demonstrate a breadboard system using a 32-actuator MEMS deformable mirror capable of operating at over 10 kHz without a computer in the loop.

  7. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  8. Fast frequency hopping codes applied to SAC optical CDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin

    2015-06-01

    This study designed a fast frequency hopping (FFH) code family suitable for application in spectral-amplitude-coding (SAC) optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) networks. The FFH code family can effectively suppress the effects of multiuser interference and had its origin in the frequency hopping code family. Additional codes were developed as secure codewords for enhancing the security of the network. In considering the system cost and flexibility, simple optical encoders/decoders using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and a set of optical securers using two arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers (DeMUXs) were also constructed. Based on a Gaussian approximation, expressions for evaluating the bit error rate (BER) and spectral efficiency (SE) of SAC optical CDMA networks are presented. The results indicated that the proposed SAC optical CDMA network exhibited favorable performance.

  9. Fast dispersion estimation in coherent optical 16QAM fast OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Shams, H

    2013-01-28

    Fast channel estimation is crucial to increase the payload efficiency which is of particular importance for optical packet networks. In this paper, we propose a novel least-square based dispersion estimation method in coherent optical fast OFDM (F-OFDM) systems. Additionally, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a 37.5 Gb/s 16QAM coherent F-OFDM system with 480 km transmission using the proposed scheme. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional channel estimation methods in minimizing the overhead load. A single training symbol can achieve near-optimum channel estimation without any prior information of the transmission distance. This makes optical F-OFDM a very promising scheme for the future burst-mode applications.

  10. Fast Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis for dynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Peled, Yair; Motil, Avi; Tur, Moshe

    2012-04-09

    A new technique for the fast implementation of Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) is proposed and demonstrated, carrying the classical BOTDA method to the dynamic sensing domain. By using a digital signal generator which enables fast switching among 100 scanning frequencies, we demonstrate a truly distributed and dynamic measurement of a 100 m long fiber with a sampling rate of ~10 kHz, limited only by the fiber length and the frequency granularity. With 10 averages the standard deviation of the measured strain was ~5 µε.

  11. Fast novel nonlinear optical NLC system with local response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljin, Andrey; Residori, Stefania; Bortolozzo, Umberto

    2017-06-01

    Nonlinear optical performance of a novel liquid crystalline (LC) cell has been studied in two-wave mixing experiments revealing high diffraction efficiency within extremely wide intensity range, fast recording times and spatial resolution. Photo-induced modulation of the LC order parameter resulting from trans-cis isomerisation of dye molecules causes consequent changes of refractive indices of the medium (Light-Induced Order Modification, LIOM-mechanism) and is proved to be the main mechanism of optical nonlinearity. The proposed arrangement of the electric-field-stabilised homeotropic alignment hinders the LC director reorientation, prevents appearance of surface effects and ensures the optical cell quality. The LIOM-type nonlinearity, characterised with the substantially local nonlinear optical response, could also be extended for the recording of arbitrary phase profiles as requested in several applications for light-beam manipulation, recording of dynamic volume holograms and photonic lattices.

  12. Rotation of the optical polarization angle associated with the 2008 γ-ray flare of blazar W Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Sorcia, Marco; Benítez, Erika; Cabrera, José I.; Hiriart, David; López, José M.; Mújica, Raúl

    2014-10-10

    An R-band photopolarimetric variability analysis of the TeV bright blazar W Comae between 2008 February 28 and 2013 May 17 is presented. The source showed a gradual tendency to decrease its mean flux level with a total change of 3 mJy. A maximum and minimum brightness states in the R band of 14.25 ± 0.04 and 16.52 ± 0.1 mag, respectively, were observed, corresponding to a maximum variation of ΔF = 5.40 mJy. We estimated a minimum variability timescale of Δt = 3.3 days. A maximum polarization degree P = 33.8% ± 1.6%, with a maximum variation of ΔP = 33.2%, was found. One of our main results is the detection of a large rotation of the polarization angle from 78° to 315° (Δθ ∼ 237°) that coincides in time with the γ-ray flare observed in 2008 June. This result indicates that both optical and γ-ray emission regions could be co-spatial. During this flare, a correlation between the R-band flux and polarization degree was found with a correlation coefficient of r {sub F} {sub –} {sub p} = 0.93 ± 0.11. From the Stokes parameters, we infer the existence of two optically thin synchrotron components that contribute to the polarized flux. One of them is stable with a constant polarization degree of 11%. Assuming a shock-in jet model during the 2008 flare, we estimated a maximum Doppler factor δ {sub D} ∼ 27 and a minimum of δ {sub D} ∼ 16; a minimum viewing angle of the jet ∼2.°0; and a magnetic field B ∼ 0.12 G.

  13. White dwarf dynamical interactions and fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Badenes, Carles; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in time-domain astronomy have uncovered a new class of optical transients with time-scales shorter than typical supernovae and a wide range of peak luminosities. Several subtypes have been identified within this broad class, including Ca-rich transients, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and fast/bright transients. We examine the predictions from a state-of-the-art grid of three-dimensional simulations of dynamical white dwarf interactions in the context of these fast optical transients. We find that for collisions involving carbon-oxygen or oxygen-neon white dwarfs, the peak luminosities and durations of the light curves in our models are in good agreement with the properties of fast/bright transients. When one of the colliding white dwarfs is made of helium, the properties of the light curves are similar to those of Ca-rich gap transients. The model light curves from our white dwarf collisions are too slow to reproduce those of SNe Ia, and too fast to match any normal or peculiar SNe Ia.

  14. A change in the optical polarization associated with a γ-ray flare in the blazar 3C279

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bock, D. C. -J.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collmar, W.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbel, S.; Corbet, R.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Macquart, J.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Taylor, G. B.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wehrle, A. E.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Ziegler, M.; Uemura, M.; Ikejiri, Y.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kino, M.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Yamanaka, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Buemi, C. S.; Chen, W. P.; Dolci, M.; Dultzin, D.; Efimova, N. V.; Gurwell, M. A.; Gusbar, C.; Gómez, J. L.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Hovatta, T.; Jorstad, S. G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Larionov, V. M.; Larionova, E. G.; Leto, P.; Lin, H. C.; Lindfors, E.; Marscher, A. P.; McHardy, I. M.; Melnichuk, D. A.; Mommert, M.; Nilsson, K.; Di Paola, A.; Reinthal, R.; Richter, G. M.; Roca-Sogorb, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sigua, L. A.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; Villforth, C.; Grainge, K.; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.

    2010-02-18

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight1. Furthermore, the size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. We report the coincidence of a gamma (γ)-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and γ-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. Our results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 105 gravitational radii.

  15. A Change in the Optical Polarization Associated with a Gamma-Ray Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight. The size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. Here we report the coincidence of a gamma ({gamma})-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and {gamma}-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. The results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 10{sup 5} gravitational radii.

  16. TORTORA discovery of Naked-Eye Burst fast optical variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Karpov, Sergey; Bondar, Sergey; Greco, Giuseppe; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Molinari, Emilio; Chincarini, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Features characterizing gamma-ray bursts in the different spectral bands may be a clue for the nature of their inner engine. Up to now, only several bursts have been observed in optical band during the gamma activity, and the only one-GRB080319B-was covered from rise till fall with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss these data, acquired with TORTORA fast wide-field monitoring optical camera, as well as results of its analysis. The camera observed the position of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080318B, before, during and after the trigger. It detected the fast rise of optical emission, which reached the peak of V 5.3 at the eighteenth second, had a complex evolution till T+43s and monotonously faded then. The brightest part of the light curve contains two 15-20 s segments with different fluxes, each having two clearly-seen peaks of 5-8 s duration; all four peaks look quasi-periodic with separation of 9 s. There is no clear evidence of any sub-second variability. However, there are signs of quasi-periodic variability on 1s time scale at around the last peak (T+40 till T+50). The general properties of the optical light curve and its variability time scales look similar to the gamma one, but there is no clear correlation between them. This raises serious problems in interpretation of mechanisms generating such variability.

  17. Fast interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors using electro-optic dual optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla-Manrique, O. E.; Garcia-Souto, J. A.; Martin-Mateos, P.; Jerez-Gonzalez, B.; Acedo, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this document, a FBG interrogation system based on a multimode optical source and a direct read-out is proposed for measuring fast phenomena such as vibrations and ultrasounds. The system is based on an electro-optic dual optical frequency-comb. This architecture allows the configuration of the multimode optical source parameters such as the number of modes that are within the reflected spectrum (FWHM) of the FBG. Results are presented for the dual-comb operating under optimized control when mapping these optical modes onto detectable tones of multiples of 100 kHz around a centre radiofrequency tone (40 MHz). Dynamic strain is induced onto the fiber through an actuator, which generates changes in the reflected wavelength of the FBG and in turn the modes within the reflected spectrum. The electrical signals are analyzed using fast Fourier transform algorithms allowing identification of the vibrations.

  18. QKD system with fast active optical path length compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byung Kwon; Lee, Min Soo; Woo, Min Ki; Kim, Yong-Su; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2017-06-01

    We develop a quantum key distribution (QKD) system with fast active optical path length compensation. A rapid and reliable active optical path length compensation scheme is proposed and applied to a plug-and-play QKD system. The system monitors changes in key rates and controls it is own operation automatically. The system achieves its optimal performance within three seconds of operation, which includes a sifted key rate of 5.5 kbps and a quantum bit error rate of less than 2% after an abrupt temperature variation along the 25 km quantum channel. The system also operates well over a 24 h period while completing more than 60 active optical path length compensations.

  19. Flaring blazar B2 0619+33: Swift X-ray and UV/optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, D.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; D'Ammando, F.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2010-09-01

    Following the Fermi/LAT detection of a GeV flare possibly associated with the blazar B2 0619+33 (ATel #2829) on September 01-04, 2010, we obtained Swift observations on September 09 (7.8 ks exposure) and 12 (2.9 ks) to search for signs of X-ray and UV activity in this source. The source was detected by Swift/XRT at a count rate of about 0.01 counts/sec.

  20. Results from NuSTAR: Dynamics and time evolution in a sub-A class hard X-ray flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Hudson, Hugh S.; Grefenstette, Brian; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a solar microflare, SOL2015-09-01T04. Although it was too faint to be observed by the GOES X-ray Sensor, we estimate the flare to be an A0.2 class flare in brightness. This flare, with only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by RHESSI, is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flare in the existing literature. The flare occurred during a solar pointing by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical observatory, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed HXR flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits HXR properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, earlier peaking time with higher energy, similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares, and a high-energy excess beyond an isothermal spectral component during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical size; observations are consistent with its arising via the interaction of at least two magnetic loops. We estimate the increase in thermal energy at the time of the flare to be 1.8×1027 ergs. The observation suggests that flares do indeed scale down to extremely small energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  1. Correlated optical, X-ray, and γ-ray flaring activity seen with INTEGRAL during the 2015 outburst of V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Siegert, T.; Zhang, X.-L.; Grinberg, V.; Savchenko, V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Chenevez, J.; Clavel, M.; Corbel, S.; Diehl, R.; Domingo, A.; Gouiffès, C.; Greiner, J.; Krause, M. G. H.; Laurent, P.; Loh, A.; Markoff, S.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Russell, D. M.; Wilms, J.

    2015-09-01

    After 25 years of quiescence, the microquasar V404 Cyg entered a new period of activity in June 2015. This X-ray source is known to undergo extremely bright and variable outbursts seen at all wavelengths. It is therefore an object of prime interest to understand the accretion-ejection connections. These can, however, only be probed through simultaneous observations at several wavelengths. We made use of the INTEGRAL instruments to obtain long, almost uninterrupted observations from 2015 June 20, 15:50 UTC to June 25, 4:05 UTC, from the optical V band up to the soft γ-rays. V404 Cyg was extremely variable in all bands, with the detection of 18 flares with fluxes exceeding 6 Crab (20-40 keV) within three days. The flare recurrence can be as short as ~20 min from peak to peak. A model-independent analysis shows that the >6 Crab flares have a hard spectrum. A simple 10-400 keV spectral analysis of the off-flare and flare periods shows that the variation in intensity is likely to be only due to variations of a cut-off power-law component. The optical flares seem to be at least of two different types: one occurring in simultaneity with the X-ray flares, the other showing a delay greater than 10 min. The former could be associated with X-ray reprocessing by either an accretion disk or the companion star. We suggest that the latter are associated with plasma ejections that have also been seen in radio. Table 1 and Fig. 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Fast optical signals in the peripheral nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Clervil, Patricia R.; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2006-07-01

    We present a study of the near-infrared optical response to electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The sural nerve of six healthy subjects between the ages of 22 and 41 was stimulated with transcutaneous electrical pulses in a region located approximately 10 cm above the ankle. A two-wavelength (690 and 830 nm) tissue spectrometer was used to probe the same sural nerve below the ankle. We measured optical changes that peaked 60 to 160 ms after the electrical stimulus. On the basis of the strong wavelength dependence of these fast optical signals, we argue that their origin is mostly from absorption rather than scattering. From these absorption changes, we obtain oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes that describe a rapid hemodynamic response to electrical nerve activation. In five out of six subjects, this hemodynamic response is an increase in total (oxy+deoxy) hemoglobin concentration, consistent with a fast vasodilation. Our findings support the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system undergoes neurovascular coupling, even though more data is needed to prove such hypothesis.

  3. FAST VARIABILITY AND MILLIMETER/IR FLARES IN GRMHD MODELS OF Sgr A* FROM STRONG-FIELD GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Marrone, Daniel; Medeiros, Lia; Sadowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-10-20

    We explore the variability properties of long, high-cadence general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations across the electromagnetic spectrum using an efficient, GPU-based radiative transfer algorithm. We focus on both standard and normal evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disk (MAD) simulations with parameters that successfully reproduce the time-averaged spectral properties of Sgr A* and the size of its image at 1.3 mm. We find that the SANE models produce short-timescale variability with amplitudes and power spectra that closely resemble those inferred observationally. In contrast, MAD models generate only slow variability at lower flux levels. Neither set of models shows any X-ray flares, which most likely indicates that additional physics, such as particle acceleration mechanisms, need to be incorporated into the GRMHD simulations to account for them. The SANE models show strong, short-lived millimeter/infrared (IR) flares, with short (≲1 hr) time lags between the millimeter and IR wavelengths, that arise from the combination of short-lived magnetic flux tubes and strong-field gravitational lensing near the horizon. Such events provide a natural explanation for the observed IR flares with no X-ray counterparts.

  4. Fast Industrial Inspection of Optical Thin Film Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Park, Kibeom; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Jeong, Hyosang; Han, Sangyeob; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-09-28

    An application of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was demonstrated for a fast industrial inspection of an optical thin film panel. An optical thin film sample similar to a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel was examined. Two identical SD-OCT systems were utilized for parallel scanning of a complete sample in half time. Dual OCT inspection heads were utilized for transverse (fast) scanning, while a stable linear motorized translational stage was used for lateral (slow) scanning. The cross-sectional and volumetric images of an optical thin film sample were acquired to detect the defects in glass and other layers that are difficult to observe using visual inspection methods. The rapid inspection enabled by this setup led to the early detection of product defects on the manufacturing line, resulting in a significant improvement in the quality assurance of industrial products.

  5. Fast Industrial Inspection of Optical Thin Film Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Park, Kibeom; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Jeong, Hyosang; Han, Sangyeob; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-01-01

    An application of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was demonstrated for a fast industrial inspection of an optical thin film panel. An optical thin film sample similar to a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel was examined. Two identical SD-OCT systems were utilized for parallel scanning of a complete sample in half time. Dual OCT inspection heads were utilized for transverse (fast) scanning, while a stable linear motorized translational stage was used for lateral (slow) scanning. The cross-sectional and volumetric images of an optical thin film sample were acquired to detect the defects in glass and other layers that are difficult to observe using visual inspection methods. The rapid inspection enabled by this setup led to the early detection of product defects on the manufacturing line, resulting in a significant improvement in the quality assurance of industrial products. PMID:27690043

  6. Proposal for fast optical spin rotations in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia E.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2008-04-01

    A proposal for fast optical rotation of the spin of an electron in a quantum dot is presented. Hyperbolic secant pulses of appropriate polarization are employed to induce a relative phase between two spin basis states. This phase is the angle of spin rotation, and the polarization determines the direction of the spin. Varying both allows for the construction of arbitrary rotations. Simulations with typical parameters for InAs self-assembled quantum dots-including dissipative dynamics-show that the fidelity of the operations is at least 99%. The effect of deviation from the ideal pulse shape is also examined.

  7. Fast calculation method of complex space targets' optical cross section.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Li, Yingchun; Guo, Huichao

    2013-06-10

    This paper utilizes the optical cross section (OCS) to characterize the optical scattering characteristics of a space target under the conditions of Sun lighting. We derive the mathematical expression of OCS according to the radiometric theory, and put forward a fast visualization calculation method of complex space targets' OCS based on an OpenGL and 3D model. Through the OCS simulation of Lambert bodies (cylinder and sphere), the computational accuracy and speed of the algorithm were verified. By using this method, the relative error for OCS will not exceed 0.1%, and it only takes 0.05 s to complete a complex calculation. Additionally, we calculated the OCS of three actual satellites with bidirectional reflectance distribution function model parameters in visible bands, and results indicate that it is easy to distinguish the three targets by comparing their OCS curves. This work is helpful for the identification and classification of unresolved space target based on photometric characteristics.

  8. Acousto-optic infrared spectral imager for Pluto fast flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, D. A.; Hillman, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF's) enable the design of compact, two-dimensional imaging spectrometers with high spectral and spatial resolution and with no moving parts. Tellurium dioxide AOTF's operate from about 400 nm to nearly 5 microns, and a single device will tune continuously over one octave by changing the RF acoustic frequency applied to the device. An infrared (1.2-2.5 micron) Acousto-Optic Imaging Spectrometer (AImS) was designed that closely conforms to the surface composition mapping objectives of the Pluto Fast Flyby. It features a 75-cm focal length telescope, infrared AOTF, and 256 x 256 NICMOS-3 focal plane array for acquiring narrowband images with a spectral resolving power (lambda/delta(lambda)) exceeding 250. We summarize the instrument design features and its expected performance at the Pluto-Charon encounter.

  9. Fast Optical Control of Spin in Semiconductor Interfacial Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nádvorník, L.; Surýnek, M.; Olejník, K.; Novák, V.; Wunderlich, J.; Trojánek, F.; Jungwirth, T.; Němec, P.

    2017-09-01

    We report on a picosecond-fast optical removal of spin polarization from a self-confined photocarrier system at an undoped GaAs /(Al ,Ga )As interface possessing superior long-range and high-speed spin-transport properties. We employ a modified resonant-spin-amplification technique with unequal intensities of subsequent pump pulses to experimentally distinguish the evolution of spin populations originating from different excitation laser pulses. We demonstrate that the density of spins, which is injected into the system by means of the optical orientation, can be controlled by reducing the electrostatic confinement of the system using an additional generation of photocarriers. It is also shown that the disturbed confinement recovers within hundreds of picoseconds after which spins can be again photoinjected into the system.

  10. The radio and optical counterpart of the new Fermi LAT flaring source J0109+6134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Peracaula, M.

    2010-02-01

    Following the recent ATELs #2414, #2416 and #2420 concerning the Fermi-LAT, AGILE and Swift/XRT consistent detections of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134, we wish to remind that the proposed radio counterpart (VCS2 J0109+6133/GT 0106+613) was extensively observed nearly two decades ago by different authors in the context of the GT catalogue of Galactic Plane radio sources (Taylor and Gregory 1983, AJ, 88, 1784; Gregory and Taylor 1986, AJ 92, 371).

  11. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  12. Detection of a gas flaring signature in the AERONET optical properties of aerosols at a tropical station in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, Olusegun G.; Cai, Xiaoming; Levine, James G.; Pinker, Rachel T.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The West African region, with its peculiar climate and atmospheric dynamics, is a prominent source of aerosols. Reliable and long-term in situ measurements of aerosol properties are not readily available across the region. In this study, Version 2 Level 1.5 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data were used to study the absorption and size distribution properties of aerosols from dominant sources identified by trajectory analysis. The trajectory analysis was used to define four sources of aerosols over a 10 year period. Sorting the AERONET aerosol retrievals by these putative sources, the hypothesis that there exists an optically distinct gas flaring signal was tested. Dominance of each source cluster varies with season: desert-dust (DD) and biomass burning (BB) aerosols are dominant in months prior to the West African Monsoon (WAM); urban (UB) and gas flaring (GF) aerosol are dominant during the WAM months. BB aerosol, with single scattering albedo (SSA) at 675 nm value of 0.86 ± 0.03 and GF aerosol with SSA (675 nm) value of 0.9 ± 0.07, is the most absorbing of the aerosol categories. The range of Absorption Angstr&öm Exponent (AAE) for DD, BB, UB and GF classes are 1.99 ± 0.35, 1.45 ± 0.26, 1.21 ± 0.38 and 0.98 ± 0.25, respectively, indicating different aerosol composition for each source. The AAE (440-870 nm) and Angstr&öm Exponent (AE) (440-870 nm) relationships further show the spread and overlap of the variation of these optical and microphysical properties, presumably due in part to similarity in the sources of aerosols and in part, due to mixing of air parcels from different sources en route to the measurement site.

  13. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies. PMID:22463023

  14. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Tim N.; Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-02-01

    We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies.

  15. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  16. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  17. A FAST FLARE AND DIRECT REDSHIFT CONSTRAINT IN FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE BLAZAR S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-10

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by {approx}40% (-0.45 mag hr{sup -1}) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr{sup -1}) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.0 to {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the {approx}30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx}< 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 {+-} 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy.

  18. Discovery of Fast X-ray Oscillations During the 1998 Giant Flare from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of complex high frequency variability during the August 27, 1998 giant flare from SGR 1900+14 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We detect an approx. equals 84 Hz oscillation (QPO) during a 1 s interval beginning approximately 1 min after the initial hard spike. The amplitude is energy dependent, reaching a maximum of 26% (rms) for photons above 30 keV, and is not detected below 11 keV, with a 90% confidence upper limit of 14% (rms). Remarkably, additional QPOs are detected in the average power spectrum of data segments centered on the rotational phase at which the 84 Hz signal was detected. Two signals, at 53.5 and 155.1 Hz, are strongly detected, while a third feature at 28 Hz is found with lower significance. These QPOs are not detected at other rotational phases. The phenomenology seen in the SGR 1900+14 flare is similar to that of QPOs recently reported by Israel et al. (2005) from the December 27, 2004 flare from SGR 1806-20, suggesting they may have a common origin, perhaps torsional vibrations of the neutron star crust. Indeed, an association of the four frequencies (in increasing order) found in SGR 1900+14 with l = 2, 4, 7, and 13 toroidal modes appears plausible. We discuss our findings in the context of this model and show that if the stars have similar masses then the magnetic field in SGR 1806-20 must be about twice as large as in SGR 1900+14, broadly consistent with estimates from pulse timing.

  19. Two-dimensional fast marching for geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Capozzoli, Amedeo; Curcio, Claudio; Liseno, Angelo; Savarese, Salvatore

    2014-11-03

    We develop an approach for the fast and accurate determination of geometrical optics solutions to Maxwell's equations in inhomogeneous 2D media and for TM polarized electric fields. The eikonal equation is solved by the fast marching method. Particular attention is paid to consistently discretizing the scatterers' boundaries and matching the discretization to that of the computational domain. The ray tracing is performed, in a direct and inverse way, by using a technique introduced in computer graphics for the fast and accurate generation of textured images from vector fields. The transport equation is solved by resorting only to its integral form, the transport of polarization being trivial for the considered geometry and polarization. Numerical results for the plane wave scattering of two perfectly conducting circular cylinders and for a Luneburg lens prove the accuracy of the algorithm. In particular, it is shown how the approach is capable of properly accounting for the multiple scattering occurring between the two metallic cylinders and how inverse ray tracing should be preferred to direct ray tracing in the case of the Luneburg lens.

  20. Bright optical flare in Gamma-source PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowsky, F.; Mohamed, M.; Schwemmer, S.; Wagner, S.; Zacharias, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optical observations of the VHE gamma-ray bright, flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1510-089 (z=0.36) with the Automatic Telescope for Optical Monitoring (ATOM) in Namibia reveal a significant brightening.

  1. Fast Optical Transillumination Tomography with Large-Size Projection Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Xia, Jinjun; Haidekker, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Techniques such as optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography have been shown to effectively image highly scattering samples such as tissue. An additional modality has received much less attention: Optical transillumination tomography (OT), a modality that promises very high acquisition speed for volumetric scans. With the motivation to image tissue-engineered blood vessels for possible biomechanical testing, we have developed a fast OT device using a collimated, non-coherent beam with a large diameter together with a large-size CMOS camera that has the ability to acquire 3D projections in a single revolution of the sample. In addition, we used accelerated iterative reconstruction techniques to improve image reconstruction speed, while at the same time obtaining better image quality than through filtered back projection. The device was tested using ink-filled PTFE tubes to determine geometric reconstruction accuracy and recovery of absorbance. Even in the presence of minor refractive index mismatch, the weighted error of the measured radius was less than 5% in all cases, and a high linear correlation of ink absorbance determined with a photospectrometer of R 2 =0.99 was found, although the OT device systematically underestimated absorbance. Reconstruction time was improved from several hours (standard arithmetic reconstruction) to 90 seconds per slice with our optimized algorithm. Composed of only a light source, two spatial filters, a sample bath, and a CMOS camera, this device was extremely simple and cost-efficient to build. PMID:18704687

  2. Fast optical transillumination tomography with large-size projection acquisition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Xia, Jinjun; Haidekker, Mark A

    2008-10-01

    Techniques such as optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography have been shown to effectively image highly scattering samples such as tissue. An additional modality has received much less attention: Optical transillumination (OT) tomography, a modality that promises very high acquisition speed for volumetric scans. With the motivation to image tissue-engineered blood vessels for possible biomechanical testing, we have developed a fast OT device using a collimated, noncoherent beam with a large diameter together with a large-size CMOS camera that has the ability to acquire 3D projections in a single revolution of the sample. In addition, we used accelerated iterative reconstruction techniques to improve image reconstruction speed, while at the same time obtaining better image quality than through filtered backprojection. The device was tested using ink-filled polytetrafluorethylene tubes to determine geometric reconstruction accuracy and recovery of absorbance. Even in the presence of minor refractive index mismatch, the weighted error of the measured radius was <5% in all cases, and a high linear correlation of ink absorbance determined with a photospectrometer of R(2) = 0.99 was found, although the OT device systematically underestimated absorbance. Reconstruction time was improved from several hours (standard arithmetic reconstruction) to 90 s per slice with our optimized algorithm. Composed of only a light source, two spatial filters, a sample bath, and a CMOS camera, this device was extremely simple and cost-efficient to build.

  3. Fast character projection electron beam lithography for diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Banasch, Michael; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-05-01

    Electron beam lithography becomes attractive also for the fabrication of large scale diffractive optical elements by the use of the character projection (CP) technique. Even in the comparable fast variable shaped beam (VSB) exposure approach for conventional electron beam writers optical nanostructures may require very long writing times exceeding 24 hours per wafer because of the high density of features, as required by e.g. sub-wavelength nanostructures. Using character projection, the writing time can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude, due to the simultaneous exposure of multiple features. The benefit of character projection increases with increasing complexity of the features and decreasing period. In this contribution we demonstrate the CP technique for a grating of hexagonal symmetry at 350nm period. The pattern is designed to provide antireflective (AR) properties, which can be adapted in their spectral and angular domain for applications from VIS to NIR by changing the feature size and the etching depth of the nanostructure. This AR nanostructure can be used on the backside of optical elements e.g. gratings, when an AR coating stack could not be applied for the reason of climatic conditions or wave front accuracy.

  4. A change in the optical polarization associated with a γ-ray flare in the blazar 3C279

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-02-18

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight1. Furthermore, the size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. We report the coincidence of a gamma (γ)-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and γ-ray emission regions and indicates a highlymore » ordered jet magnetic field. Our results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 105 gravitational radii.« less

  5. Performance analyses for fast variable optical attenuator-based optical current transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pu; Chen, Chen; Wang, Xuefeng; Shan, Xuekang; Sun, Xiaohan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of the electro-optic hybrid optical current transformer (HOCT) proposed by ourselves for high-voltage metering and protective relaying application. The transformer makes use of a fast variable optical attenuator (FVOA) to modulate the lightwave according to the voltage from the primary current sensor, such as low-power current transformer (LPCT). In order to improve the performance of the transformer, we use an optic-electro feedback loop with the PID control algorithm to compensate the nonlinearity of the FVOA. The linearity and accuracy of the transformer were analyzed and tested. The results indicate that the nonlinearity of the FVOA is completely compensated by the loop and the ratio and phase errors are under 0.07% and 5 minutes respectively, under the working power of less than 1 mW power. The transformer can be immune to the polarization and wavelength drift, and also robust against the environmental interference.

  6. Wireless optical communication for FDDI, fast Ethernet, and ATM connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved, David B.; Azancot, Yossi

    1995-09-01

    The bandwidth limitations of spread spectrum RF technology are easily removed by use of optical carriers. A variety of wireless connectivity system applications have been achieved using IR LED (not laser) at data rates up to 125 Mbps and with low frequency corners below 100 Kbps. By use of the UWINTM principle it is possible to achieve wireless communications which are protocol independent. Thus, an urgent installation which must serve today as an Ethernet or Token Ring wireless connection in the future can be used at FDDI, Fast Ethernet, 100 VG Anylan or ATM without any modification to the original installation. In this paper we describe three separate applications of this principle where there are significant trade-offs between range and angular coverage.

  7. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Sudipta; Paul, Shuvojit; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods. PMID:28139705

  8. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Paul, Shuvojit; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods.

  9. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.; Bocvarski, V.

    2006-12-01

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 {mu}m for He*, 1.2 {mu}m for Ne*, 0.87 {mu}m for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2{mu}m-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to ''vdW-Zeeman'' transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  10. Fast optical monitoring of microscopic excitation patterns in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, W; Windisch, H; Tritthart, H A

    1989-01-01

    Many vital processes depend on the generation, changes, and conduction of cellular transmembrane potentials. Optical monitoring systems are well suited to detect such cellular electrical activities in networks of excitable cells and also tissues simultaneously at multiple sites. Here, an exceptionally fast array system (16 x 16 photodiodes, up to 4,000,000 samples per second, 12-bit resolution) for imaging voltage-sensitive dye fluorescence, permitted real time measurements of excitation patterns at a microscopic size scale (256 pixels within an area of 1.8-8 mm2), in rat cardiac muscle in vitro. Results emphasize a recent hypothesis for cardiac impulse conduction, based on cardiac structural complexities, that is contradictory to all continuous cable theory models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2790142

  11. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  12. Fast responsive, optical trace level ammonia sensor for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ammonia is a ubiquitous chemical substance which is created in technical and biological processes and harmful to many different organisms. One specific problem is the toxicity of ammonia in fish at levels of 25 μg/l - a very common issue in today’s aqua culture. In this study we report a development of a fast responsive, optical ammonia sensor for trace concentrations. Results Different hydrogels have been investigated as host polymers for a pH based sensing mechanism based on fluorescent dyes. A porous hydrophobic fluoropolymer membrane was used as an ion barrier cover layer to achieve a good ammonia permeability. The sensor’s sensitivity towards ammonia as well as crosssensitivity towards pH-value and salinity, and the temperature dependency have been determined. Two different methods to reference fluorescence signals have been employed to eliminate intensity-based measurement drawbacks. Conclusion The presented sensor features high sensitivity and a fast response even at concentrations near 1 ppb. No cross sensitivity towards pH and salinity could be observed and temperature dependency was determined as compensateable. Both referencing approaches prove themselves to be able to provide a simple use of the sensor for in-field applications. PMID:23101725

  13. High frame rate CCD camera with fast optical shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Turko, B.T.

    1998-09-01

    A high frame rate CCD camera coupled with a fast optical shutter has been designed for high repetition rate imaging applications. The design uses state-of-the-art microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPII) technology fostered/developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to support nuclear, military, and medical research requiring high-speed imagery. Key design features include asynchronous resetting of the camera to acquire random transient images, patented real-time analog signal processing with 10-bit digitization at 40--75 MHz pixel rates, synchronized shutter exposures as short as 200pS, sustained continuous readout of 512 x 512 pixels per frame at 1--5Hz rates via parallel multiport (16-port CCD) data transfer. Salient characterization/performance test data for the prototype camera are presented, temporally and spatially resolved images obtained from range-gated LADAR field testing are included, an alternative system configuration using several cameras sequenced to deliver discrete numbers of consecutive frames at effective burst rates up to 5GHz (accomplished by time-phasing of consecutive MCPII shutter gates without overlap) is discussed. Potential applications including dynamic radiography and optical correlation will be presented.

  14. Terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based arithmetic units for ultra-fast optical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherri, Abdallah K.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, designs of ultra-fast all-optical based Terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based devices are reported. Using TOAD switches, adders/subtracters units are demonstrated. The high speed is achieved due to the use of the nonlinear optical materials and the nonbinary modified signed-digit (MSD) number representation. The proposed all-optical circuits are compared in terms of numbers TOAD switches, optical amplifiers and wavelength converters.

  15. FLARES IN LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  16. Flares in Long and Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  17. Fast Interrogation of Fiber Bragg Gratings with Electro-Optical Dual Optical Frequency Combs.

    PubMed

    Posada-Roman, Julio E; Garcia-Souto, Jose A; Poiana, Dragos A; Acedo, Pablo

    2016-11-26

    Optical frequency combs (OFC) generated by electro-optic modulation of continuous-wave lasers provide broadband coherent sources with high power per line and independent control of line spacing and the number of lines. In addition to their application in spectroscopy, they offer flexible and optimized sources for the interrogation of other sensors based on wavelength change or wavelength filtering, such as fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. In this paper, a dual-OFC FBG interrogation system based on a single laser and two optical-phase modulators is presented. This architecture allows for the configuration of multimode optical source parameters such as the number of modes and their position within the reflected spectrum of the FBG. A direct read-out is obtained by mapping the optical spectrum onto the radio-frequency spectrum output of the dual-comb. This interrogation scheme is proposed for measuring fast phenomena such as vibrations and ultrasounds. Results are presented for dual-comb operation under optimized control. The optical modes are mapped onto detectable tones that are multiples of 0.5 MHz around a center radiofrequency tone (40 MHz). Measurements of ultrasounds (40 kHz and 120 kHz) are demonstrated with this sensing system. Ultrasounds induce dynamic strain onto the fiber, which generates changes in the reflected Bragg wavelength and, hence, modulates the amplitude of the OFC modes within the reflected spectrum. The amplitude modulation of two counterphase tones is detected to obtain a differential measurement proportional to the ultrasound signal.

  18. On the Location of the 2009 GeV Flares of Blazar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Amanda; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen T.; McCann, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Most of the radiated power of blazars is produced at GeV energies via inverse Compton scattering at an unknown distance from the central engine. Possible seed photon sources map to different locations along the jet spanning two orders of magnitude in distance from the black hole, ranging from the broad-line region (BLR, ˜0.1 pc), to the molecular torus (MT, ˜ 1- few pc), to the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio core zone at ˜10 pc. Here, we apply a diagnostic for identifying the GeV emission zone (GEZ) in blazar PKS 1510-089 using four bright gamma-ray flares detected by Fermi in 2009. As shown by Dotson et al., the flare decay time should be energy-independent for flares in the BLR, but faster at higher energies for flares in the MT. We find that in the two cases where the gamma-ray flare was not accompanied by an optical flare, the decay times show an energy-dependence suggesting a location in the MT. For the two GeV flares accompanied by optical flares, we obtained very fast decay times (≲3 hr) in both low and high energy Fermi bands. For these flares, considering the simultaneous >100 GeV detection by HESS (H.E.S.S. Collaboration et al.) and the ejection of a superluminal component from the VLBI radio core in one case, our results suggest that both flares came from the vicinity of the VLBI core. We thus suggest that the GEZ is spread over a wide range of locations beyond the BLR.

  19. Fast QC-LDPC code for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Udeh, Chinonso Paschal; Wu, Rangzhong

    2017-02-01

    Free Space Optical (FSO) Communication systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. Hence the atmospheric turbulence effects lead to multiplicative noise related with signal intensity. In order to suppress the signal fading induced by multiplicative noise, we propose a fast Quasi-Cyclic (QC) Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) code for FSO Communication systems. As a linear block code based on sparse matrix, the performances of QC-LDPC is extremely near to the Shannon limit. Currently, the studies on LDPC code in FSO Communications is mainly focused on Gauss-channel and Rayleigh-channel, respectively. In this study, the LDPC code design over atmospheric turbulence channel which is nether Gauss-channel nor Rayleigh-channel is closer to the practical situation. Based on the characteristics of atmospheric channel, which is modeled as logarithmic-normal distribution and K-distribution, we designed a special QC-LDPC code, and deduced the log-likelihood ratio (LLR). An irregular QC-LDPC code for fast coding, of which the rates are variable, is proposed in this paper. The proposed code achieves excellent performance of LDPC codes and can present the characteristics of high efficiency in low rate, stable in high rate and less number of iteration. The result of belief propagation (BP) decoding shows that the bit error rate (BER) obviously reduced as the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) increased. Therefore, the LDPC channel coding technology can effectively improve the performance of FSO. At the same time, the BER, after decoding reduces with the increase of SNR arbitrarily, and not having error limitation platform phenomenon with error rate slowing down.

  20. Fast T1 and T2 mapping methods: the zoomed U-FLARE sequence compared with EPI and snapshot-FLASH for abdominal imaging at 11.7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Géraldine; Jiménez-González, María; Plaza-García, Sandra; Beraza, Marta; Reese, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    A newly adapted zoomed ultrafast low-angle RARE (U-FLARE) sequence is described for abdominal imaging applications at 11.7 Tesla and compared with the standard echo-plannar imaging (EPI) and snapshot fast low angle shot (FLASH) methods. Ultrafast EPI and snapshot-FLASH protocols were evaluated to determine relaxation times in phantoms and in the mouse kidney in vivo. Owing to their apparent shortcomings, imaging artefacts, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and variability in the determination of relaxation times, these methods are compared with the newly implemented zoomed U-FLARE sequence. Snapshot-FLASH has a lower SNR when compared with the zoomed U-FLARE sequence and EPI. The variability in the measurement of relaxation times is higher in the Look-Locker sequences than in inversion recovery experiments. Respectively, the average T1 and T2 values at 11.7 Tesla are as follows: kidney cortex, 1810 and 29 ms; kidney medulla, 2100 and 25 ms; subcutaneous tumour, 2365 and 28 ms. This study demonstrates that the zoomed U-FLARE sequence yields single-shot single-slice images with good anatomical resolution and high SNR at 11.7 Tesla. Thus, it offers a viable alternative to standard protocols for mapping very fast parameters, such as T1 and T2, or dynamic processes in vivo at high field.

  1. Optical activity of the flaring gamma-ray blazar PKS 0458-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Ojha, Roopesh; Kiaeerad, Fatemeh

    2012-09-01

    We report optical photometry of the high redshift (z=2.286 Strittmatter et al. 1974, ApJ, 190, 509) flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0458-02 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma. This superluminal FSRQ (apparent speed of 16.51c; Lister et al. 2009, AJ, 138,1874), is also known as 2FGL J0501.2-0155 (Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31) and was reported to be 30 times brighter than its average daily Fermi/LAT (E > 100 MeV) flux on 17 September (Atel#4396).

  2. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  3. Sub-second optical flaring in GX 339-4 during the 2017 outburst early rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Kotze, M. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Paice, J. A.; Altamirano, D.; Charles, P. A.; Russell, D. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2017-10-01

    The black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 has been caught at the early stage of a new outburst. According to optical monitoring, the outburst began between 2017-08-24 and 2017-09-14, presumably in the outer disc (ATel #10797).

  4. Swift observation of strong optical-UV and X-ray flaring activity of OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, F.; Ciprini, S.; Valtonen, M.; Zola, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new time-domain astronomy experiment performed with the Swift satellite is ongoing since mid Oct. 2016 on the peculiar BL Lac object OJ 287 (z=0.306) after the observation of a very-high optical flux (private communication and follow-up ATel#9650 and ATel#9675).

  5. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  6. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  7. Fast left ventricle tracking using localized anatomical affine optical flow.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João L; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    In daily clinical cardiology practice, left ventricle (LV) global and regional function assessment is crucial for disease diagnosis, therapy selection and patient follow-up. Currently, this is still a time-consuming task, spending valuable human resources. In this work, a novel fast methodology for automatic LV tracking is proposed based on localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow. This novel method can be combined to previously proposed segmentation frameworks or manually delineated surfaces at an initial frame to obtain fully delineated datasets and, thus, assess both global and regional myocardial function. Its feasibility and accuracy was investigated in three distinct public databases, namely in realistically simulated 3D ultrasound (US), clinical 3D echocardiography and clinical cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. The method showed accurate tracking results in all databases, proving its applicability and accuracy for myocardial function assessment. Moreover, when combined to previous state-of-the-art segmentation frameworks, it outperformed previous tracking strategies in both 3D US and CMR data, automatically computing relevant cardiac indices with smaller biases and narrower limits of agreement compared to reference indices. Simultaneously, the proposed localized tracking method showed to be suitable for online processing, even for 3D motion assessment. Importantly, although here evaluated for LV tracking only, this novel methodology is applicable for tracking of other target structures with minimal adaptations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. "Red Tweezers": Fast, customisable hologram generation for optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Richard W.; Gibson, Graham M.; Linnenberger, Anna; Phillips, David B.; Grieve, James A.; Carberry, David M.; Serati, Steven; Miles, Mervyn J.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-01-01

    Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) are a versatile way of manipulating microscopic particles in 3D. However, their ease of use has been hampered by the computational load of calculating the holograms, resulting in an unresponsive system. We present a program for generating these holograms on a consumer Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), coupled to an easy-to-use interface in LabVIEW (National Instruments). This enables a HOT system to be set up without writing any additional code, as well as providing a platform enabling the fast generation of other holograms. The GPU engine calculates holograms over 300 times faster than the same algorithm running on a quad core CPU. The hologram algorithm can be altered on-the-fly without recompiling the program, allowing it to be used to control Spatial Light Modulators in any situation where the hologram can be calculated in a single pass. The interface has also been rewritten to take advantage of new features in LabVIEW 2010. It is designed to be easily modified and extended to integrate with hardware other than our own.

  9. The puzzling case of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934: flaring optical emission during quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; Campana, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Papitto, A.; Burderi, L.; Di Salvo, T.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.

    2017-04-01

    We present an optical (gri) study during quiescence of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 performed with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) in August 2014. Although the source was in quiescence at the time of our observations, it showed a strong optical flaring activity, more pronounced in bluer filters (i.e. the g-band). After subtracting the flares, we tentatively recovered a sinusoidal modulation at the system orbital period in all bands, even when a significant phase shift with respect to an irradiated star, typical of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, was detected. We conclude that the observed flaring could be a manifestation of the presence of an accretion disc in the system. The observed light curve variability could be explained by the presence of a superhump, which might be another proof of the formation of an accretion disc. In particular, the disc at the time of our observations was probably preparing the new outburst of the source, which occurred a few months later, in 2015. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, in the island of La Palma.

  10. Optical-infrared flares and radio afterglows by Jovian planets inspiraling into their host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-04-01

    When a planet inspirals into its host star, it releases gravitational energy, which is converted into an expanding bubble of hot plasma. We study the radiation from the bubble and show that it includes prompt optical-infrared emission and a subsequent radio afterglow. The prompt emission from M31 and the Large Magellanic Cloud is detectable by optical-near-infrared transient surveys with a large field of view. The subsequent radio afterglows are detectable for 103-104 yr. The event rate depends on uncertain parameters in the formation and dynamics of giant planets. Future observations of the rate will constrain related theoretical models. If the event rate is high ( ≳ a few events per year), the circumstellar disc must typically be massive, as suggested by recent numerical simulations.

  11. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  12. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  13. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  14. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  15. Fast Interrogation of Fiber Bragg Gratings with Electro-Optical Dual Optical Frequency Combs

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Roman, Julio E.; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Poiana, Dragos A.; Acedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFC) generated by electro-optic modulation of continuous-wave lasers provide broadband coherent sources with high power per line and independent control of line spacing and the number of lines. In addition to their application in spectroscopy, they offer flexible and optimized sources for the interrogation of other sensors based on wavelength change or wavelength filtering, such as fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. In this paper, a dual-OFC FBG interrogation system based on a single laser and two optical-phase modulators is presented. This architecture allows for the configuration of multimode optical source parameters such as the number of modes and their position within the reflected spectrum of the FBG. A direct read-out is obtained by mapping the optical spectrum onto the radio-frequency spectrum output of the dual-comb. This interrogation scheme is proposed for measuring fast phenomena such as vibrations and ultrasounds. Results are presented for dual-comb operation under optimized control. The optical modes are mapped onto detectable tones that are multiples of 0.5 MHz around a center radiofrequency tone (40 MHz). Measurements of ultrasounds (40 kHz and 120 kHz) are demonstrated with this sensing system. Ultrasounds induce dynamic strain onto the fiber, which generates changes in the reflected Bragg wavelength and, hence, modulates the amplitude of the OFC modes within the reflected spectrum. The amplitude modulation of two counterphase tones is detected to obtain a differential measurement proportional to the ultrasound signal. PMID:27898043

  16. Optical flaring of a radio source seen in the Catalina Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A. A.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M.; Williams, R.; Herczeg, G.; Beshore, E.; Larson, S. M.; Boattini, A.; Christiansen, E.

    2008-12-01

    We have detected the optical brightening by ~3 mags (V ~ 16.8) of a previously known radio source (~ flat-spectrum, unknown redshift) in the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) on 29 Dec 2008 UT.

    CSS081229:104032+061721 2008-12-29 UT 10:22:05 10:40:31.61 06:17:21.8 812291070574110368
    The discovery data and finding chart are posted at the CRTS VOEventNet webpage: http://voeventnet.caltech.edu/feeds/ATEL/CRTS/812291070574110368.atel.html (SDSS object ID 587732701792108700).

  17. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrsp-2008-1.

  18. Safety Eye Protection through Use of Fast Acting Optical Switching.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    switching properties an irreversible and/or reflective mode switching process might be practical. Optical switching effects (eg. electro-optic effect, magneto ... magneto -optic effect devices is not as good as the previous materials. Of the reamining possible materials/proceses to be considered from Table I, no...tunneling occurs. Whether or not this insulator-metal transition also results in optica . reflection or an optical absorption transition is not known. It is

  19. Application of Fast Optical Tomography to Flow Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    electro-optics, quantum electronics, solid-state lasers , optical propagation and communications; microwave semiconductor devices, microwave /millimeter...34Application of Tomography in 3-D Transonic Flows, AIAA-87-1374, AIAA 19th Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Laser Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii...thermomechanics, gas kinetics and radiation; cw and pulsed chemical and excimer laser development including chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, optical

  20. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  1. X-ray and optical observations of a dMe flare star in the T Tauri field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, A. P.; Charles, P. A.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Jordan, C.; Brown, A.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of a newly discovered dMe flare star within 20 pc of the sun are presented. An EXOSAT observation of this source shows an almost complete X-ray flare light curve with rise time about 600 s, decay time about 1500 s, and peak luminosity 6.1 x 10 to the 29th erg/s, a 40-fold increase in brightness over the quiescent level. The total energy in the flare is between 2.7 x 10 to the 32nd and 3.3 x 10 to the 33rd erg. Results of two Einstein IPC observations are also presented; the source is quiescent in the first and shows evidence for a luminosity enhancement, possibly the tail of another flare, in the second. The source is identified with a hitherto unsteadied nearby star with magnitude V about 13 and spectral type roughly dM5e, at a distnce of about 13 pc. For the flare, a variety of different physical assumptions about the cooling mechanism is explored and possible values for loop lengths and electron densities are derived.

  2. Fast integral methods for integrated optical systems simulations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemann, Bernd H.

    2015-09-01

    Boundary integral equation methods (BIM) or simply integral methods (IM) in the context of optical design and simulation are rigorous electromagnetic methods solving Helmholtz or Maxwell equations on the boundary (surface or interface of the structures between two materials) for scattering or/and diffraction purposes. This work is mainly restricted to integral methods for diffracting structures such as gratings, kinoforms, diffractive optical elements (DOEs), micro Fresnel lenses, computer generated holograms (CGHs), holographic or digital phase holograms, periodic lithographic structures, and the like. In most cases all of the mentioned structures have dimensions of thousands of wavelengths in diameter. Therefore, the basic methods necessary for the numerical treatment are locally applied electromagnetic grating diffraction algorithms. Interestingly, integral methods belong to the first electromagnetic methods investigated for grating diffraction. The development started in the mid 1960ies for gratings with infinite conductivity and it was mainly due to the good convergence of the integral methods especially for TM polarization. The first integral equation methods (IEM) for finite conductivity were the methods by D. Maystre at Fresnel Institute in Marseille: in 1972/74 for dielectric, and metallic gratings, and later for multiprofile, and other types of gratings and for photonic crystals. Other methods such as differential and modal methods suffered from unstable behaviour and slow convergence compared to BIMs for metallic gratings in TM polarization from the beginning to the mid 1990ies. The first BIM for gratings using a parametrization of the profile was developed at Karl-Weierstrass Institute in Berlin under a contract with Carl Zeiss Jena works in 1984-1986 by A. Pomp, J. Creutziger, and the author. Due to the parametrization, this method was able to deal with any kind of surface grating from the beginning: whether profiles with edges, overhanging non

  3. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  4. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  5. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  6. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  7. GONG Inter-site Hα Flare Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersch, Owen

    2013-06-01

    A challenge of the past few decades for the Solar Observing Optical Network (SOON), operated by the United States Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), has been to obtain consistent flare brightness reporting for the same flare from different sites. Flare area is usually considered to be a more reliable measure, but significant variation of values between sites still occurs. The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) deployed a Hα patrol system in 2010. This provides a modern system with near identical equipment to compare flares from six different sites. The classification of flares and techniques of flare measurement will be briefly discussed. The results presented here suggest that even though different GONG sites report different flare areas and brightnesses, for some sites they vary in a consistent way allowing correction factors to be applied.

  8. Statistical studies of low-power solar flares. Distribution of flares by area, brightness, and classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, Aleksandr; Zhdanov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    An electronic database has been created for 123801 solar flares that occurred on the Sun over the period from 1972 to 2010. It is based on catalogs of the Solar Geophysical Data (SGD) and Quarterly Bulletin on Solar Activity. A software package has been used for statistical data preprocessing. The first results revealed a number of new features in the distribution of parameters of solar flares, which differ from those obtained previously. We have found that more than 90% of all solar flares are low-power. The most numerous class comprises SF flares (64%). Flare activity shows a pronounced cyclicity and high correlation with Wolf numbers. The highest correlation coefficients indicate S and 1 solar flares. There is also a high correlation between individual flare classes: S and 1, 1 and (2-4). The results obtained previously [Mitra et al., 1972] which provide evidence of the prevalence of SN solar flares (47%) and the existence of significant peaks for SN and 1N flares, have not been confirmed. The distribution of the number of solar flares with increasing optical importance smoothly decreases without significant deviations. With increasing optical importance, solar flares are gradually redistributed toward an increase in brightness class. The excess of the number of SN and 1N solar flares present in the distributions obtained in [Mitra et al., 1972] are most likely associated with poor statistics.

  9. A fast optical outburst of the quasar CTA102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana; Larionov, Valeri; Mokrushina, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The quasar CTA102 is being in an active state at gamma-ray and optical wavelengths since 2015, with prominent gamma-ray and optical outbursts observed in the beginning of 2016 (see www.bu.edu/blazars/VLBA_GLAST/cta102.html).

  10. Optical correlators with fast updating speed using photorefractive semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Gregory; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    The performance of an updatable optical correlator which uses a photorefractive semiconductor to generate real-time matched filters is discussed. The application of compound semiconductors makes possible high-speed operation and low optical input intensities. The Bragg diffraction is considered, along with the speed and power characteristics of these materials. Experimental results on photorefractive GaAs are presented.

  11. Efficient sweep buffering in swept source optical coherence tomography using a fast optical switch

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Shia, Kevin; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel buffering technique for increasing the A-scan rate of swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) systems employing low duty cycle swept source lasers. This technique differs from previously reported buffering techniques in that it employs a fast optical switch, capable of switching in 60 ns, instead of a fused fiber coupler at the end of the buffering stage, and is therefore appreciably more power efficient. The use of the switch also eliminates patient exposure to light that is not used for imaging that occurs at the end of the laser sweep, thereby increasing the system sensitivity. We also describe how careful management of polarization can remove undesirable artifacts due to polarization mode dispersion. In addition, we demonstrate how numerical compensation techniques can be used to modify the signal from a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) clock obtained from the original sweep to recalibrate the buffered sweep, thereby reducing the complexity of systems employing lasers with integrated MZI clocks. Combining these methods, we constructed an SSOCT system employing an Axsun technologies laser with a sweep rate of 100kHz and 6dB imaging range of 5.5mm. The sweep rate was doubled with sweep buffering to 200 kHz, and the imaging depth was extended to 9 mm using coherence revival. We demonstrated the feasibility of this system by acquiring images of the anterior segments and retinas of healthy human volunteers. PMID:23243559

  12. Double-pass rotary mirror array for fast scanning optical delay line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linbo; Chen, Nan Guang

    2006-07-20

    We have developed a fast scanning optical delay line based on a rotary mirror array. A double-pass configuration is adopted to optimize the fiber-optical coupling and thus minimize the amplitude modulation in the reflected light. The achieved scanning range is extended to over 3 mm. An additional Michelson interferometer is incorporated into the reference arm to achieve high delay repeatability. Such a device is ideal for real-time optical coherence tomography, optical Doppler tomography, and spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

  13. Fast magneto-optic switch based on nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua; Ruan, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shao-Han; Chen, Zhi-Min

    2011-09-01

    The paper studies an all fiber high-speed magneto-optic switch which includes an optical route, a nanosecond pulse generator, and a magnetic field module in order to reduce the switching time of the optical switch in the all optical network. A compact nanosecond pulse generator can be designed based on the special character of the avalanche transistor. The output current pulse of the nanosecond pulse generator is less than 5 ns, while the pulse amplitude is more than 100 V and the pulse width is about 10 to 20 ns, which is able to drive a high-speed magnetic field. A solenoid is used as the magnetic field module, and a bismuth-substituted rare-earth iron garnet single crystal is chosen as the Faraday rotator. By changing the direction of current in the solenoid quickly, the magnetization of the magneto-optic material is reversed, and the optical beam can be rapidly switched. The experimental results indicate that the switching time of the device is about 100 to 400 ns, which can partially meet the demand of the rapid development of the all optical network.

  14. Solar and stellar flares and their impact on planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    Recent observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of flares and flare-like phenomena, which affect terrestrial environment and our civilization. It has been established that flares are caused by the release of magnetic energy through magnetic reconnection. Many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and such stellar flares especially in stars with fast rotation are much more energetic than solar flares. These are called superflares. The total energy of a solar flare is 1029 - 1032 erg, while that of a superflare is 1033 - 1038 erg. Recently, it was found that superflares (with 1034 - 1035 erg) occur on Sun-like stars with slow rotation with frequency once in 800 - 5000 years. This suggests the possibility of superflares on the Sun. We review recent development of solar and stellar flare research, and briefly discuss possible impacts of superflares on the Earth and exoplanets.

  15. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  16. Fast incorporation of optical flow into active polygons.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gozde; Krim, Hamid; Yezzi, Anthony

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we first reconsider, in a different light, the addition of a prediction step to active contour-based visual tracking using an optical flow and clarify the local computation of the latter along the boundaries of continuous active contours with appropriate regularizers. We subsequently detail our contribution of computing an optical flow-based prediction step directly from the parameters of an active polygon, and of exploiting it in object tracking. This is in contrast to an explicitly separate computation of the optical flow and its ad hoc application. It also provides an inherent regularization effect resulting from integrating measurements along polygon edges. As a result, we completely avoid the need of adding ad hoc regularizing terms to the optical flow computations, and the inevitably arbitrary associated weighting parameters. This direct integration of optical flow into the active polygon framework distinguishes this technique from most previous contour-based approaches, where regularization terms are theoretically, as well as practically, essential. The greater robustness and speed due to a reduced number of parameters of this technique are additional and appealing features.

  17. A radio jet from the optical and x-ray bright stellar tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, S; Anderson, G E; Stone, N C; Fraser, M; Wevers, T; Metzger, B D; Jonker, P G; van der Horst, A J; Staley, T D; Mendez, A J; Miller-Jones, J C A; Hodgkin, S T; Campbell, H C; Fender, R P

    2016-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly launched jet. The multiwavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion-state changes of stellar mass black holes, which suggests that all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  19. Fabrication, Testing, Coating and Alignment of Fast Segmented Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-25

    mirror segment, a 100 mm thick Zerodur mirror blank was purchased from Schott. Figure 2 shows the segment and its support for polishing and testing in...Polishing large off-axis segments of fast primary mirrors 2. Testing large segments in an off-axis geometry 3. Alignment of multiple segments of a large... mirror 4. Coatings that reflect high-intensity light without distorting the substrate These technologies are critical because of several unique

  20. Concepts for fast acquisition in optical communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Brandon L.; Giggenbach, Dirk; Epple, Bernhard

    2006-09-01

    As free-space laser communications systems proliferate due to improved technology and transmission techniques, optical communication networks comprised of ground stations, aircraft, high altitude platforms, and satellites become an attainable goal. An important consideration for optical networks is the ability of optical communication terminals (OCT) to quickly locate one another and align their laser beams to initiate the acquisition sequence. This paper investigates promising low-cost technologies and novel approaches that will facilitate the targeting and acquisition tasks between counter terminals. Specifically, two critical technology areas are investigated: position determination (which includes location and attitude determination) and inter-terminal communications. A feasibility study identified multiple-antenna global navigation satellite system (GNSS) systems and GNSS-aided inertial systems as possible position determination solutions. Personal satellite communication systems (e.g. Iridium or Inmarsat), third generation cellular technology (IMT-2000/UMTS), and a relatively new air traffic surveillance technology called Autonomous Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) were identified as possible inter-terminal communication solutions. A GNSS-aided inertial system and an ADS-B system were integrated into an OCT to demonstrate their utility in a typical optical communication scenario. Testing showed that these technologies have high potential in future OCTs, although improvements can be made to both to increase tracking accuracy.

  1. Classification of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Sturrock, P. A.

    The historical background of solar flare classification before the SMM launch is reviewed along with recent developments made by observations with SMM, Hinotori, and other contemporary satellite and ground-based observations. Based on these recent findings, solar flares are grouped into five classes: thermal hard X-ray flares, nonthermal hard X-ray flares, impulsive gamma-ray/proton flares, gradual gamma-ray/proton flares, and quiescent filament-eruption flares. The roles of filament eruptions in flare development are examined, and theoretical ideas related to processes occurring in different flare classes are discussed.

  2. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally.

  3. Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures for image recording and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasherininov, P. G. Tomasov, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures (CdTe, GaAs) for image recording and processing with a speed to 10{sup 6} cycle/s (which exceeds the speed of known recording media based on metal-insulator-semiconductor-(liquid crystal) (MIS-LC) structures by two to three orders of magnitude), a photosensitivity of 10{sup -2}V/cm{sup 2}, and a spatial resolution of 5-10 (line pairs)/mm are developed. Operating principles of nanostructures as fast optical recording media and methods for reading images recorded in such media are described. Fast optical processors for recording images in incoherent light based on CdTe crystal nanostructures are implemented. The possibility of their application to fabricate image correlators is shown.

  4. Energetic particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Paizis, C.; Colgate, S. A.; Dulk, G. A.; Hoyng, P.; Knight, J. W.; Lin, R. P.; Melrose, D. B.; Orrall, F.; Shapiro, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The various manifestations of energetic particles in solar flares are examined, and possible mechanisms for the acceleration of these particles are considered. Hard X-ray observations and possible mechanisms for the production of the dominant form of solar energetic particles, electrons with energies between 10 and 100 keV, are discussed, with consideration of thin-target models, thick-target models and thick-target models with reverse currents, and first-phase acceleration mechanisms for energetic electrons emitting impulsive microwave and fast-drift Type III radio bursts as well as impulsive hard X rays, which are detected themselves 20 min after the flare at 1 AU are considered. Radio evidence on the number, energy and pitch-angle distributions of energetic particles produced during solar flares is summarized, and observations at 1 AU of proton and electron energy spectra, the proton/electron ratio and energetic particle events rich in He-3 from solar flares are discussed. Finally, consideration is given to gamma-ray evidence of nuclear reactions in flares and white-light flares

  5. Measurements on a shock wave generated by a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, A.; Dryer, M.

    1982-11-01

    Shock waves generated by intense solar flares may be driven by a large amount of ejected mass, about 5 x 10 to the 16th g, and the total energy involved may be of the order of 10 to the 32nd erg. The shocks may have initial velocities of the order of 2,000 km/s and, in their exodus through the corona, may be accompanied by fast-moving optical transients, the emission of highly characteristic radio signatures and the acceleration of particles to quasi-relativistic velocities. Here, a review is presented of data on a high-velocity shock generated by a flare on 18 August 1979, 1400 UT, and comments are provided on some previously deduced velocities for the shock. Attention is given to a model, based on current computer programs to account for the overall characteristics of the shock as it propagated through the corona and the interplanetary plasma.

  6. Measurements on a shock wave generated by a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, A.; Dryer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Shock waves generated by intense solar flares may be driven by a large amount of ejected mass, about 5 x 10 to the 16th g, and the total energy involved may be of the order of 10 to the 32nd erg. The shocks may have initial velocities of the order of 2,000 km/s and, in their exodus through the corona, may be accompanied by fast-moving optical transients, the emission of highly characteristic radio signatures and the acceleration of particles to quasi-relativistic velocities. Here, a review is presented of data on a high-velocity shock generated by a flare on 18 August 1979, 1400 UT, and comments are provided on some previously deduced velocities for the shock. Attention is given to a model, based on current computer programs to account for the overall characteristics of the shock as it propagated through the corona and the interplanetary plasma.

  7. Optical observations of the fast nova V2491 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Mikolajewski, M.; Ragan, E.; Swierczynski, E.; Wychudzki, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report on optical spectral observations and UBVRI brightness estimations obtained with 60/90 cm Schmidt and 60 cm Cassegrain telescopes of the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland). The nova V2491 Cyg was discovered on Apr. 10.728 UT with about 7.7 mag on unfiltered CCD frames (IAUC#8934). Additionally, the X-ray emission was detected for the prenova several months ago (ATel#1473).

  8. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  9. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  10. Fast gain and phase recovery of semiconductor optical amplifiers based on submonolayer quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Bastian Owschimikow, Nina; Kaptan, Yücel; Kolarczik, Mirco; Switaiski, Thomas; Woggon, Ulrike; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rosales, Ricardo; Strittmatter, André; Bimberg, Dieter; Pohl, Udo W.

    2015-11-16

    Submonolayer quantum dots as active medium in opto-electronic devices promise to combine the high density of states of quantum wells with the fast recovery dynamics of self-assembled quantum dots. We investigate the gain and phase recovery dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier based on InAs submonolayer quantum dots in the regime of linear operation by one- and two-color heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. We find an as fast recovery dynamics as for quantum dot-in-a-well structures, reaching 2 ps at moderate injection currents. The effective quantum well embedding the submonolayer quantum dots acts as a fast and efficient carrier reservoir.

  11. Fast Nonlinear Optical Switch Based on Resonant Vanadium Pentoxide (V2O5) Metasurfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-19

    Fast Nonlinear Optical Switch Based on Resonant Vanadium Pentoxide (V2O5) Metasurfaces Samad Jafar-Zanjani,1, a) Jierong Cheng,1, b) Vladimir...Dated: 19 May 2016) A novel low-profile nonlinear metasurface , consisting of a single-layer of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), is proposed and numerically...investigated by a nonlinear full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The metasurface acts as an ultrafast optical switch, being

  12. Wide-field monitoring strategy for the study of fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Greco, Giuseppe; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  13. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  14. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  15. Fast quantum-optical random-number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Lamoureux, Louis-Philippe; Panajotov, Krassimir; Van den Berghe, Frederik; Thienpont, Hugo

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we study experimentally the properties of three types of quantum -optical random-number generators and characterize them using the available National Institute for Standards and Technology statistical tests, as well as four alternate tests. The generators are characterized by a trade-off between, on one hand, the rate of generation of random bits and, on the other hand, the degree of randomness of the series which they deliver. We describe various techniques aimed at maximizing this rate without diminishing the quality (degree of randomness) of the series generated by it.

  16. Polarimetric Observations of Flare Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Stepanov, A.; Tsap, Yu.

    2017-06-01

    Here we present the results of our long-term observations of flaring stars with MANIA high temporal resolution equipment in polarimetric regime. More than forty flares from UV Ceti, EV Lacertae, Wolf 424 and CN Leo have been observed, and upper limits on its polarization have been derived on the level of about 1%, except for the one unique event — the giant flare of UV Ceti in 2008 with the amplitude of about 3 magnitudes in U-band. Near flare maximum more than a dozen of spike bursts have been discovered with sub-second durations and intrinsic polarizations exceeding 30-40%. We argue that these events are synchrotron emission of electron beams with the energies of several hundred MeV moving in the magnetic field of about 1.4 kG. Emission from such ultrarelativistic (with energies far exceeding 10 MeV) particles is being routinely observed in solar flares, but has never been detected from UV Ceti type stars. This is the first ever detection of linearly polarized optical light from the UV Ceti-type stars which indicates that at least some fraction of the flaring events on these stars are powered by a non-thermal synchrotron emission mechanism.

  17. Coupling from optical fibers to fast silicon modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanovic, Goran; Png, Ching Eng J.; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Reed, Graham T.; Atta, Ragheid M. H.; Ensell, Graham J.; Evans, Alan G. R.

    2003-07-01

    In silicon based photonic circuits, optical modulation is usually performed via the plasma dispersion effect, which is a relatively slow process. Until recently, most reserachers utilized Silicon on Insulator (SOI) waveguides with cross secitonal dimensions of the order of 5 microns. This limits the speed of devices based on the plasma dispersion effect due to the finite transit time of charge carriers. Consequently moving to smaller dimensions will increase device speed, as well as providing other advantages of closer packaging density, smaller bend radius, and cost effective fabrication. As a result, the trend in recent years has been a move to smaller waveguides, of the order of 1 micron in cross sectional dimensions. However, coupling light to such small waveguides is relatively inefficient. In the literature, the problem of coupling optical fibers to thin semiconductor waveguides has not been solved sufficiently well to obtain both high coupling efficiency and good fabrication tolerances, due to large difference between the fiber and the waveguide in both dimensions and refractive indices. In this paper, we discuss both the desing of small waveguide modulators (of the order of ~1 micron) together with a novel theoretical solution to the coupling problem. An example of coupling light to a thin silicon waveguide is given, as well as a discussion of a number of modulator design issues.

  18. Experimental results on time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography with fast-gated SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    We present experimental results of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) and show an increased imaged depth range for a given acquisition time compared to the non gated mode.

  19. A fast, high spatial resolution optical tomographic scanner for measurement of absorption in gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Doom, T; Bhat, M; Rutten, T P; Tran, T; Costanzo, A

    2005-06-01

    A fast tomographic optical density measurement system has been constructed and evaluated for application in Fricke 3D gel dosimetry. Although the potential for full three-dimensional radiation dosimetry with Fricke gel dosimeters has been extensively reported, its application has been limited due to a lack of fast optical density measurement systems. In this work, the emphasis of the design has been to achieve a short scan time through the use of precision optics and minimal moving parts. The system has been demonstrated in the laboratory to be able to achieve better than 1mm resolution and a scanning time per tomographic slice of 2.4 seconds. Full volumetric sampling of a 10 cm diameter by 7cm long cylinder can be achieved in 3 minutes. When applied with a Fricke based gel dosimeter a linear response between reconstructed CT number and absolute dose was better than 3%.

  20. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  1. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  2. An integrated fiber-optic probe combined with support vector regression for fast estimation of optical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2015-06-23

    A fiber-optic probe system was developed to estimate the optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Because of the limitations in numerical calculation of radiative transfer equation (RTE), diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC), support vector regression (SVR) was introduced to model the relationship between diffuse reflectance values and optical properties. The SVR models of four collection fibers were trained by phantoms in calibration set with a wide range of optical properties which represented products of different applications, then the optical properties of phantoms in prediction set were predicted after an optimal searching on SVR models. The results indicated that the SVR model was capable of describing the relationship with little deviation in forward validation. The correlation coefficient (R) of reduced scattering coefficient μ'(s) and absorption coefficient μ(a) in the prediction set were 0.9907 and 0.9980, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of μ'(s) and μ(a) in inverse validation were 0.411 cm(-1) and 0.338 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the integrated fiber-optic probe system combined with SVR model were suitable for fast and accurate estimation of optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance.

  3. Characterization of total flare energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that the estimates of total energy in the prime flares lie well below the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor upper limits. This is consistent with our knowledge of the energy distribution in solar flares. Insufficient data exist for us to be very firm about this conclusion, however, and major energetic components could exist undetected, especially in the EUV-XUV and optical bands. In addition, the radiant energy cannot quantitatively be compared at this time with non-radiant terms because of even larger uncertainties in the latter.

  4. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  5. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems.

  6. Compact, highly sensitive optical gyros and sensors with fast-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. C.; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Fast-light phenomena can enhance the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude, and could be applied to other optical sensors as well. MagiQ Technologies has been developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We will report on our findings, including repeatable fast-light effects in the lab, numerical analysis of noise and stability given realistic optical specs, and methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with current technologies. The technology could benefit inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques, and could allow high grade IMUs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of precision gyros are prohibitive. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, we also believe that our design is appropriate for development without further advances in the state of the art of components.

  7. Tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzhen; Chen, Yuping; Jiang, Haowei; Liu, Yi'an; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated a tunable temporal gap based on simultaneous fast and slow light in electro-optic photonic crystals. The light experiences an anomalous dispersion near the transmission center and a normal dispersion away from the center, where it can be accelerated and slowed down, respectively. We also obtained the switch between fast and slow light by adjusting the external electric filed. The observed largest temporal gap is 541 ps, which is crucial in practical event operation inside the gap. The results offer a new solution for temporal cloak.

  8. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  9. A fast response variable optical attenuator based on blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ge; Wei, Bing-yan; Shi, Liang-yu; Lin, Xiao-wen; Hu, Wei; Huang, Zhang-di; Lu, Yan-qing

    2013-03-11

    Blue phase liquid crystals (BPLCs) are promising candidates for next generation display thanks to their fast response and quasi-isotropic optical properties. By taking these advantages, we propose to introduce the material into fiber-optic applications. As an example, a BPLC based variable optical attenuator (VOA) is demonstrated with a polarization independent design. The device shows normally-off feature when no field is applied. Response time down to submillisecond scale is achieved in switching between two arbitrary attenuation states. The attenuation range is also measured from 1480 to 1550 nm, which cover the whole telecomm S-band and part of the C-band. The overall performances reach the requirements for practical use; while still have room for further improvement. Through this example, the applicability of BPLC in fiber-optic devices is presented, which may impel the development of many other photonic applications from infrared to even microwave regions.

  10. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  11. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Observation of a Sub-A Class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.; Hudson, Hugh; Grefenstette, Brian W.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.

    2017-08-01

    We report a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of a solar microflare, SOL2015-09-01T04. Although it was too faint to be observed by the GOES X-ray Sensor, we estimate the event to be an A0.1 class flare in brightness. This microflare, with only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flare in the existing literature. The microflare occurred during a solar pointing by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical observatory, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed HXR microflare spectra and images. The microflare exhibits HXR properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, earlier peak time with higher energy, spatial dimensions similar to the RHESSI microflares, and a high-energy excess beyond an isothermal spectral component during the impulsive phase. The microflare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical size; observations are consistent with an origin via the interaction of at least two magnetic loops. We estimate the increase in thermal energy at the time of the microflare to be 2.4 × 1027 erg. The observation suggests that flares do indeed scale down to extremely small energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flare-like” properties.

  12. Research on the planarizaion of the large optic wafer in the fast polishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Lin, Jing; Guo, YinBiao

    2010-10-01

    This paper researches on the planarization of the large optic wafer in the fast polishing process (FPP). In the FPP, the MRR (material removal rate) of the large optic wafer can reach 5~10 um/h. However, the planarization of the wafer is still a problem. Thus, this paper uses the revised skin model to analyze the non-uniform pressure distribution which results in the non-planarization of the wafer. At last, some experiments are done to see which parameter can be chosen to avoid the non-uniform pressure distribution and get the good wafer planarization.

  13. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  14. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  15. RAPID, a revolutionary fast optical to NIR camera applied to interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Feautrier, P.; Zins, G.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Stadler, E.; Kern, P.; Rothman, J.; Tauvy, M.; Coussement, J.; de Borniol, E.; Gach, J.-L.; Jacquard, M.; Moulin, T.; Rochat, S.; Delboulb, A.; Derelle, S.; Robert, C.; Vuillermet, M.; Mérand, A.; Bourget, P.

    2014-07-01

    The RAPID camera is an Avalanche Photo Diode array allowing very fast observation from the optical to the infrared with still a low noise per read. The camera born from a large collaboration within the FUI/FOCUS is intensively tested at IPAG (Grenoble) on an interferometric bench and will soon replace the actual camera of the PIONIER interferometer mounted on the visitor focus of the VLTi. We shortly present here the PIONIER instrument design and success to then focus on the RAPID tested performances. We will then resume the performance tests made on sky with the PIONIER. The RAPID camera is the first IR APD matrix ever mounted on an on-sky astronomical instrument. We show here how this fast, low-noise, large-band and sensitive camera improves PIONIER and the optical interferometry in general.

  16. Fiber-Optic Array Scanning Technology (FAST) for Detection and Molecular Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) as an important component in "liquid biopsy" holds crucial clinical relevance in cancer prognosis, treatment efficiency evaluation, prediction and potentially early detection. Here, we present a Fiber-optic Array Scanning Technology (FAST) that enables antigen-agnostic, size-agnostic detection of CTC. By immunofluorescence staining detection of a combination of a panel of markers, FAST technology can be applied to detect rare CTC in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) setting with high sensitivity and specificity. In combination with Automated Digital Microscopy (ADM) platform, companion markers on CTC such as Vimentin and Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) can also be analyzed to further characterize these CTCs. FAST data output is also compatible with downstream single cell picking platforms. Single cell can be isolated post ADM confirmation and used for "actionable" genetic mutations analysis.

  17. ADAHELI: exploring the fast, dynamic Sun in the x-ray, optical, and near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Soffitta, Paolo; Velli, Marco; Sabatini, Paolo; Bigazzi, Alberto; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bellot Rubio, Luis Ramon; Brez, Alessandro; Carbone, Vincenzo; Cauzzi, Gianna; Cavallini, Fabio; Consolini, Giuseppe; Curti, Fabio; Del Moro, Dario; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Ermolli, Ilaria; Fabiani, Sergio; Faurobert, Marianne; Feller, Alex; Galsgaard, Klaus; Gburek, Szymon; Giannattasio, Fabio; Giovannelli, Luca; Hirzberger, Johann; Jefferies, Stuart M.; Madjarska, Maria S.; Manni, Fabio; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Muleri, Fabio; Penza, Valentina; Peres, Giovanni; Piazzesi, Roberto; Pieralli, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Ermanno; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Pinchera, Michele; Reale, Fabio; Romano, Paolo; Romoli, Andrea; Romoli, Marco; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Sandri, Paolo; Scardigli, Stefano; Spandre, Gloria; Solanki, Sami K.; Stangalini, Marco; Vecchio, Antonio; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Advanced Astronomy for Heliophysics Plus (ADAHELI) is a project concept for a small solar and space weather mission with a budget compatible with an European Space Agency (ESA) S-class mission, including launch, and a fast development cycle. ADAHELI was submitted to the European Space Agency by a European-wide consortium of solar physics research institutes in response to the "Call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017," of March 9, 2012. The ADAHELI project builds on the heritage of the former ADAHELI mission, which had successfully completed its phase-A study under the Italian Space Agency 2007 Small Mission Programme, thus proving the soundness and feasibility of its innovative low-budget design. ADAHELI is a solar space mission with two main instruments: ISODY: an imager, based on Fabry-Pérot interferometers, whose design is optimized to the acquisition of highest cadence, long-duration, multiline spectropolarimetric images in the visible/near-infrared region of the solar spectrum. XSPO: an x-ray polarimeter for solar flares in x-rays with energies in the 15 to 35 keV range. ADAHELI is capable of performing observations that cannot be addressed by other currently planned solar space missions, due to their limited telemetry, or by ground-based facilities, due to the problematic effect of the terrestrial atmosphere.

  18. Optical and X-ray radiation from fast pulsars - Effects of duty cycle and spectral shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacini, F.; Salvati, M.

    1987-01-01

    The optical luminosity of PSR 0540 is considerably stronger than what one would have predicted in a simple model developed earlier where the pulses are synchrotron radiation by secondary electrons near the light cylinder. This discrepancy can be eliminated if one incorporates into the model the effects of the large duty cycle and the spectral properties of PSR 0540. It is also shown that the same model can provide a reasonable fit to the observed X-ray fluxes from fast pulsars.

  19. Slow and fast dynamics of gain and phase in a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Koos, C; Bonk, R; Freude, W; Laemmlin, M; Meuer, C; Bimberg, D; Leuthold, J

    2008-01-07

    Gain and phase dynamics in InAs/GaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers are investigated. It is shown that gain recovery is dominated by fast processes, whereas phase recovery is dominated by slow processes. Relative strengths and time constants of the underlying processes are measured. We find that operation at high bias currents optimizes the performance for nonlinear cross-gain signal processing if a low chirp is required.

  20. Manufacturability and optical functionality of multimode optical interconnections developed with fast processable and reliable polymer waveguide silicones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Joe; Lee, Allen; Hu, Mike; Chan, Lisa; Huang, Sean; Swatowski, Brandon W.; Weidner, W. Ken; Han, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We report on the manufacturing, reliability, and optical functionality of multimode optical waveguide devices developed with a fast processable optical grade silicone. The materials show proven optical losses of <0.05 dB/cm @ 850 nm, surviving >2000 hours 85°C/85% relative humidity testing as well as >4 cycles of wave solder reflow. Fabrication speeds of <10 minutes are shown for a full waveguide stack. Step index 50×50 μm waveguides were fabricated and passively MT connectorized on rigid FR4 and flexible polyimide substrates with precise alignment features (cut by dicing saw or ablated by UV laser). Two out-of-plane coupling techniques were demonstrated in this paper, a MT connectorized sample with a 45° turning lens as well as 45° dielectric mirrors on waveguides by dicing saw. Multiple connections between fiber and polymer waveguides with MPO and two out-of-plane coupling techniques in a complete optical link are demonstrated @ 10 Gbps data rates with commercial transceiver modules. Also, complex waveguide geometries such as turnings and crossings are demonstrated by QSFP+ transceiver. The eye diagram analyses show comparable results in functionality between silicone waveguide and fiber formats.

  1. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  2. Flares and MHD Jets in Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    We present a magnetic reconnection model for hard X-ray emission and flare-like hard X-ray variabilities associated with protostars detected by ASCA. The energy released by protostellar flares is 102 - 105 times larger than solar flares. Moreover, the spectrum is harder. A new ingredient in protostellar flare is the existence of a protostellar disk which can twist the magnetic fields threading the protostellar disk. We carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. Hot, outgoing plasmoid and post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011-1012cm), the total energy of X-ray flares (~1035-36erg). Furthermore, along the opening magnetic loops, hot jet is ejected in bipolar directions with speed 200-400 km/s. The speed and mass flow rate of the jet is consistent with those of optical jets. Our model can explain both the X-ray flare-like variability and mass outflow in star forming region.

  3. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  4. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-02

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  5. Causal information velocity in fast and slow pulse propagation in an optical ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Makoto; Uesugi, Hiroyuki; Sultana, Parvin; Oishi, Tohru

    2011-10-15

    We examined the propagation of nonanalytical points encoded on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast and slow light in an optical ring resonator at {lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m. The temporal peak of the Gaussian pulse was either advanced or delayed, reflecting anomalous or normal dispersions in the ring resonator, relevant to under- or overcoupling conditions, respectively. The nonanalytical points were neither advanced nor delayed but appeared as they entered the ring resonator. The nonanalytical points could be interpreted as information; therefore, the experimental results suggested that information velocity is equal to the light velocity in vacuum or the background medium, independent of the group velocity. The transient behaviors at the leading and trailing edges of the nonanalytical points are discussed in terms of optical precursors.

  6. Relative humidity multi-point optical sensors system based on fast Fourier multiplexing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Lopez-Torres, D.; Elosua, C.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.; Arregui, F. J.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a new multipoint optical fiber system for relative humidity measurements based on SnO2-FP (Fabry-Pérot) sensing heads and an optical interrogator as single active device is presented and characterized. The interrogation of the sensing heads is carried out by monitoring the Fast Fourier Transform phase variations of the FP (Fabry-Pérot) interference frequencies. This method allows to multiplex several sensors with different wavelength spacing interference pattern. The sensors operate within a wide humidity range (20%-90% relative humidity) with low crosstalk between them. Five sensing heads have been measured using two different channels of the optical interrogator. The availability of four channels in the interrogator allows to multiplex a higher number of sensors, reducing proportionally the cost of each sensing point.

  7. Automatic Detection of the Optic Disc of the Retina: A Fast Method

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, M.; Rabbani, H.; Amini, Z.; Kafieh, R.; Ommani, A.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing the optic disc (OD) in retinal fundus images is of critical importance and many techniques have been developed for OD detection. In this paper, we present the results obtained from two fast methods, correlation and least square, to approximate the location of optic cup. These methods are simple and are not complex, while most of the OD detection algorithms are. The methods were tested on two groups of data (a total of 100 color fundus images) and were 98% successful in the detection of the optic cup. An algorithm using the vessel mask of fundus images is proposed to be run after correlation to ensure that the localization of OD in all images is successful. It was tested on 40 of the test images and had a 100% rate of success. PMID:27014613

  8. Demonstration of 720×720 optical fast circuit switch for intra-datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Koh; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kiyo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Namiki, Shu; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Intra-datacenter traffic is growing more than 20% a year. In typical datacenters, many racks/pods including servers are interconnected via multi-tier electrical switches. The electrical switches necessitate power-consuming optical-to- electrical (OE) and electrical-to-optical (EO) conversion, the power consumption of which increases with traffic. To overcome this problem, optical switches that eliminate costly OE and EO conversion and enable low power consumption switching are being investigated. There are two major requirements for the optical switch. First, it must have a high port count to construct reduced tier intra-datacenter networks. Second, switching speed must be short enough that most of the traffic load can be offloaded from electrical switches. Among various optical switches, we focus on those based on arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWGs), since the AWG is a passive device with minimal power consumption. We previously proposed a high-port-count optical switch architecture that utilizes tunable lasers, route-and-combine switches, and wavelength-routing switches comprised of couplers, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), and AWGs. We employed conventional external cavity lasers whose wavelength-tuning speed was slower than 100 ms. In this paper, we demonstrate a large-scale optical switch that offers fast wavelength routing. We construct a 720×720 optical switch using recently developed lasers whose wavelength-tuning period is below 460 μs. We evaluate the switching time via bit-error-ratio measurements and achieve 470-μs switching time (includes 10-μs guard time to handle EDFA surge). To best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a large-scale optical switch with practical switching time.

  9. Measuring fast optical depth variations in cloud edges with a CCD-array spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Josep-Abel; Calbó, Josep; Sanchez-Romero, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    High frequency measurements of direct solar flux have been performed with a CCD spectrometer in six narrowband channels along the visible range. Measurements were performed in 1-sec intervals for conditions ranging from clear sky to scattered-to-broken cloud fields. The comparison between close time measurements allows obtaining information on the fast changes in optical depth associated to the pass of clouds or other changes in atmospheric conditions and constituents. The method used does not depend on the absolute calibration of the instrument, and minimizes the effects of changes in instrumental conditions (as temperature) and in air mass. The variations in optical depth in the sight direction can be associated to cloud and/or aerosol optical depth, provided that other atmospheric constituents, as ozone, remain constant. The aerosol exponent is used to characterize the spectral dependence of the changes in optical depth and for describing the evolution of the conglomerate of particles (either cloud droplets or aerosol particles) along the measurement periods. We found that rates in optical depth variations above 0.1/sec have to be attributed to sunlight occultation by cloud edges, as the spectral exponent drops to values near zero or even slightly negative. Variations in optical depth at rates below 0.01/sec are mainly related to aerosol effects.

  10. Commissioning optically stimulated luminescence in vivo dosimeters for fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lori A. Sandison, George; Yang, Fei; Woodworth, Davis; McCormick, Zephyr

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Clinical in vivo dosimeters intended for use with photon and electron therapies have not been utilized for fast neutron therapy because they are highly susceptible to neutron damage. The objective of this work was to determine if a commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in vivo dosimetry system could be adapted for use in fast neutron therapy. Methods: A 50.5 MeV fast neutron beam generated by a clinical neutron therapy cyclotron was used to irradiate carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) optically simulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in a solid water phantom under standard calibration conditions, 150 cm SAD, 1.7 cm depth, and 10.3 × 10.0 cm field size. OSLD fading and electron trap depletion studies were performed with the OSLDs irradiated with 20 and 50 cGy and monitored over a 24-h period to determine the optimal time for reading the dosimeters during calibration. Four OSLDs per group were calibrated over a clinical dose range of 0–150 cGy. Results: OSLD measurement uncertainties were lowered to within ±2%–3% of the expected dose by minimizing the effect of transient fading that occurs with neutron irradiation and maintaining individual calibration factors for each dosimeter. Dose dependent luminescence fading extended beyond the manufacturer’s recommended 10 min period for irradiation with photon or electron beams. To minimize OSL variances caused by inconsistent fading among dosimeters, the observed optimal time for reading the OSLDs postirradiation was between 30 and 90 min. No field size, wedge factor, or gantry angle dependencies were observed in the OSLDs irradiated by the studied fast neutron beam. Conclusions: Measurements demonstrated that uncertainties less than ±3% were attainable in OSLDs irradiated with fast neutrons under clinical conditions. Accuracy and precision comparable to clinical OSL measurements observed with photons can be achieved by maintaining individual OSLD calibration factors and

  11. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  12. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  13. Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkholm, John E.; Stearns, Daniel G.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-11-09

    A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

  14. COPD flare-ups

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and signs of a COPD flare-up. Warning Signs of COPD Flare-up Signs of a ... 21810710 . Vestbo J, Hurd SS, Agusti AG, et al. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Global ...

  15. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  16. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Bradley, D A; Saripan, M I; Ramli, A T; Wagiran, H

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of doped SiO(2) optical fibres subjected to (241)AmBe neutron irradiation. The TL materials, which comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres, were exposed in close contact with the (241)AmBe source to obtain fast neutron interactions through use of measurements obtained with and without a Cd filter (the filter being made to entirely enclose the fibres). The neutron irradiations were performed for exposure times of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5- and 7-days in a neutron tank filled with water. In this study, use was also made of the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 5 (V5) to simulate the neutron irradiations experiment. It was found that the commercially available Ge-doped and Al-doped optical fibres show a linear dose response subjected to fast neutrons from (241)AmBe source up to seven days of irradiations. The simulation performed using MCNP5 also exhibits a similar pattern, albeit differing in sensitivity. The TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre, the total absorption cross section for Ge in both the fast and thermal neutrons region being some ten times greater than that of Al.

  17. Fast silicon photomultiplier improves signal harvesting and reduces complexity in time-domain diffuse optics.

    PubMed

    Mora, Alberto Dalla; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Contini, Davide; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Durduran, Turgut; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Farina, Andrea; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    We present a proof of concept prototype of a time-domain diffuse optics probe exploiting a fast Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM), featuring a timing resolution better than 80 ps, a fast tail with just 90 ps decay time-constant and a wide active area of 1 mm2. The detector is hosted into the probe and used in direct contact with the sample under investigation, thus providing high harvesting efficiency by exploiting the whole SiPM numerical aperture and also reducing complexity by avoiding the use of cumbersome fiber bundles. Our tests also demonstrate high accuracy and linearity in retrieving the optical properties and suitable contrast and depth sensitivity for detecting localized inhomogeneities. In addition to a strong improvement in both instrumentation cost and size with respect to legacy solutions, the setup performances are comparable to those of state-of-the-art time-domain instrumentation, thus opening a new way to compact, low-cost and high-performance time-resolved devices for diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy.

  18. Development of a robust and fast calibration procedure for diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Vavadi, Hamed; Zhu, Quing

    2015-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography has demonstrated great potential in the initial diagnosis of tumor and the assessment of tumor vasculature response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A fast and robust data processing is critical to move this technique from lab research to bench-side application. Our lab developed frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography system for clinical applications. So far, we still collect data at hospital and do the data processing off-line. In this paper, a robust calibration procedure and fast processing program were developed to overcome this limitation. Because each detection channel had its own electronic delay, the calibration procedure measured amplitude linearity and phase linearity of each channel, and formed a look-up table. The experimental measurements were corrected by the table and the fitting accuracy improved by 45.8%. To further improve the processing speed, the data collection and processing program were converted to C++ from matlab program. The overall processing speed was improved by two times. We expect the new processing program can move diffuse optical tomography one step close to bench-side clinical applications.

  19. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Fast detection of the optic disc and fovea in color fundus photographs.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoff, Michael D; van Ginneken, Bram

    2009-12-01

    A fully automated, fast method to detect the fovea and the optic disc in digital color photographs of the retina is presented. The method makes few assumptions about the location of both structures in the image. We define the problem of localizing structures in a retinal image as a regression problem. A kNN regressor is utilized to predict the distance in pixels in the image to the object of interest at any given location in the image based on a set of features measured at that location. The method combines cues measured directly in the image with cues derived from a segmentation of the retinal vasculature. A distance prediction is made for a limited number of image locations and the point with the lowest predicted distance to the optic disc is selected as the optic disc center. Based on this location the search area for the fovea is defined. The location with the lowest predicted distance to the fovea within the foveal search area is selected as the fovea location. The method is trained with 500 images for which the optic disc and fovea locations are known. An extensive evaluation was done on 500 images from a diabetic retinopathy screening program and 100 specially selected images containing gross abnormalities. The method found the optic disc in 99.4% and the fovea in 96.8% of regular screening images and for the images with abnormalities these numbers were 93.0% and 89.0% respectively.

  1. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  2. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  3. Fast Switches for Optical Communication Utilizing Optical Kerr or Ellipse Rotation Effect.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    LaMacchia, "Optically Induced Refractive Index Changes in BaTiO , .I. Appl. Phys. 41, 5188 (170). SIONTII’ \\’ 1I ’: NliOBATV’ SUN) AND BARIUM SODIUM NIOBAT ...D.L. Staebler, and A.W. Stephens, "Holographic Storage in Doped Barium Sodium Niobate (BaNaNh () )," Appl. Phys. Lett. 18, 307 1971). .. V. ui K.D...POTASSIUM TAINTALATE NIOBATE (KTN) 1. F.S. Chen, "A Laser-Induced lnhomogeneity of Refractive Indices in KTN," J. Appl. Phys. 38, 3418 (1967). 2. D. von

  4. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  5. Flares on the sun - Selected results from SMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    At present, a point has been reached at which significant progress has been made regarding an understanding of the flare problem. The current investigation is concerned with a review of the advances being made with the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) data set on solar flares, taking into account the help which the obtained information can provide with respect to an interpretation of the flare star behavior. The physical parameters which can be readily deduced from the observations are indicated. Attention is given to fast hard X-ray time variations on March 22, 1981, and the investigation of the multithermal nature of the coronal plasma throughout flares.

  6. LYRA OBSERVATIONS OF TWO OSCILLATION MODES IN A SINGLE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Van Doorsselaere, T.; Goossens, M.; De Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.

    2011-10-20

    We analyze light curves from the LYRA irradiance experiment on board PROBA2 during the flare of 2010 February 8. We see both long- and short-period oscillations during the flare. The long-period oscillation is interpreted in terms of standing slow sausage modes; the short-period oscillation is thought to be a standing fast sausage mode. The simultaneous presence of two oscillation modes in the same flaring structure allows for new coronal seismological applications. The periods are used to find seismological estimates of the plasma-{beta} and the density contrast of the flaring loop. Also the wave mode number is estimated from the observed periods.

  7. Fast optical sectioning obtained by structured illumination microscopy using a digital mirror device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongli; Jiang, Tao; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Feng, Zhao; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput optical imaging is critical to obtain large-scale neural connectivity information of brain in neuroscience. Using a digital mirror device and a scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, we report a significant speed improvement of structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which produces a maximum SIM net frame rate of 133 Hz. We perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of mouse brain slices at diffraction-limited resolution and demonstrate the fast 3-D imaging capability to a large sample with an imaging rate of 6.9×10(7)  pixel/s of our system, an order of magnitude faster than previously reported.

  8. Cost-effective method for fast Brillouin optical time-domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Minardo, Aldo; Catalano, Ester; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-10-31

    A new Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) technique for acquiring the full Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) at high speed is proposed and demonstrated. The method employs a frequency swept microwave source for the generation of the probe wave, so that the entire BOTDA measurement is taken within the duration of the frequency sweep itself. By properly setting the duration of the sweep, the repetition rate of the pump pulses and the number of averages, truly distributed and dynamic measurements of the BGS are possible using a set-up at a fraction of the cost and complexity of the previously reported fast-BOTDA methods.

  9. Single shot, temporally and spatially resolved measurements of fast electron dynamics using a chirped optical probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Murphy, C. D.; Booth, N.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2014-03-01

    A new approach to rear surface optical probing is presented that permits multiple, time-resolved 2D measurements to be made during a single, ultra-intense ( > 1018 W cm-2) laser-plasma interaction. The diagnostic is capable of resolving rapid changes in target reflectivity which can be used to infer valuable information on fast electron transport and plasma formation at the target rear surface. Initial results from the Astra-Gemini laser are presented, with rapid radial sheath expansion together with detailed filamentary features being observed to evolve during single shots.

  10. Fast Wavefront Reconstruction in Large Adaptive Optics Systems Using the Fourier Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L; Gravel, D T; Brase, J M

    2002-01-13

    Wavefront Reconstruction using the Fast Fourier Transform and spatial filtering is shown to be computationally tractable and sufficiently accurate for use in large Shack Hartmann-based adaptive optics systems (up to at least 10,000 actuators). This method is significantly faster and can have lower noise propagation than traditional VMM reconstructors. The boundary problem which prevented the accurate reconstruction of phase in circular apertures using square-grid FTs is identified and solved. The methods are adapted for use on the Fried-geometry. Detailed performance analysis of mean squared error and noise propagation for FT methods is presented, using both theory and simulation.

  11. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  12. Immunobiosensor for fast detection of bacteria in water using plastic optical fiber (POF) bended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Domingos M. C.; Lopes, Rafaela N.; Queiroz, Vanessa M.; Allil, Regina C. S. B.; Werneck, Marcelo M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an immunobiosensor of fast response time to detection of bacteria, made by Plastic Optical Fiber. Probes were tested in U-shaped and Meander-shaped to investigate the best sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability. During calibration was used for sucrose solutions refractive index (RI) from 1.33 to 1.39. This is equivalent to IR range of the water and the highest concentration of bacteria, respectively. Immunobiosensor was able to detecting the presence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in water from suspensions of different concentrations of 106 and 104 colonies forming units per millilitre (CFU/mL) in twenty minutes.

  13. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  14. Self-Balancing, Optical-Center-Pivot, Fast-Steering Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D.; Carson, Johnathan W.

    2011-01-01

    A complete, self-contained fast-steering- mirror (FSM) mechanism is reported consisting of a housing, a mirror and mirror-mounting cell, three PZT (piezoelectric) actuators, and a counterbalance mass. Basically, it is a comparatively stiff, two-axis (tip-tilt), self-balanced FSM. The present invention requires only three (or three pairs for flight redundancy) actuators. If a PZT actuator degrades, the inherent balance remains, and compensation for degraded stroke is made by simply increasing the voltage to the PZT. Prior designs typically do not pivot at the mirror optical center, creating unacceptable beam shear.

  15. Fast optical sectioning obtained by structured illumination microscopy using a digital mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Jiang, Tao; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Feng, Zhao; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput optical imaging is critical to obtain large-scale neural connectivity information of brain in neuroscience. Using a digital mirror device and a scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, we report a significant speed improvement of structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which produces a maximum SIM net frame rate of 133 Hz. We perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of mouse brain slices at diffraction-limited resolution and demonstrate the fast 3-D imaging capability to a large sample with an imaging rate of 6.9 pixel/s of our system, an order of magnitude faster than previously reported.

  16. Flares, wind and nebulae: the 2015 December mini-outburst of V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Darias, T.; Casares, J.; Mata Sánchez, D.; Fender, R. P.; Armas Padilla, M.; Mooley, K.; Hardy, L.; Charles, P. A.; Ponti, G.; Motta, S. E.; Dhillon, V. S.; Gandhi, P.; Jiménez-Ibarra, F.; Butterley, T.; Carey, S.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Hickish, J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Perrott, Y. C.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Scott, P. F.; Titterington, D. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    After more than 26 years in quiescence, the black hole transient V404 Cyg went into a luminous outburst in 2015 June, and additional activity was detected in late December of the same year. Here, we present an optical spectroscopic follow-up of the December mini-outburst, together with X-ray, optical and radio monitoring that spanned more than a month. Strong flares with gradually increasing intensity are detected in the three spectral ranges during the ˜10 d following the Swift trigger. Our optical spectra reveal the presence of a fast outflowing wind, as implied by the detection of a P-Cyg profile (He I-5876 Å) with a terminal velocity of ˜2500 km s-1 . Nebular-like spectra - with an Hα equivalent width of ˜500 Å - are also observed. All these features are similar to those seen during the main 2015 June outburst. Thus, the fast optical wind simultaneous with the radio jet is most likely present in every V404 Cyg outburst. Finally, we report on the detection of a strong radio flare in late 2016 January, when X-ray and optical monitoring had stopped due to Sun constraints.

  17. More Diagnosis of Solar Flare Probability from Chromosphere Image Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-28

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2012-0194 TR-2012-0194 MORE DIAGNOSIS OF SOLAR FLARE PROBABILITY FROM CHROMOSPHERE IMAGE...1 Oct 2011 to 07 Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Diagnosis of Solar Flare Probability from Chromosphere Image Sequences 5a...We continued our investigation of the utility of optical observations of the solar chromosphere in the diagnosis of flare probability. Because we felt

  18. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Gardelein, A; Anzolin, G; Amaya, W; Capmany, J; Ursin, R; Peñate, L; Lopez, D; San Juan, J L; Carrasco, J A; Garcia, F; Torcal-Milla, F J; Sanchez-Brea, L M; Bernabeu, E; Perdigues, J M; Jennewein, T; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-02-28

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as 1.14×10⁻² while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication.

  19. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre, M.; Gardelein, A.; Anzolin, G.; Amaya, W.; Campmany, J.; Ursin, R.; Penate, L.; Lopez, D.; San Juan, J. L.; Carrasco, J. A.; Garcia, F.; Torcal-Milla, F. J.; Sanchez-Brea, L. M.; Bernabeu, E.; Perdigues, J. M.; Jennewein, T.; Torres, J. P.; Mitchell, M. W.; Pruneri, V.

    2011-02-01

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as $1.14\\times 10^{-2}$ while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication.

  20. A search for fast-moving features in the optical remnant of 3C 58

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Red-sensitive plates of the optical remnant of 3C 58 (G130.7 + 3.1), obtained at the prime-focus of the Hale 5 m telescope in 1977 and 1989, have been used to search for rapidly expanding knots of nebular emission. No such nebulosity was found. If the optical nebula represent the expanding shell of a supernova, then its age must be a few thousand years. A more likely alternative is that the nebulosity that is presently visible (which is significantly enriched in nitrogen) represents quasi-stationary circumstellar material that was excited and compressed by passage of the fast-moving shell of a supernova that exploded about 800 years ago. 7 refs.

  1. Fast Restoration Based on Alternative Wavelength Paths in a Wide Area Optical IP Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, Francesco; Rea, Luca; Venezia, Matteo; Capanna, Lorenzo; Del Prete, Giuseppe

    In this article we describe an experimental investigation of IP network restoration based on wavelength recovery. We propose a procedure for metro and wide area gigabit Ethernet networks that allows us to route the wavelength in case of link failure to another existing link by exploiting wavelength division multiplexing in the fiber. Such a procedure is obtained by means of an optical switch that is managed by a loss-of-light signal that is generated by a router in case of link failure. Such a method has been tested in an IP network consisting of three core routers with optical gigabit Ethernet interfaces connected by means of 50-km-long single-mode fibers between Rome and Pomezia. Compared with other conventional restoration techniques, such as OSPF and MPLS, our method -in very fast (20 ms) and is compatible with real-time TV services and low-cost chips.

  2. Large-aperture quantum well shutters for fast retroreflected optical data links in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Rabinovich, William S.; Mahon, Rita; Corson, Michael R.; Stell, Mena F.; Katzer, D. Scott; Ikossi-Anastasiou, Kiki; Meehan, Timothy J.; Kline, John F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports progress on the development of a fast modulating retroreflector for a free space optical data link. A previous publication reported sustaining video over a 17 meter link using a multiple quantum well shutter with a diameter of 0.5 cm at a rate on the order of 0.5 Mbps, limited by the demonstration electronics. This work describes improvements in the device performance, which is on the order of 4 Mbps to 6 Mbps with a Bit Error Rates of 10-6 over a robust optical link. This device lends itself to an array configuration for long range applications and will clearly support T1 rates of 1.54 Mbps, and higher.

  3. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  4. Chromospheric Condensation and Quasi-periodic Pulsations in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C3.1 circular-ribbon flare SOL2015-10-16T10:20 in active region (AR) 12434. The flare consisted of a circular flare ribbon (CFR), an inner flare ribbon (IFR) inside it, and a pair of short parallel flare ribbons (PFRs). The PFRs located to the north of the IFR were most striking in the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) 1400 and 2796 Å images. For the first time, we observed the circular-ribbon flare in the Ca ii H line of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, which has a similar shape as observed in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO show that the flare is associated with positive polarities with a negative polarity inside. The IFR and CFR were cospatial with the negative polarity and positive polarities, implying the existence of a magnetic null point ({\\boldsymbol{B}}=0) and a dome-like spine-fan topology. During the impulsive phase of the flare, “two-step” raster observations of IRIS with a cadence of 6 s and an exposure time of 2 s showed plasma downflow at the CFR in the Si iv λ1402.77 line ({log}T≈ 4.8), suggesting chromospheric condensation. The downflow speeds first increased rapidly from a few km s-1 to the peak values of 45-52 km s-1, before decreasing gradually to the initial levels. The decay timescales of condensation were 3-4 minutes, indicating ongoing magnetic reconnection. Interestingly, the downflow speeds are positively correlated with the logarithm of the Si iv line intensity and time derivative of the GOES soft X-ray (SXR) flux in 1-8 Å. The radio dynamic spectra are characterized by a type III radio burst associated with the flare, which implies that the chromospheric condensation was most probably driven by nonthermal electrons. Using an analytical expression and the peak Doppler velocity, we derive the

  5. SCRAM: a fast computational model for the optical performance of point fucus solar central receiver systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, K. D.; Chiang, C. J.

    1980-04-01

    Because of the complexities of heliostat shadowing and blocking calculations, computational models for the optical performance of point focus central receiver (PFCR) systems tend to be too slow for many important applications, such as optimization studies based on performance with realistic weather data. In this paper, a mathematical approximation procedure, designated Sandia Central Receiver Approximation Model (SCRAM) will be described. Rather than simulating the system components from first principles, it relies on data generated by the DELSOL code of Dellin and Fish for the optical performance of PFCR systems, and abstracts a mathematical model using a stepwise regression procedure. The result is a computational procedure which allows the user to define the heliostat field boundaries and tower height arbitrarily, generating a model for optical field performance, including shadowing, blocking, cosine, losses, and atmospheric attenuation, and which requires only a polynomial evaluation for each set of sun angles. A comparison with DELSOL for three different fields on three representative days indicates that the rms error of the approximation is 1-3% and that the new code is 1,000-3,000 times as fast as DELSOL. It is also shown that one reason that the accuracy in field performance predictions is higher than that of the generting function for the model is that much of the error in the generating function is due to an oscillatory behavior associated with a moire pattern in the optical response of the heiostat field.

  6. Fast-response optical and near-infrared GRB science with RATIR and RIMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John; RIMAS Collaboration, RATIR project Team

    2016-01-01

    As the Universe's most luminous transient events, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are observed at cosmological distances. The afterglow emission generated by the burst's interaction with the surrounding medium presents the opportunity to study the local environment, as well as intervening systems. The transient nature of these events requires observations starting within minutes of the GRB to maximize the scientific opportunities.This dissertation work comprises efforts to advance the field with a new instrument, the Rapid Infrared Imager and Spectrograph (RIMAS). The optical design is complicated by the broad band coverage (0.97 to 2.39 microns) and the necessity of transmissive optics due to space and weight limitations on the telescope. Additionally, the entire optical system must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to decrease the background from thermal emission. The completed instrument will be permanently installed on Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) located in Happy Jack, Arizona. The fast slew time of the telescope, combined with the instrument's ability to image in two bands simultaneously and switch to spectroscopic configurations in under a minute will allow observers to obtain photometric data within minutes and spectra within ~ ten minutes.In addition to instrumentation work on RIMAS's optics, early time photometric light curves have been studied primarily using data from the Reionization and Transients Infrared/Optical Project (RATIR). Early time photometric data in six optical and near-infrared (NIR) bands has allowed a study of color evolution in the early to late time SEDs. This study probes possible impacts of the GRB on the local medium as well as intrinsic changes in the afterglow emission.This work is made possible by the RATIR and RIMAS collaborations as well as financial support by the NSF.

  7. The chromosphere and transition region. [during solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Brown, J. C.; Craig, I. J. D.; Brueckner, G. E.; Cook, J. W.; Doschek, G. A.; Emslie, A. G.; Machado, M. E.; Henoux, J.-C.; Lites, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes occurring as a result of the transfer of energy and momentum from the primary solar flare energy release site in the corona to the underlying chromosphere and transition region during the course of the flare are investigated through a comparison of theoretical models and observational data. Static, dynamic and hydrodynamic models of the lower-temperature chromospheric flare are reviewed. The roles of thermal conduction, radiation, fast particles and mass motion in chromosphere-corona interactions are analyzed on the basis of Skylab UV, EUV and X-ray data, and empirical and synthetic models of the chromospheric and upper photospheric responses to flares are developed. The canonical model of chromospheric heating during flares as a result of primary energy release elsewhere is found to be justified in the chromosphere as a whole, although not entirely as the temperature minimum, and a simplified model of horizontal chromospheric flare structure based on results obtained is presented.

  8. Looking for Speed!! Go Optical Ultra-Fast Photonic Logic Gates for the Future Optical Communication and Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we developed two ultra-fast all-optical switches in the nanosecond and picosecond regimes. The picosecond switch is made of a polydiacetylene thin film coated on the interior wall of a hollow capillary of approximately 50 micron diameter by a photo-polymerization process. In the setup a picosecond Nd:YAG laser at 10 Hz and at 532 nm with a pulse duration of approximately 40 ps was sent collinearly along a cw He-Ne laser beam and both were waveguided through the hollow capillary. The setup functioned as an Exclusive OR gate. On the other hand, the material used in the nanosecond switch is a phthalocyanine thin film, deposited on a glass substrate by a vapor deposition technique. In the setup a nanosecond, 10 Hz, Nd:YAG laser of 8 ns pulse duration was sent collinearly along a cw He-Ne laser beam and both were wave-guided through the phthalocyanine thin film. The setup in this case functioned as an all-optical AND logic gate. The characteristic table of the ExOR gate in polydiacetylene film was attributed to an excited state absorption process, while that of the AND gate was attributed to a saturation process of the first excited state. Both mechanisms were thoroughly investigated theoretically and found to agree remarkably well with the experimental results. An all-optical inverter gate has been designed but has not yet been demonstrated. The combination of all these three gates form the foundation for building all the necessary gates needed to build a prototype of an all-optical system.

  9. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  10. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  11. High-frame-rate intensified fast optically shuttered TV cameras with selected imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.

    1994-08-01

    This invited paper focuses on high speed electronic/electro-optic camera development by the Applied Physics Experiments and Imaging Measurements Group (P-15) of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Physics Division over the last two decades. The evolution of TV and image intensifier sensors and fast readout fast shuttered cameras are discussed. Their use in nuclear, military, and medical imaging applications are presented. Several salient characteristics and anomalies associated with single-pulse and high repetition rate performance of the cameras/sensors are included from earlier studies to emphasize their effects on radiometric accuracy of electronic framing cameras. The Group`s test and evaluation capabilities for characterization of imaging type electro-optic sensors and sensor components including Focal Plane Arrays, gated Image Intensifiers, microchannel plates, and phosphors are discussed. Two new unique facilities, the High Speed Solid State Imager Test Station (HSTS) and the Electron Gun Vacuum Test Chamber (EGTC) arc described. A summary of the Group`s current and developmental camera designs and R&D initiatives are included.

  12. Fast optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-21

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel label-free microscopic imaging tool to provide in vivo optical absorbing contrasts. Specially, it is crucial to equip a real-time imaging capability without sacrificing high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for identifying and tracking specific diseases in OR-PAM. Herein we demonstrate a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner made of flexible PDMS. This flexible scanner results in a wide scanning range (9 × 4 mm(2) in a transverse plane) and a fast imaging speed (5 B-scan images per second). Further, the MEMS scanner is fabricated in a compact footprint with a size of 15 × 15 × 15 mm(3). More importantly, the scanning ability in water makes the MEMS scanner possible to confocally and simultaneously reflect both ultrasound and laser, and consequently we can maintain high SNRs. The lateral and axial resolutions of the OR-PAM system are 3.6 and 27.7 μm, respectively. We have successfully monitored the flow of carbon particles in vitro with a volumetric display frame rate of 0.14 Hz. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of microvasculatures in a mouse ear. It is expected that our compact and fast OR-PAM system can be significantly useful in both preclinical and clinical applications.

  13. Fast optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel label-free microscopic imaging tool to provide in vivo optical absorbing contrasts. Specially, it is crucial to equip a real-time imaging capability without sacrificing high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for identifying and tracking specific diseases in OR-PAM. Herein we demonstrate a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner made of flexible PDMS. This flexible scanner results in a wide scanning range (9 × 4 mm2 in a transverse plane) and a fast imaging speed (5 B-scan images per second). Further, the MEMS scanner is fabricated in a compact footprint with a size of 15 × 15 × 15 mm3. More importantly, the scanning ability in water makes the MEMS scanner possible to confocally and simultaneously reflect both ultrasound and laser, and consequently we can maintain high SNRs. The lateral and axial resolutions of the OR-PAM system are 3.6 and 27.7 μm, respectively. We have successfully monitored the flow of carbon particles in vitro with a volumetric display frame rate of 0.14 Hz. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of microvasculatures in a mouse ear. It is expected that our compact and fast OR-PAM system can be significantly useful in both preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:25604654

  14. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  15. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-12-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200-600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  16. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; ...

    2015-09-03

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. Here, we present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We also simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approachmore » and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. And while the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.« less

  17. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2016-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials. PMID:27660376

  18. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-09-03

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. Here, we present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We also simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. And while the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  19. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  20. Ultra fast all-optical fiber pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions or athletes who receive cranial impacts. Protecting people from TBI has recently attracted a significant amount of attention due to recent military operations in the Middle East. Recording pressure transient data in a blast event is very critical to the understanding of the effects of blast events on TBI. However, due to the fast change of the pressure during blast events, very few sensors have the capability to effectively track the dynamic pressure transients. This paper reports an ultra fast, miniature and all-optical fiber pressure sensor which could be mounted at different locations of a helmet to measure the fast changing pressure simultaneously. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. The end face of the fiber is wet etched. A well controlled thickness silicon dioxide diaphragm is thermal bonded on the end face to form an FP cavity. A shock tube test was conducted at Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center, where the sensors were mounted in a shock tube side by side with a reference sensor to measure the rapidly changing pressure. The results of the test demonstrated that the sensor developed had an improved rise time (shorter than 0.4 μs) when compared to a commercially available reference sensor.

  1. Development of Fast Reactor Structural Integrity Monitoring Technology Using Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuba, Ken-Ichi; Ito, Chikara; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Takafumi

    Significant thermal stresses are loaded onto the structures of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) due to high temperature and large temperature gradients associated with employing sodium coolant with its high thermal conductivity and low heat capacity. Therefore, it is important to monitor the temperature variation, related stress and displacement, and vibration in the cooling system piping and components in order to assure structural integrity while the reactor plant is in-service. SFR structural integrity monitoring can be enhanced by an optical fiber sensor, which is capable of continuous or dispersed distribution measurements of various properties such as radiation dose, temperature, strain, displacement and acceleration. In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, displacement and vibration measurements of the primary cooling system have been carried out using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to evaluate the durability and measurement accuracy of FBG sensors in a high gamma-ray environment. The data were successfully obtained with no significant signal loss up to an accumulated gamma-ray dose of approximately 4×104 Gy corresponding to 120 EFPDs (effective full power days) operation. Measured displacement of the piping support was nearly equal to the calculated thermal displacement. Measured vibration power spectra of the piping support were similar to those measured with a reference acceleration sensor. The measured results indicate that the FBG sensor is suitable for monitoring the displacement and vibration aspects of fast reactor cooling system integrity in a high gamma-ray environment.

  2. Fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Vila, F; Vigués, N; Díaz-González, M; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Mas, J

    2015-05-15

    Global urban and industrial growth, with the associated environmental contamination, is promoting the development of rapid and inexpensive general toxicity methods. Current microbial methodologies for general toxicity determination rely on either bioluminescent bacteria and specific medium solution (i.e. Microtox(®)) or low sensitivity and diffusion limited protocols (i.e. amperometric microbial respirometry). In this work, fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics is presented, using Escherichia coli as a bacterial model. Ferricyanide reduction kinetic analysis (variation of ferricyanide absorption with time), much more sensitive than single absorbance measurements, allowed for direct and fast toxicity determination without pre-incubation steps (assay time=10 min) and minimizing biomass interference. Dual wavelength analysis at 405 (ferricyanide and biomass) and 550 nm (biomass), allowed for ferricyanide monitoring without interference of biomass scattering. On the other hand, refractive index (RI) matching with saccharose reduced bacterial light scattering around 50%, expanding the analytical linear range in the determination of absorbent molecules. With this method, different toxicants such as metals and organic compounds were analyzed with good sensitivities. Half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) obtained after 10 min bioassay, 2.9, 1.0, 0.7 and 18.3 mg L(-1) for copper, zinc, acetic acid and 2-phenylethanol respectively, were in agreement with previously reported values for longer bioassays (around 60 min). This method represents a promising alternative for fast and sensitive water toxicity monitoring, opening the possibility of quick in situ analysis.

  3. Signatures of the coalescence instability in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.

    1984-11-01

    Double sub-peak structures in the quasi periodic oscillations in the time profiles of solar flares in 1980 and 1982 are discussed. Computer simulations of the coalescence instability of two current loops agree with observations of the (widely differing) flares. The simultaneous accelerations of electrons and ions, and the double sub-peak structure in quasi periodic pulses are well explained. The double sub-peak structure is more pronounced when the currents in the two loops are sufficient for fast coalescence to occur. This corresponds to the 1980 flare. When the currents are insufficient for fast coalescence, the double sub-peak structure is less pronounced, as in the 1982 flare. Observations suggest the collision of the two microwave sources for the 1982 event. It is argued that this mechanism is a plausible particle acceleration mechanism in solar flares. (ESA)

  4. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  5. Design and verification of the miniature optical system for small object surface profile fast scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Sheng; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Jen, Jen-Yu; Lai, Ti-Yu; Jan, Chia-Ming; Hu, Po-Chi

    2016-04-01

    As the progress of optical technologies, different commercial 3D surface contour scanners are on the market nowadays. Most of them are used for reconstructing the surface profile of mold or mechanical objects which are larger than 50 mm×50 mm× 50 mm, and the scanning system size is about 300 mm×300 mm×100 mm. There are seldom optical systems commercialized for surface profile fast scanning for small object size less than 10 mm×10 mm×10 mm. Therefore, a miniature optical system has been designed and developed in this research work for this purpose. Since the most used scanning method of such system is line scan technology, we have developed pseudo-phase shifting digital projection technology by adopting projecting fringes and phase reconstruction method. A projector was used to project a digital fringe patterns on the object, and the fringes intensity images of the reference plane and of the sample object were recorded by a CMOS camera. The phase difference between the plane and object can be calculated from the fringes images, and the surface profile of the object was reconstructed by using the phase differences. The traditional phase shifting method was accomplished by using PZT actuator or precisely controlled motor to adjust the light source or grating and this is one of the limitations for high speed scanning. Compared with the traditional optical setup, we utilized a micro projector to project the digital fringe patterns on the sample. This diminished the phase shifting processing time and the controlled phase differences between the shifted phases become more precise. Besides, the optical path design based on a portable device scanning system was used to minimize the size and reduce the number of the system components. A screwdriver section about 7mm×5mm×5mm has been scanned and its surface profile was successfully restored. The experimental results showed that the measurement area of our system can be smaller than 10mm×10mm, the precision reached to

  6. DISCOVERY OF FAST, LARGE-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF V648 Car (=SS73-17)

    SciTech Connect

    Angeloni, R.; Di Mille, F.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the discovery of large-amplitude flickering from V648 Car (= SS73-17), a poorly studied object listed among the very few hard X-ray-emitting symbiotic stars. We performed millimagnitude precision optical photometry with the Swope Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and found that V648 Car shows large U-band variability over timescales of minutes. To our knowledge, it exhibits some of the largest flickering of a symbiotic star ever reported. Our finding supports the hypothesis that symbiotic white dwarfs producing hard X-rays are predominantly powered by accretion, rather than quasi-steady nuclear burning, and have masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. No significant periodicity is evident from the flickering light curve. The All Sky Automated Survey long-term V light curve suggests the presence of a tidally distorted giant accreting via Roche lobe overflow, and a binary period of {approx}520 days. On the basis of the outstanding physical properties of V648 Car as hinted at by its fast and long-term optical variability, as well as by its nature as a hard X-ray emitter, we therefore call for simultaneous follow-up observations in different bands, ideally combined with time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

  7. High-speed optical shutter coupled to fast-readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, George J.; Pena, Claudine R.; McDonald, Thomas E., Jr.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Numkena, Dustin M.; Turko, Bojan T.; Ziska, George; Millaud, Jacques E.; Diaz, Rick; Buckley, John; Anthony, Glen; Araki, Takae; Larson, Eric D.

    1999-04-01

    A high frame rate optically shuttered CCD camera for radiometric imaging of transient optical phenomena has been designed and several prototypes fabricated, which are now in evaluation phase. the camera design incorporates stripline geometry image intensifiers for ultra fast image shutters capable of 200ps exposures. The intensifiers are fiber optically coupled to a multiport CCD capable of 75 MHz pixel clocking to achieve 4KHz frame rate for 512 X 512 pixels from simultaneous readout of 16 individual segments of the CCD array. The intensifier, Philips XX1412MH/E03 is generically a Generation II proximity-focused micro channel plate intensifier (MCPII) redesigned for high speed gating by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Components. The CCD is a Reticon HSO512 split storage with bi-direcitonal vertical readout architecture. The camera main frame is designed utilizing a multilayer motherboard for transporting CCD video signals and clocks via imbedded stripline buses designed for 100MHz operation. The MCPII gate duration and gain variables are controlled and measured in real time and up-dated for data logging each frame, with 10-bit resolution, selectable either locally or by computer. The camera provides both analog and 10-bit digital video. The camera's architecture, salient design characteristics, and current test data depicting resolution, dynamic range, shutter sequences, and image reconstruction will be presented and discussed.

  8. Discovery of Fast, Large-amplitude Optical Variability of V648 Car (=SS73-17)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, R.; Di Mille, F.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Masetti, N.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the discovery of large-amplitude flickering from V648 Car (= SS73-17), a poorly studied object listed among the very few hard X-ray-emitting symbiotic stars. We performed millimagnitude precision optical photometry with the Swope Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and found that V648 Car shows large U-band variability over timescales of minutes. To our knowledge, it exhibits some of the largest flickering of a symbiotic star ever reported. Our finding supports the hypothesis that symbiotic white dwarfs producing hard X-rays are predominantly powered by accretion, rather than quasi-steady nuclear burning, and have masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. No significant periodicity is evident from the flickering light curve. The All Sky Automated Survey long-term V light curve suggests the presence of a tidally distorted giant accreting via Roche lobe overflow, and a binary period of ~520 days. On the basis of the outstanding physical properties of V648 Car as hinted at by its fast and long-term optical variability, as well as by its nature as a hard X-ray emitter, we therefore call for simultaneous follow-up observations in different bands, ideally combined with time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

  9. Fast-response fiber-optic anemometer with temperature self-compensation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Hou, Weilin; Qiao, Wei; Han, Ming

    2015-05-18

    We report a novel fiber-optic anemometer with self-temperature compensation capability based on a Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) formed by a thin silicon film attached to the end face of a single-mode fiber. Guided in the fiber are a visible laser beam from a 635 nm diode laser used to heat the FPI and a white-light in the infrared wavelength range as the signal light to interrogate the optical length of the FPI. Cooling effects on the heated sensor head by wind is converted to a wavelength blueshift of the reflection spectral fringes of the FPI. Self-temperature-compensated measurement of wind speed is achieved by recording the difference in fringe wavelengths when the heating laser is turned on and then off. Large thermal-optic coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of silicon render a high sensitivity that can also be easily tuned by altering the heating laser power. Furthermore, the large thermal diffusivity and the small mass of the thin silicon film endow a fast sensor response.

  10. ``Seeing'' electroencephalogram through the skull: imaging prefrontal cortex with fast optical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Andrei V.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Borisov, Sergey V.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Vanmeter, John

    2010-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a novel imaging technique potentially sensitive to both brain hemodynamics (slow signal) and neuronal activity (fast optical signal, FOS). The big challenge of measuring FOS noninvasively lies in the presumably low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, detectability of the FOS has been controversially discussed. We present reliable detection of FOS from 11 individuals concurrently with electroencephalogram (EEG) during a Go-NoGo task. Probes were placed bilaterally over prefrontal cortex. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used for artifact removal. Correlation coefficient in the best correlated FOS-EEG ICA pairs was highly significant (p < 10-8), and event-related optical signal (EROS) was found in all subjects. Several EROS components were similar to the event-related potential (ERP) components. The most robust ``optical N200'' at t = 225 ms coincided with the N200 ERP; both signals showed significant difference between targets and nontargets, and their timing correlated with subject's reaction time. Correlation between FOS and EEG even in single trials provides further evidence that at least some FOS components ``reflect'' electrical brain processes directly. The data provide evidence for the early involvement of prefrontal cortex in rapid object recognition. EROS is highly localized and can provide cost-effective imaging tools for cortical mapping of cognitive processes.

  11. A fast SPAD-based small animal imager for early-photon diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Photon scatter is the dominant light transport process in biological tissue and is well understood to degrade imaging performance in near-infrared diffuse optical tomography. Measurement of photons arriving at early times following a short laser pulse is considered to be an effective method to improve this limitation, i.e. by systematically selecting photons that have experienced fewer scattering events. Previously, we tested the performance of single photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) in measurement of early transmitted photons through diffusive media and showed that it outperformed photo-multiplier tube (PMT) systems in similar configurations, principally due to its faster temporal response. In this paper, we extended this work and developed a fast SPAD-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography system. As a first validation of the instrument, we scanned an optical phantom with multiple absorbing inclusions and measured full time-resolved data at 3240 scan points per axial slice. We performed image reconstruction with very early-arriving photon data and showed significant improvements compared to time-integrated data. Extension of this work to mice in vivo and measurement of time-resolved fluorescence data is the subject of ongoing research.

  12. Adaptive spatial carrier frequency method for fast monitoring optical properties of fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Agour, M.; Hamza, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an extension of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method which is proposed for fast measuring optical properties of fibrous materials. The method can be considered as a two complementary steps. In the first step, the support of the adaptive filter shall be defined. In the second step, the angle between the sample under test and the interference fringe system generated by the utilized interferometer has to be determined. Thus, the support of the optical filter associated with the implementation of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method is accordingly rotated. This method is experimentally verified by measuring optical properties of polypropylene (PP) fibre with the help of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The results show that errors resulting from rotating the fibre with respect to the interference fringes of the interferometer are reduced compared with the traditional band pass filter method. This conclusion was driven by comparing results of the mean refractive index of drown PP fibre at parallel polarization direction obtained from the new and adaptive spatial carrier frequency method.

  13. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    PubMed

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  14. Energetics of the gradual phase of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) has operated since 1980 with a package of instruments that cover the solar spectrum from optical to gamma-ray wavelengths. While these instruments were not specifically designed to gather data on flare energetics, the SMM can measure many of the terms in the energy budget of a flare that have not been possible to determine in the past, especially when SMM data are combined with complementary data from other spacecraft and ground-based observatories, as was done as part of the SMY. During the recent SMM workshops on solar flares, the energetics of the gradual phase of several well-observed flares were investigated. The results of these studies are reviewed in this presentation. The advances that have resulted from the SMM flare energetics studies are discussed in context of what still must be done observationally and theoretically to define the complete energy budget of a flare.

  15. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-11

    A large sunspot was the source of a powerful solar flare (an X 9.3) and a coronal mass ejection (Sept. 6, 2017). The flare was the largest solar flare of the last decade. For one thing, it created a strong shortwave radio blackout over Europe, Africa and the Atlantic Ocean. Sunspot 2673 has been also the source of several other smaller to medium-sized solar flares over the past few days. Data from the SOHO spacecraft shows the large cloud of particles blasting into space just after the flare. Note: the bright vertical line and the other rays with barred lines are aberrations in our instruments caused by the bright flash of the flare. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21949

  16. Accurate calculation and Matlab based fast realization of merit function's Hesse matrix for the design of multilayer optical coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Su-Yong; Long, Xing-Wu; Yang, Kai-Yong

    2009-09-01

    To improve the current status of home multilayer optical coating design with low speed and poor efficiency when a large layer number occurs, the accurate calculation and fast realization of merit function’s gradient and Hesse matrix is pointed out. Based on the matrix method to calculate the spectral properties of multilayer optical coating, an analytic model is established theoretically. And the corresponding accurate and fast computation is successfully achieved by programming with Matlab. Theoretical and simulated results indicate that this model is mathematically strict and accurate, and its maximal precision can reach floating-point operations in the computer, with short time and fast speed. Thus it is very suitable to improve the optimal search speed and efficiency of local optimization methods based on the derivatives of merit function. It has outstanding performance in multilayer optical coating design with a large layer number.

  17. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  18. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  19. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  20. Flares, CMEs and sunquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, Sergei; Matthews, Sarah A.; Green, Lucie M.; Zharkova, Valentina

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be manifestations of a sudden and rapid release of the accumulated magnetic energy in the corona. Only recently, the photospheric changes due to the reconnection and coronal magnetic field reconfiguration have been seriously considered from the theoretical point of view. Analysis of seismic emission (sun-quakes) induced in the solar interior in the vicinity of flares offers us an opportunity to explore the physical processes of energy transport in flaring atmospheres. Only a limited number of M and X-class flares have been reported to show seismic signatures in the form or ripples or egression sources, revealing that some of the most powerful flares often do not produce any seismic signatures. In fact, the most powerful signatures were recorded from an M-class flare. This raises important questions about how the flare energy and momentum are transported to the solar surface and interior in order to produce sun-quakes. Using observations by Hinode, RHESSI and SDO we analyse and test the new theories, gaining insight into the flare physics using flare seismology.

  1. Flares in Profile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-11

    An active region at the sun's edge produced several M5-class (medium sized) flares over a ten-hour period (Apr. 3, 2017). The most dramatic flare occurs about half way through the video clip, when it shoots up a bright towering plume of plasma. These were the strongest flares of the year so far. Some coronal mass ejections (which hurled clouds of plasma into space) were also associated with some of these flares. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21584

  2. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  3. An ultra-fast optical shutter exploiting total light absorption in a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mohsen; Guo, L. Jay; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an ultra-fast and high-contrast optical shutter with applications in atomic clock assemblies, integrated photonic systems, communication hardware, etc. The shutter design exploits the total light absorption phenomenon in a thin phase change (PC) material placed over a metal layer. The shutter switches between ON and OFF states by changing PC material phase and thus its refractive index. The PC material used in this work is Germanium Telluride (GeTe), a group IV-VI chalcogenide compound, which exhibits good optical contrast when switching from amorphous to crystalline state and vice versa. The stable phase changing behavior and reliability of GeTe and GeSbTe (GST) have been verified in optical memories and RF switches. Here, GeTe is used as it has a lower extinction coefficient in near-IR regions compared to GST. GeTe can be thermally transitioned between two phases by applying electrical pulses to an integrated heater. The memory behavior of GeTe results in zero static power consumption which is useful in applications requiring long time periods between switching activities. We previously demonstrated a meta-surface employing GeTe in sub-wavelength slits with >14 dB isolation at 1.5 μm by exciting the surface plasmon polariton and localized slit resonances. In this work, strong interference effects in a thin layer of GeTe over a gold mirror result in near total light absorption of up to 40 dB (21 dB measured) in the amorphous phase of the shutter at 780 nm with much less fabrication complexity. The optical loss at the shutter ON state is less than 1.5 dB. A nickel chrome (NiCr) heater provides the Joule heating energy required to achieve the crystallographic phase change. The measured switching speed is 2 μs.

  4. Relationships between laser flare photometry values and complications of uveitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C A; Ladas, J G; Davis, J L; Feuer, W J; Holland, G N

    2001-12-01

    To determine whether relationships exist between elevated laser flare photometry values and common abnormalities and complications associated with uveitis. We retrospectively studied all patients with uveitis on whom laser flare photometry measurements ("flare") were obtained (N = 111) at 2 academic medical centers. The first laser flare photometry values obtained for each patient were compared with the presence or absence of the following abnormalities or complications associated with uveitis: keratic precipitates, posterior synechiae, cataract, macular edema, optic disc edema, and glaucoma. In bilateral cases, the eye with the higher flare was used in primary analyses. Flare was significantly higher in patients with posterior synechiae (P<.001) and in those with macular edema (P =.02) than in patients with uveitis who did not have these complications. Flare was significantly higher in patients with prior cataract surgery or cataract at the study visit than in those without cataracts (P =.001). There was no significant difference in flare between patients with and without keratic precipitates, optic disc edema, or glaucoma. No relationships were found between abnormalities or complications and the level of inflammatory cells or flare as determined by clinical assessment. We also identified an inverse relationship between flare and visual acuity that was not completely explained by the presence of complications in a stepwise regression model. Although causal relationships were not established, associations between flare and some complications of uveitis suggest that aqueous humor protein may be an important factor in the development of these problems. Consequently, laser flare photometry could play a role in predicting outcomes or monitoring therapy for patients with uveitis.

  5. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  6. Ionospheric effects of solar flares at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2009-08-01

    From an analysis of electron density profiles recorded aboard Mars Global Surveyor, we report observations of some new and aeronomically important solar flare effects in the ionosphere of Mars. We find that all flares result in the formation of a well defined E layer peak, not always seen on other days. Further, while majority of flares result in elevated electron densities in the E region alone, some flares affect both the E and F1 layers. These altitude - related effects can provide vital information on the relative enhancement of photon fluxes in the various wavelength bands during solar flares. By using the unit optical depth values at Mars from Fox (2004) and the XUV irradiance model of Meier et al. (2002) for the Bastille Day solar flare, we infer that the well defined E peaks could result from enhancement of photon fluxes in the 10-13 nm spectral band. The extension of effect to the F1 layer is due to hardening of the 26-91 nm spectral band, as supported by Solar EUV Monitor measurements on Solar Heliospheric Observatory.

  7. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  8. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications.

  9. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, Ismael A.; Moca, Roberta; Camargo, Franco V. A.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2014-06-01

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  10. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  11. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    PubMed Central

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications. PMID:24009998

  12. Nanowire humidity optical sensor system based on fast Fourier transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota-Rodrigo, S.; Pérez-Herrera, R.; Lopez-Aldaba, A.; López Bautista, M. C.; Esteban, O.; López-Amo, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for relative humidity measurements based on its interaction with the evanescent field of a nanowire is presented. The interrogation of the sensing head is carried out by monitoring the fast Fourier transform phase variations of one of the nanowire interference frequencies. This method is independent of the signal amplitude and also avoids the necessity of tracking the wavelength evolution in the spectrum, which can be a handicap when there are multiple interference frequency components with different sensitivities. The sensor is operated within a wide humidity range (20%-70% relative humidity) with a maximum sensitivity achieved of 0.14rad/% relative humidity. Finally, due to the system uses an optical interrogator as unique active element, the system presents a cost-effective feature.

  13. Measurements of mechanical deformation using a full field optical interferometry and a fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Gutiérrez Zamarripa, Rodolfo; Caloca Mendez, Cristian

    2006-02-01

    Full field optical interferometry known as ESPI (Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry), has been applied to dynamical deformations on solid and semisolid objects. Although microscopic (1 to 30 micrometers), these deformations offer enough information to know even an early crack detection of the material. In industrial and biomedical environments however there is a lot of noise bigger than the signal we try to recovery, therefore is necessary to compensate mechanical or digitally or both. In this paper we will discuss the basic operating principle of the interferometer and analyze its performance. The technique use a continue wave laser for illuminating the tested object. The transient event is recorded by an ultra fast digital image camera. Data processing is completed with a help of a spatio-temporal algorithm. Some results are presented.

  14. Fast electron temperature measurements using a 'multicolor' optical soft x-ray array

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Roquemore, L.; Wilson, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A fast ({<=}0.1 ms) and compact 'multicolor' scintillator-based optical soft x-ray (OSXR) array has been developed for time- and space-resolved measurements of the electron temperature [T{sub e}(R,t)] profiles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The 48-channel tangential multicolor OSXR prototype was tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Each sight line views the same plasma volume at the midplane (0{<=}r/a{<=}1), in three distinct energy ranges determined by beryllium foils with different thicknesses. A tangential view of the toroidally (circular) symmetric plasma allows an Abel inversion of the line-integrated SXR brightness to obtain the x-ray emissivity profiles which are then used to constrain the reconstruction of the fast T{sub e}(R,t). The first assessment of the electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation with the ideal double-foil method using both the line-integrated intensity measurements as well as the inverted SXR emissivity profiles.

  15. Theoretical gravity darkening as a function of optical depth. A first approach to fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Recent observations of very fast rotating stars show systematic deviations from the von Zeipel theorem and pose a challenge to the theory of gravity-darkening exponents (β1). In this paper, we present a new insight into the problem of temperature distribution over distorted stellar surfaces to try to reduce these discrepancies. Methods: We use a variant of the numerical method based on the triangles strategy, which we previously introduced, to evaluate the gravity-darkening exponents. The novelty of the present method is that the theoretical β1 is now computed as a function of the optical depth, that is, β1 ≡ β1(τ). The stellar evolutionary models, which are necessary to obtain the physical conditions of the stellar envelopes/atmospheres inherent to the numerical method, are computed via the code GRANADA. Results: When the resulting theoretical β1(τ) are compared with the best accurate data of very fast rotators, a good agreement for the six systems is simultaneously achieved. In addition, we derive an equation that relates the locus of constant convective efficiency in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram with gravity-darkening exponents.

  16. A fast Green's function method for the analysis of IDT's for acousto-optical devices.

    PubMed

    Peverini, Oscar Antonio; Orta, Renato; Tascone, Riccardo

    2002-03-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) interdigital transducers are key components in X-Y LiNbO3 acousto-optical (A-O) devices. SAW interdigital transducers (IDT's) on this substrate exhibit a high spurious resonance that may reduce the A-O efficiency. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of X-Y LiNbO3 IDT's based on a fast Green's function method (GFM). In order to correctly evaluate the spurious effects on IDT's performance, we also considered bulk terms of the Green's function. When the GFM is applied to IDT's with general topology and over a wide frequency range, the required computation time can reach quickly unacceptable values for long IDT structures. We developed a new model order reduction technique based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) for the fast generation of the IDT's frequency response. Numerical results for different configurations of X-Y LiNbO3 IDT's are in good agreement with measured data and a correct interpretation of the spurious resonance is reported. It is pointed out that bulk wave excitation may be a serious limitation in the design of efficient, wide band IDT's for A-O devices.

  17. The speed of information in a 'fast-light' optical medium.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Gauthier, Daniel J; Neifeld, Mark A

    2003-10-16

    One consequence of the special theory of relativity is that no signal can cause an effect outside the source light cone, the space-time surface on which light rays emanate from the source. Violation of this principle of relativistic causality leads to paradoxes, such as that of an effect preceding its cause. Recent experiments on optical pulse propagation in so-called 'fast-light' media--which are characterized by a wave group velocity upsilon(g) exceeding the vacuum speed of light c or taking on negative values--have led to renewed debate about the definition of the information velocity upsilon(i). One view is that upsilon(i) = upsilon(g) (ref. 4), which would violate causality, while another is that upsilon(i) = c in all situations, which would preserve causality. Here we find that the time to detect information propagating through a fast-light medium is slightly longer than the time required to detect the same information travelling through a vacuum, even though upsilon(g) in the medium vastly exceeds c. Our observations are therefore consistent with relativistic causality and help to resolve the controversies surrounding superluminal pulse propagation.

  18. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Gupta, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, Pepijn; Sneep, Maarten; deHaan, Johan; Polonsky, Igor; Spurr, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a relatively simple scheme for simulating retrieved cloud optical centroid pressures (OCP) from satellite solar backscatter observations. We have compared simulator results with those from more detailed retrieval simulators that more fully account for the complex radiative transfer in a cloudy atmosphere. We used this fast simulator to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of cloud OCPs from the two OMI algorithms using collocated data from CloudSat and Aqua MODIS, a unique situation afforded by the A-train formation of satellites. We find that both OMI algorithms perform reasonably well and that the two algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the collocated CloudSat data. This indicates that patchy snow/ice, cloud 3D, and aerosol effects not simulated with the CloudSat data are affecting both algorithms similarly. We note that the collocation with CloudSat occurs mainly on the East side of OMI's swath. Therefore, we are not able to address cross-track biases in OMI cloud OCP retrievals. Our fast simulator may also be used to simulate cloud OCP from output generated by general circulation models (GCM) with appropriate account of cloud overlap. We have implemented such a scheme and plan to compare OMI data with GCM output in the near future.

  19. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  20. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  1. Slow and fast light using nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesala, Bala Subrahmanyam

    Ability to control the velocity of light is usually referred to as slow or fast light depending on whether the group velocity of light is reduced or increased. The slowing of light as it passes through the glass to 2/3rd its original value is a well known phenomenon. This slowing down happens due to the interaction of light with the electrons in the medium. As a general principle, stronger the interaction, larger is the reduction in velocity. Recently, a fascinating field has emerged with the objective of not only slowing down the velocity of light but also speeding it up as it goes through the medium by enhancing light-matter interaction. This unprecedented control opens up several exciting applications in various scientific disciplines ranging from nonlinear science, RF photonics to all-optical networks. Initial experiments succeeded in reducing the velocity of light more than a million times to a very impressive 17 m/s. This speed reduction is extremely useful to enhance various nonlinear processes. For RF photonic applications including phased array antennas and tunable filters, control of phase velocity of light is required while control of group velocity serves various functionalities including packet synchronization and contention resolution in an optical buffer. Within the last 10 years, several material systems have been proposed and investigated for this purpose. Schemes based on semiconductor systems for achieving slow and fast light has the advantage of extremely high speed and electrical control. In addition, they are compact, operate at room temperature and can be easily integrated with other optical subsystems. In this work, we propose to use nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for the purpose of controlling the velocity of light. The versatility of the physical processes present in SOAs enables the control of optical signals ranging from 1GHz to larger than 1000 GHz (1 THz). First, we experimentally demonstrate both

  2. Fast control of nuclear spin polarization in an optically pumped single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhonin, M. N.; Kavokin, K. V.; Senellart, P.; Lemaître, A.; Ramsay, A. J.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2011-11-01

    Highly polarized nuclear spins within a semiconductor quantum dot induce effective magnetic (Overhauser) fields of up to several Tesla acting on the electron spin, or up to a few hundred mT for the hole spin. Recently this has been recognized as a resource for intrinsic control of quantum-dot-based spin quantum bits. However, only static long-lived Overhauser fields could be used. Here we demonstrate fast redirection on the microsecond timescale of Overhauser fields on the order of 0.5 T experienced by a single electron spin in an optically pumped GaAs quantum dot. This has been achieved using coherent control of an ensemble of 105 optically polarized nuclear spins by sequences of short radiofrequency pulses. These results open the way to a new class of experiments using radiofrequency techniques to achieve highly correlated nuclear spins in quantum dots, such as adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame leading to sub-μK nuclear spin temperatures, rapid adiabatic passage, and spin squeezing.

  3. Fast control of nuclear spin polarization in an optically pumped single quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Makhonin, M N; Kavokin, K V; Senellart, P; Lemaître, A; Ramsay, A J; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2011-08-28

    Highly polarized nuclear spins within a semiconductor quantum dot induce effective magnetic (Overhauser) fields of up to several Tesla acting on the electron spin, or up to a few hundred mT for the hole spin. Recently this has been recognized as a resource for intrinsic control of quantum-dot-based spin quantum bits. However, only static long-lived Overhauser fields could be used. Here we demonstrate fast redirection on the microsecond timescale of Overhauser fields on the order of 0.5 T experienced by a single electron spin in an optically pumped GaAs quantum dot. This has been achieved using coherent control of an ensemble of 10(5) optically polarized nuclear spins by sequences of short radiofrequency pulses. These results open the way to a new class of experiments using radiofrequency techniques to achieve highly correlated nuclear spins in quantum dots, such as adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame leading to sub-μK nuclear spin temperatures, rapid adiabatic passage, and spin squeezing.

  4. Pre-Hardware Optimization and Implementation Of Fast Optics Closed Control Loop Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Lyon, Richard G.; Herman, Jay R.; Abuhassan, Nader

    2004-01-01

    One of the main heritage tools used in scientific and engineering data spectrum analysis is the Fourier Integral Transform and its high performance digital equivalent - the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The FFT is particularly useful in two-dimensional (2-D) image processing (FFT2) within optical systems control. However, timing constraints of a fast optics closed control loop would require a supercomputer to run the software implementation of the FFT2 and its inverse, as well as other image processing representative algorithm, such as numerical image folding and fringe feature extraction. A laboratory supercomputer is not always available even for ground operations and is not feasible for a night project. However, the computationally intensive algorithms still warrant alternative implementation using reconfigurable computing technologies (RC) such as Digital Signal Processors (DSP) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), which provide low cost compact super-computing capabilities. We present a new RC hardware implementation and utilization architecture that significantly reduces the computational complexity of a few basic image-processing algorithm, such as FFT2, image folding and phase diversity for the NASA Solar Viewing Interferometer Prototype (SVIP) using a cluster of DSPs and FPGAs. The DSP cluster utilization architecture also assures avoidance of a single point of failure, while using commercially available hardware. This, combined with the control algorithms pre-hardware optimization, or the first time allows construction of image-based 800 Hertz (Hz) optics closed control loops on-board a spacecraft, based on the SVIP ground instrument. That spacecraft is the proposed Earth Atmosphere Solar Occultation Imager (EASI) to study greenhouse gases CO2, C2H, H2O, O3, O2, N2O from Lagrange-2 point in space. This paper provides an advanced insight into a new type of science capabilities for future space exploration missions based on on-board image processing

  5. Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Like weather forecasting, solar flare forecasting (or forecasting solar activity in general) is motivated by pragmatic needs. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar winds and other solar activity intimately influence the near-Earth space environment. All kinds of spacecraft including weather and communication satellites are orbiting Earth, and their performance and lifetimes are greatly infl...

  6. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future.

  7. Fast computation of Fresnel diffraction field of a three-dimensional object for a pixelated optical device.

    PubMed

    Esmer, G Bora

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a fast algorithm is proposed for accurate calculation of the scalar optical diffraction on a pixelated optical device used in the reconstruction process from a three-dimensional object that is formed by scattered sample points over the space. In computer-generated holography, fast and accurate calculation of the diffraction field is an important and a challenging problem. Therefore, several fast algorithms can be found in the literature. The accuracy of the calculations can be determined by the signal processing techniques and the numerical methods used in the calculation of diffraction fields. Furthermore, the quality of reconstructed objects can be affected by the properties of optical devices employed in the reconstruction process. For instance, the pixelated structure of those devices has a significant effect on the reconstruction process. Therefore, the pixelated structure of the display device has to be taken into account. Furthermore, fast calculation of the diffraction pattern can be a bottleneck in dynamic holographic content generation. As a solution to the problems, we propose a fast and accurate algorithm based on a precomputed one-dimensional kernel and scaling of that kernel for the computation of the diffraction pattern for a pixelated display.

  8. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  9. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Shepson, P. B.; Subramanian, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Mccabe, D. C.; Baum, E. K.; Caulton, D.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Bond, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of associated natural gas is flared and vented in the world, annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. Based on estimates from satellite observations, the United States flares about 7 BCM of gas, annually (the 5th highest flaring volume worldwide). The volume of gas flared in the US is growing, largely due to flaring in the Bakken formation in North Dakota. Black carbon (BC), a combustion by-product from gas flaring, is a short-term climate pollutant that absorbs shortwave radiation both in the atmosphere and on snow and ice surfaces. Flaring may be a significant source of global BC climate effects. For example, modeling estimates suggest that associated gas flares are the source of a significant percentage of BC surface concentrations in the Arctic, where BC-induced ice melting occurs. However, there are no direct field measurements of BC emission factors from associated gas flares. Emission measurements of BC that include a range of flaring conditions are needed to ascertain the magnitude of BC emissions from this source. Over one hundred flare plumes were sampled in the Bakken formation using a small aircraft. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. BC was measured using two methods; optical absorption was measured using a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Simultaneous sampling of BC absorption and mass allows for the calculation of the BC mass absorption cross-section. Results indicate that emission factor variability between flares in the region is significant; there are two orders of magnitude variation in the BC emission factors.

  10. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  11. SUNSPOT ROTATION, FLARE ENERGETICS, AND FLUX ROPE HELICITY: THE HALLOWEEN FLARE ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Longcope, Dana W.; Qiu Jiong

    2010-10-20

    We study the X17 eruptive flare on 2003 October 28 using Michelson Doppler Imager observations of photospheric magnetic and velocity fields and TRACE 1600 A images of the flare in a three-dimensional model of energy buildup and release in NOAA 10486. The most dramatic feature of this active region is the 123{sup 0} rotation of a large positive sunspot over 46 hr prior to the event. We apply a method for including such rotation in the framework of the minimum current corona model of the buildup of energy and helicity due to the observed motions. We distinguish between helicity and energy stored in the whole active region and that released in the flare itself. We find that while the rotation of a sunspot contributes significantly to the energy and helicity budgets of the whole active region, it makes only a minor contribution to that part of the region that flares. We conclude that in spite of the fast rotation, shearing motions alone store sufficient energy and helicity to account for the flare energetics and interplanetary coronal mass ejection helicity content within their observational uncertainties. Our analysis demonstrates that the relative importance of shearing and rotation in this flare depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology.

  12. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  13. A Quantitative Analysis of Solar Flare Characteristics as Observed in the Solar Observing Optical Network and the Global Oscillation Network Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    due to their possible threat to operations. Because of their importance, event-level flares are given extra consideration in this report. (AFWA...In the impulsive phase (3 to 10 minutes), as this reconnection takes place, electrons and ions with large energies are accelerated and released...right, correspond to the horizontal lines with large red dashes. The flash and gradual phases are bound by the vertical dashed lines. 13 variable in

  14. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  15. Development of fast two-dimensional standing wave microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliko, Olga; Reddy, Duemani G.; Brownell, William E.; Saggau, Peter

    2008-02-01

    A novel scheme for two-dimensional (2D) standing wave fluorescence microscopy (SWFM) using acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) is proposed. Two laser beams were coupled into an inverted microscope and focused at the back focal plane of the objective lens. The position of each of two beams at the back focal plane was controlled by a pair of AODs. This resulted in two collimated beams that interfered in the focal plane, creating a lateral periodic excitation pattern with variable spacing and orientation. The phase of the standing wave pattern was controlled by phase delay between two RF sinusoidal signals driving the AODs. Nine SW patterns of three different orientations about the optical axis and three different phases were generated. The excitation of the specimen using these patterns will result in a SWFM image with enhanced 2D lateral resolution with a nearly isotropic effective point-spread function. Rotation of the SW pattern relative to specimen and varying the SW phase do not involve any mechanical movements and are only limited by the time required for the acoustic wave to fill the aperture of AOD. The resulting total acquisition time can be as short as 100 µs and is only further limited by speed and sensitivity of the employed CCD camera. Therefore, this 2D SWFM can provide a real time imaging of subresolution processes such as docking and fusion of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the combination of 2D SWFM with variable angle total internal reflection (TIR) can extend this scheme to fast microscopy with enhanced three-dimensional (3D) resolution.

  16. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  17. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  18. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-18

    The Sun erupted with an X8 solar flare, one of the largest of the current solar cycle (Sept. 10, 2017). Its source was the same sunspot region that produced an X9 flare last week. This is shown in two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light at the same time and each reveals different features. Both are colorized to identify in which wavelength they were observed. The coils of loops after the flare are the magnetic field lines reorganizing themselves after the eruption. The video clip covers about six hours. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21958

  19. Observing flaring activity in the new source SWIFT J195509.6+261406

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanbach, Gottfried

    2006-09-01

    SWIFT/BAT triggered on a new source on 10 June, 2007 20:52:26 UTC (GCN# 6489, Pagani et al.). The reported position was promptly observed in optical light and, after some delay, with the XRT. Bright short optical outbursts (10s timescales, amplitudes >3 mag) were discovered in the first hour after the trigger and again during the night June 11-12, 2007 (GCN# 6492,6508, Stefanescu et al.). SWIFT/XRT confirmed the position of the optical counterpart and the flaring behaviour (amplitudes up to 25 mCrab). We propose to perform CXO-HETG spectroscopy of the source to determine the emission process through the spectrum, and thus the nature of this object. It could be a fast, giant X-ray transient, SGR or AXP, or a thermonuclear X-ray burster.

  20. Modelling the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.; Carlsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are the most energetic events in the solar system. In order to study this sudden release of energy and evaluate the response of the solar chromosphere to the deposition of thermal energy, we simulate the conditions of the solar atmosphere by creating a 1D plane-parallel atmospheric model and analyze the energy transport of a beam of non-thermal electrons that is injected at the top of the coronal loop. This is done using a numerical model which combines the radiative hydrodynamic equations (RADYN code - Carlsson & Stein, 1992) with the calculation of particle acceleration and transport (Flare code - Petrosian & Liu, 2004). With this model, it is for example possible to compare the emission of solar flares in several lines with available observations. The assemblage of high resolution chromospheric flare observations from the IRIS imaging spectrograph makes it an excellent time for this work. We discuss how accelerated particle heating and energy deposition rate are affected by the variation of cut-off energy and flux of non-thermal electrons as well as spectral index and investigate the response of the atmosphere to the acceleration of particles. Our flare simulation treats each atom in non-LTE condition and calculates in detail the transitions between its energy levels. It also assumes an optically thick atmosphere, which is crucial for understanding how energy is transported from the chromosphere deep into the photosphere.

  1. Multi-spectral observations of flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F.

    2016-11-01

    Observations show that during solar flares radiation can be emitted across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from gamma rays to radio waves. These emissions, related to the conversion of magnetic energy into other forms of energy (kinetic, thermal, waves) through magnetic reconnection, are due to different physical processes that can occur in different layers of the Sun. This means that flare observations need to be carried out using instruments operating in different wave-bands in order to achieve a complete scenario of the processes going on. Taking into account that most of the radiative energy is emitted at optical and UV wavelengths, observations carried out from space, need to be complemented by observations carried out from ground-based telescopes. Nowadays, the possibility to carry on high temporal, spatial and spectral resolution from ground-based telescopes in coordinated campaigns with space-borne instruments (like, i.e., IRIS and HINODE) gives the opportunity to investigate the details of the flare emission at different wavelengths and can provide useful hints to understand these phenomena and compare observations with models. However, it is undoubted that sometimes the pointing to the flaring region is not an easy task, due to the necessity to provide the target coordinates to satellites with some hours in advance. Some problems arising from this issue will be discussed. Moreover, new projects related to flare catalogues and archives will be presented.

  2. Unveiling the nature of an X-ray flare from 3XMM* J014528.9+610729: a candidate spiral galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Himali; Bhattacharyya, Subir; Bhatt, Nilay; Pandey, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    We report an X-ray flare from 3XMM J014528.9+610729, serendipitously detected during the observation of the open star cluster NGC 663. The colour-colour space technique using optical and infrared data reveals the X-ray source as a candidate spiral galaxy. The flare shows fast rise and exponential decay shape with a ratio of the peak and the quiescent count rates of ˜60 and duration of ˜5.4 ks. The spectrum during the flaring state is well fitted with a combination of thermal (APEC) model with a plasma temperature of 1.3 ± 0.1 keV and non-thermal (POWER-LAW) model with power-law index of 1.9 ± 0.2. However, no firm conclusion can be made for the spectrum during the quiescent state. The temporal behaviour, plasma temperature and spectral evolution during flare suggest that the flare from 3XMM J014528.9+610729 cannot be associated with tidal disruption events.

  3. A fast atlas-guided high density diffuse optical tomography system for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xianjin; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging functional brain imaging tool capable of assessing cerebral concentrations of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) during brain activation noninvasively. As an extension of NIRS, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) not only shares the merits of providing continuous readings of cerebral oxygenation, but also has the ability to provide spatial resolution in the millimeter scale. Based on the scattering and absorption properties of nonionizing near-infrared light in biological tissue, DOT has been successfully applied in the imaging of breast tumors, osteoarthritis and cortex activations. Here, we present a state-of-art fast high density DOT system suitable for brain imaging. It can achieve up to a 21 Hz sampling rate for a full set of two-wavelength data for 3-D DOT brain image reconstruction. The system was validated using tissue-mimicking brain-model phantom. Then, experiments on healthy subjects were conducted to demonstrate the capability of the system.

  4. Fast and precise dense grid size measurement method based on coaxial dual optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiping; Peng, Xiang; Yu, Jiping; Hao, Jian; Diao, Yan; Song, Tao; Li, Ameng; Lu, Xiaowei

    2015-10-01

    Test sieves with dense grid structure are widely used in many fields, accurate gird size calibration is rather critical for success of grading analysis and test sieving. But traditional calibration methods suffer from the disadvantages of low measurement efficiency and shortage of sampling number of grids which could lead to quality judgment risk. Here, a fast and precise test sieve inspection method is presented. Firstly, a coaxial imaging system with low and high optical magnification probe is designed to capture the grid images of the test sieve. Then, a scaling ratio between low and high magnification probes can be obtained by the corresponding grids in captured images. With this, all grid dimensions in low magnification image can be obtained by measuring few corresponding grids in high magnification image with high accuracy. Finally, by scanning the stage of the tri-axis platform of the measuring apparatus, whole surface of the test sieve can be quickly inspected. Experiment results show that the proposed method can measure the test sieves with higher efficiency compare to traditional methods, which can measure 0.15 million grids (gird size 0.1mm) within only 60 seconds, and it can measure grid size range from 20μm to 5mm precisely. In a word, the presented method can calibrate the grid size of test sieve automatically with high efficiency and accuracy. By which, surface evaluation based on statistical method can be effectively implemented, and the quality judgment will be more reasonable.

  5. Fast localization of the optic disc using projection of image features.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Ahmed E; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2010-12-01

    Optic Disc (OD) localization is an important pre-processing step that significantly simplifies subsequent segmentation of the OD and other retinal structures. Current OD localization techniques suffer from impractically-high computation times (few minutes per image). In this work, we present a fast technique that requires less than a second to localize the OD. The technique is based upon obtaining two projections of certain image features that encode the x- and y- coordinates of the OD. The resulting 1-D projections are then searched to determine the location of the OD. This avoids searching the 2-D image space and, thus, enhances the speed of the OD localization process. Image features such as retinal vessels orientation and the OD brightness are used in the current method. Four publicly-available databases, including STARE and DRIVE, are used to evaluate the proposed technique. The OD was successfully located in 330 images out of 340 images (97%) with an average computation time of 0.65 s.

  6. Adaptive optics system for fast automatic control of laser beam jitters in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Salvatore; Acernese, Fausto; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems can operate fast automatic control of laser beam jitters for several applications of basic research as well as for the improvement of industrial and medical devices. We here present our theoretical and experimental research showing the opportunity of suppressing laser beam geometrical fluctuations of higher order Hermite Gauss modes in interferometric Gravitational Waves (GW) antennas. This in turn allows to significantly reduce the noise that originates from the coupling of the laser source oscillations with the interferometer asymmetries and introduces the concrete possibility of overcoming the sensitivity limit of the GW antennas actually set at 10-23 1 Hz value. We have carried out the feasibility study of a novel AO System which performs effective laser jitters suppression in the 200 Hz bandwidth. It extracts the wavefront error signals in terms of Hermite Gauss (HG) coefficients and performs the wavefront correction using the Zernike polynomials. An experimental Prototype of the AO System has been implemented and tested in our laboratory at the University of Salerno and the results we have achieved fully confirm effectiveness and robustness of the control upon first and second order laser beam geometrical fluctuations, in good accordance with GW antennas requirements. Above all, we have measured 60 dB reduction of astigmatism and defocus modes at low frequency below 1 Hz and 20 dB reduction in the 200 Hz bandwidth.

  7. Fast wide-field photothermal and quantitative phase cell imaging with optical lock-in detection

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Will J.; Meiri, Amihai; Sheinfeld, Adi; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast, wide-field holography system for detecting photothermally excited gold nanospheres with combined quantitative phase imaging. An interferometric photothermal optical lock-in approach (POLI) is shown to improve SNR for detecting nanoparticles (NPs) on multiple substrates, including a monolayer of NPs on a silanized coverslip, and NPs bound to live cells. Furthermore, the set up allowed for co-registered quantitative phase imaging (QPI) to be acquired in an off-axis holographic set-up. An SNR of 103 was obtained for NP-tagging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in live cells with a 3 second acquisition, while an SNR of 47 was seen for 20 ms acquisition. An analysis of improvements in SNR due to averaging multiple frames is presented, which suggest that residual photothermal signal can be a limiting factor. The combination of techniques allows for high resolution imaging of cell structure via QPI with the ability to identify receptor expression via POLI. PMID:25136482

  8. Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry for fast detection of dynamic strain incorporating double-edge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Wang, Chong; Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Dou, Xiankang; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-wei

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a direct detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is demonstrated for fast distributed dynamic strain sensing incorporating double-edge technique, time-division multiplexing technique and upconversion technique. In order to guarantee the robust stability of the system, the double-edge technique is implemented by using a convert single-channel FPI and a fiber-coupled upconversion single-photon detector, incorporating a time-division multiplexing method. The upconversion single-photon detector is adopted to upconvert the backscattering photons from 1548.1 nm to 863 nm, which is subsequently detected by a Silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD). In the experiment, dynamic strain disturbance up to 1.9 mε over 1.5 km of a polarization maintaining fiber is detected at a sampling rate of 30 Hz. An accuracy of ± 30 με and spatial resolution of 0.6 m are realized.

  9. Study on optical freeform surface manufacturing of progressive addition lens based on fast tool servo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongbin; Xu, Junlong; Xiao, Jianguo; Zhang, Yunfei; Shi, Guoquan

    2017-06-01

    Progressive addition lens (PAL) is currently the state-of-the-art in multifocal correction visual for freeform lens. The PAL is used to correct presbyopia by the distributing optical powers of the three zones, which are far zone, near zone and intermediate zone. As the dioptre of progressive zone varies continuously, the lenses realize simultaneously far view and near view by a pair of glasses. Because the PAL is a freeform surface with a variable radius of curvature, complex shape, processing difficulties, low efficiency, big fluctuation of interpolation error and so on. In this paper, the design surface is discretized by the constant angle method and compensates the path of the diamond tool nose radius with AKIMA interpolation method, which can identify the machine tool of the tool locus, and exploitable fast tool servo technology controls the diamond tools movement and path. MATLAB simulation results show that this method is generally more approximate to the ideal trajectory, which is not only to ensure that surface profile accuracy, but also meet the requirements of the processing efficiency and better control the surface profile.

  10. Characterization of Fast-Electron Beam Propagation Through Solid-Density Matter by Optical Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, M.; Myatt, J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-10-01

    A diagnostic has been developed to measure the emission of optical transition radiation (OTR) produced by relativistic electrons emerging at the rear side of laser-illuminated targets. The device will be deployed in the newly completed multiterawatt (MTW) experimental facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The MTW laser is capable of producing 10-J, 600-fs pulses of 1053-nm-wavelength radiation, which are focused using an f/2 off-axis parabolic mirror to intensities in excess of 10^19 Wcm-2. A 20x microscope objective with a resolution of better than 1 μm will image the OTR signal onto a CCD camera. A postprocessor to the particle-in-cell code LSP will be used to generate a simulated OTR signal from the calculated fast-electron distributions at the rear side of the target for comparison with experimental data. This talk will present the characteristics and capabilities of the OTR device along with the most recently acquired data. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460.

  11. An ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor for blast event measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Zou, Xiaotian; Tian, Ye; Fitek, John; Maffeo, Michael; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2012-05-01

    Soldiers who are exposed to explosions are at risk of suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since the causal relationship between a blast and TBI is poorly understood, it is critical to have sensors that can accurately quantify the blast dynamics and resulting wave propagation through a helmet and skull that are imparted onto and inside the brain. To help quantify the cause of TBI, it is important to record transient pressure data during a blast event. However, very few sensors feature the capabilities of tracking the dynamic pressure transients due to the rapid change of the pressure during blast events, while not interfering with the physical material layers or wave propagation. In order to measure the pressure transients efficiently, a pressure sensor should have a high resonant frequency and a high spatial resolution. This paper describes an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on the Fabry-Perot principle for the application of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. A shock tube experiment performed in US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center has demonstrated that the resonant frequency of the sensor is 4.12 MHz, which is relatively close to the designed theoretical value of 4.113 MHz. Moreover, the experiment illustrated that the sensor has a rise time of 120 ns, which demonstrates that the sensor is capable of observing the dynamics of the pressure transient during a blast event.

  12. Optical observations of the fast declining Type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G. C.; Sahu, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    We present optical UBVRI photometry and medium resolution spectroscopy of the Type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn, spanning a phase of ˜-13 d to +71 d with respect to B-band maximum. The post-maximum decline rates indicate a fast decline with Δm15(B) = 1.82. Correcting for a Galactic extinction E(B - V)MW = 0.045 and host galaxy extinction of E(B - V)host = 0.17, the absolute V-band magnitude peaks at MV = -17.23 ± 0.20. The bolometric light curve indicates that ˜0.09 M⊙ of 56Ni was synthesized in the explosion. The earliest spectrum (-13 d) shows the presence of He I 5876 Å feature at a velocity of ˜15 000 km s-1, which falls rapidly by the time the SN approaches the epoch of B-band maximum. The photospheric velocity near maximum light, as indicated by the Fe II 5169 Å feature, is ˜9000 km s-1. The estimate for the 56Ni mass, together with the estimates for the ejected mass (Mej) and kinetic energy of the explosion (Ek) indicate that iPTF13bvn is a low-luminosity Type Ib supernova, with a lower than average ejected mass and kinetic energy. Our results suggest that the progenitor of iPTF13bvn is inconsistent with a single Wolf-Rayet star.

  13. Optimization of a fast optical CT scanner for nPAG gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    A fast laser scanning optical CT scanner was constructed and optimized at the Ghent university. The first images acquired were contaminated with several imaging artifacts. The origins of the artifacts were investigated. Performance characteristics of different components were measured such as the laser spot size, light attenuation by the lenses and the dynamic range of the photo-detector. The need for a differential measurement using a second photo-detector was investigated. Post processing strategies to compensate for hardware related errors were developed. Drift of the laser and of the detector was negligible. Incorrectly refractive index matching was dealt with by developing an automated matching process. When scratches on the water bath and phantom container are present, these pose a post processing challenge to eliminate the resulting artifacts from the reconstructed images Secondary laser spots due to multiple reflections need to be further investigated. The time delay in the control of the galvanometer and detector was dealt with using black strips that serve as markers of the projection position. Still some residual ringing artifacts are present. Several small volumetric test phantoms were constructed to obtain an overall picture of the accuracy.

  14. Spatiotemporal focusing-based widefield multiphoton microscopy for fast optical sectioning of thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Wei-Chung; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Conventional multiphoton microscopy employs beam scanning; however, in this study a microscope based on spatiotemporal focusing offering widefield multiphoton excitation has been developed to provide fast optical sectioning images. The microscope integrates a 10 kHz repetition rate ultrafast amplifier featuring strong instantaneous peak power (maximum 400 μJ/pulse at 90 fs pulse width) with a TE-cooled, ultra-sensitive photon detecting, electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera. This configuration can produce multiphoton excited images with an excitation area larger than 200 × 100 μm2 at a frame rate greater than 100 Hz. Brownian motions of fluorescent microbeads as small as 0.5 μm have been instantaneously observed with a lateral spatial resolution of less than 0.5 μm and an axial resolution of approximately 3.5 μm. Moreover, we combine the widefield multiphoton microscopy with structure illuminated technique named HiLo to reject the background scattering noise to get better quality for bioimaging.

  15. Metal Optics Based nanoLEDs: In Search of a Fast, Efficient, Nanoscale Light Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Michael Scott

    Since the invention of the laser, stimulated emission has been the de facto king of optical communication. Lasers can be directly modulated at rates as high as 50GHz, much faster than a typical solid state light-emitting diode (LED) that is limited by spontaneous emission to <1GHz. Unfortunately, lasers have a severe scaling problem; they require large cavities operated at high power to achieve efficient lasing. A properly designed LED can be made arbitrarily small and still operate with high-efficiency. On-chip interconnects is an area that is in desperate need of a high-speed, low-power optical emitter that can enable on-chip links to replace current high-loss metal wires. In this work, I will show that by utilizing proper antenna design, a nanoLED can be created that is faster than a laser while still operating at >50% efficiency. I start by formulating an optical antenna circuit model whose elements are based completely off of antenna geometry. This allows for intuitive antenna design and suggests that rate enhancements up to ~3,000x are possible while keeping antenna efficiency >50%. Such a massive speed-up in spontaneous emission would enable an LED that can be directly modulated at 100's of GHz, much faster than any laser. I then use the circuit model to design an arch-dipole antenna, a dipole antenna with an inductive arch across the feedgap. I experimentally demonstrate a free-standing arch-dipole based nanoLED with rate enhancement of 115x and 66% antenna efficiency. Because the emitter is InGaAsP, a common III-V material, I experimentally show that this device can be easily and efficiently coupled into an InP waveguide. Experimental coupling efficiencies up to 70% are demonstrated and directional antennas are employed that offer front to back emission ratios of 3:1. Finally, I show that a nanoLED can still have high quantum yield by using a transition metal dichalcogenide, WSe2, as the emitter material. By coupling a monolayer of WSe2 to a cavity

  16. Fast calculation method of computer generated hologram animation for viewpoint parallel shift and rotation using Fourier transform optical system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2016-01-20

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) animations can be made by switching many CGHs on an electronic display. Some fast calculation methods for CGH animations have been proposed, but one for viewpoint movement has not been proposed. Therefore, we designed a fast calculation method of CGH animations for viewpoint parallel shifts and rotation. A Fourier transform optical system was adopted to expand the viewing angle. The results of experiments were that the calculation time of our method was over 6 times faster than that of the conventional method. Furthermore, the degradation in CGH animation quality was found to be sufficiently small.

  17. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  18. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  20. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  1. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  2. Solar and stellar flare observations using WATCH.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Lund, N.; Rao, A. R.

    The Danish experiment WATCH (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is to be flown on board the Soviet satellite GRANAT in middle of 1989. The performance characteristics of the WATCH instrument is described. It is estimated that WATCH can detect about 100 solar hard X-ray bursts per day. WATCH can also detect about 40 energetic stellar soft X-ray flares, similar to the fast transient X-ray emissions detected by the Ariel V satellite.

  3. The dependence of solar flare energetics on flare volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The sizes of 45 X-ray flares observed on Skylab have been measured and compared to flare rise times, energies, and energy release rates as determined from Solard and XREA X-ray data. The X-ray rise time is correlated with the length and volume of the flare. The energy of the flare and the rate of increase of that energy are correlated with flare length and volume. Both the energy per unit volume and the rate of energy increase per unit volume are inversely correlated with flare length and volume. There is no correlation between the emission measure and the volume.

  4. Event-related fast optical signal in a rapid object recognition task: improving detection by the independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Andrei V; Kainerstorfer, Jana; Borisov, Sergey V; Barbour, Randall L; VanMeter, John

    2008-10-21

    Noninvasive recording of fast optical signals presumably reflecting neuronal activity is a challenging task because of a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. To improve detection of those signals in rapid object recognition tasks, we used the independent component analysis (ICA) to reduce "global interference" (heartbeat and contribution of superficial layers). We recorded optical signals from the left prefrontal cortex in 10 right-handed participants with a continuous-wave instrument (DYNOT, NIRx, Brooklyn, NY). Visual stimuli were pictures of urban, landscape and seashore scenes with various vehicles as targets (target-to-non-target ratio 1:6) presented at ISI=166 ms or 250 ms. Subjects mentally counted targets. Data were filtered at 2-30 Hz and artifactual components were identified visually (for heartbeat) and using the ICA weight matrix (for superficial layers). Optical signals were restored from the ICA components with artifactual components removed and then averaged over target and non-target epochs. After ICA processing, the event-related response was detected in 70%-100% of subjects. The refined signal showed a significant decrease from baseline within 200-300 ms after targets and a slight increase after non-targets. The temporal profile of the optical signal corresponded well to the profile of a "differential ERP response", the difference between targets and non-targets which peaks at 200 ms in similar object detection tasks. These results demonstrate that the detection of fast optical responses with continuous-wave instruments can be improved through the ICA method capable to remove noise, global interference and the activity of superficial layers. Fast optical signals may provide further information on brain processing during higher-order cognitive tasks such as rapid categorization of objects.

  5. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  6. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  7. Multifrequency observations of a flare on UV Ceti.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Fuerst, E.; Krueger, A.; Hildebrandt, J.; Barwig, H.; Schmitt, J.

    1995-07-01

    Multifrequency observations of the flare of December 31, 1991 on UV Ceti are presented. The radio observations were carried out with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope at 4750MHz, whereas optical photometry was performed using the 0.8-m telescope of the Wendelstein Observatory in the five UBVRI colors. The radio burst started ~5min after the maximum of an optical flare. X-ray emission observed with the ROSAT PSPC before and after the optical flare conclusively demonstrates that an X-ray flare has occured. Several narrow-bandwidth radio spikes with duration of about 0.1s, peak flux density of 250mJy, and >=75% LH polarization were recorded. An interpretation of the spikes in terms of electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) and, alternatively, coherent plasma emission is proposed. The flare plasma parameters obtained from radio and soft X-ray data are as follows: n_e_=~10^11^/cm-3, T_e_=~10^7^K, B=~(200-800)G. Using these values, the escape windows for ECME have been calculated at ν=4.75GHz. It has been shown that there is actually no "perpendicular" window for the ordinary mode at the second and third harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The optical flare's cross-section area and the temperature of the "cool" plasma were found to be 4x10^16^cm^2^ and 16000K, respectively. Possible reasons for the time delay between the optical and radio flares as well as stellar flare models are discussed.

  8. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Luanje, Appolinaire T; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) in liquid oxygen (LO(2)) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO(2) in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN(2)/LO(2)) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN(2) and LO(2). The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN(2) and LO(2). Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN(2)) and oxygen (GO(2)).

  9. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Luanje, Appolinaire T.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN2) in liquid oxygen (LO2) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO2 in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN2/LO2) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN2 and LO2. The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN2 and LO2. Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and oxygen (GO2).

  10. Flare activity on low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmelcer, L.; Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Bílek, F.; Dubovský, P.; Hoňková, K.; Vraštil, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of optical flares on the very low-mass red-dwarf eclipsing binary GJ 3236 and the results of our 2014-2016 photometric campaign. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically in all filters for about 900 h, which has revealed a flare rate of about 0.06 flares per hour. The amplitude of its flares is the largest among those detected in the V band (∼1.3 mag), R band (∼0.8 mag), I band (∼0.2 mag) and clear band (∼0.5 mag). The light curves of GJ 3236 were analysed and the statistics of detected flare events are presented. The energy released during individual flares was calculated as up to 2.4 × 1027 J and compared with other known active stars. The cumulative distribution of flare energies appears to follow a broken power law. The flare activity of this binary also plays an important role in the precise determination of its physical parameters and evolutionary status.

  11. Fast optical channel recovery in field demonstration of 100-Gbit/s Ethernet over OTN using real-time DSP.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Etsushi; Yamanaka, Shogo; Kisaka, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Tadao; Murata, Koichi; Yoshida, Eiji; Sakano, Toshikazu; Tomizawa, Masahito; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Shinji; Matsui, Junichiro; Shibayama, Atsufumi; Abe, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Yuichi; Noguchi, Hidemi; Fukuchi, Kiyoshi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Fukumitsu, Katsumi; Komaki, Kousuke; Takeuchi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Nakashima, Hisao; Mizuochi, Takashi; Kubo, Kazuo; Miyata, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Hirano, Susumu; Onohara, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-04

    A field trial of 100-Gbit/s Ethernet over an optical transport network (OTN) is conducted using a real-time digital coherent signal processor. Error free operation with the Q-margin of 3.2 dB is confirmed at a 100 Gbit/s Ethernet analyzer by concatenating a low-density parity-check code with a OTN framer forward error correction, after 80-ch WDM transmission through 6 spans x 70 km of dispersion shifted fiber without inline-dispersion compensation. Also, the recovery time of 12 msec is observed in an optical route switching experiment, which is achieved through fast chromatic dispersion estimation functionality.

  12. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P.; Panarin, Yuri P.; Vij, Jagdish K.; Panov, Vitaly P.; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (~30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response.

  13. The influence of posterior parietal cortex on extrastriate visual activity: A concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging study.

    PubMed

    Parks, Nathan A; Mazzi, Chiara; Tapia, Evelina; Savazzi, Silvia; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Beck, Diane M

    2015-11-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical node in attentional and saccadic eye movement networks of the cerebral cortex, exerting top-down control over activity in visual cortex. Here, we sought to further elucidate the properties of PPC feedback by providing a time-resolved map of functional connectivity between parietal and occipital cortex using single-pulse TMS to stimulate the left PPC while concurrently recording fast optical imaging data from bilateral occipital cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the PPC induced transient ipsilateral occipital activations (BA 18) 24-48ms post-TMS. Concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging results demonstrate a clear influence of PPC stimulation on activity within human extrastriate visual cortex and further extend this time- and space-resolved method for examining functional connectivity.

  14. The Influence of Posterior Parietal Cortex on Extrastriate Visual Activity: A Concurrent TMS and Fast Optical Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Nathan A.; Mazzi, Chiara; Tapia, Evelina; Savazzi, Silvia; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Beck, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical node in attentional and saccadic eye movement networks of the cerebral cortex, exerting top-down control over activity in visual cortex. Here, we sought to further elucidate the properties of PPC feedback by providing a time-resolved map of functional connectivity between parietal and occipital cortex using single-pulse TMS to stimulate the left PPC while concurrently recording fast optical imaging data from bilateral occipital cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the PPC induced transient ipsilateral occipital activations (BA 18) 24 to 48 ms post-TMS. Concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging results demonstrate a clear influence of PPC stimulation on activity within human extrastriate visual cortex and further extend this time- and space-resolved method for examining functional connectivity. PMID:26449990

  15. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect

    PubMed Central

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P.; Panarin, Yuri P.; Vij, Jagdish K.; Panov, Vitaly P.; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (∼30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response. PMID:27156514

  16. Fast, precise, and widely tunable frequency control of an optical parametric oscillator referenced to a frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prehn, Alexander; Glöckner, Rosa; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs) provide a convenient reference for the frequency stabilization of continuous-wave lasers. We demonstrate a frequency control method relying on tracking over a wide range and stabilizing the beat note between the laser and the OFC. The approach combines fast frequency ramps on a millisecond timescale in the entire mode-hop free tuning range of the laser and precise stabilization to single frequencies. We apply it to a commercially available optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and demonstrate tuning over more than 60 GHz with a ramping speed up to 3 GHz/ms. Frequency ramps spanning 15 GHz are performed in less than 10 ms, with the OPO instantly relocked to the OFC after the ramp at any desired frequency. The developed control hardware and software are able to stabilize the OPO to sub-MHz precision and to perform sequences of fast frequency ramps automatically.

  17. Fast aerosol optical thickness retrieval from MERIS data with the use of fast radiative transfer code and analytical radiative transfer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Katsev, Iosif; Prikhach, Alexander; Zege, Eleonora

    We present the new fast aerosol retrieval technique (FAR) to retrieve the aerosol optical thick-ness (AOT), Angstrom parameter, and land reflectance from spectral satellite data. The most important difference of the proposed techniques from NASA/MODIS, ESA/MERIS and some other well-known AOT retrieval codes is that our retrievals do not use the look-up tables (LUT) technique but instead it is based on our previously developed extremely fast code RAY for ra-diative transfer (RT) computations and includes analytical solutions of radiative transfer. The previous version of the retrieval code (ART) was completely based at the RT computations. The FAR technique is about 100 times faster than ART because of the use combination of the RAY computation and analytical solution of the radiative transfer theory. The accuracy of these approximate solutions is thoroughly checked. Using the RT computations in the course of the AOT retrieval allows one to include any available local models of molecular atmosphere and of aerosol in upper and middle atmosphere layers for the treated area. Any set of wave-lengths from any satellite optical instruments can be processed. Moreover, we use the method of least squares in the retrieval of optical parameters of aerosol because the RAY code pro-vides the derivatives of the radiation characteristics with respect to the parameters in question. This technique allows the optimal use on multi-spectral information. The retrieval methods are flexible and can be used in synergetic algorithms, which couple data of two or more satel-lite receivers. These features may be considered as definite merits in comparison with the LUT technique. The successful comparison of FAR retrieved data with results of some other algorithms and with AERONET measurements will be demonstrated. Beside two important problems, namely, the effect of a priory choice of aerosol model to the retrieved AOT accuracy and effect of adjacent pixels containing clouds or snow spots is

  18. Retro-modulators and fast beam steering for free-space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Trevor Keith

    Free-space optical (FSO) communications is a means of secure, high bandwidth communication through the use of a modulated laser beam in free-space as the information medium. The chaotic nature of the atmosphere and the motion of the communication nodes make laser alignment a crucial concern. The employment of retro-reflecting modulators makes the bidirectional quality of a communication link into a one sided alignment problem. While there are existing retro-reflecting modulators, their trade-offs create a lack of abilities (such as aperture size, angular range, high modulation speeds, economic viability) which do not fulfill the requirements for certain applications. Also, the beam must be directed towards the intended receiver. Form mobile or scintillated communication links, beam direction must be adaptable in real time. Once again, this area suffers from trade-offs where beamsteering speed is often limited. Research used to mitigate the trade-offs and adapt the devices into viable options for a wider range of applications is explored in this dissertation. Two forms of retro-modulators were explored; a MEMS deformable mirror retro-modulator and a solid silicon retro-modulator that modulated the light by frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR). The MEMS version offered a high speed, scalable, wavelength/angle insensitive retro-modulator which can be massed produced at low cost, while the solid retro-modulator offered a large field of view with low cost as well. Both modulator's design, simulated performances, fabrication and experimental characterization are described in this dissertation. An ultra-fast beamscanner was also designed using 2-dimensional dispersion. By using wavelength switching for directional control, a beamscanner was developed that could switch light faster than pre-existing beamscanners while the beams characteristics (most importantly its aperture) could be freely adjusted by the independent optics. This beamscanner was preceded by our

  19. Fast double-phase retrieval in Fresnel domain using modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for lensless optical security systems.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hone-Ene; Chang, Hsuan T; Lie, Wen-Nung

    2009-08-03

    A novel fast double-phase retrieval algorithm for lensless optical security systems based on the Fresnel domain is presented in this paper. Two phase-only masks are efficiently determined by using a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, in which two cascaded Fresnel transforms are replaced by one Fourier transform with compensations to reduce the consumed computations. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm substantially speeds up the iterative process, while keeping the reconstructed image highly correlated with the original one.

  20. Study on the triggering process of solar flares based on Hinode/SOT observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Y.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Okamoto, T. J.

    2013-11-20

    We investigated four major solar flare events that occurred in active regions NOAA 10930 (2006 December 13 and 14) and NOAA 11158 (2011 February 13 and 15) by using data observed by the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. To reveal the trigger mechanism of solar flares, we analyzed the spatio-temporal correlation between the detailed magnetic field structure and the emission image of the Ca II H line at the central part of flaring regions for several hours prior to the onset of the flares. In all the flare events, we observed that the magnetic shear angle in the flaring regions exceeded 70°, as well as that characteristic magnetic disturbances developed at the centers of flaring regions in the pre-flare phase. These magnetic disturbances can be classified into two groups depending on the structure of their magnetic polarity inversion lines; the so-called opposite-polarity and reversed-shear magnetic field recently proposed by our group, although the magnetic disturbance in one event of the four samples is too subtle to clearly recognize the detailed structure. The result suggests that some major solar flares are triggered by rather small magnetic disturbances. We also show that the critical size of the flare-trigger field varies among flare events and briefly discuss how the flare-trigger process depends on the evolution of active regions.

  1. X-ray studies of flaring magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Christopher Philip

    This thesis studies non-thermal emission from flaring magnetic structures by looking at HXR emission from flare footpoints at a faint X-ray source above a flare loop and finally at radio emission generated by eruptions. By complementing high quality data from recent missions with data from older instrumentation, studies were performed to compare with accepted models. The relation between Hard X-ray footpoint emission and magnetic field strength in a sample of 32 flares was studied in order to investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the transport of accelerated electrons. It was found that one third of compact flares studied had stronger footpoints in stronger magnetic regions whereas the reverse is anticipated from magnetic trapping arguments. On 16th April 2002, a limb flare was studied in many wavelengths. This provided an opportunity to study an erupting filament from the low corona and into interplanetary space. RHESSI identified a moving X-ray source associated with a rising filament, confirming the plasmoid definition of Tsuneta (1997). The velocity profile of the filament was determined along with its exponential acceleration. This suggested that an instability was responsible for eruption, possibly the kink instability. Doppler shifts were observed on either side of the filament as it crossed the slit field of view, suggesting helical flows and thus a flux rope. A succession of quadrupolar flares, followed by an LDE were then studied. An associated CME was seen and appeared linked to the quadrupolar flares which should re main confined. The flaring region triggered loop expansion, which interacted with a neighbouring large-scale streamer. This led to a fast CME front, which weakened the restraining field above the active region filaments allowing a partial filament eruption. Although at first glance the observations appeared contradictory it was demonstrated that the quadrupolar flares remained confined while triggering a large-scale eruption.

  2. Fast and automatic depth control of iterative bone ablation based on optical coherence tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander; Pengel, Steffen; Bergmeier, Jan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Laser surgery is an established clinical procedure in dental applications, soft tissue ablation, and ophthalmology. The presented experimental set-up for closed-loop control of laser bone ablation addresses a feedback system and enables safe ablation towards anatomical structures that usually would have high risk of damage. This study is based on combined working volumes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Er:YAG cutting laser. High level of automation in fast image data processing and tissue treatment enables reproducible results and shortens the time in the operating room. For registration of the two coordinate systems a cross-like incision is ablated with the Er:YAG laser and segmented with OCT in three distances. The resulting Er:YAG coordinate system is reconstructed. A parameter list defines multiple sets of laser parameters including discrete and specific ablation rates as ablation model. The control algorithm uses this model to plan corrective laser paths for each set of laser parameters and dynamically adapts the distance of the laser focus. With this iterative control cycle consisting of image processing, path planning, ablation, and moistening of tissue the target geometry and desired depth are approximated until no further corrective laser paths can be set. The achieved depth stays within the tolerances of the parameter set with the smallest ablation rate. Specimen trials with fresh porcine bone have been conducted to prove the functionality of the developed concept. Flat bottom surfaces and sharp edges of the outline without visual signs of thermal damage verify the feasibility of automated, OCT controlled laser bone ablation with minimal process time.

  3. SU-E-T-75: Commissioning Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeters for Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L; Yang, F; Sandison, G; Woodworth, D; McCormick, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Fast neutrons therapy used at the University of Washington is clinically proven to be more effective than photon therapy in treating salivary gland and other cancers. A nanodot optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system was chosen to be commissioned for patient in vivo dosimetry for neutron therapy. The OSL-based radiation detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage caused by neutrons compared to diodes or MOSFET systems. Methods: An In-Light microStar OSL system was commissioned for in vivo use by radiating Landauer nanodots with neutrons generated from 50.0 MeV protons accelerated onto a beryllium target. The OSLs were calibrated the depth of maximum dose in solid water localized to 150 cm SAD isocenter in a 10.3 cm square field. Linearity was tested over a typical clinical dose fractionation range i.e. 0 to 150 neutron-cGy. Correction factors for transient signal fading, trap depletion, gantry angle, field size, and wedge factor dependencies were also evaluated. The OSLs were photo-bleached between radiations using a tungsten-halogen lamp. Results: Landauer sensitivity factors published for each nanodot are valid for measuring photon and electron doses but do not apply for neutron irradiation. Individually calculated nanodot calibration factors exhibited a 2–5% improvement over calibration factors computed by the microStar InLight software. Transient fading effects had a significant impact on neutron dose reading accuracy compared to photon and electron in vivo dosimetry. Greater accuracy can be achieved by calibrating and reading each dosimeter within 1–2 hours after irradiation. No additional OSL correction factors were needed for field size, gantry angle, or wedge factors in solid water phantom measurements. Conclusion: OSL detectors are a useful for neutron beam in vivo dosimetry verification. Dosimetric accuracy comparable to conventional diode systems can be achieved. Accounting for transient fading effects during the neutron beam

  4. Fast pesticide detection inside microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Ehgartner, Josef; Sulzer, Philipp; Zieger, Silvia; Kasjanow, Alice; Paradiso, Mirco; Strobl, Martin; Bouwes, Dominique; Mayr, Torsten

    2017-02-15

    The necessities of developing fast, portable, cheap and easy to handle pesticide detection platforms are getting attention of scientific and industrial communities. Although there are some approaches to develop microchip based pesticide detection platforms, there is no compact microfluidic device for the complementary, fast, cheap, reusable and reliable analysis of different pesticides. In this work, a microfluidic device is developed for in-situ analysis of pesticide concentration detected via metabolism/photosynthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells (algae) in tap water. Algae are grown in glass based microfluidic chip, which contains integrated optical pH and oxygen sensors in a portable system for on-site detection. In addition, intrinsic algal fluorescence is detected to analyze the pesticide concentration in parallel to pH and oxygen sensors with integrated fluorescence detectors. The response of the algae under the effect of different concentrations of pesticides is evaluated and complementary inhibition effects depending on the pesticide concentration are demonstrated. The three different sensors allow the determination of various pesticide concentrations in the nanomolar concentration range. The miniaturized system provides the fast quantification of pesticides in less than 10min and enables the study of toxic effects of different pesticides on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii green algae. Consequently, the microfluidic device described here provides fast and complementary detection of different pesticides with algae in a novel glass based microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On fading probability density functions of fast-tracked and untracked free-space optical communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems suffer from average power loss and instantaneous power fading due to the atmospheric turbulence. The channel fading probability density function (pdf) is of critical importance for FSO communication system design and evaluation. The performance and reliability of FSO communication systems can be greatly enhanced if fast-tacking devices are employed at the transmitter in order to compensate laser beam wander at the receiver aperture. The fast-tracking method is especially effective when communication distance is long. This paper studies the fading probability density functions of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO communication channels. Large-scale wave-optics simulations are conducted for both tracked and untracked lasers. In the simulations, the Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, and it is assumed that the outer scale is infinitely large and the inner scale is negligibly small. The fading pdfs of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO channels are obtained from the simulations. Results show that the fast-tracked channel fading can be accurately modeled as gamma-distributed if receiver aperture size is smaller than the coherence radius. An analytical method is given for calculating the untracked fading pdfs of both point-like and finite-size receiver apertures from the fast-tracked fading pdf. For point-like apertures, the analytical method gives pdfs close to the well-known gamma-gamma pdfs if off-axis effects are omitted in the formulation. When off-axis effects are taken into consideration, the untracked pdfs obtained using the analytical method fit the simulation pdfs better than gamma-gamma distributions for point-like apertures, and closely fit the simulation pdfs for finite-size apertures where gamma-gamma pdfs deviate from those of the simulations significantly.

  6. Very low luminosity stars with very large amplitude flares

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.E. )

    1990-04-01

    CCD frames of CZ Cnc, KY Cep, the gamma-ray burster optical transient, and NSV 12006 are analyzed. Also studied are 549 archival photographic plates of the CZ Cnc field. These observations are compared with the data of Lovas (1976). Flare events on CZ Cnc are examined. Based on the data it is noted that CZ Cnc is a main-sequence star, has a magnitude of 16.1, a distance of 100 pc, occasional large-amplitude flares, and frequent flares with amplitudes greater than 4 mag. 36 refs.

  7. Very low luminosity stars with very large amplitude flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    CCD frames of CZ Cnc, KY Cep, the gamma-ray burster optical transient, and NSV 12006 are analyzed. Also studied are 549 archival photographic plates of the CZ Cnc field. These observations are compared with the data of Lovas (1976). Flare events on CZ Cnc are examined. Based on the data it is noted that CZ Cnc is a main-sequence star, has a magnitude of 16.1, a distance of 100 pc, occasional large-amplitude flares, and frequent flares with amplitudes greater than 4 mag.

  8. Fast calculation of tissue optical properties using MC and the experimental evaluation for diagnosis of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuying; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Qin, Zhuanping; Zhao, Huijuan

    2011-02-01

    This article aims at the development of the fast inverse Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the reconstruction of optical properties (absorption coefficient μs and scattering coefficient μs) of cylindrical tissue, such as a cervix, from the measurement of near infrared diffuse light on frequency domain. Frequency domain information (amplitude and phase) is extracted from the time domain MC with a modified method. To shorten the computation time in reconstruction of optical properties, efficient and fast forward MC has to be achieved. To do this, firstly, databases of the frequency-domain information under a range of μa and μs were pre-built by combining MC simulation with Lambert-Beer's law. Then, a double polynomial model was adopted to quickly obtain the frequency-domain information in any optical properties. Based on the fast forward MC, the optical properties can be quickly obtained in a nonlinear optimization scheme. Reconstruction resulting from simulated data showed that the developed inverse MC method has the advantages in both the reconstruction accuracy and computation time. The relative errors in reconstruction of the μs and μs are less than +/-6% and +/-12% respectively, while another coefficient (μs or μs) is in a fixed value. When both μs and μs are unknown, the relative errors in reconstruction of the reduced scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient are mainly less than +/-10% in range of 45< μs <80 cm-1 and 0.25< a μ <0.55 cm-1. With the rapid reconstruction strategy developed in this article the computation time for reconstructing one set of the optical properties is less than 0.5 second. Endoscopic measurement on two tubular solid phantoms were also carried out to evaluate the system and the inversion scheme. The results demonstrated that less than 20% relative error can be achieved.

  9. Diagnosis of Solar Flare Probability from Chromosphere Image Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-30

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2011-0005 TP-2011-0005 DIAGNOSIS OF SOLAR FLARE PROBABILITY FROM CHROMOSPHERE IMAGE... Chromosphere Image Sequences 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S) Donald C...1566, dtd 7 Nov 11 ) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We used optical observations of the solar chromosphere in the diagnosis of flare

  10. A Flaring Magnetar in FRB 121102?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-07-01

    The persistent radio counterpart of fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 is estimated to have N˜ {10}52 particles, energy {E}N˜ {10}48 erg, and size R˜ {10}17 cm. The source can be nebula inflated and heated by an intermittent outflow from a magnetar—a neutron star powered by its magnetic (rather than rotational) energy. The object is young and frequently liberating energy in magnetic flares driven by accelerated ambipolar diffusion in the neutron star core, feeding the nebula and producing bright millisecond bursts. The particle number in the nebula is consistent with ion ejecta from giant flares. The nebula may also contain the freeze-out of electron-positron pairs {N}+/- ˜ {10}51 created months after the neutron star birth; the same mechanism offers an explanation for {N}+/- in the Crab Nebula. The persistent source around FRB 121102 is likely heated by magnetic dissipation and internal waves excited by the magnetar ejecta. The volumetric heating by waves explains the nebula’s enormous efficiency in producing radio emission. The repeating radio bursts are suggested to occur much closer to the magnetar, as a result of ultrarelativistic internal shocks in the magnetar wind, which are launched by the magnetospheric flares. The shocks are mediated by Larmor rotation, which forms a GHz maser with the observed ms duration. Furthermore, the flare ejecta can become charge-starved and then convert to electromagnetic waves.

  11. A Model of Solar Flares Based on Arcade Field Reconnection and Merging of Magnetic Islands

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Choe; C.Z. Cheng

    2001-12-12

    Solar flares are intense, abrupt releases of energy in the solar corona. In the impulsive phase of a flare, the intensity of hard X-ray emission reaches a sharp peak indicating the highest reconnection rate. It is often observed that an X-ray emitting plasma ejecta (plasmoid) is launched before the impulsive phase and accelerated throughout the phase. Thus, the plasmoid ejection may not be an effect of fast magnetic reconnection as conventionally assumed, but a cause of fast reconnection. Based on resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, a solar flare model is presented, which can explain these observational characteristics of flares. In the model, merging of a newly generated magnetic island and a pre-existing island results in stretching and thinning of a current sheet, in which fast magnetic reconnection is induced. Recurrence of homologous flares naturally arises in this model. Mechanisms of magnetic island formation are also discussed.

  12. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  13. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Understanding Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    Solar flares and their associated coronal mass ejections are the most energetic explosions in the solar system. The largest events pose the greatest space weather dangers to life and civilization, and are of extreme importance to human space exploration. They also provide the best opportunity to study the universal processes of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration that underlie most solar activity. The two great mysteries of solar flares are: how can so much energy be released so quickly, and how can such a large fraction (50% or more) end up in energetic particles. We present results from recent numerical modeling that sheds new light on these mysteries. These calculations use the highest spatial resolution yet achieved in order to resolve the flare dynamics as clearly as possible. We conclude from this work that magnetic island formation is the defining property of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona, at least, in the large-scale current sheet required for a solar flare. Furthermore, we discuss the types of future observations and modeling that will be required to solve definitively the solar flare mysteries. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA TR&T and SR&T Programs.

  16. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  17. Evaluation of Intraocular Inflammation with Laser Flare Photometry in Behçet Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Yalcindag, Fatime Nilufer; Bingol Kiziltunc, Pinar; Savku, Esra

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the association between intraocular inflammation and laser flare photometry measurements in Behçet disease. In total, 45 patients were included in the study. The retrospective chart reviews of patients were performed. The flare levels were compared with the grade of anterior chamber cells, the presence of vitreous cells, the complications of uveitis, and fluorescein angiography scores. The attack group had higher flare intensity; the flare levels were higher in both groups compared with the values of healthy controls. The flare levels were related to the grade of the anterior chamber cells, the presence of vitreous cells and the fluorescein angiography scores. Patients with optic atrophy and/or maculopathy also had higher values. Higher flare values were correlated with poor vision. Laser flare photometry may reduce the necessity of fluorescein angiography in monitoring subclinical inflammation and may be an indicator of posterior segment activity when fluorescein angiography is not applicable.

  18. EUVE Spectral Observations of a Flare on AD Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cully, S. L.; Fisher, G. H.; Hawley, S. L.; Simon, T.

    1994-05-01

    The flare star AD Leo (dM3.5e, 4.9 parsecs) was observed by the EUVE DS/S from 1993 March 1 - March 3 UT. A flare was detected in the Lexan/Boron (65 - 190 Angstroms) band of the Deep Survey Instrument on March 2 UT. The flare was also observed with optical photometry at several locations and with both high and low resolution optical spectroscopy. The 0.3 magnitude optical U band (3000 - 4300 Angstroms) flare had a peak DS Lex/B count rate of about 1.0 cps and was visible for 7 hours. The total EUV energy released in the flare is estimated to be 1 x 10(33) ergs. The above results were given by Hawley et al (1994). In this work, we present the EUVE spectra (70 - 760 Angstroms) for the quiescent and flaring times of the observation and differential emission measure analysis of the strong emission lines visible in each spectrum.

  19. Implications for flare build-up and heating from observations made by OSO-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the EUV and soft X-ray emission in the event on January 19, 1972 are discussed in terms of the slow (passive) and fast (active) phases of flare evolution that were previously discussed. The implications are summarized for a flare build-up model which was derived-from these observations.

  20. Towards understanding solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1982-05-01

    Instrumentation and spacecraft payloads developed at Lockheed for solar flare studies are reviewed, noting the significance of the observations for adding to a data base for eventual prediction of the occurrence of flares and subsequent radiation hazards to people in space. Developmental work on the two solar telescopes on board the Skylab pallet was performed at a Lockheed facility, as was the fabrication of very-large-area proportional counter for flights on the Aerobee rocket in 1967. The rocket work led to the fabrication of the Mapping X Ray Heliometer on the Orbiting Solar Observatory and the X Ray Polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission. The Polychromator consists of a bent crystal spectrometer for high time resolution flare studies over a wide field of view, and a flat crystal spectrometer for simultaneous polychromatic imaging at 7 different X ray wavelengths.

  1. Chromosphere flare models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.; Machado, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Further calculated results based on the F1 and F2 chromospheric models of Machado et al. (1980) are presented in addition to results from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer for H, H(-), He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II are solved, and the overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum are determined by means of a reduced set of opacities taken from a compilation of over 10 million lines. Semiempirical models show that the white light flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating, as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region.

  2. Chromosphere flare models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.; Machado, M. E.

    1985-08-01

    Further calculated results based on the F1 and F2 chromospheric models of Machado et al. (1980) are presented in addition to results from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer for H, H(-), He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II are solved, and the overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum are determined by means of a reduced set of opacities taken from a compilation of over 10 million lines. Semiempirical models show that the white light flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating, as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region.

  3. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  4. The Solar Flare Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheibi, Akbar; Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the characteristics of the solar flare complex network. The limited predictability, nonlinearity, and self-organized criticality of the flares allow us to study systems of flares in the field of the complex systems. Both the occurrence time and the location of flares detected from 2006 January 1 to 2016 July 21 are used to design the growing flares network. The solar surface is divided into cells with equal areas. The cells, which include flares, are considered nodes of the network. The related links are equivalent to sympathetic flaring. The extracted features demonstrate that the network of flares follows quantitative measures of complexity. The power-law nature of the connectivity distribution with a degree exponent greater than three reveals that flares form a scale-free and small-world network. A large value for the clustering coefficient, a small characteristic path length, and a slow change of the diameter are all characteristics of the flares network. We show that the degree correlation of the flares network has the characteristics of a disassortative network. About 11% of the large energetic flares (M and X types in GOES classification) that occurred in the network hubs cover 3% of the solar surface.

  5. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  6. A significant hardening and rising shape detected in the MeV/GeV νFν spectrum from the recently discovered very-high-energy blazar S4 0954+65 during the bright optical flare in 2015 February

    DOE PAGES

    Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; Itoh, Ryosuke; ...

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, we report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and multi-wavelength results on the recently discovered very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) blazar S4 0954+65 (z = 0.368) during an exceptionally bright optical flare in 2015 February. During the time period (2015 February 13/14, or MJD 57067) when the MAGIC telescope detected VHE γ-ray emission from the source, the Fermi-LAT data indicated a significant spectral hardening at GeV energies, with a power-law photon index of 1.8 ± 0.1—compared with the 3FGL (The Fermi LAT 4-Year Point Source Catalog) value (averaged over four years of observation) of 2.34 ±more » 0.04. In contrast, Swift X-Ray Telescope data showed a softening of the X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of 1.72 ± 0.08 (compared with 1.38 ± 0.03 averaged during the flare from MJD 57066 to 57077), possibly indicating a modest contribution of synchrotron photons by the highest-energy electrons superposed on the inverse Compton component. Fitting of the quasi-simultaneous (<1 d) broad-band spectrum with a one-zone synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model revealed that GeV/TeV emission could be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of external photons from the dust torus. Finally, we emphasize that a flaring blazar showing high flux of ≳1.0 × 10-6 photons cm-2s-1 (E > 100 MeV) and a hard spectral index of ΓGeV < 2.0 detected by Fermi-LAT on daily timescales is a promising target for TeV follow-up by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes to discover high-redshift blazars, investigate their temporal variability and spectral features in the VHE band, and also constrain the intensity of the extragalactic background light.« less

  7. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  8. White-light flares observed by Yohkoh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.; Acton, Loren W.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Uchida, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    The Yohkoh observatory is producing a first sample of white-light flares observed from space. We present observations of four of them, all X-class events. The Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope white-light data typically have a 12-s cadence for images with 2.46 arcsec pixels over a field of view of 2.62 arcmin in one of two broad-band optical filters, and the November 15, 1991 flare produced a brightness increase of about 38 percent over the photospheric brightness in the 30 A passband filter centered at 4308 A. The white-light flare morphology in the best-observed flares displays a double 'footpoint' character, establishing a close relationship with the compact magnetic flux tubes involved with both hard and soft X-ray emissions. We describe the data in the context of the soft and hard X-ray observations simultaneously carried out on board the Yohkoh satellite, emphasizing energetics and timing.

  9. Observations of Flare-Associated Waves with SolarB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, N.; Shibata, K.

    2004-12-01

    In Hα, a flare-associated chromospheric wave (called a Moreton wave) was discovered in 1960, and after that such waves are sometimes observed. Uchida (1968, 1974) identified the Moreton wave as the intersection of a coronal MHD fast-mode shock and the chromosphere. Recently, the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on board Yohkoh observed coronal wave-like disturbances (X-ray waves). Narukage et al. (2002, 2004) showed two X-ray waves are MHD fast-mode shock, i.e. coronal counterparts of the Moreton waves. The SolarB has Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board and will be launched in 2006. We expect SOT, XRT and EIS will detect chromospheric Moreton waves, coronal X-ray waves and line-of-sight velocity of waves, respectively. In preparation for SolarB, we examine the detectable possibility of waves with these telescopes and suggest methods for observation.

  10. The DAWN and FLARE Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Zheng, Zhenya; Monson, Andrew; Persson, S. Eric; Gonzalez, Alicia; Probst, Ronald G.; Swaters, Robert A.; Tilvi, Vithal; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Jiang, Tianxing; Mobasher, Bahram; Dickinson, Mark; Dressler, Alan; Lee, Janice C.; Ammons, S. Mark; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Emig, Kimberly; Hibon, Pascale; Joshi, Bhavin; Pharo, John; Smith, Mark David; Trahan, Jacob; Veilleux, Sylvain; Wang, JunXian; Wong, Kenneth C.; Yang, Huan; Zabl, Johannes; FLARE Team, the DAWN Team

    2016-01-01

    Lyman alpha galaxy populations at redshifts 8 and 9 offer a unique probe of cosmological reionization. Resonant scattering by neutral hydrogen should obscure such galaxies if the intergalactic medium is neutral, implying a steep decline in their observed counts at redshifts prior to the central phases of reionization. We are pursuing a pair of ambitious near-infrared narrow bandpass surveys to probe these populations: The Cosmic Deep and Wide Narrowband (DAWN) survey, using the NEWFIRM camera at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's 4m Mayall telescope, and the First Light And Reionization Experiment (FLARE), using the FourStar camera at the 6.5m Magellan Telescopes. DAWN is an NOAO survey program, covering a total of five NEWFIRM fields (one square degree in all) to a limiting sensitivity around 9e-18 erg/cm2/s for emission lines at 1.06 micron wavelength, corresponding to redshift 7.7 for Lyman alpha. FLARE uses the larger aperture of the Magellan telescope to push to still higher redshift, with a limiting line flux near 5e-18 erg/cm2/s in the COSMOS field, and with additional coverage of a half dozen strongly lensed fields where we can probe still further down the Lyman alpha luminosity function. Imaging observations are largely complete for both surveys, and we are now pursuing spectroscopic followup at both near-IR and optical wavelengths. We will summarize initial results from both surveys in this meeting. With two nights of Keck+MOSFIRE observations complete already (and more scheduled in late 2015), we have numerous emission line confirmations-- both including many H alpha and Oxygen emitters in the foreground, and at least one Lyman alpha galaxy in the epoch of reionization.

  11. EvryFlare: Flare rates and intensities for every 10 < g' < 15 solar-type and red dwarf star in the Southern sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Ward; Fors, Octavi; Ratzloff, Jeff; Corbett, Hank; del Ser, Daniel; Law, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Habitable-zone rocky planets orbit nearly all stars; however, stellar flares make detecting these planets and discovering their actual habitability challenging. Although Kepler measured flare rates for various spectral-types around distant stars, the flare rates and intensities of nearby stars available to planet searches and follow-up remain poorly characterized. High-cadence, long-timescale photometry of such stars will provide the intensity and frequency of flares incident upon nearby HZ planets. At the same time, optical counterparts to CME-exoplanet-magnetosphere searches in the radio, and potentially-reduced flare interference for radial-velocity planet searches are obtained. The EvryFlare project employs the CTIO-based Evryscope, a combination of twenty-four telescopes, together giving instantaneous sky coverage of 8000 square degrees. Solar-type and red dwarf stars are selected by color and searched with an automated flare detector. We are currently sensitive to flares down to about 10 milli-magnitudes at g' 12 and about 0.2 of a magnitude at g' 15. With 2-minute cadence and a projected 5-year timeline with 1.5 years already recorded, we are precisely characterizing the flare rates and intensities of bright, nearby stars. With this information, we provide insight into the frequency and relative insolation incident upon HZ planets discovered orbiting nearby stars, as well as provide optical counterparts for radio planetary magnetosphere searches.

  12. RAPID TRANSITION OF UNCOMBED PENUMBRAE TO FACULAE DURING LARGE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Deng Na; Liu Chang

    2012-04-01

    In the past two decades, the complex nature of sunspots has been disclosed with high-resolution observations. One of the most important findings is the 'uncombed' penumbral structure, where a more horizontal magnetic component carrying most of Evershed flows is embedded in a more vertical magnetic background. The penumbral bright grains are locations of hot upflows and dark fibrils are locations of horizontal flows that are guided by a nearly horizontal magnetic field. On the other hand, it was found that flares may change the topology of sunspots in {delta} configuration: the structure at the flaring polarity inversion line becomes darkened while sections of peripheral penumbrae may disappear quickly and permanently associated with flares. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations obtained with the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope provide an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of penumbral fine structures associated with major flares. Taking advantage of two near-limb events, we found that in sections of peripheral penumbrae swept by flare ribbons the dark fibrils completely disappear, while the bright grains evolve into faculae that are signatures of vertical magnetic flux tubes. The corresponding magnetic fluxes measured in the decaying penumbrae show stepwise changes temporally correlated with the flares. These observations suggest that the horizontal magnetic field component of the penumbra could be straightened upward (i.e., turning from horizontal to vertical) due to magnetic field restructuring associated with flares, which results in the transition of penumbrae to faculae.

  13. Flare activity, sunspot motions, and the evolution of vector magnetic fields in Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Machado, Marcos E.; Smith, Jesse B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic and dynamical circumstances leading to the 1B/M4 flare of November 5, 1980 are studied, and a strong association is found between the buildup of magnetic shear and the onset of flare activity within the active region. The development of shear, as observed directly in vector magnetograms, is consistent in detail with the dynamical history of the active region and identifies the precise location of the optical and hard-X-ray kernels of the flare emission.

  14. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  15. Development of a fast and sensitive glucose biosensor using iridium complex-doped electrospun optical fibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuisong; Shi, Yalin; Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Luo, Jiaojiao; Lu, Zhiyun; Xiao, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Polystyrene electrospun optical fibrous membrane (EOF) was fabricated using a one-step electrospinning technique, functionalized with glucose oxidases (GOD/EOF), and used as a quick and highly sensitive optical biosensor. Because of the doped iridium complex, the fibrous membrane emitted yellow luminescence (562 nm) when excited at 405 nm. Its luminescence was significantly enhanced with the presence of extremely low concentration glucose. The detection limit was of 1.0 × 10(-10) M (S/N = 3), superior to that of reported glucose biosensor with 1.2 × 10(-10) M. A linear range between the relative intensity increase and the logarithm of glucose concentration was exhibited from 3.0 × 10(-10) M to 1.3 × 10(-4) M, which was much wider than reported results. Notably, the response time was less than 1 s. These high sensitivity and fast response were attributed to the high surface-area-to-volume of the porous fibrous membrane, the efficient GOD biocatalyst reaction on the fibers surface, as well as the fast electron or energy transfer between dissolved oxygen and the optical fibrous membrane.

  16. Optically-energized, emp-resistant, fast-acting, explosion initiating device

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David A.; Kuswa, Glenn W.

    1987-01-01

    Optical energy, provided from a remote user-operated source, is utilized to initially electrically charge a capacitor in a circuit that also contains an explosion initiating transducer in contact with a small explosive train contained in an attachable housing. Additional optical energy is subsequently supplied in a preferred embodiment to an optically responsive phototransistor acting in conjunction with a silicon controlled rectifer to release the stored electrical energy through the explosion initiating transducer to set off the explosive train. All energy transfers between the user and the explosive apparatus, either for charging it up or for setting it off, are conveyed optically and may be accomplished in a single optical fiber with coding to distinguish between specific optical energy transfers and between these and any extraneous signals.

  17. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  18. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10{sup 4} K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100.

  19. Damage testing of critical optical components for high power ultra-fast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Enam; Poole, Patrick; Jiang, Sheng; Taylor, Brittany; Daskalova, Rebecca; Van Woerkom, Linn; Freeman, Richard; Smith, Douglas

    2010-11-01

    Mirrors and gratings used in high power ultra fast lasers require a broad bandwidth and high damage fluence, which is essential to the design and construction of petawatt class short pulse lasers. Damage fluence of several commercially available high energy broad band dielectric mirrors with over 100 nm bandwidth at 45 degree angle of incidence, and pulse compression reflection gratings with gold coating with varying processing conditions is studied using a 25 femtosecond ultra-fast laser.

  20. Fast and cheap prototyping of nonstandard optical components for sensing speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Kühn, Jan; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothening standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development price and time can become a prohibitively large part of a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces of a molding tool may be done directly using diamond turning, but it is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, however, calling for manual polishing afterwards. Particularly, this last process is expensive as well, and will introduce an uncertainty in precisely how much material the polishing process will remove, introducing roughness on a larger lateral scale, such as waviness. Therefore, we have investigated the possibilities of smoothening surfaces of various shapes succeeding a standard CNC machining process. Different coatings have been tested for their abilities to fill and smoothen out structures of larger scales, while removing the small-scale roughness, which is critical for optical uses. In this work we will present an optical element, designed for optical spatial filtering velocimetry. The spatial filter is the key component in an optical sensor for non-contact measurement of surface vibrations, based on speckle dynamics. The optical element is casted in silicon. The results of smoothing an optical element will be demonstrated, and the sensor will be demonstrated for real-time measurements.

  1. Fast, high-fidelity, all-optical and dynamically-controlled polarization gate using room-temperature atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Runbing; Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L.; Hagley, E. W.

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a fast, all-optical polarization gate in a room-temperature atomic medium. Using a Polarization-Selective-Kerr-Phase-Shift (PSKPS) technique, we selectively write a π phase shift to one circularly-polarized component of a linearly-polarized input signal field. The output signal field maintains its original strength but acquires a 90° linear polarization rotation, demonstrating fast, high-fidelity, dynamically-controlled polarization gate operation. The intensity of the polarization-switching field used in this PKSPK-based polarization gate operation is only 2 mW/cm{sup 2}, which would be equivalent to 0.5 nW of light power (λ = 800 nm) confined in a typical commercial photonic hollow-core fiber. This development opens a realm of possibilities for potential future extremely low light level telecommunication and information processing systems.

  2. Fast, high-fidelity, all-optical and dynamically-controlled polarization gate using room-temperature atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Runbing; Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L.; Hagley, E. W.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a fast, all-optical polarization gate in a room-temperature atomic medium. Using a Polarization-Selective-Kerr-Phase-Shift (PSKPS) technique, we selectively write a π phase shift to one circularly-polarized component of a linearly-polarized input signal field. The output signal field maintains its original strength but acquires a 90° linear polarization rotation, demonstrating fast, high-fidelity, dynamically-controlled polarization gate operation. The intensity of the polarization-switching field used in this PKSPK-based polarization gate operation is only 2 mW/cm2, which would be equivalent to 0.5 nW of light power (λ = 800 nm) confined in a typical commercial photonic hollow-core fiber. This development opens a realm of possibilities for potential future extremely low light level telecommunication and information processing systems.

  3. Fast and efficient loading of a Rb magneto-optical trap using light-induced atomic desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Mai, B.; Rudavets, A.G.; Scansani, E.; Tomassetti, L.; Biancalana, V.; Burchianti, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Moi, L.; Veronesi, S.

    2003-05-01

    We have obtained fast loading of a rubidium magneto-optical trap and very high collection efficiency by capturing the atoms desorbed by a light flash from a polydimethylsiloxane film deposited on the internal surface of a cell. The atoms are trapped with an effective loading time of about 65 ms at a loading rate greater than 2x10{sup 8} atoms per second. This rate is larger than the values reported in literature and is obtained by preserving a long lifetime of the trapped atoms. This lifetime exceeds the filling time by nearly two orders of magnitude. Trap loading by light-induced desorption from siloxane compounds can be very effectively applied to store and trap a large number of atoms in the case of very weak atomic flux or extremely low vapor density. It can be also effectively used for fast production of ultracold atoms.

  4. Smokeless, efficient, nontoxic flaring

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, O.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The primary function of a flare is to dispose of toxic, corrosive or flammable vapors safely, under relief conditions, by converting them into less objectional products by combustion. Toxic limits are the greatest concentration of a poisonous substance that can be tolerated in the air for a length of time without danger. Most emergencies causing overpressure on safety relief valves can be controlled within 5 to 10 minutes, for example, by shutting down a pump or compressor. A period of 10 to 30 minutes should be sufficient to control any emergency situation short of a catastrophe. Atmospheric discharge of hydrocarbons or other flammables should be designed to avoid the formation of flammable mixtures and exposure of personnel to toxic or corrosive vapors at grade level or on elevated structures. Either elevated flares or ground flares can accomplish efficiently the discharges to atmosphere when properly designed. Proper design is based on the characteristics of waste gas, heat radiation, noise levels, smoke and atmospheric dispersion. Smokeless flares use smoke suppression systems, like stream injection, forced draft air fans, high pressure gas injection and other devices to reduce the smoking tendency of certain fuels, improving air entrainment and mixing.

  5. Workshop on Impulsive Solar Flares, 2nd, University of New Hampshire, Durham, Sept. 26-28, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers on impulsive solar flares are presented, covering topics such as the optical properties of impulsive flares, soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares, the energy release process in impulsive bursts, high-velocity evaporation and a high-speed shock wave during the impulsive phase of the April 24, 1984 flare, nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares, and meter-decimeter and microwave radio observations of solar flares. Other topics include rise times in solar radio bursts, removal of the gradual component in analyses of solar impulsive bursts, ion and relativistic electron transport in solar flares, neutrons and gamma-ray emission on June 3, 1982, emission characteristics of three intense solar flares in cycle 21, and solar flare gamma-ray observations with the Hinotori satellite. Additional topics include spectra of relativistic solar proton ground-level events recorded in Antarctica, a 153-d periodicity in the occurrence of solar flares producing energetic interplanetary electrons, a search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data, neutral beams in two-ribbon flares and in the geomagnetic tail, beam heating in solar flares, and solar flare gamma-ray line shapes.

  6. Ginga observations of X-ray flares on Algol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R. A.; Uchida, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Nagase, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Ginga X-ray satellite observed Algol (Beta Per) for 2 days in 1989 January, including both the primary optical eclipse and most of the secondary eclipse. We derive upper limits of about 20 and 10 percent, respectively, for the eclipsed flux fraction during the two eclipses. A large flare lasting over 12 hr was seen prior to and during secondary eclipse. High-temperature Fe line emission is clearly detected in the proportional counter data. The Fe line equivalent width is variable during the flare, ranging from 0.4-1.0 keV. Except for two intervals during the flare rise, the observed equivalent width is lower than predicted using solar abundances and an optically thin plasma model. Similar behavior has also been observed by Ginga in a large flare on UX Ari: in both events, opacity effects at line center may be playing a significant role. Loop model analysis of the large flare suggests that it involves a substantially longer loop or loops than a shorter duration Algol flare seen with Exosat.

  7. All sky coordination initiative, simple service for wide-field monitoring systems to cooperate in searching for fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Sokołowski, M.; Gorbovskoy, E.

    Here we stress the necessity of cooperation between different wide-field monitoring projects (FAVOR/TORTORA, Pi of the Sky, MASTER, etc), aimed for independent detection of fast optical transients, in order to maximize the area of the sky covered at any moment and to coordinate the monitoring of gamma-ray telescopes' field of view. We review current solutions available for it and propose a simple protocol with dedicated service (ASCI) for such systems to share their current status and pointing schedules.

  8. Performance evaluation of coherent free space optical communications with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror adaptive optics system depending on the Greenwood frequency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Kainan; Huang, Danian; Lin, Xudong; Wang, Liang; Lv, Yaowen

    2016-06-13

    The Greenwood frequency (GF) is influential in performance improvement for the coherent free space optical communications (CFSOC) system with a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) unit. We analyze the impact of tilt and high-order aberrations on the mixing efficiency (ME) and bit-error-rate (BER) under different GF. The root-mean-square value (RMS) of the ME related to the RMS of the tilt aberrations, and the GF is derived to estimate the volatility of the ME. Furthermore, a numerical simulation is applied to verify the theoretical analysis, and an experimental correction system is designed with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror and a 97-element continuous surface deformable mirror. The conclusions of this paper provide a reference for designing the AO system for the CFSOC system.

  9. Flaring Quasar 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrle, Ann; Ogle, Patrick

    2005-06-01

    The quasar 3C454.3 is currently undergoing the largest optical flare in its recorded history: during the past three weeks it has exceeded even 3C273 in optical brightness. We propose to observe 3C454.3 with Spitzer IPAC, MIPS and IRS during each of their normally scheduled blocks in June, July and August 2005, and repeat observations daily. Supporting ground based data will be obtained from Palomar Mountain (approved observations on the 60" robotic telescope; A. Wehrle, PI), Colgate University, and other observatories of the international blazar monitoring teams. The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has already started observing as a Target of Opportunity.

  10. SnO2-MOF-Fabry-Perot humidity optical sensor system based on fast Fourier transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Lopez-Torres, D.; Ascorbe, J.; Rota-Rodrigo, S.; Elosua, C.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Arregui, F. J.; Corres, J. M.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for relative humidity measurements based on a SnO2 sputtering deposition on a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) low-finesse Fabry-Perot (FP) sensing head is presented and characterized. The interrogation of the sensing head is carried out by monitoring the Fast Fourier Transform phase variations of the FP interference frequency. This method is low-sensitive to signal amplitude variations and also avoids the necessity of tracking the evolution of peaks and valleys in the spectrum. The sensor is operated within a wide humidity range (20%-90% relative humidity) with a maximum sensitivity achieved of 0.14rad/%. The measurement method uses a commercial optical interrogator as the only active element, this compact solution allows real time analysis of the data.

  11. Fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Myoung-Sun; Choi, Jae-yoon; Shin, Yong-il

    2011-01-15

    We demonstrate a fast production of large {sup 23}Na Bose-Einstein condensates in an optically plugged magnetic quadrupole trap. A single global minimum of the trapping potential is generated by slightly displacing the plug beam from the center of the quadrupole field. With a dark magneto-optical trap and a simple rf evaporation, our system produces a condensate with N{approx_equal}10{sup 7} atoms every 17 s. The Majorana loss rates and the resultant heating rates for various temperatures are measured with and without plugging. The average energy of a spin-flipped atom is almost linearly proportional to temperature and determined to be about 60% of the average energy of a trapped atom. We present a numerical study of the evaporation dynamics in a plugged linear trap.

  12. Association Between Aqueous Flare and Epiretinal Membrane in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kohta; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Nakatake, Shunji; Tachibana, Takashi; Yoshida, Noriko; Nakao, Shintaro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a frequent macular complication in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The etiology of ERM formation in RP is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between aqueous flare, a surrogate index of intraocular inflammation, and ERM secondary to RP. We retrospectively studied a total of 206 eyes of 117 patients who were diagnosed with typical RP. Aqueous flare values were measured consecutively in 2012 and 2013 using a laser flare cell meter. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images and fundus photographs taken on the same day of the aqueous flare measurements were analyzed for ERM detection. The mean values of aqueous flare, age, and frequency of male sex were significantly higher in the RP patients with ERM compared with the RP patients without ERM (P < 0.0001, P = 0.007, and P = 0.004, respectively). After adjustment for age and sex, the eyes in the highest quartile of aqueous flare had significantly higher odds of having ERM than those in the lowest quartile (odds ratio [OR], 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-6.93), and the linear trend across flare levels was significant (P = 0.005). In addition, each 1-log-transformed increase in flare values was associated with an elevation of the likelihood of having ERM (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.33-5.06). Our analysis demonstrated that elevated aqueous flare is associated with ERM secondary to RP, suggesting that inflammation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of ERM formation in RP.

  13. Predictions of reconnected flux, energy and helicity in eruptive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria Dmitiyevna

    2010-12-01

    In order to better understand the solar genesis of interplanetary magnetic clouds, I model the magnetic and topological properties of several large eruptive solar flares and relate them to observations. My main hypothesis is that the flux ropes ejected during eruptive solar flares are the result of a sequence of magnetic reconnections. To test this hypothesis, I use the three-dimensional Minimum Current Corona model of flare energy storage (Longcope, 1996) together with pre-flare photospheric magnetic field and flare ribbon observations to predict the basic flare properties: reconnected magnetic flux, free energy, and flux rope helicity. Initially, the MCC model was able to quantify the properties of the flares that occur in active regions with only photospheric shearing motions. Since rotating motions may also play a key role in the flare energetics, I develop a method for including both shearing and rotating motions into the MCC model. I use this modified method to predict the model flare properties and then compare them to the observed quantities. Firstly, for two flares in active regions with fast rotating sunspots, I find that the relative importance of shearing and rotation to those flares depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology. Secondly, for four flares analyzed with the MCC model (three flares described here and one flare described in Longcope et al. (2007)), I find that the modeled flare properties agree with the observed properties within the uncertainties of the methods used. This agreement compels me to believe that the magnetic clouds associated with these four solar flares are formed by low-corona magnetic reconnection during the eruption as modeled by the MCC model, rather than eruption of pre-existing structures in the corona or formation in the upper corona with participation of the global magnetic field. I note that since all four flares occurred in active regions without significant pre-flare flux emergence

  14. Improvement of the method of optical testing of fast aspherical surfaces with null-screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Aguirre Aguirre, Daniel; Armengol-Cruz, Victor de Emanuel

    2017-06-01

    We extend the principles of the null-screen method for testing fast aspheric surfaces with polynomial expansion. We present the formulae to design the null-screen in such a way that the image on the CCD is a perfect array circular points; the departures of the surface from a perfect shape are observed as deformations of the array in the image. For the testing of fast aspherics with polynomial expansion, we propose some geometrical configurations. In addition, we perform an analysis of the deformations of the image of the null-screen reflected by the testing surface due to the slop defects of the surface. Experimental results for the testing fast aspherics are shown. The main advantages and the limitations of the method will be discussed.

  15. Ultra-fast solid state electro-optical modulator based on liquid crystal polymer and liquid crystal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ouskova, Elena; Sio, Luciano De Vergara, Rafael; Tabiryan, Nelson; White, Timothy J.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2014-12-08

    A different generation of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on a liquid crystalline polymer host is reported wherein the fluid behavior of the reactive mesogenic monomer is an enabler to concentration windows (liquid crystal polymer/liquid crystal) (and subsequent morphologies) not previously explored. These liquid crystal (LC) polymer/LC composites, LCPDLCs, exhibit excellent optical and electro-optical properties with negligible scattering losses in both the ON and OFF states. These systems thus have application in systems where fast phase modulation of optical signal instead of amplitude control is needed. Polarized optical microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy confirm a bicontinuous morphology composed of aligned LC polymer coexisting with a phase separated LC fluid. Operating voltages, switching times, and spectra of LCPDLCs compare favourably to conventional PDLC films. The LCPDLCs exhibit a low switching voltage (4–5 V/μm), symmetric and submillisecond (200 μs) on/off response times, and high transmission in both the as formed and switched state in a phase modulation geometry.

  16. Out-of-focus background subtraction for fast structured illumination super-resolution microscopy of optically thick samples.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, P; Zhan, H; Orieux, F; Olivo-Marin, J-C; Lenkei, Z; Loriette, V; Fragola, A

    2015-09-01

    We propose a structured illumination microscopy method to combine super resolution and optical sectioning in three-dimensional (3D) samples that allows the use of two-dimensional (2D) data processing. Indeed, obtaining super-resolution images of thick samples is a difficult task if low spatial frequencies are present in the in-focus section of the sample, as these frequencies have to be distinguished from the out-of-focus background. A rigorous treatment would require a 3D reconstruction of the whole sample using a 3D point spread function and a 3D stack of structured illumination data. The number of raw images required, 15 per optical section in this case, limits the rate at which high-resolution images can be obtained. We show that by a succession of two different treatments of structured illumination data we can estimate the contrast of the illumination pattern and remove the out-of-focus content from the raw images. After this cleaning step, we can obtain super-resolution images of optical sections in thick samples using a two-beam harmonic illumination pattern and a limited number of raw images. This two-step processing makes it possible to obtain super resolved optical sections in thick samples as fast as if the sample was two-dimensional.

  17. Optical knobs from slow- to fast-light with gain in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dingan; Zeng, Yaguang; Bai, Yanfeng

    2011-09-01

    The light pulse propagation through semiconductor quantum-well heterostructures under realistic experimental conditions is studied analytically with the Schrödinger equations. It is shown that slow light and superluminal propagation with gain can be observed by varying the relative phase and the strength of the applied fields. Such investigation may open up the possibility to control the light propagation and may lead to potential applications such as high-fidelity optical delay lines, optical buffers and optical communication in quantum wells solid materials.

  18. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  19. A Hard Gamma-Ray Flare from 3C 279 in 2013 December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Diltz, Chris; Böttcher, Markus; Stalin, C. S.; Buckley, David

    2016-01-01

    The blazar 3C 279 exhibited twin γ-ray flares of similar intensity in 2013 December and 2014 April. In this work, we present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis of the 2013 December flaring event. Multi-frequency observations reveal the uncorrelated variability patterns with X-ray and optical-UV fluxes peaking after the γ-ray maximum. The broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) at the peak of the γ-ray activity shows a rising γ-ray spectrum but a declining optical-UV flux. This observation along with the detection of uncorrelated variability behavior rules out the one-zone leptonic emission scenario. We, therefore, adopt two independent methodologies to explain the SED: a time-dependent lepto-hadronic modeling and a two-zone leptonic radiative modeling approach. In the lepto-hadronic modeling, a distribution of electrons and protons subjected to a randomly orientated magnetic field produces synchrotron radiation. Electron synchrotron is used to explain the IR to UV emission while proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the high-energy γ-ray emission. A combination of both electron synchrotron self-Compton emission and proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the X-ray spectral break seen during the later stage of the flare. In the two-zone modeling, we assume a large emission region emitting primarily in IR to X-rays and γ-rays to come primarily from a fast-moving compact emission region. We conclude by noting that within a span of four months, 3C 279 has shown the dominance of a variety of radiative processes over each other and this reflects the complexity involved in understanding the physical properties of blazar jets in general.

  20. Noncontact three-dimensional quantitative profiling of fast aspheric lenses by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, Bujagouni Karthik; Udupa, Dinesh Venkatesh; Prathap, Chilakala; Shinde, Deepak Dilip; Rao, Kompalli Divakar; Sahoo, Naba Kishore

    2016-12-01

    The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for noncontact three-dimensional aspheric lens profiling and retrieval of aspheric surface parameters is demonstrated. Two commercially available aspheric lenses with different focal length-to-diameter ratio have been imaged using OCT, and the measured optical path length distribution has been least square fitted with the aspheric lens surface retrieving the radius of curvature, aspheric constant, and conic constants. The refractive index of these lenses has also been measured referencing with a standard Zerodur glass flat. The fitted aspheric surface coefficients of the lenses are in close agreement with the manufacturer's values, thus, envisaging the potential of OCT in rapid screening, testing of aspheric lenses, and other micro-optical components such as those used in illumination optics.

  1. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  2. Fast and scalable algorithm for the simulation of multiple Mie scattering in optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, Oliver; Kampmann, Ronald; Streicher, Simon; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2016-05-20

    The Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in optical systems requires the processing of a large number of photons to achieve a satisfactory statistical accuracy. Based on classical Mie scattering, we experimentally show that the independence of photons propagating through a turbid medium imposes a postulate for a concurrent and scalable programming paradigm of general purpose graphics processing units. This ensures that, without rewriting code, increasingly complex optical systems can be simulated if more processors are available in the future.

  3. Relationship of solar flare accelerated particles to solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in the interplanetary medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.

    2005-08-01

    Observations of hard X-ray (HXR)/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines produced by energetic electrons and ions, respectively, colliding with the solar atmosphere, have shown that large solar flares can accelerate ions up to many GeV and electrons up to hundreds of MeV. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are observed by spacecraft near 1 AU and by ground-based instrumentation to extend up to similar energies, but these appear to be accelerated by shocks associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) mission provides high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of flare HXRs and gamma-rays. Here we review RHESSI observations for large solar flares and SEP events. The 23 July gamma-ray line flare was associated with a fast, wide CME but no SEPs were observed, while the 21 April 2002 flare had no detectable gamma-ray line emission but a fast CME and strong SEP event were observed. The October- November 2003 series of large flares and associated fast CMEs produced both gamma-ray line emission and strong SEP events. The spectra of flare-accelerated protons, inferred from the gamma-ray line emission observed by RHESSI, is found to be essentially identical to the spectra of the SEPs observed near 1 AU for the well-connected 2 November and 20 January events.

  4. Fast technique for the identification of Gilbertella persicaria via optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Lachica, Isabel; Marquez-Zequera, Isidro; Allende-Molar, Raul; Sañudo-Barajas, Josefa Adriana; Leon-Felix, Josefina; Garcia-Estrada, Raymundo Saul

    2017-09-09

    Gilbertella persicaria is an important phytopathogen that is confused with Mucor spp. and Rhizopus spp. The main distinguishing characteristic of G. persicaria is the presence of appendages in sporangiospores, and their observation by conventional staining techniques generally fails. A technique is described using light microscopy for fast and reliable diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  6. Ultra-fast nonlinear optical properties and photophysical mechanism of a novel pyrene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youwei; Yang, Junyi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Song, Yinglin

    2016-10-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of 1-(pyrene-1-y1)-3-(3-methylthiophene) acrylic keton named PMTAK was investigated by using Z-scan technique. The light sources for picoseconds(ps) and femtosecond(fs) Z-scan were a mode-locked Nd: YAG laser (21 ps, 532 nm,10 Hz) and an Yb: KGW based fiber laser (190 fs, 515 nm,532 nm, 20 Hz), respectively. In the two cases, reverse saturation absorption(RSA) are observed. The dynamics of the sample's optical nonlinearity is discussed via the femtosecond time-resolved pump probe with phase object at 515nm. We believe that the molecules in excited state of particle population count is caused by two-photon absorption(TPA). The five-level theoretical model is used to analysis the optical nonlinear mechanism. Combining with the result of picosecond Z-scan experiment, a set of optical nonlinear parameters are calculated out. The femtosecond Z-scan experiment is taken to confirm these parameters. The obvious excited-state nonlinearity is found by the set of parameters. The result shows that the sample has good optical nonlinearity which indicates it has potential applications in nonlinear optics field.

  7. Derivation of the physical parameters for strong and weak flares from the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeida, M. A.; Rashed, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    The two flares of 19 and 30 July 1999 were observed in the Hα line using the multichannel flare spectrograph (MFS) at the Astronomical Institute in Ondřejov, Czech Republic. We use a modified cloud method to fit the Hα line profiles which avoids using the background profile. We obtain the four parameters of the two flares: the source function, the optical thickness at line center, the line-of-sight velocity and the Doppler width. The observed asymmetry profiles have been reproduced by the theoretical ones based on our model. A discussion is made about the results of strong and weak flares using the present method.

  8. Energy Release and Transport in Super-Hot Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; McTiernan, J. M.; Shih, A.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Allred, J. C.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares efficiently convert the magnetic energy stored in the Sun's complex coronal magnetic field into the kinetic energies of hot plasma, accelerated particles, and bulk flows. In intense flares, up to 10^32-33 ergs can go into heating plasma to tens of MK, accelerating electrons to hundreds of MeV and ions to tens of GeV, and ejecting 10^9-10 kg of coronal material into the heliosphere at thousands of km/s. However, the exact physical mechanisms behind these phenomena are poorly understood. For example, while "super-hot" (T > 30 MK) plasma temperatures appear to be common in the most intense, X-class flares, how that plasma is so efficiently heated remains unknown. Current studies favor an in situ heating process for super-hot plasma, versus chromospheric evaporation for cooler plasma, although the specific mechanism is under debate. X-class flares are also often associated with enhanced photospheric/chromospheric white light emission, which is itself poorly understood, and with fast (>1000 km/s) CMEs; super-hot flares are more commonly observed in eruptive two-ribbon arcade flares than in highly-confined events. These phenomena may well have common underlying drivers. We discuss the current understanding of super-hot plasma in solar flares, its formation, and evolution, based on observations from RHESSI, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA, and other instruments. We discuss the energetics of these events and their relationship to white light enhancement and fast CMEs. We explore the possibility of energy deposition by accelerated ions as a common driver for super-hot plasmas and white light enhancement, and discuss future instrumentation -- both for CubeSats and Explorers -- that will provide a deeper understanding of these phenomena and their interrelationships.

  9. Bright Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A bright solar flare is captured by the EIT 195Å instrument on 1998 May 2. A solar flare (a sudden, rapid, and intense variation in brightness) occurs when magnetic energy that has built up in the solar atmosphere is suddenly released, launching material outward at millions of km per hour. The Sun’s magnetic fields tend to restrain each other and force the buildup of tremendous energy, like twisting rubber bands, so much that they eventually break. At some point, the magnetic lines of force merge and cancel in a process known as magnetic reconnection, causing plasma to forcefully escape from the Sun. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  10. Design and development of a profilometer for the fast and accurate characterization of optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Pedrero, José A.; Rodríguez-Ibañez, Diego; Alonso, José; Quirgoa, Juan A.

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of techniques devised for the mass production of optical components made with surfaces of arbitrary form (also known as free form surfaces) in the last years, a parallel development of measuring systems adapted for these new kind of surfaces constitutes a real necessity for the industry. Profilometry is one of the preferred methods for the assessment of the quality of a surface, and is widely employed in the optical fabrication industry for the quality control of its products. In this work, we present the design, development and assembly of a new profilometer with five axis of movement, specifically suited to the measurement of medium size (up to 150 mm of diameter) "free-form" optical surfaces with sub-micrometer accuracy and low measuring times. The apparatus is formed by three X, Y, Z linear motorized positioners plus and additional angular and a tilt positioner employed to locate accurately the surface to be measured and the probe which can be a mechanical or an optical one, being optical one a confocal sensor based on chromatic aberration. Both optical and mechanical probes guarantee an accuracy lower than the micrometer in the determination of the surface height, thus ensuring an accuracy in the surface curvatures of the order of 0.01 D or better. An original calibration procedure based on the measurement of a precision sphere has been developed in order to correct the perpendicularity error between the axes of the linear positioners. To reduce the measuring time of the profilometer, a custom electronics, based on an Arduino™ controller, have been designed and produced in order to synchronize the five motorized positioners and the optical and mechanical probes so that a medium size surface (around 10 cm of diameter) with a dynamic range in curvatures of around 10 D, can be measured in less than 300 seconds (using three axes) keeping the resolution in height and curvature in the figures mentioned above.

  11. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  12. Spectroscopic Exploration of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Paxton, L. J.; Woods, T. N.

    2016-12-01

    Professor Eugene Parker has educated and inspired the heliophysics community since the 1950s about the Parker spiral path for the solar wind, magnetic reconnection throughout the heliosphere, and coronal heating by nano-flares. Solar flares, as well as their often eruptive companions called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), have been studied for decades. While most of these studies involve imaging the Sun, observations of the Sun as a star (full-disk irradiance) have also revealed interesting results through exploring the spectral variability during flare events. Some of the new results from such studies include understanding the flare variability over all wavelengths from the energetic X-rays to the visible, discovering and classifying different flare phases, using coronal dimming measurements to predict CME properties of mass and velocity, and exploring the role of Parker's nano-flares in continual heating of active regions.

  13. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  14. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2. 23 refs.

  15. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  16. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  17. Well-observed Dynamics of Flaring and Peripheral Coronal Magnetic Loops during an M-class Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Li

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  18. Correlative Studies of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, post-doc Haimin Wang was awarded a Compton GRO Fellowship by NASA to study the flares observed simultaneously by BATSE (Burst and Transient Experiment), OVRO (Owens Valley Radio Observatory), Yohkoh, and BBSO (Big Bear Solar Observatory). During the past four years, a number of flares have been analyzed in detail. Substantial information on the physics of flares came out of these studies.

  19. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  20. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  1. Saturation phenomenon research of fast light in a Tm3+-doped optical fiber at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Yuda; Yang, Yujing; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2017-09-01

    The theoretical model and numerical simulations are established by the rate equation of thulium ion. Using the coherent population oscillation effect, we realize the controllable light velocity in the thulium doped fiber. We show that coherent population oscillations effect produces a very narrow spectral hole and anti-holes in the spectrum. The hole caused the amplitude modulation beam experience a large change of the group of refractive index, and makes us to achieve fast light propagation. Therefore, the pump intensity can be used as a control parameter to increase the fractional advance. In addition, we can confirm that the larger input intensity can lead to large time advancement, and saturation phenomenon of fast light exists in low frequency.

  2. Highly accurate and fast optical penetration-based silkworm gender separation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamtongdee, Chakkrit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Chanhorm, Sataporn

    2015-07-01

    Based on our research work in the last five years, this paper highlights our innovative optical sensing system that can identify and separate silkworm gender highly suitable for sericulture industry. The key idea relies on our proposed optical penetration concepts and once combined with simple image processing operations leads to high accuracy in identifying of silkworm gender. Inside the system, there are electronic and mechanical parts that assist in controlling the overall system operation, processing the optical signal, and separating the female from male silkworm pupae. With current system performance, we achieve a very highly accurate more than 95% in identifying gender of silkworm pupae with an average system operational speed of 30 silkworm pupae/minute. Three of our systems are already in operation at Thailand's Queen Sirikit Sericulture Centers.

  3. Fast and accurate determination of the detergent efficiency by optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsa, Maria; Pfeiffer, Helge; Wevers, Martine

    2011-06-01

    An optical fiber sensor was developed to control the cleaning efficiency of surfactants. Prior to the measurements, the sensing part of the probe is covered with a uniform standardized soil layer (lipid multilayer), and a gold mirror is deposited at the end of the optical fiber. For the lipid multilayer deposition on the fiber, Langmuir-Blodgett technique was used and the progress of deposition was followed online by ultraviolet spectroscopy. The invention provides a miniaturized Surface Plasmon Resonance dip-sensor for automated on-line testing that can replace the cost and time consuming existing methods and develop a breakthrough in detergent testing in combining optical sensing, surface chemistry and automated data acquisition. The sensor is to be used to evaluate detergency of different cleaning products and also indicate how formulation, concentration, lipid nature and temperature affect the cleaning behavior of a surfactant.

  4. Electrically tunable fast light at THz bandwidth using cascaded semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Pesala, Bala; Sedgwick, Forrest; Uskov, Alexander V; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2007-11-26

    Ultra fast non-linear processes are used to achieve an advance of 2 ps for a 600 fs pulse propagating through two SOAs in series. This corresponding 3.3-pulse advance is tuned continuously by changing the current applied to the devices. We propose an experimental scheme that uses a single SOA in a loop to emulate the propagation of pulse through multiple cascaded SOAs.

  5. Fast, all-optical, zero to π continuously controllable Kerr phase gate.

    PubMed

    Li, R B; Deng, L; Hagley, E W

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate a fast Kerr phase gate in a room-temperature (85)Rb vapor using a Raman gain method where the probe wave travels "superluminally". Continuously variable, zero to π radian nonlinear Kerr phase shifts of the probe wave relative to a reference wave have been observed at 333 K. We show rapid manipulation of digitally encoded probe waves using a digitally encoded phase-control light field, demonstrating the capability of the system in information science and telecommunication applications.

  6. Optical characterization of the SOFIA telescope using fast EM-CCD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfüller, Enrico; Wolf, Jürgen; Hall, Helen; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently demonstrated its scientific capabilities in a first series of astronomical observing flights. In parallel, special measurements and engineering flights were conducted aiming at the characterization and the commissioning of the telescope and the complete airborne observatory. To support the characterization measurements, two commercial Andor iXon EM-CCD cameras have been used, a DU-888 dubbed Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) running at frame rates up to about 400 fps, and a DU-860 as a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) providing 2000 fps. Both cameras have been mounted to the telescope’s Focal Plane Imager (FPI) flange in lieu of the standard FPI tracking camera. Their fast image sequences have been used to analyze and to improve the telescope’s pointing stability, especially to help tuning active mass dampers that suppress eigenfrequencies in the telescope system, to characterize and to optimize the chopping secondary mirror and to investigate the structure and behavior of the shear layer that forms over the open telescope cavity in flight. In June 2011, a collaboration between the HIPO science instrument team, the MIT’s stellar occultation group and the FDC team, led to the first SOFIA observation of a stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Pluto over the Pacific.

  7. SCRAM: A fast computational model for the optical performance of point focus solar central receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, K. D.; Chiang, C. J.

    1980-04-01

    A mathematical approximation procedure, designated Sandia Central Receiver Approximation Model is described. A computational procedure which allows the user to define the heliostat field boundaries and tower height arbitrarily, generating a model for optical field performance, including shadowing, blocking, cosine, losses, and atmospheric attenuation, and which requires only a polynomial evaluation for each set of Sun angles was developed. One reason that the accuracy in field performance predictions is higher than that of the generating function for the model is that much of the error in the generating function is due to an oscillatory behavior associated with a moire pattern in the optical response of the heliostat field.

  8. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  9. Plasmonic particles set into fast orbital motion by an optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Lehmuskero, Anni; Li, Yanming; Johansson, Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2014-02-24

    We optically trap plasmonic gold particles in two dimensions and set them into circular motion around the optical axis using a helically phased vortex laser beam. The orbiting frequency of the particles reaches 86 Hz, which corresponds to a particle velocity of the order 1 mm per second, for an incident laser power of a few tens of milliwatts. The experimentally determined orbiting frequencies are found to be well in line with the notion that the beam carries an orbital angular momentum of ħl per photon.

  10. Distribution of pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve. An autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1981-07-01

    The distribution of transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve from eyes subjected to five hours of pressure elevation (perfusion pressure of 35 mm Hg) was studied. Tissue autoradiography and electron microscopy were used to localize regions of the lamina cribrosa with increased transport interruption. A preferential involvement by this transport abnormality involved the superior, temporal, and inferior portions, to the exclusion of the nasal portion, of the optic nerve head. This observation supports the hypothesis that transport interruption seen in this model may be pertinent to the study of clinical glaucomatous neuropathy.

  11. Detection of Fast Radio Variability of Radio Objects with Continuous Optical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.

    The results of the search for rapid variability (T > 1 day) in centimeter range using RATAN-600 in 14 radio objects with contiuous optical spectra are given. In 9 of them, namely 0109+224, 0139-097, 0300+471, 0306+102, 0754+100, 0818-128, 0823-223, 1034-293 and 1538+149 the rapid variability is detected at the wavelengths either 3.9 or 8.2 cm with the confidence probability > 0.98. The conclusion is reached on the close correlation of the presence of the rapid radiovariability and the relative power of non-thermal optical continuum.

  12. The flares of August 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis is made of observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra. In each flare the observations fit a model of particle acceleration in the chromosphere with emission produced by impart and by heating by the energetic electrons and protons. The region showed twisted flux and high gradients from birth, and flares appear due to strong magnetic shears and gradients across the neutral line produced by sunspot motions. Post flare loops show a strong change from sheared, force-free fields parallel to potential-field-like loops, perpendicular to the neutral line above the surface.

  13. Solar Flares with some Flair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-23

    The Sun produced three M-class (medium-sized) flares in less than 13 hours and the third one had an interesting flourish at the end (July 22-23, 2016). These were the largest flares the Sun had produced this year. The first two flares occurred in quick succession. The third one (see the still taken at 5:38 UT on the 23rd), besides the familiar bright flash of a flare, also spewed out into space a curving string of plasma. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17912

  14. DRAFTS: A DEEP, RAPID ARCHIVAL FLARE TRANSIENT SEARCH IN THE GALACTIC BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Osten, Rachel A.; Sahu, Kailash; Kowalski, Adam; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2012-07-20

    We utilize the Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data set for a Deep Rapid Archival Flare Transient Search to constrain the flare rate toward the older stellar population in the Galactic bulge. During seven days of monitoring 229,293 stars brighter than V = 29.5, we find evidence for flaring activity in 105 stars between V = 20 and V = 28. We divided the sample into non-variable stars and variable stars whose light curves contain large-scale variability. The flare rate on variable stars is {approx}700 times that of non-variable stars, with a significant correlation between the amount of underlying stellar variability and peak flare amplitude. The flare energy loss rates are generally higher than those of nearby well-studied single dMe flare stars. The distribution of proper motions is consistent with the flaring stars being at the distance and age of the Galactic bulge. If they are single dwarfs, then they span a range of Almost-Equal-To 1.0-0.25 M{sub Sun }. A majority of the flaring stars exhibit periodic photometric modulations with P < 3 days. If these are tidally locked magnetically active binary systems, then their fraction in the bulge is enhanced by a factor of {approx}20 compared to the local value. These stars may be useful for placing constraints on the angular momentum evolution of cool close binary stars. Our results expand the type of stars studied for flares in the optical band, and suggest that future sensitive optical time-domain studies will have to contend with a larger sample of flaring stars than the M dwarf flare stars usually considered.

  15. Study of a novel fast restoration mechanism for data-intensive applications in grid-enabled optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Wu, Runze; Qiao, Yaojun; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    During the past few years, gird technology has gained a rapid progress in E-Science, E-education, etc. All these typical grid applications are involved with huge data transacting and collaborating that need a more capable network infrastructure with sufficient bandwidth provisioning and high QOS guarantee other then the traditional Internet. Thus gives birth to the concept of Grid-enabled Optical Network (Optical Grid), which mainly orients to the data-intensive applications. In this paper, we give a vivid definition to Optical Grid, expound the most distinguished characteristics of it, propose a novel SOA-based architecture for it, and then introduce a fast and flexible restoration mechanism, named DIR, based on mature RSVP-TE for its control plane to support data-intensive grid applications, then make a deep analysis and illustration on the proposed mechanism, finally draw a conclusion that the DIR mechanism can achieve much rapid service recovery speed thus be very applicable for the distributed grid environment.

  16. Synchronous triple-optical-path digital speckle pattern interferometry with fast discrete curvelet transform for measuring three-dimensional displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guoqing; Wang, Kaifu; Wang, Yanfang; She, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established and widely used optical measurement technique for obtaining qualitative as well as quantitative measurements of objects deformation. The simultaneous measurement of an object's surface displacements in three dimensions using DSPI is of great interest. This paper presents a triple-optical-path DSPI based method for the simultaneous and independent measurement of three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields. In the proposed method, in-plane speckle interferometers with dual-observation geometry and an out-of-plane interferometer are optimally combined to construct an integrated triple-optical-path DSPI system employing the phase shift technique, which uses only a single laser source and three cameras. These cameras are placed along a single line to synchronously capture real-time visible speckle fringe patterns in three dimensions. In addition, a pre-filtering method based on the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) is utilized for denoising the obtained wrapped phase patterns to improve measurement accuracy. Finally, the simultaneous measurement of the 3D displacement fields of a simple beam and a composite laminated plate respectively subjected to three-point and single-point bend loading are investigated to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Observations of a Two Ribbon White Light Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Mickey, D.; LaBonte, B.

    2003-05-01

    On July 15 2002, an X3 flare occured within AR10030 and it was accompanied with a white light flare (WLF). The Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory recorded the entire event including several hours of data before and after the flare. The IVM continuum images are taken at time cadence as high as 1 seconds per image. Such observations enabled us to resolve the WLF patches in time and space. We will present (1). the initial WLF patch fell on a small sunspot located at an area surrounded with single relatively weak magnetic polarity between proceeding and following sunspot groups; (2) the energy deposited during the WLF flare; (3) the light curves of the optical continuum, the UV continuum (TRACE/1600) and microwaves (1.2 - 18 GHz from Oven's Valley Solar Array). They demonstrate the same profiles during flare impulsive phase. The observations suggest that the origin of the WLF flare was caused by accelerated particles precipitate into lower atmosphere along magnetic field lines. This work is supported by NASA grant to Mess Solar Observatory and MURI program.

  18. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  19. A multi-wavelength view of AB Doradus outer atmosphere . Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy at high cadence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Wolter, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the chromosphere and corona of the ultra-fast rotator AB Dor A at high temporal and spectral resolution using simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton in the X-rays, VLT/UVES in the optical, and the ATCA in the radio. Our optical spectra have a resolving power of ~50 000 with a time cadence of ~1 min. Our observations continuously cover more than one rotational period and include both quiescent periods and three flaring events of different strengths. Methods: From the X-ray observations we investigated the variations in coronal temperature, emission measure, densities, and abundance. We interpreted our data in terms of a loop model. From the optical data we characterised the flaring chromospheric material using numerous emission lines that appear in the course of the flares. A detailed analysis of the line shapes and line centres allowed us to infer physical characteristics of the flaring chromosphere and to coarsely localise the flare event on the star. Results: We specifically used the optical high-cadence spectra to demonstrate that both turbulent and Stark broadening are present during the first ten minutes of the first flare. Also, in the first few minutes of this flare, we find short-lived (one to several minutes) emission subcomponents in the Hα and Ca ii K lines, which we interpret as flare-connected shocks owing to their high intrinsic velocities. Combining the space-based data with the results of our optical spectroscopy, we derive flare-filling factors. Finally, comparing X-ray, optical broadband, and line emission, we find a correlation for two of the three flaring events, while there is no clear correlation for one event. Also, we do not find any correlation of the radio data to any other observed data. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002A and on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member

  20. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Jenna R.; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes. PMID:26625116

  1. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes.

  2. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-03

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  4. Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Line Flares,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Sauna -ray line flares now identified, can yield valuable insight that is not obtainable from studying the few Sana-ray line flares observed before...Spectrometer (HUBS; cf., Orwig, Dennis, and Frost 1980) and found that the Sauna -ray line flares are very intense hard X-ray flares. For comparison, we...found that all the Sauna -ray line flares produced hard X-ray emissions with RXRBS peak count rates > 7500 counts s"- (all but two flares were > 104

  5. A concept for the readout of multichannel detectors by using analog signal transmission via optical fibres coupled to a fast CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Lorenz, E.; Rose, J.

    2000-06-01

    Recent developments in the field of electro-optical components allowed one to transform fast analog electrical signals into fast light pulses in a wide dynamic range and to send them via optical fibres over relatively long distances with very low time dispersion and amplitude losses. Here we propose to use the analog signal fibre transmission technique in combination with fast CCDs for the data acquisition of multichannel detectors as, for example, for the read out of imaging cameras of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Hundreds of signal channels can be read out by using commercially available single CCD module in fast gated mode. The latter can provide high amplitude resolution and an acquisition rate of up to a few hundred Hz. Such a system can provide significantly lower costs compared to traditionally used amplitude digitizing systems. .

  6. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  7. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, M.; Ikuta, R.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T. E-mail: yamamoto@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Özdemir, Ş. K. E-mail: yamamoto@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Chen, W.; Yang, L.

    2016-05-02

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er{sup 3+}) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two m-class flares

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; ...

    2014-04-29

    Here, we present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. Our work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed bymore » slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. Furthermore, this would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.« less

  9. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two m-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2014-04-29

    Here, we present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. Our work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. Furthermore, this would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  10. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  11. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  12. Type III radio burst productivity of solar flares. I - Release of energetic electrons out of the flare site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poquerusse, M.; McIntosh, P. S.

    1990-12-01

    The statistical relationship between type III radio bursts and optical flares, using the comprehensive flare data base at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (Boulder, Colorado), and the radio observations obtained with the ARTEMIS multichannel spectrograph in Nancay (France), operating at 500-100 MHz are presented. At variance with previous results, it is seen that type III probability of occurrence depends only weakly upon the spatial extension of the flare observed in H-alpha, but strongly upon its brightness. It is confirmed that the type III probability increases with proximity to sunspots and with mass motions (surges and prominence activity); in addition, statistical data are consistent with both relations holding at fixed flare brightness. Thus, some of the conditions favorable to type III occurrence are characteristic of compact flares, while others are characteristic of large and long-duration flares, which are often related to mass ejections. This apparent paradox suggests that particle acceleration and magnetic expansion are at work simultaneously in the ejection of electron streams out of faring sites.

  13. Mid infra-red hyper-spectral imaging with bright super continuum source and fast acousto-optic tuneable filter for cytological applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farries, Mark; Ward, Jon; Valle, Stefano; Stephens, Gary; Moselund, Peter; van der Zanden, Koen; Napier, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Mid-IR imaging spectroscopy has the potential to offer an effective tool for early cancer diagnosis. Current development of bright super-continuum sources, narrow band acousto-optic tunable filters and fast cameras have made feasible a system that can be used for fast diagnosis of cancer in vivo at point of care. The performance of a proto system that has been developed under the Minerva project is described.

  14. Radio-interferometric Monitoring of FRB 131104: A Coincident AGN Flare, but No Evidence for a Cosmic Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. M.; Ravi, V.

    2017-03-01

    The localization of fast radio bursts (FRBs) has been hindered by the poor angular resolution of the detection observations and inconclusive identification of transient or variable counterparts. Recently a γ-ray pulse of 380 s duration has been associated with FRB 131104. We report on radio-continuum imaging observations of the original localization region of the FRB, beginning three days after the event and comprising 25 epochs over 2.5 years. We argue that the probability of an association between the FRB and the γ-ray transient has been overestimated. We provide upper limits on radio afterglow emission that would be predicted if the γ-ray transient was associated with an energetic γ-ray burst. We further report the discovery of an unusual variable radio source spatially and temporally coincident with FRB 131104, but not spatially coincident with the γ-ray event. The radio variable flares by a factor of 3 above its long-term average within 10 day of the FRB at 7.5 GHz, with a factor-of-2 increase at 5.5 GHz. Since the flare, the variable has persisted with only modest modulation and never approached the flux density observed in the days after the FRB. We identify an optical counterpart to the variable. Optical and infrared photometry, and deep optical spectroscopy, suggest that the object is a narrow-line radio active galactic nucleus.

  15. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-12

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  16. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  17. Fast and efficient image reconstruction for high density diffuse optical imaging of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Culver, Joseph P.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Real-time imaging of human brain has become an important technique within neuroimaging. In this study, a fast and efficient sensitivity map generation based on Finite Element Models (FEM) is developed which utilises a reduced sensitivitys matrix taking advantage of sparsity and parallelisation processes. Time and memory efficiency of these processes are evaluated and compared with conventional method showing that for a range of mesh densities from 50000 to 320000 nodes, the required memory is reduced over tenfold and computational time fourfold allowing for near real-time image recovery. PMID:26601019

  18. Properties of Solar Flare Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan; DeRosa, Marc

    The continuous full disk observations provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give an observer the impression that flare and filament eruptions are related. However, both detailed analysis of a number of events as well as a number of statistical studies have provided only rare examples of clear causal behavior. But the mechanisms of flare triggering are not well understood, so the lack of hard evidence is not surprising. Here we have examined the waiting-time statistics of GOES X-ray flares of magnitude C5 or greater during the last sunspot cycle with the aim of assessing the degree to which flares are clustered in time. Clusters are groups of flares in which all successive flares occur within a fixed separation time - the linking window. While many of the flares in a cluster may come from the same active region, the clusters that last more than a disk passage must result from flares in multiple active regions. The longest cluster of the last cycle lasted more than 42 days. None of the flares were separated by more than 36 hours. Since that cluster lasted more than three disk passages, it could not have been caused by a single region. We find that during the last maximum, eight clusters contributed 44% of all flares. All of these clusters spanned multiple disk passages, but occupied only 16.5% of the cycle duration. Two of the clusters provided 34% of the flares. We suggest that this behavior implies that a component of the observed coordinated behavior has its origin in the solar dynamo.

  19. Giant Radio Flare of Cygnus X-3 in September 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. A.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Zhekanis, G. V.

    2017-06-01

    In the long-term multi-frequency monitoring program of the microquasars with RATAN-600 we discovered the giant flare from X-ray binary Cyg X-3 on 13 September 2016. It happened after 2000 days of the 'quiescent state' of the source passed after the former giant flare (˜18 Jy) in March 2011. We have found that during this quiet period the hard X-ray flux (Swift/BAT, 15-50 keV) and radio flux (RATAN-600, 11 GHz) have been strongly anti-correlated. Both radio flares occurred after transitions of the microquasar to a 'hypersoft' X-ray state that occurred in February 2011 and in the end of August 2016. The giant flare was predicted by us in the first ATel (Trushkin et al. (2016)). Indeed after dramatic decrease of the hard X-ray Swift 15-50 keV flux and RATAN 4- 11 GHz fluxes (a 'quenched state') a small flare (0.7 Jy at 4-11 GHz) developed on MJD 57632 and then on MJD 57644.5 almost simultaneously with X-rays radio flux rose from 0.01 to 15 Jy at 4.6 GHz during few days. The rise of the flaring flux is well fitted by a exponential law that could be a initial phase of the relativistic electrons generation by internal shock waves in the jets. Initially spectra were optically thick at frequencies lower 2 GHz and optically thin at frequencies higher 8 GHz with typical spectral index about -0.5. After maximum of the flare radio fluxes at all frequencies faded out with exponential law.

  20. Examining Cortical Dynamics and Connectivity with Simultaneous Single-Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Fast Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Nathan A.; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Beck, Diane M.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used experimental and clinical technique that directly induces activity in human cortex using magnetic fields. However, the neural mechanisms of TMS-induced activity are not well understood. Here, we introduce a novel method of imaging TMS-evoked activity using a non-invasive fast optical imaging tool, the event-related optical signal (EROS). EROS measures changes in the scattering of near-infrared light that occur synchronously with electrical activity in cortical tissue. EROS has good temporal and spatial resolution, allowing the dynamics and spatial spread of a TMS pulse to be measured. We used EROS to monitor activity induced in primary motor cortex (M1) by a TMS pulse. Left- and right-hand representations were mapped using standard TMS procedures. Optical sources and detectors mounted on thin rubber patches were then centered on M1 hand representations. EROS was recorded bilaterally from motor cortex while unilateral TMS was simultaneously delivered. Robust ipsilateral EROS activations were apparent within 16 ms of a pulse for TMS delivered to both left and right hemispheres. Clear motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also elicited by these TMS pulses. Movement artifacts could be excluded as a source of EROS, as no activation was present on short-distance optical channels. For left hemisphere TMS subsequent (40 ms) contralateral activity was also present, presumably due to trans-synaptic propagation of TMS-evoked activity. Results demonstrate that concurrent TMS/EROS is a viable and potentially powerful method for studying TMS-induced activity in the human brain. With further development, this technique may be applied more broadly in the study of the dynamics of causal cortico-cortical connectivity. PMID:21925608