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Sample records for fast ramped superconducting

  1. CABLE DESIGN FOR FAST RAMPED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS (COS-0 DESIGN).

    SciTech Connect

    GHOSH,A.

    2004-03-22

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 300 T-m and 100 T-m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of ac loss and magnetic field distortion. The development of the low loss Rutherford cable that can be used is described, together with a novel insulation scheme designed to promote efficient cooling. Measurements of contact resistance in the cable are presented and the results of these measurements are used to predict the ac losses, in the magnets during fast ramp operation. For the high energy ring, a lm model dipole magnet was built, based on the RHIC dipole design. This magnet was tested under boiling liquid helium in a vertical cryostat. The quench current showed very little dependence on ramp rate. The ac losses, measured by an electrical method, were fitted to straight line plots of loss/cycle versus ramp rate, thereby separating the eddy current and hysteresis components. These results were compared with calculated values, using parameters which had previously been measured on short samples of cable. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment was found, although the measured hysteresis loss is higher than expected in ramps to the highest field levels.

  2. Thermodynamic Properties of Fast Ramped Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for the Fair Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Mierau, A.; Schnizer, P.; Bleile, A.; Gärtner, W.; Guymenuk, O.; Khodzhibagiyan, H.; Schroeder, C.; Sikler, G.; Stafiniak, A.

    2010-04-01

    The 100 Tm synchrotron SIS 100 is the core component of the international Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) to be built at GSI Darmstadt. The 108 bending magnets are 3 m long 2 T superferric dipoles providing a nominal ramp rate of 4 T/s within a usable aperture of 115 mmṡ60 mm. An intensive R&D period was conducted to minimise the AC losses to lower operation costs and to guarantee a safe thermal stability for long term continuous cycling with a maximum repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The latter requirement is strictly limited by the overall heat flow originated by eddy currents and hysteresis losses in iron yoke and coil as well as by its hydraulic resistance respective to the forced two phase helium cooling flow within the hollow superconducting cable. Recently three full size dipoles—and one quadrupole magnets were built and intensive tests have been started in the end of 2008 at the GSI cryogenic test facility. We present the measured thermodynamic parameters of the first tested dipole: AC losses depending on Bmax and dB/dt for various characteristic ramping modes and conclude for necessary optimisations toward the final design of the series magnets.

  3. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  4. Fast current ramp experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Morris, A.W.; Stauffer, F.J.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    Electron heat transport on TFTR and other tokamaks is several orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical calculations would predict. Despite considerable effort, there is still no clear theoretical understanding of this anomalous transport. The electron temperature profile T/sub e/(r), shape has shown a marked consistency on many machines, including TFTR, for a wide range of plasma parameters and heating profiles. This could be an important clue as to the process responsible for this enhanced thermal transport. In this paper 'profile consistency' in TFTR is described and an experiment which uses a fast current ramp to transiently decouple the current density profile J(r), and the T/sub e/(r) profiles is discussed. From this experiment the influence of J(r) on electron temperature profile consistency can be determined.

  5. CORED RUTHERFORD CABLES FOR THE GSI FAST RAMPING SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,M.N.; GHOSH,A.K.; TEN HAKEN,B.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; KAUGERTS,J.; MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; DEN OUDEN,A.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.; WESSEL,W.A.J.

    2002-08-04

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 200T-m and 100T.m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of s c loss and field distortion. This paper discusses the 200T.m ring, which will use Cos0 magnets based on the RHIC dipole design. We discuss the reasons for choosing Rutherford cable with a resistive core and report loss measurements carried out on cable samples. These measurements are compared with theoretical calculations using measured values of inter-strand resistance. Reasonably good agreement is found, but there are indications of non-uniformity in the adjacent resistance R,. Using these measured parameters, losses and temperature rise are calculated for a RHIC dipole in the operating cycle of the accelerator. A novel insulation scheme designed to promote efficient cooling is described.

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIELD QUALITY IN SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLES AT HIGH RAMP RATES.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS, R.; WANDERER, P.

    2006-09-18

    Several recent applications of superconducting magnets require the magnets to be operated at high ramp rates and at frequencies of several Hertz. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has recently designed and built prototypes of superconducting dipole magnets that can be ramped at a fairly high rate (1 T/s or more). For accelerator applications, it is also crucial that the magnets maintain good field quality even at high ramp rates. In order to characterize the field quality of magnets at high ramp rates, a measurement system consisting of 16 printed circuit tangential coils has been developed. The coil system is held stationary while the magnet is ramped. This paper describes the techniques used for the measurements and data analysis, and presents the results of measurements at ramp rates of up to 4 T/s in a prototype dipole built at BNL for GSI.

  7. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1995-12-31

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

  8. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  9. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  10. A VERY FAST RAMPING MUON SYNCHROTRON FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUMMERS,D.J.BERG,J.S.PALMER,R.B.GARREN,A.A.

    2003-05-12

    A 4600 Hz fast ramping synchrotron is studied as an economical way of accelerating muons from 4 to 20 GeV/c for a neutrino factory. Eddy current losses are minimized by the low machine duty cycle plus thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations and thin copper wires. Combined function magnets with high gradients alternating within single magnets form the lattice. Muon survival is 83%.

  11. A Lattice for a Hybrid Fast-Ramping Muon Accelerator to 750 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.

    2011-09-06

    We describe a lattice for accelerating muons from 375 GeV to 750 GeV. The lattice is a fast-ramping synchrotron with a mixture of fixed-field superconducting dipoles and warm dipoles, so as to have a high average bending field while still being able to rapidly change the average bending field as the beam momentum increases. For a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider, muons must be rapidly accelerated to 750 GeV. To accomplish this efficiently, we wish to make as many passes through the RF cavities as possible, while keeping the average RF gradients sufficiently high to avoid excess muon decays. A synchrotron where the magnets are very rapidly ramped has been envisioned as one option to accomplish this. The entire acceleration cycle takes place in less than 1 ms, presenting a technological challenge for the magnets. Clearly superconducting magnets cannot be ramped on this time scale, so instead room-temperature magnets will be ramped. To keep losses low, dipoles can use grain-oriented silicon steel, but quadrupoles will probably need to use more conventional steel, giving a lower maximum field for these high ramping rates. If we want to have a large average RF gradient and simultaneously make a large number of passes through the RF cavities, the average bending field must be high. To achieve such a large bending field while rapidly ramping magnets, it has been proposed to use a hybrid lattice consisting of interleaved superconducting dipoles and bipolar ramped dipoles. Due to the large single-bunch current and the relatively small apertures we desire (both because we would like to use high-frequency RF, and because power requirements and heating will be more reasonable for smaller aperture ramped magnets), collective effects are expected to be very significant. To reduce their effects, we propose to have strong synchrotron oscillations (a synchrotron tune of over 1). To have such a high synchrotron tune, a large number of superperiods are needed. Putting together

  12. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; ANERELLA,M.; GHOSH,A.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; AGAPOV,N.; KHODZHIBAGIYAN,H.; KOVALENKO,A.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; WILSON,M.N.

    2001-06-18

    The concept for the new GSI accelerator facilities is based on a large synchrotron designed for operation at BR=200 Tm and with the short cycle-time of about one second to achieve high average beam intensities. Superconducting magnets may reduce considerably investment and operating costs in comparison with conventional magnets. A R and D program was initiated to develop these magnets for a maximum field of 2-4 Tesla and a ramp rate of 4 T/s. In collaboration with JINR (Dubna), the window-frame type Nuclotron dipole, which has been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses and to improve the magnetic field quality. Another collaboration with BNL (Brookhaven) was established to develop the one-layer-coil cos{theta}-type RHIC arc dipole designed for operation at 3.5 Tesla with a rather slow ramp-rate of 0.07 T/s towards the design ramp-rate of 4 T/s. The design concepts for both R and D programs are reported.

  13. Fast-ramp rapid vertical processor for 300-mm Si wafer processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Cole; Laser, Allan; Herring, Robert; Pandey, Pradeep

    1998-09-01

    Fast-ramp vertical furnace technology has been established on the 200-nm wafer platform providing higher capacity production, decreased cycle time and lower thermal budgets. Fast-ramp furnaces are capable of instantaneous temperature ramp rates up to 100 degrees C/min. This fast-ramp technology is now applied to 300-nm wafer processing on the SVG/Thermco Rapid Vertical Processor Vertical Furnace. 300- mm fast-ramp capability using the latest in real-time adaptive model based temperature control technology, Clairvoyant Control, is reported. Atmospheric Thermal Oxidation, LPCVD Nitride and Polysilicon Deposition, and LPCVD TEOS-based SiO2 Deposition results are discussed. 300- mm wafer Radial Delta Temperature dependence on temperature ramp rate, wafer pitch, and wafer support fixtures are discussed. Wafer throughput is calculated and reported. The Clairvoyant Control methodology of combining thermal, direct and virtually-sensed parameters to produce real-tim e estimation of wafer temperatures, thermal trajectory optimization, and feedback to minimize variations in film thickness and electrical properties is presented.

  14. Polishing in fabrication of superconducting circuits with ramp-edge junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hato, Tsunehiro; Harada, Naoki; Yoshida, Akira; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Tarutani, Yoshinobu; Tanabe, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2002-10-01

    A ramp-edge junction was fabricated with 200-nm-thick YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x (YBCO) electrodes and an intermediate insulating layer of 300-nm-thick LaSrAlTaO (LSAT). Extraneous electrode areas are placed on top of their ramps as a result of the fabrication process. The junction exhibited an RSJ-like I-V curve with a swelling or steps depending on the shape of the extraneous electrode areas. The junctions on a 4-mm□ chip were polished and the extraneous electrode areas were removed. We obtained quasi-planar junctions with planarized surfaces and base structures composed of YBCO and LSAT. The swelling and steps were explained as results of the resonance of parasitic inductance and capacitance as they disappeared after polishing. The IcRn product did not decrease, which suggests that the junction was not damaged by polishing. We think that polishing will be important in the fabrication of high- Tc superconducting circuits with ramp-edge junctions.

  15. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  16. MUON ACCELERATION WITH A VERY FAST RAMPING SYNCHROTRON FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUMMERS,D.J.BERG,J.S.GARREN,A.A.PALMER,R.B.

    2002-07-01

    A 4600 Hz fast ramping synchrotron is explored as an economical way of accelerating muons from 4 to 20 GeV/c for a neutrino factory. Eddy current losses are minimized by the low machine duty cycle plus thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations and thin copper wires. Combined function magnets with high gradients alternating within single magnets form the lattice we describe. Muon survival is 83%.

  17. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  18. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  19. Calculation of eddy-currents induced in a compact synchrotron superconducting magnet structure during a current ramp

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, S. . Space and Electronics Systems Div.); Heese, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Under DARPA sponsorship, a compact Superconducting X-Ray Light Source (SXSL) is being designed and built by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with industry participation from Grumman Corporation and General Dynamics. The SXLS machine employs two 180{degrees} curved 4 telsa superconducting dipole magnets. These magnets are required to produce a dipole field for bending the beam but at the same time they must produce finite amounts of higher multipoles which are required for conditioning the beam. In fact uniformity of the field to less than 1 part in 10,000 must be maintained under all operating conditions. When a superconducting magnet is ramped from zero to full field, the changing magnetic field produces eddy-currents in the magnet structure which in turn can produce undesirable multipoles. This paper discusses a simple method for estimating these eddy-currents and their effect on the field harmonics. The paper present the analysis basis and its application to the SXLS magnet support structure and to the beam chamber components. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Superconducting, fast rise-time voltage source

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, R.M.

    1983-01-25

    A pulse generator comprises a toroid of a superconducting material such as niobium on a glass or ceramic substrate. A cryogenic source such as liquid helium cools the toroid to within a few degrees of absolute zero and a perpetually circulatory current is set up in the toroid. A laser beam is fired at the toroid to cause localized heating and the resultant current drop due to the material resistance causes an output pulse to be induced in an adjacent current winding.

  1. Tunneling spectroscopy of clean and adsorbate-covered gold surfaces in humid air, measured with fast bias voltage ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Raphael; Schuster, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The noise level of tunneling spectroscopic data can be significantly reduced by averaging the tunneling current over a large number of short bias voltage ramps, instead of recording over a single slow ramp. This effect is demonstrated for tunneling spectra of Au(111) by averaging over 200 consecutive bias voltage ramps, each 500 μs long. We attribute the improvement of the data quality to the frequency dependence of the current noise spectral density. Due to mechanical vibrations and tip instabilities the noise density is usually much higher for low frequencies ca. < 1 kHz than for the high frequencies relevant for measuring with fast bias ramps. The high data quality allowed for the routine detection of the Au(111) surface state and the investigation of the influence of steps in humid air, i.e., with a water-covered tunneling gap. For a CN covered Au surface in the presence of water we unexpectedly found additional electronic density of states at positive energies, around 0.6 eV, i.e., for unoccupied states. STS spectra of a (√{ 3} ×√{ 3}) R 30 ° Cu-UPD layer, formed by adsorbed sulfate and Cu species, indicate tunneling via the sulfate electronic density of states.

  2. Tune Determination of Strongly Coupled Betatron Oscillations in a Fast-Ramping Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W; Triplett, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Tune identification -- i.e. attribution of the spectral peak to a particular normal de of oscillations -- can present a significant difficulty in the presence of strong transverse coupling when the normal mode with a lower damping rate dominates spectra of Turn-by-Turn oscillations in both planes. The introduced earlier phased sum algorithm helped to recover the weaker normal mode signal from the noise, but by itself proved to be insufficient for automatic peak identification in the case of close phase advance distribution in both planes. To resolve this difficulty we modified the algorithm by taking and analyzing Turn-by-Turn data for two different ramps with the beam oscillation excited in each plane in turn. Comparison of relative amplitudes of Fourier components allows for correct automatic tune identification. The proposed algorithm was implemented in the Fermilab Booster B38 console application and successfully used for tune, coupling and chromaticity measurements.

  3. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry E-mail: hrspksc@hku.hk E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2014-11-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch.

  4. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-03-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  5. Behavior of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on a round core cable at current ramp rates as high as 67.8 kA s-1 in background fields of up to 19 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. C.; Bromberg, L.; van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P.; Weijers, H. W.

    2016-04-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) conductor-on-round-core (CORC®) cables have been developed for use in power transmission systems and large high-field magnets. The use of high-current conductors for large-scale magnets reduces system inductance and limits the peak voltage needed for ramped field operation. A CORC® cable contains a large number of RE-Ba2Cu3O7-δ (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors, helically wound in multiple layers on a thin, round former. Large-scale applications, such as fusion and accelerator magnets, require current ramp rates of several kilo-Amperes per second during pulsed operation. This paper presents results that demonstrate the electromagnetic stability of a CORC® cable during transient conditions. Measurements were performed at 4.2 K using a 1.55 m long CORC® cable in background fields of up to 19 T. Repeated current pulses in a background field of 19 T at current ramp rates of up to 67.8 kA s-1 to approximately 90% of the cable’s quench current at that field, did not show any sign of degradation in cable performance due to excessive ac loss or electromagnetic instability. The very high current ramp rates applied during these tests were used to compensate, to the extent possible, the limited cable length accommodated by the test facility, assuming that the measured results could be extrapolated to longer length cables operated at proportionally lower current ramp rates. No shift of the superconducting transition to lower current was measured when the current ramp rate was increased from 25 A s-1 to 67.8 kA s-1. These results demonstrate the viability of CORC® cables for use in low-inductance magnets that operate at moderate to high current ramp rates.

  6. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Dohlus, M.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.; Vogt, M.

    2011-09-07

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak acceleratingmore » electric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.« less

  7. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Dohlus, M.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.; Vogt, M.

    2011-09-07

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak accelerating electric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.

  8. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  9. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-03

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  10. Electronic and structural response of materials to fast intense laser pulses, including light-induced superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland E.

    2016-06-01

    This is a very brief discussion of some experimental and theoretical studies of materials responding to fast intense laser pulses, with emphasis on those cases where the electronic response and structural response are both potentially important (and ordinarily coupled). Examples are nonthermal insulator-to-metal transitions and light-induced superconductivity in cuprates, fullerenes, and an organic Mott insulator.

  11. Hybrid Fast-Ramping Accelerator to 750 GeV/c: Refinement and Parameters over Full Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Berg J. S.; Garren, A. A.

    2012-03-02

    Starting with the lattice design specified in [Garren and Berg, MAP-doc-4307, 2011], we refine parameters to get precise dispersion suppression in the straight sections and eliminate beta beating in the arcs. We then compute ramped magnet fields over the entire momentum range of 375 GeV/c to 750 GeV/c, and fit them to a polynomial in the momentum. We compute the time of flight and frequency slip factor over the entire momentum range, and discuss the consequences for longitudinal dynamics.

  12. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  13. Conceptual design of a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. Wan, B.; Hu, L.; Hu, C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Gao, W.; Wu, C.; Li, Y.; Fu, J.; Lyu, B.; Yu, Y.; Ye, M.; Shi, Y.

    2014-11-15

    To investigate the fast ion behavior, a fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic system has been planned and is presently under development on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The greatest challenges for the design of a FIDA diagnostic are its extremely low intensity levels, which are usually significantly below the continuum radiation level and several orders of magnitude below the bulk-ion thermal charge-exchange feature. Moreover, an overlaying Motional Stark Effect (MSE) feature in exactly the same wavelength range can interfere. The simulation of spectra code is used here to guide the design and evaluate the diagnostic performance. The details for the parameters of design and hardware are presented.

  14. Conceptual design of a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Wan, B.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Zhu, Y.; Gao, W.; Wu, C.; Li, Y.; Fu, J.; Lyu, B.; Yu, Y.; Shi, Y.; Ye, M.; Hu, L.; Hu, C.

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the fast ion behavior, a fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic system has been planned and is presently under development on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The greatest challenges for the design of a FIDA diagnostic are its extremely low intensity levels, which are usually significantly below the continuum radiation level and several orders of magnitude below the bulk-ion thermal charge-exchange feature. Moreover, an overlaying Motional Stark Effect (MSE) feature in exactly the same wavelength range can interfere. The simulation of spectra code is used here to guide the design and evaluate the diagnostic performance. The details for the parameters of design and hardware are presented.

  15. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  16. Conceptual design of a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Heidbrink, W W; Wan, B; von Hellermann, M G; Zhu, Y; Gao, W; Wu, C; Li, Y; Fu, J; Lyu, B; Yu, Y; Shi, Y; Ye, M; Hu, L; Hu, C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the fast ion behavior, a fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic system has been planned and is presently under development on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The greatest challenges for the design of a FIDA diagnostic are its extremely low intensity levels, which are usually significantly below the continuum radiation level and several orders of magnitude below the bulk-ion thermal charge-exchange feature. Moreover, an overlaying Motional Stark Effect (MSE) feature in exactly the same wavelength range can interfere. The simulation of spectra code is used here to guide the design and evaluate the diagnostic performance. The details for the parameters of design and hardware are presented.

  17. Mixed Linear/Square-Root Encoded Single Slope Ramp Provides a Fast, Low Noise Analog to Digital Converter with Very High Linearity for Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Christopher James (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Newton, Kenneth W. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter (ADC) converts pixel voltages from a CMOS image into a digital output. A voltage ramp generator generates a voltage ramp that has a linear first portion and a non-linear second portion. A digital output generator generates a digital output based on the voltage ramp, the pixel voltages, and comparator output from an array of comparators that compare the voltage ramp to the pixel voltages. A return lookup table linearizes the digital output values.

  18. Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

  19. Fast 704 MHz Ferroelectric Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Omega-P SBIR project described in this Report has as its goal the development, test, and evaluation of a fast electrically-controlled L-band tuner for BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner, that employs an electrically-controlled ferroelectric component, is to allow fast compensation to cavity resonance changes. In ERLs, there are several factors which significantly affect the amount of power required from the wall-plug to provide the RF-power level necessary for the operation. When beam loading is small, the power requirements are determined by (i) ohmic losses in cavity walls, (ii) fluctuations in amplitude and/or phase for beam currents, and (iii) microphonics. These factors typically require a substantial change in the coupling between the cavity and the feeding line, which results in an intentional broadening of the cavity bandwidth, which in turn demands a significant amount of additional RF power. If beam loading is not small, there is a variety of beam-drive phase instabilities to be managed, and microphonics will still remain an issue, so there remain requirements for additional power. Moreover ERL performance is sensitive to changes in beam arrival time, since any such change is equivalent to phase instability with its vigorous demands for additional power. In this Report, we describe the new modular coaxial tuner, with specifications suitable for the 704 MHz ERL application. The device would allow changing the RF-coupling during the cavity filling process in order to effect significant RF power savings, and also will provide rapid compensation for beam imbalance and allow for fast stabilization against phase fluctuations caused by microphonics, beam-driven instabilities, etc. The tuner is predicted to allow a reduction of about ten times in the required power from the RF source, as compared to a compensation system

  20. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  1. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  2. Parallel Configuration For Fast Superconducting Strip Line Detectors With Very Large Area In Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.

    2009-12-16

    We realized a very fast and large Superconducting Strip Line Detector based on a parallel configuration of nanowires. The detector with size 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} recorded a sub-nanosecond pulse width of 700 ps in FWHM (400 ps rise time and 530 ps relaxation time) for lysozyme monomers/multimers molecules accelerated at 175 keV in a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This record is the best in the class of superconducting detectors and comparable with the fastest NbN superconducting single photon detector of 10x10 {mu}m{sup 2}. We succeeded in acquiring mass spectra as the first step for a scale-up to {approx}mm pixel size for high throughput MS analysis, while keeping a fast response.

  3. Fast superconducting kicker magnet. Final technical report, November 1994--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Mahale, N.K.

    1998-05-01

    Fast kicker magnets are needed in accelerators to deflect the beam out of the storage ring and into experimental targets and beam dumps. The work reported here is on a new type of fast kicker magnet. The basic idea is to transport the beam along the axis of a tube made of Type I superconductor. An ordinary magnet is used to create a field, B{sub o} perpendicular to the axis of the tube. If B{sub o}superconducting condition. Due to the Meissner effect, the tube shields the beam (on the axis of the tube) from B{sub o}. Thus the beam is in a zero field region. In order to apply a kicker field to the beam, B{sub o} is increased such that B{sub o}>B{sub c}. The tube of superconductor then goes normal. The field which had been shielded from the beam can now penetrate to the beam. This concept is applicable as a fast magnetic switch. DOE has been granted a patent on this device, which was disclosed to DOE by N.K. Mahale and D. Goren while they were at SSC. A feasibility study of this new form of kicker magnet is reported here.

  4. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-05-01

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K = 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt γ-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the γ-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 1011 pps.

  5. GLOBAL DECOUPLING ON THE RHIC RAMP.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO, Y.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; FISCHER, W.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The global betatron decoupling on the ramp is an important issue for the operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), especially in the RHIC polarized proton (pp) run. To avoid the major betatron and spin resonances on the ramp, the betatron tunes are constrained. And the rms value of the vertical closed orbit should be smaller than 0.5mm. Both require the global coupling on the ramp to be well corrected. Several ramp decoupling schemes were found and tested at RHIC, like N-turn map decoupling, three-ramp correction, coupling amplitude modulation, and coupling phase modulation. In this article, the principles of these methods are shortly reviewed and compared. Among them, coupling angle modulation is a robust and fast one. It has been applied to the global decoupling in the routine RHIC operation.

  6. Supersonic Elliptical Ramp Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Eric E. (Inventor); Fink, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Fugal, Spencer R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A supersonic inlet includes a supersonic section including a cowl which is at least partially elliptical, a ramp disposed within the cowl, and a flow inlet disposed between the cowl and the ramp. The ramp may also be at least partially elliptical.

  7. Seaplane ramp area looking south. Seaplane ramp 3 is in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Seaplane ramp area looking south. Seaplane ramp 3 is in extreme foreground. Building 1 at right, with building 2 beyond. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Ramps Nos. 2, 3 & 4, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  8. 43. VIEW OF THE RAMP ABOVE LOWER PORTAL AND RAMP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEW OF THE RAMP ABOVE LOWER PORTAL AND RAMP, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE RAMP WAS USED TO GUIDE RUN-OFF FROM THUNDERSTORMS AWAY FROM THE PORTAL. - Independent Coal & Coke Company, Kenilworth, Carbon County, UT

  9. Fast valve based on double-layer eddy-current repulsion for disruption mitigation in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H D; Zhang, X D

    2015-05-01

    A fast valve based on the double-layer eddy-current repulsion mechanism has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to a double-layer eddy-current coil, a preload system was added to improve the security of the valve, whereby the valve opens more quickly and the open-valve time becomes shorter, making it much safer than before. In this contribution, testing platforms, open-valve characteristics, and throughput of the fast valve are discussed. Tests revealed that by choosing appropriate parameters the valve opened within 0.15 ms, and open-valve times were no longer than 2 ms. By adjusting working parameter values, the maximum number of particles injected during this open-valve time was estimated at 7 × 10(22). The fast valve will become a useful tool to further explore disruption mitigation experiments on EAST in 2015.

  10. RAMP MANAGEMENT IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA,T.

    1999-03-29

    In RHIC, magnets and RF cavities are controlled by Wave Form Generators (WFGs), simple real time computers which generate the set points. The WFGs are programmed to change set points from one state to another in a synchronized way. Such transition is called a ''Ramp'' and consists of a sequence of ''stepping stones'' which contain the set point of every WFG controlled device at a point in time. An appropriate interpolation defines the set points between these stepping stones. This report describes the implementation of the ramp system. The user interface, tools to create and modify ramps, interaction with modeling tools and measurements and correction programs are discussed.

  11. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

    2009-12-01

    With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

  12. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W. Bruce; McNeilly, David R.; Thacker, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  13. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  14. Superconducting Switch for Fast On-Chip Routing of Quantum Microwave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, M.; Besse, J.-C.; Mondal, M.; Oppliger, M.; Gasparinetti, S.; Wallraff, A.

    2016-08-01

    A switch capable of routing microwave signals at cryogenic temperatures is a desirable component for state-of-the-art experiments in many fields of applied physics, including but not limited to quantum-information processing, communication, and basic research in engineered quantum systems. Conventional mechanical switches provide low insertion loss but disturb operation of dilution cryostats and the associated experiments by heat dissipation. Switches based on semiconductors or microelectromechanical systems have a lower thermal budget but are not readily integrated with current superconducting circuits. Here we design and test an on-chip switch built by combining tunable transmission-line resonators with microwave beam splitters. The device is superconducting and as such dissipates a negligible amount of heat. It is compatible with current superconducting circuit fabrication techniques, operates with a bandwidth exceeding 100 MHz, is capable of handling photon fluxes on the order of 1 05 μ s-1 , equivalent to powers exceeding -90 dBm , and can be switched within approximately 6-8 ns. We successfully demonstrate operation of the device in the quantum regime by integrating it on a chip with a single-photon source and using it to route nonclassical itinerant microwave fields at the single-photon level.

  15. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  16. Pathfinder Rear Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's rear rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was later used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Areas of a lander petal and deflated airbag are visible at left. The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine that the rear ramp was the one to use for rover deployment. At upper right is the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' which Sojourner will later study.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  17. Fast, low-power manipulation of spin ensembles in superconducting microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Sigillito, A. J. Malissa, H.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Houck, A. A.; Lyon, S. A.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Itoh, K. M.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schuster, D. I.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate the use of high-Q superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) microresonators to perform rapid manipulations on a randomly distributed spin ensemble using very low microwave power (400 nW). This power is compatible with dilution refrigerators, making microwave manipulation of spin ensembles feasible for quantum computing applications. We also describe the use of adiabatic microwave pulses to overcome microwave magnetic field (B{sub 1}) inhomogeneities inherent to CPW resonators. This allows for uniform control over a randomly distributed spin ensemble. Sensitivity data are reported showing a single shot (no signal averaging) sensitivity to 10{sup 7} spins or 3×10{sup 4}spins/√(Hz) with averaging.

  18. Status of the SNS Power Ramp Up

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. Since formal operations began in 2006, the beam power has been steadily increasing toward the design goal of 1.4 MW. In September 2009 the power surpassed 1 MW for the first time, and operation at the 1 MW level is now routine. The status of the beam power ramp-up program and present operational limitations will be described.

  19. Seaplane ramp area looking north. Seaplane ramp 2 is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Seaplane ramp area looking north. Seaplane ramp 2 is at right foreground. Building 1 is at extreme left. Boathouse and small boat docks visible in distance. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Ramps Nos. 2, 3 & 4, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  20. Investigating Ramps and Sliders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Mark R.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a series of hands-on activities for introducing students to concepts of energy transfer and conversion. Describes how simple devices as marbles, ramps, and sliders can be used to gauge the transfer of energy and assist in the development of investigative skills. (ML)

  1. Crescentic ramp turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Inventor); Tam, Anna (Inventor); Kirtley, Kevin Richard (Inventor); Lamson, Scott Henry (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A turbine stage includes a row of airfoils joined to corresponding platforms to define flow passages therebetween. Each airfoil includes opposite pressure and suction sides and extends in chord between opposite leading and trailing edges. Each platform includes a crescentic ramp increasing in height from the leading and trailing edges toward the midchord of the airfoil along the pressure side thereof.

  2. Resistors Improve Ramp Linearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    Simple modification to bootstrap ramp generator gives more linear output over longer sweep times. New circuit adds just two resistors, one of which is adjustable. Modification cancels nonlinearities due to variations in load on charging capacitor and due to changes in charging current as the voltage across capacitor increases.

  3. Asymptotic global fast dynamics and attractor fractal dimension of the TDGL-equations of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willie, Robert

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study a model system of equations of the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations of superconductivity in a Lorentz gauge, in scale of Hilbert spaces E^{α } with initial data in E^{β } satisfying 3α + β ≥ N/2, where N=2,3 is such that the spatial domain of the equations [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. We show in the asymptotic dynamics of the equations, well-posedness of the dynamical system for a global exponential attractor {{U}}subset E^{α } compact in E^{β } if α >β , uniform differentiability of orbits on the attractor in E0\\cong L2, and the existence of an explicit finite bounding estimate on the fractal dimension of the attractor yielding that its Hausdorff dimension is as well finite. Uniform boundedness in (0,∞ )× Ω of solutions in E^{1/2}\\cong H1(Ω ) is in addition investigated.

  4. An ultra-fast superconducting Nb nanowire single-photon detector for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inderbitzin, K.; Engel, A.; Schilling, A.; Il'in, K.; Siegel, M.

    2012-10-15

    Although superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are well studied regarding the detection of infrared/optical photons and keV-molecules, no studies on continuous x-ray photon counting by thick-film detectors have been reported so far. We fabricated a 100 nm thick niobium x-ray SNSPD (an X-SNSPD) and studied its detection capability of photons with keV-energies in continuous mode. The detector is capable to detect photons even at reduced bias currents of 0.4%, which is in sharp contrast to optical thin-film SNSPDs. No dark counts were recorded in extended measurement periods. Strikingly, the signal amplitude distribution depends significantly on the photon energy spectrum.

  5. A balanced, superconducting multiplier circuit for fast-switching and multiplexed qubit readout: Performance and demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad A.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Rosenthal, Eric I.; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Lehnert, K. W.

    A major challenge of scaling the promising transmon qubits into a quantum information processing machine is the classical hardware burden required to readout many qubits. Within the cavity QED architecture, qubit states are measured by detecting the transmission through microwave cavities. A multiplexing scheme could allow the classical hardware burden of generating and measuring a readout tone to be shared among several cavity-qubit systems. In this talk, we will present measurements of a recently designed superconducting multiplier circuit intended to accomplish time and code domain multiplexed readout. In particular, we characterize three modes of microwave operation: transmission, reflection and inversion. The device can be switched between these modes approximately 100 times faster than typical qubit coherence times. Exploiting this performance, we demonstrate a code domain multiplexing scheme with classical signals created to simulate typical qubit signals. The scheme operates with near unity fidelity at microwave powers comparable to typical qubit tones. This work is supported by the ARO under the Contract W911NF-14-1-0079.

  6. Research on fast fault identification method of 10.5 kV/1.5 kA superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Qiang; Xiao, Liye; Liu, Daqian; Qiu, Ming; Qiu, Qinquan; Zhang, Guomin; Dai, Shaotao; Lin, Liangzhen

    2014-09-01

    Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is a prospective electric devices connected in series in power grid to limit short-circuit current. A 10.5 kV/1.5 kA 3-phase SFCL with HTS coil of 6.24 mH was developed at IEECAS in China in 2005, which was operated in a local power grid in Hunan province for more than 11,000 h, and integrated lately in a superconducting power substation in Baiyin city in 2011 and is still running safely and reliably. In order to reduce the fault response time and enhance the performance of the SFCL, we analyzed the structure characteristics of the SFCL and discussed the variation of currents and voltages of the HTS coil and the bridge during the fault time. The simulation and tests results of power system validate the feasibility of the fast fault identification method.

  7. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Morita, Shigeru; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Dong, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongmin; Huang, Xianli; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang

    2015-12-01

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm2 and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm2/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ0 = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ0 is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification.

  8. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morita, Shigeru; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Dong, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongmin; Huang, Xianli; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang

    2015-12-01

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm(2) and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm(2)/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ0 = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ0 is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification. PMID:26724029

  9. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang; Morita, Shigeru; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Dong, Chunfeng; and others

    2015-12-15

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm{sup 2} and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm{sup 2}/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ{sub 0} = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ{sub 0} is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification.

  10. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morita, Shigeru; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Dong, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongmin; Huang, Xianli; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang

    2015-12-01

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm(2) and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm(2)/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ0 = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ0 is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification.

  11. On the Effect of Ramp Rate in Damage Accumulation of the CPV Die-Attach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N. S.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    It is commonly understood that thermal cycling at high temperature ramp rates may activate unrepresentative failure mechanisms. Increasing the temperature ramp rate of thermal cycling, however, could dramatically reduce the test time required to achieve an equivalent amount of thermal fatigue damage, thereby reducing overall test time. Therefore, the effect of temperature ramp rate on physical damage in the CPV die-attach is investigated. Finite Element Model (FEM) simulations of thermal fatigue and thermal cycling experiments are made to determine if the amount of damage calculated results in a corresponding amount of physical damage measured to the die-attach for a variety of fast temperature ramp rates. Preliminary experimental results are in good agreement with simulations and reinforce the potential of increasing temperature ramp rates. Characterization of the microstructure and resulting fatigue crack in the die-attach suggest a similar failure mechanism across all ramp rates tested.

  12. Directly coupled direct current superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers based on ramp-edge Ag:YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}/Ag:YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Q.X.; Yan, F.; Mombourquette, C.; Reagor, D.

    1998-06-01

    Directly coupled dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates were fabricated using ramp-edge superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor junctions, where Ag-doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} was used for the electrode and PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} for the normal-metal barrier. A flux noise of 8{times}10{sup {minus}6}thinsp{Phi}{sub 0}thinspHz{sup {minus}1/2} at 10 kHz measured with a dc bias current was achieved at 75 K, which corresponded to a field sensitivity of 400thinspfTHz{sup {minus}1/2} for a magnetometer with a pick-up loop area of 8.5thinspmm{times}7.5thinspmm. Most significantly, the noise floor increased at lower frequencies with a frequency dependence slightly less than 1/f. The field noise of the SQUID magnetometers increased by only 25{percent} after cycling the devices from zero field to 500 mG. In a static earth{close_quote}s magnetic field background, the field noise of the SQUID magnetometers increased by less than a factor of 2. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Magnetic excitations of Fe1 + ySexTe1 - x in magnetic and superconductive phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkevich, P.; Bendele, M.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Conder, K.; Gvasaliya, S. N.; Khasanov, R.; Pomjakushina, E.; Roessli, B.

    2010-04-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering and muon-spin rotation to compare the low energy magnetic excitations in single crystals of superconducting Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50 and non-superconducting Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75. We confirm the existence of a spin resonance in the superconducting phase of Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50, at an energy of 7 meV and a wavevector of (1/2, 1/2, 0). The non-superconducting sample exhibits two incommensurate magnetic excitations at (1/2, 1/2, 0) ± (0.18, - 0.18, 0) which rise steeply in energy, but no resonance is observed at low energies. A strongly dispersive low energy magnetic excitation is also observed in Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75 close to the commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering wavevector (1/2 - δ, 0, 1/2), where δ≈0.03. The magnetic correlations in both samples are found to be quasi-two-dimensional in character and persist well above the magnetic (Fe1.10Se0.25Te0.75) and superconducting (Fe1.01Se0.50Te0.50) transition temperatures.

  15. Revisit of the Ramp Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2014-01-01

    An important part of the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm is the ramp filter. This paper derives the discrete version of the ramp filter in the Fourier domain and studies the windowing effects. When a window function is used to control the noise, the image amplitude will be affected and reduced. A simple remedy is proposed to improve the image accuracy when a window function must be used. PMID:25729091

  16. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  17. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  18. SR-71 on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's SR-71A, used for high-speed, high-altitude aeronautical research, is seen here on the ramp outside its main building hangar at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA operated two of these unique aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer during the decade of the 1990s. The SR-71 was designed and built by the Lockheed Skunk Works, now Lockheed Martin. Studies have shown that less than 20 percent of the total thrust used to fly at Mach 3 is produced by the basic engine itself. The balance of the total thrust is produced by the unique design of the engine inlet and 'moveable spike' system at the front of the engine nacelles, and by the ejector nozzles at the exhaust. Data from the SR-71 high speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that

  19. Model for RHIC ramp controls

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch, J.; Mane, V.; Clifford, T.; Hartmann, H.; Kahn, T.; Oerter, B.; Peggs, S.

    1994-08-01

    This paper introduces the hardware and software concepts for the implementation of the ramp controls. The hardware part of the ramp controls consists of a number of multi-purpose Wave Form Generators (WFGS) which control the settings of accelerator hardware directly or indirectly by controlling their WFG. A Real Time Data Link (RTDL) data transfer system connects the WFGs in a three layer architecture. To the usual two layers which generate an independent timing signal and dependent set points, respectively, an intermediate layer is added which produces accelerator parameters such as the magnet strength. The task of the bottom layer is therefore reduced to the function of implementing those parameters. This architecture de-couples two independent functions which axe normally folded together. The function of the hardware becomes modular and easily maintainable. The ramp control software is layered in the same way. Between the top layer (the ramp procedure application program) and the bottom layer (the hardware interface) an additional layer of ``manager`` programs allow operation of accelerator subsystems.

  20. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  1. Forward ramp & low gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this color image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal. The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower part of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis. At center, a lander petal is visible.

    spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  3. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; Prestemon, Soren; Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Robin, David

    2015-10-01

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  4. Forward ramp in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal.

    The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower left of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis. At right, a lander petal is visible.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  5. Ramp-rate sensitivity of SSC dipole magnet prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Devred, A.; Ogitsu, T.

    1994-07-01

    One of the major achievements of the magnet R&D program for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the fabrication and test of a series of 20 5-cm aperture, 15-m long dipole magnet prototypes. The ramp rate sensitivity of these magnets appears to fall in at least two categories that can be correlated to the manufacturer and production batch of the strands used for the inner-coil cables. The first category, referred to as type-A, is characterized by a strong quench current degradation at high ramp rates, usually accompanied by large distortions of the multipole fields and large energy losses. The second category, referred to as type-B, is characterized by a sudden drop of quench current at low ramp rates, followed by a much milder degradation at larger rates. The multipole fields of the type-B magnets show little ramp-rate sensitivity, and the energy losses are smaller than for the type-A magnets. The behavior of the Type-A magnets can be explained in terms of inter-strand eddy currents arising from low and non-uniform resistances at the crossovers between the strands of the two-layer Rutherford-type cable. Anomalies in the transport-current repartition among the cable strands are suggested as a possible cause for the type-B behavior. The origins of these anomalies have not yet been clearly identified. The SSC project was canceled by decision of the United States Congress on October 21, 1994.

  6. JF-102A on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Convair JF-102A (54-1374) on the ramp at NACA High-Speed Flight Station , Edwards, California in 1956. The most prominent new feature distinguishing the JF-102A from the YF-102 was a longer fuselage with a pinched or 'coke-bottle' waist. Note wing-fences on both wings. The JF-102A Characteristics are: Wing Span, ft. 38.1 Fuselage length, ft. 63.4 Vertical Tail height, ft. 21.2 Power Plant: Pratt & Whitney J57-P-23 turbojet

  7. Launch of a Vehicle from a Ramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2011-01-01

    A vehicle proceeding up an inclined ramp will become airborne if the ramp comes to a sudden end and if the vehicle fails to stop before it reaches the end of the ramp. A vehicle may also become airborne if it passes over the top of a hill at sufficient speed. In both cases, the vehicle becomes airborne if the point of support underneath the…

  8. Airport ramp safety and crew performance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Roy; Drew, Charles; Patten, Marcia; Matchette, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This study examined 182 ramp operations incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database, to determine which factors influence ramp operation incidents. It was found that incidents occurred more often during aircraft arrival operations than during departure operations; incidents occurred most often at the gate stop area, less so at the gate entry/exit areas, and least on the ramp fringe areas; and reporters cited fewer incidents when more ground crew were present. The authors offer suggestions for both airline management and flight crews to reduce the rate of ramp incidents.

  9. MEASURING CHROMATICITY ALONG THE RAMP USING THE PLL TUNE METER IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TEPIKIAN,S.; AHRENS,L.; CAMERON,P.; SCHULTHEISS,C.

    2002-06-02

    Beam stability up the ramp requires the appropriate sign and magnitude of the chromaticity. We developed a way to measure the chromaticity using the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) tune-meter. Since, the accuracy of the PLL tune-meter with properly adjusted loop gain is better than {approx} 0.0001 in tune units, the radial loop needs only be changed by a small amount of 0.2mm at a 1Hz rate. Thus, we can achieve fast chromaticity measurements in 1 sec. Except during the very beginning of the ramp where there are snapback effects and the gamma changes very rapidly, we can have good chromaticcity measurements along the ramp. This leads to the possibility of correcting the chromaticity during the ramp using a feedback system.

  10. 9 CFR 91.23 - Loading ramps and doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... height of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. The incline of the ramps shall not exceed 1:2 (261/2°) between the ramps and the horizontal plane. The ramps shall be fitted with footlocks of approximately...

  11. 9 CFR 91.23 - Loading ramps and doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... height of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. The incline of the ramps shall not exceed 1:2 (261/2°) between the ramps and the horizontal plane. The ramps shall be fitted with footlocks of approximately...

  12. 9 CFR 91.23 - Loading ramps and doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... height of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. The incline of the ramps shall not exceed 1:2 (261/2°) between the ramps and the horizontal plane. The ramps shall be fitted with footlocks of approximately...

  13. 9 CFR 91.23 - Loading ramps and doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... height of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. The incline of the ramps shall not exceed 1:2 (261/2°) between the ramps and the horizontal plane. The ramps shall be fitted with footlocks of approximately...

  14. 9 CFR 91.23 - Loading ramps and doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... height of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. The incline of the ramps shall not exceed 1:2 (261/2°) between the ramps and the horizontal plane. The ramps shall be fitted with footlocks of approximately...

  15. B-47A on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Boeing B-47A (NACA 150) shown on the ramp near NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station at South Base of Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1953. The B-47A Stratojet's wing is mounted high on the fuselage with a sweep back of 36 degrees and a span of 116 feet, with wing vortex generators installed. A two engine pod under each wing, and an additional engine pod at each wing tip using General Electric J-47-GE-23 turbojets. The airplane is fitted with a nose boom for measuring airspeed, altitude, angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip, and an optigraph for measuring the movements of target lights on the wing and tail.

  16. On the formation of sand ramps: A case study from the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Mark D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Foster, Ian D. L.; Livingstone, Ian; Parsons, Anthony J.

    2012-08-01

    Sand ramps are dune-scale sedimentary accumulations found at mountain fronts and consist of a combination of aeolian sands and the deposits of other geomorphological processes associated with hillslope and fluvial activity. Their complexity and their construction by wind, water and mass movement means that sand ramps potentially hold a very rich store of palaeoenvironmental information. However, before this potential can be realised a full understanding of their formation is necessary. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the principal factors influencing the development of sand ramps. It reviews the stratigraphic, chronometric and sedimentological evidence relating to the past development of sand ramps, focussing particularly on Soldier Mountain sand ramp in the Mojave Desert, as well as using observations of the modern movement of slope material to elucidate the formation of stone horizons within sand ramps. Findings show that sand ramps cannot easily be interpreted in terms of a simple model of fluctuating palaeoenvironmental phases from aeolian dominated to soil/fluvial dominated episodes. They accumulate quickly (perhaps in < 5 ka), probably in a single phase before becoming relict. Based on the evidence from Soldier Mountain, they appear strongly controlled by a 'window of opportunity' when sediment supply is plentiful and cease to develop when this sediment supply diminishes and/or the accommodation space is filled up. Contemporary observations of stone movement both on rock and sandy sloping surfaces in the Mojave region indicate movement rates in the order of 0.6 and 11 mm yr- 1, which is insufficiently fast to explain how stone horizons could have been moved across and been incorporated into sand ramps on multiple occasions. Stone horizons found within the aeolian sediments lack evidence for soil development and are interpreted as very short-term events in which small streams moved and splayed discontinuous stone horizons across the sand

  17. Effects of ramp-up of inspired airflow on in vitro aerosol dose delivery performance for certain dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ung, Keith T; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-03-10

    This study investigated the effect of airflow ramp-up on the dose delivery performance of seven dry powder inhalers, covering a broad range of powder formulations and powder dispersion mechanisms. In vitro performance tests were performed at a target pressure drop of 4kPa, using two inspiratory flow ramp-up conditions, representing slow and fast ramp-up of airflow, respectively. The fluidization of bulk powder and aerosol clearance from the inhaler was assessed by laser photometer evaluation of aerosol emission kinetics and measurement of the delivered dose (DD). The quality of aerosol dispersion (i.e. de-agglomeration) and associated lung targeting performance was assessed by measuring the total lung dose (TLD) using the Alberta idealized mouth-throat model. The ratio of DD and TLD under slow/fast ramp conditions was used as a metric to rank-order flow ramp effects. Test results show that the delivered dose is relatively unaffected by flow ramp (DD ratio ~1 for all dry powder inhalers). In contrast, the total lung dose showed significantly more variation as a function of flow ramp and inhaler type. Engineered (spray dried) powder formulations were associated with relatively high TLD (>50% of nominal dose) compared to lactose blend and agglomerate based formulations, which had a lower TLD (7-40% of nominal dose), indicative of less efficient targeting of the lung. The TLD for the Tobi Podhaler was the least influenced by flow ramp (TLD ratio ~1), while the TLD for the Asmanex Twisthaler was the most sensitive to flow ramp (TLD ratio ≪1). The relatively high sensitivity of the Asmanex Twisthaler to flow ramp is attributed to rapid aerosol clearance (from the inhaler) combined with a strong effect of flow-rate on particle de-agglomeration and resulting size distribution.

  18. Off-ramps and on-ramps: keeping talented women on the road to success.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Sylvia Ann; Luce, Carolyn Buck

    2005-03-01

    Most professional women step off the career fast track at some point. With children to raise, elderly parents to care for, and other pulls on their time, these women are confronted with one off-ramp after another. When they feel pushed at the same time by long hours and unsatisfying work, the decision to leave becomes even easier. But woe to the woman who intends for that exit to be temporary. The on-ramps for professional women to get back on track are few and far between, the authors confirm. Their new survey research reveals for the first time the extent of the problem--what percentage of highly qualified women leave work and for how long, what obstacles they face coming back, and what price they pay for their time-outs. And what are the implications for corporate America? One thing at least seems clear: As market and economic factors align in ways guaranteed to make talent constraints and skill shortages huge issues again, employers must learn to reverse this brain drain. Like it or not, large numbers of highly qualified, committed women need to take time out of the workplace. The trick is to help them maintain connections that will allow them to reenter the workforce without being marginalized for the rest of their lives. Strategies for building such connections include creating reduced-hour jobs, providing flexibility in the workday and in the arc of a career, removing the stigma of taking time off, refusing to burn bridges, offering outlets for altruism, and nurturing women's ambition.

  19. Off-ramps and on-ramps: keeping talented women on the road to success.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Sylvia Ann; Luce, Carolyn Buck

    2005-03-01

    Most professional women step off the career fast track at some point. With children to raise, elderly parents to care for, and other pulls on their time, these women are confronted with one off-ramp after another. When they feel pushed at the same time by long hours and unsatisfying work, the decision to leave becomes even easier. But woe to the woman who intends for that exit to be temporary. The on-ramps for professional women to get back on track are few and far between, the authors confirm. Their new survey research reveals for the first time the extent of the problem--what percentage of highly qualified women leave work and for how long, what obstacles they face coming back, and what price they pay for their time-outs. And what are the implications for corporate America? One thing at least seems clear: As market and economic factors align in ways guaranteed to make talent constraints and skill shortages huge issues again, employers must learn to reverse this brain drain. Like it or not, large numbers of highly qualified, committed women need to take time out of the workplace. The trick is to help them maintain connections that will allow them to reenter the workforce without being marginalized for the rest of their lives. Strategies for building such connections include creating reduced-hour jobs, providing flexibility in the workday and in the arc of a career, removing the stigma of taking time off, refusing to burn bridges, offering outlets for altruism, and nurturing women's ambition. PMID:15768675

  20. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  1. IMPROVEMENTS OF THE RHIC RAMP EFFICIENCY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; PTITSYN,V.; FISCHER,W.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; HAYES,T.; PILAT,F.; ROSER,T.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    The last nms in both gold-gold and polarized proton-proton required necessary corrections in the ramp as the intensities in the two rings were rising towards design values. Corrections were made with respect to the beam-beam effects, transverse and longitudinal instabilities, transition crossing (for the gold-gold ramps), transverse tune resonances, local and global coupliug problems, aperture restrictions, chromatic effects. Along the ramps we had to use the beam separation, ''Landau'' cavities, chromatic and tune control, orbit correction, special gamma-t quadrupole system for the transition crossing in the gold run, correction octupole circuits, beam position monitor system decoupling etc.

  2. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  3. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  4. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  5. Launch of a Vehicle from a Ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2011-10-01

    Avehicle proceeding up an inclined ramp will become airborne if the ramp comes to a sudden end and if the vehicle fails to stop before it reaches the end of the ramp. A vehicle may also become airborne if it passes over the top of a hill at sufficient speed. In both cases, the vehicle becomes airborne if the point of support underneath the vehicle falls below the trajectory that would be followed by the vehicle in the presence of gravity alone. When the vehicle becomes airborne, the normal reaction force exerted by the ramp or the hill drops to zero, first on the front wheels and then on the rear wheels. Just prior to the vehicle's becoming airborne, the normal reaction force on the rear wheels acts to exert a torque on the vehicle, causing the vehicle to rotate. After the rear wheels become airborne, the vehicle will continue to rotate until it lands some distance from the launch point.

  6. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  7. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  8. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  9. Tunable cavity resonator with ramp shaped supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Hoffman, T. E.; Levine, M. W. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A cavity for a hydrogen maser is described consisting of three parts which provide highly stable mechanical and thermal expansion characteristics for the cavity and ease of tuning. The three parts which are made of a glass ceramic material having a very small thermal expansion coefficient (1) a top plate, (2) a cylinder with three interrupted helical ramps at its bottom, and (3) a base which includes a bottom plate and three ramp lugs on which the helical ramps of the cylinder rest when the cylinder is placed on the base with the bottom plate in the cylinder. Cavity tuning is achieved by rotating the cylinder and thereby raising or lowering it on the base, which results in changing the cylinder volume by changing the distance between the bottom and top plates.

  10. YF-12C on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The so-called YF-12C on the NASA Flight Research Center ramp. Following the loss of a YF-12A in a non-fatal accident in June 1971, NASA acquired the second production SR-71A (61-7951) from the Air Force. Because the SR-71 program was shrouded in the highest secrecy, the Air Force restricted NASA to using the aircraft solely for propulsion testing with YF-12A inlets and engines. It was designated the YF-12C, and given a bogus tail number (06937). The two YF-12As in the program had actual tail numbers 06935 and 06936. The first NASA flight of the YF-12C took place on 24 May 1972. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 606936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made

  11. Analysis of Voltage Signals from Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lizarazo, J.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-30

    We present two techniques used in the analysis of voltage tap data collected during recent tests of superconducting magnets developed by the Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The first technique was used on a quadrupole to provide information about quench origins that could not be obtained using the time-of-flight method. The second technique illustrates the use of data from transient flux imbalances occurring during magnet ramping to diagnose changes in the current-temperature margin of a superconducting cable. In both cases, the results of this analysis contributed to make improvements on subsequent magnets.

  12. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  13. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  14. Visual accessibility of ramps and steps.

    PubMed

    Legge, Gordon E; Yu, Deyue; Kallie, Christopher S; Bochsler, Tiana M; Gage, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The visual accessibility of a space refers to the effectiveness with which vision can be used to travel safely through the space. For people with low vision, the detection of steps and ramps is an important component of visual accessibility. We used ramps and steps as visual targets to examine the interacting effects of lighting, object geometry, contrast, viewing distance, and spatial resolution. Wooden staging was used to construct a sidewalk with transitions to ramps or steps. Forty-eight normally sighted subjects viewed the sidewalk monocularly through acuity-reducing goggles and made recognition judgments about the presence of the ramps or steps. The effects of variation in lighting were milder than expected. Performance declined for the largest viewing distance but exhibited a surprising reversal for nearer viewing. Of relevance to pedestrian safety, the step up was more visible than the step down. We developed a probabilistic cue model to explain the pattern of target confusions. Cues determined by discontinuities in the edge contours of the sidewalk at the transition to the targets were vulnerable to changes in viewing conditions. Cues associated with the height in the picture plane of the targets were more robust.

  15. Identifying Wind and Solar Ramping Events: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.

    2013-01-01

    Wind and solar power are playing an increasing role in the electrical grid, but their inherent power variability can augment uncertainties in power system operations. One solution to help mitigate the impacts and provide more flexibility is enhanced wind and solar power forecasting; however, its relative utility is also uncertain. Within the variability of solar and wind power, repercussions from large ramping events are of primary concern. At the same time, there is no clear definition of what constitutes a ramping event, with various criteria used in different operational areas. Here the Swinging Door Algorithm, originally used for data compression in trend logging, is applied to identify variable generation ramping events from historic operational data. The identification of ramps in a simple and automated fashion is a critical task that feeds into a larger work of 1) defining novel metrics for wind and solar power forecasting that attempt to capture the true impact of forecast errors on system operations and economics, and 2) informing various power system models in a data-driven manner for superior exploratory simulation research. Both allow inference on sensitivities and meaningful correlations, as well as the ability to quantify the value of probabilistic approaches for future use in practice.

  16. Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view looking northeast at ramp 3. View shows remaining stone inlay to provide traction surface. - Naval Air Station North Island, Seaplane Ramps Nos. 2, 3 & 4, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  17. Oblique view of westside ramp of Facility No. 394 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of west-side ramp of Facility No. 394 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Two-Story Storehouses with Ramps, Port Royal Street between Central and South Avenues, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 27. View from waiting area level looking up ramp to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View from waiting area level looking up ramp to F train platform and down ramp to street level. Looking north. - Stillwell Avenue Station, Intersection of Stillwell & Surf Avenues, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  19. 16. Built c. 1936, this ramp from the first to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Built c. 1936, this ramp from the first to the second floor along the northwestern side of Pier G (shown at the first floor) was called 'ramp C.' - Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pier G, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  20. Results of the Cryogenic Tests of the Superconducting Magnets Forming the Barrel Toroid of the Atlas Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, K.; Delruelle, N.; Dudarev, A.; Junker, S.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.; Berriaud, C.

    2006-04-01

    The Barrel Toroid magnet of the ATLAS experiment will be built from eight 25 m × 5 m racetrack shaped superconducting coils that are symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. Prior to their final assembly in the underground cavern of the LHC, these magnets are individually tested at ground level in order to verify the expected overall performances. A dedicated facility has been commissioned and the testing of the coils, at their nominal electrical and thermal operating conditions, has been carried out. The paper presents the results obtained during the cool-down phase from ambient temperature, the steady-state operation at 4.5 K, the 20 kA current ramping up/down and the thermal recovery after a fast energy dump of up to 138 MJ stored energy. Included are the measurements of the various thermal loads in both static and dynamic conditions.

  1. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.1 Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. (a) Livestock pens, driveways and ramps shall be maintained in good repair. They shall be free from sharp...

  2. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.1 Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. (a) Livestock pens, driveways and ramps shall be maintained in good repair. They shall be free from sharp...

  3. 3. Ramp No. 6 connection between Medical Detachment Barracks: Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Ramp No. 6 connection between Medical Detachment Barracks: Building Nos. 9970-B (left) and 9969-B (right). The many windows makes this section almost unique among the ramps and corridors. - Madigan Hospital, Corridors & Ramps, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  4. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.1 Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. (a) Livestock pens, driveways and ramps shall be maintained in good repair. They shall be free from sharp...

  5. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.1 Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. (a) Livestock pens, driveways and ramps shall be maintained in good repair. They shall be free from sharp...

  6. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.1 Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. (a) Livestock pens, driveways and ramps shall be maintained in good repair. They shall be free from sharp...

  7. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose systems. They represent an example of the "molecular" superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt

    [Helv. Phys. Acta 30 93 (1957)]
    . The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductors are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  8. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose system. They represent an example of the ''molecular'' superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt. The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductor are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  9. Ramp Angle, Not Plateau Height, Influences Transition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2016-10-01

    In a previous study, we found that participants modified how they transitioned onto and off of ramp configurations depending upon the incline. While the transition strategies were originally attributed to ramp angles, it is possible that the plateau influenced the strategies since the final surface height also differed. Ultimately, for the current study, we hypothesized that an individual's transition strategies would have significant main effects for ramp angle, but not plateau height. Twelve healthy, young adults transitioned onto 3 distinct ramp configurations, a 2.4-m ramp angled at 12.5° ending at a plateau height of 53 cm, a 1.2-m ramp angled at 23.5° ending at a plateau height of 53 cm, and a 2.4-m ramp angled at 23.5° ending at a plateau height of 99.5 cm. Kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activity were measured during the stance phase before contacting the ramp. In support of our hypothesis, impact peak, active peak, and all of the muscle activity variables had a significant main effect for ramp angle, with greater vertical force peaks and muscle activity on steeper ramp transitions. These findings support our previous interpretation that individuals use estimations of ramp angle, not plateau height, to determine their transition strategies.

  10. Engineering Analysis of Characterization Ramps and Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-25

    The calculations in Appendix A and B determine the adequacy of the ramps and platforms to accomplish two tasks: (1) Core sampling using the modifications imposed by the use of a FDNW foundation at PFP; and (2) Core sampling within the 200E and 200W Tank Farms without the imposed modifications. The calculations in this document determined that the ramps and platforms are adequate for use with core sampling equipment when sampling either tank 241-2-361 or within 200E or 200W Tank Farms. When sampling tank 241-2-361 the modifications made by ECN 651132 must be implemented. These modifications are the addition of diagonal cross bracing on both the lateral and longitudinal sides. Also, a 1 1/4 inch tie rod must connect both bases of each longitudinal side.

  11. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  12. Public transit bus ramp slopes measured in situ.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina; Frost, Karen; Smalley, Craig

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Purpose: The slopes of fixed-route bus ramps deployed for wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users during boarding and alighting were assessed. Measured slopes were compared to the proposed Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) maximum allowable ramp slope. Methods: A ramp-embedded inclinometer measured ramp slope during WhMD user boarding and alighting on a fixed-route transit bus. The extent of bus kneeling was determined for each ramp deployment. In-vehicle video surveillance cameras captured ramp deployment level (street versus sidewalk) and WhMD type. Results: Ramp slopes ranged from -4° to 15.5° with means of 4.3° during boarding (n = 406) and 4.2° during alighting (n = 405). Ramp slope was significantly greater when deployed to street level. During boarding, the proposed ADA maximum allowable ramp slope (9.5°) was exceeded in 66.7% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level, and in 1.9% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. During alighting, the proposed ADA maximum allowable slope was exceeded in 56.8% of instances when the ramp was deployed to street level and in 1.4% of instances when the ramp was deployed to sidewalk level. Conclusions: Deployment level, built environment and extent of bus kneeling can affect slope of ramps ascended/descended by WhMD users when accessing transit buses. Implications for Rehabilitation Since public transportation services are critical for integration of wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users into the community and society, it is important that they, as well as their therapists, are aware of conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses. Knowledge of real world ramp slope conditions that may be encountered when accessing transit buses will allow therapists to better access capabilities of WhMD users in a controlled clinical setting. Real world ramp slope conditions can be recreated in a clinical setting to allow WhMD users to develop and practice necessary

  13. A survey on wind power ramp forecasting.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Matias, L.; Botterud, A.; Wang, J.

    2011-02-23

    The increasing use of wind power as a source of electricity poses new challenges with regard to both power production and load balance in the electricity grid. This new source of energy is volatile and highly variable. The only way to integrate such power into the grid is to develop reliable and accurate wind power forecasting systems. Electricity generated from wind power can be highly variable at several different timescales: sub-hourly, hourly, daily, and seasonally. Wind energy, like other electricity sources, must be scheduled. Although wind power forecasting methods are used, the ability to predict wind plant output remains relatively low for short-term operation. Because instantaneous electrical generation and consumption must remain in balance to maintain grid stability, wind power's variability can present substantial challenges when large amounts of wind power are incorporated into a grid system. A critical issue is ramp events, which are sudden and large changes (increases or decreases) in wind power. This report presents an overview of current ramp definitions and state-of-the-art approaches in ramp event forecasting.

  14. Fold patterns, lateral ramps and seismicity in central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohn, H.A.; Coleman, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Susquehanna lateral ramp crosses the entire length of Pennsylvania in a NNE direction and extends into southern New York State. Its presence was first suspected because of a dramatic change in fold wavelength across the Susquehanna River, seen on both side-looking airborne radar (SLAR *) data and the geologic map of Pennsylvania. Seismic reflection profiles confirm the presence of a ramp and show the detailed nature of structures associated with it. These structures include antiformal stacks, juxtaposed anticlines and synclines, and folds beheaded by thrust faults. The change in the fold pattern, which led to recognizing the lateral ramp, occurs above a rapid dropoff in depth to the basement suggesting that the ramp and the basement configuration may somehow be related. In plan view, eleven earthquakes are spatially related to the Susquehanna lateral ramp, although they are in the basement rocks rather than in the cover rocks which contain the lateral ramp itself. The earthquakes are, therefore, not likely directly associated with the ramp, though they may be affiliated with strike-slip faulting in the basement which, itself, appears to be partly responsible for the formation of the ramp. The initial age of the faulting along, and in the vicinity of, the Susquehanna lateral ramp is presumably Early to Middle Paleozoic. However, the presence of a surficially-exposed Mesozoic dike along the ramp and modern seismicity suggest that the Susquehanna lateral ramp may be a zone of protracted, and perhaps repeated, tectonism which is currently being reactivated. A preliminary evaluation of the distribution of modern earthquakes in the Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge and Appalachian Plateau shows that nearly half of the earthquakes are located under lateral ramps. If this observation is true, the presence of ramps may be a useful geological indicator of areas susceptible to seismicity. ?? 1991.

  15. Stress, strain, and fault behavior at a thrust ramp: Insights from the Naukluft thrust, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Smith, Zach; Rowe, Christie D.; Makhubu, Bandile; Sylvester, Fernando Y. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report observations from a kilometer-scale thrust ramp on the Naukluft thrust, Namibia. The Naukluft thrust is a low angle thrust that was active at subgreenschist facies conditions and accommodated several tens of kilometers of displacement at the base of the Naukluft Nappe Complex in the Pan-African Damara Orogeny. The fault zone is generally planar and a few meters thick, comprising predominantly a dolomite-rich cataclasite. At the ramp, the fault-rock assemblage increases in thickness, and the hanging-wall, which elsewhere is relatively intact, contains a high density network of inclined quartz veins, subvertical dolomite and calcite veins, breccia zones, as well as injectites of cataclastic fault rock emanating from the fault surface. The geometry of the hanging-wall structures indicates local subhorizontal extension. Local tensile stress can be explained by bending in the hanging-wall as it deformed to slide above the ramp structure. High fluid pressures created dynamically during fast slip by decarbonation of carbonate fault rock, and by dewatering of the footwall under an impermeable fault during interseismic periods, led to additional reduction in local effective compressive stresses. In this location, the ramp is more optimally oriented for slip in the inferred regional stress field, and therefore likely to fail before the contiguous thrust flats that are subparallel to the maximum principal stress. As such, the ramp represents the likely location for nucleation of fault slip, which could both trigger dynamic failure of the adjacent thrust faults, and produce hanging-wall extensional structures.

  16. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  17. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min(-1) speed and increases by 3 m.min(-1) every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min(-2)), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min(-2)). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p < 0.05) and was highest (59.0 ml.kg (0.75).min(-1)) for the 3 m.min(-2) 0° ramp protocol. In the latter, the presence of a VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l(-1) and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min(-2) 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope. PMID:27621709

  18. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L.; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min−1 speed and increases by 3 m.min−1 every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min−2), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min−2). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p < 0.05) and was highest (59.0 ml.kg 0.75.min−1) for the 3 m.min−2 0° ramp protocol. In the latter, the presence of a VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l−1 and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min−2 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope. PMID:27621709

  19. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min(-1) speed and increases by 3 m.min(-1) every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min(-2)), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min(-2)). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p < 0.05) and was highest (59.0 ml.kg (0.75).min(-1)) for the 3 m.min(-2) 0° ramp protocol. In the latter, the presence of a VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l(-1) and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min(-2) 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope.

  20. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L.; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min−1 speed and increases by 3 m.min−1 every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min−2), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min−2). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p < 0.05) and was highest (59.0 ml.kg 0.75.min−1) for the 3 m.min−2 0° ramp protocol. In the latter, the presence of a VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l−1 and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min−2 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope.

  1. NASA #801 and NASA 7 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA N801NA and NASA 7 together on the NASA Dryden ramp. The Beechcraft Beech 200 Super KingAir aircraft N7NA, known as NASA 7, has been a support aircraft for many years, flying 'shuttle' missions to Ames Research Center. It once flew from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and back each day but now (2001) flies between the Dryden Flight Research Center and Ames. A second Beechcraft Beech 200 Super King Air, N701NA, redesignated N801NA, transferred to Dryden on 3 Oct. 1997 and is used for research missions but substitutes for NASA 7 on shuttle missions when NASA 7 is not available.

  2. 4. RAMP FOR BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BRIDGE (FOURTH ST.) BETWEEN VINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. RAMP FOR BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BRIDGE (FOURTH ST.) BETWEEN VINE AND RACE STS., LOOKING NORTHWEST - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Quantum Ramp Secret Sharing Scheme and Quantum Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heling; Wang, Huifeng; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of quantum secret sharing, quantum ramp secret sharing schemes were proposed (Ogawa et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032318 [2005]), which had a trade-off between security and coding efficiency. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an intermediate set, which cannot fully reconstruct the secret. This paper revisits the size of a share in the quantum ramp secret scheme based on a relation between the quantum operations and the coherent information. We also propose an optimal quantum ramp secret sharing scheme.

  4. Superconducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors.

  5. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  6. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  7. Cretaceous tide-dominated carbonate ramp: Comparison of reservoir hetergeneity in tide-versus wave-dominated carbonate ramp systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1995-08-01

    Cretaceous (upper Albian) carbonate ramp strata, Pecos River Canyon, Texas, provide a uniquely continuous exposure of a tide-dominated ramp reservoir analog. The continuous 100-km shelf-to-basin outcrop begins in inner ramp mud-rich facies that record both high-frequency (20-100 ky) and intermediate frequency (>200 ky) cyclicity. The ramp-crest is up to 40 km across depositional dip. Intermediate-scale cycles in the ramp crest include basal oyster and toucasid wackestones, chondrodontid-rudist packstones, rudist-skeletal grainstones, and caprinid biostromes. Ramp-crest grainstones are 4-23 m in thickness and extend more than 20 km in a shelf to basin direction. Rudist biostromes are 3-7 m in thickness and are up to several kilometers in dip continuity except in deeper outer ramp settings where 100-200 m wide mounds are more common. The ramp crest is dominated by grain-rich facies with moderate to high permeability. Toucasid wackestones and oyster marls are 1-5 m in thickness and extend tens of kilometers in a dip direction, representing potential fluid flow barriers. Wave-dominated ramp systems of the Permian of West Texas provide a contrast to the Cretaceous tide-dominated setting. Low-permeability high-frequency cycle base mudstones and high-permeability cycle-top grainstones are preserved in both inner ramp and ramp crest settings. Fluid-flow modeling of these Permian wave-dominated reservoir strata illustrates that the intercalation of thin high- and low-permeability layers result in crossflow trapping and thief zones controlling the position and amount of remaining oil saturation. The depositional homogeneity of the Cretaceous tide-dominated ramp indicates that diagenetic heterogeneities and gravitational effects are potentially dominant controls on reservoir performance for these strata.

  8. Rainfall Manipulation Plot Study (RaMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Blair, John [Kansas State University; Fay, Phillip [USDA-ARS; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University; Collins, Scott [University of New Mexico; Smith, Melinda [Yale University

    Rainfall Manipulation Plots facility (RaMPs) is a unique experimental infrastructure that allows us to manipulate precipitation events and temperature, and assess population community, and ecosystem responses in native grassland. This facility allows us to manipulate the amount and timing of individual precipitation events in replicated field plots at the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Questions we are addressing include: • What is the relative importance of more extreme precipitation patterns (increased climatic variability) vs. increased temperatures (increased climatic mean) with regard to their impact on grassland ecosystem structure and function? Both projected climate change factors are predicted to decrease soil water availability, but the mechanisms by which this resource depletion occurs differ. • Will altered precipitation patterns, increased temperatures and their interaction increase opportunities for invasion by exotic species? • Will long-term (6-10 yr) trajectories of community and ecosystem change in response to more extreme precipitation patterns continue at the same rate as initial responses from years 1-6? Or will non-linear change occur as potential ecological thresholds are crossed? And will increased temperatures accelerate these responses? Data sets are available as ASCII files, in Excel spreadsheets, and in SAS format. (Taken from http://www.konza.ksu.edu/ramps/backgrnd.html

  9. Chaotic Pattern Dynamics in Spatially Ramped Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, R. J.; Ashbaker, E.; Olsen, T.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2003-11-01

    In previous experiments(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997)., Taylor vortex flow in an hourglass geometry has demonstrated a period-doubling cascade to chaotic pattern dynamics. A spatial ramp exists in the Reynolds number. For low reduced Reynolds numbesr \\varepsilon, supercritical vortex flow occurs between regions of subcritical structureless flow with soft boundaries that allow for pattern dynamics. At \\varepsilon ≈ 0.5, the pattern exhibits phase slips that occur irregularly in time. At \\varepsilon ≈ 1.0 the entire system is supercritical, and the pattern is stabilized against phase slips. At \\varepsilon > 15, shear flow creates a spatial ramp in turbulence. Remarkably, the phase slip instability reoccurs. Vortex pairs are created chaotically, possibly due to the spatial variation of the turbulence. The variance and Fourier spectra of time series of light scattered off Kalliroscope tracer were measured. These indicate that a region of turbulence exists, within which phase slips occur, bounded by regions of laminar flow which may provide soft boundaries that allow for the phase dynamics. Despite the presence of turbulence, the dynamics might be describable by a phase equation.

  10. Ramp compression of diamond to five terapascals.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Eggert, J H; Jeanloz, R; Duffy, T S; Braun, D G; Patterson, J R; Rudd, R E; Biener, J; Lazicki, A E; Hamza, A V; Wang, J; Braun, T; Benedict, L X; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W

    2014-07-17

    The recent discovery of more than a thousand planets outside our Solar System, together with the significant push to achieve inertially confined fusion in the laboratory, has prompted a renewed interest in how dense matter behaves at millions to billions of atmospheres of pressure. The theoretical description of such electron-degenerate matter has matured since the early quantum statistical model of Thomas and Fermi, and now suggests that new complexities can emerge at pressures where core electrons (not only valence electrons) influence the structure and bonding of matter. Recent developments in shock-free dynamic (ramp) compression now allow laboratory access to this dense matter regime. Here we describe ramp-compression measurements for diamond, achieving 3.7-fold compression at a peak pressure of 5 terapascals (equivalent to 50 million atmospheres). These equation-of-state data can now be compared to first-principles density functional calculations and theories long used to describe matter present in the interiors of giant planets, in stars, and in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. Our data also provide new constraints on mass-radius relationships for carbon-rich planets. PMID:25030170

  11. Numerical study of friction-induced instability and acoustic radiation - Effect of ramp loading on the squeal propensity for a simplified brake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Sinou, J.-J.; Besset, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the influence of loading conditions on the vibrational and acoustic responses of a disc brake system subjected to squeal. A simplified model composed of a circular disc and a pad is proposed. Nonlinear effects of contact and friction over the frictional interface are modelled with a cubic law and a classical Coulomb's law with a constant friction coefficient. The stability analysis of this system shows the presence of two instabilities with one and two unstable modes that lead to friction-induced nonlinear vibrations and squeal noise. Nonlinear time analysis by temporal integration is conducted for two cases of loadings and initial conditions: a static load near the associated sliding equilibrium and a slow and a fast ramp loading. The analysis of the time responses shows that a sufficiently fast ramp loading can destabilize a stable configuration and generate nonlinear vibrations. Moreover, the fast ramp loading applied for the two unstable cases generates higher amplitudes of velocity than for the static load cases. The frequency analysis shows that the fast ramp loading generates a more complex spectrum than for the static load with the appearance of new resonance peaks. The acoustic responses for these cases are estimated by applying the multi-frequency acoustic calculation method based on the Fourier series decomposition of the velocity and the Boundary Element Method. Squeal noise emissions for the fast ramp loading present lower or higher levels than for the static load due to the different amplitudes of velocities. Moreover, the directivity is more complex for the fast ramp loading due to the appearance of new harmonic components in the velocity spectrum. Finally, the sound pressure convergence study shows that only the first harmonic components are sufficient to well describe the acoustic response.

  12. Cellular damage as induced by high temperature is dependent on rate of temperature change - investigating consequences of ramping rates on molecular and organismal phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper G; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten N

    2013-03-01

    Ecological relevance and repeatability of results obtained in different laboratories are key issues when assessing thermal tolerance of ectotherms. Traditionally, assays have used acute exposures to extreme temperatures. The outcomes of ecologically more relevant ramping experiments, however, are dependent on the rate of temperature change leading to uncertainty of the causal factor for loss of function. Here, we test the physiological consequences of exposing female Drosophila melanogaster to gradually increasing temperatures in so-called ramping assays. We exposed flies to ramping at rates of 0.06 and 0.1°C min(-1), respectively. Flies were sampled from the two treatments at 28, 30, 32, 34, 36 and 38°C and tested for heat tolerance and expression levels of the heat shock genes hsp23 and hsp70, as well as Hsp70 protein. Heat shock genes were upregulated more with a slow compared with a faster ramping rate, and heat knock-down tolerance was higher in flies exposed to the faster rate. The fact that slow ramping induces a stronger stress response (Hsp expression) compared with faster ramping suggests that slow ramping induces more heat damage at the cellular level due to longer exposure time. This is supported by the observation that fast ramped flies have higher heat knock-down tolerance. Thus we observed both accumulation of thermal damage at the molecular level and heat hardening at the phenotypic level as a consequence of heat exposure. The balance between these processes is dependent on ramping rate leading to the observed variation in thermal tolerance when using different rates.

  13. 51. VIEW SOUTH, WIDE VIEW INTO SOUTH STREET RAMP NECKDOWN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. VIEW SOUTH, WIDE VIEW INTO SOUTH STREET RAMP NECKDOWN, SHOWING UNDERSIDE FRAMING OF CENTER RAMP SECTION AND BOTH EAST AND WEST SPLITS, AND STEEL BENTS - Route 1 Extension, Southbound Viaduct, Spanning Conrail Yards, Wilson Avenue, Delancy Street, & South Street on Routes 1 & 9 Southbound, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  14. How does the edge height of curb ramps obstruct bicycles?

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to recommend revisions, based on empirical data, to the current curb ramp standards for keeping bicyclists safe. Four types of curb ramps were tested: (1) concrete with a 50 mm edge height, (2) concrete reinforced by a metal plate with a 50 mm edge height, (3) plastic with a 20 mm edge height, and (4) recycled rubber with a 10 mm edge height. Twenty subjects aged 20-60 years ascended the curbs on a bicycle under various conditions. The angles of approach were 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees and 90 degrees. Experiments were executed under both wet and dry conditions. We found that when approaching from an angle of 45 degrees or more, all subjects could ascend all ramps under both conditions. From a 15 degrees approach under wet conditions, no subjects ascended the concrete ramps. Some could not ascend at a 15 degrees approach on the concrete ramps in dry conditions, and some could not ascend from a 30 degrees approach on the reinforced concrete ramp in wet conditions. Bicyclists riding on roadways cannot easily ascend a curb ramp with a 50 mm edge, even in dry conditions. We thus recommend that curb ramp edge heights be lower than 50 mm. Keywords: friction coefficient; approach angle PMID:25665200

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF THREE CONCENTRATION TABLES, LOADING RAMP, AND CLASSIFIER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE CONCENTRATION TABLES, LOADING RAMP, AND CLASSIFIER, LOOKING EST. THE RAKE THAT WAS ORIGINALLY INSIDE THE CLASSIFIER IS AT CENTER RIGHT ON TOP OF THE LOADING RAMP. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. SUBSTRUCTURE AND RAMP DETAIL VIEW OF FIRST AVENUE ON AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SUBSTRUCTURE AND RAMP DETAIL VIEW OF FIRST AVENUE ON- AND OFF-RAMPS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT FIRST AVENUE (DEARBORN AND RAILROAD AVENUES SOUTH INTERSECTION). NOTE STEEL AND CONCRETE GIRDERS AND CONCRETE COLUMNS. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  17. 2. Ramp No. 3 connection between two Standard Wards: Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Ramp No. 3 connection between two Standard Wards: Building Nos. 9935-A (left) and 9934-A (right). Note asymetrical wooden door, and brick arch above doorway. - Madigan Hospital, Corridors & Ramps, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  18. SOLANO AVENUE ENTRANCE RAMP. NOTE SOLANO AVENUE OVERCROSSING AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOLANO AVENUE ENTRANCE RAMP. NOTE SOLANO AVENUE OVERCROSSING AT LEFT REAR AND CLOSED ACCESS RAMP BENEATH; PARK ROW BRIDGE AT CENTER REAR AND TUNNEL NO. 2. LOOKING 350°N - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Solano Avenue Underpass, Milepost 25.09, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 1. Ramp No. 1 with west end of Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ramp No. 1 with west end of Building No. 9902 in background. Corner of Headquarters Building No. 9900 is on right. For view in opposite direction, see photo WA-202-1-2. - Madigan Hospital, Corridors & Ramps, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  20. 14. VIEW OF THE MODERN CONCRETE RAMP THAT CONNECTED THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF THE MODERN CONCRETE RAMP THAT CONNECTED THE UPPER AND LOWER MINE ROADS. TRUCKS USED THIS RAMP AND THE ROADS TO HAUL SLAG TO THE MINE DUMP. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  1. Oblique view of eastside ramp of Facility No. 393, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of east-side ramp of Facility No. 393, with Facility No. 394 in background - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Two-Story Storehouses with Ramps, Port Royal Street between Central and South Avenues, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  4. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  5. Terasaki Spiral Ramps in the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Jemal; Huber, Greg; Valencia, Dulce María

    2014-10-01

    We present a model describing the morphology as well as the assembly of "Terasaki ramps," the recently discovered helicoidal connections linking adjacent sheets of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The fundamental unit is a localized symmetric double-ramped "parking garage" formed by two separated gently pitched, approximately helicoidal, ramps of opposite chiralities. This geometry is stabilized by a short-range repulsive interaction between ramps associated with bending energy which opposes the long-range attraction associated with tension. The ramp inner boundaries are themselves stabilized by the condensation of membrane-shaping proteins along their length. A mechanism for parking garage self-assembly is proposed involving the nucleation of dipoles at the center of tubular three-way junctions within the smooth ER. Our predictions are compared with the experimental data.

  6. Terasaki spiral ramps in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Guven, Jemal; Huber, Greg; Valencia, Dulce María

    2014-10-31

    We present a model describing the morphology as well as the assembly of "Terasaki ramps," the recently discovered helicoidal connections linking adjacent sheets of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The fundamental unit is a localized symmetric double-ramped "parking garage" formed by two separated gently pitched, approximately helicoidal, ramps of opposite chiralities. This geometry is stabilized by a short-range repulsive interaction between ramps associated with bending energy which opposes the long-range attraction associated with tension. The ramp inner boundaries are themselves stabilized by the condensation of membrane-shaping proteins along their length. A mechanism for parking garage self-assembly is proposed involving the nucleation of dipoles at the center of tubular three-way junctions within the smooth ER. Our predictions are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Assigning on-ramp flows to maximize highway capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiao-Ming; Jiang, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we study the capacity of a highway with two on-ramps by using a cellular automata traffic flow model. We investigate how to improve the system capacity by assigning traffic flow to the two ramps. The system phase diagram is presented and different regions are classified. It is shown that in region I, in which both ramps are in free flow and the main road upstream of the ramps is in congestion, assigning a higher proportion of the demand to the upstream on-ramp could improve the overall flow, which is consistent with previous studies. This is explained through studying the spatiotemporal patterns and analytical investigations. In contrast, optimal assignment has not been observed in other regions. We point out that our result is robust and model independent under certain conditions.

  8. Comprehensive School Counseling Programs and Student Achievement Outcomes: A Comparative Analysis of Ramp versus Non-Ramp Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Kevin; Perusse, Rachelle; Hughes, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    This study compares school-wide Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) results in Indiana schools earning the Recognized ASCA Model Program (RAMP) designation (n = 75) with a sample of control schools stratified by level and locale (n = 226). K-12 schools earning the RAMP designation in 2007, 2008, and 2009 comprise the experimental group. Findings indicate…

  9. Real-time gait event detection for transfemoral amputees during ramp ascending and descending.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, H F; Husman, M A B; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2015-01-01

    Events and phases detection of the human gait are vital for controlling prosthesis, orthosis and functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems. Wearable sensors are inexpensive, portable and have fast processing capability. They are frequently used to assess spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of the human gait which in turn provide more details about the human voluntary control and ampute-eprosthesis interaction. This paper presents a reliable real-time gait event detection algorithm based on simple heuristics approach, applicable to signals from tri-axial gyroscope for lower limb amputees during ramp ascending and descending. Experimental validation is done by comparing the results of gyroscope signal with footswitches. For healthy subjects, the mean difference between events detected by gyroscope and footswitches is 14 ms and 10.5 ms for initial contact (IC) whereas for toe off (TO) it is -5 ms and -25 ms for ramp up and down respectively. For transfemoral amputee, the error is slightly higher either due to the placement of footswitches underneath the foot or the lack of proper knee flexion and ankle plantarflexion/dorsiflexion during ramp up and down. Finally, repeatability tests showed promising results.

  10. Real-time gait event detection for transfemoral amputees during ramp ascending and descending.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, H F; Husman, M A B; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2015-01-01

    Events and phases detection of the human gait are vital for controlling prosthesis, orthosis and functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems. Wearable sensors are inexpensive, portable and have fast processing capability. They are frequently used to assess spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of the human gait which in turn provide more details about the human voluntary control and ampute-eprosthesis interaction. This paper presents a reliable real-time gait event detection algorithm based on simple heuristics approach, applicable to signals from tri-axial gyroscope for lower limb amputees during ramp ascending and descending. Experimental validation is done by comparing the results of gyroscope signal with footswitches. For healthy subjects, the mean difference between events detected by gyroscope and footswitches is 14 ms and 10.5 ms for initial contact (IC) whereas for toe off (TO) it is -5 ms and -25 ms for ramp up and down respectively. For transfemoral amputee, the error is slightly higher either due to the placement of footswitches underneath the foot or the lack of proper knee flexion and ankle plantarflexion/dorsiflexion during ramp up and down. Finally, repeatability tests showed promising results. PMID:26737364

  11. Superconducting Materials, Magnets and Electric Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2011-03-01

    The surprising discovery of superconductivity a century ago launched a chain of convention-shattering innovations and discoveries in superconducting materials and applications that continues to this day. The range of large-scale applications grows with new materials discoveries - low temperature NbTi and Nb3 Sn for liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, intermediate temperature MgB2 for inexpensive cryocooled applications including MRI magnets, and high temperature YBCO and BSSCO for high current applications cooled with inexpensive liquid nitrogen. Applications based on YBCO address critical emerging challenges for the electricity grid, including high capacity superconducting cables to distribute power in urban areas; transmission of renewable electricity over long distances from source to load; high capacity DC interconnections among the three US grids; fast, self-healing fault current limiters to increase reliability; low-weight, high capacity generators enabling off-shore wind turbines; and superconducting magnetic energy storage for smoothing the variability of renewable sources. In addition to these grid applications, coated conductors based on YBCO deposited on strong Hastelloy substrates enable a new generation of all superconducting high field magnets capable of producing fields above 30 T, approximately 50% higher than the existing all superconducting limit based on Nb3 Sn . The high fields, low power cost and the quiet electromagnetic and mechanical operation of such magnets could change the character of high field basic research on materials, enable a new generation of high-energy colliding beam experiments and extend the reach of high density superconducting magnetic energy storage.

  12. Ramping Performance Analysis of the Kahuku Wind-Energy Battery Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, V.; Corbus, D.

    2013-11-01

    High penetrations of wind power on the electrical grid can introduce technical challenges caused by resource variability. Such variability can have undesirable effects on the frequency, voltage, and transient stability of the grid. Energy storage devices can be an effective tool in reducing variability impacts on the power grid in the form of power smoothing and ramp control. Integrating anenergy storage system with a wind power plant can help smooth the variable power produced from wind. This paper explores the fast-response, megawatt-scale, wind-energy battery storage systems that were recently deployed throughout the Hawaiian islands to support wind and solar projects.

  13. Spontaneous fluxoid formation in superconducting loops

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Rivers, R. J.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2009-11-01

    We report on the experimental verification of the Zurek-Kibble scenario in an isolated superconducting ring over a wide parameter range. The probability of creating a single flux quantum spontaneously during the fast normal-superconducting phase transition of a wide Nb loop clearly follows a scaling relation on the quenching time {tau}{sub Q}, as one would expect if the transition took place as fast as causality permits. However, the observed Zurek-Kibble scaling exponent {sigma}=0.62{+-}0.15 is two times larger than anticipated for large loops. Assuming Gaussian winding number densities we show that this doubling is well founded for small annuli.

  14. Trunk Highway 169: Dynamic ramp metering evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Peak period travel demand has exceed unmanaged road capacity on most of Twin Cities metropolitan area freeways for more than two decades. During this time, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MN/DOT) has developed and implemented its freeway traffic management system (FTMS). MN/DOT continues to expand the FTMS, which includes ramp metering as one component. This report documents the impact of dynamic ramp metering on Trunk Highway 169 (TH 16) from Minnetonka Boulevard in Minnetonka to 77th Avenue in Brooklyn Park. The study examines changes in traffic performance with regard to traffic flow, congestion levels, travel times, and accident rates before and after implementation of dynamic ramp metering.

  15. Current ramp-up with rf waves in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1984-08-01

    The circuit equations for current-drive in a start-up or ramp-up plasma are derived by finding appropriate response functions in the presence of an electric field. The effect of arbitrary wave-induced fluxes on runaway production and current generation can then be determined. An interpretation of the rather remarkable PLT ramp-up efficiencies, difficult to explain using the steady-state efficiency, is now possible. A parameter regime, available also on reactor-grade devices, is identified wherein quick ramp-up by lower-hybrid waves may be efficient.

  16. 2. Overview showing Medical Detachment Barracks on both Ramp No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Overview showing Medical Detachment Barracks on both Ramp No. 5 (left buildings) and Ramp No. 6 (right buildings). View is to west from roof of Corridor A. Note that a pedestrian sidewalk separates buildings instead of a street for automobiles. In left foreground is the north end of Building No. 9962-B; followed by the north B-sides of Buildings Nos. 9963, 9964, 9965, 9966, 9967 and 9968 on Ramp No. 5. Large white building in far distance is a barracks on the other side of Wilson Avenue. - Madigan Hospital, Medical Detachment Barracks, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  17. Forward ramp and Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A lander petal and the forward ramp are featured in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. There are several prominent rocks, including Wedge at left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin in the background; and Flat Top and Little Flat Top at center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  19. Ramp loading in Russian doll poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailani, Gaffar; Cowin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Aporoelastic model for porous materials with a nested pore space structure is developed to represent the interstitial fluid flow in bone tissue. The nested porosity model is applied to the problem of determining the exchange of pore fluid between the vascular porosity (PV) and the lacunar-canalicular porosity (PLC) in bone tissue in a ramp loading in the case where the fluid and solid constituents are assumed to be compressible. The compressibility assumption is appropriate for hard tissues while the incompressibility assumption is appropriate for soft tissues. The influence of blood pressure in the PV is included in the analysis. A formula for the fluid that moves between the two porosities is developed. The analysis showed the coupling of the two porosities and their influence on each other and concluded that the PV pore pressure has an influence less than 3% on the PLC pore pressure while the absence of the PV pore pressure will affect the fluid exchange between the PV and PLC by less than 6% (the blood pressure range is 40-60 mmHg). Also the analysis has shown that the draining time of the PLC is inversely proportional to its permeability. The significance of the result is basic to the understanding of interstitial flow in bone tissue that, in turn, is basic to understanding of nutrient transport from the vasculature to the bone cells buried in the bone tissue and to the process of mechanotransduction by these cells.

  20. Facility 596, detail of ramp from below, with replacement sheetpile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility 596, detail of ramp from below, with replacement sheet-pile dolphin on right and southernmost dolphins in background. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ferry Landing Type, Halawa Landing on Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Facility S 372, replacement dolphins and ramp from upper deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility S 372, replacement dolphins and ramp from upper deck of ferry boat (YFB 87). - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ferry Landing Type, Halawa Landing on Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 34. VIEW TO EAST; DETAIL OF LAMP ON VEHICULAR RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW TO EAST; DETAIL OF LAMP ON VEHICULAR RAMP LIGHTING PYLON (Dobson) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 33. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; DETAIL OF VEHICULAR RAMP LIGHTING PYLON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW TO NORTHWEST; DETAIL OF VEHICULAR RAMP LIGHTING PYLON (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms and specimen preparation rooms. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. 3. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, north facade. Loading ramp on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Cement and Plaster Warehouse, north facade. Loading ramp on the right. Utility building, intrusion, on the far right. - Curtis Wharf, Cement & Plaster Warehouse, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  6. Viaduct, looking west with downtown Harrisburg in background. Note ramp ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Viaduct, looking west with downtown Harrisburg in background. Note ramp descending from viaduct to Cameron Street at left. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  7. East view; Mechanical Building south elevation, covered ramp, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East view; Mechanical Building - south elevation, covered ramp, and Street Car Waiting House, left to right - North Philadelphia Station, Mechanical Building, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  9. 124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  10. View from water's edge across the ramp of the 1922 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water's edge across the ramp of the 1922 Seaplane Runway, looking toward Hospital Point - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Runway, Southern tip of Ford Island, near Lexington Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Overview of the area leading to beaching ramp, looking across ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the area leading to beaching ramp, looking across water of west loch. View facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waipio Peninsula, Waipo Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. A Scenario Generation Method for Wind Power Ramp Events Forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ming-Jian; Ke, De-Ping; Sun, Yuan-Zhang; Gan, Di; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2015-07-03

    Wind power ramp events (WPREs) have received increasing attention in recent years due to their significant impact on the reliability of power grid operations. In this paper, a novel WPRE forecasting method is proposed which is able to estimate the probability distributions of three important properties of the WPREs. To do so, a neural network (NN) is first proposed to model the wind power generation (WPG) as a stochastic process so that a number of scenarios of the future WPG can be generated (or predicted). Each possible scenario of the future WPG generated in this manner contains the ramping information, and the distributions of the designated WPRE properties can be stochastically derived based on the possible scenarios. Actual data from a wind power plant in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was selected for testing the proposed ramp forecasting method. Results showed that the proposed method effectively forecasted the probability of ramp events.

  13. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. LOOKING 278°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 3. West facade, looking east, with concrete truck ramp leading ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West facade, looking east, with concrete truck ramp leading to main floor. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Incinerator, Midway along northern boundary of Charlestown Navy Yard, on Little Mystic Channel, near junction of Eighteenth Street & Second Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  16. Modelling hanging wall accommodation above rigid thrust ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Mulugeta, Genene; Katrivanos, Emmanouil

    2000-08-01

    Experimental models are used to study the role of material rheology in hanging wall accommodation above rigid flat-ramp-flat thrust footwalls. The deformation in the hanging wall was accomplished by forwards sliding along a rigid basal staircase trajectory with a variable ramp angle, α, ranging from 15° to 60°. We model different ramp angles to examine hanging wall accommodation styles above thrust ramps of overthrust faults ( α ranging from 15° to 30°), as well as above pre-existing normal faults ( α ranging from 45° to 60°). For the hanging walls we used stratified frictional (sand) and viscous (silicone putty) materials. In this paper we study three types of models. Type 1 models represent purely frictional hanging walls where accommodation above thrust ramps was by layer-parallel thickening and by generating a series of back thrusts. Type 2 and 3 models represent stratified frictional/viscous hanging walls. In these models, accommodation was by a complex association of reverse and normal faults, mainly controlled by the rheological anisotropy as well as by the ramp inclination angle α. In Type 2 models the silicone covered only the lower flat, while in Type 3 models it also covered the rigid ramp. For α≤30° in Type 2 models and α≤45° in Type 3 models, the viscous layer inhibited the development of back thrusts in the frictional hanging wall, instead the silicone thickened to develop a 'ductile ramp'. For α-values higher than 30° in Type 2 models and α=45° in Type 3 models, back thrusts develop in response to the bulk compression. The experiments simulate many structures observed above natural thrust ramps with α≤30° and pre-existing normal faults with α≥45°. The models emphasise the importance of a basal ductile layer, which allows the hanging wall to step-up over the rigid ramp by building up its own ductile ramp. The models also emphasise that foreland-directed normal faulting can develop at a thrust front in the case that the

  17. Ramp Metering by Limitation of Density and Queue Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Boumediene; Benasser, Amar; Jolly, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    As shown by many works and studies, the control of traffic flow remains the best and the efficient solution of the congestion problems. The ramp metering is a means to reduce congestion effects, it has shown his effectiveness to improve the flow and consequently to reduce the total time spent (TTS) by the vehicles in the network. In Kamel et al. [2008] the concept of flatness-based control was applied to regulate the flow at the mainline section of the road on the traffic flow model LWR. This work was preceded by Abouaïssa et al. [2006]. In this article we have proceeded the same way to set the flat output for a second order model METANET. Unfortunately we were unable to prove that the system is flat and therefore define density as flat output, but we manage to define the control laws in order to respect constraints on density and queue length at the on-ramp. The idea is to express the control variable (the outflow of the on-ramp) according to the output (density or queue length at the on-ramp), then inject it in the system. We use this control method in the ramp metering case. The first aim of the control is to keep the density in the segment where the on-ramp is connected below a density (called the target density YT) for which we have the lowest TTS, and the second aim is to keep the queue length at the on-ramp below a maximum value. In order to evaluate the controller's efficiency and applicability, a comparison is made with traditional ALINEA based controller. We illustrate this approach by comparing the cases 'no control' and 'ramp metering' for a simple network.

  18. Truck ramp construction from clean coal technology waste products

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    The construction and performance of a truck ramp made from clean coal technology waste products are described. The specific waste product used in this project was generated at the power plant located on the campus of The Ohio State University in Columbus. The ramp is used by University vehicles depositing hard trash at a central disposal facility on the OSU campus. Laboratory tests which had been conducted on samples made from the power plant waste product clearly showed that, when the material is property compacted, strengths could be obtained that were much higher than those of the natural soils the clean coal waste would replace. In addition, the permeability and swelling characteristics of the waste product should make it an attractive alternative to importing select borrow materials. Based on the results of the laboratory tests, a decision was made to use the power plant waste in the truck ramp rather than the soil that was called for in the original design. Prior to the start of construction, the area on which the ramp was to be located was covered with an impermeable geomembrane. Drain lines were installed on top of the geomembrane so that water that might leach through the ramp could be collected. The waste product from the power plant was placed on the geomembrane in 20 to 30 centimeter lifts by University maintenance personnel without special equipment. A drain line was installed across the toe of the ramp to intercept surface runoff, and a wearing surface of 7 to 15 centimeters of crushed limestone was placed over the compacted ash. The finished ramp structure recycled approximately 180 metric tons of the power plant byproduct. After over a year in service there is no indication of erosion or rutting in the ramp surface. Tests performed on the leachate and runoff water have shown the high pH characteristic of these materials, but concentrations of metals fall below the established limits.

  19. Vibratory high pressure coal feeder having a helical ramp

    DOEpatents

    Farber, Gerald

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and method for feeding powdered coal from a helical ramp into a high pressure, heated, reactor tube containing hydrogen for hydrogenating the coal and/or for producing useful products from coal. To this end, the helical ramp is vibrated to feed the coal cleanly at an accurately controlled rate in a simple reliable and trouble-free manner that eliminates complicated and expensive screw feeders, and/or complicated and expensive seals, bearings and fully rotating parts.

  20. Ramp wave stress-density measurements of Ta and W

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, J.; Bastea, M.; Reisman, D. B.; Erskine, D.; Collins, G. W.; Rothman, S.; Davis, J.-P.; Knudson, M. D.; Hayes, D. B.; Gray, G. T. III

    2007-12-12

    Stress-density ({sigma}-{rho}) loading paths of both Ta and W under ramped compression were measured up to 300 GPa. For similar ramp loading conditions, {sigma}({rho}) for Ta lies close to the cold curve and significantly below the Hugoniot, while {sigma}({rho}) for W lies close to the Hugoniot and significantly above the cold curve. The elastic yield limit is reported for W and Ta with thicknesses 400-700 {mu}m.

  1. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping... be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and headroom to...

  2. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and... they will be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and...

  3. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping... be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and headroom to...

  4. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and... they will be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and...

  5. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and... they will be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and...

  6. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping... be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and headroom to...

  7. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping... be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and headroom to...

  8. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping... be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and headroom to...

  9. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and... they will be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and...

  10. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and... they will be subjected. The ramps and dumping facilities shall provide width, clearance, and...

  11. Superconducting cable

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, H.

    1983-03-22

    A superconducting cable containing a plurality of individual wires which are stranded or plaited to wire bundles and ropes, wherein in order to avoid relative movement and/or deformation between the wire bundles and/or ropes as, for example, may otherwise be caused by high current loading, the individual wire bundles and the ropes are materially joined together at their points of contact, preferably by soldering, to form a mechanically rigid structure, in which the parts between the soldered areas can as well as possible deform elastically, thereby avoiding all disadvantages associated with freely movable wire bundles. In a preferred embodiment, the ropes are made from wire bundles arranged in a lattice.

  12. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"-the time derivative of the driving field phase-matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient. PMID:27415271

  13. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"—the time derivative of the driving field phase—matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  14. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"-the time derivative of the driving field phase-matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  15. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  16. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  17. Impact of Balancing Area Size, Obligation Sharing, and Energy Markets on Mitigating Ramping Requirements in Systems with Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Balancing area reserve sharing holds the promise of significantly reducing wind integration costs. In a companion paper we examine wind integration costs as a function of balancing area size to determine if the larger system size helps mitigate wind integration cost increases. In this paper we turn to an examination of the NYISO sub-hourly energy market to understand how it incentivizes generators to respond to ramping signals without having to explicitly pay for the service. Because markets appear to have the ability of bringing out supply response in sub-hourly energy markets, and because existing thermal resources appear to have significant untapped ramping capability, we believe that a combination of fast energy markets and combined balancing area operations can increase the grid's ability to absorb higher wind penetrations without experiencing significant operational problems or costs.

  18. Meniscal Ramp Lesions: Anatomy, Incidence, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J; Cram, Tyler R; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  19. Meniscal Ramp Lesions: Anatomy, Incidence, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J; Cram, Tyler R; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol.

  20. Superconductivity: Squash and sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio

    2008-12-01

    Externally applied pressure induces superconductivity in the layer compound 1T-TaS2. Similarities to, and differences from, other superconducting systems promise exciting future experiments on this old, but suddenly rejuvenated, compound.

  1. Improving short-term forecasting during ramp events by means of Regime-Switching Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, C.; Costa, A.; Cuerva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Since nowadays wind energy can't be neither scheduled nor large-scale storaged, wind power forecasting has been useful to minimize the impact of wind fluctuations. In particular, short-term forecasting (characterised by prediction horizons from minutes to a few days) is currently required by energy producers (in a daily electricity market context) and the TSO's (in order to keep the stability/balance of an electrical system). Within the short-term background, time-series based models (i.e., statistical models) have shown a better performance than NWP models for horizons up to few hours. These models try to learn and replicate the dynamic shown by the time series of a certain variable. When considering the power output of wind farms, ramp events are usually observed, being characterized by a large positive gradient in the time series (ramp-up) or negative (ramp-down) during relatively short time periods (few hours). Ramp events may be motivated by many different causes, involving generally several spatial scales, since the large scale (fronts, low pressure systems) up to the local scale (wind turbine shut-down due to high wind speed, yaw misalignment due to fast changes of wind direction). Hence, the output power may show unexpected dynamics during ramp events depending on the underlying processes; consequently, traditional statistical models considering only one dynamic for the hole power time series may be inappropriate. This work proposes a Regime Switching (RS) model based on Artificial Neural Nets (ANN). The RS-ANN model gathers as many ANN's as different dynamics considered (called regimes); a certain ANN is selected so as to predict the output power, depending on the current regime. The current regime is on-line updated based on a gradient criteria, regarding the past two values of the output power. 3 Regimes are established, concerning ramp events: ramp-up, ramp-down and no-ramp regime. In order to assess the skillness of the proposed RS-ANN model, a single

  2. Effects of micro-ramp on transverse jet in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujie; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Bo; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-10-01

    The effects of micro-ramp on the characteristics of transverse jet were investigated by the LES simulation at Mach 2.7, with recycling-rescaling method applied to reproduce the turbulent boundary layer. The transverse nitrogen jet in front of micro-ramp and behind micro-ramp were studied by comparison with plate jet. It is found that the micro-ramp can improve the penetration height obviously, while placing jet orifice behind micro-ramp, due to the low freestream momentum in ramp wake. On the other hand, when placing the jet orifice in front of micro-ramp, the improvement in penetration is quite slight, because most injection is above the boundary layer and micro-ramp has little influence on the main flow. It is also observed that unlike the periodic Kevin Helmholtz (K-H) vortices appeared in ramp wake, the periodic K-H vortices are not achieved in jet cases.

  3. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  4. Speed limit and ramp meter control for traffic flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatin, Paola; Göttlich, Simone; Kolb, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The control of traffic flow can be related to different applications. In this work, a method to manage variable speed limits combined with coordinated ramp metering within the framework of the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) network model is introduced. Following a 'first-discretize-then-optimize' approach, the first order optimality system is derived and the switch of speeds at certain fixed points in time is explained, together with the boundary control for the ramp metering. Sequential quadratic programming methods are used to solve the control problem numerically. For application purposes, experimental setups are presented wherein variable speed limits are used as a traffic guidance system to avoid traffic jams on highway interchanges and on-ramps.

  5. Shock formation and the ideal shape of ramp compression waves

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G; Loomis, E; Hicks, D G; McNaney, J M; Johnson, R P

    2008-05-29

    We derive expressions for shock formation based on the local curvature of the flow characteristics during dynamic compression. Given a specific ramp adiabat, calculated for instance from the equation of state for a substance, the ideal nonlinear shape for an applied ramp loading history can be determined. We discuss the region affected by lateral release, which can be presented in compact form for the ideal loading history. Example calculations are given for representative metals and plastic ablators. Continuum dynamics (hydrocode) simulations were in good agreement with the algebraic forms. Example applications are presented for several classes of laser-loading experiment, identifying conditions where shocks are desired but not formed, and where long duration ramps are desired.

  6. YF-12A #935 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A front, overhead view of the number two YF-12A (60-6935) on the ramp at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden), Edwards, California. Notice how the chines end abruptly, just aft of the nose radome. The aircraft was originally designed as an interceptor. The large radome housed a radar for the Hughes ASG-18 missile fire control system. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, 'coldwall' research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the so-called YF-12C (SR-71A 61-7951, modified with YF-12A inlets and engines and a bogus tail number 06937). The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the

  7. Structure Function Analysis of Two-Scale Scalar Ramps. Part II: Ramp Characteristics and Surface Renewal Flux Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A. J.; Snyder, R. L.; Paw U, K. T.

    2012-10-01

    Ramp features in the turbulent scalar field are associated with turbulent coherent structures, which dominate energy and mass fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. Although finer scale ramp-like shapes embedded within larger scale ramp-like shapes can readily be perceived in turbulent scalar traces, their presence has largely been overlooked in the literature. We demonstrate the signature of more than one ramp scale in structure functions of the turbulent scalar field measured from above bare ground and two types of short plant canopies, using structure-function time lags ranging in scale from isotropic to larger than the characteristic coherent structures. Spectral analysis of structure functions was used to characterize different scales of turbulent structures. By expanding structure function analysis to include two ramp scales, we characterized the intermittency, duration, and surface renewal flux contribution of the smallest (i.e., Scale One) and the dominant (i.e., Scale Two) coherent structure scales. The frequencies of the coherent structure scales increase with mean wind shear, implying that both Scale One and Scale Two are shear-driven. The embedded Scale One turbulent structure scale is ineffectual in the surface-layer energy and mass transport process. The new method reported here for obtaining surface renewal-based scalar exchange works well over bare ground and short canopies under unstable conditions, effectively eliminating the α calibration for these conditions and forming the foundation for analysis over taller and more complex surfaces.

  8. PDR with a Foot-Mounted IMU and Ramp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Antonio R.; Seco, Fernando; Zampella, Francisco; Prieto, José C.; Guevara, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The localization of persons in indoor environments is nowadays an open problem. There are partial solutions based on the deployment of a network of sensors (Local Positioning Systems or LPS). Other solutions only require the installation of an inertial sensor on the person’s body (Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning or PDR). PDR solutions integrate the signals coming from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which usually contains 3 accelerometers and 3 gyroscopes. The main problem of PDR is the accumulation of positioning errors due to the drift caused by the noise in the sensors. This paper presents a PDR solution that incorporates a drift correction method based on detecting the access ramps usually found in buildings. The ramp correction method is implemented over a PDR framework that uses an Inertial Navigation algorithm (INS) and an IMU attached to the person’s foot. Unlike other approaches that use external sensors to correct the drift error, we only use one IMU on the foot. To detect a ramp, the slope of the terrain on which the user is walking, and the change in height sensed when moving forward, are estimated from the IMU. After detection, the ramp is checked for association with one of the existing in a database. For each associated ramp, a position correction is fed into the Kalman Filter in order to refine the INS-PDR solution. Drift-free localization is achieved with positioning errors below 2 meters for 1,000-meter-long routes in a building with a few ramps. PMID:22163701

  9. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  10. Ramp-edge structured tunneling devices using ferromagnet electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi

    2002-09-03

    The fabrication of ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet magnetic tunneling junction devices using a ramp-edge geometry based on, e.g., (La.sub.0.7 Sr.sub.0.3) MnO.sub.3, ferromagnetic electrodes and a SrTiO.sub.3 insulator is disclosed. The maximum junction magnetoresistance (JMR) as large as 23% was observed below 300 Oe at low temperatures (T<100 K). These ramp-edge junctions exhibited JMR of 6% at 200 K with a field less than 100 Oe.

  11. Superconductivity fact vs. fancy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, K.

    1988-05-01

    The author says great advances have been made in superconductivity. However, the rush to secure recognition combined with public confusion over superconductivity has tainted the field with misconceptions. Some people are saying little progress towards practical use of the ceramics has been made over the last year and many researchers have left what they were doing to study superconductivity. All the hype surrounding the new found ceramic superconductors could give way to a period of disillusionment and frustration. This article discusses recent work in the field of superconductivity. IEEE Spectrum has adopted an attitude of ''just the facts'' in reporting superconductivity news.

  12. Shear Seismic Anisotropy Within a Relay Ramp Structure, Baton Rouge Fault System, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, C. C.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Saanumi, A.; Zapata, R.; Egnew, S.

    2005-05-01

    Shear wave data were acquired to characterize the fracture pattern at depth within a relay ramp structure associated with a Pleistocene Growth Fault system in Louisiana. By using both the degree and maximum direction of shear seismic anisotropy, we estimate the extent and orientation preference of subsurface fractures. Multi-source shear seismic data were generated by striking an I-beam, cut to 18 inches in length, from either side. Data collected in two control surveys show an expected 10-15% seismic anisotropy between fast and slow polarization directions, with the maximum anisotropy produced with the survey coordinate system being rotated parallel to the fault scarp. Data collected within the relay ramp structure indicate the principle direction(s) of stress, with depth, as well as density of fracturing. The results of this experiment should aid in regional fluid flow modeling and in local infrastructure planning such as residential construction, groundwater usage evaluation, and waste disposal site selection. This experiment has defined a successful technique that should be used when conducting similar studies in the region.

  13. 1 mm ultrafast superconducting stripline molecule detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, N.; Casaburi, A.; Shiki, S.; Suzuki, K.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Ohkubo, M.

    2009-10-01

    Superconducting stripline detectors (SSLDs) are promising for detecting keV molecules at nanosecond response times and with mass-independent detection efficiency. However, a fast response time is incompatible with practical centimeter detector size. A parallel configuration of striplines provides a means to address this problem. Experimental results and simulation for promisingly large 1-mm-square parallel niobium SSLDs show that nanosecond pulses are produced by superconducting-normal transition within only one of the parallel striplines instead of cascade switching of all the parallel striplines. Successful detection of a series of multimers of immunoglobulin G up to 584 kDa supports the mass-independent efficiency for mass spectrometry.

  14. Asymmetry in perceived duration between up-ramp and down-ramp sounds as a function of duration.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Sabine; Vannier, Michaël; Chatron, Jacques; Susini, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The perceived duration of 1-kHz pure tones with increasing or decreasing intensity profiles was measured. The ratio between the down- and up-ramp durations at equal subjective durations was examined as a function of the sound duration (50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000 ms). At 50 and 100 ms, the ratio was constant and equaled about 1.7, then it logarithmically decreased from 100 to 1000 ms to reach a constant value of 1 at 1 and 2 s. The different mechanisms proposed in the literature to explain the perceived duration asymmetry between up-ramp and down-ramp were discussed in the light of the dependence of this ratio on duration. PMID:25096142

  15. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  16. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  17. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  18. SR-71 Ship #1 on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This look-down, front view of NASA's SR-71A aircraft shows the Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in

  19. SR-71 Ship #1 on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This look-down view of NASA's SR-71A aircraft shows the Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, with Rogers Dry Lake in the background. NASA operated two SR-71s, an SR-71A and an SR- 71B pilot trainer aircraft at that point in time, both based at Dryden. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the

  20. Three SR-71s on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The original trio of SR-71 'Blackbirds' loaned to NASA by the U.S. Air Force for high-speed, high-altitude research line the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The three former reconnaissance aircraft, two SR-71 'A' models and one 'B' model, can fly more than 2200 mph and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet. This operating environment makes the aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. One of the 'A' models was later returned the Air Force for active duty. It subsequently returned to Dryden. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system

  1. X-1-2 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 aircraft on the ramp at NACA High Speed Flight Research Station located on the South Base of Muroc Army Air Field in 1947. The X-1-2 flew until October 23, 1951, completing 74 glide and powered flights with nine different pilots. The aircraft has white paint and the NACA tail band. The black Xs are reference markings for tracking purposes. They were widely used on NACA aircraft in the early 1950s. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager

  2. SR-71 - Taxi on Ramp with Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo shows a head-on shot of NASA's SR-71A aircraft taxiing on the ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, heat waves from its engines blurring the hangars in the background. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena

  3. SR-71 Ship #1 on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This photo shows a head-on shot of NASA's SR-71A aircraft on the ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. NASA operated two SR-71s, an SR-71A and an SR- 71B pilot trainer aircraft, both based at Dryden, at that particular point in time. The SR-71 was designed and built by the Lockheed Skunk Works, now the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. Studies have shown that less than 20 percent of the total thrust used to fly at Mach 3 is produced by the basic engine itself. The balance of the total thrust is produced by the unique design of the engine inlet and 'moveable spike' system at the front of the engine nacelles, and by the ejector nozzles at the exhaust which burn air compressed in the engine bypass system. Data from the SR-71 high speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems, including a high speed civil transport. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to

  4. 13. July 1958 VIEW OF RAMPS LEADING FROM PARADE GROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. July 1958 VIEW OF RAMPS LEADING FROM PARADE GROUND LEVEL TO TERREPLEIN LEVEL Interior face of sally port at left, No. Soldiers' Barracks (Building E) at right. Note brick breast-height wall on terreplein, and stone revetment wall which surrounds parade ground. - Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, East Fort Avenue at Whetstone Point, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. Detail of staircase (stepped ramp) and retaining wall at West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of staircase (stepped ramp) and retaining wall at West 102nd Street, soccer field at right, looking south, with London Plane trees surrounding field. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  6. 6. View west up barn ramp to east side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View west up barn ramp to east side of dairy barn, Nemours Estate carillon tower visible in right background - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Blue Ball Dairy Barn, Junction of U.S. Route 202 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  7. Archives, Oral History and Oral Tradition: A RAMP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, William W.; Mazikana, Peter C.

    This Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) report provides information on the nature of oral tradition/history; the role of recorded oral history as documentation in the absence of written records, or as a supplement where written records exist; problems in recording and administering such materials; and basic considerations involved in…

  8. Ramp Technology and Intelligent Processing in Small Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    To address the issues of excessive inventories and increasing procurement lead times, the Navy is actively pursuing flexible computer integrated manufacturing (FCIM) technologies, integrated by communication networks to respond rapidly to its requirements for parts. The Rapid Acquisition of Manufactured Parts (RAMP) program, initiated in 1986, is an integral part of this effort. The RAMP program's goal is to reduce the current average production lead times experienced by the Navy's inventory control points by a factor of 90 percent. The manufacturing engineering component of the RAMP architecture utilizes an intelligent processing technology built around a knowledge-based shell provided by ICAD, Inc. Rules and data bases in the software simulate an expert manufacturing planner's knowledge of shop processes and equipment. This expert system can use Product Data Exchange using STEP (PDES) data to determine what features the required part has, what material is required to manufacture it, what machines and tools are needed, and how the part should be held (fixtured) for machining, among other factors. The program's rule base then indicates, for example, how to make each feature, in what order to make it, and to which machines on the shop floor the part should be routed for processing. This information becomes part of the shop work order. The process planning function under RAMP greatly reduces the time and effort required to complete a process plan. Since the PDES file that drives the intelligent processing is 100 percent complete and accurate to start with, the potential for costly errors is greatly diminished.

  9. Building Ramps and Hovercrafts and Improving Math Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottge, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a video- and computer-based program used to motivate and develop mathematics skills in middle school students with disabilities. The program emphasizes real-life problems such as building a cage for a pet, a skate boarding ramp, and a "hovercraft" frame. Case studies illustrate the program's effectiveness with individual…

  10. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped modal... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped modal... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test...

  12. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped modal... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped modal... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test...

  14. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....520 Section 1033.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.520 Alternative ramped modal... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test...

  15. 20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE ACCESS RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE ACCESS RAMP TO THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA FROM THE COLD ASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. Student Surveyors Test Skills on Mississippi Boat Ramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Glen Lamb

    1978-01-01

    Students enrolled in the construction surveying class at Southern Illinois University's School of Technical Careers gained practical experience and helped the community by giving engineering assistance to the checking of existing design features and to surveying and laying out a project to construct a boat ramp on the Mississippi River. An…

  17. RAMPS: The Radio Ammonia Mid-Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, James M.; Hogge, Taylor; Stephens, Ian; Whitaker, John Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Radio Ammonia Mid-Plane Survey (RAMPS) is a new 1.3 cm survey of the Galactic plane that will simultaneously image several 23 GHz ammonia lines [NH3 (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and (5,5)] and the 22.2 GHz water maser line from l = 10o to 40o and b = -0.5o to 0.5o. RAMPS employs the K-band Focal Plane Array receiver on the NRAO Green Bank Telescope. The main goal of RAMPS is to characterize the Galactic population of dense star-forming molecular clumps by measuring the gas temperatures, column densities, radial velocities, and kinematic distances using the ammonia line ratios. I report results from the survey's first 6.4 square degrees and present large-scale NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) integrated intensity maps, gas temperature maps, and column density maps. To date over 500 clumps have been identified and characterized. In addition, RAMPS has now detected 619 water maser sites, most of which are detected for the first time. Only 60% of the water masers are associated with detected ammonia emission. We have also discovered a remarkable star forming region with unusually broad NH3 lines (ΔV ~ 25 km/s) and a very rare NH3 (3,3) shock-excited maser. Altough located in the Galactic disk, this clump has characteristics usually found in Galactic Center clouds.

  18. A Framework to Support Generator Ramping Uncertainty Analysis and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    Power system operation requires maintaining a continuous balance between system demand and generation within certain constraints. Traditionally, the balancing processes are based on deterministic models, which do not consider possible random deviations of system generation and load from their predicted values. With the increasing penetration of the renewable generation, unexpected balancing problems can happen due to the deviations. This can result in serious risks to system reliability and efficiency. When the available balancing reserve is not enough to cover the predicted net load range with uncertainty, deficiency of balancing needs occurs. In this case, it is necessary to commit or de-commit additional conventional generators to achieve the desired confidence level for the balancing needs. The framework is built for solving this problem. The ramping tool engine is used to predict additional balancing requirements caused by the variability and uncertainty of the renewable energy, under the constraints of the generation ramping capability and interchange schedule. The webbrowser- based GUI is used to visualize the data in web-environment, which provides flexibility to allow user to see the ramping outputs in any platform. The GOSS structure provides strong support to allow easy communication between ramping engine, and system inputs, as well as the GUI.

  19. 1. Aerial view of bridge showing ramp down to Landing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view of bridge showing ramp down to Landing Street in the Bronx (East) and railroad yard in Manhattan (West). (New York State Department of Transportation; Photographer unknown; View taken in approximately 1986) - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York County, NY

  20. Unsteady transitions of separation patterns in single expansion ramp nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Xu, J.; Yu, K.; Mo, J.

    2015-11-01

    The single expansion ramp nozzle is one of the optimal configurations for a planar rocket-based combined cycle engine because of its good integration and self-adaptability at off-design operation. The single expansion ramp nozzle is seriously overexpanded when the vehicle is at low speed, resulting in complex flow separation phenomena. Several separation patterns have been found in the single expansion ramp nozzle. Numerical simulations have shown that the transition between these separation patterns occurs in the nozzle startup and shutdown processes. However, only a few relevant experimental studies have been reported. This study reproduces the nozzle startup and shutdown processes using wind tunnel experiments. Two restricted shock separation patterns are observed in the experiment, namely, a separation bubble either forms on the ramp or the flap. The detailed flow fields in the transition processes are captured using a high-speed camera. The shock wave structures in the two separation patterns, influences of the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) on the separation patterns and changes of the shock waves in the transition processes are discussed in detail. Shock wave instabilities accompany the separation transition, which usually takes less than 5 ms. The nozzle pressure ratios corresponding to the separation pattern transition are different in the startup and shutdown processes, which leads to a hysteresis effect.

  1. Records Surveys and Schedules: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Derek

    Prepared for Unesco's Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP), this study is intended to introduce workers in archival services to the life cycle concept of records, and to the advantages of establishing a legally authorized and comprehensive program for the orderly disposal of modern institutional records. It is noted that, although the…

  2. The Archival Appraisal of Photographs: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, William H.

    Prepared for Unesco's Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP), this study is designed to provide archivists, manuscript and museum curators, and other interested information professionals in both industrialized and developing countries with an understanding of the archival character of photographs, and a set of guidelines for the…

  3. View of Corto Square. Access ramp in foreground to Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Corto Square. Access ramp in foreground to Building No. 30. Buildings No. 25, 26, 34, and 32 left to right at rear, looking north - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  4. Exterior direct detail view of revised entry handicap ramp at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior direct detail view of revised entry handicap ramp at east side of Building 7 (including 3-story trash dump tower), looking north - North Beach Place, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Experiencing Production Ramp-Up Education for Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassetto, S.; Fiegenwald, V.; Cholez, C.; Mangione, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a game of industrialisation, based on a paper airplane, that mimics real world production ramp-up and blends classical engineering courses together. It is based on a low cost product so that it can be mass produced. The game targets graduate students and practitioners in engineering fields. For students, it offers an experiment…

  6. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. NOTE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE FEATURES AT RIGHT. LOOKING 248°WSW - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Comparison of foot pressure in stretching exercises according to the type of ankle ramp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Keun; Yoo, Won-Gyu; Shin, Seung-Je

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study compared and analyzed use of an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects were included; they were stroke patients more than 6 months after onset, with no orthopedic or biological problems in the legs, so independent gait was possible. [Methods] The subjects performed stretching exercises for 5 min with an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp; foot pressure was then measured. [Results] The averaged percentage and kilopascal data for weight bearing and foot pressure on the affected side with the newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises were significantly higher than those with the existing ankle ramp. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that stretching exercises using the newly developed ankle ramp more effectively increase foot pressure than the existing ankle ramp.

  8. Facility No. S362, view across the ramp U.S. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. S362, view across the ramp - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Ramps - World War II Type, Southwest and west shore of Ford Island, near Wasp Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Metabolic parameters for ramp versus step incremental cycle ergometer tests.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Jorge M; Housh, Terry J; Camic, Clayton L; Bergstrom, Haley C; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mean differences and the patterns of responses for oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O(2)), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for ramp (15 W·min(-1)) versus step (30 W increments every 2 min) incremental cycle ergometer tests. Fourteen subjects (age and body mass of 23.2 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD ) years and 71.1 ± 10.1 kg, respectively) visited the laboratory on separate occasions. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs with appropriate follow-up procedures, as well as paired t tests, were used to analyze the data. In addition, polynomial regression analyses were used to determine the patterns of responses for each dependent variable for the ramp and step tests. The ramp protocol resulted in lower mean [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR values at the common power outputs than the step protocol with no differences in RPE. The increased amount of work performed during the step (total work = 75.83 kJ) versus ramp (total work = 65.60 kJ) tests at the common power outputs may have contributed to the greater [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR values. The polynomial regression analyses showed that most subjects had the same patterns of responses for the ramp and step incremental tests for HR (86%) and RPE (93%) but different patterns for [Formula: see text]O(2) (71%). The findings from the present study suggested that the protocol selection for an incremental cycle ergometer test can affect the mean values for [Formula: see text]O(2) and HR, as well as the [Formula: see text]O(2) - power output relationship.

  10. Numerical study of micro-ramp vortex generator for supersonic ramp flow control at Mach 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Chen, L.; Li, Q.; Liu, C.

    2016-03-01

    An implicit large eddy simulation, implemented using a fifth-order, bandwidth-optimized weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme, was used to study the flow past a compression ramp at Mach 2.5 and Re_{θ } = 5760 with and without a micro-ramp vortex generator (MVG) upstream. The MVG serves as a passive flow control device. The results suggested that MVGs may distinctly reduce the separation zone at the ramp corner and lower the boundary layer shape factor. New findings regarding the MVG-ramp interacting flow included the surface pressure distribution, three-dimensional structures of the re-compression shock waves, surface separation topology, and a new secondary vortex system. The formation of the momentum deficit was studied in depth. A new mechanism was observed wherein a series of vortex rings originated from the MVG-generated high shear at the boundary of the momentum deficit zone. Vortex rings strongly interact with the shock-separated flow and play an important role in the separation zone reduction.

  11. Design considerations for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 T B-field generated by a transmission line conductor of up to 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vadim; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, Lucio; /CERN

    2007-08-01

    Recently proposed synchrotrons, SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab, would operate with a 0.5 Hz cycle (or 2 second time period) while accelerating protons to 480 GeV. We examine possibilities of superconducting magnet technology that would allow for an accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. For superconducting magnets the cryogenic cooling power demand due to AC losses in the superconductor leads to a high operational cost. We outline a novel magnet technology based on HTS superconductors that may allow to reduce AC losses in the magnet coil possibly up to an order of magnitude as compared to similar applications based on LTS type superconductors.

  12. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  13. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  14. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  15. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  16. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  18. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  19. Superconducting imaging surface magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; van Hulsteyn, D.B.; Flynn, E.R.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes an improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. Another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  20. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The geometric variables on the expansion-ramp surface of the upper flap consisted of ramp chordal angle, ramp length, and initial ramp angle. On the lower flap, the geometric variables consisted of flap angle and flap length. Both internal performance and static-pressure distributions on the centerlines of the upper and lower flaps were obtained for all 43 nozzle configurations tested.

  1. A Novel Parameter for Ramp Metering and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Jia, Yuanhua; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Feng; Ao, Guchang

    Real and scientific traffic flow parameter are the basis to make efficient traffic control strategy and establish control function and this will leads to an appropriate and impartial reflection to efficiency and equity of control property. Intelligent control is a new development where the control problem is to find the combination of control measures that result in the best road performance and control effectiveness. The problems of intelligent metering evaluation for local ramp are considered. In this paper, a novel ramp queuing parameter-the reduplicated waiting time was posed using the queuing theory. With in-situ traffic flow data, comparison between the novel and previous parameters are made to clarify the advantages of the novel parameter.

  2. Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps

    SciTech Connect

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2008-10-14

    A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

  3. Engineering task plan for steam line ramp calculations

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, G.N.; Freeman, R.D.

    1994-10-11

    The purpose of this document is to provide an approved work plan to perform calculations that verify the load limits of a proposed ramp over a steam line at the back side (East side) of SY Farm in support of work package 2W-94-00812/K. The objective of this supporting document is to provide Operations with a set of checked calculations that verify the ramp over the steam line at SY Farm will support a fully loaded concrete mixer truck without affecting the steam line. The calculations will be performed by an engineers from Facility Systems and independently checked and reviewed by another engineer. The calculations may then be added to the work package. If Operations decides to make any configuration changes to the steam line or surrounding area, Operations shall have these changes documented by an Engineering Change Notice (ECN). This ECN can be done by Facility Systems or any other engineering organization at the direction of Operations.

  4. Muscle oxygen saturation heterogeneity among leg muscles during ramp exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether O(2) saturation in several leg muscles changes as exercise intensity increases. Twelve healthy young males performed 20 W/min ramp bicycle exercise until exhaustion. Pulmonary O(2) uptake (VO(2)) was monitored continuously during the experiments to determine peak oxygen uptake. Muscle O(2) saturation (SmO(2)) was also monitored continuously at the belly of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, and tibialis anterior by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. Although the VL muscle mainly contributes during cycling exercise, deoxygenation was enhanced not only in the VL muscle but also in the other thigh muscles and lower leg muscles with increased exercise intensity. Furthermore, SmO(2) response during ramp cycling exercise differed considerably between leg muscles.

  5. Radar echo processing with partitioned de-ramp

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2013-03-19

    The spurious-free dynamic range of a wideband radar system is increased by apportioning de-ramp processing across analog and digital processing domains. A chirp rate offset is applied between the received waveform and the reference waveform that is used for downconversion to the intermediate frequency (IF) range. The chirp rate offset results in a residual chirp in the IF signal prior to digitization. After digitization, the residual IF chirp is removed with digital signal processing.

  6. Forward ramp & low-gain antenna in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal.

    The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower left of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  7. X-1-2 on Ramp with Boeing B-29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 sitting on the ramp at NACA High- Speed Flight Research Station with the Boeing B-29 launch ship behind. The B-29 was fondly referred to as 'Fertile Myrtle.' The painting near the nose depicts a stork carrying a bundle which is symbolic of the Mothership launching her babe (X-1-2). The pilot access door is open to the cockpit of the X-1-2 aircraft.

  8. Kinematics investigations of cylinders rolling down a ramp using tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prima, Eka Cahya; Mawaddah, Menurseto; Winarno, Nanang; Sriwulan, Wiwin

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays, students' exploration as well as students' interaction in the application stage of learning cycle can be improved by directly model real-world objects based on Newton's Law using Open Source Physics (OSP) computer-modeling tools. In a case of studying an object rolling down a ramp, a traditional experiment method commonly uses a ticker tape sliding through a ticker timer. However, some kinematics parameters such as the instantaneous acceleration and the instantaneous speed of object cannot be investigated directly. By using the Tracker video analysis method, all kinematics parameters of cylinders rolling down a ramp can be investigated by direct visual inspection. The result shows that (1) there are no relations of cylinders' mass as well as cylinders' radius towards their kinetics parameters. (2) Excluding acceleration data, the speed and position as function of time follow the theory. (3) The acceleration data are in the random order, but their trend-lines closely fit the theory with 0.15% error. (4) The decrease of acceleration implicitly occurs due to the air friction acting on the cylinder during rolling down. (5) The cylinder's inertial moment constant has been obtained experimentally with 3.00% error. (6) The ramp angle linearly influences the cylinders' acceleration with 2.36% error. This research implied that the program can be further applied to physics educational purposes.

  9. Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

    2011-03-28

    Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

  10. Shock-wave-based density down ramp for electron injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Li, Ji; Sun, Jun; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a sharp density transition for electron injection in laser wakefield acceleration through numerical study. This density transition is generated by a detached shock wave induced by a cylinder inserted into a supersonic helium gas flow. In a Mach 1.5 flow, the scale length of the density transition Lgrad can approximately equal to plasma wavelength λp at the shock front, and can be further reduced with an increase of the flow Mach number. A density down ramp with Lgrad≥λp can reduce the phase velocity of the wakefield and lower the energy threshold for the electrons to be trapped. Moreover, the quality of the accelerated beam may be greatly improved by precisely controlling of Lgrad to be one λp. For an even sharper density down ramp with Lgrad≪λp, the oscillating electrons in the plasma wave will up shift their phase when crossing the ramp, therefore a fraction of the electrons are injected into the accelerating field. For this injection mechanism, there is no threshold requirement for the pump laser intensity to reach wave breaking, which is a big advantage as compared with other injection mechanisms.

  11. Investigation of ramp injectors for supersonic mixing enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimovitch, Y.; Gartenberg, E.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of wall mounted swept ramp injectors fitted with injector nozzles of different shape has been conducted in a constant area duct to explore mixing enhancement techniques for scramjet combustors. Six different injector nozzle inserts, all having equal exit and throat areas, were tested to explore the interaction between the preconditioned fuel jet and the vortical flowfield produced by the ramp: circular nozzle (baseline), nozzle with three downstream facing steps, nozzle with four vortex generators, elliptical nozzle, tapered-slot nozzle, and trapezoidal nozzle. The main flow was air at Mach 2, and the fuel was simulated by air injected at Mach 1.63 or by helium injected at Mach 1.7. Pressure and temperature surveys, combined with Mie and Rayleigh scattering visualization, were used to investigate the flow field. The experiments were compared with three dimensional Navier-Stokes computations. The results indicate that the mixing process is dominated by the streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp, the injectors' inner geometry having a minor effect. It was also found that the injectant/air mixing in the far-field is nearly independent of the injector geometry, molecular weight of the injectant, and the initial convective Mach number.

  12. Middle Ordovician carbonate ramp deposits of central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Demicco, R.V.

    1986-05-01

    Middle Ordovician carbonates exposed in Maryland and Pennsylvania can be divided into six facies, each a few tens to hundreds of meters thick: (1) cyclic, meter-scale, alternating thin-bedded to massive limestones and mud-cracked, stromatolitic laminites; (2) thick-bedded to massive skeletal wackestones containing diverse fauna; (3) cross-stratified skeletal-oncoid grainstones; (4) graded, thin-bedded limestones with diverse fauna and internal planar lamination or hummocky cross-stratification; (5) nodular, thin-bedded limestones; and (6) shaly, thin-bedded to laminated limestones containing rare breccia beds. These facies are interpreted as deposits of: (1) tidal flats; (2) open, bioturbated muddy shelf; (3) lime-sand shoals; (4) below normal wave-base shelf; (5) deep ramp; and (6) basin. Palinspastic reconstructions of facies distribution in Maryland and Pennsylvania suggest that these facies developed during flooding of a carbonate ramp that deepened northeastward into a foreland basin. This northern depocenter of the Middle Ordovician Appalachian foreland basin is notably different that its southern counterpart in Virginia and Tennessee. Large skeletal bioherms did not develop on the northern carbonate ramp, where only one onlap package exists. Thus, although the record of the foundering of the passive Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf is grossly similar in the southern and central Appalachians, there are several significant differences. The overlying Martinsburg Formation contains deep-water facies and taconic-style thrust sheets in the central Appalachians, which suggests that the two depocenters may have had different tectonic settings.

  13. Superconductivity in bad metals

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals`` with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described.

  14. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element.

  15. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  16. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element. PMID:17750320

  17. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  18. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  19. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  20. Superconductivity: Finding a direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    The experimental observation of superconductivity that breaks spin-rotation symmetry in copper-doped Bi2Se3 provides a qualitatively distinct kind of unconventional superconducting behaviour -- one that brings the importance of the spin-orbit interaction to the fore.

  1. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  2. Fast sweeping reflectometry upgrade on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Molina, D.; Ducobu, L.; Leroux, F.; Barbuti, A.; Heuraux, S.

    2010-10-15

    In order to study the temporal dynamics of turbulence, the sweep time of our reflectometry has been shortened from 20 to 2 {mu}s with 1 {mu}s dead time. Detailed technical aspects of the upgrade are given, namely, about the stability of the ramp generation, the detection setup, and the fast acquisition module. A review of studies (velocity measurement of the turbulence, modifications of the wavenumber spectrum, radial mapping of correlation time, etc.) offered by such improvements is presented.

  3. Metal optics and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The articles contained in this collection are dedicated to the study of the electron structure of transition metals and superconducting alloys and compounds based on them. The study of the electron structure of materials is one of the central problems of solid-state physics and defines the solution of a number of problems. One of them is the problem of high-temperature superconductivity which has attracted exceptional attention from physicists in connection with the discovery of new classes of ceramic oxides which are superconducting at liquid-nitrogen temperature. The electron structure is one of the three whales on which all of superconductivity rests. It is frequently our ignorance of the electronic properties of a metal, alloy or compound in its normal state which makes it impossible to predict superconductivity in the material, preventing use from calculating the parameters of the superconducting state. There are now a number of effective methods for investigation of the electron structure of the metals and allows. This collection discusses metal optics, tunneling and magnetic measurements in superconductors. These methods are quite informative and allow us to obtain many important electron characteristics and temperature relations. Various characteristics of the superconducting compounds Nb{sub 3}Ge, Nb{sub 3}Al, nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Ga with A15 structure and NbN with B1 structure, having rather high critical temperatures, are experimentally studied.

  4. Tests of a 3 meter curved superconducting beam transport dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J E; Carroll, A S; Danby, G T; DeVito, B; Jackson, J W; Leonhardt, W J; Prodell, A G; Weisenbloom, J

    1981-01-01

    Initial tests of one of the curved 3 m long superconducting dipole magnets intended to generate 6.0 T and produce a 20.4/sup 0/ bend in the primary proton beam to a new D-target station at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS have been completed. Although this magnet, whose window frame design generally follows that of the successful 8/sup 0/ and Model T superconducting dipoles, demonstrates many of the desirable characteristics of these earlier magnets such as excellent quench propagation and good ramping properties, it has only reached a disappointingly low magnetic field of 3.5 to 4.0 T. Because of the great interest in superconducting magnet technology, this report will describe the diagnostic tests performed and plans for future modifications.

  5. Superconductivity in Opal-based superconducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. K.; Charnaya, E. V.; Chang, L. J.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Lin, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate superconducting nanocomposites (SCNCs) to elucidate superconductivity in nanostructured type I superconductor. In, Sn and Hg are loaded into opal matrices by high pressure up to 10kbar, in which introducing superconducting metals into templates preserves their own 3D nanostructures. The opal matrices is adopted because it is a well-developed nanoconfinement and widely used in the studies of photonic crystal due to its periodically-superlatticed nanoporous structure. The SCNCs are then measured by Quantum Design MPMS 3 under different external magnetic fields reveal the field dependences of Tc and irreversibility temperature (Tirr). Next, AC susceptibility measurements of SCNCs determine grain coupling, vortex dynamics and field dependence of activation barrier (Ua) as well as Tc. Additionally, the phase diagrams of these SCNCs are analyzed to study superconductivity for a system with similar nanogeometry. Exotic phase diagrams in the opal SCNC studies reveal an enhanced upper critical field (Hc2 (0)) and curvature crossover of upper critical field line. Additionally, according to the field dependence of Ua(H), curvature crossover of the upper critical field line can occur, owing to vortex phase transition.

  6. Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, S. D.

    1998-03-01

    Although it is well known that magnetism influences superconductivity, the converse issue has been less well explored. Recent theoretical predictions for ferromagnetic/ superconducting/ ferromagnetic trilayers exhibiting interlayer magnetic coupling in the normal state indicate that the coupling should be suppressed below the superconducting transition temperature.(C.A. R. Sá de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 1933 (1997); O. Sipr, B.L. Györffy, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 7, 5239 (1995). To realize such a situation, a requirement (when the magnetic layers are thick) is that the superconducting layer thickness must simultaneously be less than the range over which the magnetic interlayer coupling decays, but greater than the superconducting coherence length. This introduces serious materials constraints. The present work describes initial explorations of three sputtered multilayer systems in an attempt to observe coupling of the ferromagnetic layers across a superconducting spacer:((a) J.E. Mattson, R.M. Osgood III, C.D. Potter, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 15), 1774 (1997); (b) J.E. Mattson, C.D. Potter, M.J. Conover, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, Phys. Rev. B 55, 70 (1997), and (c) R.M. Osgood III, J.E. Pearson, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, submitted (1997). (a) Ni/Nb, (b) Fe_4N/NbN, and (c) GdN/NbN. In these systems we have retained thinner superconducting layers than had been achieved previously, but interlayer magnetic coupling is not observed even in the normal state. For Ni/Nb the interfacial Ni loses its moment, which also reduces the superconducting pair-breaking. GdN is an insulating ferromagnet, so itinerancy is sacrificed, and, probably as a result of this, no coupling is observed. Each system gives rise to interesting and anisotropic superconducting properties. Thus, although the goal remains elusive, our search highlights the challenges and opportunities.

  7. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  8. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  9. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  10. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  11. Recognition of Ramps and Steps by People with Low Vision

    PubMed Central

    Bochsler, Tiana M.; Legge, Gordon E.; Gage, Rachel; Kallie, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Detection and recognition of ramps and steps are important for the safe mobility of people with low vision. Our primary goal was to assess the impact of viewing conditions and environmental factors on the recognition of these targets by people with low vision. A secondary goal was to determine if results from our previous studies of normally sighted subjects, wearing acuity-reducing goggles, would generalize to low vision. Methods. Sixteen subjects with heterogeneous forms of low vision participated—acuities from approximately 20/200 to 20/2000. They viewed a sidewalk interrupted by one of five targets: a single step up or down, a ramp up or down, or a flat continuation of the sidewalk. Subjects reported which of the five targets was shown, and percent correct was computed. The effects of viewing distance, target–background contrast, lighting arrangement, and subject locomotion were investigated. Performance was compared with a group of normally sighted subjects who viewed the targets through acuity-reducing goggles. Results. Recognition performance was significantly better at shorter distances and after locomotion (compared with purely stationary viewing). The effects of lighting arrangement and target–background contrast were weaker than hypothesized. Visibility of the targets varied, with the step up being more visible than the step down. Conclusions. The empirical results provide insight into factors affecting the visibility of ramps and steps for people with low vision. The effects of distance, target type, and locomotion were qualitatively similar for low vision and normal vision with artificial acuity reduction. However, the effects of lighting arrangement and background contrast were only significant for subjects with normal vision. PMID:23221068

  12. Status of the SNS Ring Power Ramp UP

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Pelaia II, Tom; Shishlo, Andrei P; Zhang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Beam was first circulated in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring in January 2006. Since that time we have been working to raise the beam power to the design value of 1.4 MW. In general the power ramp up has been proceeding very well, but several issues have been uncovered. Examples include poor transmission of the waste beams in the injection dump beam line, and cross-plane coupling in the ring to target beam transport line. In this paper we will discuss these issues and present an overall status of the ring and the transport beam lines.

  13. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part I: Ramping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. This tool predicts and displays additional capacity and ramping requirements caused by uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation. The tool is currently operational in the CAISO operations center. This is one of two final reports on the project.

  14. Experiencing production ramp-up education for engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetto, S.; Fiegenwald, V.; Cholez, C.; Mangione, F.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a game of industrialisation, based on a paper airplane, that mimics real world production ramp-up and blends classical engineering courses together. It is based on a low cost product so that it can be mass produced. The game targets graduate students and practitioners in engineering fields. For students, it offers an experiment in which methods learned in separate courses can be applied. For practitioners, it affords an opportunity to engage in reflexive practices related to industrialisation. Both students and practitioners are able to experience integrated management, required by industrialisation, in a controlled environment: the laboratory.

  15. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  16. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  17. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  18. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  19. Superconductivity and its devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, D. S.

    Among the more important developments that are discussed are cryotrons, superconducting motors and generators, and high-field magnets. Cryotrons will create faster and more economical computer systems. Superconducting motors and generators will cost much less to build than conventional electric generators and cut fuel consumption. Moreover, high-field magnets are being used to confine plasma in connection with nuclear fusion. Superconductors have a vital role to play in all of these developments. Most importantly, though, are the magnetic properties of superconductivity. Superconducting magnets are an integral part of nuclear fusion. In addition, high-field magnets are necessary in the use of accelerators, which are needed to study the interactions between elementary particles.

  20. Photoinduced superconductivity in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Aron, Camille; Chamon, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    We show that optically pumped semiconductors can exhibit superconductivity. We illustrate this phenomenon in the case of a two-band semiconductor tunnel-coupled to broad-band reservoirs and driven by a continuous wave laser. More realistically, we also show that superconductivity can be induced in a two-band semiconductor interacting with a broad-spectrum light source. We furthermore discuss the case of a three-band model in which the middle band replaces the broad-band reservoirs as the source of dissipation. In all three cases, we derive the simple conditions on the band structure, electron-electron interaction, and hybridization to the reservoirs that enable superconductivity. We compute the finite superconducting pairing and argue that the mechanism can be induced through both attractive and repulsive interactions and is robust to high temperatures.

  1. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-06-15

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines.

  2. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  3. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  4. Magnetic ramp scale at supercritical perpendicular collisionless shocks: Full particle electromagnetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Huang, Can; Yang, Huigen; Hu, Hongqiao; Han, Desheng; Liu, Ying

    2013-09-15

    Supercritical perpendicular collisionless shocks are known to exhibit foot, ramp, and overshoot structures. The shock ramp structure is in a smaller scale in contrast to other microstructures (foot and overshoot) within the shock front. One-dimensional full particle simulations of strictly perpendicular shocks over wide ranges of ion beta β{sub i}, Alfvén Mach number M{sub A}, and ion-to-electron mass ratio m{sub i}/m{sub e} are presented to investigate the impact of plasma parameters on the shock ramp scale. Main results are (1) the ramp scale can be as small as several electron inertial length. (2) The simulations suggest that in a regime below the critical ion beta value, the shock front undergoes a periodic self-reformation and the shock ramp scale is time-varying. At higher ion beta values, the shock front self-reformation is smeared. At still higher ion beta value, the motion of reflected ions is quite diffuse so that they can lead to a quasi-steady shock ramp. Throughout the above three conditions, the shock ramp thickness increases with β{sub i}. (3) The increase (decrease) in Mach number and the decrease (increase) in the beta value have almost equivalent impact on the state (i.e., stationary or nonstationary) of the shock ramp. Both of front and ramp thicknesses are increased with M{sub A}.

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  7. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  8. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  9. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  11. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  12. The STOR-1M Tokamak: Experiments on Current Reversal and Fast Current Ramping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Sean William

    1987-09-01

    Experiments on the STOR-1M tokamak have addressed the following problems in magnetic confinement fusion research: (1) the attainment of quasi-continuous operation in a fusion reactor by inductively driving a current which alternates polarity; (2) plasma heating by inducing turbulence to enhance the Ohmic dissipation; and, (3) the stability of tokamak plasmas carrying large currents. STOR-1M plasmas have major and minor radii of 22 cm and 3.5 cm, respectively, and are produced with hydrogen at a pressure of 0.9 mTorr. Typical discharges carry a current of 5 kA with a toroidal field of 1 T. Around the current peak, electrons at a density of 1 x 10('13) cm(' -3) are heated to a temperature of 80 eV. The ions, with an effective charge number of 2, reach a temperature of 30 eV. Input energy is confined for almost 0.1 ms at the current peak, and the total discharge length is usually 4.5 ms. To simulate the current reversal phase in an ac tokamak reactor, a sinusoidal plasma current has been sustained for one cycle. Peak currents of 8 kA and electron densities of 1.8 x 10('13) cm('-3) have been attained. The electron density at the reversal is always at least 2 x 10('12) cm('-3). The unexpected equilibrium when the toroidal current goes through zero may be due to vertical plasma currents closing through the limiter or chamber walls. To induce turbulence for plasma heating, an electric field pulse of amplitude up to 360 V/m and width 20 (mu)s drives up to 10 kA of current on top of a normal discharge. After the pulse, electron temperatures of 300 eV and ion temperatures of 200 eV have been recorded. About 200 (mu)s after the pulse, the electron density and temperature reach a peak, implying that containment of energy is enhanced. The safety factor at the plasma surface during the pulse can be as low as 1.5. Disruptive behaviour, in the form of current interruption and loop voltage spikes, is observed when the safety factor is between 1.85 and 2.1. Outside this range, the plasma is grossly stable.

  13. Predictability of wind ramps in the Columbia River Gorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.

    2013-12-01

    Wind generation capacity in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) system, which stands at 4,500 MW currently, can at time account for 70% of total electricity demand. With 2,500 additional MW of wind generation capacity expected by 2015, increasingly accurate forecasts are required to avoid water quality issues associated with hydropower dam overspill. Wind ramps, or large increases or decreases in wind generation over a short period of time, are particularly difficult to accurately forecast in the Columbia River Gorge area. Industry standard computational resources, combined with turbulence grey-zone issues associated with planetary boundary (PBL) schemes, suggest a leveling off of numerical weather prediction (NWP) model skill score with respect to increasing grid resolution until eddy resolving scales are resolved. However, we show that dispersion errors, which associated with wind ramps, continue to decrease for locations and seasons in which meso-scale and topographically forced diurnal motions account for a significant portion of the power spectral density of hub-height wind speeds.

  14. Pure rotation of a prism on a ramp

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study a prism with a cross section in polygon rolling on a ramp inclined at a small angle. The prism under gravity rolls purely around each individual edge, intermittently interrupted by a sequence of face collisions between the side face of the prism and the ramp. By limiting the prism in a planar motion, we propose a mathematical model to deal with the events of the impacts. With a pair of laser-Doppler vibrometers, experiments are also conducted to measure the motions of various prisms made of different materials and with different edge number. Not only are good agreements achieved between our numerical and experimental results, but also an intriguing physical phenomenon is discovered: the purely rolling motion is nearly independent of the prism's materials, yet it is closely related to the prism's geometry. Imagine that an ideal circular section can be approximately equivalent to a polygon with a large enough edge number N, the finding presented in this paper may help discover the physical mechanism of rolling friction. PMID:25197242

  15. Superconducting mirror for laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.

    1991-05-14

    This paper describes an apparatus for reflecting a light beam. It comprises: a mirror assembly comprising a substrate and a superconductive mirror formed on such substrate, wherein: the substrate is optically transparent to the light beam and has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 millimeter, and the superconductive mirror has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 microns; means for cooling the superconductive mirror; means for measuring the temperature of the superconductive mirror; means for determining the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror; and means for varying the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror.

  16. Superconducting A/D converter using latching comparators

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, C.A.; Kautz, R.L.; Loyld, F.L.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a six-bit A/D converter using fast edge latching comparators. Simulations predicting conversion times of 100 ps and 100 MHz signal bandwidth are verified experimentally. The addition of a superconducting track/hold circuit in front of the A/D converter is expected to substantially improve the signal bandwidth.

  17. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Tekletsadik, Kasegn

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  18. Imprinted labyrinths and percolation in Nd-Co/Nb magnetic/superconducting hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Valdepeñas, L.; Velez, M.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Garcia-Alonso, F. J.; Martin, J. I.; Navarro, E.; Alameda, J. M.; Vicent, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetization reversal processes have been studied in hybrid magnetic/superconducting Nd-Co/Nb bilayers by the comparison of out-of-plane magnetic hysteresis loops and superconducting phase diagrams as a function of magnetic layer thickness and of disorder in the magnetic layer induced by a nanostructured copolymer template. A good correlation is found between the regimes corresponding to percolation effects in the superconductor and to the transition from extended to confined superconductivity with the characteristic fields for reverse domain nucleation and fast domain expansion in the magnetic layer, indicating that superconductivity nucleates on the disordered network imprinted on the superconducting layer by the labyrinth domain structure of the magnetic layer. As disorder increases in the magnetic layer, percolation effects disappear from the superconducting transitions in agreement with a more homogeneous magnetization reversal process.

  19. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  20. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  1. Surface Induced Anomalous Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Herman J.; Haley, Stephen B.

    The Ginzburg Landau (GL) theory is recast using a Hamiltonian involving the complete kinetic energy density which requires that the surface energy must contain a term ∇∣ψ∣2 to support superconducting (SC) states. The GL equations contain two temperature t dependent parameters α(t) and β(t), which are respectively the coefficients of the SC pair density ∝∣ψ∣2, and the pair interaction term ∝∣ψ∣4 in the free energy density. The sign of these parameters, which defines distinct solution classes, and the ratio s(t)=√ {|α |/|β |} are governed by the characteristics of the surface energy density. In addition to the conventional bulk superconducting states with (α < 0, β > 0), anomalous superconducting states exist for all other sign combinations, including cases with β < 0 which may exist only when surface pair interactions are significant. All possible solutions of our generalized nonlinear, one-dimensional GL equations are found analytically and applied to a thin superconducting slab which manifests the possibility of states exhibiting enhanced, diminished, and pre-wetting superconductivity. Critical currents are determined as functions of s(t) and surface parameters. The results are applied to critical current experiments on SNS systems.

  2. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  3. Structure function analysis of two-scale Scalar Ramps. Part I: Theory and Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structure functions are used to study the dissipation and inertial range scales of turbulent energy, to parameterize remote turbulence measurements, and to characterize ramp features in the turbulent field. The ramp features are associated with turbulent coherent structures, which dominate energy an...

  4. Thermal ramp tritium release in COBRA-1A2 C03 beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Tritium release kinetics, using the method of thermal ramp heating at three linear ramp rates, were measured on the COBRA-1A2 C03 1-mm beryllium pebbles. This report includes a brief discussion of the test, and the test data in graph format.

  5. Application of multi-objective nonlinear optimization technique for coordinated ramp-metering

    SciTech Connect

    Haj Salem, Habib; Farhi, Nadir; Lebacque, Jean Patrick E-mail: nadir.frahi@ifsttar.fr

    2015-03-10

    This paper aims at developing a multi-objective nonlinear optimization algorithm applied to coordinated motorway ramp metering. The multi-objective function includes two components: traffic and safety. Off-line simulation studies were performed on A4 France Motorway including 4 on-ramps.

  6. The Effects of Truncated Dome Detectable Warnings on Travelers Negotiating Curb Ramps in Wheelchairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Truncated domes on curb ramps benefit travelers with visual impairments. However, concerns associated with the safety and negotiability of such detectable warnings for other travelers have resulted in much controversy. The findings of the study presented here indicate that detectable warnings did not adversely affect the negotiability of ramps by…

  7. Aerial view looking northwest showing location of seaplane ramps 2,3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view looking northwest showing location of seaplane ramps 2,3, and 4. Ramps lead from buildings 1 and 2, bayside left center, into San Diego Bay. - Naval Air Station North Island, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  8. View looking west toward southern end of seaplane ramps 2,3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking west toward southern end of seaplane ramps 2,3, and 4 area. Building 2 at right, building 1 on right edge of photograph. Ramp 2 is located center photograph. - Naval Air Station North Island, North Island, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  9. View from Facility No. S357 (Seaplane Ramp 1) toward Facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from Facility No. S357 (Seaplane Ramp 1) toward Facility No. S358 (Seaplane Ramp 2) with strafing marks in foreground. Foundation of demolished Facility No. 38 is in background on right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Runways-1933 Type, South shore of Ford Island, near Lexington Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. S362, view up the ramp. Note the mooring cleat on the top edge of the curb at the right - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Ramps - World War II Type, Southwest and west shore of Ford Island, near Wasp Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 19, 20, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor); Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on superconductivity applications for IR and microwave devices are presented. The individual topics addressed include: pulsed laser deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films, patterning of high-Tc superconducting thin films on Si substrates, IR spectra and the energy gap in thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), high-temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits, novel filter implementation utilizing HTS materials, high-temperature superconductor antenna investigations, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors from Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films, Y-Ba-Cu0-O thin films as high-speed IR detectors, fabrication of a high-Tc superconducting bolometer, transition-edge microbolometer, photoresponse of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) granular and epitaxial superconducting thin films, fast IR response of YBCO thin films, kinetic inductance effects in high-Tc microstrip circuits at microwave frequencies.

  12. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, J. G.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Wilson, J. R.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2012-12-15

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency P{sub el}/P{sub LH} was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  13. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Li, J. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency Pel/PLH was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  14. Unsteady Navier-Stokes simulation of the canard-wing-body ramp motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; Obayashi, Shigeru; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1993-01-01

    A time-accurate thin-layer Navier-Stokes simulation of the unsteady flowfield is performed for a typical canard-wing-body configuration undergoing ramp motions. The computations are made at a transonic Mach number of 0.90 and for ramp angles from 0 to 15 degrees. Accuracy is determined by comparisons with steady-state experimental data and with spatial and time-step refinement studies. During the ramp motion, the computational results show improved dynamic lift performance and a strong canard-wing interaction for the canard-on configuration. Formation of the canard leading-edge vortex is inhibited in the early stages of the ramp motion. An analysis performed on the transient flowfield after the ramp motion ends shows that the canard vortex rapidly gains strength and vortex breakdown eventually occurs. These characteristics of the canard vortex have significant influences on wing performance.

  15. Comparison of RAMP and SSR markers for the study of wild barley genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Dávila, J A; Loarce, Y; Ramsay, L; Waugh, R; Ferrer, E

    1999-01-01

    Two molecular marker technologies, random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR), were used to determine genetic diversity of 27 accessions of the wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum. 19 primer combinations were used to generate RAMP fragments and 16 SSR loci were analysed. A high level of polymorphism was found with both kind of markers as revealed by the mean polymorphism information content (PIC) values obtained: 0.838 and 0.855 for RAMP and SSR, respectively. Genetic dissimilarities between genotypes were estimated from RAMP and SSR data. A lack of correlation was found between both sets of data. This was reflected in the two dendrograms obtained which presented accessions clustered differently. The results suggest that both sets of markers reveal genetic variation induced by different mechanisms. The dendrogram produced from the RAMP dissimilarity estimates showed most of the groups related to the geographic origin of the accessions. PMID:10628292

  16. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  17. Superconducting active impedance converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  18. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jingbo; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Wang, Huabing

    2014-10-20

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  19. Deformation Above an Extensional Lateral Ramp, Crater Flat, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. P.; Ferrill, D. A.; Sims, D. W.; Stamatakos, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Tectonic models of Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, site of the USA's proposed high-level nuclear waste repository, are based on understanding the nature of deformation affecting the site. Using mapped fault dips (50° in the north to 70° in the south) from the Bare Mountain fault (BMF, 15 to 25 km [9.3 to 15.5 mi] west of YM) and the surface geology of Crater Flat (CF, immediately west of YM) and YM itself, we constructed cross-sections across northern and southern CF. The sections indicate that the BMF has a listric shape detaching at a depth of about 6 km (3.7 mi) under northern CF and 12 km (7.5 mi) under southern CF. We present the results of physical analog modeling that tests the hypothesis that the BMF has a lateral ramp linking a shallow detachment under northern CF with a deeper detachment under southern CF. We constructed a footwall with two contrasting profiles based on cross sections generated using a constant thickness algorithm. The northern profile had a horizontal detachment at half the depth of the southern profile and the two fault surfaces were linked by a steep, S-dipping lateral ramp. The hanging wall of the model consisted of a plastic sheet conforming to the footwall shape, overlain by dry sand. To prevent frictional edge effects, the sand pack was large and laterally unconstrained. Undyed and acrylic-dyed sand simulated mechanically passive layering. Dry sand was chosen because of its ability to represent the brittle crust, and the ease with which it can be sectioned. The entire hanging wall moved in concert, constant velocity displacement was driven by a stepper motor attached via a rigid, strike-parallel assembly to the plastic sheet. After 2.8 cm (1.1 in) of horizontal displacement, synkinematic growth layers of sand were added to the model. After 5 cm (2 in) of horizontal displacement the model was stopped and sand added to stabilize the model prior to saturation and sectioning. Hanging wall deformation in the model was dominated by the

  20. Generation of ramp waves using variable areal density flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Chapman, D. J.; Eakins, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ramp loading using graded density impactors as flyers in gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments can yield new and useful information about the equation of state and the strength properties of the loaded material. Selective Laser Melting, an additive manufacturing technique, was used to manufacture a graded density flyer, termed the "bed-of-nails" (BON). A 2.5-mm-thick × 99.4-mm-diameter solid disc of stainless steel formed a base for an array of tapered spikes of length 5.5 mm and spaced 1 mm apart. The two experiments to test the concept were performed at impact velocities of 900 and 1100 m/s using the 100-mm gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics at Imperial College London. In each experiment, a BON flyer was impacted onto a copper buffer plate which helped to smooth out perturbations in the wave profile. The ramp delivered to the copper buffer was in turn transmitted to three tantalum targets of thicknesses 3, 5 and 7 mm, which were mounted in contact with the back face of the copper. Heterodyne velocimetry (Het-V) was used to measure the velocity-time history, at the back faces of the tantalum discs. The wave profiles display a smooth increase in velocity over a period of ˜ 2.5 μs, with no indication of a shock jump. The measured profiles have been analysed to generate a stress vs. volume curve for tantalum. The results have been compared with the predictions of the Sandia National Laboratories hydrocode, CTH.

  1. Extracting strength from high pressure ramp-release experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. L.; Alexander, C. S.; Asay, J. R.; Vogler, T. J.; Ding, J. L.

    2013-12-14

    Unloading from a plastically deformed state has long been recognized as a sensitive measure of a material's deviatoric response. In the case of a ramp compression and unload, time resolved particle velocity measurements of a sample/window interface may be used to gain insight into the sample material's strength. Unfortunately, measurements of this type are often highly perturbed by wave interactions associated with impedance mismatches. Additionally, wave attenuation, the finite pressure range over which the material elastically unloads, and rate effects further complicate the analysis. Here, we present a methodology that overcomes these shortcomings to accurately calculate a mean shear stress near peak compression for experiments of this type. A new interpretation of the self-consistent strength analysis is presented and then validated through the analysis of synthetic data sets on tantalum to 250 GPa. The synthetic analyses suggest that the calculated shear stresses are within 3% of the simulated values obtained using both rate-dependent and rate-independent constitutive models. Window effects are addressed by a new technique referred to as the transfer function approach, where numerical simulations are used to define a mapping to transform the experimental measurements to in situ velocities. The transfer function represents a robust methodology to account for complex wave interactions and a dramatic improvement over the incremental impedance matching methods traditionally used. The technique is validated using experiments performed on both lithium fluoride and tantalum ramp compressed to peak stresses of 10 and 15 GPa, respectively. In each case, various windows of different shock impedance are used to ensure consistency within the transfer function analysis. The data are found to be independent of the window used and in good agreement with previous results.

  2. Flow Separation Control Over a Ramp Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Owens, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow separation control on an adverse-pressure-gradient ramp model was investigated using various flow-control methods in the NASA Langley 15-Inch Wind Tunnel. The primary flow-control method studied used a sweeping jet actuator system to compare with more classic flow-control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady- and unsteady-vortex generating jets. Surface pressure measurements and a new oilflow visualization technique were used to characterize the effects of these flow-control actuators. The sweeping jet actuators were run in three different modes to produce steady-straight, steady-angled, and unsteady-oscillating jets. It was observed that all of these flow-control methods are effective in controlling the separated flows on the ramp model. The steady-straight jet energizes the boundary layer by momentum addition and was found to be the least effective method for a fixed momentum coefficient. The steady-angled jets achieved better performance than the steady-straight jets because they generate streamwise vortices that energize the boundary layer by mixing high-momentum fluid with near wall low-momentum fluid. The unsteady-oscillating jets achieved the best performance by increasing the pressure recovery and reducing the downstream flow separation. Surface flow visualizations indicated that two out-of-phase counter-rotating vortices are generated per sweeping jet actuator, while one vortex is generated per vortex-generating jets. The extra vortex resulted in increased coverage, more pressure recovery, and reduced flow separation.

  3. Active oblique ramp faulting in the Southern Tunisian Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saïd, Aymen; Chardon, Dominique; Baby, Patrice; Ouali, Jamel

    2011-03-01

    The Gafsa fault is the longest and most active structure of the fold-and-thrust belt achieving southeastward propagation of the Atlas belt of Eastern North Africa onto the Saharan platform. The Gafsa fault is a 75-km long dextral-oblique basement fault ramp that poses a sizable challenge in earthquake hazard assessment because the post-Paleozoic sedimentary cover is decoupled from its basement above the basement fault. In this study, we combine seismic lines interpretation, tectonic geomorphology and paleoseismological investigations to assess the level of seismic hazard of this fault and evaluate its role in the geodynamic framework of the Central Mediterranean. We show that despite a moderate instrumental and historical seismicity, the fault has produced M ≥ 6 earthquakes with a return period of ca. 500-5000 years during the Late Quaternary. The latest large event having produced a surface rupture on the fault occurred around 8000 yr BP, suggesting an M ≥ 6 earthquake is overdue on the fault. The fault has a minimum reverse component of slip rate of 0.21-0.34 mm/yr over the past 50 Ka. The occurrence of M ≥ 7 paleoearthquakes on the fault may be suspected but not established. Such very strong earthquakes would require transient coseismic linkage of the buried basement fault with the overlying listric fault ramping off the décollement layer. The level of seismic hazard may be underestimated on the Gafsa fault. Indeed, given the geometry of the basement-cover fault system, a number of earthquakes generated in the basement would have led to coseismic surface folding instead of to surface rupture. The Gafsa fault is a major structure accommodating eastward extrusion / spreading of the Atlas belt onto the Saharan and Pelagian plateforms above the retreating Ionian lithospheric slab.

  4. Adiabat Shaping of ICF Capsules Using Ramped Pressure Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Haan, S. W.

    2002-11-01

    Target design of direct-drive ICF capsules has historically involved a compromise between high 1-D (clean) yield and capsule stability. Low-adiabat fuel is desirable to achieve high compression and, hence, high yield. A higher adiabat at the ablation front reduces the growth rate of the Raleigh--Taylor instability due to higher ablation velocity. An optimal target design will take advantage of both by shaping the adiabat of the capsule to allow for high adiabat in the material that is to be ablated and low adiabat in the remaining fuel. We present here a method of adiabat shaping using a low-intensity prepulse followed by laser shutoff before beginning the main drive pulse. This creates a decaying shock with a ramped pressure profile behind it. Since the prepulse is low intensity, the adiabat is not strongly affected by the prepulse. The main shock is then launched up this ramped pressure profile to set the adiabat. Because the main shock sees an increasing pressure profile, the effective strength of the shock decreases as it propagates through the shell, thus creating a smooth adiabat profile from high outer-shell adiabat to low inner-shell adiabat. Results of simulations using 1-D LILAC and 2-D DRACO (LLE), as well as 1-D and 2-D HYDRA (LLNL), are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460 and by the University of California LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  6. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  7. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  8. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  9. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Montenero, Giuseppe; Daponte, Vincenzo; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-15

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, “Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test,” Rev. Sci. Instrum.83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  10. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Daponte, Vincenzo; Montenero, Giuseppe; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, "Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  11. Acoustic emission during quench training of superconducting accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G.; Bajas, H.; Gourlay, S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensing is a viable tool for superconducting magnet diagnostics. Using in-house developed cryogenic amplified piezoelectric sensors, we conducted AE studies during quench training of the US LARP's high-field quadrupole HQ02 and the LBNL's high-field dipole HD3. For both magnets, AE bursts were observed, with spike amplitude and frequency increasing toward the quench current during current up-ramps. In the HQ02, the AE onset upon current ramping is distinct and exhibits a clear memory of the previously-reached quench current (Kaiser effect). On the other hand, in the HD3 magnet the AE amplitude begins to increase well before the previously-reached quench current (felicity effect), suggesting an ongoing progressive mechanical motion in the coils. A clear difference in the AE signature exists between the untrained and trained mechanical states in HD3. Time intervals between the AE signals detected at the opposite ends of HD3 coils were processed using a combination of narrow-band pass filtering; threshold crossing and correlation algorithms, and the spatial distributions of AE sources and the mechanical energy release were calculated. Both distributions appear to be consistent with the quench location distribution. Energy statistics of the AE spikes exhibits a power-law scaling typical for the self-organized critical state.

  12. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  13. 77 FR 39795 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Interstate 395 High Occupancy (HOV) Vehicle Ramp at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Occupancy (HOV) Vehicle Ramp at Seminary Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration...). The actions relate to the Interstate 395 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Ramp at Seminary Road project in... 395 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Ramp at Seminary Road. The project would involve construction of...

  14. Resource Letter Scy-3: Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butch, N. P.; de Andrade, M. C.; Maple, M. B.

    2008-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on superconductivity. Since the last Resource Letter on superconductivity, Scy-2, was published in 1970, there have been dramatic advances in our basic understanding of superconductivity, discovery of new superconducting materials, and improved technological exploitation of superconductors. We review basic phenomenology, followed by concise descriptions of several main classes of superconductors recognized today. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: Conventional superconductors, paramagnetic impurities in superconductors, magnetically ordered superconductors, heavy fermion superconductors, high Tc superconductors, organic superconductors, applications of superconductivity, and laboratory demonstrations of superconductivity. Owing to the large volume of available literature on superconductivity, the journal articles and books we discuss constitute good starting points for further exploration of particular topics.

  15. Review of new energy. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-03-01

    An summary is given of the research and development on high temperature superconductivity. It begins with a description of superconducting state and enumerates chemical elements, in particular oxides, associated with high temperature superconductivity. A brief account is next given on the progress of research and development on the present subject. Some of well known topics associated with superconductivity are described shortly, namely Meissner effect, quenching (transition to normal conducting state from superconducting one), Perovskite structure, positive hole earrier, Josephson effect, SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) and so on. Various devices or technology are enumerated, to which superconductivity, in particular high temperature one, is proposed to apply, namely electromagnet, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), particle accelerator, linear motor car, electric power storage and so on. The summary is finished with a future outlook.

  16. Superconducting thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Pietropaolo, A.; Celentano, G.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.

    2016-09-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium nitride (NbN) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle is well described by a hot spot mechanism: upon the occurrence of the nuclear reactions n + 10B → α + 7Li + 2.8 MeV, the energy released by the secondary particles into the strip induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T below 11K and current-biased below the critical current IC, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed and compared to those of a borated Nb superconducting strip.

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. Applications of Superconductivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  20. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  1. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  2. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  3. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  4. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  5. Superconducting magnets 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T{sub c} at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design.

  6. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  7. Superconducting nano-strip particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors. Particle detectors based on superconducting nano-strips stem from the parent devices developed for single photon detection (SSPD) and share with them ultra-fast response times (sub-nanosecond) and the ability to operate at a relatively high temperature (2-5 K) compared with other cryogenic detectors. SSPDs have been used in the detection of electrons, neutral and charged ions, and biological macromolecules; nevertheless, the development of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors has mainly been driven by their use in time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) where the goal of 100% efficiency at large mass values can be achieved. Special emphasis will be given to this case, reporting on the great progress which has been achieved and which permits us to overcome the limitations of existing mass spectrometers represented by low detection efficiency at large masses and charge/mass ambiguity. Furthermore, such progress could represent a breakthrough in the field. In this review article we will introduce the device concept and detection principle, stressing the peculiarities of the nano-strip particle detector as well as its similarities with photon detectors. The development of parallel strip configuration is introduced and extensively discussed, since it has contributed to the significant progress of TOF-MS applications.

  8. Tumorigenesis, metabolism, speciation, bioavailability, and tissue deposition of selenium in selenium-enriched ramps (Allium tricoccum).

    PubMed

    Whanger, P D; Ip, C; Polan, C E; Uden, P C; Welbaum, G

    2000-11-01

    Ramps (Allium tricoccum) were grown either in a mixture of vermiculite and peat moss or hydroponically with various concentrations of selenium as sodium selenate. The concentrations used were from 30 to 300 mg of selenium/kg of vermiculite-peat moss or from 10 to 120 mg/L in the hydroponic solutions. Levels as high as 784 mg of selenium/kg were obtained in the ramp bulbs when grown with high levels of selenium in the vermiculite-peat moss, and up to 600 mg of selenium/kg was obtained hydroponically. The predominant form of selenium in the ramp bulbs at all concentrations of selenium was Se-methylselenocysteine, with lower amounts of selenate, Se-cystathionine, and glutamyl-Se-methylselenocysteine. There was a approximately 43% reduction in chemically induced mammary tumors when rats were fed a diet with Se-enriched ramps. Dietary Se-enriched ramps for rats did not result in excessive tissue selenium accumulation or undesirable side effects. Bioavailability studies with rats indicated that selenium in ramps was 15-28% more available for regeneration of glutathione peroxidase activity than inorganic selenium as selenite. Therefore, Se-enriched ramps appear to have potential for the reduction of cancer in humans. PMID:11087545

  9. Study on traffic characteristics for a typical expressway on-ramp bottleneck considering various merging behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Li, Zhipeng; Sun, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Recurring bottlenecks at freeway/expressway are considered as the main cause of traffic congestion in urban traffic system while on-ramp bottlenecks are the most significant sites that may result in congestion. In this paper, the traffic bottleneck characteristics for a simple and typical expressway on-ramp are investigated by the means of simulation modeling under the open boundary condition. In simulations, the running behaviors of each vehicle are described by a car-following model with a calibrated optimal velocity function, and lane changing actions at the merging section are modeled by a novel set of rules. We numerically derive the traffic volume of on-ramp bottleneck under different upstream arrival rates of mainline and ramp flows. It is found that the vehicles from the ramp strongly affect the pass of mainline vehicles and the merging ratio changes with the increasing of ramp vehicle, when the arrival rate of mainline flow is greater than a critical value. In addition, we clarify the dependence of the merging ratio of on-ramp bottleneck on the probability of lane changing and the length of the merging section, and some corresponding intelligent control strategies are proposed in actual traffic application.

  10. Downstream effect of ramping neural activity through synapses with short-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ramping neuronal activity has been observed in multiple cortical areas correlated with evidence accumulation processes or timing. In this work we investigate the downstream effect of ramping neuronal activity through synapses that display short-term facilitation (STF) or depression (STD). We obtain an analytical result for a synapse driven by deterministic linear ramping input that exhibits pure STF or STD, and investigate the general case when both STF and STD exist numerically. In neural circuits, the ramping inputs usually have strong fluctuation and each downstream neuron receives converging inputs from many presynaptic neurons. We show that the analytical deterministic solution gives an accurate description of the averaging synaptic activation that a postsynaptic neuron receives in a neural circuit, even when the fluctuation in ramping input is strong. Therefore our work provides insights on the impact of ramping neuronal activity on downstream neurons through synapses displaying short-term plasticity. Specifically, activation of a synapse with STF shows a sublinear increase with time and is insensitive to the slopes of ramping inputs during the initial period, followed by a linear ramping similar to a synapse without STF. Activation of a synapse with STD, on the other hand, develops a local maximum before reaching a steady state, which is independent of the slope of ramping input. For a synapse displaying both STF and STD, increase of the depression time constant from a value much smaller than the facilitation time constant τF to a value much larger than τF leads to a transition from facilitation domination to depression domination. By utilizing STD in the corticostriatal synapses, our work provides an understanding of the saturation of striatal activity as observed for monkeys performing evidence accumulation. Our work also predicts that in the fixed duration version of motion discrimination tasks the stationary state of neuronal activity downstream to the

  11. A modified nomogram for ramp treadmill testing using the Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Jamal; Myers, Jonathan; Froelicher, Victor

    2014-09-01

    Studies performed over the past 2 decades have supported the recommendation that the exercise test protocol be individualized and that a targeted duration of 8 to 12 minutes is optimal. However, this is not always implemented clinically because of the complication of having to choose a specific ramp to match a patient. We present a simple nomogram based on a questionnaire to choose 1 of 4 possible ramp protocols that provide individualized ramp rates for subjects undergoing clinical exercise testing. PMID:25034327

  12. Performance evaluation and parametric analysis on cantilevered ramp injector in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li; Wang, Zhen-guo

    2013-03-01

    The cantilevered ramp injector is one of the most promising candidates for the mixing enhancement between the fuel and the supersonic air, and its parametric analysis has drawn an increasing attention of researchers. The flow field characteristics and the drag force of the cantilevered ramp injector in the supersonic flow with the freestream Mach number 2.0 have been investigated numerically, and the predicted injectant mole fraction and static pressure profiles have been compared with the available experimental data in the open literature. At the same time, the grid independency analysis has been performed by using the coarse, the moderate and the refined grid scales, and the influence of the turbulence model on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector has been carried on as well. Further, the effects of the swept angle, the ramp angle and the length of the step on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector have been discussed subsequently. The obtained results show that the grid scale has only a slight impact on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector except in the region near the fuel injector, and the predicted results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Additionally, the turbulence model makes a slight difference to the numerical results, and the results obtained by the RNG k-ɛ and SST k-ω turbulence models are almost the same. The swept angle and the ramp angle have the same impact on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector, and the kidney-shaped plume is formed with shorter distance with the increase of the swept and ramp angles. At the same time, the shape of the injectant mole fraction contour at X/H=6 goes through a transition from a peach-shaped plume to a kidney-shaped plume, and the cantilevered ramp injector with larger swept and ramp angles has the higher mixing efficiency and the larger drag force. The length of the step has only a slight impact on the drag force performance of the cantilevered

  13. Parametric study of single expansion ramp nozzles at subsonic/transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Re, R. J.; Bare, E. A.; Maclean, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has conducted a parametric investigation to determine the aeropropulsive characteristics of single expansion ramp nozzles (SERN). The SERN is a nonaxisymmetric, variable-area, internal/external expansion exhaust nozzle. Internal nozzle parameters that were varied included upper ramp length, ramp chordal angle, lower flap length, flap angle and the axial and vertical locations of nozzle throat. Convergent-divergent and convergent nozzles were included in this investigation which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.2 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to 12.0.

  14. Modelling off Hugoniot Loading Using Ramp Compression in Single Crystal Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Remington, B A; Lorenzana, H; Bringa, E; Wark, J

    2010-11-29

    The application of a ramp load to a sample is a method by which the thermodynamic variables of the high pressure state can be controlled. The faster the loading rate, the higher the entropy and higher the temperature. This paper describes moleculer dynamics (MD) simulations with 25 million atoms which investigate ramp loading of single crystal copper. The simulations followed the propagation of a 300ps ramp load to 3Mbar along the [100] direction copper. The simulations were long enough to allow the wave front to steepen into a shock, at which point the simulated copper sample shock melted.

  15. [Prediction and influence factors of the ramp's noise of the entrance or exit of garages].

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Bang-Jun

    2005-09-01

    Some typical entrances/exits of the underground garages are chosen in urban residential areas. On the basis of the optimization of the positions of the noise sampling points and the groupings of the synchronous sampling points, by means of the acoustical analysis of the noise samples, the relation of the correlative factors, among the ramps' noise of the entrances or exits of the garages, the structure, grade, shape of the ramps, upgrade and downgrade, is studied. The prediction model of the ramp's noise influence of the entrance or exit of the garage is established through amending the noise influence of the entrance or exit of the even concrete road. PMID:16366500

  16. Comparator circuits with local ramp buffering for a column-parallel single slope ADC

    DOEpatents

    Milkov, Mihail M.

    2016-04-26

    A comparator circuit suitable for use in a column-parallel single-slope analog-to-digital converter comprises a comparator, an input voltage sampling switch, a sampling capacitor arranged to store a voltage which varies with an input voltage when the sampling switch is closed, and a local ramp buffer arranged to buffer a global voltage ramp applied at an input. The comparator circuit is arranged such that its output toggles when the buffered global voltage ramp exceeds the stored voltage. Both DC- and AC-coupled comparator embodiments are disclosed.

  17. RAMP: A fault tolerant distributed microcomputer structure for aircraft navigation and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    RAMP consists of distributed sets of parallel computers partioned on the basis of software and packaging constraints. To minimize hardware and software complexity, the processors operate asynchronously. It was shown that through the design of asymptotically stable control laws, data errors due to the asynchronism were minimized. It was further shown that by designing control laws with this property and making minor hardware modifications to the RAMP modules, the system became inherently tolerant to intermittent faults. A laboratory version of RAMP was constructed and is described in the paper along with the experimental results.

  18. Aphotic zone carbonate production on a Miocene ramp, Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, Laura; Brandano, Marco

    2003-09-01

    The lower Miocene Latium-Abruzzi platform was a low-angle ramp that developed under tropical-to-subtropical conditions, but was dominated by bryomol and rhodalgal sediment associations. The Aquitanian to Serravallian sequence described here paraconformably overlies the Cretaceous limestones. It consists of a lowstand systems tract, a transgressive systems tract and a highstand systems tract. Based on facies analysis and on the light dependence of biotic associations, the ramp is divided into three parts: an inner ramp, a middle ramp and an outer ramp. The inner ramp facies are represented by a few metres of coral framestone, rhodolith floatstone-rudstone and balanid macroids floatstone without wave-related structures. The middle ramp consists of structureless bioclastic grainstone to packstone, floatstone and rudstone with rhodoliths and larger foraminifera. The outer ramp facies—proximal sector—are composed of crudely stratified bryozoan-dominated packstone to floatstone which extend over the whole platform. The outer ramp facies—intermediate sector—are represented by wackestone, packstone and rarely grainstone with foraminifera and echinoid fragments. The final depositional profile of the ramp was strongly influenced by the main organisms producing sediment. During the lowstand, the resulting profile is a ramp type. During the transgressive phase, the rapid spreading of the outer ramp facies belt, as a consequence of the enhanced productivity of the light-independent biota, is believed to be promoted by a change from oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions. Climate and/or tectonics are presumed to have played an important role in continental runoff and then in the nutrients delivery. During the highstand phase, the system returns to rates of production uniform throughout the platform. The high rates of carbonate production occurring in the aphotic zone are quite unusual in tropical settings and represent a provocative trend in apparent contrast with the

  19. Extracting Strength from Ramp-Release Experiments on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin

    2013-06-01

    Releasing from a compressed state has long been recognized as a sensitive measure of a material's constitutive response. The initial elastic unloading provides insights which can be related to changes in shear stress or, in the context of classic plasticity, to the material's yield surface. Ramp compression and subsequent release experiments on Sandia's Z machine typically consist of a driving aluminum electrode pushing a sample material which is backed by a window. A particle velocity measurement of the sample/window interface provides a ramp-release profile. Under most circumstances, however, the impedance mismatch at this interface results in the measurement of a highly perturbed velocity, particularly at the late times of interest. Wave attenuation, the finite pressure range over which the material elastically unloads, and rate effects additionally complicate the interpretation of the experiment. In an effort to accurately analyze experiments of this type, each of these complications is addressed. The wave interactions are accounted for through the so-called transfer function methodology and involves a coupling of the experimental measurements with numerical simulations. Simulated window velocity measurements are combined with the corresponding in situ simulations to define a mapping describing the wave interactions due to the presence of the window. Applying this mapping to the experimentally measured velocity results in an in situ sample response which may then be used in a classic Lagrangian analysis from which the strength can be extracted via the self-consistent method. Corrections for attenuation, pressure averaging, and limitations of the analysis due to rate-effects are verified through the use of synthetic data. To date, results on the strength of aluminum to 1.2 MBar, beryllium to 1 MBar, and tantalum to over 2 MBar have been obtained through this methodology and will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by

  20. Static internal performance of convergent single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Capone, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of convergent single expansion ramp nozzles. The effects of ramp chordal angle, initial ramp angle, flap angle, flap length, and ramp length were determined. All nozzles tested has a nominally constant throat area and aspect ratio. Static pressure distributions along the centerlines of the ramp and flap were also obtained for each configuration. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10.0 for all configurations.

  1. The Nucleation and Propagation of Thrust Ramps: Insights from Quantitative Analysis of Frictional Analog (Sandbox) Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, P.; Haq, S. S.; Marshak, S.

    2012-12-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) provides a unique opportunity to analyze deformation in sandbox analog models at a scale that allows documentation of movement within and around individual shear structures. We employed PIV analysis to quantify deformation in sandbox experiments designed to simulate the initiation of thrust ramps developed during crustal shortening (i.e., contractional deformation). Our intent was to answer a long-standing question: Do ramps initiate at the tip of a detachment, or do they initiate in the interior of a deforming layer and propagate up-dip and down-dip until they link to the detachment at a location to the hinterland of the detachment's tip line? Most geometric studies of ramp-flat geometries in fold-thrust belts assume that ramps propagate up-dip from the tip of the detachment, and grow only in one direction. Field studies, in contrast, reveal that layer-parallel shortening structures develop to the foreland of the last ramp to form, suggesting that ramps initiate in a thrust sheet that has already undergone displacement above a detachment. Published sandbox models, using color-sand marker layers, support this idea. To test this idea further, we set up a model using a 3 m-long by 0.31-m wide glass-walled sandbox with a rigid backstop. The sand layer was sifted onto a sheet of mylar that could be pulled beneath the rigid backstop. Sand used in our experiments consisted of <250 μm-diameter grains. We carried out multiple runs using 4 cm, 5 cm and 6 cm-thick layers. Images were acquired over 1 mm displacement intervals using an 18 mega-pixel camera. By moving the camera at specific steps during the experiment, we sampled the development of several thrust ramps. The images taken during experimental runs were analyzed with a MATLAB-based program called 'PIV LAB' that utilizes an image cross-correlation subroutine to determine displacement fields of the sand particles. Our results demonstrate that: (1) thrust ramps initiate within the

  2. BaBar superconducting coil: design, construction and test

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R A; Berndt, M; Burgess, W; Craddock, W; Dormicchi, O; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Keller, L; Moreschi, P; Musenich, R; O'Connor, T G; Penco, R; Priano, C; Shen, S; Valente, P

    2001-01-26

    The BABAR Detector, located in the PEP-II B-Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, includes a large 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 2.8 m bore and length 3.7 m. The two layer solenoid is wound with an aluminum stabilized conductor which is graded axially to produce a {+-} 3% field uniformity in the tracking region. This paper summarizes the 3 year design, fabrication and testing program of the superconducting solenoid. The work was carried out by an international collaboration between INFN, LLNL and SLAC. The coil was constructed by Ansaldo Energia. Critical current measurements of the superconducting strand, cable and conductor, cool-down, operation with the thermo-siphon cooling, fast and slow discharges, and magnetic forces are discussed in detail.

  3. Overview of real-time kernels at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.; Acharya, S.; Allen, M.; Faught, E.; Haenni, D.; Kalbfleisch, C.

    1991-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) will have many subsystems that will require real-time microprocessor control. Examples of such sub-systems requiring real-time controls are power supply ramp generators and quench protection monitors for the superconducting magnets. We plan on using a commercial multitasking real-time kernel in these systems. These kernels must perform in a consistent, reliable and efficient manner. Actual performance measurements have been conducted on four different kernels, all running on the same hardware platform. The measurements fall into two categories. Throughput measurements covering the non-real-time'' aspects of the kernel include process creation/termination times, interprocess communication facilities involving messages, semaphores and shared memory and memory allocation/deallocation. Measurements concentrating on real-time response are context switch times, interrupt latencies and interrupt task response. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. SOUTH RAMP 3.01.X AREA GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bonabian

    1999-07-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the stability and determine ground support requirements for the 3.01.X areas in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) South Ramp. The 3.01.X area refers to the ESF tunnel portions that were constructed under Section 3.01.X of the ESF General Construction Specification (Reference 8.4). Four 3.01.X areas in the ESF Main Loop are covered in this analysis that extend from Station 60+15.28 to 60+49.22, 62+04.82 to 62+32.77, 75+21.02 to 75+28.38, and 76+63.08 to 77+41.23. The scope of the analysis is (1) to document the as-built configuration including existing voids and installed ground support, (2) to evaluate the existing ground conditions, (3) to determine applicable design loads, (4) to evaluate the stability and determine a ground support system, and (5) to analyze the recommended system.

  5. Upper Jurassic ramp carbonate and associated evaporite, Neuquen Province, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Nickelsen, B.H.; Merrill, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    The Oxfordian La Manga Limestone (10-65 m) and overlying Auquilco Gypsum (315 m maximum thickness) crop out along the west flank of the Neuquen basin, Neuquen Province, Argentina (36/sup 0/40/sup 0/S lat.). The contact with the underlying Lotena Sandstone is gradational, and both formations are cut by the Late Jurassic Araucanian angular unconformity. Seven lithofacies have been identified within sections measured through the entire interval along the northeast to southwest trending, 30-km long Sierra de la Vaca Muerta ridge (38/sup 0/30'-39/sup 0/S). The La Manga Limestone is interpreted as a temperate ramp carbonate that developed over the Lotena Formation siliciclastic shelf. Interpretations of lithofacies from southwest to northeast are: behind-barrier subtidal lagoon with washovers; coral and red algae biostromes; ooid and peloid sand shoals; downslope wackestone and packstone mud mounds; and deep-water carbonate turbidites. A minor regression separates La Manga and Auquilco Formations. Lithofacies of the Auquilco Formation indicate a shallowing-up sequence comprised of initially deep (hundreds of meters) subaqueous evaporite deposition followed by shallow, subtidal carbonate peloidal and shell fragment grainstones and evaporites. Thickness of the subaqueous evaporite gives an order of magnitude estimate of Auquilco basin depths of a few hundred meters at most. The Neuquen basin has an intermediate proportion of carbonate in comparison to relatively carbonate-poor basins to the south and carbonate-rich basins to the north.

  6. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  7. Tier 3- DarkStar engine run on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin/Boeing Tier III- (minus) unpiloted aerial vehicle undergoing an engine run on the ramp at, following its arrival at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Tier III Minus project used Dryden ground facilities during the flight test program. The vehicle was developed by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and Boeing Defense and Space Group to satisfy a goal of the Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office to supply responsive and sustained data from anywhere within enemy territory, day or night, in all types of weather. Dubbed DarkStar, the vehicle, with a wing span of 69 feet, was designed to fly above 45,000 feet at subsonic speeds on missions lasting more than eight hours. The first DarkStar prototype (article #695) made its first flight on March 29, 1996. At the begininning of its second flight, on April 22, 1996, it crashed on takeoff, and was destroyed. More than two years passed before the second Darkstar prototype (article #696) took to the air on June 29, 1998. The vehicle made a total of five flights, the last on January 9, 1999. The program was cancelled on January 28, 1999.

  8. Micro-Ramps for External Compression Low-Boom Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybalko, Michael; Loth, Eric; Chima, Rodrick V.; Hirt, Stefanie M.; DeBonis, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The application of vortex generators for flow control in an external compression, axisymmetric, low-boom concept inlet was investigated using RANS simulations with three-dimensional (3-D), structured, chimera (overset) grids and the WIND-US code. The low-boom inlet design is based on previous scale model 1- by 1-ft wind tunnel tests and features a zero-angle cowl and relaxed isentropic compression centerbody spike, resulting in defocused oblique shocks and a weak terminating normal shock. Validation of the methodology was first performed for micro-ramps in supersonic flow on a flat plate with and without oblique shocks. For the inlet configuration, simulations with several types of vortex generators were conducted for positions both upstream and downstream of the terminating normal shock. The performance parameters included incompressible axisymmetric shape factor, separation area, inlet pressure recovery, and massflow ratio. The design of experiments (DOE) methodology was used to select device size and location, analyze the resulting data, and determine the optimal choice of device geometry. The optimum upstream configuration was found to substantially reduce the post-shock separation area but did not significantly impact recovery at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). Downstream device placement allowed for fuller boundary layer velocity profiles and reduced distortion. This resulted in an improved pressure recovery and massflow ratio at the AIP compared to the baseline solid-wall configuration.

  9. Study on Recovery Performance of High Tc Superconducting Tapes for Resistive Type Superconducting Fault Current Limiter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kar, Soumen; Kulkarni, Sandeep; Dixit, Manglesh; Singh, Kuwar Pal; Gupta, Alok; Balasubramanyam, P. V.; Sarangi, S. K.; Rao, V. V.

    Recent advances in reliable production of long length high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes have resulted in commercial application of superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) in electrical utility networks. SFCL gives excellent technical performance when compared to conventional fault current limiters. The fast self-recovery from normal state to superconducting state immediately after the fault removal is an essential criterion for resistive type SFCL operation. In this paper, results on AC over-current testing of 1st generation (1G) Bi2223 tapes and 2nd generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors operating at 77 K are reported. From these results, the recovery time is estimated for different available HTS tapes in the market. The current limiting tests have also been performed to study the effective current limitation. Further, the recovery characteristics after the current limitation are quantitatively discussed for repetitive faults for different time intervals in the range of 100 ms to few seconds.

  10. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  11. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  12. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  15. Static internal performance of a single expansion ramp nozzle with multiaxis thrust vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Schirmer, Alberto W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at static conditions in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle. Yaw vectoring was achieved by deflecting yaw flaps in the nozzle sidewall into the nozzle exhaust flow. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the variable angle yaw flap deflected into the exhaust flow and the nozzle upper ramp and lower flap which were deflected for pitch vectoring, the downstream corners of both the nozzle ramp and lower flap were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw vectoring. The effects of nozzle upper ramp and lower flap cutout, yaw flap hinge line location and hinge inclination angle, sidewall containment, geometric pitch vector angle, and geometric yaw vector angle were studied. This investigation was conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  16. REQUIREMENTS ALLOCATION ANALYSIS FOR NORTH RAMP EXCAVATION AND LAYOUT, CII: BABEAD000

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Kennedy

    1995-01-03

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to allocate all Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements (ESFDR) (Reference 8.1) applicable to Configuration Item (CI) North Ramp Excavation and Layout, Configuration Item Identifier (CII) BABEAD000.

  17. Micro-Ramp Flow Control for Oblique Shock Interactions: Comparisons of Computational and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Reich, David B.; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to study the effectiveness of micro-ramp vortex generators to control oblique shock boundary layer interactions. Simulations were based on experiments previously conducted in the 15 x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Four micro-ramp geometries were tested at Mach 2.0 varying the height, chord length, and spanwise spacing between micro-ramps. The overall flow field was examined. Additionally, key parameters such as boundary-layer displacement thickness, momentum thickness and incompressible shape factor were also examined. The computational results predicted the effects of the micro-ramps well, including the trends for the impact that the devices had on the shock boundary layer interaction. However, computing the shock boundary layer interaction itself proved to be problematic since the calculations predicted more pronounced adverse effects on the boundary layer due to the shock than were seen in the experiment.

  18. Assessing the Effectiveness of Ramp-Up During Sonar Operations Using Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Ramp-up procedures are used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Sound exposure models combined with observations of marine mammals responding to sound can be used to assess the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. We found that ramp-up procedures before full-level sonar operations can reduce the risk of hearing threshold shifts with marine mammals, but their effectiveness depends strongly on the responsiveness of the animals. In this paper, we investigated the effect of sonar parameters (source level, pulse-repetition time, ship speed) on sound exposure by using a simple analytical model and highlight the mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. PMID:26611087

  19. Tamping Ramping: Algorithmic, Implementational, and Computational Explanations of Phasic Dopamine Signals in the Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kevin; Dayan, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the phasic activity of dopamine neurons represents reinforcement learning's temporal difference prediction error. However, recent reports of ramp-like increases in dopamine concentration in the striatum when animals are about to act, or are about to reach rewards, appear to pose a challenge to established thinking. This is because the implied activity is persistently predictable by preceding stimuli, and so cannot arise as this sort of prediction error. Here, we explore three possible accounts of such ramping signals: (a) the resolution of uncertainty about the timing of action; (b) the direct influence of dopamine over mechanisms associated with making choices; and (c) a new model of discounted vigour. Collectively, these suggest that dopamine ramps may be explained, with only minor disturbance, by standard theoretical ideas, though urgent questions remain regarding their proximal cause. We suggest experimental approaches to disentangling which of the proposed mechanisms are responsible for dopamine ramps. PMID:26699940

  20. Tamping Ramping: Algorithmic, Implementational, and Computational Explanations of Phasic Dopamine Signals in the Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kevin; Dayan, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the phasic activity of dopamine neurons represents reinforcement learning's temporal difference prediction error. However, recent reports of ramp-like increases in dopamine concentration in the striatum when animals are about to act, or are about to reach rewards, appear to pose a challenge to established thinking. This is because the implied activity is persistently predictable by preceding stimuli, and so cannot arise as this sort of prediction error. Here, we explore three possible accounts of such ramping signals: (a) the resolution of uncertainty about the timing of action; (b) the direct influence of dopamine over mechanisms associated with making choices; and (c) a new model of discounted vigour. Collectively, these suggest that dopamine ramps may be explained, with only minor disturbance, by standard theoretical ideas, though urgent questions remain regarding their proximal cause. We suggest experimental approaches to disentangling which of the proposed mechanisms are responsible for dopamine ramps.

  1. Tamping Ramping: Algorithmic, Implementational, and Computational Explanations of Phasic Dopamine Signals in the Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Kevin; Dayan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the phasic activity of dopamine neurons represents reinforcement learning’s temporal difference prediction error. However, recent reports of ramp-like increases in dopamine concentration in the striatum when animals are about to act, or are about to reach rewards, appear to pose a challenge to established thinking. This is because the implied activity is persistently predictable by preceding stimuli, and so cannot arise as this sort of prediction error. Here, we explore three possible accounts of such ramping signals: (a) the resolution of uncertainty about the timing of action; (b) the direct influence of dopamine over mechanisms associated with making choices; and (c) a new model of discounted vigour. Collectively, these suggest that dopamine ramps may be explained, with only minor disturbance, by standard theoretical ideas, though urgent questions remain regarding their proximal cause. We suggest experimental approaches to disentangling which of the proposed mechanisms are responsible for dopamine ramps. PMID:26699940

  2. Near- and far-field measurements of phase-ramped frequency selective surfaces at infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Eric; Boreman, Glenn; D'Archangel, Jeffrey; Raschke, Markus B.

    2014-07-28

    Near- and far-field measurements of phase-ramped loop and patch structures are presented and compared to simulations. The far-field deflection measurements show that the phase-ramped structures can deflect a beam away from specular reflection, consistent with simulations. Scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy of the elements comprising the phase ramped structures reveals part of the underlying near-field phase contribution that dictates the far-field deflection, which correlates with the far-field phase behavior that was expected. These measurements provide insight into the resonances, coupling, and spatial phase variation among phase-ramped frequency selective surface (FSS) elements, which are important for the performance of FSS reflectarrays.

  3. Effect of ramping on oxygen precipitates and Cu-vacancy complex in Czochralski silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Lv, Yaochao; Guo, Weibin; Xie, Tingting

    2016-07-01

    The effect of ramping on oxygen precipitates and Cu-vacancy complex in Czochralski silicon has been investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, respectively. It was found that ramping from low temperature could promote the formation of oxygen precipitates in copper-contaminated Czochralski silicon and the lower the start ramping temperature was, the more oxygen precipitates formed. Moreover, the amount of precipitated oxygen atoms increased with copper contamination temperature. Through the investigation of 0.97 eV PL line related with Cu-vacancy complex, it was revealed that a lower start ramping temperature led to a lower concentration of Cu-vacancy complex and the increase of the copper contamination temperature resulted in the decrease of concentration of Cu-vacancy complex.

  4. Assessing the Effectiveness of Ramp-Up During Sonar Operations Using Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Ramp-up procedures are used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Sound exposure models combined with observations of marine mammals responding to sound can be used to assess the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. We found that ramp-up procedures before full-level sonar operations can reduce the risk of hearing threshold shifts with marine mammals, but their effectiveness depends strongly on the responsiveness of the animals. In this paper, we investigated the effect of sonar parameters (source level, pulse-repetition time, ship speed) on sound exposure by using a simple analytical model and highlight the mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures.

  5. Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm for Wind Power Ramp Event Detection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony R.; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Ke, Deping; Sun, Yuanzhang

    2015-08-06

    Significant wind power ramp events (WPREs) are those that influence the integration of wind power, and they are a concern to the continued reliable operation of the power grid. As wind power penetration has increased in recent years, so has the importance of wind power ramps. In this paper, an optimized swinging door algorithm (SDA) is developed to improve ramp detection performance. Wind power time series data are segmented by the original SDA, and then all significant ramps are detected and merged through a dynamic programming algorithm. An application of the optimized SDA is provided to ascertain the optimal parameter of the original SDA. Measured wind power data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) are used to evaluate the proposed optimized SDA.

  6. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  7. Helical superconducting black holes.

    PubMed

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  8. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  9. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  10. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  11. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  12. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  13. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  14. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  15. Mesoscale Simulations of a Wind Ramping Event for Wind Energy Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M; Lundquist, J K

    2011-09-21

    Ramping events, or rapid changes of wind speed and wind direction over a short period of time, present challenges to power grid operators in regions with significant penetrations of wind energy in the power grid portfolio. Improved predictions of wind power availability require adequate predictions of the timing of ramping events. For the ramping event investigated here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run at three horizontal resolutions in 'mesoscale' mode: 8100m, 2700m, and 900m. Two Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) schemes, were run at each resolution as well. Simulations were not 'tuned' with nuanced choices of vertical resolution or tuning parameters so that these simulations may be considered 'out-of-the-box' tests of a numerical weather prediction code. Simulations are compared with sodar observations during a wind ramping event at a 'West Coast North America' wind farm. Despite differences in the boundary-layer schemes, no significant differences were observed in the abilities of the schemes to capture the timing of the ramping event. As collaborators have identified, the boundary conditions of these simulations probably dominate the physics of the simulations. They suggest that future investigations into characterization of ramping events employ ensembles of simulations, and that the ensembles include variations of boundary conditions. Furthermore, the failure of these simulations to capture not only the timing of the ramping event but the shape of the wind profile during the ramping event (regardless of its timing) indicates that the set-up and execution of such simulations for wind power forecasting requires skill and tuning of the simulations for a specific site.

  16. Comparison of energy output during ramp and staircase shortening in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, M; Woledge, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We compared the rates of work and heat production during ramp shortening with those during staircase shortening (sequence of step releases of the same amplitude, separated by regular time intervals). Ramp or staircase shortening was applied to isolated muscle fibres (sarcomere length, 2.2 microns; temperature, approximately 1 degree C) at the plateau of an isometric tetanus. The total amount of shortening was no greater than 6% of the fibre length. 2. During ramp shortening the power output showed a maximum at about 0.8 fibre lengths per second (Lo s-1), which corresponds to 1/3 the maximum shortening velocity (Vo). For the same average shortening velocity during staircase shortening (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) the power output was 40-60% lower. The rate of heat production for the same average shortening velocity was approximately 45% higher during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. 3. The relation between rate of total energy output and shortening velocity was well described by a second order regression line in the range of velocities used (0.1-2.3 Lo s-1). For any shortening velocity the rate of total energy output (power plus heat rate) was not statistically different for staircase (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) and ramp shortening. 4. The mechanical efficiency (the ratio of the power over the total energy rate) during ramp shortening had a maximum value of 0.36 at 1/5 Vo; during staircase shortening, for any given shortening velocity, the mechanical efficiency was reduced compared with ramp shortening: with a staircase step of about 0.5% Lo at 1/5 Vo the efficiency was approximately 0.2. 5. The results indicate that a cross-bridge is able to convert different quantities of energy into work depending on the different shortening protocol used. The fraction of energy dissipated as heat is larger during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. PMID:8544132

  17. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough...

  2. Downstream Effect of Ramping Neuronal Activity through Synapses with Short-Term Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-04-01

    Ramping neuronal activity refers to spiking activity with a rate that increases quasi-linearly over time. It has been observed in multiple cortical areas and is correlated with evidence accumulation processes or timing. In this work, we investigated the downstream effect of ramping neuronal activity through synapses that display short-term facilitation (STF) or depression (STD). We obtained an analytical result for a synapse driven by deterministic linear ramping input that exhibits pure STF or STD and numerically investigated the general case when a synapse displays both STF and STD. We show that the analytical deterministic solution gives an accurate description of the averaging synaptic activation of many inputs converging onto a postsynaptic neuron, even when fluctuations in the ramping input are strong. Activation of a synapse with STF shows an initial cubical increase with time, followed by a linear ramping similar to a synapse without STF. Activation of a synapse with STD grows in time to a maximum before falling and reaching a plateau, and this steady state is independent of the slope of the ramping input. For a synapse displaying both STF and STD, an increase in the depression time constant from a value much smaller than the facilitation time constant τ(F) to a value much larger than τ(F) leads to a transition from facilitation dominance to depression dominance. Therefore, our work provides insights into the impact of ramping neuronal activity on downstream neurons through synapses that display short-term plasticity. In a perceptual decision-making process, ramping activity has been observed in the parietal and prefrontal cortices, with a slope that decreases with task difficulty. Our work predicts that neurons downstream from such a decision circuit could instead display a firing plateau independent of the task difficulty, provided that the synaptic connection is endowed with short-term depression. PMID:26890350

  3. Application of Micro-ramp Flow Control Devices to an Oblique Shock Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie; Anderson, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Tests are planned in the 15cm x 15cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn to demonstrate the applicability of micro-ramp flow control to the management of shock wave boundary layer interactions. These tests will be used as a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation and Design of Experiments (DoE) design information. Micro-ramps show potential for mechanically simple and fail-safe boundary layer control.

  4. View from corner of Facility No. S358 (Seaplane Ramp 2), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from corner of Facility No. S358 (Seaplane Ramp 2), looking toward facility No. S357 (Seaplane Ramp 1). Foreground shows openings for service access to subsurface oil and water lines. Facility No. 39 is in background on left, with foundation of demolished Facility No. 38 in front of that - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Runways-1933 Type, South shore of Ford Island, near Lexington Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Realization of an on-chip superconducting microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, Marek; Gasparinetti, Simone; Mondal, Mintu; Oppliger, Markus; Wallraff, Andreas

    As state-of-the-art superconducting quantum devices get increasingly complex, they require a growing number of control and detection channels. On-chip routing and multiplexing of signals presents a way to realize these without requiring an unrealistically large number of microwave lines. The ability to route signals on a chip will also be a useful tool for fast in-situ characterization of superconducting devices. Here, we describe and experimentally demonstrate a superconducting on-chip microwave switch which can be integrated with current superconducting quantum circuits. The device is based on interference effects and is in principle lossless, making it well-suited for operation in dilution cryostats and for routing of signals at the single quantum level with near-unity efficiency. The first proof-of-principle device has a bandwidth of 150 MHz , a 1 dB compression point of - 80 dBm and turn-on/off times on the order of 5 ns . On/off power ratios reach values of approximately 30 dB . We expect that our device will find use in (de)multiplexing of control and readout in superconducting circuits and routing of microwave fields in quantum optical experiments and quantum communication applications.

  6. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  7. Topological Superconductivity in Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

    Dirac semimetals host bulk band-touching Dirac points and a surface Fermi loop. We develop a theory of superconducting Dirac semimetals. Establishing a relation between the Dirac points and the surface Fermi loop, we clarify how the nontrivial topology of Dirac semimetals affects their superconducting state. We note that the unique orbital texture of Dirac points and a structural phase transition of the crystal favor symmetry-protected topological superconductivity with a quartet of surface Majorana fermions. We suggest the possible application of our theory to recently discovered superconducting states in Cd3As2.

  8. Cosmic sparks from superconducting strings.

    PubMed

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-01

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents approximately 10{5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{-1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model. PMID:18851517

  9. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  10. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  11. A Planar Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Chen, Tina C.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Supanich, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide high sensitivity rapid imaging at 3.3mm (90GHz) for the Green Bank Telescope - the world's largest steerable aperture - a camera is being built by the University of Pennsylvania, NASA/GSFC, and NRAO. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled detector array. We have designed and are fabricating a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture. Read out by SQUID multiplexers, the superconducting transition edge sensors will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. This will provide the first ever superconducting bolometer array on a facility instrument.

  12. Effects of ramped amplitude waveforms on the onset response of high-frequency mammalian nerve block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. D.; Kilgore, K. L.; Bhadra, N.; Lahowetz, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    Though high-frequency alternating current (HFAC) can block nerve conduction, the block is invariably preceded by an onset response which is a period of repetitive nerve firing. We tested the hypothesis that slowly ramping up the amplitude of the HFAC waveform could produce block without this initial onset response. Computer simulations were performed, using the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) model of myelinated mammalian axon. A ramped-amplitude HFAC was applied to axons of diameters ranging from 7.3 µm to 16 µm and at frequencies ranging from 3125 Hz to 40 kHz. The ramped-amplitude HFAC was also investigated in vivo in preparations of rat sciatic nerve. Sinusoidal voltage-regulated waveforms, at frequencies between 10 kHz and 30 kHz, were applied with initial amplitudes of 0 V, linearly increasing with time to 10 V. Ramp durations ranged from 0 s to 60 s. In both the MRG model simulations and the experiments, ramping the HFAC waveform did not eliminate the onset response. In the rat experiments, the peak amplitude of the onset response was lessened by ramping the amplitude, but both the onset response duration and the amount of onset activity as measured by the force-time integral were increased.

  13. Submarine ramp facies model for delta-fed, sand-rich turbidite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, P.L.; Dickinson, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    Some sandy turbidite successions contain facies that differ in significant ways from those predicted by the canyonfed submarine fan depositional model. The key differences are the absence of a master slope channel or canyon through which sediment is transported to the basin, and the lack of facies segregation into distinct channel and overbank or interchannel facies associations within the turbidite sequence. These types of sequences can be better described using a delta-fed submarine ramp depositional model. The primary components of this model are: a sandy deltaic system that has prograded to the shelf-slope break; an abbreviated section of mud-rich slope deposits traversed by multiple shallow channels that transport sand from the delta front to the deeper basin; very sandy proximal ramp deposits composed dominantly of laterally continuous sheets of Facies B turbidites; and less sandy distal ramp deposits characterized by an increase in the abundance of Facies C and D turbidites. Ramp turbidites characteristically display statistically random patterns of bed thickness. Submarine ramp development requires rapid sediment accumulation (>800 ft or 250 m/m.y.) in turbidite basins of shallow to moderate depth where deltaic progradation is rapid enough to mask the structural relief along basin margins. The delta-fed submarine ramp facies model may be useful in describing short-lived sandy depositonal episodes in some rapidly aggrading and prograding basinal sequences. As such, they represent one member in a spectrum of submarine fan depositional styles.

  14. Risk assessment in ramps for heavy vehicles--A French study.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Veronique; Conche, Florence

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a study dealing with the risk for heavy vehicles in ramps. Two approaches are used. On one hand, statistics are applied on several accidents databases to detect if ramps are more risky for heavy vehicles and to define a critical value for longitudinal slope. χ(2) test confirmed the risk in ramps and statistical analysis proved that a longitudinal slope superior to 3.2% represents a higher risk for heavy vehicles. On another hand, numerical simulations allow defining the speed profile in ramps for two types of heavy vehicles (tractor semi-trailer and 2-axles rigid body) and different loads. The simulations showed that heavy vehicles must drive more than 1000 m on ramps to reach their minimum speed. Moreover, when the slope is superior to 3.2%, tractor semi-trailer presents a strong decrease of their speed until 50 km/h. This situation represents a high risk of collision with other road users which drive at 80-90 km/h. Thus, both methods led to the determination of a risky configuration for heavy vehicles: ramps with a length superior to 1000 m and a slope superior to 3.2%. An application of this research work concerns design methods and guidelines. Indeed, this study provides threshold values than can be used by engineers to make mandatory specific planning like a lane for slow vehicles.

  15. Risk assessment in ramps for heavy vehicles--A French study.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Veronique; Conche, Florence

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a study dealing with the risk for heavy vehicles in ramps. Two approaches are used. On one hand, statistics are applied on several accidents databases to detect if ramps are more risky for heavy vehicles and to define a critical value for longitudinal slope. χ(2) test confirmed the risk in ramps and statistical analysis proved that a longitudinal slope superior to 3.2% represents a higher risk for heavy vehicles. On another hand, numerical simulations allow defining the speed profile in ramps for two types of heavy vehicles (tractor semi-trailer and 2-axles rigid body) and different loads. The simulations showed that heavy vehicles must drive more than 1000 m on ramps to reach their minimum speed. Moreover, when the slope is superior to 3.2%, tractor semi-trailer presents a strong decrease of their speed until 50 km/h. This situation represents a high risk of collision with other road users which drive at 80-90 km/h. Thus, both methods led to the determination of a risky configuration for heavy vehicles: ramps with a length superior to 1000 m and a slope superior to 3.2%. An application of this research work concerns design methods and guidelines. Indeed, this study provides threshold values than can be used by engineers to make mandatory specific planning like a lane for slow vehicles. PMID:26994373

  16. Ramp Forecasting Performance from Improved Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Freedman, J.

    2014-05-01

    The variable and uncertain nature of wind generation presents a new concern to power system operators. One of the biggest concerns associated with integrating a large amount of wind power into the grid is the ability to handle large ramps in wind power output. Large ramps can significantly influence system economics and reliability, on which power system operators place primary emphasis. The Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP) was performed to improve wind power forecasts and determine the value of these improvements to grid operators. This paper evaluates the performance of improved short-term wind power ramp forecasting. The study is performed for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) by comparing the experimental WFIP forecast to the current short-term wind power forecast (STWPF). Four types of significant wind power ramps are employed in the study; these are based on the power change magnitude, direction, and duration. The swinging door algorithm is adopted to extract ramp events from actual and forecasted wind power time series. The results show that the experimental short-term wind power forecasts improve the accuracy of the wind power ramp forecasting, especially during the summer.

  17. Cellular automata model simulating traffic car accidents in the on-ramp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, using Nagel-Schreckenberg model we study the on-ramp system under the expanded open boundary condition. The phase diagram of the two-lane on-ramp system is computed. It is found that the expanded left boundary insertion strategy enhances the flow in the on-ramp lane. Furthermore, we have studied the probability of the occurrence of car accidents. We distinguish two types of car accidents: the accident at the on-ramp site (Prc) and the rear-end accident in the main road (Pac). It is shown that car accidents at the on-ramp site are more likely to occur when traffic is free on road A. However, the rear-end accidents begin to occur above a critical injecting rate αc1. The influence of the on-ramp length (LB) and position (xC0) on the car accidents probabilities is studied. We found that large LB or xC0 causes an important decrease of the probability Prc. However, only large xC0 provokes an increase of the probability Pac. The effect of the stochastic randomization is also computed.

  18. Flow control of micro-ramps on supersonic forward-facing step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hu, Zhang; Tao, Zhu; Shihe, Yi; Anping, Wu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of the micro-ramps on supersonic turbulent flow over a forward-facing step (FFS) was experimentally investigated in a supersonic low-noise wind tunnel at Mach number 3 using nano-tracer planar laser scattering (NPLS) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. High spatiotemporal resolution images and velocity fields of supersonic flow over the testing model were captured. The fine structures and their spatial evolutionary characteristics without and with the micro-ramps were revealed and compared. The large-scale structures generated by the micro-ramps can survive the downstream FFS flowfield. The micro-ramps control on the flow separation and the separation shock unsteadiness was investigated by PIV results. With the micro-ramps, the reduction in the range of the reversal flow zone in streamwise direction is 50% and the turbulence intensity is also reduced. Moreover, the reduction in the average separated region and in separation shock unsteadiness are 47% and 26%, respectively. The results indicate that the micro-ramps are effective in reducing the flow separation and the separation shock unsteadiness. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172326 and 11502280).

  19. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Mueller, D.; Taylor, G.

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW andmore » electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.« less

  20. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Mueller, D.; Taylor, G.

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW and electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.

  1. Temperature-ramped (129)Xe spin-exchange optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-08-19

    We describe temperature-ramped spin-exchange optical pumping (TR-SEOP) in an automated high-throughput batch-mode (129)Xe hyperpolarizer utilizing three key temperature regimes: (i) "hot"-where the (129)Xe hyperpolarization rate is maximal, (ii) "warm"-where the (129)Xe hyperpolarization approaches unity, and (iii) "cool"-where hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas is transferred into a Tedlar bag with low Rb content (<5 ng per ∼1 L dose) suitable for human imaging applications. Unlike with the conventional approach of batch-mode SEOP, here all three temperature regimes may be operated under continuous high-power (170 W) laser irradiation, and hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas is delivered without the need for a cryocollection step. The variable-temperature approach increased the SEOP rate by more than 2-fold compared to the constant-temperature polarization rate (e.g., giving effective values for the exponential buildup constant γSEOP of 62.5 ± 3.7 × 10(-3) min(-1) vs 29.9 ± 1.2 × 10(-3) min(-1)) while achieving nearly the same maximum %PXe value (88.0 ± 0.8% vs 90.1% ± 0.8%, for a 500 Torr (67 kPa) Xe cell loading-corresponding to nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging (NMR/MRI) enhancements of ∼3.1 × 10(5) and ∼2.32 × 10(8) at the relevant fields for clinical imaging and HP (129)Xe production of 3 T and 4 mT, respectively); moreover, the intercycle "dead" time was also significantly decreased. The higher-throughput TR-SEOP approach can be implemented without sacrificing the level of (129)Xe hyperpolarization or the experimental stability for automation-making this approach beneficial for improving the overall (129)Xe production rate in clinical settings.

  2. Temperature-ramped (129)Xe spin-exchange optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-08-19

    We describe temperature-ramped spin-exchange optical pumping (TR-SEOP) in an automated high-throughput batch-mode (129)Xe hyperpolarizer utilizing three key temperature regimes: (i) "hot"-where the (129)Xe hyperpolarization rate is maximal, (ii) "warm"-where the (129)Xe hyperpolarization approaches unity, and (iii) "cool"-where hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas is transferred into a Tedlar bag with low Rb content (<5 ng per ∼1 L dose) suitable for human imaging applications. Unlike with the conventional approach of batch-mode SEOP, here all three temperature regimes may be operated under continuous high-power (170 W) laser irradiation, and hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas is delivered without the need for a cryocollection step. The variable-temperature approach increased the SEOP rate by more than 2-fold compared to the constant-temperature polarization rate (e.g., giving effective values for the exponential buildup constant γSEOP of 62.5 ± 3.7 × 10(-3) min(-1) vs 29.9 ± 1.2 × 10(-3) min(-1)) while achieving nearly the same maximum %PXe value (88.0 ± 0.8% vs 90.1% ± 0.8%, for a 500 Torr (67 kPa) Xe cell loading-corresponding to nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging (NMR/MRI) enhancements of ∼3.1 × 10(5) and ∼2.32 × 10(8) at the relevant fields for clinical imaging and HP (129)Xe production of 3 T and 4 mT, respectively); moreover, the intercycle "dead" time was also significantly decreased. The higher-throughput TR-SEOP approach can be implemented without sacrificing the level of (129)Xe hyperpolarization or the experimental stability for automation-making this approach beneficial for improving the overall (129)Xe production rate in clinical settings. PMID:25008290

  3. Structural Analysis of the Redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. R.; Dawicke, D. S.; Gentz, S. J.; Roberts, P. W.; Raju, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the interim structural analysis of a redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp bracket for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The proposed redesigned bracket consists of mounts for attachment to the ET wall, supports for the electronic/instrument cables and propellant repressurization lines that run along the ET, an upper plate, a lower plate, and complex bolted connections. The eight nominal bolted connections are considered critical in the summarized structural analysis. Each bolted connection contains a bolt, a nut, four washers, and a non-metallic spacer and block that are designed for thermal insulation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the bracket is developed using solid 10-node tetrahedral elements. The loading provided by the ET Project is used in the analysis. Because of the complexities associated with accurately modeling the bolted connections in the bracket, the analysis is performed using a global/local analysis procedure. The finite element analysis of the bracket identifies one of the eight bolted connections as having high stress concentrations. A local area of the bracket surrounding this bolted connection is extracted from the global model and used as a local model. Within the local model, the various components of the bolted connection are refined, and contact is introduced along the appropriate interfaces determined by the analysts. The deformations from the global model are applied as boundary conditions to the local model. The results from the global/local analysis show that while the stresses in the bolts are well within yield, the spacers fail due to compression. The primary objective of the interim structural analysis is to show concept viability for static thermal testing. The proposed design concept would undergo continued design optimization to address the identified analytical assumptions and concept shortcomings, assuming successful thermal testing.

  4. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  5. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Satterthwaite, J.C.; Gawlinski, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  7. Strain accommodation through facet matching in La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}/Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} ramp-edge junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, M.; Coneri, F.; Poccia, N.; Renshaw Wang, X.; Hilgenkamp, H.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2015-08-01

    Scanning nano-focused X-ray diffraction and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy are used to investigate the crystal structure of ramp-edge junctions between superconducting electron-doped Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} and superconducting hole-doped La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} thin films, the latter being the top layer. On the ramp, a new growth mode of La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} with a 3.3° tilt of the c-axis is found. We explain the tilt by developing a strain accommodation model that relies on facet matching, dictated by the ramp angle, indicating that a coherent domain boundary is formed at the interface. The possible implications of this growth mode for the creation of artificial domains in morphotropic materials are discussed.

  8. Late Miocene breccia of Menorca (Balearic Islands) a basis for the interpretation of a Neogene ramp deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrador, A.; Pomar, L.; Taberner, C.

    1992-08-01

    Neogene (Tortonian) ramp facies associations crop out in the southern sector of Menorca (Balearic island). These are made mainly by sigmoidal and oblique clinoform units comprising rhodoliths, bryozoans, molluscs and foraminifera. These units are interpreted as outer-ramp deposits. A breccia deposit infilling an erosional surface is found at the top of the carbonate ramp sequence. The breccia components (mainly rhodoliths and oolite clasts) may represent erosion of the underlying ramp deposits and inner-ramp counterparts, which do not crop out on the island. The study of components in the breccia deposits confirms the indigenous character of the outer-ramp facies associations, which suggests that the ramp was steepened distally. The breccia deposits correspond laterally to a discontinuity surface locally showing karstic features. Transgressive sediments (including a phosphatic crust) are found above the discontinuity surface. All together these features, and the dolomitisation of the uppermost ramp sediments and breccia deposits, suggest that the breccia originated from erosion of the ramp after a major relative sea-level fall. The breccia and discontinuity surface separate the ramp sequence from an overlying prograding sequence. A correlation of this sequence boundary to other areas in the western Mediterranean is proposed.

  9. Loading and Unloading Finishing Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Arlene; McGlone, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Current guidelines suggest the use of ramps below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs; however, they do not suggest the use of any specific bedding. Bedding types (nothing, feed, sand, wood shavings, and hay) were tested with finishing pigs (70–120 kg) to determine which was most effective in reducing slips, falls, and vocalizations at three ramp angles, two moisture levels, over two seasons. Slips, falls, and vocalizations were summed to establish a scoring system for the types of beddings. Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload pigs, increased as the slope increased. Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and ramp slope interacted to impact the total time it took for finishing pigs to load and unload the ramp. Selection of the best bedding depends on ramp slope, season, and wetness of bedding. Abstract The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of finishing pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps with a slope below 20 degrees to load and unload pigs. However, the total time it takes to load and unload animals and slips, falls, and vocalizations are a welfare concern. Three ramp angles (0, 10 or 20 degrees), five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay), two moistures (dry or wet bedding, >50% moisture) over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter) were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 2400 pig observations) and analyzed with a scoring system. The use of bedding during summer or winter played a role in the total time it took to load and unload the ramp (p < 0.05). Bedding, bedding moisture, season, and slope significantly interacted to impact the total time to load and unload finishing pigs (p < 0.05). Heart rate and the total time it took to load and unload the ramp increased as the slope of the ramp increased (p < 0.05). Heart rates were higher during the

  10. Probing the enhanced superconductivity and chiral edge current in spin-triplet superconductor strontium ruthenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yiqun Alex

    This dissertation aims at providing insight into the mechanism of spin-triplet superconductivity in Sr2RuO4, the only Cu-free layered perovskite material found to be superconducting. The work starts by looking at the Sr2RuO4-Ru eutectic phase featuring Ru islands embedded in a bulk crystal of Sr2RuO 4. The Sr2RuO4-Ru interface was found to be atomically smooth. Surprisingly, even such a clean interface appears not to allow the proximity effect of spin-triplet superconducting gap to enter the Ru islands. The previously observed 3 K-phase superconductivity in this eutectic phase seems to occur away from the interface where dislocations are present. To pinpoint the enhanced superconductivity to dislocations, micrometer sized flakes of Sr2RuO4 were studied, in which the effect of dislocations on Tc can be studied without the influence of Ru islands. The origin of the 3 K-phase was shown to be the presence of dislocations, near which the crystalline symmetry is lowered. The reduced symmetry leads naturally to an enhanced Tc, as revealed by a phenomenologically theory. After that, a different experiment is presented. Unconventional Josephson coupling was shown to occur in ramp-type junctions on Sr2RuO 4 flakes. The chiral edge current was measured using Josephson interferometry. An upper limit of the edge current was obtained to be as small as 0.1 percent of the theoretically predicted value. Such an upper limit was found to be similar to the measured transport critical current density of the Sr 2RuO4 flakes. The results suggest that the interlayer coupling and the multiband nature of the electronic structure are important to the mechanism of superconductivity.

  11. 4C code analysis of thermal-hydraulic transients in the KSTAR PF1 superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoldi Richard, L.; Bonifetto, R.; Chu, Y.; Kholia, A.; Park, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Zanino, R.

    2013-01-01

    The KSTAR tokamak, in operation since 2008 at the National Fusion Research Institute in Korea, is equipped with a full superconducting magnet system including the central solenoid (CS), which is made of four symmetric pairs of coils PF1L/U-PF4L/U. Each of the CS coils is pancake wound using Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors with a square Incoloy jacket. The coils are cooled with supercritical He in forced circulation at nominal 4.5 K and 5.5 bar inlet conditions. During different test campaigns the measured temperature increase due to AC losses turned out to be higher than expected, which motivates the present study. The 4C code, already validated against and applied to different types of thermal-hydraulic transients in different superconducting coils, is applied here to the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a full set of trapezoidal current pulses in the PF1 coils, with different ramp rates. We find the value of the coupling time constant nτ that best fits, at each current ramp rate, the temperature increase up to the end of the heating at the coil outlet. The agreement between computed results and the whole set of measured data, including temperatures, pressures and mass flow rates, is then shown to be very good both at the inlet and at the outlet of the coil. The nτ values needed to explain the experimental results decrease at increasing current ramp rates, consistently with the results found in the literature.

  12. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  13. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  14. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  15. Anatomy of a cyclically packaged Mesoproterozoic carbonate ramp in northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, A. G.; Narbonne, G. M.; James, N. P.

    2001-03-01

    Carbonates in the upper member of the Mesoproterozoic Victor Bay Formation are dominated by lime mud and packaged in cycles of 20-50 m. These thicknesses exceed those of classic shallowing-upward cycles by almost a factor of 10. Stratigraphic and sedimentological evidence suggests high-amplitude, high-frequency glacio-eustatic cyclicity, and thus a cool global climate ca. 1.2 Ga. The Victor Bay ramp is one of several late Proterozoic carbonate platforms where the proportions of lime mud, carbonate grains, and microbialites are more typical of younger Phanerozoic successions which followed the global waning of stromatolites. Facies distribution in the study area is compatible with deposition on a low-energy, microtidal, distally steepened ramp. Outer-ramp facies are hemipelagic lime mudstone, shale, carbonaceous rhythmite, and debrites. Mid-ramp facies are molar-tooth limestone tempestite with microspar-intraclast lags. In a marine environment where stromatolitic and oolitic facies were otherwise rare, large stromatolitic reefs developed at the mid-ramp, coeval with inner-ramp facies of microspar grainstone, intertidal dolomitic microbial laminite, and supratidal evaporitic red shale. Deep-subtidal, outer-ramp cycles occur in the southwestern part of the study area. Black dolomitic shale at the base is overlain by ribbon, nodular, and carbonaceous carbonate facies, all of which exhibit signs of synsedimentary disruption. Cycles in the northeast are shallow-subtidal and peritidal in character. Shallow-subtidal cycles consist of basal deep-water facies, and an upper layer of subtidal molar-tooth limestone tempestite interbedded with microspar calcarenite facies. Peritidal cycles are identical to shallow-subtidal cycles except that they contain a cap of dolomitic tidal-flat microbial laminite, and rarely of red shale sabkha facies or of sandy polymictic conglomerate. A transect along the wall of a valley extending 8.5 km perpendicular to depositional strike reveals

  16. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  17. Sequence development of a latest Devonian-Tournaisian distally-steepened mixed carbonate-siliciclastic ramp, Canning Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedmehdi, Zahra; George, Annette D.; Tucker, Maurice E.

    2016-03-01

    The sequence development and evolution of latest Devonian-earliest Carboniferous Fairfield Group in the Canning Basin have been established through integration of detailed sedimentological analysis of core, petrophysical data, existing biostratigraphic data and new seismic interpretations. The Fairfield Group on the Lennard Shelf was deposited on a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic distally-steepened ramp with a broad inner ramp, narrow mid ramp and steepened outer ramp. The majority of facies associations (FA1-FA8) were formed in intertidal-shallow subtidal conditions in proximal to distal inner ramp including siliciclastic tidal flats (FA1), carbonate intertidal flats (FA2), tidal flats and channels (FA3), lagoons (FA4-FA5), and shallow subtidal (FA6), backshoal (FA7) and fore-shoal areas (FA8). Bioclastic muddy sandstone (FA9) and bioclastic mudstone (FA10) are the dominant mid-ramp facies. Recognition of turbiditic facies of middle to lower slope of the outer ramp (FA11-FA13) led to the identification of a distally-steepened ramp. Antecedent topography exerted a significant control on platform morphology and the development of the widespread inner-ramp facies on the Lennard Shelf. A sequence-stratigraphic analysis reveals that the Fairfield Group ramp deposits consists of four third-order sequences (S1-S4) that were largely deposited during sea-level highstands (HST) characterized by progradational trends and dominant shallow subtidal inner-ramp facies associations. Transgressive systems tracts (TST) are well developed in S1 and S3 and have a retrogradational facies pattern with dominant deep subtidal mid-outer ramp facies associations. Lowstand systems tracts, characterized by lowstand wedges and turbiditic facies, are identified in the lower parts of S2 and S3. Coarse and fine-grained siliciclastic facies are mixed with carbonate facies as a result of coeval deposition on the inner and mid ramp, and reciprocal deposition on the outer ramp. A temporal variation in

  18. Superconducting Magnets for RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, A. F.

    2004-06-01

    The highest priority for new construction for the nuclear physics community is the Rare Isotope Accelerator. This project's goal is to produce up to 400 kW of beams from protons to uranium. Beam transport at the high-energy end has to deal with high radiation fields and high beam rigidities. Superconducting magnets are being designed to fulfill both these requirements. The quadrupoles in the fragment separator will use superferric design with pole tip fields of up to 2.5 T to produce the required gradients in the large apertures. Several techniques are presented that deal with making the magnets radiation resistant.

  19. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  20. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  1. PIK-20 and LRV Vehicles Parked on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's PIK-20 motor-glider sailplane on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Next to the PIK-20 is the Low Reynolds Number Vehicle (LRV) remotely-piloted research vehicle. The PIK-20E was a sailplane flown at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) beginning in 1981. The vehicle, bearing NASA tail number 803, was used as a research vehicle on projects calling for high lift-over-drag and low-speed performance. Later NASA used the PIK-20E to study the flow of fluids over the aircraft's surface at various speeds and angles of attack as part of a study of airflow efficiency over lifting surfaces. The single-seat aircraft was used to begin developing procedures for collecting sailplane glide performance data in a program carried out by Ames-Dryden. It was also used to study high-lift aerodynamics and laminar flow on high-lift airfoils. Built by Eiri-Avion in Finland, the PIK-20E is a sailplane with a two-cylinder 43-horsepower, retractable engine. It is made of carbon fiber with sandwich construction. In this unique configuration, it takes off and climbs to altitude on its own. After reaching the desired altitude, the engine is shut down and folded back into the fuselage and the aircraft is then operated as a conventional sailplane. Construction of the PIK-20E series was rather unusual. The factory used high-temperature epoxies cured in an autoclave, making the structure resistant to deformation with age. Unlike today's normal practice of laying glass over gelcoat in a mold, the PIK-20E was built without gelcoat. The finish is the result of smooth glass lay-up, a small amount of filler, and an acrylic enamel paint. The sailplane was 21.4 feet long and had a wingspan of 49.2 feet. It featured a wooden, fixed-pitch propeller, a roomy cockpit, wingtip wheels, and a steerable tailwheel.

  2. Pleistocene sand ramp deposits in the Aegean (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, E.; Zuschin, M.; Gier, S.; Bickel, L.

    2010-05-01

    Yellowish calcarenite is found abundantly on Despotiko, a small, unpopulated island in the central Aegean. Up to several meters thick layers of this sandstone is found as discordant cover above greenschist to amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks of the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline of the Central Hellenides. In some cases reddish soil is found below the sandstone. The calcarenite preferably fills preexisting relief of the underlying crystalline, therefore the thickest occurrences are found in the intermittent creeks. The sandstone can be traced from below sea-level up to around 90 m altitudes with abundant occurrences, but is most common at the north and northwest coast of the island. Generally, the sandstone layers and the internal lamination are parallel or at shallow angles to the slopes of the underlying crystalline without forming any morphological terraces. In some cases continuous layers of the sandstone can be traced for more than 20 m altitude. Cross-bedding has been observed in very rare cases and dips steeply towards the SE. The calcarenite (locally called "lithos poros") is strongly dominated by marine bioclasts (Corallinaceae, foraminifera, gastropod and bivalve fragments, etc.) with only minor siliciclastic components hardly exceeding 20%. The grains well-rounded and well-sorted with rain sizes range between medium sand to granule sizes. Based on the sandstone distribution in a high range of altitudes, sedimentary structures (e.g. pin-stripe lamination, high-angle cross bedding, rhizoliths, occurrence of terrestrial gastropod shells and correlation with almost identical sandstones in the Mediterranean) we conclude an aeolian origin and probably Pleistocene age of this sandstone. Horizons containing dm-sized, angular metamorphic clasts within well-rounded and well-sorted aeolian layers point to interaction of wind-blown and talus processes. Therefore these sediments are interpreted as sand ramps that formed during increased aeolian activity during the

  3. X-3 Stiletto on Ramp - View from Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    This NACA High-Speed Flight Station photograph shows a side-view of the X-3 Stiletto research aircraft on the ramp at Edwards Air Force Base in 1954. The X-3 Stiletto was a single-place jet aircraft with a slender fuselage and a long tapered nose, manufactured by the Douglas Aircraft Company. The X-3's primary mission was to investigate the design features of an aircraft suitable for sustained supersonic speeds, which included the first use of titanium in major airframe components. It was delivered to the NACA High-Speed Flight Station in August of 1954 after some Douglas and Air Force evaluation testing. The Douglas X-3, known as the Stiletto, was built to investigate the design of an aircraft suitable for sustained supersonic speeds. The X-3 was intended for sustained flight research above Mach 2, but was hampered by use of underpowered Westinghouse J34 turbojet engines which could not power the aircraft past Mach 1 in level flight. This aircraft was built by the Douglas Aircraft Company. The X-3 had, perhaps, the most highly refined supersonic airframe of its day as well as other important advances including one of the first machined structures. It included the first use of titanium in major airframe components. Its long fuselage gave the Stiletto a high-fineness ratio and a low-aspect ratio (the ratio of the wing's span to its chord; in other words, it was short and stubby). Despite this refined configuration, the maximum speed it attained was Mach 1.21, during a dive. The general consensus was that the aircraft was sluggish and extremely underpowered. The X-3 also demonstrated coupling instability during abrupt rolling maneuvers, which could cause it to go wildly out of control, as happened on a flight on October 27, 1954, with National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) pilot Joe Walker at the controls. The principle contribution of the X-3 was its data on inertial coupling (roll divergence)--a tendency to diverge from the intended flight path. The

  4. XS-1 on ramp with B-29 mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    XS-1 on the ramp with the B-29 mothership in 1949. This is the second XS-1 built; it later was converted into the X-1E. Unlike the XS-1-1, which was flown by the Air Force, the XS-1-2 was flown mostly by Bell and NACA pilots. It gathered much more research data than the more famous XS-1-1, known as 'Glamorous Glennis.' The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the NACA. The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' The first of the three X-1s was glide-tested at Pinecastle Army Air Field, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Edwards Air Force Base with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot, at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after the B-29 air-launched it from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 feet. The 6,000-pound thrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed the aircraft up to a speed of 700 miles per hour in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed, 957 miles per hour. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 feet. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before ever making any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 30 feet, 11 inches long; 10 feet, 10 inches high; and had a wingspan of 29 feet. It weighed 6,784 pounds and carried 6,250 pounds of fuel. It had a flush cockpit with a side entrance and no ejection seat.

  5. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Xu, Fengyu; Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiangchen; Chen, Anbin; Wei, Xiaotao; Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu

    2014-11-01

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  6. Numerical Simulation on Ramp Initiation and Propagation in a Fold-and-thrust Belt and Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C.; Liu, X.; Shi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedge develop along compressive plate boundaries, both in hinterland and foreland. Under the long-term compressive tectonic loading, a series ramps will initiate and propagate along the wedge. How do the ramps initiate? What are the timing and spacing intervals between the ramps? How many patterns are there for the ramp propagation? These questions are basic for the study of ramp initiation and propagation. Many scholars used three different methods, critical coulomb wedge theory, analogue sandbox models, and numerical simulation to research the initiation and propagation of the ramps, respectively. In this paper, we set up a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element model, with a frictional contact plane, to simulate the initiation and propagation of the ramps. In this model, the material in upper wedge is homogenous, but considering the effects of gravity and long-term tectonic loading. The model is very simple but simulated results are very interesting. The simulated results indicate that the cohesion of upper wedge and dip angle of detachment plane have strong effects on the initiation and propagation of ramps. There are three different patterns of ramp initiation and propagation for different values of the cohesion. The results are different from those by previous analogue sandbox models, and numerical simulation, in which there is usually only one pattern for the ramp initiation and propagation. The results are consistent with geological survey for the ramp formation in an accretionary wedge. This study will provide more knowledge of mechanism of the ramp initiation and propagation in Tibetan Plateau and central Taiwan.

  7. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  8. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  9. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  10. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  11. Role of superconductivity in superconducting transmission line resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao-Ke

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the role of superconductivity in superconducting transmission line resonator, we derive the mode equations using the macroscopic wavefunction of the Cooper pairs. We make an appropriate scaling to obtain the dimensionless form of equations and establish the validity of good conductor approximation under most circumstances. Quantization of superconducting transmission line resonator is realized by the black-box principle. We also briefly discuss that the deviation from good conductor behavior would result in the observable effects, such as the considerable decrease of phase velocity and the soliton.

  12. The Effect of Micro-ramps on Supersonic Flow over a Forward-Facing Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Hu; Yi, Shi-He; Zhu, Yang-Zhu; Chen, Zhi; Wu, Yu

    2013-04-01

    The effect of micro-ramp control on fully developed turbulent flow over a forward-facing step (FFS) is investigated in a supersonic low-noise wind tunnel at Mach number 3 using nano-tracer planar laser scattering (NPLS) and supersonic particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. High spatiotemporal resolution images and the average velocity profiles of supersonic flow over the FFS with and without the control of the micro-ramps are captured. The fine structures of both cases, including the coherent structures of fully developed boundary layer and the large-scale hairpin-like vortices originated from the micro-ramps as well as the interaction of shock waves with the large-scale structures, are revealed and compared. Based on the time-correlation images, the temporal and spatial evolutionary characteristics of the coherent structures are investigated. It is beneficial to understand the dynamic mechanisms of the separated flow and the control mechanisms of the micro-ramps. The size of the separation region is determined by the NPLS and PIV. The results indicate that the control of the micro-ramps is capable of delaying the separation and diminishing the extent of recirculation zone.

  13. Solar Power Ramp Events Detection Using an Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Ke, Deping; Sun, Yuanzhang

    2015-08-05

    Solar power ramp events (SPREs) significantly influence the integration of solar power on non-clear days and threaten the reliable and economic operation of power systems. Accurately extracting solar power ramps becomes more important with increasing levels of solar power penetrations in power systems. In this paper, we develop an optimized swinging door algorithm (OpSDA) to enhance the state of the art in SPRE detection. First, the swinging door algorithm (SDA) is utilized to segregate measured solar power generation into consecutive segments in a piecewise linear fashion. Then we use a dynamic programming approach to combine adjacent segments into significant ramps when the decision thresholds are met. In addition, the expected SPREs occurring in clear-sky solar power conditions are removed. Measured solar power data from Tucson Electric Power is used to assess the performance of the proposed methodology. OpSDA is compared to two other ramp detection methods: the SDA and the L1-Ramp Detect with Sliding Window (L1-SW) method. The statistical results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. OpSDA can significantly improve the performance of the SDA, and it can perform as well as or better than L1-SW with substantially less computation time.

  14. Solar Power Ramp Events Detection Using an Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Ke, Deping; Sun, Yuanzhang

    2015-08-07

    Solar power ramp events (SPREs) are those that significantly influence the integration of solar power on non-clear days and threaten the reliable and economic operation of power systems. Accurately extracting solar power ramps becomes more important with increasing levels of solar power penetrations in power systems. In this paper, we develop an optimized swinging door algorithm (OpSDA) to detection. First, the swinging door algorithm (SDA) is utilized to segregate measured solar power generation into consecutive segments in a piecewise linear fashion. Then we use a dynamic programming approach to combine adjacent segments into significant ramps when the decision thresholds are met. In addition, the expected SPREs occurring in clear-sky solar power conditions are removed. Measured solar power data from Tucson Electric Power is used to assess the performance of the proposed methodology. OpSDA is compared to two other ramp detection methods: the SDA and the L1-Ramp Detect with Sliding Window (L1-SW) method. The statistical results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. OpSDA can significantly improve the performance of the SDA, and it can perform as well as or better than L1-SW with substantially less computation time.

  15. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  16. Probabilistic Swinging Door Algorithm as Applied to Photovoltaic Power Ramping Event Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Florita, Anthony; Zhang, Jie; Brancucci Martinez-Anido, Carlo; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Cui, Mingjian

    2015-10-02

    Photovoltaic (PV) power generation experiences power ramping events due to cloud interference. Depending on the extent of PV aggregation and local grid features, such power variability can be constructive or destructive to measures of uncertainty regarding renewable power generation; however, it directly influences contingency planning, production costs, and the overall reliable operation of power systems. For enhanced power system flexibility, and to help mitigate the negative impacts of power ramping, it is desirable to analyze events in a probabilistic fashion so degrees of beliefs concerning system states and forecastability are better captured and uncertainty is explicitly quantified. A probabilistic swinging door algorithm is developed and presented in this paper. It is then applied to a solar data set of PV power generation. The probabilistic swinging door algorithm builds on results from the original swinging door algorithm, first used for data compression in trend logging, and it is described by two uncertain parameters: (i) e, the threshold sensitivity to a given ramp, and (ii) s, the residual of the piecewise linear ramps. These two parameters determine the distribution of ramps and capture the uncertainty in PV power generation.

  17. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T < T(c), the resistivity peak can still be observed; however, its line-shape is now affected by the onset of the quasi two-dimensional superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  18. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  19. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  20. Protection circuits for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Wood, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    As the technology of controlled nuclear fusion progresses, plans for new experimental reactors include much longer duty cycles than those of earlier experiments. Many of the magnet systems for these reactors must be superconducting due to the prolonged or continuous high current levels required. The large initial investment of a superconducting magnet system justifies a protective dump circuit. This circuit must operate if the magnet goes normal or in the event of failure of some of the critical auxiliary equipment. This paper examines two applications of superconducting magnet protection for fusion experiments. A novel dc interrupter being developed especially for this purpose is also discussed.