Science.gov

Sample records for fast response modeling

  1. Urban dispersion : challenges for fast response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    There is renewed interest in urban dispersion modeling due to the need for tools that can be used for responding to, planning for, and assessing the consequences of an airborne release of toxic materials. Although not an everyday phenomenon, releases of hazardous gases and aerosols have occurred in populated urban environments and are potentially threatening to human life. These releases may stem from on-site accidents as in the case of industrial chemical releases, may result during transport of hazardous chemicals as in tanker truck or railroad spills, or may be premeditated as in a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) agent terrorist attack. Transport and dispersion in urban environments is extremely complicated. Buildings alter the flow fields and deflect the wind, causing updrafts and downdrafts, channeling between buildings, areas of calm winds adjacent to strong winds, and horizontally and vertically rotating-eddies between buildings, at street corners, and other places within the urban canopy (see review by Hosker, 1984). Trees, moving vehicles, and exhaust vents among other things further complicate matters. The distance over which chemical, biological, or radiological releases can be harmful varies from tens of meters to many kilometers depending on the amount released, the toxicity of the agent, and the atmospheric conditions. As we will show later, accounting for the impacts of buildings on the transport and dispersion is crucial in estimating the travel direction, the areal extent, and the toxicity levels of the contaminant plume, and ultimately for calculating exposures to the population.

  2. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  3. Importance of vegetation processes for model spread in the fast precipitation response to CO2 forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Qu, Xin; Hall, Alex

    2016-12-01

    In the current generation of climate models, the projected increase in global precipitation over the 21st century ranges from 2% to 10% under a high-emission scenario. Some of this uncertainty can be traced to the rapid response to carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing. We analyze an ensemble of simulations to better understand model spread in this rapid response. A substantial amount is linked to how the land surface partitions a change in latent versus sensible heat flux in response to the CO2-induced radiative perturbation; a larger increase in sensible heat results in a larger decrease in global precipitation. Model differences in the land surface response appear to be strongly related to the vegetation response to increased CO2, specifically, the closure of leaf stomata. Future research should thus focus on evaluation of the vegetation physiological response, including stomatal conductance parameterizations, for the purpose of constraining the fast response of Earth's hydrologic cycle to CO2 forcing.

  4. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  5. Development and validation of a two-dimensional fast-response flood estimation model

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    A finite difference formulation of the shallow water equations using an upwind differencing method was developed maintaining computational efficiency and accuracy such that it can be used as a fast-response flood estimation tool. The model was validated using both laboratory controlled experiments and an actual dam breach. Through the laboratory experiments, the model was shown to give good estimations of depth and velocity when compared to the measured data, as well as when compared to a more complex two-dimensional model. Additionally, the model was compared to high water mark data obtained from the failure of the Taum Sauk dam. The simulated inundation extent agreed well with the observed extent, with the most notable differences resulting from the inability to model sediment transport. The results of these validation studies complex two-dimensional model. Additionally, the model was compared to high water mark data obtained from the failure of the Taum Sauk dam. The simulated inundation extent agreed well with the observed extent, with the most notable differences resulting from the inability to model sediment transport. The results of these validation studies show that a relatively numerical scheme used to solve the complete shallow water equations can be used to accurately estimate flood inundation. Future work will focus on further reducing the computation time needed to provide flood inundation estimates for fast-response analyses. This will be accomplished through the efficient use of multi-core, multi-processor computers coupled with an efficient domain-tracking algorithm, as well as an understanding of the impacts of grid resolution on model results.

  6. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  7. Development of a fast response dispersion model for virtual urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balwinder

    According to a UN report, more than 50% of the total world's population resides in urban areas and this fraction is increasing. Urbanization has a wide range of potential environmental impacts, including those related to the dispersion of potentially dangerous substances emitted from activities such as combustion, industrial processing or from deliberate harmful releases. This research is primarily focused on the investigation of various factors which contribute to the dispersion of certain classes of materials in a complex urban environment and improving both of the fundamental components of a fast response dispersion modeling system---wind modeling and dispersion modeling. Specifically, new empirical parameterizations have been suggested for an existing fast response wind model for street canyon flow fields. These new parameterizations are shown to produce more favorable results when compared with the experimental data. It is also demonstrated that the use of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) technology can enhance the efficiency of an urban Lagrangian dispersion model and can achieve near real-time particle advection. The GPU also enables real-time visualizations which can be used for creating virtual urban environments to aid emergency responders. The dispersion model based on the GPU architecture relies on the so-called "simplified Langevin equations (SLEs)" for particle advection. The full or generalized form of the Langevin equations (GLEs) is known for its stiffness which tends to generate unstable modes in particle trajectory, where a particle may travel significant distances in a small time step. A fractional step methodology has been used to implement the GLEs into an existing Lagrangian random walk model to partially circumvent the stiffness associated with the GLEs. Dispersion estimates from the GLEs-based model have been compared with the SLEs-based model and available wind tunnel data. The GLEs-based model is more dispersive than the SLEs-based model in

  8. Implementation of rooftop reciculation parameterization into the QUIC fast response urban wind model

    SciTech Connect

    Bagal, N.; Singh, B.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Brown, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The QUIC (Quick Urban & Industrial Complex) dispersion modeling system has been developed to provide high-resolution wind and concentration fields in cities. The fast response 3D urban wind model QUIC-URB explicitly solves for the flow field around buildings using a suite of empirical parameterizations and mass conservation. This procedure is based on the work of Rockle (1990). The current Rockle (1990) model does not capture the rooftop recirculation region associated with flow separation from the leading edge of an isolated building. According to Banks et al. (2001), there are two forms of separation depending on the incident wind angle. For an incident wind angle within 20{sup o} of perpendicular to the front face of the building, 'bubble separation' occurs in which cylindrical vortices whose axis are orthogonal to the flow are generated along the rooftop surface (see Fig. 1). For a 'corner wind' flow or incident wind angle of 30{sup o} to 70{sup o} of perpendicular to the front face of the building, 'conical' or 'delta wing' vortices form along the roof surface (Fig. 3). In this work, a model for rooftop recirculation is implemented into the QUIC- URB model for the two incident wind angle regimes described above. The parameterizations for the length and height of the recirculation region are from Wilson (1979) for the case of flow perpendicular or near perpendicular to the building and from Banks et al. (2000) for the case of off-angle flow. In this paper, we describe the rooftop algorithms and show how the model results are improved through comparisons to experimental data (Snyder and Lawson 1994).

  9. Modeling the viscoplastic micromechanical response of two-phase materials using fast Fourier transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Lee, Sukbin; Rollett, Anthony D

    2009-01-01

    A viscoplastic approach using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method for obtaining local mechanical response is utilized to study microstructure-property relationships in composite materials. Specifically, three-dimensional, two-phase digital materials containing isotropically coarsened particles surrounded by a matrix phase, generated through a Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts model for Ostwald ripening, are used as instantiations in order to calculate the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension. The effects of the morphology of the matrix phase, the volume fraction and the contiguity of particles, and the polycrystallinity of matrix phase, on the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension are examined. It is found that the first moments of the stress and strain rate fields have a different dependence on the particle volume fraction and the particle contiguity from their second moments. The average stresses and average strain rates of both phases and of the overall composite have rather simple relationships with the particle volume fraction whereas their standard deviations vary strongly, especially when the particle volume fraction is high, and the contiguity of particles has a noticeable effect on the mechanical response. It is also found that the shape of stress distribution in the BCC hard particle phase evolves as the volume fraction of particles in the composite varies, such that it agrees with the stress field in the BCC polycrystal as the volume of particles approaches unity. Finally, it is observed that the stress and strain rate fields in the microstructures with a polycrystalline matrix are less sensitive to changes in volume fraction and contiguity of particles.

  10. Fast response sequential measurements and modelling of nanoparticles inside and outside a car cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodatnia, Pouyan; Kumar, Prashant; Robins, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Commuters are regularly exposed to short-term peak concentration of traffic produced nanoparticles (i.e. particles <300 nm in size). Studies indicate that these exposures pose adverse health effects (i.e. cardiovascular). This study aims to obtain particle number concentrations (PNCs) and distributions (PNDs) inside and outside a car cabin whilst driving on a road in Guildford, a typical UK town. Other objectives are to: (i) investigate the influences of particle transformation processes on particle number and size distributions in the cabin, (ii) correlate PNCs inside the cabin to those measured outside, and (iii) predict PNCs in the cabin based on those outside the cabin using a semi-empirical model. A fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50) was employed in conjunction with an automatic switching system to measure PNCs and PNDs in the 5-560 nm range at multiple locations inside and outside the cabin at 10 Hz sampling rate over 10 s sequential intervals. Two separate sets of measurements were made at: (i) four seats in the car cabin during ˜700 min of driving, and (ii) two points, one the driver seat and the other near the ventilation air intake outside the cabin, during ˜500 min of driving. Results of the four-point measurements indicated that average PNCs at all for locations were nearly identical (i.e. 3.96, 3.85, 3.82 and 4.00 × 104 cm-3). The modest difference (˜0.1%) revealed a well-mixed distribution of nanoparticles in the car cabin. Similar magnitude and shapes of PNDs at all four sampling locations suggested that transformation processes (e.g. nucleation, coagulation, condensation) have minimal effect on particles in the cabin. Two-point measurements indicated that on average, PNCs inside the cabin were about 72% of those measured outside. Time scale analysis indicated that dilution was the fastest and dominant process in the cabin, governing the variations of PNCs in time. A semi-empirical model was proposed to predict PNCs inside

  11. Aggregate modeling of fast-acting demand response and control under real-time pricing

    DOE PAGES

    Chassin, David P.; Rondeau, Daniel

    2016-08-24

    This paper develops and assesses the performance of a short-term demand response (DR) model for utility load control with applications to resource planning and control design. Long term response models tend to underestimate short-term demand response when induced by prices. This has two important consequences. First, planning studies tend to undervalue DR and often overlook its benefits in utility demand management program development. Second, when DR is not overlooked, the open-loop DR control gain estimate may be too low. This can result in overuse of load resources, control instability and excessive price volatility. Our objective is therefore to develop amore » more accurate and better performing short-term demand response model. We construct the model from first principles about the nature of thermostatic load control and show that the resulting formulation corresponds exactly to the Random Utility Model employed in economics to study consumer choice. The model is tested against empirical data collected from field demonstration projects and is shown to perform better than alternative models commonly used to forecast demand in normal operating conditions. Finally, the results suggest that (1) existing utility tariffs appear to be inadequate to incentivize demand response, particularly in the presence of high renewables, and (2) existing load control systems run the risk of becoming unstable if utilities close the loop on real-time prices.« less

  12. Aggregate modeling of fast-acting demand response and control under real-time pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Rondeau, Daniel

    2016-08-24

    This paper develops and assesses the performance of a short-term demand response (DR) model for utility load control with applications to resource planning and control design. Long term response models tend to underestimate short-term demand response when induced by prices. This has two important consequences. First, planning studies tend to undervalue DR and often overlook its benefits in utility demand management program development. Second, when DR is not overlooked, the open-loop DR control gain estimate may be too low. This can result in overuse of load resources, control instability and excessive price volatility. Our objective is therefore to develop a more accurate and better performing short-term demand response model. We construct the model from first principles about the nature of thermostatic load control and show that the resulting formulation corresponds exactly to the Random Utility Model employed in economics to study consumer choice. The model is tested against empirical data collected from field demonstration projects and is shown to perform better than alternative models commonly used to forecast demand in normal operating conditions. Finally, the results suggest that (1) existing utility tariffs appear to be inadequate to incentivize demand response, particularly in the presence of high renewables, and (2) existing load control systems run the risk of becoming unstable if utilities close the loop on real-time prices.

  13. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  14. Modeling fast stimulus-response association learning along the occipito-parieto-frontal pathway following rule instructions.

    PubMed

    Bugmann, Guido

    2012-01-24

    On the basis of instructions, humans are able to set up associations between sensory and motor areas of the brain separated by several neuronal relays, within a few seconds. This paper proposes a model of fast learning along the dorsal pathway, from primary visual areas to pre-motor cortex. A new synaptic learning rule is proposed where synaptic efficacies converge rapidly toward a specific value determined by the number of active inputs of a neuron, respecting a principle of resource limitation in terms of total synaptic input efficacy available to a neuron. The efficacies are stable with regards to repeated arrival of spikes in a spike train. This rule reproduces the inverse relationship between initial and final synaptic efficacy observed in long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments. Simulations of learning experiments are conducted in a multilayer network of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) spiking neuron models. It is proposed that cortical feedback connections convey a top-down learning-enabling signal that guides bottom-up learning in "hidden" neurons that are not directly exposed to input or output activity. Simulations of repeated presentation of the same stimulus-response pair, show that, under conditions of fast learning with probabilistic synaptic transmission, the networks tend to recruit a new sub-network at each presentation to represent the association, rather than re-using a previously trained one. This increasing allocation of neural resources results in progressively shorter execution times, in line with experimentally observed reduction in response time with practice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neural Coding.

  15. EVALUATION OF A FAST-RESPONSE URBAN WIND MODEL - COMPARISON TO SINGLE-BUILDING WIND TUNNEL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    E.R. PARDYJAK; M.J. BROWN

    2001-08-01

    Prediction of the 3-dimensional flow field around buildings and other obstacles is important for a number of applications, including urban air quality studies, the tracking of plumes from accidental releases of toxic air contaminants, indoor/outdoor air pollution problems, and thermal comfort assessments. Various types of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been used for determining the flow fields around buildings (e.g., Reisner et al., 1998; Eichhorn et al., 1988). Comparisons to measurements show that these models work reasonably well for the most part (e.g., Ehrhard et al., 2 ; Johnson and Hunter, 1998; Murakami, 1997). However, CFD models are computationally intensive and for some applications turn-around time is of the essence. For example, planning and assessment studies in which hundreds of cases must be analyzed or emergency response scenarios in which plume transport must be computed quickly. Several fast-response dispersion models of varying levels of fidelity have been developed to explicitly account for the effects of a single building or groups of buildings (e.g., UDM - Hall et al. (2000), NRC-Ramsdell and Fosmire (1995), CBP-3 - Yamartino and Wiegand (1986), APRAC - Daerdt et al. (1973)). Although a few of these models include the Hotchkiss and Harlow (1973) analytical solution for potential flow in a notch to describe the velocity field within an urban canyon, in general, these models do not explicitly compute the velocity field around groups of buildings. The EPA PRIME model (Schulman et al., 2000) has been empirically derived to provide streamlines around a single isolated building.

  16. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al

  17. Validation of a Fast-Response Urban Micrometeorological Model to Assess the Performance of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, D.; Girard, P.; Overby, M.; Pardyjak, E.; Stoll, R., II; Willemsen, P.; Bailey, B.; Parlange, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHI) are a real threat in many cities worldwide and mitigation measures have become a central component of urban planning strategies. Even within a city, causes of UHI vary from one neighborhood to another, mostly due the spatial variability in surface thermal properties, building geometry, anthropogenic heat flux releases and vegetation cover. As a result, the performance of UHI mitigation measures also varies in space. Hence, there is a need to develop a tool to quantify the efficiency of UHI mitigation measures at the neighborhood scale. The objective of this ongoing study is to validate the fast-response micrometeorological model QUIC EnvSim (QES). This model can provide all information required for UHI studies with a fine spatial resolution (up to 0.5m) and short computation time. QES combines QUIC, a CFD-based wind solver and dispersion model, and EnvSim, composed of a radiation model, a land-surface model and a turbulent transport model. Here, high-resolution (1 m) simulations are run over a subset of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) campus including complex buildings, various surfaces properties and vegetation. For nearly five months in 2006-07, a dense network of meteorological observations (92 weather stations over 0.1 km2) was deployed over the campus and these unique data are used here as a validation dataset. We present validation results for different test cases (e.g., sunny vs cloudy days, different incoming wind speeds and directions) and explore the effect of a few UHI mitigation strategies on the spatial distribution of near-surface air temperatures. Preliminary results suggest that QES may be a valuable tool in decision-making regarding adaptation of urban planning to UHI.

  18. The Fast-Evolving phy-2 Gene Modulates Sexual Development in Response to Light in the Model Fungus Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jigang; Dunlap, Jay C.; Trail, Frances

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid responses to changes in incident light are critical to the guidance of behavior and development in most species. Phytochrome light receptors in particular play key roles in bacterial physiology and plant development, but their functions and regulation are less well understood in fungi. Nevertheless, genome-wide expression measurements provide key information that can guide experiments that reveal how genes respond to environmental signals and clarify their role in development. We performed functional genomic and phenotypic analyses of the two phytochromes in Neurospora crassa, a fungal model adapted to a postfire environment that experiences dramatically variable light conditions. Expression of phy-1 and phy-2 was low in early sexual development and in the case of phy-2 increased in late sexual development. Under light stimulation, strains with the phytochromes deleted exhibited increased expression of sexual development-related genes. Moreover, under red light, the phy-2 knockout strain commenced sexual development early. In the evolution of phytochromes within ascomycetes, at least two duplications have occurred, and the faster-evolving phy-2 gene has frequently been lost. Additionally, the three key cysteine sites that are critical for bacterial and plant phytochrome function are not conserved within fungal phy-2 homologs. Through the action of phytochromes, transitions between asexual and sexual reproduction are modulated by light level and light quality, presumably as an adaptation for fast asexual growth and initiation of sexual reproduction of N. crassa in exposed postfire ecosystems. PMID:26956589

  19. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J.

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  20. Physiological Responses of a Model Marine Diatom to Fast pH Changes: Special Implications of Coastal Water Acidification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaping; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton in coastal waters experience rapid pH changes in milieu due to high biological activities and/or upwelled CO2-rich waters. While CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are employed by all diatoms tested to counter low CO2 availability in seawater, little is known how this mechanism responds to fast pH changes. In the present study, the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was acclimated for 20 generations to low pH (7.81) at an elevated CO2 of 1000 μatm (HC) or to high pH (8.18) at ambient CO2 levels of 390 μatm (LC), then its physiological characteristics were investigated as cells were shifted from HC to LC or vice versa. The maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax) in the HC-acclimated cells was immediately reduced by decreased CO2 availability, showing much lower values compared to that of the LC-acclimated cells. However, the cells showed a high capacity to regain their photochemical performance regardless of the growth CO2 levels, with their ETRmax values recovering to initial levels in about 100 min. This result indicates that this diatom might modulate its CCMs quickly to maintain a steady state supply of CO2, which is required for sustaining photosynthesis. In addition, active uptake of CO2 could play a fundamental role during the induction of CCMs under CO2 limitation, since the cells maintained high ETR even when both intracellular and periplasmic carbonic anhydrases were inhibited. It is concluded that efficient regulation of the CCM is one of the key strategies for diatoms to survive in fast changing pH environment, e.g. for the tested species, which is a dominant species in coastal waters where highly fluctuating pH is observed.

  1. Fast-response cup anemometer features cosine response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenzen, P.

    1968-01-01

    Six-cup, low-inertia anemometer combines high resolution and fast response with a unique ability to sense only the horizontal component of the winds fluctuating rapidly in three dimensions. Cup assemblies are fabricated of expanded polystyrene plastic.

  2. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  3. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  4. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  5. Fast infrared response of YBCO thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballentine, P. H.; Kadin, A. M.; Donaldson, W. R.; Scofield, J. H.; Bajuk, L.

    1990-01-01

    The response to short infrared pulses of some epitaxial YBCO films prepared by sputter deposition and by electron-beam evaporation is reported. The response is found to be essentially bolometric on the ns timescale, with some indirect hints of nonequilibrium electron transport on the ps scale. Fast switching could be obtained either by biasing the switch close to the critical current or by cooling the film below about 20 K. These results are encouraging for potential application to a high-current optically-triggered opening switch.

  6. FAST Simulation Tool Containing Methods for Predicting the Dynamic Response of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, Jason

    2015-08-12

    FAST is a simulation tool (computer software) for modeling tlie dynamic response of horizontal-axis wind turbines. FAST employs a combined modal and multibody structural-dynamics formulation in the time domain.

  7. The fast debris evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  8. The Fast Debris Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Swinerd, Graham; Newland, Rebecca; Saunders, Arrun

    The ‘Particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent (1992) removed the need for computerintensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FaDE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects (˜ 10 cm) are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent (1992) based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FaDE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FaDE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using Javascript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FaDE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ˜ 10 cm low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model. The results demonstrate that the FaDE model is able to capture comparable time-series of collisions and number of objects as predicted by DAMAGE in several scenarios. Further, and perhaps more importantly

  9. Probing Planetary Bodies for Subsurface Volatiles: GEANT4 Models of Gamma Ray, Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal Neutron Response to Active Neutron Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.

    2014-12-01

    Using an active source of neutrons as an in situ probe of a planetary body has proven to be a powerful tool to extract information about the presence, abundance, and location of subsurface volatiles without the need for drilling. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on Curiosity is an example of such an instrument and is designed to detect the location and abundance of hydrogen within the top 50 cm of the Martian surface. DAN works by sending a pulse of neutrons towards the ground beneath the rover and detecting the reflected neutrons. The intensity and time of arrival of the reflection depends on the proportion of water, while the time the pulse takes to reach the detector is a function of the depth at which the water is located. Similar instruments can also be effective probes at the polar-regions of the Moon or on asteroids as a way of detecting sequestered volatiles. We present the results of GEANT4 particle simulation models of gamma ray, fast, epithermal, and thermal neutron responses to active neutron illumination. The results are parameterized by hydrogen abundance, stratification and depth of volatile layers, versus the distribution of neutron and gamma ray energy reflections. Models will be presented to approximate Martian, lunar, and asteroid environments and would be useful tools to assess utility for future NASA exploration missions to these types of planetary bodies.

  10. Fast response to human voices in autism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Fan; Agus, Trevor R.; Suied, Clara; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Yamada, Takashi; Komine, Yoko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are reported to allocate less spontaneous attention to voices. Here, we investigated how vocal sounds are processed in ASD adults, when those sounds are attended. Participants were asked to react as fast as possible to target stimuli (either voices or strings) while ignoring distracting stimuli. Response times (RTs) were measured. Results showed that, similar to neurotypical (NT) adults, ASD adults were faster to recognize voices compared to strings. Surprisingly, ASD adults had even shorter RTs for voices than the NT adults, suggesting a faster voice recognition process. To investigate the acoustic underpinnings of this effect, we created auditory chimeras that retained only the temporal or the spectral features of voices. For the NT group, no RT advantage was found for the chimeras compared to strings: both sets of features had to be present to observe an RT advantage. However, for the ASD group, shorter RTs were observed for both chimeras. These observations indicate that the previously observed attentional deficit to voices in ASD individuals could be due to a failure to combine acoustic features, even though such features may be well represented at a sensory level. PMID:27193919

  11. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, S. A. Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-15

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  12. Fast two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Guthrie, Paul D.; Thompson, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    A two dimensional (altitude and latitude) model of the atmosphere is used to investigate problems relating to the variability of the dynamics and temperature of the atmosphere on the ozone distribution, solar cycle variations of atmospheric constituents, the sensitivity of model results to tropospheric trace gas sources, and assessment computations of changes in ozone related to manmade influences. In a comparison between two dimensional model results in which the odd nitrogen family was transported together and model results in which the odd nitrogen species was transported separately, it was found that the family approximations are adequate for perturbation scenario calculations.

  13. A critical role for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in the cellular fasting response: the PPARalpha-null mouse as a model of fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Leone, T C; Weinheimer, C J; Kelly, D P

    1999-06-22

    We hypothesized that the lipid-activated transcription factor, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), plays a pivotal role in the cellular metabolic response to fasting. Short-term starvation caused hepatic steatosis, myocardial lipid accumulation, and hypoglycemia, with an inadequate ketogenic response in adult mice lacking PPARalpha (PPARalpha-/-), a phenotype that bears remarkable similarity to that of humans with genetic defects in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzymes. In PPARalpha+/+ mice, fasting induced the hepatic and cardiac expression of PPARalpha target genes encoding key mitochondrial (medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) and extramitochondrial (acyl-CoA oxidase, cytochrome P450 4A3) enzymes. In striking contrast, the hepatic and cardiac expression of most PPARalpha target genes was not induced by fasting in PPARalpha-/- mice. These results define a critical role for PPARalpha in a transcriptional regulatory response to fasting and identify the PPARalpha-/- mouse as a potentially useful murine model of inborn and acquired abnormalities of human fatty acid utilization.

  14. Evidence of Effective Early Numeracy Models. CEELO FastFacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilder, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this "Fast Facts," a state requested information on supporting districts' use of effective models and approaches to improve children's early literacy and numeracy outcomes. In response, Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) staff reviewed key research including information from the What Works Clearinghouse obtained by…

  15. Fast Electromechanical Response in Liquid Crystal Elastomer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduzco, Rafael; Agrawal, Aditya; Jacot, Jeff; Adetiba, Tomi

    2014-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) combine the elasticity of polymer networks with the fluidity and responsiveness of liquid crystals. LCEs can respond to a variety of external stimuli - heat, light, electric and magnetic fields - with large and reversible shape-changes. However, the response can be slow and/or require large external fields. Here, we present our recent work with LCE bilayers and LCE composite materials that demonstrates LCEs can respond quickly and with 3-D shape changes. Nematic LCE bilayers are prepared by depositing a PS film on top of a nematic LCE, and the bilayers exhibit reversible wrinkling, folding, and curling with temperature. The shape change of LCE bilayers is quantitatively predicted using finite-element modeling. Next, we show that a fast response to an electric field is achieved in nematic LCE composites. While typical nematic LCEs are relatively unresponsive to electric fields, LCE composites with 2 wt % carbon black can reversibly contract and expand in response to a 40 V electric field. The response time (0.1 - 10 Hz) and amplitude of shape change (1 - 20 %) depends on the external field and carbon black content. These composites may be useful for biomedical applications, such as substrates for dynamic cell culture and biocompatible scaffolds for heart tissue regeneration. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes remain viable on LCE-carbon black bilayer substrates, and aligned myocyte cell sheets were successfully grown on LCE-composite bilayers.

  16. Fasting-related autophagic response in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomonori; Oishi, Yasuharu; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Muraoka, Isao

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated regulation of autophagy in slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles in fasting-related atrophy. Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to fasting for 1, 2, or 3 days. Greater weight loss was observed in plantaris muscle than in soleus muscle in response to fasting. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LC3-II, a marker protein for macroautophagy, was expressed at a notably higher level in plantaris than in soleus muscle, and that the expression level was fasting duration-dependent. To identify factors related to LC3-II enhancement, autophagy-related signals were examined in both types of muscle. Phosphorylated mTOR was reduced in plantaris but not in soleus muscle. FOXO3a and ER stress signals were unchanged in both muscle types during fasting. These findings suggest that preferential atrophy of fast-twitch muscle is associated with induction of autophagy during fasting and that differences in autophagy regulation are attributable to differential signal regulation in soleus and plantaris muscle.

  17. Post-fasting olfactory, transcriptional, and feeding responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Farhadian, Shelli F; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cho, Christine E; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2012-01-18

    The sensation of hunger after a period of fasting and of satiety after eating is crucial to behavioral regulation of food intake, but the biological mechanisms regulating these sensations are incompletely understood. We studied the behavioral and physiological adaptations to fasting in the vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Here we show that both male and female flies increased their rate of food intake transiently in the post-fasted state. Although the basal feeding rate was higher in females than males, the magnitude of the post-fasting feeding response was the same in both sexes. Flies returned to a stable baseline feeding rate within 12 h after return to food for males and 24 h for females. This modulation in feeding was accompanied by a significant increase in the size of the crop organ of the digestive system, suggesting that fasted flies responded both by increasing their food intake and storing reserve food in their crop. Flies demonstrated increased behavioral attraction to an attractive odor when food-deprived. Expression profiling of head, body, and chemosensory tissues by microarray analysis revealed 415 genes regulated by fasting after 24 h and 723 genes after 48 h, with downregulated genes outnumbering upregulated genes in each tissue and fasting time point. These transcriptional changes showed rich temporal dynamics and affected genes across multiple functional gene ontology categories. These observations suggest that a coordinated transcriptional response to internal physiological state may regulate both ingestive behaviors and chemosensory perception of food.

  18. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  19. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; Shindell, D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  20. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems. PMID:27941846

  1. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M

    2016-12-12

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems.

  2. A fast response thermal conductivity gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, J. O., II; Krummerich, M. B.

    1986-04-01

    During the spring of 1983, the Ballistic Research Laboratory measured behind-the-armor effects for several weapons against a variety of targets. One of the major concerns was heat generation during and immediately following impact of the warhead against the targets. Previous tests of this type had used thin skin total heat gages and standard laboratory heat detectors. Thin skin gages record only the maximum temperature attained by the skins' back surface with no indication of the time required to reach this temperature. Although an approximation of the total heat deposition can be made, no rate of deposition can be estimated without knowing the time of the event. The large thermal mass of a typical laboratory detector such as an infrared power meter is designed to measure a steady-state flux and cannot respond quickly enough to register a transient event. Neither gage type can withstand severe blast and shock environments. Since the temperature inside the target rose sharply in a very short time, special thermal fluence gages were fabricated which emphasized the time response of the gage rather than its thermal capacity. This gage is used when the thermal flux is of short duration, 150 milliseconds or less, and of low total energy, 179 calories per square centimeter or less. The maximum operating temperature of the gage is 500 degree Celsius.

  3. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  4. Application of Model Based Parameter Estimation for Fast Frequency Response Calculations of Input Characteristics of Cavity-Backed Aperture Antennas Using Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) is presented in conjunction with the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique for fast computation of the input characteristics of cavity-backed aperture antennas over a frequency range. The hybrid FENI/MoM technique is used to form an integro-partial- differential equation to compute the electric field distribution of a cavity-backed aperture antenna. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-partial-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/ MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is obtained over a frequency range. Using the electric field at different frequencies, the input characteristics of the antenna are obtained over a wide frequency range. Numerical results for an open coaxial line, probe-fed coaxial cavity and cavity-backed microstrip patch antennas are presented. Good agreement between MBPE and the solutions over individual frequencies is observed.

  5. Fast Vegetational Responses to Late-Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Post, D. M.; Cwynar, L. C.; Lotter, A. F.; Levesque, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    How rapidly can natural ecosystems respond to rapid climate change? This question can be addressed by studying paired paleoecological and paleoclimatological records spanning the last deglaciation. Between 16 and 10 ka, abrupt climatic oscillations (e.g. Younger Dryas, Gerzensee/Killarney Oscillations) interrupted the general warming trend. Rates of climate change during these events were as fast or faster than projected rates of change for this century. We compiled a dozen high-resolution lacustrine records in North America and Europe with a pollen record and independent climatic proxy, a clear Younger Dryas signal, and good age control. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that vegetation responded rapidly to late-glacial climate change, with significant changes in vegetation composition occurring within the lifespan of individual trees. At all sites, vegetation lagged climate by less than 200 years, and at two-thirds of the sites, the initial vegetational response occurred within 100 years. The finding of rapid vegetational responses is consistent across sites and continents, and is similar to the 100-200 year response times predicted by gap-scale forest models. Likely mechanisms include 1) increased susceptibility of mature trees to disturbances such as fire, wind, and disease, thereby opening up gaps for colonization, 2) the proximity of these sites to late-glacial treeline, where climate may directly control plant population densities and range limits, 3) the presence of herbaceous taxa with short generation times in these plant communities, and 4) rapid migration due to rare long-distance seed dispersals. Our results are consistent with reports that plant ranges are already shifting in response to recent climate change, and suggest that these shifts will persist for the next several centuries. Widespread changes in plant distributions may affect surface-atmosphere interactions and will challenge attempts to manage ecosystems and conserve biodiversity.

  6. Inductor flyback characteristic gives voltage regulator fast response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. D.

    1965-01-01

    Voltage regulator alternately connects an inductor in parallel and in series with the input voltage source. This flyback voltage regulator provides a regulated dc voltage to varying loads from a varying dc supply and gives fast response to load and supply changes.

  7. Portion sizes and obesity: responses of fast-food companies.

    PubMed

    Young, Lisa R; Nestle, Marion

    2007-07-01

    Because the sizes of food portions, especially of fast food, have increased in parallel with rising rates of overweight, health authorities have called on fast-food chains to decrease the sizes of menu items. From 2002 to 2006, we examined responses of fast-food chains to such calls by determining the current sizes of sodas, French fries, and hamburgers at three leading chains and comparing them to sizes observed in 1998 and 2002. Although McDonald's recently phased out its largest offerings, current items are similar to 1998 sizes and greatly exceed those offered when the company opened in 1955. Burger King and Wendy's have increased portion sizes, even while health authorities are calling for portion size reductions. Fast-food portions in the United States are larger than in Europe. These observations suggest that voluntary efforts by fast-food companies to reduce portion sizes are unlikely to be effective, and that policy approaches are needed to reduce energy intake from fast food.

  8. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Current fast-time wake models are reviewed and three basic types are defined. Predictions from several of the fast-time models are compared. Previous statistical evaluations of the APA-Sarpkaya and D2P fast-time models are discussed. Root Mean Square errors between fast-time model predictions and Lidar wake measurements are examined for a 24 hr period at Denver International Airport. Shortcomings in current methodology for evaluating wake errors are also discussed.

  9. Fast Response and Low Voltage Dual Frequency Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-24

    mixtures, 2) submillisecond-response and scattering-free polymer network liquid crystals for IR laser beam steering, and 3) low absorption loss nematic...favorable. 3.2.3 High birefringence DFLC using 3- ring NCS tolane compounds High n DFLC materials are equally favoured from fast response time and...and synthesized 3- ring NCS tolane compounds with a structure shown in Fig.1 (b). In the structure, lateral difluoro on the middle ring of the

  10. Resist profile simulation with fast lithography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ying; Chou, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Yu-Po; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    A traditional approach to construct a fast lithographic model is to match wafer top-down SEM images, contours and/or gauge CDs with a TCC model plus some simple resist representation. This modeling method has been proven and is extensively used for OPC modeling. As the technology moves forward, this traditional approach has become insufficient in regard to lithography weak point detection, etching bias prediction, etc. The drawback of this approach is from metrology and simulation. First, top-down SEM is only good for acquiring planar CD information. Some 3D metrology such as cross-section SEM or AFM is necessary to obtain the true resist profile. Second, the TCC modeling approach is only suitable for planar image simulation. In order to model the resist profile, full 3D image simulation is needed. Even though there are many rigorous simulators capable of catching the resist profile very well, none of them is feasible for full-chip application due to the tremendous consumption of computational resource. The authors have proposed a quasi-3D image simulation method in the previous study [1], which is suitable for full-chip simulation with the consideration of sidewall angles, to improve the model accuracy of planar models. In this paper, the quasi-3D image simulation is extended to directly model the resist profile with AFM and/or cross-section SEM data. Resist weak points detected by the model generated with this 3D approach are verified on the wafer.

  11. Energy Expenditure Responses to Fasting and Overfeeding Identify Phenotypes Associated With Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Schlögl, Mathias; Pannacciuli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan M.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S.

    2015-01-01

    Because it is unknown whether 24-h energy expenditure (EE) responses to dietary extremes will identify phenotypes associated with weight regulation, the aim of this study was to determine whether such responses to fasting or overfeeding are associated with future weight change. The 24-h EE during energy balance, fasting, and four different overfeeding diets with 200% energy requirements was measured in a metabolic chamber in 37 subjects with normal glucose regulation while they resided on our clinical research unit. Diets were given for 24 h each and included the following: 1) low protein (3%), 2) standard (50% carbohydrate, 20% protein), 3) high fat (60%), and 4) high carbohydrate (75%). Participants returned for follow-up 6 months after the initial measures. The decrease in 24-h EE during fasting and the increase with overfeeding were correlated. A larger reduction in EE during fasting, a smaller EE response to low-protein overfeeding, and a larger response to high-carbohydrate overfeeding all correlated with weight gain. The association of the fasting EE response with weight change was not independent from that of low protein in a multivariate model. We identified the following two independent propensities associated with weight gain: a predilection for conserving energy during caloric and protein deprivation and a profligate response to large amounts of carbohydrates. PMID:26185280

  12. Energy Expenditure Responses to Fasting and Overfeeding Identify Phenotypes Associated With Weight Change.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Mathias; Piaggi, Paolo; Pannacciuli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan M; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S

    2015-11-01

    Because it is unknown whether 24-h energy expenditure (EE) responses to dietary extremes will identify phenotypes associated with weight regulation, the aim of this study was to determine whether such responses to fasting or overfeeding are associated with future weight change. The 24-h EE during energy balance, fasting, and four different overfeeding diets with 200% energy requirements was measured in a metabolic chamber in 37 subjects with normal glucose regulation while they resided on our clinical research unit. Diets were given for 24 h each and included the following: (1) low protein (3%), (2) standard (50% carbohydrate, 20% protein), (3) high fat (60%), and (4) high carbohydrate (75%). Participants returned for follow-up 6 months after the initial measures. The decrease in 24-h EE during fasting and the increase with overfeeding were correlated. A larger reduction in EE during fasting, a smaller EE response to low-protein overfeeding, and a larger response to high-carbohydrate overfeeding all correlated with weight gain. The association of the fasting EE response with weight change was not independent from that of low protein in a multivariate model. We identified the following two independent propensities associated with weight gain: a predilection for conserving energy during caloric and protein deprivation and a profligate response to large amounts of carbohydrates.

  13. New CO2 Sensor with High Resolution and Fast Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    colorimetry [7]. The dominant gas phase principle is Nondispersive Infrared Sprectroscopy ( NDIR ) [8], based on specific absorption at the 4.23 µm band...to the list of important characteristics is made in Table 1. The scaling properties are favorable for all principles except NDIR . The relatively...accuracy or response time. The accuracy of the pH-based methods is limited [12], whereas all methods except possibly the NDIR have capability of fast

  14. Applying a 4D multiscale in vivo tumor growth model to the exploration of radiotherapy scheduling: The effects of weekend treatment gaps and p53 gene status on the response of fast growing solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper aims at demonstrating clinically oriented applications of the multiscale four dimensional in vivo tumor growth simulation model previously developed by our research group. To this end the effect of weekend radiotherapy treatment gaps and p53 gene status on two virtual glioblastoma tumors differing only in p53 gene status is investigated in silico. Tumor response predictions concerning two rather extreme dose fractionation schedules (daily dose of 4.5 Gy administered in 3 equal fractions) namely HART (Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy weekend less) 54 Gy and CHART (Continuous HART) 54 Gy are presented and compared. The model predictions suggest that, for the same p53 status, HART 54 Gy and CHART 54 Gy have almost the same long term effects on locoregional tumor control. However, no data have been located in the literature concerning a comparison of HART and CHART radiotherapy schedules for glioblastoma. As non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) may also be a fast growing and radiosensitive tumor, a comparison of the model predictions with the outcome of clinical studies concerning the response of NSCLC to HART 54 Gy and CHART 54 Gy is made. The model predictions are in accordance with corresponding clinical observations, thus strengthening the potential of the model. PMID:19458763

  15. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  16. Acute metabolic response to fasted and postprandial exercise

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Filipe Dinato; Correia, Ana Luiza Matias; Teixeira, Denilson da Silva; da Silva Neto, Domingos Vasco; Fernandes, Ítalo Sávio Gonçalves; Viana, Mário Boratto Xavier; Petitto, Mateus; da Silva Sampaio, Rodney Antônio; Chaves, Sandro Nobre; Alves, Simone Teixeira; Dantas, Renata Aparecida Elias; Mota, Márcio Rabelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the acute metabolic response to exercise in fasting and postprandial. For this, ten individuals were submitted to an incremental treadmill test, with an initial speed of 5 and 1 km/h increments every minute, with no inclination, and a body composition assessment. After this 1st day, all volunteers were submitted to two experimental procedures (fasting and postprandial), with an aerobic exercise performed for 36 minutes at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption. At postprandial procedure, all subjects ingested a breakfast containing 59.3 g of carbohydrate (76.73%), 9.97 g of protein (12.90%), 8.01 g of lipids (10.37%), with a total energy intake of 349.17 kcal. An analysis of plasma concentration of triglycerides, lactate, and glucose was performed in two stages: before and after exercise. The Shapiro–Wilk test was used to verify the normality of the data. For analysis of glucose concentration, plasma lactate, and triglycerides, we used a repeated measures analysis of variance factorial 2×2, with Bonferroni multiple comparison test. The significance level of P<0.05 was adopted. The results indicated a maintenance level of glucose at fasting and a decrease in glucose concentration at postprandial exercise. Both conditions increase plasma lactate. Triglycerides also increased in the two experimental conditions; however, after exercise fasting, the increase was significantly higher than in the postprandial exercise. These data suggest that both exercises could increase plasma lactate and triglycerides. However, exercise performed in fasting condition decreases glucose concentration and increases triglycerides, even more than postprandial exercise. PMID:26316800

  17. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm-3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (˜ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  18. Fast Photoconductive Responses in Organometal Halide Perovskite Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Mei, Jingjing; Wang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Ligong; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Dongxu

    2016-02-03

    Inorganic semiconductor-based photodetectors have been suffering from slow response speeds, which are caused by the persistent photoconductivity of semiconductor materials. For realizing high speed optoelectronic devices, the organometal halide perovskite thin films were applied onto the interdigitated (IDT) patterned Au electrodes, and symmetrical structured photoconductive detectors were achieved. The detectors were sensitive to the incident light signals, and the photocurrents of the devices were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than dark currents. The responsivities of the devices could reach up to 55 mA W(1-). Most importantly, the detectors have a fast response time of less than 20 μs. The light and bias induced dipole rearrangement in organometal perovskite thin films has resulted in the instability of photocurrents, and Ag nanowires could quicken the process of dipole alignment and stabilize the photocurrents of the devices.

  19. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; ...

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamicmore » response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  20. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  1. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  2. Physiological responses to feeding, fasting and estivation for anurans.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M

    2005-07-01

    Anuran estivation is characterized by long episodes of aphagia. To investigate whether estivating anurans downregulate intestinal performance as an adaptive mechanism to reduce energy expenditure, I compared the metabolic and intestinal responses to feeding, fasting and estivation among non-estivating and estivating species of the anuran families Bufonidae, Leptodactylidae and Ranidae. Standard metabolic rates of the estivating Bufo alvarius, Ceratophrys ornata and Pyxicephalus adspersus were significantly less than those of the non-estivating Bufo marinus, Leptodactylus pentadactylus and Rana catesbeiana. Whereas the digestion of rodent meals equaling 15% of anuran body mass generated significant metabolic responses for all species, specific dynamic action was significantly greater for the estivating species. For estivating species, feeding triggered more than a doubling of small intestinal mass and significant upregulation of intestinal nutrient transport rates, resulting in six- to tenfold increases in total intestinal nutrient uptake capacity. The postprandial intestinal responses of the non-estivating species were much more modest, averaging a 50% increase in small intestinal mass and 69% increase in uptake capacities. Following 1 month of laboratory-induced estivation, C. ornata and P. adspersus had further depressed metabolic rates by 20%, intestinal masses by 44%, and total intestinal uptake capacities by 60%. In a fashion similar to infrequently feeding, sit-and-wait foraging snakes, estivating anurans possess the capacity to severely downregulate intestinal performance with fasting and estivation, and subsequently upregulate the gut with feeding. The depression in gut performance during estivation aids in reducing energy expenditure, thereby increasing the duration that the animal can remain dormant while relying solely upon stored energy.

  3. An application of fast response Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, Deependra; van Winkle, David

    2007-03-01

    A fast response polarized light microscope was designed based on the algorithm by Shribak et. al (Applied Optics, vol. 42, 3009-3017). A pulsed laser beam was passed through two Pockels cells aligned at different angles with respect to optical axis. The retardance of the Pockels cell was controlled by external switches and power supplies. The electronics circuit in the system allows change of the retardance of the Pockels cell each millisecond for four milliseconds. In four milliseconds, four images of a birefringent sample, formed by different states of polarized light are recorded. The images are added appropriately to calculate retardence amplitude and phase by using codes written in imageJ software. The microscope was used to show the retardance and phase of a rabbit muscle fiber. Recordings were also taken of the contraction of Vorticella convallaria but the changes were too fast to yield retardance images. This type of microscope can be used to study different kinds of biological functions that change on a timescale slower than four milliseconds but faster than two seconds.

  4. General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an…

  5. PRMT5 modulates the metabolic response to fasting signals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Niessen, Sherry; Goebel, Naomi; Yates, John R; Guccione, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2013-05-28

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating glucagon maintain glucose balance by promoting hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway stimulates gluconeogenic gene expression through the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein and via the dephosphorylation of the latent cytoplasmic CREB regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2). CREB and CRTC2 activities are increased in insulin resistance, in which they promote hyperglycemia because of constitutive induction of the gluconeogenic program. The extent to which CREB and CRTC2 are coordinately up-regulated in response to glucagon, however, remains unclear. Here we show that, following its activation, CRTC2 enhances CREB phosphorylation through an association with the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). In turn, PRMT5 was found to stimulate CREB phosphorylation via increases in histone H3 Arg2 methylation that enhanced chromatin accessibility at gluconeogenic promoters. Because depletion of PRMT5 lowers hepatic glucose production and gluconeogenic gene expression, these results demonstrate how a chromatin-modifying enzyme regulates a metabolic program through epigenetic changes that impact the phosphorylation of a transcription factor in response to hormonal stimuli.

  6. Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2012-09-25

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  7. Fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-ho

    2012-09-01

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  8. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  9. Fast Odor Learning Improves Reliability of Odor Responses in the Locust Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Laurent, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recordings in the locust antennal lobe (AL) reveal activity-dependent, stimulus-specific changes in projection neuron (PN) and local neuron response patterns over repeated odor trials. During the first few trials, PN response intensity decreases, while spike time precision increases, and coherent oscillations, absent at first, quickly emerge. We examined this “fast odor learning” with a realistic computational model of the AL. Activity-dependent facilitation of AL inhibitory synapses was sufficient to simulate physiological recordings of fast learning. In addition, in experiments with noisy inputs, a network including synaptic facilitation of both inhibition and excitation responded with reliable spatiotemporal patterns from trial to trial despite the noise. A network lacking fast plasticity, however, responded with patterns that varied across trials, reflecting the input variability. Thus, our study suggests that fast olfactory learning results from stimulus-specific, activity-dependent synaptic facilitation and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio for repeatedly encountered odor stimuli. PMID:15882647

  10. EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Gravel, Roland; Conley, Jason; Kittelson, David

    2008-09-30

    The overall objective of this project was to develop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) control strategies using fast-response Particulate Matter (PM) sensors and NOx sensors to improve the quality of particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel engines. This project initially comprised three phases: (1) Phase IA - sensor requirements to meet PM sensor specifications, NOx sensor assessment, and initial model development for EGR control; (2) Phase IB - continue development on PM and NOx sensors, integrate the sensor signals into the control simulations, and finalize model development for control strategies; and (3) Phase II - validation testing of the control strategies. Only Phase 1A was funded by DOE and executed by Honeywell. The major objectives of Phase 1A of the project included: (1) Sensor validation and operation of fast-response PM and NOx sensors; (2) Control system modeling of low-pressure EGR controls, development of control strategies, and initial evaluation of these models and strategies for EGR control in diesel engines; (3) Sensor testing to understand applicability of fast-response PM sensors in determining loading rates of the particle trap; and (4) Model validation and sensor testing under steady-state and transient operational conditions of actual engines. In particular, specific objectives included demonstration of: (1) A PM sensor response time constant (T10 - T90) of better than 100 milliseconds (msec); (2) The ability to detect PM at concentrations from 0.2 to 2 Bosch smoke number (BSN) or equivalent; (3) PM sensor accuracy to within 20% BSN over the entire range of operation; and (4) PM sensor repeatability to within 10% over the PM entire sensor range equivalent to a BSN of 0.2 to 2.

  11. Effect of Fasting on the Metabolic Response of Liver to Experimental Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Orman, Mehmet A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Liver metabolism is altered after systemic injuries such as burns and trauma. These changes have been elucidated in rat models of experimental burn injury where the liver was isolated and perfused ex vivo. Because these studies were performed in fasted animals to deplete glycogen stores, thus simplifying quantification of gluconeogenesis, these observations reflect the combined impact of fasting and injury on liver metabolism. Herein we asked whether the metabolic response to experimental burn injury is different in fed vs. fasted animals. Rats were subjected to a cutaneous burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, or to similar procedures without administering the burn, hence a sham-burn. Half of the animals in the burn and sham-burn groups were fasted starting on postburn day 3, and the others allowed to continue ad libitum. On postburn day 4, livers were isolated and perfused for 1 hour in physiological medium supplemented with 10% hematocrit red blood cells. The uptake/release rates of major carbon and nitrogen sources, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were measured during the perfusion and the data fed into a mass balance model to estimate intracellular fluxes. The data show that in fed animals, injury increased glucose output mainly from glycogen breakdown and minimally impacted amino acid metabolism. In fasted animals, injury did not increase glucose output but increased urea production and the uptake of several amino acids, namely glutamine, arginine, glycine, and methionine. Furthermore, sham-burn animals responded to fasting by triggering gluconeogenesis from lactate; however, in burned animals the preferred gluconeogenic substrate was amino acids. Taken together, these results suggest that the fed state prevents the burn-induced increase in hepatic amino acid utilization for gluconeogenesis. The role of glycogen stores and means to increase and/or maintain internal sources of glucose to prevent increased hepatic amino acid utilization warrant further

  12. Development of a fast-response multi-hole probe for unsteady and turbulent flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Espen Sten

    The development of a fast-response aerodynamic probe calibration routine has been completed. This work includes the development of a theoretical probe and application and adaptation of potential flow theory to a fast-response 5-hole probe. Based on the theoretical probe, a procedure to determine the flow angles in flowfields with significant inertial effects was devised. It was further shown that this definition can be used to accurately predict the angles in flowfields with very high frequency oscillations (large inertial effects) over a wide range of flow incidence angles. The velocity magnitude was solved from the governing equation. This equation is a first-order, non-linear, ordinary differential equation, and a predictor-corrector method was formulated to calculate the velocity based on the measured port pressures. An experimental procedure to determine the steady and unsteady pressure coefficients was presented. The steady pressure coefficient is readily calculated from steady calibration data, but the determination of the unsteady coefficient requires a selective averaging procedure based on the rate-of-change parameter. A spherical probe with a fast-response pressure transducer was designed. The spherical probe was oscillated in water flow, and the coefficient determination procedure was experimentally verified. A facility was designed for the unsteady calibration of fast-response probes in air. This facility generates a repeatable velocity oscillation that is sinusoidal in nature with mean velocity up to Mach 0.5 and frequency up to 1.5 kHz. A fast-response 5-hole probe was developed that can resolve frequency content up to 20 kHz, and was used to verify the unsteady calibration routine. Several test cases were presented and excellent prediction capabilities were demonstrated. Acoustic pressure attenuation in the tubing systems for miniature multi-hole probes is discussed, and theoretical models are presented that determine the transfer function of such

  13. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  14. The CLYC-6 and CLYC-7 response to γ-rays, fast and thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Pellegri, L.; Camera, F.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.; Cazzaniga, C.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-02-01

    The crystal Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) is a very interesting scintillator material because of its good energy resolution and its capability to identify γ-rays and fast/thermal neutrons. The crystal Cs2LiYCl6:Ce contains 6Li and 35Cl isotopes, therefore, it is possible to detect thermal neutrons through the reaction 6Li(n, α)t while 35Cl ions allow to measure fast neutrons through the reactions 35Cl(n, p)35S and 35Cl(n, α)32P. In this work two CLYC 1″×1″ crystals were used: the first crystal, enriched with 6Li at 95% (CLYC-6) is ideal for thermal neutron measurements while the second one, enriched with 7Li at >99% (CLYC-7) is suitable for fast neutron measurements. The response of CLYC scintillators was measured with different PMT models: timing or spectroscopic, with borosilicate glass or quartz window. The energy resolution, the neutron-γ discrimination and the internal activity are discussed. The capability of CLYC scintillators to discriminate γ rays from neutrons was tested with both thermal and fast neutrons. The thermal neutrons were measured with both detectors, using an AmBe source. The measurements of fast neutrons were performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator facility (Italy) where a deuterium beam was accelerated on a deuterium or on a tritium target, providing neutrons of 2.5 MeV or 14.1 MeV, respectively. The different sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons of a CLYC-6 and of a CLYC-7 was additionally studied.

  15. The Case for Intelligent Propulsion Control for Fast Engine Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2009-01-01

    Damaged aircraft have occasionally had to rely solely on thrust to maneuver as a consequence of losing hydraulic power needed to operate flight control surfaces. The lack of successful landings in these cases inspired research into more effective methods of utilizing propulsion-only control. That research demonstrated that one of the major contributors to the difficulty in landing is the slow response of the engines as compared to using traditional flight control. To address this, research is being conducted into ways of making the engine more responsive under emergency conditions. This can be achieved by relaxing controller limits, adjusting schedules, and/or redesigning the regulators to increase bandwidth. Any of these methods can enable faster response at the potential expense of engine life and increased likelihood of stall. However, an example sensitivity analysis revealed a complex interaction of the limits and the difficulty in predicting the way to achieve the fastest response. The sensitivity analysis was performed on a realistic engine model, and demonstrated that significantly faster engine response can be achieved compared to standard Bill of Material control. However, the example indicates the need for an intelligent approach to controller limit adjustment in order for the potential to be fulfilled.

  16. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  17. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  18. A sex difference in the response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Zandian, Modjtaba; Ioakimidis, Ioannis; Bergh, Cecilia; Leon, Michael; Södersten, Per

    2011-07-06

    We determined whether women and men would alter their pattern of food intake after they had deprived themselves of food. We found that women consumed 12% less food after fasting and that men ate 28% more food after fasting. Serving more food on the test day did not increase food intake of women. Women, who ate at a nearly constant rate (linear eaters), consumed less food than those eating at an initially high speed which decreased over the course of the meal (decelerated eaters). Women decreased their food intake after fasting as their eating pattern became more linear. After fasting, men increased their food intake, and the rate at which they ate became more decelerated. Food intake of both women and men was normalized after fasting by providing feedback that encouraged them to eat according to the pattern they showed in the non-fasted condition. The results support the hypothesis that linear eating, and the dieting that elicits linear eating, are risk factors for the development of the abnormal linear eating pattern that characterizes patients with anorexia nervosa. The data also provide additional support for the use of behavioral feedback to normalize the pattern of eating for individuals who have difficulty maintaining their body weight.

  19. Metabolic response to a glucagon challenge varies with adiposity and life-history stage in fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Daniel E; Fowler, Melinda A; Champagne, Cory D; Vanderlugt, Anna L; Houser, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic adaptations for extended fasting in wildlife prioritize beta-oxidation of lipids and reduced glucose utilization to support energy metabolism. The pancreatic hormone glucagon plays key roles in regulating glycemia and lipid metabolism during fasting in model species but its function in wildlife species adapted for extended fasting is not well understood. Northern elephant seals (NES) undergo natural fasts of 1-3months while under constraints of high nutrient demands including lactation and development. We performed a glucagon challenge on lactating, molting and developing NES, early and late in their natural fasts, to examine the impact of this important regulatory hormone on metabolism. Glucagon caused increases in plasma glucose, insulin, fatty acids, ketones and urea, but the magnitude of these effects varied widely with adiposity and life-history stage. The strong impact of adiposity on glucose and insulin responses suggest a potential role for adipose derived factors in regulating hepatic metabolism and pancreatic sensitivity. Elevations in plasma glucose in response to glucagon were strongly associated with increases in protein catabolism, suggesting negative impacts of elevated glucagon on protein sparing. Glucagon promoted rapid ketone accumulation suggesting that low ketoacid levels in NES reflect low rates of production. These results demonstrate strong metabolic impacts of glucagon and support the idea that glucagon levels are downregulated in the context of metabolic adaptation to extended fasting. These results suggest that the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in NES changes with adiposity, fasting duration and under various constraints of nutrient demands.

  20. Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

    2014-02-28

    Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

  1. A pipette-based calibration system for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with fast response times.

    PubMed

    Ramsson, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that utilizes the oxidation and/or reduction of an analyte of interest to infer rapid changes in concentrations. In order to calibrate the resulting oxidative or reductive current, known concentrations of an analyte must be introduced under controlled settings. Here, I describe a simple and cost-effective method, using a Petri dish and pipettes, for the calibration of carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMs) using FSCV.

  2. Modeling Response Signal and Response Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) and the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA, Usher & McClelland, 2001) were tested against two-choice data collected from the same subjects with the standard response time procedure and the response signal procedure. In the response signal procedure, a stimulus is presented and then, at one of a number of…

  3. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  4. A Fast Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rafael Coimbra; Engel, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    This work builds upon previous efforts in online incremental learning, namely the Incremental Gaussian Mixture Network (IGMN). The IGMN is capable of learning from data streams in a single-pass by improving its model after analyzing each data point and discarding it thereafter. Nevertheless, it suffers from the scalability point-of-view, due to its asymptotic time complexity of O(NKD3) for N data points, K Gaussian components and D dimensions, rendering it inadequate for high-dimensional data. In this work, we manage to reduce this complexity to O(NKD2) by deriving formulas for working directly with precision matrices instead of covariance matrices. The final result is a much faster and scalable algorithm which can be applied to high dimensional tasks. This is confirmed by applying the modified algorithm to high-dimensional classification datasets. PMID:26444880

  5. Nanorod-Based Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy; VanderWal, Randall

    2007-01-01

    A proposed program of research and development would be devoted to exploitation of nanomaterials in pressuresensitive paints (PSPs), which are used on wind-tunnel models for mapping surface pressures associated with flow fields. Heretofore, some success has been achieved in measuring steady-state pressures by use of PSPs, but success in measuring temporally varying pressures has been elusive because of the inherent slowness of the optical responses of these materials. A PSP contains a dye that luminesces in a suitable wavelength range in response to photoexcitation in a shorter wavelength range. The luminescence is quenched by oxygen at a rate proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen and thus proportional to the pressure of air. As a result, the intensity of luminescence varies inversely with the pressure of air. The major problem in developing a PSP that could be easily applied to a wind-tunnel model and could be useful for measuring rapidly varying pressure is to provide very high gas diffusivity for rapid, easy transport of oxygen to and from active dye molecules. Most PSPs include polymer-base binders, which limit the penetration of oxygen to dye molecules, thereby reducing responses to pressure fluctuations. The proposed incorporation of nanomaterials (somewhat more specifically, nanorods) would result in paints having nanostructured surfaces that, relative to conventional PSP surfaces, would afford easier and more nearly complete access of oxygen molecules to dye molecules. One measure of greater access is effective surface area: For a typical PSP as proposed applied to a given solid surface, the nanometer-scale structural features would result in an exposed surface area more than 100 times that of a conventional PSP, and the mass of proposed PSP needed to cover the surface would be less than tenth of the mass of the conventional PSP. One aspect of the proposed development would be to synthesize nanorods of Si/SiO2, in both tangle-mat and regular- array

  6. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence; Williamson, Richard L.; Schwen, Daniel; Zhang, Yongfeng; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  7. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  8. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  9. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  10. Finite Post Synaptic Potentials Cause a Fast Neuronal Response

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Diesmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulses at discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalent theory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neurons relies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synaptic impulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to a vanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer of time varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Going beyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synaptic impulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively from previous predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-pass characteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse, is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristic level of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictions between the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here we review the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights. We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitive to properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neural response. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discrete steps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methods to cross check results. PMID:21427776

  11. A fasting-responsive signaling pathway that extends life span in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Uno, Masaharu; Honjoh, Sakiko; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Hoshikawa, Haruka; Kishimoto, Saya; Yamamoto, Tomohito; Ebisuya, Miki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Nishida, Eisuke

    2013-01-31

    Intermittent fasting is one of the most effective dietary restriction regimens that extend life span in C. elegans and mammals. Fasting-stimulus responses are key to the longevity response; however, the mechanisms that sense and transduce the fasting stimulus remain largely unknown. Through a comprehensive transcriptome analysis in C. elegans, we find that along with the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, AP-1 (JUN-1/FOS-1) plays a central role in fasting-induced transcriptional changes. KGB-1, one of the C. elegans JNKs, acts as an activator of AP-1 and is activated in response to fasting. KGB-1 and AP-1 are involved in intermittent fasting-induced longevity. Fasting-induced upregulation of the components of the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex via AP-1 and DAF-16 enhances protein ubiquitination and reduces protein carbonylation. Our results thus identify a fasting-responsive KGB-1/AP-1 signaling pathway, which, together with DAF-16, causes transcriptional changes that mediate longevity, partly through regulating proteostasis.

  12. Response of surge protection devices to fast rising pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindel, I. N.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of lightning protection modules incorporating leadless (pill type) Zener like devices were evaluated with regard to their ability to suppress EMP induced transients. Two series of tests were performed to evaluate the ability of these modules to react to fast rate of rise ( 1Kv/ns) transients, and the attenuation introduced and the ability to limit damped sinusoid pulses which may be induced due to an EMP resulting from a nuclear detonation.

  13. Time-domain analysis for extracting fast-paced pupil responses

    PubMed Central

    Zénon, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The eye pupil reacts to cognitive processes, but its analysis is challenging when luminance varies or when stimulation is fast-paced. Current approaches relying on deconvolution techniques do not account for the strong low-frequency spontaneous changes in pupil size or the large interindividual variability in the shape of the responses. Here a system identification framework is proposed in which the pupil responses to different parameters are extracted by means of an autoregressive model with exogenous inputs. In an example application of this technique, pupil size was shown to respond to the luminance and arousal scores of affective pictures presented in rapid succession. This result was significant in each subject (N = 5), but the pupil response varied between individuals both in amplitude and latency, highlighting the need for determining impulse responses subjectwise. The same method was also used to account for pupil size variations caused by respiration, illustrating the possibility to model the relation between pupil size and other continuous signals. In conclusion, this new framework for the analysis of pupil size data allows us to dissociate the response of the eye pupil from intermingled sources of influence and can be used to study the relation between pupil size and other physiological signals. PMID:28134323

  14. Effect of fasting on body composition and responses to stress in sunshine bass.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kenneth B; Gaylord, T Gibson

    2011-01-01

    The integrated responses of the hormonal regulation of growth and stress in sunshine bass (Morone chrysops X Morone saxatilis) as regulated by feed deprivation were investigated. Groups of fish were fed 1.5% of the body weight per day or offered no feed for 4weeks. Another group of fish was not fed for 3weeks and feed was offered during the fourth week. Fish in each group were sampled immediately before or after a 15-min low water confinement stressor after each week of the experiment. Liver mass and liver glycogen content were decreased after one week of fasting and remained low until the end of the study. However, both recovered after a week of refeeding. Intraperitoneal fat was significantly lower after two weeks of fasting and did not recover after a week of refeeding. None of these components were affected by confinement stress. Plasma glucose in unstressed fish was generally unaffected by fasting or refeeding; however, plasma glucose increased after confinement stress in fed but not in fasted fish. The cortisol stress response was unaltered by fasting and remained robust. Plasma IGF-I generally decreased in fasted fish but was not significantly lower than fed fish until the fourth week. A week of refeeding did not restore plasma IGF-I concentrations. Plasma IGF-I concentrations were higher in confinement stressed fed fish after two and four weeks but were unchanged in the fourth week. There was no change in the plasma IGF-I concentrations in fasted or refed fish due to the stress. Liver weight and liver glycogen were essentially depleted after 2weeks of fasting. The reduction of liver glycogen greatly reduced the glucose response to stress; however, the cortisol stress response was maintained for at least four weeks of fasting. Intraperitoneal fat was decreased very little after 4weeks of fasting. Plasma IGF-I concentrations were reduced only after 3weeks of fasting.

  15. Fast bias dependent device models for CAD of MMICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Tom T.; Tayrani, Reza

    1995-02-01

    Fast and accurate physics-based models for High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) and Metal-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MESFETs) suitable for computer-aided design of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) are described. These models are incorporated into Microwave Harmonica(sup trademark) to enable the prediction of device IV characteristics and nonlinear performance, as well as bias dependent equivalent circuit parameters from device geometry and material profile.

  16. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    PubMed

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  17. Fast Bayesian Inference in Dirichlet Process Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianming; Dunson, David B

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in applying Bayesian nonparametric methods in large samples and high dimensions. As Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are often infeasible, there is a pressing need for much faster algorithms. This article proposes a fast approach for inference in Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) models. Viewing the partitioning of subjects into clusters as a model selection problem, we propose a sequential greedy search algorithm for selecting the partition. Then, when conjugate priors are chosen, the resulting posterior conditionally on the selected partition is available in closed form. This approach allows testing of parametric models versus nonparametric alternatives based on Bayes factors. We evaluate the approach using simulation studies and compare it with four other fast nonparametric methods in the literature. We apply the proposed approach to three datasets including one from a large epidemiologic study. Matlab codes for the simulation and data analyses using the proposed approach are available online in the supplemental materials.

  18. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales

    PubMed Central

    IDE, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes. PMID:25311138

  19. Assessing cognitive processes with diffusion model analyses: a tutorial based on fast-dm-30

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andreas; Voss, Jochen; Lerche, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion models can be used to infer cognitive processes involved in fast binary decision tasks. The model assumes that information is accumulated continuously until one of two thresholds is hit. In the analysis, response time distributions from numerous trials of the decision task are used to estimate a set of parameters mapping distinct cognitive processes. In recent years, diffusion model analyses have become more and more popular in different fields of psychology. This increased popularity is based on the recent development of several software solutions for the parameter estimation. Although these programs make the application of the model relatively easy, there is a shortage of knowledge about different steps of a state-of-the-art diffusion model study. In this paper, we give a concise tutorial on diffusion modeling, and we present fast-dm-30, a thoroughly revised and extended version of the fast-dm software (Voss and Voss, 2007) for diffusion model data analysis. The most important improvement of the fast-dm version is the possibility to choose between different optimization criteria (i.e., Maximum Likelihood, Chi-Square, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov), which differ in applicability for different data sets. PMID:25870575

  20. Physiological responses to food deprivation in the house sparrow, a species not adapted to prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Anton; McCue, Marshall D; Pinshow, Berry

    2012-09-01

    Many wild birds fast during reproduction, molting, migration, or because of limited food availability. Species that are adapted to fasting sequentially oxidize endogenous fuels in three discrete phases. We hypothesized that species not adapted to long fasts have truncated, but otherwise similar, phases of fasting, sequential changes in fuel oxidization, and similar changes in blood metabolites to fasting-adapted species. We tested salient predictions in house sparrows (Passer domesticus biblicus), a subspecies that is unable to tolerate more than ~32 h of fasting. Our main hypothesis was that fasting sparrows sequentially oxidize substrates in the order carbohydrates, lipids, and protein. We dosed 24 house sparrows with [(13)C]glucose, palmitic acid, or glycine and measured (13)CO(2) in their breath while they fasted for 24 h. To ascertain whether blood metabolite levels reflect fasting-induced changes in metabolic fuels, we also measured glucose, triacylglycerides, and β-hydroxybutyrate in the birds' blood. The results of both breath (13)CO(2) and plasma metabolite analyses did not support our hypothesis; i.e., that sparrows have the same metabolic responses characteristic of fasting-adapted species, but on a shorter time scale. Contrary to our main prediction, we found that recently assimilated (13)C-tracers were oxidized continuously in different patterns with no definite peaks corresponding to the three phases of fasting and also that changes in plasma metabolite levels accurately tracked the changes found by breath analysis. Notably, the rate of recently assimilated [(13)C]glycine oxidization was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than that of the other metabolic tracers at all postdosing intervals. We conclude that the inability of house sparrows to fast for longer than 32 h is likely related to their inability to accrue large lipid stores, separately oxidize different fuels, and/or spare protein during fasting.

  1. Fast to forgive, slow to retaliate: intuitive responses in the ultimatum game depend on the degree of unfairness.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Maltby, John; Bibby, Peter A; Lawrence, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary accounts have difficulty explaining why people cooperate with anonymous strangers they will never meet. Recently models, focusing on emotional processing, have been proposed as a potential explanation, with attention focusing on a dual systems approach based on system 1 (fast, intuitive, automatic, effortless, and emotional) and system 2 (slow, reflective, effortful, proactive and unemotional). Evidence shows that when cooperation is salient, people are fast (system 1) to cooperate, but with longer delays (system 2) they show greed. This is interpreted within the framework of the social heuristic hypothesis (SHH), whereby people overgeneralize potentially advantageous intuitively learnt and internalization social norms to 'atypical' situations. We extend this to explore intuitive reactions to unfairness by integrating the SHH with the 'fast to forgive, slow to anger' (FFSA) heuristic. This suggests that it is advantageous to be prosocial when facing uncertainty. We propose that whether or not someone intuitively shows prosociality (cooperation) or retaliation is moderated by the degree (certainty) of unfairness. People should intuitively cooperate when facing mild levels of unfairness (fast to forgive) but when given longer to decide about another's mild level of unfairness should retaliate (slow to anger). However, when facing severe levels of unfairness, the intuitive response is always retaliation. We test this using a series of one-shot ultimatum games and manipulate level of offer unfairness (50:50 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and enforced time delays prior to responding (1s, 2s, 8s, 15s). We also measure decision times to make responses after the time delays. The results show that when facing mildly unfair offers (60:40) people are fast (intuitive) to cooperate but with longer delays reject these mildly unfair offers: 'fast to forgive, and slow to retaliate'. However, for severely unfair offers (90:10) the intuitive and fast response is to always

  2. Temperature dependence of the response of ultra fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, R.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Boscardin, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Durando, S.; Fadavi, A.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Monaco, V.; Obertino, M.; Pancheri, L.; Paternoster, G.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F. W.; Seiden, A.; Sola, V.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) are a novel concept of silicon detectors based on the Low Gain Avalanche Diode (LGAD) technology, which are able to obtain time resolution of the order of few tens of picoseconds. First prototypes with different geometries (pads/pixels/strips), thickness (300 and 50 μm) and gain (between 5 and 20) have been recently designed and manufactured by CNM (Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, Barcelona) and FBK (Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento). Several measurements on these devices have been performed in laboratory and in beam test and a dependence of the gain on the temperature has been observed. Some of the first measurements will be shown (leakage current, breakdown voltage, gain and time resolution on the 300 μm from FBK and gain on the 50 μm-thick sensor from CNM) and a comparison with the theoretically predicted trend will be discussed.

  3. Metabolic and hormonal response to short term fasting after endurance training in the rat.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, C Y; Serrurier, B; Aymonod, M; Merino, D; Pesquies, P C

    1984-11-01

    The metabolic and hormonal response to short term fasting was studied after endurance exercise training. Rats were kept running on a motor driven rodent treadmill 5 days/wk for periods up to 1 h/day for 6 wk. Trained and untrained rats were then fasted for 24 h and 48 h. Liver and muscle glycogen, blood glucose, lactate, beta OH butyrate, glycerol, plasma insulin, testosterone and corticosterone were measured in fed and fasted trained and untrained rats. 48 h fasted trained rats show a lower level of blood lactate (1.08 +/- 0.05 vs 1.33 +/- 0.08 mmol/l-1 of blood glycerol (1 +/- 0.11 vs 0.84 +/- 0.08 mmol/l-1), and of muscle glycogen. There is a significant increase in plasma corticosterone in 48 h fasted trained rats from fed values. Plasma testosterone decreases during fasting, the values are higher in trained rats. Plasma insulin decreases during fasting without any difference between the two groups. These results show higher lipolysis, and decreased glycogenolysis in trained animals during 48 h fasting. The difference between the groups in steroid hormone response could reduce neoglucogenesis and muscle proteolysis in trained animals.

  4. An application of fast algorithms to numerical electromagnetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bezvoda, V.; Segeth, K.

    1987-03-01

    Numerical electromagnetic modeling by the finite-difference or finite-element methods leads to a large sparse system of linear algebraic equations. Fast direct methods, requiring an order of at most q log q arithmetic operations to solve a system of q equations, cannot easily be applied to such a system. This paper describes the iterative application of a fast method, namely cyclic reduction, to the numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation with a piecewise constant imaginary coefficient of the absolute term in a plane domain. By means of numerical tests the advantages and limitations of the method compared with classical direct methods are discussed. The iterative application of the cyclic reduction method is very efficient if one can exploit a known solution of a similar (e.g., simpler) problem as the initial approximation. This makes cyclic reduction a powerful tool in solving the inverse problem by trial-and-error.

  5. A Fast Technology Infusion Model for Aerospace Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Andrew A.; Schone, Harald; Brinza, David E.; Garrett, Henry B.; Feather, Martin S.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-year Fast Technology Infusion initiative proposes a model for aerospace organizations to improve the cost-effectiveness by which they mature new, in-house developed software and hardware technologies for space mission use. The first year task under the umbrella of this initiative will provide the framework to demonstrate and document the fast infusion process. The viability of this approach will be demonstrated on two technologies developed in prior years with internal Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funding. One hardware technology and one software technology were selected for maturation within one calendar year or less. The overall objective is to achieve cost and time savings in the qualification of technologies. At the end of the recommended three-year effort, we will have demonstrated for six or more in-house developed technologies a clear path to insertion using a documented process that permits adaptation to a broad range of hardware and software projects.

  6. Battlefield Lessons: The Forward Air Surgical Team (FAST) Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-24

    Decompression Craniotomy , Thoracotomy, and Surgical Airway. 23 The MFST personnel and equipment may be transported by fixed wing aircraft or helicopter. The...41 Frank Navarette, “State of Arizona Emergency Response and Recovery Plan,” Arizona Department of Emergency Management. (December, 2003), 8-5-2

  7. Effect of fasting versus feeding on the bone metabolic response to running.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan P R; Sale, Craig; Greeves, Julie P; Casey, Anna; Dutton, John; Fraser, William D

    2012-12-01

    Individuals often perform exercise in the fasted state, but the effects on bone metabolism are not currently known. We compared the effect of an overnight fast with feeding a mixed meal on the bone metabolic response to treadmill running. Ten, physically-active males aged 28 ± 4y (mean ±SD) completed two, counterbalanced, 8d trials. After 3d on a standardised diet, participants performed 60 min of treadmill running at 65% VO(2max) on Day 4 following an overnight fast (FAST) or a standardised breakfast (FED). Blood samples were collected at baseline, before and during exercise, for 3h after exercise, and on four consecutive follow-up days (FU1-FU4). Plasma/serum were analysed for the c-terminal telopeptide region of collagen type 1 (β-CTX), n-terminal propeptides of procollagen type 1 (P1NP), osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium, phosphate, osteoprotegerin (OPG), cortisol, leptin and ghrelin. Only the β-CTX response was significantly affected by feeding. Pre-exercise concentrations decreased more in FED compared with FAST (47% vs 26%, P<0.001) but increased during exercise in both groups and were not significantly different from baseline at 1h post-exercise. At 3h post-exercise, concentrations were decreased (33%, P<0.001) from baseline in FAST and significantly lower (P<0.001) than in FED. P1NP and PTH increased, and OC decreased during exercise. Bone markers were not significantly different from baseline on FU1-FU4. Fasting had only a minor effect on the bone metabolic response to subsequent acute, endurance exercise, reducing the duration of the increase in β-CTX during early recovery, but having no effect on changes in bone formation markers. The reduced duration of the β-CTX response with fasting was not fully explained by changes in PTH, OPG, leptin or ghrelin.

  8. Validation of a FAST model of the Statoil-Hywind Demo floating wind turbine

    DOE PAGES

    Driscoll, Frederick; Jonkman, Jason; Robertson, Amy; ...

    2016-10-13

    To assess the accuracy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) FAST simulation tool for modeling the coupled response of floating offshore wind turbines under realistic open-ocean conditions, NREL developed a FAST model of the Statoil Hywind Demo floating offshore wind turbine, and validated simulation results against field measurements. Field data were provided by Statoil, which conducted a comprehensive test measurement campaign of its demonstration system, a 2.3-MW Siemens turbine mounted on a spar substructure deployed about 10 km off the island of Karmoy in Norway. A top-down approach was used to develop the FAST model, starting with modeling themore » blades and working down to the mooring system. Design data provided by Siemens and Statoil were used to specify the structural, aerodynamic, and dynamic properties. Measured wind speeds and wave spectra were used to develop the wind and wave conditions used in the model. The overall system performance and behavior were validated for eight sets of field measurements that span a wide range of operating conditions. The simulated controller response accurately reproduced the measured blade pitch and power. In conclusion, the structural and blade loads and spectra of platform motion agree well with the measured data.« less

  9. Validation of a FAST model of the Statoil-Hywind Demo floating wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Frederick; Jonkman, Jason; Robertson, Amy; Sirnivas, Senu; Skaare, Bjorn; Nielsen, Finn Gunnar

    2016-10-13

    To assess the accuracy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) FAST simulation tool for modeling the coupled response of floating offshore wind turbines under realistic open-ocean conditions, NREL developed a FAST model of the Statoil Hywind Demo floating offshore wind turbine, and validated simulation results against field measurements. Field data were provided by Statoil, which conducted a comprehensive test measurement campaign of its demonstration system, a 2.3-MW Siemens turbine mounted on a spar substructure deployed about 10 km off the island of Karmoy in Norway. A top-down approach was used to develop the FAST model, starting with modeling the blades and working down to the mooring system. Design data provided by Siemens and Statoil were used to specify the structural, aerodynamic, and dynamic properties. Measured wind speeds and wave spectra were used to develop the wind and wave conditions used in the model. The overall system performance and behavior were validated for eight sets of field measurements that span a wide range of operating conditions. The simulated controller response accurately reproduced the measured blade pitch and power. In conclusion, the structural and blade loads and spectra of platform motion agree well with the measured data.

  10. Modeling the effects of fast shocks on solar winds ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xuepu; Ogilvie, K. W.; Whang, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Observations show that, when alpha particles and other minor ions in the solar wind plasma encounter fast shocks, they are heated more than protons and their bulk motion is decelerated less than protons. These effects have been studied using a three-fluid model, and the model predictions have been compared with observations. The comparison indicates that, for supercritical fast shocks, the three-fluid model can explain cross-shock minor ion heating which is significantly greater than that of protons. When the ratio of specific heats for minor ions, gamma (alpha), equals 2, both the lesser cross-shock deceleration and the greater heating of minor ions than of protons can be predicted by the model; thus, the minor ion heating through the shock transition region is consistent with the involvement of two degrees of freedom. Because the analysis is formulated in the de Heffmann-Teller frame of reference, the method is not valid for perpendicular shocks or when the angle is large. These results agree with the few extant observations and might be confirmed by further observations at the earth's bow shock.

  11. Physiological Responses to Fasting and Estivation for the Three-Toed Amphiuma (Amphiuma tridactylum).

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew E; Secor, Stephen M

    Species of Amphiuma enter a state of subterranean estivation with the drying of their aquatic habitat. Characteristic of amphibian fasting and estivation is an initial depression of metabolism and tissue mass and function with fasting, followed by a more pronounced adaptive decrease in metabolism and tissue function with estivation. We hypothesized that Amphiuma likewise experiences a two-stage set of responses to estivation. Therefore, we examined the physiological responses of the three-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma tridactylum) to fasting and estivation treatments. Recently fed A. tridactylum served as controls for fasting treatments of 1, 3, and 6 mo (in water) and estivation treatments of 3 and 6 mo (buried in dried substrate). After a 1-mo fast, A. tridactylum experienced no further depression of metabolic rate following 3 or 6 mo of fasting or estivation. For all fasting and estivation trials, A. tridactylum maintained blood chemistry homeostasis, with the exception of an increase in blood urea following 6 mo of estivation. Compared with fed controls, the mass of most organs did not vary even after 6 mo of fasting and estivation. Only the small intestine (decreasing) and the full gall bladder (increasing) experienced significant changes in mass with fasting or estivation. The fasting decrease in small intestinal mass was in part due to enterocyte atrophy, which resulted in a decrease in mucosa/submucosa thickness. In contrast to many estivating anurans and the ecologically convergent sirens, A. tridactylum does not surround itself in a cocoon of dried skin or mucus during estivation. The thickness and architecture of their skin remains unchanged even after 6 mo of estivation. Following months of fasting or estivation, individuals still maintain gastric acid production, pancreatic enzyme activity, and intestinal enzyme and transporter activities. Contrary to our hypothesis that A. tridactylum experiences two stages of metabolic depression and tissue downregulation

  12. A Mathematical Model of the Liver Circadian Clock Linking Feeding and Fasting Cycles to Clock Function.

    PubMed

    Woller, Aurore; Duez, Hélène; Staels, Bart; Lefranc, Marc

    2016-10-18

    To maintain energy homeostasis despite variable energy supply and consumption along the diurnal cycle, the liver relies on a circadian clock synchronized to food timing. Perturbed feeding and fasting cycles have been associated with clock disruption and metabolic diseases; however, the mechanisms are unclear. To address this question, we have constructed a mathematical model of the mammalian circadian clock, incorporating the metabolic sensors SIRT1 and AMPK. The clock response to various temporal patterns of AMPK activation was simulated numerically, mimicking the effects of a normal diet, fasting, and a high-fat diet. The model reproduces the dampened clock gene expression and NAD(+) rhythms reported for mice on a high-fat diet and predicts that this effect may be pharmacologically rescued by timed REV-ERB agonist administration. Our model thus identifies altered AMPK signaling as a mechanism leading to clock disruption and its associated metabolic effects and suggests a pharmacological approach to resetting the clock in obesity.

  13. Promoting cooperation through fast response to defection in spatial games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Nie, Sen; Chen, Shi-Ming; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Recent experimental research has revealed that the cooperation in dynamic social networks, has significant scope for enhancement because individuals in a social system break the links with defective neighbours. To investigate how the length of defection tolerance affects the cooperation of prisoner’s dilemma game in dynamic ring networks, we study evolution of breaking and rewiring operations for social interaction as a response to the defection strategy. Defection tolerance is measured in terms of the time length that an individual tolerates a defector who continuously adopts the defective strategy. The results show that the dynamic nature of human social networks plays an essential role in promoting cooperation. Interestingly, there exists a critical value of the temptation to defect, below which the system is entirely dominated by cooperators, and a lower value of defection tolerance induces a larger threshold of temptation.

  14. Development of miniature 35 lbf fast response bipropellant divert thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttle, Dan; Fitzsimmons, Mark

    1993-06-01

    A 35-lbf thrust bipropellant divert thruster developed for the Army Lightweight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP) is described. The thruster produces a vacuum thrust of 35 lbf at 700 psia chamber pressure using nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine at an O/F of 1.2. A multiple doublet type injector and a desilicide-coated columbium chamber are used; miniature fuel and oxidizer solenoid valves provide a 1-millisec opening response. In accordance with test results for a typical firing, the thrust reaches 90 percent of steady-state thrust 5 millisec after the electrical 'on' command; thrust termination occurs in 3.8 millisec. Results of gelled propellant tests are also presented.

  15. A fast method for a generalized nonlocal elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ning; Wang, Hong; Wang, Che

    2015-09-01

    We develop a numerical method for a generalized nonlocal elastic model, which is expressed as a composition of a Riesz potential operator with a fractional differential operator, by composing a collocation method with a finite difference discretization. By carefully exploring the structure of the coefficient matrix of the numerical method, we develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace method, which reduces the computations to (Nlog ⁡ N) per iteration and the memory to O (N). The use of the preconditioner significantly reduces the number of iterations, and the preconditioner can be inverted in O (Nlog ⁡ N) computations. Numerical results show the utility of the method.

  16. Modeling Fast Ion Transport in TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Bell, R E; Darrow, D; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G; Kubota, S; Levinton, F M; Liu, D; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Tritz, K

    2009-08-17

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557 ] have found strong bursts of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1-51 (1992)] and ORBIT [R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE were modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE were then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate. While these results represent our best attempts to find agreement, we believe that further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  17. Unified Dark Matter scalar field models with fast transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide E-mail: marco.bruni@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the general properties of Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field models with Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term, looking specifically for models that can produce a fast transition between an early Einstein-de Sitter CDM-like era and a later Dark Energy like phase, similarly to the barotropic fluid UDM models in JCAP01(2010)014. However, while the background evolution can be very similar in the two cases, the perturbations are naturally adiabatic in fluid models, while in the scalar field case they are necessarily non-adiabatic. The new approach to building UDM Lagrangians proposed here allows to escape the common problem of the fine-tuning of the parameters which plague many UDM models. We analyse the properties of perturbations in our model, focusing on the the evolution of the effective speed of sound and that of the Jeans length. With this insight, we can set theoretical constraints on the parameters of the model, predicting sufficient conditions for the model to be viable. An interesting feature of our models is that what can be interpreted as w{sub DE} can be < −1 without violating the null energy conditions.

  18. Toward a Fast-Response Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Kypuros, Javier A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, technologies developed for clearance control can benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first portion of the paper addresses the research from a programmatic viewpoint. Recent studies that provide motivation for the work, identification of key technologies, and NASA's plan for addressing deficiencies in the technologies are discussed. The later portion of the paper drills down into one of the key technologies by presenting equations and results for a preliminary dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena.

  19. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21-Null Mice Do Not Exhibit an Impaired Response to Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Antonellis, Patrick Joseph; Hayes, Meghan Patricia; Adams, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a pleotropic metabolic regulator, expression of which is elevated during fasting. To this end, the precise role played by FGF21 in the biology of fasting has been the subject of several recent studies, which have demonstrated contributions to the regulation of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) and FGF21-null (FGF21KO) mice, demonstrating that, despite the significant induction of FGF21 during fasting in the WT animals, our strain of FGF21-null mice exhibits only limited impairments in their adaptation to nutrient deprivation. Specifically, fasted FGF21KO mice display a mild attenuation of gluconeogenic transcriptional induction in the liver accompanied by partially blunted glucose production in response to a pyruvate challenge. Furthermore, FGF21KO mice displayed only minor impairments in lipid metabolism in the fasted state, limited to accumulation of hepatic triglycerides and a reduction in expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. To address the possibility of compensation to germline deletion of FGF21, we further interrogated the role of endogenous FGF21 via acute pharmacological blockade of FGF21 signaling. At the transcriptional level, we show that FGF21 signaling is required for full induction of gluconeogenic and oxidative genes in the liver. However, corroborating our findings in FGF21KO mice, pharmacological blockade of the FGF21 axis did not profoundly disrupt the physiological response to fasting. Taken as a whole, these data demonstrate that, while FGF21 is partially required for appropriate gene expression during the fed to fasted transition, its absence does not significantly impact the downstream physiology of the fasted state. PMID:27445980

  1. A Model for Fast Ion Emission from Metal Deuterides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Peter

    2000-03-01

    There have been numerous claims during the past ten years of the observation of a variety of anomalies in metal deuterides. One such anomaly involves the emission of fast (MeV) alpha from PdD as reported by G. Chambers and colleagues at NRL in the early 1990s. A related effect is the emission of a variety of low mass fast ions from TiD reported by groups led by G. Chambers and by F. E. Cecil (Colorado School of Mines) et al(F. E. Cecil, H. Liu, D. Beddingfield and C. S. Galovich, in Anomalous Nuclear Effects in Deuterium/Solid Systems, AIP Conf. Proc.) 228, p. 383 (1990).. We have recently examined a theoretical model for this effect. We propose a second order off-resonant reaction in which fusion reactions are coupled to optical phonons, and then the optical phonon excitation is dipole-coupled to nuclear ionization. Such a model gives reaction products and energies which appear to be in agreement with experiment.

  2. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Lipunova, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  3. Implicit XMHD Modeling of Fast Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The numerical modeling of fast Z-Pinches as applied to magnetically driven inertial confinement fusion concepts is typically performed under the resistive- magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We derive the limitations of this model as currently applied to modeling such targets and present numerical test problems that demonstrate the physical error introduced through the approximations inherent in resistive-MHD. We then compare the resistive-MHD model to simulations utilizing new implicit algorithms for the efficient solution of the extended-magnetohydrodynamic (XMHD) system of equations. Herein we define XMHD as a quasi-neutral electro-magnetic two-fluid model. We present specific examples where the XMHD system of equations is required for modeling magnetically driven ICF targets if large physical errors are to be avoided in the numerical solution of the system. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  5. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  6. Models of fast radio bursts at cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottez, F.; Guépin, C.; Kotera, K.; Voisin, G.; Zarka, P.

    2016-12-01

    Fast radio bursts are isolated radio pulses of high amplitude, with a frequency / time delay relation that can be interpreted as the dispersion measure (DM) of a source at cosmological distances (several hundreds of Mpc). Up to 2015, the only known FRBs all had different locations on the sky, and different DM. Many theoretical explanations of FRBs have been proposed. Some of them are associated to unique cataclysmic events, others are compatible with the repetition of bursts from the same source. The recent publication of the repeating FRB 121102 shows that at least some of the FRB must be compatible with non-cataclysmic events. A model based on the interaction of a highly relativitic pulsar wind with a body orbiting the pulsar (planet, big asteroid, white dwarf) could explain FRBs. It is briefly compared with other models of repeating FRBs.

  7. A Fast Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Donor Increases the Tumor Response to Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Preter, Géraldine; Deriemaeker, Caroline; Danhier, Pierre; Brisson, Lucie; Cao Pham, Thanh Trang; Grégoire, Vincent; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the last gaseous transmitter identified in mammals, and previous studies have reported disparate conclusions regarding the implication of H2S in cancer progression. In the present study, we hypothesized that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a fast H2S-releasing donor, might interfere with the mitochondrial respiratory chain of tumor cells, increase tumor oxygenation, and potentiate the response to irradiation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, we found a rapid increase in tumor pO2 after NaHS administration (0.1 mmol/kg) in two human tumor models (breast MDA-MB-231 and cervix SiHa), an effect that was due to a decreased oxygen consumption and an increased tumor perfusion. Tumors irradiated 15 minutes after a single NaHS administration were more sensitive to irradiation compared with those that received irradiation alone (increase in growth delay by 50%). This radiosensitization was due to the oxygen effect, as the increased growth delay was abolished when temporarily clamped tumors were irradiated. In contrast, daily NaHS injection (0.1 mmol/kg/day for 14 days) did not provide any effect on tumor growth in vivo. To understand these paradoxical data, we analyzed the impact of external factors on the cellular response to NaHS. We found that extracellular pH had a dramatic effect on the cell response to NaHS, as the proliferation rate (measured in vitro by BrdU incorporation) was increased at pH = 7.4, but decreased at pH = 6.5. Overall, our study highlights the complex role of environmental components in the response of cancer cells to H2S and suggests a new approach for the use of H2S donors in combination with radiotherapy.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF OPEN-PATH FTIR FOR FAST DEPLOYMENT EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL THREATS AND ACCIDENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed a series of experiments to determine the tradeoff in detection sensitivity for implementing design features for an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) chemical analyzer that would be quick to deploy under emergency response conditions. The fast-deplo...

  9. Polylactide-based polyurethane shape memory nanocomposites (Fe3O4/PLAUs) with fast magnetic responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shu-Ying; Jin, Sheng-Peng; Gao, Xie-Feng; Mu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Polylactide-based polyurethane shape memory nanocomposites (Fe3O4/PLAUs) with fast magnetic responsiveness are presented. For the purpose of fast response and homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles, oleic acid was used to improve the dispersibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. A homogeneous distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the polymer matrix was obtained for nanocomposites with low Fe3O4 loading content. A small agglomeration was observed for nanocomposites with 6 wt% and 9 wt% loading content, leading to a small decline in the mechanical properties. PLAU and its nanocomposites have glass transition around 52 °C, which can be used as the triggering temperature. PLAU and its nanocomposites have shape fixity ratios above 99%, shape recovery ratios above 82% for the first cycle and shape recovery ratios above 91% for the second cycle. PLAU and its nanocomposites also exhibit a fast water bath or magnetic responsiveness. The magnetic recovery time decreases with an increase in the loading content of Fe3O4 nanoparticles due to an improvement in heating performance for increased weight percentage of fillers. The nanocomposites have fast responses in an alternating magnetic field and have potential application in biomedical areas such as intravascular stent.

  10. Aroclor 1254 exposure reduces disease resistance and innate immune responses in fasted arctic charr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, A.G.; Jorgensen, E.H.; Vijayan, M.M.; Killie, J.-E.A.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the immunological impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an environmentally relevant way, we orally contaminated Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) with Aroclor 1254. After contamination, fish were either fed (0 and 100 mg Aroclor 1254 kg-1 fish wt) or fasted (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg kg-1) to mimic cycles of feeding-fasting experienced by Arctic animals. After four months, PCB concentrations in muscle were the same in fasted and fed fish; however, PCBs in kidneys of fed fish were 33 to 50% of those in fasted fish. Arctic charr were exposed to Aeromonas salmonicida, the bacteria responsible for furunculosis, by cohabitation with infected conspecifics. Fasted fish had a significant trend toward lower survival with higher dose of PCBs - from 68% in controls to 48% in treatment involving 100 mg kg-1. Independent of PCB contamination, fed fish had the lowest survival; we attribute this to stress associated with establishing and maintaining feeding hierarchies. A significant decrease in the activity of lysozyme was observed in skin mucus, as was hemagglutination ability of a putative rhamnose lectin in fasted, but not in fed, PCB-treated fish. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive effects of PCBs on Arctic charr, and they illustrate the importance of considering environmentally relevant nutritional status in ecotoxicological studies.

  11. Modelling land-fast sea ice using a linear elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Mathieu; Tremblay, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land-fast ice is an important component of the Arctic system, capping the coastal Arctic waters for most of the year and exerting a large influence on ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Yet, the accurate representation of land-fast ice in most large-scale sea ice models remains a challenge, part due to the difficult (and sometimes non-physical) parametrisation of ice fracture. In this study, a linear elastic model is developed to investigate the internal stresses induced by the wind forcing on the land-fast ice, modelled as a 2D elastic plate. The model simulates ice fracture by the implementation of a damage coefficient which causes a local reduction in internal stress. This results in a cascade propagation of damage, simulating the ice fracture that determines the position of the land-fast ice edge. The modelled land-fast ice cover is sensitive to the choice of failure criterion. The parametrised cohesion, tensile and compressive strength and the relationship with the land-fast ice stability is discussed. To estimate the large scale mechanical properties of land-fast ice, these results are compared to a set of land-fast ice break up events and ice bridge formations observed in the Siberian Arctic. These events are identified using brightness temperature imagery from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra and Aqua satellites, from which the position of the flaw lead is identifiable by the opening of polynyi adjacent to the land-fast ice edge. The shape of the land-fast ice before, during and after these events, along with the characteristic scale of the resulting ice floes, are compared to the model results to extrapolate the stress state that corresponds to these observations. The model setting that best reproduce the scale of the observed break up events is used to provide an estimation of the strength of the ice relative to the wind forcing. These results will then be used to investigate the relationship between the ice thickness and the

  12. Fast and stable numerical method for neuronal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Soheil; Abdolali, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Excitable cell modelling is of a prime interest in predicting and targeting neural activity. Two main limits in solving related equations are speed and stability of numerical method. Since there is a tradeoff between accuracy and speed, most previously presented methods for solving partial differential equations (PDE) are focused on one side. More speed means more accurate simulations and therefore better device designing. By considering the variables in finite differenced equation in proper time and calculating the unknowns in the specific sequence, a fast, stable and accurate method is introduced in this paper for solving neural partial differential equations. Propagation of action potential in giant axon is studied by proposed method and traditional methods. Speed, consistency and stability of the methods are compared and discussed. The proposed method is as fast as forward methods and as stable as backward methods. Forward methods are known as fastest methods and backward methods are stable in any circumstances. Complex structures can be simulated by proposed method due to speed and stability of the method.

  13. Reasoning with Vectors: A Continuous Model for Fast Robust Inference

    PubMed Central

    Widdows, Dominic; Cohen, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of continuous vector space models for reasoning with a formal knowledge base. The practical significance of these models is that they support fast, approximate but robust inference and hypothesis generation, which is complementary to the slow, exact, but sometimes brittle behavior of more traditional deduction engines such as theorem provers. The paper explains the way logical connectives can be used in semantic vector models, and summarizes the development of Predication-based Semantic Indexing, which involves the use of Vector Symbolic Architectures to represent the concepts and relationships from a knowledge base of subject-predicate-object triples. Experiments show that the use of continuous models for formal reasoning is not only possible, but already demonstrably effective for some recognized informatics tasks, and showing promise in other traditional problem areas. Examples described in this paper include: predicting new uses for existing drugs in biomedical informatics; removing unwanted meanings from search results in information retrieval and concept navigation; type-inference from attributes; comparing words based on their orthography; and representing tabular data, including modelling numerical values. The algorithms and techniques described in this paper are all publicly released and freely available in the Semantic Vectors open-source software package.1 PMID:26582967

  14. Gaining control over responses to implicit attitude tests: Implementation intentions engender fast responses on attitude-incongruent trials.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal; Pepper, John

    2012-03-01

    The present research investigated whether forming implementation intentions could promote fast responses to attitude-incongruent associations (e.g., woman-manager) and thereby modify scores on popular implicit measures of attitude. Expt 1 used the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to measure associations between gender and science versus liberal arts. Planning to associate women with science engendered fast responses to this category-attribute pairing and rendered summary scores more neutral compared to standard IAT instructions. Expt 2 demonstrated that forming egalitarian goal intentions is not sufficient to produce these effects. Expt 3 extended these findings to a different measure of implicit attitude (the Go/No-Go Association Task) and a different stereotypical association (Muslims-terrorism). In Expt 4, managers who planned to associate women with superordinate positions showed more neutral IAT scores relative to non-planners and effects were maintained 3 weeks later. In sum, implementation intentions enable people to gain control over implicit attitude responses.

  15. A fast aerosol microphysical model for the UTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S.; Grainger, R.; Rogers, H.

    2003-04-01

    A fast aerosol microphysical model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) has been developed to study aerosol behaviour in UTLS region. This model simulates homogeneous heteromolecular nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation and sedimentation of binary sulphuric acid-water particles together to predict the composition and size-distribution of stratospheric aerosols. This model has already been successfully applied to estimate the changes in background stratospheric aerosol surface area due to aircraft sulphur emission (Tripathi et al., 2002). The principal advantage with this model is that it is non-iterative (Jacobson, 1999), i.e. computing time is minimised by finding semi-implicit solutions to aerosol processes. Condensation and coagulation are solved using operator-split method. Hence the effect of coagulation is determined in a single iteration and the solution is volume conserving for any time-step. The semi-implicit solution for coagulation agrees well with the Smoluchowski's solution for a constant coagulation kernel. Similarly, starting from the fundamental growth equation, solution for condensational growth is derived which does not require iteration. The solution conserves mass exactly, and is unconditionally stable. In the model homogeneous nucleation and condensation is coupled in such a manner that it allows for a realistic competition between the two processes for the limited amount of vapour. With geometrically related size bin (44 bins for sulphuric acid-water particles in the range from 0.3 nm to 5mm) and a 600s time-step the model takes about half an hour to complete a 7 year simulation of stratospheric background aerosols on a work station. FAMMUS has been used to simulate background stratospheric aerosols and volcanically disturbed aerosol and model results are compared favourably with results from earlier model studies and observed data.

  16. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  17. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sweety; Krug, Susanne; Skurk, Thomas; Halama, Anna; Stank, Antonia; Artati, Anna; Prehn, Cornelia; Malek, Joel A; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Adamski, Jerzy; Hauner, Hans; Suhre, Karsten

    2014-06-06

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  18. Modeling the redshift and energy distributions of fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Xiao, Ming; Xiao, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most mysterious astronomical phenomena nowadays. The identification of their origin requires more observations in the future and, importantly, deep understandings of the existing observational data. By fitting the redshift and energy distributions of 15 Parkes FRBs, we try to derive their intrinsic energy function and the cosmic evolution of their burst rates. Specifically, while the energy function is assumed as usual to have a single-power-law form, the burst rates are considered to be proportional to the cosmic star formation rates by a redshift-dependent coefficient. Some plausible fittings are obtained, which indicate the power-law assumptions are feasible and effective. The values of the power-law indices could be used to independently constrain candidate FRB models, although parameter degeneracies still exist.

  19. Linear model for fast background subtraction in oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One important preprocessing step in the analysis of microarray data is background subtraction. In high-density oligonucleotide arrays this is recognized as a crucial step for the global performance of the data analysis from raw intensities to expression values. Results We propose here an algorithm for background estimation based on a model in which the cost function is quadratic in a set of fitting parameters such that minimization can be performed through linear algebra. The model incorporates two effects: 1) Correlated intensities between neighboring features in the chip and 2) sequence-dependent affinities for non-specific hybridization fitted by an extended nearest-neighbor model. Conclusion The algorithm has been tested on 360 GeneChips from publicly available data of recent expression experiments. The algorithm is fast and accurate. Strong correlations between the fitted values for different experiments as well as between the free-energy parameters and their counterparts in aqueous solution indicate that the model captures a significant part of the underlying physical chemistry. PMID:19917117

  20. Model biases in high-burnup fast reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Touran, N.; Cheatham, J.; Petroski, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new code system called the Advanced Reactor Modeling Interface (ARMI) has been developed that loosely couples multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulations to provide rapid, user-friendly, high-fidelity full systems analysis. Incorporating neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, safety/transient, fuel performance, core mechanical, and economic analyses, ARMI provides 'one-click' assessments of many multi-disciplined performance metrics and constraints that historically require iterations between many diverse experts. The capabilities of ARMI are implemented in this study to quantify neutronic biases of various modeling approximations typically made in fast reactor analysis at an equilibrium condition, after many repetitive shuffles. Sensitivities at equilibrium that result in very high discharge burnup are considered ( and >20% FIMA), as motivated by the development of the Traveling Wave Reactor. Model approximations discussed include homogenization, neutronic and depletion mesh resolution, thermal-hydraulic coupling, explicit control rod insertion, burnup-dependent cross sections, fission product model, burn chain truncation, and dynamic fuel performance. The sensitivities of these approximations on equilibrium discharge burnup, k{sub eff}, power density, delayed neutron fraction, and coolant temperature coefficient are discussed. (authors)

  1. Fast-response liquid-crystal lens for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifan; Ren, Hongwen; Xu, Su; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display has become an increasingly important technology trend for information display applications. Dozens of different 3D display solutions have been proposed. The autostereoscopic 3D display based on lenticular microlens array is a promising approach, and fast-switching microlens array enables this system to display both 3D and conventional 2D images. Here we report two different fast-response microlens array designs. The first one is a blue phase liquid crystal lens driven by the Pedot: PSS resistive film electrodes. This BPLC lens exhibits several attractive features, such as polarization insensitivity, fast response time, simple driving scheme, and relatively low driving voltage, as compared to other BPLC lens designs. The second lens design has a double-layered structure. The first layer is a polarization dependent polymer microlens array, and the second layer is a thin twisted-nematic (TN) liquid crystal cell. When the TN cell is switched on/off, the traversing light through the polymeric lens array is either focused or defocused, so that 2D/3D images are displayed correspondingly. This lens design has low driving voltage, fast response time, and simple driving scheme. Simulation and experiment demonstrate that the performance of both switchable lenses meet the requirement of 3D display system design.

  2. Fast Numerically Based Modeling for Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, D. S.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-05-01

    There is a need for computationally fast GPR numerical modeling. This includes circumstances where real time performance is needed, for example discrimination of landmines or UXO's, and in circumstances that require a high number of successive forward problems, for example inversion or imaging. Traditional numerical techniques such as finite difference or finite element are too slow for these applications, but they provide results from general scenarios such as scattering from very complicated shapes with high contrast. Neural networks may fit in the niche between analytical techniques and traditional numerical techniques. Our concept is training a neural network to associate the model inputs of electromagnetic properties of the background and targets, and the size and shape of the targets, with the output generated by a 3-D finite difference model. Successive examples from various electromagnetic properties and targets are displayed to the neural network, until the neural network has adapted itself though optimization. The trained neural network is now used as the forward model by displaying new input parameters and the neural network then generates the appropriate output. The results from the neural network are then compared to results from finite difference models to see how well the neural networks is performing and at what point it breaks down. Areas of poor fit can be addressed through further training. The neural network GPR model can be adapted by displaying additional finite difference results to the neural network, and can also be adapted to a specific field area by actual field data examples. Because of this adaptation ability the neural network GPR model can be optimized for specific environments and applications.

  3. Fast ionospheric response to enhanced activity in geospace: Ion feeding of the inner magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Daglis, I.A.; Axford, I.A.

    1996-03-01

    The authors look at the question of the ionosphere feeding ions into the magnetosphere/magnetotail, in response to magnetic storm activity, or coupling of the solar wind into the system. They are concerned with fast response, not the question of whether the ionosphere feeds ions in general. The dynamics which results in the inner magnetosphere in response to the input of cold ions from the ionosphere is of interest to the authors. They review recent and older data which has shed light on this question. They look at outflow data, and heating mechanisms for these cold ions, as well as the impact such ions may have on the dynamics of magnetic storms. They observe that fast feeding of ions out of the ionosphere may leave the inner magnetosphere heavily populated with heavy ions such as O{sup +}, which can have a definite impact on the dynamic development of the magnetosphere.

  4. Hypothalamic responses to fasting indicate metabolic reprogramming away from glycolysis toward lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Michal M; Mastaitis, Jason W; Yang, Xue-Jun; Mobbs, Charles V

    2010-11-01

    Nutrient-sensitive hypothalamic neurons regulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis, but the molecular mechanisms mediating hypothalamic responses to nutritional state remain incompletely characterized. To address these mechanisms, the present studies used quantitative PCR to characterize the expression of a panel of genes the hypothalamic expression by nutritional status of which had been suggested by DNA microarray studies. Although these genes regulate a variety of function, the most prominent set regulate intermediary metabolism, and the overall pattern clearly indicated that a 48-h fast produced a metabolic reprogramming away from glucose metabolism and toward the utilization of alternative fuels, particularly lipid metabolism. This general reprogramming of intermediary metabolism by fasting was observed both in cortex and hypothalamus but most prominently in hypothalamus. The effect of fasting on the expression of these genes may be mediated by reduction in plasma glucose or glucose metabolism, rather than leptin, because they were generally recapitulated by hypoglycemia even in the presence of elevated insulin and in vitro by low glucose but were not recapitulated in ob/ob mice. These studies suggest that fasting reduces glucose metabolism and thus minimizes the production of hypothalamic malonyl-coenzyme A. However, because the reprogramming of glucose metabolism by fasting was also observed in cortex, this apparent substrate competition may mediate more general responses to nutritional deprivation, including those responsible for the protective effects of dietary restriction. The present studies also provide a large panel of novel glucose-regulated genes that can be used as markers of glucose action to address mechanisms mediating hypothalamic responses to nutritional state.

  5. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  6. Metabolomics reveals differences in postprandial responses to breads and fasting metabolic characteristics associated with postprandial insulin demand in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Moazzami, Ali A; Shrestha, Aahana; Morrison, David A; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2014-06-01

    Changes in serum metabolic profile after the intake of different food products (e.g., bread) can provide insight into their interaction with human metabolism. Postprandial metabolic responses were compared after the intake of refined wheat (RWB), whole-meal rye (WRB), and refined rye (RRB) breads. In addition, associations between the metabolic profile in fasting serum and the postprandial concentration of insulin in response to different breads were investigated. Nineteen postmenopausal women with normal fasting glucose and normal glucose tolerance participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. The test breads, RWB (control), RRB, and WRB, providing 50 g of available carbohydrate, were each served as a single meal. The postprandial metabolic profile was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and targeted LC-mass spectrometry and was compared between different breads using ANOVA and multivariate models. Eight amino acids had a significant treatment effect (P < 0.01) and a significant treatment × time effect (P < 0.05). RWB produced higher postprandial concentrations of leucine (geometric mean: 224; 95% CI: 196, 257) and isoleucine (mean ± SD: 111 ± 31.5) compared with RRB (geometric mean: 165; 95% CI: 147, 186; mean ± SD: 84.2 ± 22.9) and WRB (geometric mean: 190; 95% CI: 174, 207; mean ± SD: 95.8 ± 17.3) at 60 min respectively (P < 0.001). In addition, 2 metabolic subgroups were identified using multivariate models based on the association between fasting metabolic profile and the postprandial concentration of insulin. Women with higher fasting concentrations of leucine and isoleucine and lower fasting concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines had higher insulin responses despite similar glucose concentration after all kinds of bread (cross-validated ANOVA, P = 0.048). High blood concentration of branched-chain amino acids, i.e., leucine and isoleucine, has been associated with the increased risk of diabetes, which

  7. New models for fast steady state magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    A new unified family of models for incompressible, steady-state magnetic reconnection in a finite region is presented. The models are obtained by expanding in powers of the Alfven Mach number and may be used to elucidate some of the puzzling properties of numerical experiments on reconnection which are not present in the classical models. The conditions imposed on the inflow boundary of the finite region determine which member of the family occurs. Petscheklien and Sonnerup like solutions are particular members. The Sonneruplike regime is a special case of a weak slow mode expansion in the inflow region, and it separates two classes of members with reversed currents. The Petscheklike regime is a singular case of a weak fast mode expansion, and it separates the hybrid regime from a regime of slow mode compressions. Care should be taken in deciding which type of reconnection is operating in a numerical experiment. Indeed, no experiment to date has used boundary conditions appropriate for demonstrating steady state Petschek reconnection.

  8. Calibration, characterisation and Monte Carlo modelling of a fast-UNCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagziria, Hamid; Bagi, Janos; Peerani, Paolo; Belian, Antony

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the calibration, characterisation and Monte Carlo modelling of a new IAEA Uranium Neutron Collar (UNCL) for LWR fuel, which can be operated in both passive and active modes. It can employ either 35 3He tubes (in active configuration) or 44 tubes at 10 atm pressure (in its passive configuration) and thus can be operated in fast mode (with Cd liner) as its efficiency is higher than that of the standard UNCL. Furthermore, it has an adjustable internal cavity which allows the measurement of varying sizes of fuel assemblies such as WWER, PWR and BWR. It is intended to be used with Cd liners in active mode (with an AmLi interrogation source in place) by the inspectorate for the determination of the 235U content in fresh fuel assemblies, especially in cases where high concentrations of burnable poisons cause problems with accurate assays. A campaign of measurements has been carried out at the JRC Performance Laboratories (PERLA) in Ispra (Italy) using various radionuclide neutron sources (252Cf, 241AmLi and PuGa) and our BWR and PWR reference assemblies, in order to calibrate and characterise the counter as well as assess its performance and determine its optimum operational parameters. Furthermore, the fast-UNCL has been extensively modelled at JRC using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP-PTA, which simulates both the neutron transport and the coincidence electronics. The model has been validated using our measurements which agreed well with calculations. The WWER1000 fuel assembly for which there are no representative reference materials for an adequate calibration of the counter, has also been modelled and the response of the counter to this fuel assembly has been simulated. Subsequently numerical calibrations curves have been obtained for the above fuel assemblies in various modes (fast and thermal). The sensitivity of the counter to fuel rods substitution as well as other important aspects and the parameters of the fast-UNCL performance have been

  9. Design and evaluation of novel fast forming pilocarpine-loaded ocular hydrogels for sustained pharmacological response

    PubMed Central

    Anumolu, SivaNaga S.; Singh, Yashveer; Gao, Dayuan; Stein, Stanley; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast forming hydrogels prepared by crosslinking a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based copolymer containing multiple thiol (SH) groups were evaluated for the controlled ocular delivery of pilocarpine and subsequent pupillary constriction. Physical properties of the hydrogels were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), rheometry, and swelling kinetics. Pilocarpine loading efficiency and release properties were measured in simulated tear fluid. The hydrogel formulations exhibited high drug loading efficiency (~74%). Pilocarpine release was found to be biphasic with release half times of ~2 and 94 h, respectively, and 85–100% of the drug was released over 8-days. Pilocarpine-loaded (2% w/v) hydrogels were evaluated in a rabbit model and compared to a similar dose of drug in aqueous solution. The hydrogels were retained in the eye for the entire period of the study with no observed irritation. Pilocarpine-loaded hydrogels sustained pupillary constriction for 24 h after administration as compared to 3 h for the solution, an 8-fold increase in duration of action. A strong correlation between pilocarpine release and pupillary response was observed. In conclusion, the current studies demonstrate that in situ forming PEG hydrogels possess the viscoelastic, retention, and sustained delivery properties required for an efficient ocular drug delivery system. PMID:19341773

  10. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  11. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  12. Neurobiological model of stimulated dopamine neurotransmission to interpret fast-scan cyclic voltammetry data.

    PubMed

    Harun, Rashed; Grassi, Christine M; Munoz, Miranda J; Torres, Gonzalo E; Wagner, Amy K

    2015-03-02

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical method that can assess real-time in vivo dopamine (DA) concentration changes to study the kinetics of DA neurotransmission. Electrical stimulation of dopaminergic (DAergic) pathways can elicit FSCV DA responses that largely reflect a balance of DA release and reuptake. Interpretation of these evoked DA responses requires a framework to discern the contribution of DA release and reuptake. The current, widely implemented interpretive framework for doing so is the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model, which is grounded on two assumptions- (1) DA release rate is constant during stimulation, and (2) DA reuptake occurs through dopamine transporters (DAT) in a manner consistent with M-M enzyme kinetics. Though the M-M model can simulate evoked DA responses that rise convexly, response types that predominate in the ventral striatum, the M-M model cannot simulate dorsal striatal responses that rise concavely. Based on current neurotransmission principles and experimental FSCV data, we developed a novel, quantitative, neurobiological framework to interpret DA responses that assumes DA release decreases exponentially during stimulation and continues post-stimulation at a diminishing rate. Our model also incorporates dynamic M-M kinetics to describe DA reuptake as a process of decreasing reuptake efficiency. We demonstrate that this quantitative, neurobiological model is an extension of the traditional M-M model that can simulate heterogeneous regional DA responses following manipulation of stimulation duration, frequency, and DA pharmacology. The proposed model can advance our interpretive framework for future in vivo FSCV studies examining regional DA kinetics and their alteration by disease and DA pharmacology.

  13. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  14. Evaluation of nonlinear structural dynamic responses using a fast-running spring-mass formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, A. S.; Altman, B. S.; Gruda, J. D.

    In today's world, accurate finite-element simulations of large nonlinear systems may require meshes composed of hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom. Even with today's fast computers and the promise of ever-faster ones in the future, central processing unit (CPU) expenditures for such problems could be measured in days. Many contemporary engineering problems, such as those found in risk assessment, probabilistic structural analysis, and structural design optimization, cannot tolerate the cost or turnaround time for such CPU-intensive analyses, because these applications require a large number of cases to be run with different inputs. For many risk assessment applications, analysts would prefer running times to be measurable in minutes. There is therefore a need for approximation methods which can solve such problems far more efficiently than the very detailed methods and yet maintain an acceptable degree of accuracy. For this purpose, we have been working on two methods of approximation: neural networks and spring-mass models. This paper presents our work and results to date for spring-mass modeling and analysis, since we are further along in this area than in the neural network formulation. It describes the physical and numerical models contained in a code we developed called STRESS, which stands for 'Spring-mass Transient Response Evaluation for structural Systems'. The paper also presents results for a demonstration problem, and compares these with results obtained for the same problem using PRONTO3D, a state-of-the-art finite element code which was also developed at Sandia.

  15. Evaluation of nonlinear structural dynamic responses using a fast-running spring-mass formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.S.; Altman, B.S.; Gruda, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    In today`s world, accurate finite-element simulations of large nonlinear systems may require meshes composed of hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom. Even with today`s fast computers and the promise of ever-faster ones in the future, central processing unit (CPU) expenditures for such problems could be measured in days. Many contemporary engineering problems, such as those found in risk assessment, probabilistic structural analysis, and structural design optimization, cannot tolerate the cost or turnaround time for such CPU-intensive analyses, because these applications require a large number of cases to be run with different inputs. For many risk assessment applications, analysts would prefer running times to be measurable in minutes. There is therefore a need for approximation methods which can solve such problems far more efficiently than the very detailed methods and yet maintain an acceptable degree of accuracy. For this purpose, we have been working on two methods of approximation: neural networks and spring-mass models. This paper presents our work and results to date for spring-mass modeling and analysis, since we are further along in this area than in the neural network formulation. It describes the physical and numerical models contained in a code we developed called STRESS, which stands for ``Spring-mass Transient Response Evaluation for structural Systems``. The paper also presents results for a demonstration problem, and compares these with results obtained for the same problem using PRONTO3D, a state-of-the-art finite element code which was also developed at Sandia.

  16. Response of six neutron survey meters in mixed fields of fast and thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Kim, B H; Chang, I; Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Pradhan, A S

    2013-10-01

    Calibration neutron fields have been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to study the responses of commonly used neutron survey meters in the presence of fast neutrons of energy around 10 MeV. The neutron fields were produced by using neutrons from the (241)Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile and a DT neutron generator. The spectral details and the ambient dose equivalent rates of the calibration fields were established, and the responses of six neutron survey meters were evaluated. Four single-moderator-based survey meters exhibited an under-responses ranging from ∼9 to 55 %. DINEUTRUN, commonly used in fields around nuclear reactors, exhibited an over-response by a factor of three in the thermal neutron field and an under-response of ∼85 % in the mixed fields. REM-500 (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) exhibited a response close to 1.0 in the fast neutron fields and an under-response of ∼50 % in the thermal neutron field.

  17. Fast Virtual Stenting with Active Contour Models in Intracranical Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jingru; Long, Yunling; Yan, Huagang; Meng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial stents are becoming increasingly a useful option in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Image simulation of the releasing stent configuration together with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation prior to intervention will help surgeons optimize intervention scheme. This paper proposed a fast virtual stenting of IAs based on active contour model (ACM) which was able to virtually release stents within any patient-specific shaped vessel and aneurysm models built on real medical image data. In this method, an initial stent mesh was generated along the centerline of the parent artery without the need for registration between the stent contour and the vessel. Additionally, the diameter of the initial stent volumetric mesh was set to the maximum inscribed sphere diameter of the parent artery to improve the stenting accuracy and save computational cost. At last, a novel criterion for terminating virtual stent expanding that was based on the collision detection of the axis aligned bounding boxes was applied, making the stent expansion free of edge effect. The experiment results of the virtual stenting and the corresponding CFD simulations exhibited the efficacy and accuracy of the ACM based method, which are valuable to intervention scheme selection and therapy plan confirmation. PMID:26876026

  18. MACULA: Fast Modeling of Rotational Modulations of Spotty Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David

    2015-08-01

    Rotational modulations are frequently observed on stars observed by photometry surveys such as Kepler, with periodicities ranging from days to months and amplitudes of sub-parts-per-million to several percent. These variations may be studied to reveal important stellar properties such as rotational periods, inclinations and gradients of differential rotation. However, inverting the disk-integrated flux into a solution for spot number, sizes, contrasts, etc is highly degenerate and thereby necessitating an exhaustive search of the parameter space. In recognition of this, the software MACULA is designed to be a fast forward model of circular, grey spots on rotating stars, including effects such as differential rotation, spot evolution and even spot penumbra/umbra. MACULA seeks to achieve computational efficiency by using a wholly analytic description of the disk-integrated flux, which is described in Kipping (2012), leading to a computational improvement of three orders-of-magnitude over its numerical counterparts. As part of the hack day, I'll show how to simulate light curves with MACULA and provide examples with visualizations. I will also discuss the on-going development of the code, which will head towards modeling spot crossing events and radial velocity jitter and I encourage discussions amongst the participants on analytic methods to this end.

  19. Effect of fasting on serum lithium levels: an experimental study in animal models.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zia; Subhan, Fazal; Shah, Muhammad Tahir; Farooq, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Muslims throughout the world observe dawn to dusk fast in the month of Holy Ramadan. This study aims to investigate the effect of fasting on serum lithium levels in an animal model under typical conditions of Ramadan. Animals were categorized into oral and intraperitoneal groups. Each group was divided into fasting and non fasting groups along with their controls having six animals each. Mean serum lithium levels of non-fasting and fasting rats were assessed. Mean serum lithium levels of oral non-fasting rats was 0.23±0.004 mequiv/L, (n=6) compared to oral fasting rats 0.20+0.002 mequiv/L, (n=6) mean difference=0.003. The mean difference between mean serum lithium level of intraperitoneal non fasting (0.246±0.015 mequiv/L, n = 6) and intraperitoneal fasting rats (0.206±0.020 mequiv/L, n = 6) was 0.02. These differences were statistically non significant (P>0.05). The mean serum lithium is not grossly affected by fasting in rats under 25ºC and fasting for almost 12 hours which is consistent with a previous clinical study. Lithium can be used by fasting bipolar patients but, will require careful supervision.

  20. A fast-responsive fluorescent probe for sulfite and its bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaoliang; Long, Liping; Xiao, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    A turn-on fluorescent probe Coumarin-SO2 based on a nucleophilic addition reaction was developed for the rapid detection of SO3(2-) in aqueous media. The probe Coumarin-SO2 displays excellent water solubility, fast response, highly sensitivity and highly selectivity over other biological related species. More importantly, living cell imaging experiments indicate the feasibility of using the probe for the detection of SO3(2-) in biological systems.

  1. Fast Prediction and Evaluation of Gravitational Waveforms Using Surrogate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Scott E.; Galley, Chad R.; Hesthaven, Jan S.; Kaye, Jason; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    We propose a solution to the problem of quickly and accurately predicting gravitational waveforms within any given physical model. The method is relevant for both real-time applications and more traditional scenarios where the generation of waveforms using standard methods can be prohibitively expensive. Our approach is based on three offline steps resulting in an accurate reduced order model in both parameter and physical dimensions that can be used as a surrogate for the true or fiducial waveform family. First, a set of m parameter values is determined using a greedy algorithm from which a reduced basis representation is constructed. Second, these m parameters induce the selection of m time values for interpolating a waveform time series using an empirical interpolant that is built for the fiducial waveform family. Third, a fit in the parameter dimension is performed for the waveform's value at each of these m times. The cost of predicting L waveform time samples for a generic parameter choice is of order O(mL+mcfit) online operations, where cfit denotes the fitting function operation count and, typically, m ≪L. The result is a compact, computationally efficient, and accurate surrogate model that retains the original physics of the fiducial waveform family while also being fast to evaluate. We generate accurate surrogate models for effective-one-body waveforms of nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with durations as long as 105M, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and for multiple spherical harmonic modes. We find that these surrogates are more than 3 orders of magnitude faster to evaluate as compared to the cost of generating effective-one-body waveforms in standard ways. Surrogate model building for other waveform families and models follows the same steps and has the same low computational online scaling cost. For expensive numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences, we thus anticipate extremely large speedups in generating new waveforms with a

  2. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Bradley, D A; Saripan, M I; Ramli, A T; Wagiran, H

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of doped SiO(2) optical fibres subjected to (241)AmBe neutron irradiation. The TL materials, which comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres, were exposed in close contact with the (241)AmBe source to obtain fast neutron interactions through use of measurements obtained with and without a Cd filter (the filter being made to entirely enclose the fibres). The neutron irradiations were performed for exposure times of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5- and 7-days in a neutron tank filled with water. In this study, use was also made of the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 5 (V5) to simulate the neutron irradiations experiment. It was found that the commercially available Ge-doped and Al-doped optical fibres show a linear dose response subjected to fast neutrons from (241)AmBe source up to seven days of irradiations. The simulation performed using MCNP5 also exhibits a similar pattern, albeit differing in sensitivity. The TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre, the total absorption cross section for Ge in both the fast and thermal neutrons region being some ten times greater than that of Al.

  3. Model refinement using transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

  4. Fast response measurements of the dispersion of nanoparticles in a vehicle wake and a street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Robins, Alan; Britter, Rex

    2009-12-01

    The distributions of nanoparticles (below 300 nm in diameter) change rapidly after emission from the tail pipe of a moving vehicle due to the influence of transformation processes. Information on this time scale is important for modelling of nanoparticle dispersion but is unknown because the sampling frequencies of available instruments are unable to capture these rapid processes. In this study, a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (Cambustion Instruments DMS500), originally designed to measure particle number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations in engine exhaust emissions, was deployed to measure particles in the 5-1000 nm size range at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz. This article presents results of two separate studies; one, measurements along the roadside in a Cambridge (UK) street canyon and, two, measurements at a fixed position (20 cm above road level), centrally, in the wake of a single moving diesel-engined car. The aims of the first measurements were to test the suitability and recommend optimum operating conditions of the DMS500 for ambient measurements. The aim of the second study was to investigate the time scale over which competing influences of dilution and transformation processes (nucleation, condensation and coagulation) affect the PNDs in the wake of a moving car. Results suggested that the effect of transformation processes was nearly complete within about 1 s after emission due to rapid dilution in the vehicle wake. Furthermore, roadside measurements in a street canyon showed that the time for traffic emissions to reach the roadside in calm wind conditions was about 45 ± 6 s. These observations suggest the hypothesis that the effects of transformation processes are generally complete by the time particles are observed at roadside and the total particle numbers can then be assumed as conserved. A corollary of this hypothesis is that complex transformation processes can be ignored when modelling the behaviour of nanoparticles

  5. A “Cosmic Comb” Model of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    Recent observations of fast radio bursts (FRBs) indicate a perplexing, inconsistent picture. We propose a unified scenario to interpret diverse FRBs observed. A regular pulsar, otherwise unnoticeable at a cosmological distance, may produce a bright FRB if its magnetosphere is suddenly “combed” by a nearby, strong plasma stream toward the anti-stream direction. If the Earth is to the night side of the stream, the combed magnetic sheath would sweep across the direction of Earth and make a detectable FRB. The stream could be an AGN flare, a GRB or supernova blastwave, a tidal disruption event, or even a stellar flare. Since it is the energy flux received by the pulsar rather than the luminosity of the stream origin that defines the properties of the FRB, this model predicts a variety of counterparts of FRBs, including a possible connection between FRB 150418 and an AGN flare, a possible connection between FRB 131104 and a weak GRB, a steady radio nebula associated with the repeating FRB 121102, and probably no bright counterparts for some FRBs.

  6. Fast-mode elimination in stochastic metapopulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, George W. A.; McKane, Alan J.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the stochastic dynamics of entities which are confined to a set of islands, between which they migrate. They are assumed to be one of two types, and in addition to migration, they also reproduce and die. Birth and death events are later moderated by weak selection. Systems which fall into this class are common in biology and social science, occurring in ecology, population genetics, epidemiology, biochemistry, linguistics, opinion dynamics, and other areas. In all these cases the governing equations are intractable, consisting as they do of multidimensional Fokker-Planck equations or, equivalently, coupled nonlinear stochastic differential equations with multiplicative noise. We develop a methodology which exploits a separation in time scales between fast and slow variables to reduce these equations so that they resemble those for a single island, which are amenable to analysis. The technique is generally applicable, but we choose to discuss it in the context of population genetics, in part because of the extra features that appear due to selection. The idea behind the method is simple, its application is systematic, and the results are in very good agreement with simulations of the full model for a range of parameter values.

  7. Models of coronal heating, turbulence and fast reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, M.; Pucci, F.; Rappazzo, F.; Tenerani, A.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal heating is at the origin of the EUV and X-ray emission and mass loss from the sun and many other stars. While different scenarios have been proposed to explain the heating of magnetically confined and open regions of the corona, they must all rely on the transfer, storage and dissipation of the abundant energy present in photospheric motions, which, coupled to magnetic fields, give rise to the complex phenomenology seen at the chromosphere and transition region (i.e. spicules, jets, 'tornadoes'). Here we discuss models and numerical simulations which rely on magnetic fields and electric currents both for energy transfer and for storage in the corona. We will revisit the sources and frequency spectrum of kinetic and electromagnetic energies, the role of boundary conditions, and the routes to small scales required for effective dissipation. Because reconnection in current sheets has been, and still is, one of the most important processes for coronal heating, we will also discuss recent aspects concerning the triggering of reconnection instabilities and the transition to fast reconnection.

  8. Models of coronal heating, turbulence and fast reconnection.

    PubMed

    Velli, M; Pucci, F; Rappazzo, F; Tenerani, A

    2015-05-28

    Coronal heating is at the origin of the EUV and X-ray emission and mass loss from the sun and many other stars. While different scenarios have been proposed to explain the heating of magnetically confined and open regions of the corona, they must all rely on the transfer, storage and dissipation of the abundant energy present in photospheric motions, which, coupled to magnetic fields, give rise to the complex phenomenology seen at the chromosphere and transition region (i.e. spicules, jets, 'tornadoes'). Here we discuss models and numerical simulations which rely on magnetic fields and electric currents both for energy transfer and for storage in the corona. We will revisit the sources and frequency spectrum of kinetic and electromagnetic energies, the role of boundary conditions, and the routes to small scales required for effective dissipation. Because reconnection in current sheets has been, and still is, one of the most important processes for coronal heating, we will also discuss recent aspects concerning the triggering of reconnection instabilities and the transition to fast reconnection.

  9. Photoconductive Detectors with Fast Temporal Response for Laser Produced Plasma Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Halvorson, C; Perry, T; Weber, F; Young, P; Silbernagel, C

    2008-05-06

    Processes during laser plasma experiments typically have time scales that are less than 100 ps. The measurement of these processes requires X-ray detectors with fast temporal resolution. We have measured the temporal responses and linearity of several different X-ray sensitive Photoconductive Detectors (PCDs). The active elements of the detectors investigated include both diamond (natural and synthetic) and GaAs crystals. The typical time responses of the GaAs PCDs are approximately 60 ps, respectively. Some characterizations using X-ray light from a synchrotron light source are presented.

  10. Photoconductive Detectors with Fast Temporal Response for Laser Produced Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. May, C. Halvorson, T. Perry, F. Weber, P. Young, C. Silbernagel

    2008-06-01

    Processes during laser plasma experiments typically have time scales that are less than 100 ps. The measurement of these processes requires X-ray detectors with fast temporal resolution. We have measured the temporal responses and linearity of several different Xray sensitive Photoconductive Detectors (PCDs). The active elements of the detectors investigated include both diamond (natural and synthetic) and GaAs crystals. The typical time responses of the GaAs PCDs are approximately 60 ps, respectively. Some characterizations using X-ray light from a synchrotron light source are presented.

  11. Photoconductive detectors with fast temporal response for laser produced plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Halvorson, C; Perry, T; Weber, F; Young, P; Silbernagel, C

    2008-10-01

    Processes during laser plasma experiments typically have time scales that are less than 100 ps. The measurement of these processes requires x-ray detectors with fast temporal resolution. We have measured the temporal responses and linearity of several different x-ray sensitive photoconductive detectors (PCDs). The active elements of the detectors investigated include both diamond (natural and synthetic) and GaAs crystals. The typical time responses of the GaAs PCDs are approximately 60 ps, respectively. Some characterizations using x-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source are presented.

  12. Density Estimation Trees as fast non-parametric modelling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    A Density Estimation Tree (DET) is a decision trees trained on a multivariate dataset to estimate the underlying probability density function. While not competitive with kernel techniques in terms of accuracy, DETs are incredibly fast, embarrassingly parallel and relatively small when stored to disk. These properties make DETs appealing in the resource- expensive horizon of the LHC data analysis. Possible applications may include selection optimization, fast simulation and fast detector calibration. In this contribution I describe the algorithm and its implementation made available to the HEP community as a RooFit object. A set of applications under discussion within the LHCb Collaboration are also briefly illustrated.

  13. Duration of fasting but not diurnal variation affects the response to glucagon in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Gilor, C; Glock, R; Gilor, S

    2015-10-01

    The role of glucagon disturbances in diabetes is increasingly recognized. Glucagon stimulation tests (GSTs) have been described in cats previously, but information is lacking on the response of cats to glucagon under specific conditions. The aim of this study was to assess a novel protocol for GST using human-recombinant glucagon and the effect of diurnal variation and duration of fasting using this protocol in healthy cats. All intravenous doses resulted in occasional vomiting and nausea, and eventually, a 20-μg/kg intramuscular dose was chosen. Five healthy cats were then used in a repeated-measures study. Cats were free-fed regularly at 7:30 AM and 5:30 PM for 30 min. In each cat, GST was performed at 7 PM after a 25-h fast (PM25), at 9 AM after a 25-h fast (AM25), and at 9 AM after a 15-h fast (AM15). Glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at -15, 0, 15, 25, 35, 45, and 60 min after stimulation. Baseline and peak concentrations were compared using the Friedman test. Baseline glucose and insulin did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Peak glucose concentrations occurred at 15 min and were significantly higher (P = 0.0085) at AM15 (mean ± standard deviation = 185.2 ± 43.0 mg/dL) vs AM25 (144.4 ± 10.5 mg/dL) and PM25 (128.0 ± 18.4 mg/dL). Similarly, peak insulin concentrations occurred at 15 min and were significantly higher (P = 0.04) at AM15 (1,911 ± 1,153 pg/mL) vs AM25 (739 ± 52 pg/mL) or PM25 (549 ± 366 pg/mL). In conclusion, prolonged fasting significantly blunted the glycemic response to glucagon compared with shorter fasting, but diurnal variation had no significant effect on glucose or insulin responses.

  14. Fast Flexible Modeling of RNA Structure Using Internal Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Samuel Coulbourn; Sherman, Michael A.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Eastman, Peter; Altman, Russ Biagio

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the structure and dynamics of large macromolecules remains a critical challenge. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are expensive because they model every atom independently, and are difficult to combine with experimentally derived knowledge. Assembly of molecules using fragments from libraries relies on the database of known structures and thus may not work for novel motifs. Coarse-grained modeling methods have yielded good results on large molecules but can suffer from difficulties in creating more detailed full atomic realizations. There is therefore a need for molecular modeling algorithms that remain chemically accurate and economical for large molecules, do not rely on fragment libraries, and can incorporate experimental information. RNABuilder works in the internal coordinate space of dihedral angles and thus has time requirements proportional to the number of moving parts rather than the number of atoms. It provides accurate physics-based response to applied forces, but also allows user-specified forces for incorporating experimental information. A particular strength of RNABuilder is that all Leontis-Westhof basepairs can be specified as primitives by the user to be satisfied during model construction. We apply RNABuilder to predict the structure of an RNA molecule with 160 bases from its secondary structure, as well as experimental information. Our model matches the known structure to 10.2 Angstroms RMSD and has low computational expense. PMID:21778523

  15. Fast Hemodynamic Responses in the Visual Cortex of the Awake Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Dhruv, Neel T.; Benucci, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses in mice and other species are typically measured under anesthesia. However, anesthesia could influence their relationship to neural activity. To investigate this relationship, we used optical imaging in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). Hemodynamic responses yielded clear maps of retinotopy in both anesthetized and awake mice. However, during wakefulness, responses were four times larger and twice as fast. These differences held whether we induced anesthesia with urethane or isoflurane and whether awake mice were stationary or running on a treadmill. With electrode recordings, we established that the effects of wakefulness reflect changes in neurovascular coupling, not in neural activity. By activating V1 directly via optogenetics, we replicated the effects of wakefulness in terms of timing but not of amplitude. We conclude that neurovascular coupling depends critically on anesthesia and wakefulness: during wakefulness, neural activity is followed by much stronger and quicker hemodynamic responses. PMID:24227743

  16. Frequency response function-based model updating using Kriging model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. T.; Wang, C. J.; Zhao, J. P.

    2017-03-01

    An acceleration frequency response function (FRF) based model updating method is presented in this paper, which introduces Kriging model as metamodel into the optimization process instead of iterating the finite element analysis directly. The Kriging model is taken as a fast running model that can reduce solving time and facilitate the application of intelligent algorithms in model updating. The training samples for Kriging model are generated by the design of experiment (DOE), whose response corresponds to the difference between experimental acceleration FRFs and its counterpart of finite element model (FEM) at selected frequency points. The boundary condition is taken into account, and a two-step DOE method is proposed for reducing the number of training samples. The first step is to select the design variables from the boundary condition, and the selected variables will be passed to the second step for generating the training samples. The optimization results of the design variables are taken as the updated values of the design variables to calibrate the FEM, and then the analytical FRFs tend to coincide with the experimental FRFs. The proposed method is performed successfully on a composite structure of honeycomb sandwich beam, after model updating, the analytical acceleration FRFs have a significant improvement to match the experimental data especially when the damping ratios are adjusted.

  17. Response surface methodology to optimize novel fast disintegrating tablets using β cyclodextrin as diluent.

    PubMed

    Late, Sameer G; Banga, Ajay K

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work was to apply response surface approach to investigate main and interaction effects of formulation parameters in optimizing novel fast disintegrating tablet formulation using β cyclodextrin as a diluent. The variables studied were diluent (β cyclodextrin, X (1)), superdisintegrant (Croscarmellose sodium, X (2)), and direct compression aid (Spray dried lactose, X (3)). Tablets were prepared by direct compression method on B2 rotary tablet press using flat plain-face punches and characterized for weight variation, thickness, disintegration time (Y (1)), and hardness (Y (2)). Disintegration time was strongly affected by quadratic terms of β cyclodextrin, croscarmellose sodium, and spray-dried lactose. The positive value of regression coefficient for β cyclodextrin suggested that hardness increased with increased amount of β cyclodextrin. In general, disintegration of tablets has been reported to slow down with increase in hardness. However in the present study, higher concentration of β cyclodextrin was found to improve tablet hardness without increasing the disintegration time. Thus, β cyclodextrin is proposed as a suitable diluent to achieve fast disintegrating tablets with sufficient hardness. Good correlation between the predicted values and experimental data of the optimized formulation validated prognostic ability of response surface methodology in optimizing fast disintegrating tablets using β cyclodextrin as a diluent.

  18. Spike history neural response model.

    PubMed

    Kameneva, Tatiana; Abramian, Miganoosh; Zarelli, Daniele; Nĕsić, Dragan; Burkitt, Anthony N; Meffin, Hamish; Grayden, David B

    2015-06-01

    There is a potential for improved efficacy of neural stimulation if stimulation levels can be modified dynamically based on the responses of neural tissue in real time. A neural model is developed that describes the response of neurons to electrical stimulation and that is suitable for feedback control neuroprosthetic stimulation. Experimental data from NZ white rabbit retinae is used with a data-driven technique to model neural dynamics. The linear-nonlinear approach is adapted to incorporate spike history and to predict the neural response of ganglion cells to electrical stimulation. To validate the fitness of the model, the penalty term is calculated based on the time difference between each simulated spike and the closest spike in time in the experimentally recorded train. The proposed model is able to robustly predict experimentally observed spike trains.

  19. Response of a Si-diode-based device to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Spurný, Frantisek

    2005-02-01

    Semiconductor devices based on a Si-detector are frequently used for charged particle's detection; one application being in the investigation of cosmic radiation fields. From the spectra of energy deposition events in such devices, the total energy deposited by the radiation in silicon can be derived. This contribution presents the results of studies concerning the response of this type of detector to fast neutrons. First, the spectrum of energy deposition was established in fast neutron radiation fields with average energies from 0.5 to 50 MeV. It was found that these spectra vary significantly with the neutron energy. The comparison with the spectra registered in photon beams permitted an estimation of the part of energy deposited that could be attributed to neutrons. It was found that this part increases rapidly with neutron energy. The possibilities to use this type of detector for neutron detection and dosimetry for radiation protection are analysed and discussed.

  20. Fast-SNP: a fast matrix pre-processing algorithm for efficient loopless flux optimization of metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Computation of steady-state flux solutions in large metabolic models is routinely performed using flux balance analysis based on a simple LP (Linear Programming) formulation. A minimal requirement for thermodynamic feasibility of the flux solution is the absence of internal loops, which are enforced using ‘loopless constraints’. The resulting loopless flux problem is a substantially harder MILP (Mixed Integer Linear Programming) problem, which is computationally expensive for large metabolic models. Results: We developed a pre-processing algorithm that significantly reduces the size of the original loopless problem into an easier and equivalent MILP problem. The pre-processing step employs a fast matrix sparsification algorithm—Fast- sparse null-space pursuit (SNP)—inspired by recent results on SNP. By finding a reduced feasible ‘loop-law’ matrix subject to known directionalities, Fast-SNP considerably improves the computational efficiency in several metabolic models running different loopless optimization problems. Furthermore, analysis of the topology encoded in the reduced loop matrix enabled identification of key directional constraints for the potential permanent elimination of infeasible loops in the underlying model. Overall, Fast-SNP is an effective and simple algorithm for efficient formulation of loop-law constraints, making loopless flux optimization feasible and numerically tractable at large scale. Availability and Implementation: Source code for MATLAB including examples is freely available for download at http://www.aibn.uq.edu.au/cssb-resources under Software. Optimization uses Gurobi, CPLEX or GLPK (the latter is included with the algorithm). Contact: lars.nielsen@uq.edu.au Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27559155

  1. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Green, Melissa; Boris, Jay; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    We describe a model for systems-level transport in the human circulatory system that is based on a set of equations for a one-dimensional unsteady elastic pipe flow circuit. The system is collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To drive the fluid, the contractions of a beating heart are modeled as periodic area changes of the elastic vessels. Two different models are compared, both including and neglecting fluid acceleration. Time-resolved distributions of pressure, velocity and area compare reasonably well with reference data. Increasing the rigidity of the vasculature is found to increase peak arterial pressures on the order of ten percent, and including a distributed vascular contraction to model distributed skeletal muscle contractions monotonically increases time-averaged blood flow in the veins, consistent with human physiological response. The circulatory system model presented here simulates the circulatory system on the order of one hundred times faster than real-time; that is, we can compute thousands of heartbeats per minute of CPU time.

  2. A new fast reconnection model in a collisionless regime

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, David

    2008-11-15

    Based on the first principles [i.e., (i) by balancing the magnetic field advection with the term containing electron pressure tensor nongyrotropic components in the generalized Ohm's law; (ii) using the conservation of mass; and (iii) assuming that the weak magnetic field region width, where electron meandering motion supports electron pressure tensor off-diagonal (nongyrotropic) components, is of the order of electron Larmor radius] a simple model of magnetic reconnection in a collisionless regime is formulated. The model is general, resembling its collisional Sweet-Parker analog in that it is not specific to any initial configuration, e.g., Harris-type tearing unstable current sheet, X-point collapse or otherwise. In addition to its importance from the fundamental point of view, the collisionless reconnection model offers a much faster reconnection rate [M{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/(r{sub L,e}L)] than Sweet-Parker's classical one (M{sub sp}=S{sup -1/2}). The width of the diffusion region (current sheet) in the collisionless regime is found to be {delta}{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/r{sub L,e}, which is independent of the global reconnection scale L and is only prescribed by microphysics (electron inertial length, c/{omega}{sub pe}, and electron Larmor radius, r{sub L,e}). Amongst other issues, the fastness of the reconnection rate alleviates, e.g., the problem of interpretation of solar flares by means of reconnection, as for the typical solar coronal parameters the obtained collisionless reconnection time can be a few minutes, as opposed to Sweet-Parker's equivalent value of less than a day. The new theoretical reconnection rate is compared to the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment device experimental data by Yamada et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 052119 (2006)] and Ji et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 13106 (2008)], and a good agreement is obtained.

  3. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  4. Cultured slow vs. fast skeletal muscle cells differ in physiology and responsiveness to stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chih; Dennis, Robert G; Baar, Keith

    2006-07-01

    In vitro studies have used protein markers to distinguish between myogenic cells isolated from fast and slow skeletal muscles. The protein markers provide some support for the hypothesis that satellite cells from fast and slow muscles are different, but the data are equivocal. To test this hypothesis directly, three-dimensional skeletal muscle constructs were engineered from myogenic cells isolated from fast tibialis anterior (TA) and slow soleus (SOL) muscles of rats and functionality was tested. Time to peak twitch tension (TPT) and half relaxation time (RT(1/2)) were approximately 30% slower in constructs from the SOL. The slower contraction and relaxation times for the SOL constructs resulted in left shift of the force-frequency curve compared with those from the TA. Western blot analysis showed a 60% greater quantity of fast myosin heavy chain in the TA constructs. 14 days of chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation resulted in a 15% slower TPT and a 14% slower RT(1/2), but no change in absolute force production in the TA constructs. In SOL constructs, slow electrical stimulation resulted in an 80% increase in absolute force production with no change in TPT or RT(1/2). The addition of cyclosporine A did not prevent the increase in force in SOL constructs after chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting that calcineurin is not responsible for the increase in force. We conclude that myogenic cells associated with a slow muscle are imprinted to produce muscle that contracts and relaxes slowly and that calcineurin activity cannot explain the response to a slow pattern of electrical stimulation.

  5. 'Bubble chamber model' of fast atom bombardment induced processes.

    PubMed

    Kosevich, Marina V; Shelkovsky, Vadim S; Boryak, Oleg A; Orlov, Vadim V

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning FAB mechanisms, referred to as a 'bubble chamber FAB model', is proposed. This model can provide an answer to the long-standing question as to how fragile biomolecules and weakly bound clusters can survive under high-energy particle impact on liquids. The basis of this model is a simple estimation of saturated vapour pressure over the surface of liquids, which shows that all liquids ever tested by fast atom bombardment (FAB) and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were in the superheated state under the experimental conditions applied. The result of the interaction of the energetic particles with superheated liquids is known to be qualitatively different from that with equilibrium liquids. It consists of initiation of local boiling, i.e., in formation of vapour bubbles along the track of the energetic particle. This phenomenon has been extensively studied in the framework of nuclear physics and provides the basis for construction of the well-known bubble chamber detectors. The possibility of occurrence of similar processes under FAB of superheated liquids substantiates a conceptual model of emission of secondary ions suggested by Vestal in 1983, which assumes formation of bubbles beneath the liquid surface, followed by their bursting accompanied by release of microdroplets and clusters as a necessary intermediate step for the creation of molecular ions. The main distinctive feature of the bubble chamber FAB model, proposed here, is that the bubbles are formed not in the space and time-restricted impact-excited zone, but in the nearby liquid as a 'normal' boiling event, which implies that the temperature both within the bubble and in the droplets emerging on its burst is practically the same as that of the bulk liquid sample. This concept can resolve the paradox of survival of intact biomolecules under FAB, since the part of the sample participating in the liquid-gas transition via the bubble mechanism has an ambient temperature

  6. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  7. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    High-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.

  8. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-12-16

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.

  9. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    DOE PAGES

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; ...

    2014-12-16

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale inmore » a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.« less

  10. Development of a system for aerodynamic fast-response probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossweiler, C.; Humm, H.; Kupferschmied, P.

    This paper describes the development of a fast-response probe measurement system. Small pressure probes have been equipped with up to 4 miniature pressure sensors. The high frequency response of such sensors allied to minimized cavities between the flow and the sensing diaphragm enables the probe system to take measurements up to 40 kHz bandwidth (typical blade passing frequency: 2-10 kHz). First results of investigations on the aerodynamic of high frequency response measurement probes are presented including experiments in a water towing channel with unsteady flows around different probe geometries. The packaging of the sensor chip into the probe, the properties of the sensors and the measurement errors are examined. Probe calibration methods and aerodynamic evaluation procedures are discussed, followed by a presentation of the data acquisition system and of the data evaluation software. Measurements in a radial compressor test rig and in a fully developed pipe flow are shown as applications.

  11. Foxa2 integrates the transcriptional response of the hepatocyte to fasting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Rubins, Nir E; Ahima, Rexford S; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2005-08-01

    Survival during prolonged food deprivation depends on the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Inappropriate regulation of this process is a hallmark of diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Activation of the genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes is mediated by hormone-responsive transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here we show using cell-type-specific gene ablation that the winged helix transcription factor Foxa2 is required for activation of the hepatic gluconeogenic program during fasting. Specifically, Foxa2 promotes gene activation both by cyclic AMP, the second messenger for glucagon, and glucocorticoids. Foxa2 mediates these effects by enabling recruitment of CREB and GR to their respective target sites in chromatin. We conclude that Foxa2 is required for execution of the hepatic gluconeogenic program by integrating the transcriptional response of the hepatocyte to hormonal stimulation.

  12. Ultraviolet fast-response photoelectric effects in LiTaO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-Jia; Xing, Jie; Lu, Hui-Bin; Jin, Kui-Juan; Wen, Juan; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The photoelectric effects of LiTaO3 (LTO) single crystals are experimentally studied with two kinds of LTO wafers, 10° tilted and untilted, at room temperature. A transient open-circuit photoelectrical response of 143 ps rise time is observed in the 10° tilted LTO when a 266 nm pulsed laser with a duration of 25 ps is irradiated directly onto the LTO surface. The untilted LTO with interdigitated electrodes of 10 µm finger width and 10 µm interspacing exhibits a linear dependence on the applied bias and power density of incident light, a response peak at about 235 nm and a sharp cutoff at about 270 nm. The noise current is only 61 pA at 20 V bias under the illumination of sunlight outdoors at midday. The experimental results suggest the promising application of the LTO single crystal in UV detection, in particular, as a solar-blind fast-response photodetector.

  13. Exupéry - a mobile fast response system for managing a volcanic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Despite ever increasing efforts to monitor historically active volcanoes many of those are still very poorly or unmonitored, even in highly populated areas. In case of volcanic unrest or even a volcanic crisis evaluating the situation is therefore often very difficult due to the little information that is available for that specific volcano. Over the past decades several different programs have supported volcanic crisis management efforts in third world countries from sending experts all the way to improving or even installing new networks around the volcano. One of the main problems especially when quickly upgrading networks during a crisis is that each system usually comes with its own acquisition and processing system which makes it very difficult to manage the observational network and provide an interdisciplinary interpretation of the data with respect to the activity status of the volcano. Here we present a newly developed volcano fast response system which overcomes several of these shortcomings. The core of the system is a novel database (SEISHUB) that allows for the collection of data of various kinds, i.e. simple time series data like seismic data, gas measurements, GPS measurements, as well as satellite data (SO2 flux, thermal anomaly, ground deformation). Part of the collected data may also come from an already existing network. Data from new field instruments are transmitted through a wireless network that has been specifically designed for the volcano fast response system. One of the main difficulties with such a multidisciplinary data set is an easy access to the data. This is provided through a common Web based GIS interface which allows various datalayers being simultaneously accessed through a Web Browser. The underlying software is designed in such a way that it only uses open source software, so it can be easily installed on other systems not having to deal with purchasing proprietary software. Aside from this the system provides tools to

  14. Characterizing a fast-response, low-afterglow liquid scintillator for neutron time-of-flight diagnostics in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y. Hosoda, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Iwasa, Y.; Iwano, K.; Yamanoi, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Sarukura, N.; Shiraga, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2014-11-15

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are investigated and optimized for application to a single-hit neutron spectrometer for fast ignition experiments. It is found that 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene has better characteristics as a liquid scintillator solvent than the conventional solvent, p-xylene. In addition, a benzophenon-doped BBQ liquid scintillator is shown to demonstrate very rapid time response, and therefore has potential for further use in neutron diagnostics with fast time resolution.

  15. Physiological responses to short-term fasting among herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous fishes.

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan D; Tibbetts, Ian R; Secor, Stephen M

    2014-05-01

    We explored the integrated role of dietary specialization and feeding periodicity on the response of the gastrointestinal tract of teleosts fishes to short-term (7-10 days) fasting and refeeding. Fasted and fed herbivorous grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), omnivorous channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were compared for digestive organ masses, intestinal morphology, gastrointestinal pH, and the specific activities and total intestinal capacities of the intestinal hydrolases aminopeptidase (APN) and maltase and intestinal nutrient transporters. All three species experience intestinal hypertrophy with feeding as noted by significant increases in enterocyte dimensions. Of the three, only I. punctatus experienced a postprandial increase in intestinal length, and only C. idella experienced significant modulation of intestinal microvillus length. Feeding resulted in acidification of the stomachs of I. punctatus and M. salmoides. Predicted to exhibit a relatively modest set of postprandial responses because of their more frequent feeding habits, C. idella only experienced increases in APN and maltase activity with feeding and no significant regulation of nutrient uptake. Significant regulation of hydrolase activities and nutrient uptake were exhibited by I. punctatus and M. salmoides, with I. punctatus experiencing the most comprehensive set of responses. As predicted by food habits, there was an interspecific gradient in intestinal length and glucose uptake extending from longer intestines and greater glucose uptake for the herbivorous C. idella, intermediate lengths and glucose uptake for the omnivorous I. punctatus, and shorter intestines and reduced glucose uptake for the carnivorous M. salmoides. Among teleosts fishes, short episodes of fasting lead to significant alterations in intestinal form and function that are rapidly restored with feeding.

  16. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  17. Fast response temperature and humidity sensors for measurements in high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Arwatz, Gilad; Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Conventional hot/cold wires have been widely used in measuring velocity and temperature in turbulent flows due to their fine resolutions and fast response. However, for very high Reynolds number flows, limitations on the resolution appear. A very high Reynolds number flow is the atmospheric boundary layer. In order to accurately predict the energy balance at the Earth's surface, one needs information about the different turbulent scalar fields, mainly temperature and humidity, which together with velocity, contribute to the turbulent fluxes away from the surface. The nano-scaled thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) was previously developed at Princeton and has proven to have much higher spatial and temporal resolution than the regular hot wires. Here we introduce new fast-response temperature and humidity sensors that have been developed and tested. These sensors are made in-house using standard MEMS manufacturing techniques, leaving high flexibility in the process for optimization to different conditions. The small dimensions of these novel sensors enable very high spatial resolution while the small thermal mass allows significant improvements in the frequency response. These sensors have shown promising results in acquiring un-biased data of turbulent scalar and vector fields. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  18. A display module implemented by the fast high-temperatue response of carbon nanotube thin yarns.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Liu, Peng; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2012-05-09

    Suspending superaligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were processed into CNT thin yarns, about 1 μm in diameter, by laser cutting and an ethanol atomization bath treatment. The fast high-temperature response under a vacuum was revealed by monitoring the incandescent light with a photo diode. The thin yarns can be electrically heated up to 2170 K in 0.79 mS, and the succeeding cool-down time is 0.36 mS. The fast response is attributed to the ultrasmall mass of the independent single yarn, large radiation coefficient, and improved thermal conductance through the two cool ends. The millisecond response time makes it possible to use the visible hot thin yarns as light-emitting elements of an incandescent display. A fully sealed display with 16 × 16 matrix was successfully fabricated using screen-printed thick electrodes and CNT thin yarns. It can display rolling characters with a low power consumption. More applications can be further developed based on the addressable CNT thermal arrays.

  19. Fast magnetic resonance imaging of the internal impact response of dense granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christoph; Penn, Alexander; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    Dense granular suspensions exhibit a number of intriguing properties such as discontinuous shear-thickening and the formation of dynamic jamming fronts when impacted by a solid. Probing non-intrusively these phenomena experimentally in full three-dimensional systems is, however, highly challenging as suspensions are commonly opaque and thus, not accessible optically. Here we report the development and implementation of a fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology allowing us to image the internal dynamics of dense granular suspensions at high temporal resolutions. An important facet of this work is the implementation of parallel MRI using tailored multi-channel receive hardware and the optimization of magnetic properties (susceptibility and NMR relaxivity) of the liquid phase. These two improvements enable us to utilize fast single-shot pulse sequences while yielding sufficient signal intensity at temporal resolutions of less than 50 ms. Furthermore, using motion-sensitive MR pulse sequences we are able to image bulk motion within the system and the response of dense granular suspensions to fast impacts.

  20. Modelling hormonal response and development.

    PubMed

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2014-05-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin-cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges.

  1. Fast and singular muscle responses initiate the startle response of Pantodon buchholzi (Osteoglossomorpha).

    PubMed

    Starosciak, A K; Kalola, R P; Perkins, K P; Riley, J A; Saidel, W M

    2008-01-01

    The startle response of Pantodon buchholzi, the African butterfly fish, is a complete or incomplete ballistic jump resulting from abduction of the pectoral fins. This study analyzed the neuromuscular basis for such a jump by recording in vivo electromyograms (emgs) from the muscles of abduction, the muscularis abductor superficialis (MAS) and the muscularis abductor profundus (MAP). The motor neurons innervating the MAS muscle were localized by retrograde transport of biocytin. The latency between stimulus and the evoked emg in the MAS was less than 5 ms; the latency of the MAP was about 6.5 ms. A single emg was recorded per jump. High speed video demonstrated that onset of a startle movement began within 10 ms of the onset of fin abduction. The emg associated with this movement is short (<2 ms) and followed by a variably-shaped, slower and smaller potential of 10-30 ms duration. The brief period between stimulus and startle response of Pantodon suggests a Mauthner neuron-related response, only with the behavior occurring in the vertical plane. The MAS may act only in a startle response, whereas the MAP might have a role in other behaviors. Elicited jumping habituates after a single trial. Electrophysiological evidence is presented indicating that the innervating motor neurons are suppressed for seconds following a stimulus. The neurons innervating the MAS are located at the medullary-spinal cord junction and possess an average radius of approximately 17.9 mum. These fish have been historically described as 'fresh water' flying fish. As a single emg occurs per startle response, repetitive pectoral activity generating flying cannot be supported. Pantodon 'flight' is ballistic.

  2. A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

  3. Neural Network Model For Fast Learning And Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Henri H.; Macukow, Bohdan

    1989-05-01

    An approach to learning in a multilayer neural network is presented. The proposed network learns by creating interconnections between the input layer and the intermediate layer. In one of the new storage prescriptions proposed, interconnections are excitatory (positive) only and the weights depend on the stored patterns. In the intermediate layer each mother cell is responsible for one stored pattern. Mutually interconnected neurons in the intermediate layer perform a winner-take-all operation, taking into account correlations between stored vectors. The performance of networks using this interconnection prescription is compared with two previously proposed schemes, one using inhibitory connections at the output and one using all-or-nothing interconnections. The network can be used as a content-addressable memory or as a symbolic substitution system that yields an arbitrarily defined output for any input. The training of a model to perform Boolean logical operations is also described. Computer simulations using the network as an autoassociative content-addressable memory show the model to be efficient. Content-addressable associative memories and neural logic modules can be combined to perform logic operations on highly corrupted data.

  4. Problems in modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from a tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The present status of modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from tokamaks is summarized. The modeling issues are discussed, and several new aspects of this problem are described, including gyromotion, radial electric field, and sawtoothing. Existing models predict that TF ripple loss of fast alphas will have a low-to-moderate impact on the design of a tokamak engineering test reactor (ETR). 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Fast-response humidity-sensing films based on methylene blue aggregates formed on nanoporous semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Ryota; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2016-05-01

    We prepared fast-response colorimetric humidity-sensing (vapochromic) films based on methylene blue adsorption onto nanoporous semiconductor (TiO2, Al2O3) films. Color changes caused by changes of humidity could be easily identified visually. A characteristic feature of the vapochromic films was their fast response to changes of humidity. We found that the response began to occur within 10 ms. The response was rapid because all the methylene blue molecules attached to the nanoporous semiconductor surface were directly exposed to the environment. We also deduced that the color changes were caused by structural changes of the methylene blue aggregates on the surface.

  6. Constructing Fast Carrier Tracks into Flexible Perovskite Photodetectors To Greatly Improve Responsivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Yu, Dejian; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yue; Cao, Fei; Wei, Yi; Wu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Zhiguo; Ji, Jianping; Shen, Yalong; Sun, Handong; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-02-28

    Intrinsically high mobility and large absorption coefficient endow inorganic halide perovskites (IHPs) with great promise for high-performance photodetectors (PDs), which, however, are being hindered by the low carrier extraction and transport efficiency of the solution assembled films. Here, we report on a general strategy to enhance the perovskite film conductivity that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) conductive nanonets are constructed from to provide fast carrier tracks. Resultantly, the CsPbBr3 nanosheet/CNT composite films exhibit both high light harvesting and high conductivity, such advantages are demonstrated by the high performances of corresponding planar PDs. Specifically, the highest external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 7488% and the highest responsivity of 31.1 A W(-1) under a bias of 10 V among IHP PDs with planar structure are achieved, which are almost 125-fold over the previous best results. Besides, the efficient charge extraction and transport also remarkably contribute to the fast response speed where a rise time of 16 μs is achieved, which is also superior to state-of-the-art IHP PDs. Furthermore, the composite films exhibit impressive flexibility due to the ultrathin 2D and 1D structural characteristic of perovskites and CNTs. By deploying the PD as a point-like detector, we acquire clear images. The results indicate the promising potentials of the perovskite/CNT composites for solution and ambient condition processed flexible devices, and this strategy is general for all kinds of perovskite optoelectronic devices including photodetectors, phototransistors, and even LEDs.

  7. Thermal remote sensing as a part of Exupéry volcano fast response system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakšek, Klemen; Hort, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the eruptive potential of a volcanic system one has to characterize the actual state of stress of a volcanic system that involves proper monitoring strategies. As several volcanoes in highly populated areas especially in south east Asia are still nearly unmonitored a mobile volcano monitoring system is currently being developed in Germany. One of the major novelties of this mobile volcano fast response system called Exupéry is the direct inclusion of satellite based observations. Remote sensing data are introduced together with ground based field measurements into the GIS database, where the statistical properties of all recorded data are estimated. Using physical modelling and statistical methods we hope to constrain the probability of future eruptions. The emphasis of this contribution is on using thermal remote sensing as tool for monitoring active volcanoes. One can detect thermal anomalies originating from a volcano by comparing signals in mid and thermal infrared spectra. A reliable and effective thermal anomalies detection algorithm was developed by Wright (2002) for MODIS sensor; it is based on the threshold of the so called normalized thermal index (NTI). This is the method we use in Exupéry, where we characterize each detected thermal anomaly by temperature, area, heat flux and effusion rate. The recent work has shown that radiant flux is the most robust parameter for this characterization. Its derivation depends on atmosphere, satellite viewing angle and sensor characteristics. Some of these influences are easy to correct using standard remote sensing pre-processing techniques, however, some noise still remains in data. In addition, satellites in polar orbits have long revisit times and thus they might fail to follow a fast evolving volcanic crisis due to long revisit times. Thus we are currently testing Kalman filter on simultaneous use of MODIS and AVHRR data to improve the thermal anomaly characterization. The advantage of

  8. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  9. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  10. Sucralose Promotes Food Intake through NPY and a Neuronal Fasting Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-Ping; Lin, Yong Qi; Zhang, Lei; Wilson, Yana A; Oyston, Lisa J; Cotterell, James; Qi, Yue; Khuong, Thang M; Bakhshi, Noman; Planchenault, Yoann; Browman, Duncan T; Lau, Man Tat; Cole, Tiffany A; Wong, Adam C N; Simpson, Stephen J; Cole, Adam R; Penninger, Josef M; Herzog, Herbert; Neely, G Gregory

    2016-07-12

    Non-nutritive sweeteners like sucralose are consumed by billions of people. While animal and human studies have demonstrated a link between synthetic sweetener consumption and metabolic dysregulation, the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Here we use a diet supplemented with sucralose to investigate the long-term effects of sweet/energy imbalance. In flies, chronic sweet/energy imbalance promoted hyperactivity, insomnia, glucose intolerance, enhanced sweet taste perception, and a sustained increase in food and calories consumed, effects that are reversed upon sucralose removal. Mechanistically, this response was mapped to the ancient insulin, catecholamine, and NPF/NPY systems and the energy sensor AMPK, which together comprise a novel neuronal starvation response pathway. Interestingly, chronic sweet/energy imbalance promoted increased food intake in mammals as well, and this also occurs through an NPY-dependent mechanism. Together, our data show that chronic consumption of a sweet/energy imbalanced diet triggers a conserved neuronal fasting response and increases the motivation to eat.

  11. Fast reconfiguration of high-frequency brain networks in response to surprising changes in auditory input.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Ruth M; Chapman, Sandra C; Vértes, Petra E; Nathan, Pradeep J; Smith, Marie L; Shtyrov, Yury; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-03-01

    How do human brain networks react to dynamic changes in the sensory environment? We measured rapid changes in brain network organization in response to brief, discrete, salient auditory stimuli. We estimated network topology and distance parameters in the immediate central response period, <1 s following auditory presentation of standard tones interspersed with occasional deviant tones in a mismatch-negativity (MMN) paradigm, using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure synchronization of high-frequency (gamma band; 33-64 Hz) oscillations in healthy volunteers. We found that global small-world parameters of the networks were conserved between the standard and deviant stimuli. However, surprising or unexpected auditory changes were associated with local changes in clustering of connections between temporal and frontal cortical areas and with increased interlobar, long-distance synchronization during the 120- to 250-ms epoch (coinciding with the MMN-evoked response). Network analysis of human MEG data can resolve fast local topological reconfiguration and more long-range synchronization of high-frequency networks as a systems-level representation of the brain's immediate response to salient stimuli in the dynamically changing sensory environment.

  12. Mesoscale Simulation Data for Initializing Fast-Time Wake Transport and Decay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Mathew J.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The fast-time wake transport and decay models require vertical profiles of crosswinds, potential temperature and the eddy dissipation rate as initial conditions. These inputs are normally obtained from various field sensors. In case of data-denied scenarios or operational use, these initial conditions can be provided by mesoscale model simulations. In this study, the vertical profiles of potential temperature from a mesoscale model were used as initial conditions for the fast-time wake models. The mesoscale model simulations were compared against available observations and the wake model predictions were compared with the Lidar measurements from three wake vortex field experiments.

  13. Fast Model Generalized Pseudopotential Theory Interatomic Potential Routine

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-18

    MGPT is an unclassified source code for the fast evaluation and application of quantum-based MGPT interatomic potentials for mrtals. The present version of MGPT has been developed entirely at LLNL, but is specifically designed for implementation in the open-source molecular0dynamics code LAMMPS maintained by Sandia National Laboratories. Using MGPT in LAMMPS, with separate input potential data, one can perform large-scale atomistic simulations of the structural, thermodynamic, defeat and mechanical properties of transition metals with quantum-mechanical realism.

  14. Different response of body weight change according to ketonuria after fasting in the healthy obese.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Min; Lee, Duck-Joo; Kim, Sang-Man

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between obesity and ketonuria is not well-established. We conducted a retrospective observational study to evaluate whether their body weight reduction response differed by the presence of ketonuria after fasting in the healthy obese. We used the data of 42 subjects, who had medical records of initial urinalysis at routine health check-up and follow-up urinalysis in the out-patient clinic, one week later. All subjects in the initial urinalysis showed no ketonuria. However, according to the follow-up urinalysis after three subsequent meals fasts, the patients were divided into a non-ketonuria group and ketonuria group. We compared the data of conventional low-calorie diet programs for 3 months for both groups. Significantly greater reduction of body weight (-8.6 ± 3.6 kg vs -1.1 ± 2.2 kg, P < 0.001), body mass index (-3.16 ± 1.25 kg/m(2) vs -0.43 ± 0.86 kg/m(2), P < 0.001) and waist circumference (-6.92 ± 1.22 vs -2.32 ± 1.01, P < 0.001) was observed in the ketonuria group compared to the non-ketonuria group. Fat mass and lean body mass were also more reduced in the ketonuria group. In addition, serum free fatty acid concentration after intervention in the ketonuria group showed significant more increment than in the non-ketonuria group. The presence of ketonuria after fasting may be a predicting factor of further body weight reduction.

  15. The effect of pantothenate deficiency in mice on their metabolic response to fast and exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, C M; Narrow, C M; Kendrick, Z V; Steffen, C

    1987-02-01

    The changes in fuel metabolism during fast and exercise were compared to the tissue total CoA levels in mice maintained on pantothenate-deficient and pantothenate-supplemented (control) diets. In nonexercised mice maintained on a pantothenate-deficient diet for 65 to 105 days, the total CoA levels of many tissues were significantly lower than in controls (liver 18%, kidney 23%, spleen 21%, heart 38%, and leg skeletal muscle 66%). However, no differences in total CoA levels in brain or epididymal fat pads were observed. During a 48-hour fast, the total CoA levels increased in the heart and liver of both pantothenate-deficient and control mice (heart 32 and 19%, respectively; liver 39 and 45%, respectively), but the level of total CoA remained lower in the deficient mice. Liver glycogen levels were 17% lower in deficient mice than in controls and liver ketone bodies were 17% higher in pantothenate deficient mice than in controls. Separate groups of mice on deficient and supplemented diets were trained to run to exhaustion. Compared to trained mice on pantothenate-supplemented diets, the trained pantothenate-deficient mice had lower running times until exhaustion, lower body weights, lower liver and muscle glycogen content (even after rest), and elevated liver ketone bodies both during rest and after running. In summary, the pantothenate-deficient mice were unable to maintain normal glycogen stores, but had a normal ketogenic response to fast and exercise in spite of the lower levels of liver total CoA.

  16. Effect of training in the fasted state on metabolic responses during exercise with carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    De Bock, K; Derave, W; Eijnde, B O; Hesselink, M K; Koninckx, E; Rose, A J; Schrauwen, P; Bonen, A; Richter, E A; Hespel, P

    2008-04-01

    Skeletal muscle gene response to exercise depends on nutritional status during and after exercise, but it is unknown whether muscle adaptations to endurance training are affected by nutritional status during training sessions. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of an endurance training program (6 wk, 3 day/wk, 1-2 h, 75% of peak Vo(2)) in moderately active males. They trained in the fasted (F; n = 10) or carbohydrate-fed state (CHO; n = 10) while receiving a standardized diet [65 percent of total energy intake (En) from carbohydrates, 20%En fat, 15%En protein]. Before and after the training period, substrate use during a 2-h exercise bout was determined. During these experimental sessions, all subjects were in a fed condition and received extra carbohydrates (1 g.kg body wt(-1) .h(-1)). Peak Vo(2) (+7%), succinate dehydrogenase activity, GLUT4, and hexokinase II content were similarly increased between F and CHO. Fatty acid binding protein (FABPm) content increased significantly in F (P = 0.007). Intramyocellular triglyceride content (IMCL) remained unchanged in both groups. After training, pre-exercise glycogen content was higher in CHO (545 +/- 19 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0.02), but not in F (434 +/- 32 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0.23). For a given initial glycogen content, F blunted exercise-induced glycogen breakdown when compared with CHO (P = 0.04). Neither IMCL breakdown (P = 0.23) nor fat oxidation rates during exercise were altered by training. Thus short-term training elicits similar adaptations in peak Vo(2) whether carried out in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. Although there was a decrease in exercise-induced glycogen breakdown and an increase in proteins involved in fat handling after fasting training, fat oxidation during exercise with carbohydrate intake was not changed.

  17. SCRAM: a fast computational model for the optical performance of point fucus solar central receiver systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, K. D.; Chiang, C. J.

    1980-04-01

    Because of the complexities of heliostat shadowing and blocking calculations, computational models for the optical performance of point focus central receiver (PFCR) systems tend to be too slow for many important applications, such as optimization studies based on performance with realistic weather data. In this paper, a mathematical approximation procedure, designated Sandia Central Receiver Approximation Model (SCRAM) will be described. Rather than simulating the system components from first principles, it relies on data generated by the DELSOL code of Dellin and Fish for the optical performance of PFCR systems, and abstracts a mathematical model using a stepwise regression procedure. The result is a computational procedure which allows the user to define the heliostat field boundaries and tower height arbitrarily, generating a model for optical field performance, including shadowing, blocking, cosine, losses, and atmospheric attenuation, and which requires only a polynomial evaluation for each set of sun angles. A comparison with DELSOL for three different fields on three representative days indicates that the rms error of the approximation is 1-3% and that the new code is 1,000-3,000 times as fast as DELSOL. It is also shown that one reason that the accuracy in field performance predictions is higher than that of the generting function for the model is that much of the error in the generating function is due to an oscillatory behavior associated with a moire pattern in the optical response of the heiostat field.

  18. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; ...

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delaymore » of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.« less

  19. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  20. Renal responses to plasma volume expansion and hyperosmolality in fasting seal pups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2002-01-01

    Renal responses were quantified in northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups during their postweaning fast to examine their excretory capabilities. Pups were infused with either isotonic (0.9%; n = 8; Iso) or hypertonic (16.7%; n = 7; Hyper) saline via an indwelling catheter such that each pup received 3 mmol NaCl/kg. Diuresis after the infusions was similar in magnitude between the two treatments. Osmotic clearance increased by 37% in Iso and 252% in Hyper. Free water clearance was reduced 3.4-fold in Hyper but was not significantly altered in Iso. Glomerular filtration rate increased 71% in the 24-h period after Hyper, but no net change occurred during the same time after Iso. Natriuresis increased 3.6-fold in Iso and 5.3-fold in Hyper. Iso decreased plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol acutely, whereas Hyper increased plasma and excreted AVP and cortisol. Iso was accompanied by the retention of water and electrolytes, whereas the Hyper load was excreted within 24 h. Natriuresis is attributed to increased filtration and is independent of an increase in atrial natriuretic peptide and decreases in ANG II and aldosterone. Fasting pups appear to have well-developed kidneys capable of both extreme conservation and excretion of Na(+).

  1. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Bell, R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  2. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method.

  3. Response of genes involved in lipid metabolism in rat epididymal white adipose tissue to different fasting conditions after long-term fructose consumption.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Xiu; Ke, Da-Zhi; Yao, Ling; Wang, Shang; Ma, Peng; Liu, Li; Zuo, Guo-Wei; Jiang, Li-Rong; Wang, Jian-Wei

    2017-03-04

    There has been much concern regarding the dietary fructose contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. High-fructose diet changes the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Levels of a number of hepatic lipogenic enzymes are increased by a high-carbohydrate diet in fasted-refed model rats/mice. Both the white adipose tissue (WAT) and the liver play a key role in the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis. Here, the aim of this study was to analyze the expression of key genes related to lipid metabolism in epididymal WAT (eWAT) in response to different fasting condition after long-term chronic fructose consumption. Rats were fed standard chow supplemented with 10% w/v fructose solution for 5 weeks, and killed after chow-fasting and fructose withdrawal (fasting) or chow-fasting and continued fructose (fructose alone) for 14 h. Blood parameters and the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis (ChREBP, SREBP-1c, FAS, SCD1), triglyceride biosynthesis (DGAT-1, DGAT-2) and lipid mobilization (ATGL, HSL) in eWAT were analyzed. In addition, mRNA levels of PPAR-γ, CD36 and LPL were also detected. As expected, fructose alone increased the mRNA expression of FAS, SCD1, and correspondingly decreased ATGL and HSL mRNA levels. However, ChREBP, DGAT-2, ATGL and HSL mRNA levels restored near to normal while FAS and SCD1 tend to basic level under fasting condition. The mRNA expression of SREBP-1c, PPAR-γ and LPL did not changed at any situations but CD36 mRNA decreased remarkably in fructose alone group. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that genes involved in lipid metabolism in rat eWAT are varied in response to different fasting conditions after long-term fructose consumption.

  4. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  5. Unique and shared responses of the gut microbiota to prolonged fasting: a comparative study across five classes of vertebrate hosts.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Amaya, James; Passement, Celeste A; Dearing, M Denise; McCue, Marshall D

    2014-12-01

    Many animals face unpredictable food sources and periods of prolonged fasting, which likely present significant challenges to gut microorganisms. While several studies have demonstrated that fasting impacts the gut microbiota, experiments have not been carried out in a comparative context. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to document changes in colonic and cecal microbiomes of animals representing five classes of vertebrates at four time points through prolonged fasting: tilapia, toads, geckos, quail, and mice. We found differences in the starvation-induced changes in the microbiome across host species and across gut regions. Microbial phylogenetic diversity increased as a result of fasting in the colons of fish, toads, and mice, while quail exhibited a decrease in diversity; geckos exhibited no change. Microbial diversity in the cecum decreased in fish and exhibited no change in mice. Alterations in relative abundances of microbial taxa varied across hosts. Fish exhibited the most significant changes due to fasting, while geckos maintained a stable community over 28 days of fasting. We uncovered several shared responses of the microbiota across hosts. For example, all tetrapods exhibited decreases in the abundances of Coprobacillus and Ruminococcus in response to fasting. We also discuss host-mediated physiological mechanisms that may underlie these community changes.

  6. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  7. Modeling of traveling compression regions in the Earth's magnetotail by the spontaneous fast reconnection model

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, M.; Zheng, L.

    2006-03-15

    The spontaneous fast reconnection model is applied to the traveling compression regions (TCRs) observed in the Earth's magnetotail lobe region in association with substorms. For this purpose, virtual satellites are located at spatial points in the (low-{beta}) magnetic field region in the three-dimenisonal simulation domain, so that each satellite directly observes the temporal variations of magnetic fields, obtained from simulations, in accordance with the growth and proceeding of the fast reconnection mechanism. If the virtual satellite is located ahead of the initial plasmoid formation, it observes a pulse-like field compression with the compression rate of more than 10% as well as the bipolar structure of the magnetic field component from northward to southward tilting, when the plasmoid center passes through the satellite location. On the other hand, if it is located behind the plasmoid formation, it observes the unipolar structure of the southward field component. The simulation results are shown to be, both quantitatively and qualitatively, in good agreement with the actual satellite observations. It is demonstrated that the TCR event is the fast reconnection mechanism itself that is seen in the ambient (low-{beta}) magnetic field (magnetotail lobe) region.

  8. Measurements and modelling of fast-ion redistribution due to resonant MHD instabilities in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Cecconello, M.; McClements, K. G.; Klimek, I.; Akers, R. J.; Boeglin, W. U.; Keeling, D. L.; Meakins, A. J.; Perez, R. V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-12-01

    The results of a comprehensive investigation into the effects of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes on the NBI-generated fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are reported. Fast-ion redistribution due to frequency-chirping TAE in the range 50 kHz-100 kHz and frequency-chirping energetic particle modes known as fishbones in the range 20 kHz-50 kHz, is observed. TAE and fishbones are also observed to cause losses of fast ions from the plasma. The spatial and temporal evolution of the fast-ion distribution is determined using a fission chamber, a radially-scanning collimated neutron flux monitor, a fast-ion deuterium alpha spectrometer and a charged fusion product detector. Modelling using the global transport analysis code Transp, with ad hoc anomalous diffusion and fishbone loss models introduced, reproduces the coarsest features of the affected fast-ion distribution in the presence of energetic particle-driven modes. The spectrally and spatially resolved measurements show, however, that these models do not fully capture the effects of chirping modes on the fast-ion distribution.

  9. A fast collocation method for a variable-coefficient nonlocal diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Che; Wang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We develop a fast collocation scheme for a variable-coefficient nonlocal diffusion model, for which a numerical discretization would yield a dense stiffness matrix. The development of the fast method is achieved by carefully handling the variable coefficients appearing inside the singular integral operator and exploiting the structure of the dense stiffness matrix. The resulting fast method reduces the computational work from O (N3) required by a commonly used direct solver to O (Nlog ⁡ N) per iteration and the memory requirement from O (N2) to O (N). Furthermore, the fast method reduces the computational work of assembling the stiffness matrix from O (N2) to O (N). Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the fast method.

  10. The Safety Limits Of An Extended Fast: Lessons from a Non-Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Bertile, Fabrice; Fouillen, Laetitia; Wasselin, Thierry; Maes, Pauline; Le Maho, Yvon; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Raclot, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    While safety of fasting therapy is debated in humans, extended fasting occurs routinely and safely in wild animals. To do so, food deprived animals like breeding penguins anticipate the critical limit of fasting by resuming feeding. To date, however, no molecular indices of the physiological state that links spontaneous refeeding behaviour with fasting limits had been identified. Blood proteomics and physiological data reveal here that fasting-induced body protein depletion is not unsafe “per se”. Indeed, incubating penguins only abandon their chick/egg to refeed when this state is associated with metabolic defects in glucose homeostasis/fatty acid utilization, insulin production and action, and possible renal dysfunctions. Our data illustrate how the field investigation of “exotic” models can be a unique source of information, with possible biomedical interest. PMID:27991520

  11. A new fast response instrument for measuring total water content from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, S.; Leighton, J.; Barker, R.

    1990-10-01

    A device for measuring the total water content of a parcel of air from an aircraft has been developed. The total water of a parcel of air is a conserved quantity, independent of phase changes, provided there is no transport of water through the parcel boundaries. Current airborne hygrometers normally attempt to measure the water content in individual phases and the presence of other phases invariably influences the quality of the data. However, any liquid water or ice entering this new probe is efficiently evaporated and the resultant water vapor measured using a Lyman-alpha hygrometer. In airborne trials the device was calibrated against a cooled-mirror dewpoint device. Runs were conducted in warm stratocumulus tops, through small cumulus, in mixed-phase precipitation and cirrus cloud. In all cases the device was found to produce high quality, fast response data.

  12. A fast response hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating onto a fiber's end-face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haitao; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qiu-Ze; Cao, Jingxiao; Han, Dao-Fu; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated an integrated hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating fabricated on a fiber end-face. The grating consists of three thin metal layers in stacks, Au, WO3 and Pd. The WO3 is used as a waveguide layer between the Pd and Au layer. The Pd layer is etched by using a focused ion beam (FIB) method, forming a Pd metallic grating with period of 450 nm. The sensor is experimentally exposed to hydrogen gas environment. Changing the concentration from 0% to 4% which is the low explosive limit (LEL), the resonant wavelength measured from the reflection experienced 28.10 nm spectral changes in the visible range. The results demonstrated that the sensor is sensitive for hydrogen detection and it has fast response and low temperature effect.

  13. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4).

  14. Model reduction for slow–fast stochastic systems with metastable behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Smith, Matthew J.

    2014-05-07

    The quasi-steady-state approximation (or stochastic averaging principle) is a useful tool in the study of multiscale stochastic systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a model. The method is extended here to slow–fast systems in which the fast variables exhibit metastable behaviour. The key parameter that determines the form of the reduced model is the ratio of the timescale for the switching of the fast variables between metastable states to the timescale for the evolution of the slow variables. The method is illustrated with two examples: one from biochemistry (a fast-species-mediated chemical switch coupled to a slower varying species), and one from ecology (a predator–prey system). Numerical simulations of each model reduction are compared with those of the full system.

  15. Development of a fast sampling system for estimation of impulse responses of mobile radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melancon, Pierre

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the features of measurement equipment developed to measure impulse response estimates of mobile radio channels in less than a ms per measurement. The development of such equipment was required to measure mobile radio channels in realistic operating scenarios, in a normal sized vehicle moving at typical speeds in different environments. Up to speeds of 70 km/hr, the measurement period is short enough to assume the equipment is measuring the same channel during the whole sampling interval. AT the transmitter end of the measurement system, a wideband signal (10 MHz) is produced by modulating a carrier frequency with a 511 bit pseudo random sequence at 5 Mb/s and transmitted through the radio channel. The received signal is down-converted to 70 MHz and demodulated by a complex demodulator. The quadrature baseband signals at the demodulator outputs are then filtered and sampled at high speed by two fast digitizers. During this process, the data are stored in large memory banks to allow a fast sampling rate during a long period of time. Data are transferred to laser disks for further processing in the laboratory. Impulse response of radio channels are estimated by performing a software correlation between a measurement system back to back reference and real time measurements. A minivan was modified to hold the receiver, digitizers, memory banks and the computer. A shaft encoder was attached to its rear left wheel to trigger measurements while moving. Features of the system are discussed along with the effects of data block length, signal to noise ratio, sampling rate, memory size and phase stability on the design of the measurement equipment. Finally, some measurement results are presented and discussed.

  16. Fast Responsive and Controllable Liquid Transport on a Magnetic Fluid/Nanoarray Composite Interface.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dongliang; Zhang, Na; Zheng, Xi; Hou, Guanglei; Tian, Ye; Du, Yi; Jiang, Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-06-28

    Controllable liquid transport on surface is expected to occur by manipulating the gradient of surface tension/Laplace pressure and external stimuli, which has been intensively studied on solid or liquid interface. However, it still faces challenges of slow response rate, and uncontrollable transport speed and direction. Here, we demonstrate fast responsive and controllable liquid transport on a smart magnetic fluid/nanoarray interface, i.e., a composite interface, via modulation of an external magnetic field. The wettability of the composite interface to water instantaneously responds to gradient magnetic field due to the magnetically driven composite interface gradient roughness transition that takes place within a millisecond, which is at least 1 order of magnitude faster than that of other responsive surfaces. A water droplet can follow the motion of the gradient composite interface structure as it responds to the gradient magnetic field motion. Moreover, the water droplet transport direction can be controlled by modulating the motion direction of the gradient magnetic field. The composite interface can be used as a pump for the transport of immiscible liquids and other objects in the microchannel, which suggests a way to design smart interface materials and microfluidic devices.

  17. Simulating polar bear energetics during a seasonal fast using a mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Paul D; Porter, Warren P

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the ability of a mechanistic model (Niche Mapper™) to accurately model adult, non-denning polar bear (Ursus maritimus) energetics while fasting during the ice-free season in the western Hudson Bay. The model uses a steady state heat balance approach, which calculates the metabolic rate that will allow an animal to maintain its core temperature in its particular microclimate conditions. Predicted weight loss for a 120 day fast typical of the 1990s was comparable to empirical studies of the population, and the model was able to reach a heat balance at the target metabolic rate for the entire fast, supporting use of the model to explore the impacts of climate change on polar bears. Niche Mapper predicted that all but the poorest condition bears would survive a 120 day fast under current climate conditions. When the fast extended to 180 days, Niche Mapper predicted mortality of up to 18% for males. Our results illustrate how environmental conditions, variation in animal properties, and thermoregulation processes may impact survival during extended fasts because polar bears were predicted to require additional energetic expenditure for thermoregulation during a 180 day fast. A uniform 3°C temperature increase reduced male mortality during a 180 day fast from 18% to 15%. Niche Mapper explicitly links an animal's energetics to environmental conditions and thus can be a valuable tool to help inform predictions of climate-related population changes. Since Niche Mapper is a generic model, it can make energetic predictions for other species threatened by climate change.

  18. Simulating Polar Bear Energetics during a Seasonal Fast Using a Mechanistic Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Paul D.; Porter, Warren P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the ability of a mechanistic model (Niche Mapper™) to accurately model adult, non-denning polar bear (Ursus maritimus) energetics while fasting during the ice-free season in the western Hudson Bay. The model uses a steady state heat balance approach, which calculates the metabolic rate that will allow an animal to maintain its core temperature in its particular microclimate conditions. Predicted weight loss for a 120 day fast typical of the 1990s was comparable to empirical studies of the population, and the model was able to reach a heat balance at the target metabolic rate for the entire fast, supporting use of the model to explore the impacts of climate change on polar bears. Niche Mapper predicted that all but the poorest condition bears would survive a 120 day fast under current climate conditions. When the fast extended to 180 days, Niche Mapper predicted mortality of up to 18% for males. Our results illustrate how environmental conditions, variation in animal properties, and thermoregulation processes may impact survival during extended fasts because polar bears were predicted to require additional energetic expenditure for thermoregulation during a 180 day fast. A uniform 3°C temperature increase reduced male mortality during a 180 day fast from 18% to 15%. Niche Mapper explicitly links an animal’s energetics to environmental conditions and thus can be a valuable tool to help inform predictions of climate-related population changes. Since Niche Mapper is a generic model, it can make energetic predictions for other species threatened by climate change. PMID:24019883

  19. Only signaling modules that discriminate sharply between stimulatory and nonstimulatory inputs require basal signaling for fast cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artomov, Mykyta; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2010-09-01

    In many types of cells, binding of molecules to their receptors enables cascades of intracellular chemical reactions to take place (signaling). However, a low level of signaling also occurs in most unstimulated cells. Such basal signaling in resting cells can have many functions, one of which is that it is thought to be required for fast cellular responses to external stimuli. A mechanistic understanding of why this is true and which features of cellular signaling networks make basal signaling necessary for fast responses is unknown. We address this issue by obtaining the time required for activation of common types of cell signaling modules with and without basal signaling. Our results show that the absence of basal signaling does not have any dramatic effects on the response time for signaling modules that exhibit a graded response to increasing stimulus levels. In sharp contrast, signaling modules that exhibit sharp dose-response curves which discriminate sensitively between stimuli to which the cell needs to respond and low-grade inputs (or stochastic noise) require basal signaling for fast cellular responses. In such cases, we find that an optimal level of basal signaling balances the requirements for fast cellular responses while minimizing spurious activation without appropriate stimulation.

  20. Accurate and fast simulation of channel noise in conductance-based model neurons by diffusion approximation.

    PubMed

    Linaro, Daniele; Storace, Marco; Giugliano, Michele

    2011-03-01

    Stochastic channel gating is the major source of intrinsic neuronal noise whose functional consequences at the microcircuit- and network-levels have been only partly explored. A systematic study of this channel noise in large ensembles of biophysically detailed model neurons calls for the availability of fast numerical methods. In fact, exact techniques employ the microscopic simulation of the random opening and closing of individual ion channels, usually based on Markov models, whose computational loads are prohibitive for next generation massive computer models of the brain. In this work, we operatively define a procedure for translating any Markov model describing voltage- or ligand-gated membrane ion-conductances into an effective stochastic version, whose computer simulation is efficient, without compromising accuracy. Our approximation is based on an improved Langevin-like approach, which employs stochastic differential equations and no Montecarlo methods. As opposed to an earlier proposal recently debated in the literature, our approximation reproduces accurately the statistical properties of the exact microscopic simulations, under a variety of conditions, from spontaneous to evoked response features. In addition, our method is not restricted to the Hodgkin-Huxley sodium and potassium currents and is general for a variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion currents. As a by-product, the analysis of the properties emerging in exact Markov schemes by standard probability calculus enables us for the first time to analytically identify the sources of inaccuracy of the previous proposal, while providing solid ground for its modification and improvement we present here.

  1. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ions and rotation effects on RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; ...

    2015-10-15

    Here, validation results for the MARS-K code for DIII-D equilibria, predict that the absence of fast Neutral Beam (NB) generated ions leads to a plasma response ~40–60% higher than in NB-sustained H-mode plasmas when the no-wall βN limit is reached. In a βN scan, the MARS-K model with thermal and fast-ions, reproduces the experimental measurements above the no-wall limit, except at the highest βN where the phase of the plasma response is overestimated. The dependencies extrapolate unfavorably to machines such as ITER with smaller fast ion fractions since elevated responses in the absence of fast ions indicate the potential onsetmore » of a resistive wall mode (RWM). The model was also tested for the effects of rotation at high βN, and recovers the measured response even when fast-ions are neglected, reversing the effect found in lower βN cases, but consistent with the higher βN results above the no-wall limit. The agreement in the response amplitude and phase for the rotation scan is not as good, and additional work will be needed to reproduce the experimental trends. In the case of current-driven instabilities, the magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy system used to measure the plasma response reacts differently from that for pressure driven instabilities: the response amplitude remains low up to ~93% of the current limit, showing an abrupt increase only in the last ~5% of the current ramp. This makes it much less effective as a diagnostic for the approach to an ideal limit. However, the mode structure of the current driven RWM extends radially inwards, consistent with that in the pressure driven case for plasmas with qedge~2. This suggests that previously developed RWM feedback techniques together with the additional optimizations that enabled qedge~2 operation, can be applied to control of both current-driven and pressure-driven modes at high βN.« less

  2. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ions and rotation effects on RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Navratil, Gerald A.

    2015-10-15

    Here, validation results for the MARS-K code for DIII-D equilibria, predict that the absence of fast Neutral Beam (NB) generated ions leads to a plasma response ~40–60% higher than in NB-sustained H-mode plasmas when the no-wall βN limit is reached. In a βN scan, the MARS-K model with thermal and fast-ions, reproduces the experimental measurements above the no-wall limit, except at the highest βN where the phase of the plasma response is overestimated. The dependencies extrapolate unfavorably to machines such as ITER with smaller fast ion fractions since elevated responses in the absence of fast ions indicate the potential onset of a resistive wall mode (RWM). The model was also tested for the effects of rotation at high βN, and recovers the measured response even when fast-ions are neglected, reversing the effect found in lower βN cases, but consistent with the higher βN results above the no-wall limit. The agreement in the response amplitude and phase for the rotation scan is not as good, and additional work will be needed to reproduce the experimental trends. In the case of current-driven instabilities, the magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy system used to measure the plasma response reacts differently from that for pressure driven instabilities: the response amplitude remains low up to ~93% of the current limit, showing an abrupt increase only in the last ~5% of the current ramp. This makes it much less effective as a diagnostic for the approach to an ideal limit. However, the mode structure of the current driven RWM extends radially inwards, consistent with that in the pressure driven case for plasmas with qedge~2. This suggests that previously developed RWM feedback techniques together with the additional optimizations that enabled qedge~2 operation, can be applied to control of both current-driven and pressure-driven modes at high βN.

  3. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yimin; Goldberg, Marshall

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  4. Scalable complexity-distortion model for fast motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoquan; Ling, Nam

    2005-07-01

    Recently established international video coding standard H.264/AVC and the upcoming standard on scalable video coding (SVC) bring part of the solution to high compression ratio requirement and heterogeneity requirement. However, these algorithms have unbearable complexities for real-time encoding. Therefore, there is an important challenge to reduce encoding complexity, preferably in a scalable manner. Motion estimation and motion compensation techniques provide significant coding gain but are the most time-intensive parts in an encoder system. They present tremendous research challenges to design a flexible, rate-distortion optimized, yet computationally efficient encoder, especially for various applications. In this paper, we present a scalable motion estimation framework for complexitydistortion consideration. We propose a new progressive initial search (PIS) method to generate an accurate initial search point, followed by a fast search method, which can greatly benefit from the tighter bounds of the PIS. Such approach offers not only significant speedup but also an optimal distortion performance for a given complexity constrain. We analyze the relationship between computational complexity and distortion (C-D) through probabilistic distance measure extending from the complexity and distortion theory. A configurable complexity quantization parameter (Q) is introduced. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scalable complexity-distortion framework enables video encoder to conveniently adjust its complexity while providing best possible services.

  5. A new fast-response, real-time and continuous dissolved methane sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triest, Jack; Chappellaz, Jerome; Grilli, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Continuous high resolution profiling of dissolved methane down to ocean depths is made possible as a result of technological innovations achieved in the search for the oldest ice in Antarctica. Testing for the SUBGLACIOR probe, which is being developed at LGGE in response to the IPICS >1Ma old ice challenge, showed that much of the technology to extract the trapped gases from ice can also significantly improve the extraction and analysis of dissolved methane from the sea compared to current available sensors. To develop this potential, an oceanographic instrument 'SubOcean' was built and deployed over a gas-hydrate zone of western Svalbard, in collaboration with CAGE, in October 2015. Continuous measurements to depths of 400 m were made over three days resulting in high-resolution 3D profiles. The very fast response time of the sensor allows to display the in-situ measurements in real-time and compare them directly to data from other instrumentation aboard the ship whilst underway. The sensor contains a membrane based gas extraction system coupled to a laser spectrometer to provide accurate measurements over a wide concentration range. We will present the overall design of the instrument and highlight how it can help provide new insights into the spatial distribution and flux of methane in the marine environment.

  6. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  7. Nanometal-decorated exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet based glucose biosensors with high sensitivity and fast response.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jue; Do, Inhwan; Drzal, Lawrence T; Worden, Robert M; Lee, Ilsoon

    2008-09-23

    We report the novel fabrication of a highly sensitive, selective, fast responding, and affordable amperometric glucose biosensor using exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs) decorated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles. Nafion was used to solubilize metal-decorated graphite nanoplatelets, and a simple cast method with high content organic solvent (85 wt %) was used to prepare the biosensors. The addition of precious metal nanoparticles such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) to xGnP increased the electroactive area of the electrode and substantially decreased the overpotential in the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The Pt-xGnP glucose biosensor had a sensitivity of 61.5+/-0.6 microA/(mM x cm(2)) and gave a linear response up to 20 mM. The response time and detection limit (S/N=3) were determined to be 2 s and 1 microM, respectively. Therefore, this novel glucose biosensor based on the Pt nanoparticle coated xGnP is among the best reported to date in both sensing performance and production cost. In addition, the effects of metal nanoparticle loading and the particle size on the biosensor performance were systematically investigated.

  8. Fracture response of several metals to fast heating of samples by intensive X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Results on studying the fracture response of metals samples in the form of thin disks to fast heating by the intensive pulse of X-ray radiation of a complete spectrum are presented in the paper. The samples of such metals as iron, copper, AMg6 aluminum, VT14 titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, cadmium, lead and zinc were tested. The samples were fixed in the special cartridges that were placed at such distances from the X-ray irradiator where the energy fluxes were 1.38, 0.90 and 0.29 kJ/cm2. The irradiating X-ray pulse was about 2 ns in duration. After testing, the depth of material ablation from a sample front surface and the degree and character of its spall damage were determined. The method of metallographic analysis was used for these purposes. The spectrum data were used for the calculations of samples heating. Numerical calculations of thermomechanical and shock wave loading conditions were made with the use of the equation of state taking into account the process of evaporation. The calculated value of maximum negative pressure in the sample at the coordinate corresponding to the depth of ablation and formation of spallation zones or spall cracks was conventionally accepted as the material resistance to spall fracture in such conditions. The comparison of obtained results with the data on the fracture of examined materials in the conditions of fast heating by the X-ray pulse with a hard spectrum and by the high-current electron beam of an electron pulse generator was conducted.

  9. Hepatocellular autophagy modulates the unfolded protein response and fasting-induced steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwanten, Wilhelmus J; Vandewynckel, Yves-Paul; Martinet, Wim; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Michielsen, Peter P; Van Hoof, Viviane O; Driessen, Ann; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Bedossa, Pierre; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Francque, Sven M

    2016-10-01

    Autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are key cellular homeostatic mechanisms and are both involved in liver diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although increasing but conflicting results link these mechanisms to lipid metabolism, their role and potential cross talk herein have been poorly investigated. Therefore, we assessed the effects of hepatocyte-specific autophagy deficiency on liver parenchyma, the UPR, and lipid metabolism. Adult hepatocellular-specific autophagy-deficient mice (Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+)) were compared with their autophagy-competent littermates (Atg7(+/+)Alb-Cre(+)). Livers were analyzed by electron microscopy, histology, real-time qPCR, and Western blotting. Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+) mice developed hepatomegaly with significant parenchymal injury, as shown by inflammatory infiltrates, hepatocellular apoptosis, pericellular fibrosis, and a pronounced ductular reaction. Surprisingly, the UPR exhibited a pathway-selective pattern upon autophagy deficiency. The activity of the adaptive activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) pathway was abolished, whereas the proapoptotic protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway was increased compared with Atg7(+/+)Alb-Cre(+) mice. The inositol-requiring enzyme-1α signal was unaltered. Fasting-induced steatosis was absent in Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+) mice. Remarkably, some isolated islands of fat-containing and autophagy-competent cells were observed in these livers. Hepatocellular autophagy is essential for parenchymal integrity in mice. Moreover, in the case of autophagy deficiency, the three different UPR branches are pathway selectively modulated. Attenuation of the ATF6 pathway might explain the observed impairment of fasting-induced steatosis. Finally, autophagy and lipid droplets are directly linked to each other.

  10. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  11. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vyas, V K; Ukawala, R D; Ghate, M; Chintha, C

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  12. A microprocessor-controlled fast-response speed regulator with dual mode current loop for DCM drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmae, T.; Matsuda, T.; Suzuki, T.; Azusawa, N.; Kamiyama, K.; Konishi, T.

    1980-06-01

    A new control method is described in which a microprocessor is used to regulate the speed of a dc motor driven by antiparallel-connected three-phase dual thyristor converters. A distinct feature of this speed regulating system is that speed response is improved by using a fast-response current controller for the internal loop. A fast-response current controller is obtained by employing a nonlinear compensation subloop and a proportional plus integral compensation subloop. The nonlinear compensation subloop is used to linearize the nonlinear load characteristics of the thyristor converter, which are encountered under discontinuous conduction states of current. The proportional plus integral compensation subloop reduces the deviation of detected current from the current reference. With these two current-control subloops a fast motor speed response is achieved under discontinuous as well as continuous conduction states; hence the steady-state accuracy of speed is improved. A speed regulator using a microprocessor was trial manufactured and tested with a 20-kW dc motor. It was found that an extremely fast controlled current response can be obtained even with a relatively long sampling period. Further, normal action was confirmed in four-quadrant operation.

  13. Fast correspondences for statistical shape models of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Florian; Vlassis, Nikos; Gemmar, Peter; Husch, Andreas; Thunberg, Johan; Goncalves, Jorge; Hertel, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Statistical shape models based on point distribution models are powerful tools for image segmentation or shape analysis. The most challenging part in the generation of point distribution models is the identification of corresponding landmarks among all training shapes. Since in general the true correspondences are unknown, correspondences are frequently established under the hypothesis that correct correspondences lead to a compact model, which is mostly tackled by continuous optimisation methods. In favour of the prospect of an efficient optimisation, we present a simplified view of the correspondence problem for statistical shape models that is based on point-set registration, the linear assignment problem and mesh fairing. At first, regularised deformable point-set registration is performed and combined with solving the linear assignment problem to obtain correspondences between shapes on a global scale. With that, rough correspondences are established that may not yet be accurate on a local scale. Then, by using a mesh fairing procedure, consensus of the correspondences on a global and local scale among the entire set of shapes is achieved. We demonstrate that for the generation of statistical shape models of deep brain structures, the proposed approach is preferable over existing population-based methods both in terms of a significantly shorter runtime and in terms of an improved quality of the resulting shape model.

  14. Case-based reasoning(CBR) model for ultra-fast cooling in plate mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Wang, Zhaodong; Wang, Guodong

    2014-11-01

    New generation thermo-mechanical control process(TMCP) based on ultra-fast cooling is being widely adopted in plate mill to product high-performance steel material at low cost. Ultra-fast cooling system is complex because of optimizing the temperature control error generated by heat transfer mathematical model and process parameters. In order to simplify the system and improve the temperature control precision in ultra-fast cooling process, several existing models of case-based reasoning(CBR) model are reviewed. Combining with ultra-fast cooling process, a developed R5 CBR model is proposed, which mainly improves the case representation, similarity relation and retrieval module. Certainty factor is defined in semantics memory unit of plate case which provides not only internal data reliability but also product performance reliability. Similarity relation is improved by defined power index similarity membership function. Retrieval process is simplified and retrieval efficiency is improved apparently by windmill retrieval algorithm. The proposed CBR model is used for predicting the case of cooling strategy and its capability is superior to traditional process model. In order to perform comprehensive investigations on ultra-fast cooling process, different steel plates are considered for the experiment. The validation experiment and industrial production of proposed CBR model are carried out, which demonstrated that finish cooling temperature(FCT) error is controlled within ±25°C and quality rate of product is more than 97%. The proposed CBR model can simplify ultra-fast cooling system and give quality performance for steel product.

  15. Fokker-Planck model for collisional loss of fast ions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavorskij, V.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Schoepf, K.

    2016-11-01

    Modelling of the collisional loss of fast ions from tokamak plasmas is important from the point of view of the impact of fusion alphas and neutral beam injection ions on plasma facing components as well as for the development of diagnostics of fast ion losses [1-3]. This paper develops a Fokker-Planck (FP) method for the assessment of distributions of collisional loss of fast ions as depending on the coordinates of the first wall surface and on the velocities of lost ions. It is shown that the complete 4D drift FP approach for description of fast ions in axisymmetric tokamak plasmas can be reduced to a 2D FP problem for lost ions with a boundary condition delivered by the solution of a 3D boundary value problem for confined ions. Based on this newly developed FP approach the poloidal distribution of neoclassical loss, depending on pitch-angle and energy, of fast ions from tokamak plasma may be examined as well as the contribution of this loss to the signal detected by the scintillator probe may be evaluated. It is pointed out that the loss distributions obtained with the novel FP treatment may serve as an alternative approach with respect to Monte-Carlo models [4, 5] commonly used for simulating fast ion loss from toroidal plasmas.

  16. A Numerical Model for Coupling of Neutron Diffusion and Thermomechanics in Fast Burst Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Dana A. Knoll; Cassiano De Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    We develop a numerical model for coupling of neutron diffusion adn termomechanics in order to stimulate transient behavior of a fast burst reactor. The problem involves solving a set of non-linear different equations which approximate neutron diffusion, temperature change, and material behavior. With this equation set we will model the transition from a supercritical to subcritical state and possible mechanical vibration.

  17. Metabolic and hormonal response to chronic maternal fasting in the ewe.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R L; Lemons, J A; Gresham, E L

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolic adaptations of the fetus during maternal starvation and to determine the changes of plasma insulin and glucagon concentrations in the fed state and during severe maternal fasting in the chronic fetal sheep preparation. Maternal fasting resulted in a decrease in maternal and fetal plasma glucose as well as a decrease in fetal plasma fructose. Fetal-maternal arterial urea concentration differences increased with maternal fasting, suggesting increased fetal amino acid catabolism. Both maternal anf fetal plasma insulin decreased parallel to the decrease in plasma glucose concentration. Maternal glucagon did not change significantly during fasting and with a short-term fast there was no change in fetal glucagon concentration. However, by 6 days of fasting, the fetal glucagon concentration tended to increase.

  18. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (<10 Hz). However, this consideration alone may not be adequate for real chromatograms when an appreciable amount of noise is present. Further, depending on the instrument, the manufacturer's choice of a particular data bunching/integration/response time condition may be integrally coupled to the sampling frequency. In any case, the exact nature of signal filtration often occurs in a manner neither transparent to nor controllable by the user. Using fast chromatography on a state-of-the-art column (38,000 plates), we evaluate the responses produced by different present generation instruments, each with their unique black box digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter

  19. Modeling of the Proposed ATA Fast Correction Coils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 4 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT...J 0 100 200 Z0 (0) Figure 7. Electrical efficiency of four bar coil designs. P is the poNer input needed to produce the wave mode shown in...in a lower 1 inkage of beam generated flux. The coupling is calculated using a version of JASON which has been modified to handle a limited class of

  20. Kinetic models for historical processes of fast invasion and aggression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Vladimir V.; Ilyin, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    In the last few decades many investigations have been devoted to theoretical models in new areas concerning description of different biological, sociological, and historical processes. In the present paper we suggest a model of the Nazi Germany invasion of Poland, France, and the USSR based on kinetic theory. We simulate this process with the Cauchy boundary problem for two-element kinetic equations. The solution of the problem is given in the form of a traveling wave. The propagation velocity of a front line depends on the quotient between initial forces concentrations. Moreover it is obtained that the general solution of the model can be expressed in terms of quadratures and elementary functions. Finally it is shown that the front-line velocities agree with the historical data.

  1. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Models using Wake Encounter Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Bowles, Roland L.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.; Gloudesman, Thijs; van Lochem, Sander; Ras, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integration and evaluation of fast-time wake models with flight data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted detailed flight tests in 1995 and 1997 under the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Program to characterize wake vortex decay and wake encounter dynamics. In this study, data collected during Flight 705 were used to evaluate NASA's fast-time wake transport and decay models. Deterministic and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to define wake hazard bounds behind the wake generator. The methodology described in this paper can be used for further validation of fast-time wake models using en-route flight data, and for determining wake turbulence constraints in the design of air traffic management concepts.

  2. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  3. Appetite, energy intake and resting metabolic responses to 60 min treadmill running performed in a fasted versus a postprandial state.

    PubMed

    Deighton, Kevin; Zahra, Jessica C; Stensel, David J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of fasted and postprandial exercise on appetite, energy intake and resting metabolic responses. Twelve healthy males (mean±SD: age 23±3 years, body mass index 22.9±2.1 kg m(-2), maximum oxygen uptake 57.5±9.7 mL kg(-1) min(-1)) performed three 10 h experimental trials (control, fasted exercise and postprandial exercise) in a Latin Square design. Trials commenced at 8 am after an overnight fast. Sixty min of treadmill running at ∼70% of maximum oxygen uptake was performed at 0-1 h in the fasted exercise trial and 4-5 h in the postprandial exercise trial. A standardised breakfast was provided at 1.5 h and ad libitum buffet meals at 5.5 and 9.5 h. Appetite ratings and resting expired air samples were collected throughout each trial. Postprandial exercise suppressed appetite to a greater extent than fasted exercise. Ad libitum energy intake was not different between trials, resulting in a negative energy balance in exercise trials relative to control after accounting for differences in energy expenditure (control: 9774±2694 kJ; fasted exercise: 6481±2318 kJ; postprandial exercise: 6017±3050 kJ). These findings suggest that 60 min treadmill running induces a negative daily energy balance relative to a sedentary day but is no more effective when performed before or after breakfast.

  4. Fast-response temperature-sensitive-paint measurements on a hypersonic transition cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, H.; Laurence, S. J.; Schramm, J. Martinez; Wagner, A.; Hannemann, K.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are performed using a fast-response temperature-sensitive-paint (TSP) technique to measure the heat-flux distribution on a slender cone in a hypersonic shock tunnel under both laminar and transitional conditions. The millisecond-order test duration together with the self-luminosity of shock layers place stringent conditions on the choice of TSP luminophore and the TSP-layer thickness that can be employed. The luminosity and dimming from particulates in the free-stream cause additional problems in interpreting the obtained intensity profiles. Nevertheless, favorable agreement with thermocouple-based measurements show that it is possible to derive quantitatively accurate heat-flux distributions with the TSP technique for temperature rises of up to approximately 40 K above room temperature. The technique accuracy is adversely affected at higher temperatures, which is thought to result from non-constant thermal properties of the insulating base layer. At high unit Reynolds number conditions, time-resolved heat-flux distributions show large-scale unsteadiness in the boundary-layer transition location and reveal transient streamwise streaks developing in the transitional region.

  5. A fast response miniature probe for wet steam flow field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosdas, Ilias; Mansour, Michel; Kalfas, Anestis I.; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-12-01

    Modern steam turbines require operational flexibility due to renewable energies’ increasing share of the electrical grid. Additionally, the continuous increase in energy demand necessitates efficient design of the steam turbines as well as power output augmentation. The long turbine rotor blades at the machines’ last stages are prone to mechanical vibrations and as a consequence time-resolved experimental data under wet steam conditions are essential for the development of large-scale low-pressure steam turbines. This paper presents a novel fast response miniature heated probe for unsteady wet steam flow field measurements. The probe has a tip diameter of 2.5 mm, and a miniature heater cartridge ensures uncontaminated pressure taps from condensed water. The probe is capable of providing the unsteady flow angles, total and static pressure as well as the flow Mach number. The operating principle and calibration procedure are described in the current work and a detailed uncertainty analysis demonstrates the capability of the new probe to perform accurate flow field measurements under wet steam conditions. In order to exclude any data possibly corrupted by droplets’ impact or evaporation from the heating process, a filtering algorithm was developed and implemented in the post-processing phase of the measured data. In the last part of this paper the probe is used in an experimental steam turbine test facility and measurements are conducted at the inlet and exit of the last stage with an average wetness mass fraction of 8.0%.

  6. Advanced vapor recognition materials for selective and fast responsive surface acoustic wave sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana

    2013-07-17

    The necessity of selectively detecting various organic vapors is primitive not only with respect to regular environmental and industrial hazard monitoring, but also in detecting explosives to combat terrorism and for defense applications. Today, the huge arsenal of micro-sensors has revolutionized the traditional methods of analysis by, e.g. replacing expensive laboratory equipment, and has made the remote screening of atmospheric threats possible. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors - based on piezoelectric crystal resonators - are extremely sensitive to even very small perturbations in the external atmosphere, because the energy associated with the acoustic waves is confined to the crystal surface. Combined with suitably designed molecular recognition materials SAW devices could develop into highly selective and fast responsive miniaturized sensors, which are capable of continuously monitoring a specific organic gas, preferably in the sub-ppm regime. For this purpose, different types of recognition layers ranging from nanostructured metal oxides and carbons to pristine or molecularly imprinted polymers and self-assembled monolayers have been applied in the past decade. We present a critical review of the recent developments in nano- and micro-engineered synthetic recognition materials predominantly used for SAW-based organic vapor sensors. Besides highlighting their potential to realize real-time vapor sensing, their limitations and future perspectives are also discussed.

  7. Fast-response fiber-optic anemometer with temperature self-compensation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Hou, Weilin; Qiao, Wei; Han, Ming

    2015-05-18

    We report a novel fiber-optic anemometer with self-temperature compensation capability based on a Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) formed by a thin silicon film attached to the end face of a single-mode fiber. Guided in the fiber are a visible laser beam from a 635 nm diode laser used to heat the FPI and a white-light in the infrared wavelength range as the signal light to interrogate the optical length of the FPI. Cooling effects on the heated sensor head by wind is converted to a wavelength blueshift of the reflection spectral fringes of the FPI. Self-temperature-compensated measurement of wind speed is achieved by recording the difference in fringe wavelengths when the heating laser is turned on and then off. Large thermal-optic coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of silicon render a high sensitivity that can also be easily tuned by altering the heating laser power. Furthermore, the large thermal diffusivity and the small mass of the thin silicon film endow a fast sensor response.

  8. Fast response dry-type artificial molecular muscles with [c2]daisy chains.

    PubMed

    Iwaso, Kazuhisa; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Hierarchically organized myosin and actin filaments found in biological systems exhibit contraction and expansion behaviours that produce work and force by consuming chemical energy. Inspired by these naturally occurring examples, we have developed photoresponsive wet- and dry-type molecular actuators built from rotaxane-based compounds known as [c2]daisy chains (specifically, [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel and [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel). These actuators were prepared via polycondensation between four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) and a [c2]daisy chain based on α-cyclodextrin as the host component and azobenzene as a photoresponsive guest component. The light-induced actuation arises from the sliding motion of the [c2]daisy chain unit. Ultraviolet irradiation caused the gels to bend towards the light source. The response of the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel, even under dry conditions, is very fast (7° every second), which is 10,800 times faster than the [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel (7° every 3 h). In addition, the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel was used as a crane arm to lift an object using ultraviolet irradiation to produce mechanical work.

  9. Fast response dry-type artificial molecular muscles with [c2]daisy chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaso, Kazuhisa; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Hierarchically organized myosin and actin filaments found in biological systems exhibit contraction and expansion behaviours that produce work and force by consuming chemical energy. Inspired by these naturally occurring examples, we have developed photoresponsive wet- and dry-type molecular actuators built from rotaxane-based compounds known as [c2]daisy chains (specifically, [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel and [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel). These actuators were prepared via polycondensation between four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) and a [c2]daisy chain based on α-cyclodextrin as the host component and azobenzene as a photoresponsive guest component. The light-induced actuation arises from the sliding motion of the [c2]daisy chain unit. Ultraviolet irradiation caused the gels to bend towards the light source. The response of the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel, even under dry conditions, is very fast (7° every second), which is 10,800 times faster than the [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel (7° every 3 h). In addition, the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel was used as a crane arm to lift an object using ultraviolet irradiation to produce mechanical work.

  10. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-01-01

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications. PMID:27160693

  11. Analysis of the ballistic impact response of a composite material using FAST Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, Frederick; Ouellet, Simon; Farley, Vincent

    2013-05-01

    The level of protection offered by a given ballistic material is typically evaluated in terms of a set of projectiles and their associated velocity at which a certain percentage of the projectiles are expected to perforate. (i.e. FSP 17gr : V50 = 500m/s, 9mm FMJ; V0=500m/s). These metrics give little information about the physical phenomena by which energy is dispersed, spread or absorbed in a specific target material. Aside from post-test inspection of the impacted material, additional information on the target response is traditionally obtained during a test from the use of high speed imaging, whether it is from a single camera aimed at the impact surface or the backface, or from a set of camera allowing full 3-D reconstruction of a deformed surface. Again, this kind of data may be difficult to interpret if the interest is in the way energy is managed in the target in real time. Recent technological progress in scientific grade high-speed infrared (IR) camera demonstrated that these phenomena can straightforwardly be measured using IR thermal imaging. This paper presents promising results obtained from Telops FAST-IR 1500 infrared camera on an aramid-based ballistic composite during an impact from a small caliber fragment simulating projectile (FSP).

  12. Formulation and optimization of fast dissolving intraoral drug delivery system for clobazam using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Rajni; Khanna, Sushil; Pawar, Pravin K.

    2013-01-01

    Clobazam is a newer 1,5-benzodiazepine used for the treatment of epilepsy. It is better tolerated and less sedating than other benzodiazepines. Absorption of the drug can be impacted by oral fast dissolving dosage form; this may have implications for epilepsy in pediatrics and those having difficulty in swallowing tablets/capsules resulting in improved patient compliance. The purpose of the present investigation was to formulate and optimize clobazam oro-dissolving tablets by direct compression method using response surface methodology (RSM). Oro-dispersible tablets of clobazam were prepared by direct compression method using crospovidone (2-6%) as a superdisintegrant, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) (20-40%) was used as diluents along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of crospovidone and MCC over the independent variables disintegration time, wetting time and percent drug release. Disintegration time showed by all formulations was found to be in the range of 24.3-193 s based on evaluation parameters the formulation containing 6% of crospovidone and 30% of MCC showed promising performance against all other formulations. The results demonstrated that the RSM could efficiently be applied for the formulation of clobazam oro-dispersible tablets; therefore, constitute an advance in the management of epileptic attacks. PMID:24083203

  13. Measurement of the Fast Neutron Response for {sup 4}He Scintillation Detectors Using a Coincidence Scattering Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P.; Lewis, J.M.; Murer, D.; Enqvist, A.; Jordan, K.A.

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has measured the neutron response of pressurized {sup 4}He scintillation detectors, however these studies only examine the response as a function of incident neutron energy. Since the detection mechanism in {sup 4}He detectors is elastic scattering, and the interacting neutron will only deposit a fraction of its incident kinetic energy in the detector gas, an examination of the response of the detector output to deposited energy is necessary to transform these detectors into instruments for neutron spectrometry. Using a combined time-of-flight (TOF) and coincidence scattering method, this paper further characterizes the {sup 4}He light response to fast neutrons by examining the scintillation light yield as a function of deposited energy, measuring the light response up to 5 MeV. These {sup 4}He detectors are simple in design, and are manufactured by Arktis Radiation Detectors in several sizes. The specific model used in this experiment had an active volume 20 cm long with an inner diameter of 4.4 cm, giving a total active volume of 304 cm{sup 3}. The key components include the active volume, filled with 150 bar of helium-4 gas, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) mounted at either end of the active volume. The detector body is made of stainless steel. The detector response was experimentally measured using a two-detector coincidence arrangement with a {sup 252}Cf source. Two {sup 4}He detectors were vertically mounted, and the source was placed at a horizontal distance from the center of the bottom detector, forming a right angle. By requiring coincidence between the two detectors, it was confirmed that each neutron interacting in the second (top) detector must first have undergone a scattering interaction in the first (bottom) detector, and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique could then be used to determine the energy of the neutron as it traveled between the two detectors by the difference in time between the two detector events. More importantly, with

  14. MCNPX simulations of the silicon carbide semiconductor detector response to fast neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Zat'ko, Bohumír; Nečas, Vladimír; Solar, Michael; Granja, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been long recognized as a suitable semiconductor material for use in nuclear radiation detectors of high-energy charged particles, gamma rays, X-rays and neutrons. The nuclear interactions occurring in the semiconductor are complex and can be quantified using a Monte Carlo-based computer code. In this work, the MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was employed to support detector design and analysis. MCNPX is widely used to simulate interaction of radiation with matter and supports the transport of 34 particle types including heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The code also supports complex 3D geometries and both nuclear data tables and physics models. In our model, monoenergetic neutrons from D-T nuclear reaction were assumed as a source of fast neutrons. Their energy varied between 16 and 18.2 MeV, according to the accelerating voltage of the deuterons participating in D-T reaction. First, the simulations were used to calculate the optimum thickness of the reactive film composed of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE), which converts neutral particles to charged particles and thusly enhancing detection efficiency. The dependency of the optimal thickness of the HDPE layer on the energy of the incident neutrons has been shown for the inspected energy range. Further, from the energy deposited by secondary charged particles and recoiled ions, the detector response was modeled and the effect of the conversion layer on detector response was demonstrated. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental data obtained for a detector covered by a 600 and 1300 μm thick conversion layer. Some limitations of the simulations using MCNPX code are also discussed.

  15. Macroporous gels with fast response prepared by e-beam crosslinking of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrany, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    Macroporous temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) gels exhibiting fast response rates were obtained by electron beam irradiation of aqueous polymer solutions. The effect of polymer concentration, irradiation temperature and dose, as well as addition of crosslinker was studied. The gels synthesized above the critical temperature from 20 wt.% polymer solution without crosslinker exhibited the highest equilibrium swelling and fastest response rate measured by seconds. The gels show reversible response to cyclical changes in temperature and might be used as actuators or pulsed drug release.

  16. Traditional healers and the "Fast-Track" HIV response: is success possible without them?

    PubMed

    Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne; Green, Edward; Hallin, Mary

    2016-07-01

    The rapid scale-up of effective HIV prevention strategies is a central theme of the post-2015 health and development agenda. All major global HIV and AIDS funders have aligned their policies and plans to achieve sharp reductions in new HIV infections and reach epidemic control by 2030. In these "fast-track" plans, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage and the attainment of viral suppression are pivotal, and there is firm recognition of the need for countries to mobilise more domestic resources and build stronger community clinic systems. There is little in these bold plans, however, to suggest that the now 30-year-old call by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other organisations to establish systematic collaborations with the traditional health sector will finally be heeded. In the context of sub-Saharan Africa's HIV epidemic, a significant body of literature demonstrates the critical role that traditional healers can play in improving the success of health programmes, including those for HIV prevention. This paper provides a brief history of collaboration with traditional healers for HIV followed by a description of several successful collaborations and discussion of key elements for success. We argue that the traditional health sector is a major resource that has yet to be sufficiently mobilised against HIV. As we shift from a short-term HIV response to a longer-term and more sustainable response, there is an urgent need to accelerate efforts to leverage and partner with the hundreds of thousands of traditional health practitioners who are already providing health services in communities. Failure to better attune our work to the medical pluralism of communities affected by HIV will continue to hinder HIV programming success and help assure that ambitious post-2015 HIV prevention and control goals are not realised.

  17. A fast ellipsoid model for asteroids inverted from lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Hai-Bin; You, Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Research about asteroids has recently attracted more and more attention, especially focusing on their physical structures, such as their spin axis, rotation period and shape. The long distance between observers on Earth and asteroids makes it impossible to directly calculate the shape and other parameters of asteroids, with the exception of Near Earth Asteroids and others that have passed by some spacecrafts. Photometric measurements are still generally the main way to obtain research data on asteroids, i.e. the lightcurves recording the brightness and positions of asteroids. Supposing that the shape of the asteroid is a triaxial ellipsoid with a stable spin, a new method is presented in this article to reconstruct the shape models of asteroids from the lightcurves, together with other physical parameters. By applying a special curvature function, the method calculates the brightness integration on a unit sphere and Lebedev quadrature is employed for the discretization. Finally, the method searches for the optimal solution by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to minimize the residual of the brightness. By adopting this method, not only can related physical parameters of asteroids be obtained at a reasonable accuracy, but also a simple shape model of an ellipsoid can be generated for reconstructing a more sophisticated shape model.

  18. Fast Ray Tracing of Lunar Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Ray-tracing (RT) of Lunar Digital Elevation Models (DEM)'s is performed to virtually derive the degree of radiation incident to terrain as a function of time, orbital and ephemeris constraints [I- 4]. This process is an integral modeling process in lunar polar research and exploration due to the present paucity of terrain information at the poles and mission planning activities for the anticipated spring 2009 launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). As part of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) preparations RI methods are used to estimate the critical conditions presented by the combined effects of high latitude, terrain and the moons low obliquity [5-7]. These factors yield low incident solar illumination and subsequently extreme thermal, and radiation conditions. The presented research uses RT methods both for radiation transport modeling in space and regolith related research as well as to derive permanently shadowed regions (PSR)'s in high latitude topographic minima, e.g craters. These regions are of scientific and human exploration interest due to the near constant low temperatures in PSRs, inferred to be < 100 K. Hydrogen is thought to have accumulated in PSR's through the combined effects of periodic cometary bombardment and/or solar wind processes, and the extreme cold which minimizes hydrogen sublimation [8-9]. RT methods are also of use in surface position optimization for future illumination dependent on surface resources e.g. power and communications equipment.

  19. Response of gut microbiota to fasting and hibernation in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Sonoyama, Kei; Fujiwara, Reiko; Takemura, Naoki; Ogasawara, Toru; Watanabe, Jun; Ito, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tatsuya

    2009-10-01

    Although hibernating mammals wake occasionally to eat during torpor, this period represents a state of fasting. Fasting is known to alter the gut microbiota in nonhibernating mammals; therefore, hibernation may also affect the gut microbiota. However, there are few reports of gut microbiota in hibernating mammals. The present study aimed to compare the gut microbiota in hibernating torpid Syrian hamsters with that in active counterparts by using culture-independent analyses. Hamsters were allocated to either torpid, fed active, or fasted active groups. Hibernation was successfully induced by maintaining darkness at 4 degrees C. Flow cytometry analysis of cecal bacteria showed that 96-h fasting reduced the total gut bacteria. This period of fasting also reduced the concentrations of short chain fatty acids in the cecal contents. In contrast, total bacterial numbers and concentrations of short chain fatty acids were unaffected by hibernation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments indicated that fasting and hibernation modulated the cecal microbiota. Analysis of 16S rRNA clone library and species-specific real-time quantitative PCR showed that the class Clostridia predominated in both active and torpid hamsters and that populations of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin degrader, were increased by fasting but not by hibernation. From these results, we conclude that the gut microbiota responds differently to fasting and hibernation in Syrian hamsters.

  20. Metabolic and hormonal responses of growing modern meat type chickens to fasting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study compared the effects of fasting on circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin and glucagon in male and female modern meat-type chickens (Ross 708) at three ages (19 d, 33 d and 47 d). Plasma concentrations of glucose were reduced by fasting with reductions of 24.9% (19-d-old),...

  1. Fast coarse-grained model for RNA titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2017-01-01

    A new numerical scheme for RNA (ribonucleic acid) titration based on the Debye-Hückel framework for the salt description is proposed in an effort to reduce the computational costs for further applications to study protein-RNA systems. By means of different sets of Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrated that this new scheme is able to correctly reproduce the experimental titration behavior and salt pKa shifts. In comparison with other theoretical approaches, similar or even better outcomes are achieved at much lower computational costs. The model was tested on the lead-dependent ribozyme, the branch-point helix, and the domain 5 from Azotobacter vinelandii Intron 5.

  2. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, Hansen et al. proposed a fast kurtosis mapping method and demonstrated it in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, both DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26±13%, P<0.01) and fast DKI methods (23±8%, P<0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R2=0.57, P=0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting. PMID:25208309

  3. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, a fast kurtosis mapping method has been demonstrated in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, the two DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and fast DKI methods (23 ± 8%, P < 0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatches obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R(2) = 0.57, P = 0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting.

  4. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  5. RF Modeling of a Helical Kicker for Fast Chopping

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, Mohamed; Chen, Alex; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Saewert, Gregory; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav

    2015-06-01

    High intensity proton particle accelerators that supports several simultaneous physics experiments requires sharing the beam. A bunch by bunch beam chopper system located after the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) is required in this case to structure the beam in the proper bunch format required by the several experiments. The unused beam will need to be kicked out of the beam path and is disposed in a beam dumb. In this paper, we report on the RF modeling results of a proposed helical kicker. Two beam kickers constitutes the proposed chopper. The beam sequence is formed by kicking in or out the beam bunches from the streamline. The chopper was developed for Project X Injection Experiment (PXIE).

  6. Cell-autonomous regulation of fast troponin T pre-mRNA alternative splicing in response to mechanical stretch.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Rudolf J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2012-08-01

    How mechanochemical signals induced by the amount of weight borne by the skeletal musculature are translated into modifications to muscle sarcomeres is poorly understood. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that, in response to experimentally induced increases in the weight load borne by a rat, alternative splicing of the fast skeletal muscle troponin T (Tnnt3) pre-mRNA in gastrocnemius was adjusted in a correlated fashion with the amount of added weight. (Schilder RJ, Kimball SR, Marden JH, Jefferson LS. J Exp Biol 214: 1523-1532, 2011). Thus muscle load is perceived quantitatively by the body, and mechanisms that sense it appear to control processes that generate muscle sarcomere composition plasticity, such as alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here we demonstrate how mechanical stretch (see earlier comment) of C2C12 muscle cells in culture results in changes to Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing that are qualitatively similar to those observed in response to added weight in rats. Moreover, inhibition of Akt signaling, but not that of ERK1/2, prevents the stretch-induced effect on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing. These findings suggest that effects of muscle load on Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing are controlled by a cell-autonomous mechanism, rather than systemically. They also indicate that, in addition to its regulatory role in protein synthesis and muscle mass plasticity, Akt signaling may regulate muscle sarcomere composition by modulating alternative splicing events in response to load. Manipulation of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing by mechanical stretch of cells in culture provides a model to investigate the biology of weight sensing by skeletal muscles and facilitates identification of mechanisms through which skeletal muscles match their performance and experienced load.

  7. Fast and parallel spectral transform algorithms for global shallow water models. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jakob, R.

    1993-01-01

    The dissertation examines spectral transform algorithms for the solution of the shallow water equations on the sphere and studies their implementation and performance on shared memory vector multiprocessors. Beginning with the standard spectral transform algorithm in vorticity divergence form and its implementation in the Fortran based parallel programming language Force, two modifications are researched. First, the transforms and matrices associated with the meridional derivatives of the associated Legendre functions are replaced by corresponding operations with the spherical harmonic coefficients. Second, based on the fast Fourier transform and the fast multipole method, a lower complexity algorithm is derived that uses fast transformations between Legendre and interior Fourier nodes, fast surface spherical truncation and a fast spherical Helmholz solver. Because the global shallow water equations are similar to the horizontal dynamical component of general circulation models, the results can be applied to spectral transform numerical weather prediction and climate models. In general, the derived algorithms may speed up the solution of time dependent partial differential equations in spherical geometry.

  8. Fast approximate EM induction modeling of metallic and UXO targets using a permeable prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asten, Michael W.; Duncan, Andrew C.

    2007-03-01

    The time-domain EM induction response of non-magnetic and magnetic targets can be approximated using a conductive permeable prism composed of six faces of conductive plates, each face being composed of a set of conductive ribbons. The effect of magnetic permeability is included by the use of two "apparent flux gathering" coefficients, and two "effective magnetic permeability" coefficients, in the axial and transverse directions. These four magnetic property coefficients are a function of physical properties and geometry of the target, but are independent of prism orientation relative to a transmitter. The approximation algorithm is computationally fast, allowing inversions for target parameters to be achieved in seconds. The model is tested on profiles acquired with a Geonics EM63 time-domain EM metal detector over a non-magnetic copper pipe target, and a steel artillery shell in horizontal and vertical orientations. Results show that this approximation to a permeable prism has a capability of fitting geometric, conductivity and magnetic parameters at both early and late sample times. The magnetic parameters show strong change from early to late times on the EMI decay curve, indicating that the magnetic properties of the target have non-linear characteristics. It is proposed that these magnetic parameters and the nature of their non-linearity may carry additional discrimination information for distinguishing between intact munitions and scrap in UXO studies.

  9. α-Adrenoceptor constrictor responses and their modulation in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, David G; Thomas, Gail D

    2005-01-01

    Vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation and their sensitivity to metabolic modulation reportedly differ in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors mediate these vascular responses in fast-twitch muscle, while their roles in slow-twitch muscle are less well defined. In this study, the phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain (smRLC) was measured as an index of vasoconstriction in slow-twitch soleus muscles and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles isolated from C57BL/6J mice. In soleus muscles, incubation with phenylephrine (PE) or UK 14,304 to selectively activate α1- or α2-adrenoceptors resulted in concentration-dependent increases in smRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate metabolic modulation of these responses, vasodilator pathways previously implicated in such modulation in fast-twitch muscle were activated in soleus muscles by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroprusside or the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel opener cromakalim. Both drugs inhibited responses to UK 14,304, but not to PE. The effect of nitroprusside to antagonize UK 14,304 responses was prevented by inhibition of guanylyl cyclase or by blockade of KATP channels, but not by blockade of other potassium channels. Results were similar in EDL muscles. These data provide the first evidence for α2-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in slow-twitch muscle, and show that it is sensitive to modulation by NO via a cGMP-dependent mechanism that requires KATP channel activation. Based on the similar findings in soleus and EDL muscles, fibre type does not appear to determine the innate vascular response to α1- or α2-adrenoceptor activation. PMID:15618269

  10. Extending food deprivation reverses the short-term lipolytic response to fasting: role of the triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jean-Michel; Reidy, Shannon P

    2012-05-01

    The effects of short-term food deprivation on lipid metabolism are well documented, but little is known about prolonged fasting. This study monitored the kinetics of glycerol (rate of appearance, R(a) glycerol) and non-esterified fatty acids (R(a) NEFA) in fasting rabbits. Our goals were to determine whether lipolysis is stimulated beyond values seen for short-term fasting, and to characterize the roles of primary (intracellular) and secondary (with transit through the circulation) triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycling (TAG/FA cycling) in regulating fatty acid allocation to oxidation or re-esterification. R(a) glycerol (9.62±0.72 to 15.29±0.96 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)) and R(a) NEFA (18.05±2.55 to 31.25±1.93 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)) were stimulated during the first 2 days of fasting, but returned to baseline after 4 days. An initial increase in TAG/FA cycling was followed by a reduction below baseline after 6 days without food, with primary and secondary cycling contributing to these responses. We conclude that the classic activation of lipolysis caused by short-term fasting is abolished when food deprivation is prolonged. High rates of re-esterification may become impossible to sustain, and TAG/FA cycling could decrease to reduce its cost to 3% of total energy expenditure. Throughout prolonged fasting, fatty acid metabolism gradually shifts towards increased oxidation and reduced re-esterification. Survival is achieved by pressing fuel selection towards the fatty acid dominance of energy metabolism and by slowing substrate cycles to assist metabolic suppression. However, TAG/FA cycling remains active even after prolonged fasting, suggesting that re-esterification is a crucial mechanism that cannot be stopped without harmful consequences.

  11. Acceleration through a Holistic Support Model: An Implementation and Outcomes Analysis of FastStart@CCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgecombe, Nikki; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Baker, Elaine DeLott; Bailey, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Originally designed for students who test into at least two levels of developmental education in a particular subject area, FastStart is a compressed course program model launched in 2005 at the Community College of Denver (CCD). The program combines multiple semester-length courses into a single intensive semester, while providing case…

  12. Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-02

    Under the support of this grant, we investigated the fast process of interaction of clouds, shallow convection, and boundary layer turbulence and their parameterizations. Main accomplishments involve two things. One is the understanding of the physical mechanisms of low cloud feedbacks; the second is the development and evaluation of convection and cloud parameterizations in climate models.

  13. Psychological Plausibility of the Theory of Probabilistic Mental Models and the Fast and Frugal Heuristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Michael R.; Franco-Watkins, Ana M.; Thomas, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The theory of probabilistic mental models (PMM; G. Gigerenzer, U. Hoffrage, & H. Kleinbolting, 1991) has had a major influence on the field of judgment and decision making, with the most recent important modifications to PMM theory being the identification of several fast and frugal heuristics (G. Gigerenzer & D. G. Goldstein, 1996). These…

  14. Fast magnetic response in gigahertz-band for columnar-structured Fe nanoparticle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, T. Tate, R.; Kura, H.; Oikawa, T.; Hata, K.

    2014-05-07

    High density Fe-based ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) assembly is expected to have unique magnetic properties, such as superferromagnetism and super-spin-glass, different from magnetically isolated NP systems due to strong dipole interactions among the NPs. A high dipole interaction field, H{sub dip}, of ∼3.5 kOe can result in a high effective internal field to the magnetic moment of the NP, expecting for ultra-fast magnetic response, that is, a high magnetic resonance frequency, f{sub r}, of ∼10 GHz. However, for a simply molded Fe NP assembly, a low f{sub r} was observed due to inhomogeneous distribution of the internal field, implying the necessity of a unidirectional state of H{sub dip} for higher f{sub r}. In this study, we fabricated a columnar Fe NP assembly for realizing the unidirectional state of H{sub dip} by applying our uniquely developed external field-induced agglomeration method for monodispersed Fe NPs (13 nm in average size) as a function of the field (0–30 kOe) and volume fraction of the Fe NPs (0.5%–51%) in a polymer matrix with dimensions of 4 mm × 4 mm × 0.7 mm{sup t}. A columnar-structured Fe NP assembly was successfully achieved along an in-plane direction (defined as the x-axis) under optimized conditions. From static magnetization curves, induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy was observed according to the shape of the columnar structure of the Fe NP assembly, where easy and hard axes of magnetization were realized along the parallel (x-axis) and normal directions (in-plane y-axis and z-axis in the thickness direction) to the external field during the process, respectively. Interestingly, this fabricated columnar-structured Fe NP assembly exhibited very high f{sub r} in the range from 3 to 11 GHz judging from the complex susceptibility spectra obtained. The f{sub r} values were well-scaled by a modified Snoek's-limit-law using demagnetization factors quantitatively estimated from the static magnetization curves. Thus, shape

  15. Fast response air-to-fuel ratio measurements using a novel device based on a wide band lambda sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regitz, S.; Collings, N.

    2008-07-01

    A crucial parameter influencing the formation of pollutant gases in internal combustion engines is the air-to-fuel ratio (AFR). During transients on gasoline and diesel engines, significant AFR excursions from target values can occur, but cycle-by-cycle AFR resolution, which is helpful in understanding the origin of deviations, is difficult to achieve with existing hardware. This is because current electrochemical devices such as universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensors have a time constant of 50-100 ms, depending on the engine running conditions. This paper describes the development of a fast reacting device based on a wide band lambda sensor which has a maximum time constant of ~20 ms and enables cyclic AFR measurements for engine speeds of up to ~4000 rpm. The design incorporates a controlled sensor environment which results in insensitivity to sample temperature and pressure. In order to guide the development process, a computational model was developed to predict the effect of pressure and temperature on the diffusion mechanism. Investigations regarding the sensor output and response were carried out, and sensitivities to temperature and pressure are examined. Finally, engine measurements are presented.

  16. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  17. Fast and accurate calculation of dilute quantum gas using Uehling-Uhlenbeck model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-02-01

    The Uehling-Uhlenbeck (U-U) model equation is studied for the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas. In particular, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the U-U model equation. DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation is expected to enable the thermalization to be accurately obtained using a small number of sample particles and the dilute quantum gas dynamics to be calculated in a practical time. Finally, the applicability of DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation to the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas is confirmed by calculating the viscosity coefficient of a Bose gas on the basis of the Green-Kubo expression and the shock layer of a dilute Bose gas around a cylinder.

  18. Fast 3D spine reconstruction of postoperative patients using a multilevel statistical model.

    PubMed

    Lecron, Fabian; Boisvert, Jonathan; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Labelle, Hubert; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Severe cases of spinal deformities such as scoliosis are usually treated by a surgery where instrumentation (hooks, screws and rods) is installed to the spine to correct deformities. Even if the purpose is to obtain a normal spine curve, the result is often straighter than normal. In this paper, we propose a fast statistical reconstruction algorithm based on a general model which can deal with such instrumented spines. To this end, we present the concept of multilevel statistical model where the data are decomposed into a within-group and a between-group component. The reconstruction procedure is formulated as a second-order cone program which can be solved very fast (few tenths of a second). Reconstruction errors were evaluated on real patient data and results showed that multilevel modeling allows better 3D reconstruction than classical models.

  19. Linear discrete population models with two time scales in fast changing environments I: autonomous case.

    PubMed

    Blasco, A; Sanz, L; Auger, P; Bravo de la Parra, R

    2001-01-01

    In this work we consider a structured population with groups and subgroups of individuals. The intra-group dynamics is assumed to be fast in comparison with the inter-group dynamics. We study linear discrete models where the slow dynamics is represented by a single matrix and the fast dynamics is described by means of the first k terms of a converging sequence of different matrices. The number k can be interpreted as the ratio between the two time scales. The aim of this work is to extend aggregation techniques to the case of fast changing environments. The main idea of aggregation is to build up a new system, with lower dimension, that summarizes the information concerning the fast process. This "aggregated" system provides essential information on the original one. It is shown that the asymptotic behavior of the original system can be approximated by the asymptotic behavior of the aggregated system when the ratio between the two time scales is large enough. We present an example of an age structured population in a patchy environment. The migration process is assumed to be fast in comparison with the demographic process. Numerical simulations illustrate that the asymptotic growth rate and the stable age distribution of the population in the original and the aggregated systems are getting closer as the ratio k increases.

  20. Experiments and numerical modeling of fast flowing liquid metal thin films under spatially varying magnetic field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Manmeet Singh

    Innovative concepts using fast flowing thin films of liquid metals (like lithium) have been proposed for the protection of the divertor surface in magnetic fusion devices. However, concerns exist about the possibility of establishing the required flow of liquid metal thin films because of the presence of strong magnetic fields which can cause flow disrupting MHD effects. A plan is underway to design liquid lithium based divertor protection concepts for NSTX, a small spherical torus experiment at Princeton. Of these, a promising concept is the use of modularized fast flowing liquid lithium film zones, as the divertor (called the NSTX liquid surface module concept or NSTX LSM). The dynamic response of the liquid metal film flow in a spatially varying magnetic field configuration is still unknown and it is suspected that some unpredicted effects might be lurking. The primary goal of the research work being reported in this dissertation is to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the liquid metal film flow dynamics under spatially varying magnetic field conditions, typical of the divertor region of a magnetic fusion device. The liquid metal film flow dynamics have been studied through a synergic experimental and numerical modeling effort. The Magneto Thermofluid Omnibus Research (MTOR) facility at UCLA has been used to design several experiments to study the MHD interaction of liquid gallium films under a scaled NSTX outboard divertor magnetic field environment. A 3D multi-material, free surface MHD modeling capability is under development in collaboration with HyPerComp Inc., an SBIR vendor. This numerical code called HIMAG provides a unique capability to model the equations of incompressible MHD with a free surface. Some parts of this modeling capability have been developed in this research work, in the form of subroutines for HIMAG. Extensive code debugging and benchmarking exercise has also been carried out. Finally, HIMAG has been used to study the

  1. Exupery volcano fast response system - The event detection and waveform classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Conny; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    volcanic signal classification scheme as early as new events have been identified. For implementation issues we make use of the Hidden Markov Toolkit (HTK), a software package which is mainly intended for speech recognition. For the training procedure we first extract a valuable set of wave field parameters (here, polarization and spectral attributes) in a sliding window fashion from an unlabeled continuous data stream. In the following these parameters are used to extract a fixed number of clusters in the feature space. Based on this general multivariate description of the overall data set we start building particular event classifiers from a single waveform example based on the cluster description learned before. We will present first results of the automatic classification process to show that the system is able to provide a robust event classification without previously existing training events and hence is a step forward for volcano fast response systems.

  2. Expression of the fusogenic p14 FAST protein from a replication-defective adenovirus vector does not provide a therapeutic benefit in an immunocompetent mouse model of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, C M; Nash, L A; Del Papa, J; Poulin, K L; Falls, T; Bell, J C; Parks, R J

    2016-01-01

    When injected directly into a tumor mass, adenovirus (Ad) vectors only transduce cells immediately along the injection tract. Expression of fusogenic proteins from the Ad vector can lead to syncytium formation, which efficiently spreads the therapeutic effect. Fusogenic proteins can also cause cancer cell death directly, and enhance the release of exosome-like particles containing tumor-associated antigens, which boosts the anti-tumor immune response. In this study, we have examined whether delivery of an early region 1 (E1)-deleted, replication-defective Ad vector encoding the reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein can provide therapeutic efficacy in an immunocompetent mouse tumor model. A high multiplicity of infection of AdFAST is required to induce cell fusion in mouse mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in vitro, and FAST protein expression caused a modest reduction in cell membrane integrity and metabolic activity compared with cells infected with a control vector. Cells expressing FAST protein released significantly higher quantities of exosomes. In immunocompetent Balb/C mice harboring subcutaneous 4T1 tumors, AdFAST did not induce detectable cancer cell fusion, promote tumor regression or prolong mouse survival compared with untreated mice. This study suggests that in the context of the 4T1 model, Ad-mediated FAST protein expression did not elicit a therapeutic effect. PMID:27740615

  3. Retrieving ice cloud properties by using a fast infrared radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Yang, P.; Heidinger, A. K.; Platnick, S. E.; Baum, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    A new fast infrared radiative transfer (RT) model based on pre-computed look-up tables (LUTs) including the LUTs for emissivity function and cloud effective temperature is proposed. This model can be applied to the simulation of upward radiance (or brightness temperature) at 8.5, 11.0 and 12.0 μm at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) under cloudy-sky conditions. Optical depths of Atmospheric layers resulting from gaseous absorption are derived from the correlated-K distribution (CKD) method. The cloud reflection and transmission functions are computed from the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT). In addition to the LUTs of reflection and transmission functions of cloud in traditional RT models, the LUTs of emissivity and effective temperature are also included to improve the accuracy. Generally speaking, for an atmosphere containing a single ice cloud layer with small optical thickness (i.e., less than 5.0), the brightness temperature differences (BTDs) between the fast model and DISORT results are approximately less than 0.1K, whereas the BTDs are less than 0.02K when the ice cloud optical thickness is larger than 5.0. Moreover, with the fast RT model, cloud optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds are retrieved from MODIS and CALIPSO observations and the MERRA reanalysis data. The present retrievals are compared with the MODIS operational cloud products (MYD06).

  4. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  5. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  6. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations.

  7. ModelOMatic: fast and automated model selection between RY, nucleotide, amino acid, and codon substitution models.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Simon; Allen, James E; Blackburne, Benjamin P; Talavera, David

    2015-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics is a powerful tool for inferring both the process and pattern of evolution from genomic sequence data. Statistical approaches, such as maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, are now established as the preferred methods of inference. The choice of models that a researcher uses for inference is of critical importance, and there are established methods for model selection conditioned on a particular type of data, such as nucleotides, amino acids, or codons. A major limitation of existing model selection approaches is that they can only compare models acting upon a single type of data. Here, we extend model selection to allow comparisons between models describing different types of data by introducing the idea of adapter functions, which project aggregated models onto the originally observed sequence data. These projections are implemented in the program ModelOMatic and used to perform model selection on 3722 families from the PANDIT database, 68 genes from an arthropod phylogenomic data set, and 248 genes from a vertebrate phylogenomic data set. For the PANDIT and arthropod data, we find that amino acid models are selected for the overwhelming majority of alignments; with progressively smaller numbers of alignments selecting codon and nucleotide models, and no families selecting RY-based models. In contrast, nearly all alignments from the vertebrate data set select codon-based models. The sequence divergence, the number of sequences, and the degree of selection acting upon the protein sequences may contribute to explaining this variation in model selection. Our ModelOMatic program is fast, with most families from PANDIT taking fewer than 150 s to complete, and should therefore be easily incorporated into existing phylogenetic pipelines. ModelOMatic is available at https://code.google.com/p/modelomatic/.

  8. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  9. Response of urinary hydroxyproline to dietary protein and fasting in white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, G.D.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of dietary protein, fasting, and refeeding on urinary hydroxyproline of nine captive female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were examined from 23 February to 3 May 1984 in northern Minnesota. In the fasted group, mean hydroxyproline:creatinine (OHP:C) was greater (P less than 0.05) at week 4 compared to baseline at week 0. Between fasted deer and deer fed high protein-high energy (HPHE) and low protein-high energy (LPHE) diets, no difference in OHP:C ratios was detected during the initial 4 wk of the study. Urinary OHP:C ratios were significantly (P less than 0.05) greater in the fasted group during refeeding, concomitant with greater feed consumption and weight gain. There was also a significant (P less than 0.02) time effect in the fasted-refed group; OHP:C ratios increased during these two phases of the study. There was no difference between the HPHE and LPHE fed deer in renal OHP excretion. However, mean OHP:C ratios in yearlings (16.8 +/- 2.2) were greater (P less than 0.001) than in the adults (7.5 +/- 1.2) of those groups, indicating a higher collagen turnover rate. Urinary OHP:C shows potential as an indicator of growth and starvation, and the data presented may serve as reference values.

  10. Physiological responses of juvenile rainbow trout to fasting and swimming activity: Effects on body composition and condition indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The physiological traits that allow fish to survive periods of limited food resources are poorly understood. We assessed changes in proximate body composition, relative organ mass, blood metabolites, and relative weight (Wr) of sedentary and actively swimming (15 cm/s) juvenile rainbow trout (154-182 mm total length) over 147 d of fasting. Fasting caused measurable responses that were augmented when fish were swimming. Lipids and plasma triacylglycerides declined over time. Proteins were catabolized simultaneously with lipid reserves, but ammonia concentrations in plasma did not increase. The liver somatic index (LSI) did not change substantially over 105 d, suggesting that gluconeogenesis maintained blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen reserves for a substantial period of fasting. The gut somatic index (GSI) and Wr declined linearly during fasting, but the LSI did not decline until after 105 d of fasting. Consequently, the use of different body condition indices could lead to different conclusions about the condition of juvenile rainbow trout. Swimming activity caused fish to have lower lipid and protein reserves than those of sedentary fish. No mortalities were observed among sedentary fish, but mortalities occurred among actively swimming fish after 97 d of fasting when 3.2% or less lipid remained in their bodies. Body condition indices did not account for differences in proximate body composition between sedentary and actively swimming fish and were relatively poor predictors of lipid content and risk of mortality. The probability of mortality was most accurately predicted by percent lipid content. Therefore, we suggest that fisheries scientists consider using percent lipid content when evaluating the physiological status and risk of mortality due to starvation among juvenile rainbow trout.

  11. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  13. An accurate, fast and stable material model for shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Philipp

    2014-10-01

    Shape memory alloys possess several features that make them interesting for industrial applications. However, due to their complex and thermo-mechanically coupled behavior, direct use of shape memory alloys in engineering construction is problematic. There is thus a demand for tools to achieve realistic, predictive simulations that are numerically robust when computing complex, coupled load states, are fast enough to calculate geometries of industrial interest, and yield realistic and reliable results without the use of fitting curves. In this paper a new and numerically fast material model for shape memory alloys is presented. It is based solely on energetic quantities, which thus creates a quite universal approach. In the beginning, a short derivation is given before it is demonstrated how this model can be easily calibrated by means of tension tests. Then, several examples of engineering applications under mechanical and thermal loads are presented to demonstrate the numerical stability and high computation speed of the model.

  14. Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

  15. Modeling of single noninactivating Na+ channels: evidence for two open and several fast inactivated states.

    PubMed

    The, Yu-Kai; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Popa, M Oana; Alekov, Alexi K; Timmer, Jens; Lerche, Holger

    2006-05-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play a fundamental role in the excitability of nerve and muscle cells. Defects in fast Na(+) channel inactivation can cause hereditary muscle diseases with hyper- or hypoexcitability of the sarcolemma. To explore the kinetics and gating mechanisms of noninactivating muscle Na(+) channels on a molecular level, we analyzed single channel currents from wild-type and five mutant Na(+) channels. The mutations were localized in different protein regions which have been previously shown to be important for fast inactivation (D3-D4-linker, D3/S4-S5, D4/S4-S5, D4/S6) and exhibited distinct grades of defective fast inactivation with varying levels of persistent Na(+) currents caused by late channel reopenings. Different gating schemes were fitted to the data using hidden Markov models with a correction for time interval omission and compared statistically. For all investigated channels including the wild-type, two open states were necessary to describe our data. Whereas one inactivated state was sufficient to fit the single channel behavior of wild-type channels, modeling the mutants with impaired fast inactivation revealed evidence for several inactivated states. We propose a single gating scheme with two open and three inactivated states to describe the behavior of all five examined mutants. This scheme provides a biological interpretation of the collected data, based on previous investigations in voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels.

  16. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  17. Fast and accurate focusing analysis of large photon sieve using pinhole ring diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lingjie; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Jizhen; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we developed a pinhole ring diffraction model for the focusing analysis of a large photon sieve. Instead of analyzing individual pinholes, we discuss the focusing of all of the pinholes in a single ring. An explicit equation for the diffracted field of individual pinhole ring has been proposed. We investigated the validity range of this generalized model and analytically describe the sufficient conditions for the validity of this pinhole ring diffraction model. A practical example and investigation reveals the high accuracy of the pinhole ring diffraction model. This simulation method could be used for fast and accurate focusing analysis of a large photon sieve.

  18. SCOUT: A Fast Monte-Carlo Modeling Tool of Scintillation Camera Output

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William C. J.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Muzi, John P.; Li, Xiaoli; McDougald, Wendy; MacDonald, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo photon-tracking and readout simulator called SCOUT to study the stochastic behavior of signals output from a simplified rectangular scintillation-camera design. SCOUT models the salient processes affecting signal generation, transport, and readout. Presently, we compare output signal statistics from SCOUT to experimental results for both a discrete and a monolithic camera. We also benchmark the speed of this simulation tool and compare it to existing simulation tools. We find this modeling tool to be relatively fast and predictive of experimental results. Depending on the modeled camera geometry, we found SCOUT to be 4 to 140 times faster than other modeling tools. PMID:22072297

  19. The Creation of Surrogate Models for Fast Estimation of Complex Model Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pruett, W Andrew; Hester, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    A surrogate model is a black box model that reproduces the output of another more complex model at a single time point. This is to be distinguished from the method of surrogate data, used in time series. The purpose of a surrogate is to reduce the time necessary for a computation at the cost of rigor and generality. We describe a method of constructing surrogates in the form of support vector machine (SVM) regressions for the purpose of exploring the parameter space of physiological models. Our focus is on the methodology of surrogate creation and accuracy assessment in comparison to the original model. This is done in the context of a simulation of hemorrhage in one model, "Small", and renal denervation in another, HumMod. In both cases, the surrogate predicts the drop in mean arterial pressure following the intervention. We asked three questions concerning surrogate models: (1) how many training examples are necessary to obtain an accurate surrogate, (2) is surrogate accuracy homogeneous, and (3) how much can computation time be reduced when using a surrogate. We found the minimum training set size that would guarantee maximal accuracy was widely variable, but could be algorithmically generated. The average error for the pressure response to the protocols was -0.05±2.47 in Small, and -0.3 +/- 3.94 mmHg in HumMod. In the Small model, error grew with actual pressure drop, and in HumMod, larger pressure drops were overestimated by the surrogates. Surrogate use resulted in a 6 order of magnitude decrease in computation time. These results suggest surrogate modeling is a valuable tool for generating predictions of an integrative model's behavior on densely sampled subsets of its parameter space.

  20. Physiological adaptive indicators in fasted neonate broiler chicks in response to calcium gluconate injection.

    PubMed

    Khosravinia, H

    2016-06-01

    Four hundred and eighty mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 3 h after hatching were allotted according to a completely random design in a 6 × 2 × 2 factorial schedule into two groups of 12 replications of 20 chicks each. The main experimental factors were fasting for 0, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after chick placement and calcium gluconate (Ca-glu) injection (0 and 0.6 ml). Live body weight (BW) of chicks decreased linearly (Y = 43.36-0.109BW0 h , r(2)  = 0.876) as neonatal fasting extended. Injection of 0.6 ml Ca-glu at 3 h post-hatching did not affect weight loss of chicks. Yolk residuals (YR) utilized linearly (Y = 5.75-0.062YR, r(2)  = 0.956) by 0.062 g/h in neonate fasted chicks up to 48 h, showing no effect of Ca-glu injection. Neonatal fasting periods longer than 12 h increased liver weight (p < 0.05). The mean absolute and proportional (% of BW0 h ) breast and leg weight were reduced linearly as neonatal fasting extended (p < 0.05). Serum glucose concentration increased up to 6 h and then reduced linearly to 150 mg/dl after 48-h fasting. The Ca-glu treatment influenced serum glucose level for a short period up to 6 h of fasting. Serum Ca concentration sharply increased up to threefolds in the birds received Ca-glu injection resulting in acute hypercalcemia, then decreased to the initial level after 24-h feed withdrawal (p < 0.05). The mean serum level for creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, HDL, albumins and total proteins significantly increased during the fasting periods of 6 to 48 h and significantly elevated in the birds receiving 0.6-ml Ca-glu injection compared with the non-treated chicks (p < 0.05). It was concluded that subcutaneous administration of 0.6 ml Ca-glu in the chick's neck did not suitably support the increased metabolic demands for glucose and calcium in feed-deprived neonate chicks.

  1. Modeling noisy resonant system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Patrick Thomas; Walrath, David Edwin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a theory-based model replicating empirical acoustic resonant signals is presented and studied to understand sources of noise present in acoustic signals. Statistical properties of empirical signals are quantified and a noise amplitude parameter, which models frequency and amplitude-based noise, is created, defined, and presented. This theory-driven model isolates each phenomenon and allows for parameters to be independently studied. Using seven independent degrees of freedom, this model will accurately reproduce qualitative and quantitative properties measured from laboratory data. Results are presented and demonstrate success in replicating qualitative and quantitative properties of experimental data.

  2. On Compensation in Multidimensional Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of compensation in multidimensional response modeling is addressed. We show that multidimensional response models are compensatory in their ability parameters if and only if they are monotone. In addition, a minimal set of assumptions is presented under which the MLEs of the ability parameters are also compensatory. In a recent series of…

  3. Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peress, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

  4. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  5. The Creation of Surrogate Models for Fast Estimation of Complex Model Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, W. Andrew; Hester, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    A surrogate model is a black box model that reproduces the output of another more complex model at a single time point. This is to be distinguished from the method of surrogate data, used in time series. The purpose of a surrogate is to reduce the time necessary for a computation at the cost of rigor and generality. We describe a method of constructing surrogates in the form of support vector machine (SVM) regressions for the purpose of exploring the parameter space of physiological models. Our focus is on the methodology of surrogate creation and accuracy assessment in comparison to the original model. This is done in the context of a simulation of hemorrhage in one model, “Small”, and renal denervation in another, HumMod. In both cases, the surrogate predicts the drop in mean arterial pressure following the intervention. We asked three questions concerning surrogate models: (1) how many training examples are necessary to obtain an accurate surrogate, (2) is surrogate accuracy homogeneous, and (3) how much can computation time be reduced when using a surrogate. We found the minimum training set size that would guarantee maximal accuracy was widely variable, but could be algorithmically generated. The average error for the pressure response to the protocols was -0.05±2.47 in Small, and -0.3 +/- 3.94 mmHg in HumMod. In the Small model, error grew with actual pressure drop, and in HumMod, larger pressure drops were overestimated by the surrogates. Surrogate use resulted in a 6 order of magnitude decrease in computation time. These results suggest surrogate modeling is a valuable tool for generating predictions of an integrative model’s behavior on densely sampled subsets of its parameter space. PMID:27258010

  6. Fast periodic presentation of natural images reveals a robust face-selective electrophysiological response in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rossion, Bruno; Torfs, Katrien; Jacques, Corentin; Liu-Shuang, Joan

    2015-01-16

    We designed a fast periodic visual stimulation approach to identify an objective signature of face categorization incorporating both visual discrimination (from nonface objects) and generalization (across widely variable face exemplars). Scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in 12 human observers viewing natural images of objects at a rapid frequency of 5.88 images/s for 60 s. Natural images of faces were interleaved every five stimuli, i.e., at 1.18 Hz (5.88/5). Face categorization was indexed by a high signal-to-noise ratio response, specifically at an oddball face stimulation frequency of 1.18 Hz and its harmonics. This face-selective periodic EEG response was highly significant for every participant, even for a single 60-s sequence, and was generally localized over the right occipitotemporal cortex. The periodicity constraint and the large selection of stimuli ensured that this selective response to natural face images was free of low-level visual confounds, as confirmed by the absence of any oddball response for phase-scrambled stimuli. Without any subtraction procedure, time-domain analysis revealed a sequence of differential face-selective EEG components between 120 and 400 ms after oddball face image onset, progressing from medial occipital (P1-faces) to occipitotemporal (N1-faces) and anterior temporal (P2-faces) regions. Overall, this fast periodic visual stimulation approach provides a direct signature of natural face categorization and opens an avenue for efficiently measuring categorization responses of complex visual stimuli in the human brain.

  7. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  8. Predicting Student Responsiveness to Fast ForWord Using DIBELS Subtests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The current study was completed through a retrospective analysis of school records of elementary school students in the Northeast Region of the Philadelphia School District (PSD) who have participated in the Fast ForWord (FFW) Language program. The data requested from student records included: demographic information (e.g., gender, grade, age,…

  9. Fasting levels of ghrelin covary with the brain response to food pictures.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Nils B; Krebs, Lena; Kobiella, Andrea; Grimm, Oliver; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin figures prominently in the regulation of appetite in normal-weighed individuals. The apparent failure of this mechanism in eating disorders and the connection to addictive behavior in general demand a deeper understanding of the endogenous central-nervous processes related to ghrelin. Thus, we investigated processing of pictures showing palatable food after overnight fasting and following a standardized caloric intake (i.e. a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test) using functional magnetic resonance imaging and correlated it with blood plasma levels of ghrelin. Twenty-six healthy female and male volunteers viewed food and control pictures in a block design and rated their appetite after each block. Fasting levels of ghrelin correlated positively with food-cue reactivity in a bilateral network of visual processing-, reward- and taste-related regions, including limbic and paralimbic regions. Notably, among those regions were the hypothalamus and the midbrain where ghrelin receptors are densely concentrated. In addition, high fasting ghrelin levels were associated with stronger increases of subjective appetite during the food-cue-reactivity task. In conclusion, brain activation and subjective appetite ratings suggest that ghrelin elevates the hedonic effects of food pictures. Thereby, fasting ghrelin levels may generally enhance subjective craving when confronted with reward cues.

  10. Preparation of fast response superabsorbent hydrogels by radiation polymerization and crosslinking of N-isopropylacrylamide in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Mohdy, H. L.; Safrany, Agnes

    2008-03-01

    Macroporous temperature-responsive poly( N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels with high equilibrium swelling and fast response rates were obtained by a 60Co γ- and electron beam (EB) irradiation of aqueous N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer solutions. The effect of irradiation temperatures, the dose, the addition of a pore-forming agent on the swelling ratio, and the kinetics of swelling and shrinking of the PNIPAAm gels was studied. The gels synthesized above the LCST exhibited the highest equilibrium swelling (300-400) and fastest response rate measured by minutes. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures revealed that the gels synthesized above the LCST have larger pores than those prepared at temperatures below the LCST. The gels showed a reversible response to cyclical changes in temperature and might be used in a pulsed drug delivery device. The gels synthesized above the LCST exhibited the highest testosterone propionate release.

  11. The use of kinetic modelling as a fast way to screen thermal endurance of space materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Heltzel, S.; Semprimoschnig, C.; Garcia Martin, G.

    2003-09-01

    Currently planned missions of ESA (European Space Agency) to the inner part of the solar system will require the use of materials at an extreme radiation and temperature environment. A major concern regarding the selection of these materials is the thermal behaviour and the thermal stability. In this paper two kinetic models, the one following the ASTM E 1641 and ASTM E 1877 standards and the other following the Model Free Kinetics (MFK) approach, are presented. These models allow an easy and fast way to screen the thermal endurance of organic materials by running Thermo Gravimetric Analyses (TGA) temperature scans.

  12. Image fusion for remote sensing using fast, large-scale neuroscience models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumby, Steven P.

    2011-05-01

    We present results with large-scale neuroscience-inspired models for feature detection using multi-spectral visible/ infrared satellite imagery. We describe a model using an artificial neural network architecture and learning rules to build sparse scene representations over an adaptive dictionary, fusing spectral and spatial textural characteristics of the objects of interest. Our results with fast codes implemented on clusters of graphical processor units (GPUs) suggest that visual cortex models are a promising approach to practical pattern recognition problems in remote sensing, even for datasets using spectral bands not found in natural visual systems.

  13. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  14. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Development of models for fast fluid pathways through unsaturated heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    The pre-waste-emplacement ground water travel time requirement is a regulatory criterion that specifies ground water travel time to the accessible environment shall be greater than 1,000 years. Satisfying the ground water travel time criterion for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain requires the study of fast travel path formation in the unsaturated zone and development of models that simulate the formation of fast paths. Conceptual models for unsaturated flow that have been used for total-systems performance assessment generally fall into the categories of composite-porosity or fracture models. The actual hydrologic conditions at Yucca Mountain are thought to lie somewhere between the extremes of these two types of models. The current study considers the effects of heterogeneities on composite-porosity models and seeks to develop numerical methods (and models) that can produce locally saturated zones where fracture flow can occur. The credibility of the model and numerical methods is investigated by using test data from the INTRAVAL project (Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate, 1992) to attempt to predict in-situ volumetric water content at specific locations in Yucca Mountain. Work based on the numerical methods presented in this study is eventually intended to allow the calculation of ground water travel times in heterogeneous media. 60 refs.

  16. Demanding response time requirements on coherent receivers due to fast polarization rotations caused by lightning events.

    PubMed

    Krummrich, Peter M; Ronnenberg, David; Schairer, Wolfgang; Wienold, Daniel; Jenau, Frank; Herrmann, Maximilian

    2016-05-30

    Lightning events can cause fast polarization rotations and phase changes in optical transmission fibers due to strong electrical currents and magnetic fields. Whereas these are unlikely to affect legacy transmission systems with direct detection, different mechanisms have to be considered in systems with local oscillator based coherent receivers and digital signal processing. A theoretical analysis reveals that lightning events can result in polarization rotations with speeds as fast as a few hundred kRad/s. We discuss possible mechanisms how such lightning events can affect coherent receivers with digital signal processing. In experimental investigations with a high current pulse generator and transponder prototypes, we observed post FEC errors after polarization rotation events which can be expected from lightning strikes.

  17. Mathematical model and its fast numerical method for the tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Kim, Yangjin; Kim, Junseok

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we reformulate the diffuse interface model of the tumor growth (S.M. Wise et al., Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth-I: model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008) 524--543). In the new proposed model, we use the conservative second-order Allen--Cahn equation with a space--time dependent Lagrange multiplier instead of using the fourth-order Cahn--Hilliard equation in the original model. To numerically solve the new model, we apply a recently developed hybrid numerical method. We perform various numerical experiments. The computational results demonstrate that the new model is not only fast but also has a good feature such as distributing excess mass from the inside of tumor to its boundary regions.

  18. A fast radiative transfer model for the assimilation of water vapor radiances from the Kalpana very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Randhir; Rayer, Peter; Saunders, Roger; Migliorini, Stefano; Brugge, Roger; O'Neill, Alan

    2009-04-01

    A fast radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute emitted infrared radiances for a very high resolution radiometer (VHRR), onboard the operational Indian geostationary satellite Kalpana has been developed and verified. This work is a step towards the assimilation of Kalpana water vapor (WV) radiances into numerical weather prediction models. The fast RTM uses a regression-based approach to parameterize channel-specific convolved level to space transmittances. A comparison between the fast RTM and the line-by-line RTM demonstrated that the fast RTM can simulate line-by-line radiances for the Kalpana WV channel to an accuracy better than the instrument noise, while offering more rapid radiance calculations. A comparison of clear sky radiances of the Kalpana WV channel with the ECMWF model first guess radiances is also presented, aiming to demonstrate the fast RTM performance with the real observations. In order to assimilate the radiances from Kalpana, a simple scheme for bias correction has been suggested.

  19. Prediction of Sawtooth Periods in Fast-Wave Heated DIII-D Experiments Using Extensions of the Porcelli Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Choi, M.; Lao, L. L.; Chan, V. S.; Chu, M. S.; Jeon, Y. M.; Li, G.; Ren, Q.; Gorelenkov, N.

    2007-11-01

    Validation of a predictive sawtooth model is important for burning plasma experiments such as ITER. The Porcelli model using simplified expressions for the key contributions has been found to predict average sawtooth periods reasonably well in existing tokamaks. We evaluate this model using realistic models for the ideal MHD contribution from GATO, and a nonisotropic fast ion contribution using ORBIT-RF and TORIC for the rf-modified fast-ion pressure. Application to the first giant sawtooth cycle in a DIII-D discharge where beam ions accelerated by fast waves modify the sawteeth shows the model can predict the crash time consistent with the experimental crash. The stabilizing contributions depend strongly on uncertainties in the magnetic shear at q=1 and the fast ion poloidal beta. The model will be also applied to other sawteeth in the same discharge and compared to predictions from the more complete NOVA-K stability code with full anistropy.

  20. Developmental Mediation of Genetic Variation in Response to the Fast Track Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W.; Crowley, D. Max; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dick, Danielle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a developmental analysis of genetic moderation of the effect of the Fast Track intervention on adult externalizing psychopathology. The Fast Track intervention enrolled 891 children at high risk to develop externalizing behavior problems when they were in kindergarten. Half of the enrolled children were randomly assigned to receive 10 years of treatment with a range of services and resources provided to the children and their families and the other half to usual care (controls). We previously showed that the effect of the Fast Track intervention on participants’ risk of externalizing psychopathology at age 25 years was moderated by a variant in the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene (NR3C1). Children who carried copies of the A-allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 had the highest risk of externalizing psychopathology if they were in the control arm of the trial and the lowest risk of externalizing psychopathology if they were in the treatment arm. In this study, we test a developmental hypothesis about the origins of this for-better-and-for-worse gene-by-intervention interaction (GxI): That the observed GxI effect on adult psychopathology is mediated by the proximal impact of intervention on childhood externalizing problems and adolescent substance use and delinquency. We analyzed longitudinal data tracking the 270 European-American children in the Fast Track RCT with available genetic information (129 intervention children and 141 control-group peers, 69% male) from kindergarten through age 25 years. Results show that the same pattern of “for-better-and-for-worse” susceptibility to intervention observed at the age-25 follow-up was evident already during childhood. At the elementary school follow-ups and at the middle/high-school follow-ups, rs10482672 predicted better adjustment among children receiving the Fast Track intervention, and worse adjustment among children in the control condition. In turn, these proximal GxI effects

  1. A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Responses from a Graded Disagree-Agree Response Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A parametric item response theory model for unfolding binary or graded responses is developed. The graded unfolding model (GUM) is a generalization of the hyperbolic cosine model for binary data of D. Andrich and G. Luo (1993). Applicability of the GUM to attitude testing is illustrated with real data. (SLD)

  2. Modelling event-related skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Flandin, Guillaume; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic tools for psychophysiological signals often make implicit assumptions that are unspecified. In developing a mathematical framework for analysis of skin conductance responses [SCRs], we formalise our assumptions by positing that SCRs can be regarded as the output of a linear time-invariant filter. Here, we provide an empirical test of these assumptions. Our findings indicate that a large component of the variance in SCRs can be explained by one response function per individual. We note that baseline variance (i.e. variance in the absence of evoked responses) is higher than variance that could not be explained by a linear time-invariant model of evoked responses. Furthermore, there was no evidence for nonlinear interactions among evoked responses that depended on their temporal overlap. We develop a canonical response function and show that it can be used for signals from different recording sites. We discuss the implications of these observations for model-based analysis of SCRs. PMID:20093150

  3. Validation of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, J. H.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason; Driscoll, Frederick

    2016-06-01

    As part of a collaboration of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SWAY AS, NREL installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the spar-type 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating offshore wind system. The equipment enhanced SWAY's data collection and allowed SWAY to verify the concept and NREL to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), in collaboration with NREL, assisted with the validation. This final report gives an overview of the SWAY prototype and NREL and NTU's efforts to validate a model of the system. The report provides a summary of the different software tools used in the study, the modeling strategies, and the development of a FAST model of the SWAY prototype wind turbine, including justification of the modeling assumptions. Because of uncertainty in system parameters and modeling assumptions due to the complexity of the design, several system properties were tuned to better represent the system and improve the accuracy of the simulations. Calibration was performed using data from a static equilibrium test and free-decay tests.

  4. Fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix for responses to the Earth's conductivity: General strategy and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, O. V.; Kuvshinov, A. V.

    2010-09-01

    Modern electromagnetic studies of the Earth deal with three-dimensional data sets and their inversion in the class of three-dimensional models. Due to the large scale of the 3D inverse problem, it is usually solved using gradient-type iteration techniques. These techniques require repeated calculations of the gradient of the penalty function (i.e., the sum of the misfit and the regularization term) with respect to the model parameters that describe the spatial distribution of conductivity. Since there are generally no analytical tools for calculating the misfit gradient, its computation requires the application of some numerical techniques. Unfortunately, it is impossible to perform mass calculations of the misfit gradient even using modern computing if one applies conventional numerical differentiation. In reality, in this case the number of calls of the forward problem is proportional to the number of the sought parameters, which is very large in case of a 3D inversion. However, there is a much more efficient method for calculation of the misfit gradient, namely, the adjoint-field technique. At present, this technique is widely used in the numerical schemes of the 3D inversion of electromagnetic and other data. With this technique we can calculate the misfit gradient with the same computational burden as that required for the solution of a single additional forward problem. Although this technique is widely used, we failed to find any comprehensive description of this technique in the literature that would allow one to apply this approach for any particular scheme of sounding, profiling, or transillumination as easily as a general formula is applied for a given case. In the present paper, we obtain general formulas for the quick calculation of the derivatives of the frequency-domain responses and the derivatives of the misfit function with respect to the variations in conductivity. We also show how the derived general formulas are transformed into particular

  5. Fast Computation of Frequency Response of Cavity-Backed Apertures Using MBPE in Conjunction with Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    2004-01-01

    The hybrid Finite Element Method(FEM)/Method of Moments(MoM) technique has become popular over the last few years due to its flexibility to handle arbitrarily shaped objects with complex materials. One of the disadvantages of this technique, however, is the computational cost involved in obtaining solutions over a frequency range as computations are repeated for each frequency. In this paper, the application of Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) method[1] with the hybrid FEM/MoM technique is presented for fast computation of frequency response of cavity-backed apertures[2,3]. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency-derivatives of the integro-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is calculated at different frequencies from which the frequency response is obtained.

  6. Extensions of boundary layer modeling of photomask topography effects to fast-CAD using pattern matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal A.; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2009-10-01

    In lithography for the 45nm node and beyond, phase errors introduced through electromagnetic field (EMF) effects at photomask openings are significant sources of error in calculating on-wafer images. These edge effects create distortion in both real and imaginary field transmission, which leads to a tilt in the process window, and must be addressed in mask design to avoid loss of process latitude. This study presents a new formulation for pattern matching, which allows EMF effects to be included via boundary layer modeling to facilitate extremely fast assessment of EMF impact on imaging. Boundary layers are first used to model these edge effects, by adding additional transmission features to a layout to represent the error transmissions caused by edges. Pattern matching is then used to determine susceptibly to various pre-existing perturbations, in the presence of defocus. This process can be extremely fast and hotspot detection can be run on an entire chip in hours, compared to days for aerial imaging. Correlation between pattern matching and full aerial imaging can be as high as 0.97 for coherent imaging, and ~ 0.75 for off-axis dipole illumination. This pattern matching framework is extremely flexible and can be used for fast assessment of any series of effects which can be described as a path difference in the pupil or as a transmission on the mask.

  7. A mixture hierarchical model for response times and response accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Xu, Gongjun

    2015-11-01

    In real testing, examinees may manifest different types of test-taking behaviours. In this paper we focus on two types that appear to be among the more frequently occurring behaviours – solution behaviour and rapid guessing behaviour. Rapid guessing usually happens in high-stakes tests when there is insufficient time, and in low-stakes tests when there is lack of effort. These two qualitatively different test-taking behaviours, if ignored, will lead to violation of the local independence assumption and, as a result, yield biased item/person parameter estimation. We propose a mixture hierarchical model to account for differences among item responses and response time patterns arising from these two behaviours. The model is also able to identify the specific behaviour an examinee engages in when answering an item. A Monte Carlo expectation maximization algorithm is proposed for model calibration. A simulation study shows that the new model yields more accurate item and person parameter estimates than a non-mixture model when the data indeed come from two types of behaviour. The model also fits real, high-stakes test data better than a non-mixture model, and therefore the new model can better identify the underlying test-taking behaviour an examinee engages in on a certain item.

  8. Modeling of the fast organic emissions from a wood-finishing product—Floor wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, John C. S.; Guo, Zhishi

    Environmental chamber and full-scale residential house tests were conducted to evaluate the fast organic emissions from a wood-finishing product—floor wax. For the environmental chamber tests, a very small amount of (<5 gm -2) of the wax was applied to an aluminum plate. It was found that the chamber exit organic concentrations can be estimated by a model with an initial condition of instant organic emissions. The model was applied to the house data to interpret the octane and nonane emissions. Significant sink effects were found in the house that prolonged the elevated octane and nonane concentrations for more than 2 days.

  9. A fast model for spreading of neutral particles injected locally into hot plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2014-08-15

    A fast model for calculation of non-stationary 3-D profiles of the density for neutral particles locally released into a hot plasma is elaborated. The approach reduces non-stationary three-dimensional transport equations to a set of one-dimensional ones describing the time evolution of the radial profiles for several parameters characterizing adequately the three-dimensional structure. The method is applied to model the spreading process of carbon atoms released by laser desorption in an experimental device and the local injection of working gas into a fusion reactor. The associated heat loads onto the first wall are assessed.

  10. COBRA-WC model and predictions for a fast-reactor natural-circulation transient. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Prather, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code has been used to predict the core-wide coolant and rod temperature distribution in a liquid metal fast reactor during the early part (first 220 seconds) of a natural circulation transient. Approximately one-sixth of the core was modeled including bypass flows and the pressure losses above and below the core region. Detailed temperature and flow distributions were obtained for the two test fuel assemblies. The COBRA-WC model, the approach, and predictions of core-wide transient coolant and rod temperatures during a natural circulation transient are presented in this paper.

  11. Modeling the behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels during extended transients

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Billone, M.C.; Tsai, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    Passive safety features in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) make it possible to avoid core damage for extended time periods even when automatic scram systems fail to operate or heat removal systems are severely degraded. The time scale for these transients are intermediate between those that have traditionally been analyzed in fast reactor safety assessments and those of normal operation. Consequently, it has been necessary to validate models and computer codes (FPIN2 and LIFE-METAL) for application to this time regime. Results from out-of-reactor Whole Pin Furnace tests are being used for this purpose. Pretest predictions for tests FM-1 through FM-6 have been performed and calculations have been compared with the experimental measurements.

  12. Modeling the behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels during extended transients

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Billone, M.C.; Tsai, H.C.

    1992-11-01

    Passive safety features in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) make it possible to avoid core damage for extended time periods even when automatic scram systems fail to operate or heat removal systems are severely degraded. The time scale for these transients are intermediate between those that have traditionally been analyzed in fast reactor safety assessments and those of normal operation. Consequently, it has been necessary to validate models and computer codes (FPIN2 and LIFE-METAL) for application to this time regime. Results from out-of-reactor Whole Pin Furnace tests are being used for this purpose. Pretest predictions for tests FM-1 through FM-6 have been performed and calculations have been compared with the experimental measurements.

  13. A General Model for Free Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    1972-01-01

    This paper proposes a general model for free-response data collected for measuring a specified unidimensional psychological process; systematizes situations which vary with respect to the scoring level of items; and finds out general conditions for the operating characteristic of an item response category to provide a unique maximum likelihood…

  14. Porcine skin thermal response to near-IR lasers using a fast infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence; Milner, Thomas; Telenkov, Sergey; Schuster, Kurt; Stockton, Kevin; Stolarski, David; Condit, Chris; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.; Welch, A. J.

    2004-07-01

    We have measured the Minimum Visible Lesion (MVL) thresholds for porcine skin and determined the ED50 for exposures at 1314 nm and 0.35 ms laser pulses. An in-vivo pigmented animal model, Yucatan mini-pig (Sus scrofa domestica), was used in this study. We also have measured the thermal response using a high-speed Infrared camera for single pulse temperature recordings for Gaussian beams of 1 mm diameter. Several 2-D measurements of temperature as a function of time were made with an IR array detector thermal camera using a sampling rate of 100 frames per second. In Vitro samples of the same pig skin were used for measurements of the optical properties (absorption coefficient, μa, and reduced scattering coefficient μs) as a function of wavelength around 1315 nm wavelength. A measured surface temperature distribution for one IR laser pulse of 0.37J at a spot size of 1.2 mm diameter gave approximately a 43° C rise at a hot spot. Temperature distributions as a function of time and space will be presented and compared with the measured thresholds.

  15. Differential epigenetic modifications of histones at the myosin heavy chain genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers and in response to muscle unloading.

    PubMed

    Pandorf, Clay E; Haddad, Fadia; Wright, Carola; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in chromatin biology have enhanced our understanding of gene regulation. It is now widely appreciated that gene regulation is dependent upon post-translational modifications to the histones which package genes in the nucleus of cells. Active genes are known to be associated with acetylation of histones (H3ac) and trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined histone modifications at the myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes expressed in fast vs. slow fiber-type skeletal muscle, and in a model of muscle unloading, which results in a shift to fast MHC gene expression in slow muscles. Both H3ac and H3K4me3 varied directly with the transcriptional activity of the MHC genes in fast fiber-type plantaris and slow fiber-type soleus. During MHC transitions with muscle unloading, histone H3 at the type I MHC becomes de-acetylated in correspondence with down-regulation of that gene, while upregulation of the fast type IIx and IIb MHCs occurs in conjunction with enhanced H3ac in those MHCs. Enrichment of H3K4me3 is also increased at the type IIx and IIb MHCs when these genes are induced with muscle unloading. Downregulation of IIa MHC, however, was not associated with corresponding loss of H3ac or H3K4me3. These observations demonstrate the feasibility of using the ChIP assay to understand the native chromatin environment in adult skeletal muscle, and also suggest that the transcriptional state of types I, IIx and IIb MHC genes are sensitive to histone modifications both in different muscle fiber-types and in response to altered loading states.

  16. Composite model of microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel under fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A rate-theory-based model has been developed which includes the simultaneous evolution of the dislocation and cavity components of the microstructure of irradiated austenitic stainless steels. Previous work has generally focused on developing models for void swelling while neglecting the time dependence of the dislocation structure. These models have broadened our understanding of the physical processes that give rise to swelling, e.g., the role of helium and void formation from critically-sized bubbles. That work has also demonstrated some predictive capability by successful calibration to fit the results of fast reactor swelling data. However, considerable uncertainty about the values of key parameters in these models limits their usefulness as predictive tools. Hence the use of such models to extrapolate fission reactor swelling data to fusion reactor conditions is compromised.

  17. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This…

  18. Measurement of N{sub 2}O fluxes from fertilized grassland using a fast response tunable diode laser spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wienhold, F.G.; Frahm, H.; Harris, G.W.

    1994-08-20

    Measurements of nitrous oxide flux from fertilized agricultural grasslands is important in explaining and predicting the relationship of emissions of this gas to global warming. The nitrous oxide flux from agricultural grasslands was measured using micrometeorological techniques at a site near Stirling, Scotland. Emission levels were measured using a fast response tunable diode laser spectrometer. Measurements were made by both eddy correlation and concentration gradient techniques. This paper describes the results of this experiment and discusses information obtained that may be used for the characterization of the spatial variability in nitrous oxide emissions. 20 refs., 8 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications. PMID:25425458

  20. Realization of Field Sequential Color in Simple Matrix Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystal Displays by Utilizing Fast Pretransitional Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Chen, Guo-Ping; Manna, Uttam; Vij, Jagdish K.; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2009-07-01

    Simple matrix antiferroelectric liquid crystal displays (SM-AFLCDs) are prototyped to realize field sequential color (FSC) by utilizing the fast pretransitional response. The developed FSC-SM-AFLCDs will lead to the replacement of existing static driven FSC-SM-nematic-LCDs. Bright and clear color can be given to already market-acquired, black-and-white SM-LCDs of up to 1/64-duty and 3-in. diagonal size. To optimize the display performance, we analyze two important factors, the large pretransitional effect and the appropriate reset pulse, in terms of the interlayer interaction potential used in describing the field-induced transition of the antiferroelectric smectic phase.

  1. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  2. Fast response and high sensitivity ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave humidity sensors using graphene oxide sensing layer.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J K

    2014-11-26

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with < 1 sec rise time. The simple design and excellent stability of our GO-based SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  3. A Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS): Algorithm and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit; Dudhia, Jimy

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models simulating broadband solar radiation have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resources for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the RT equation, the computation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time-consuming, though many approximations (e.g., two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme) have been utilized. Thus, a more efficient RT model is crucial for model developers as a new option for approximating solar radiation at the land surface with minimal loss of accuracy. In this study, we developed a fast all-sky radiation model for solar applications (FARMS) using the simplified clear-sky RT model, REST2, and simulated cloud transmittances and reflectances from the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) with a 16-stream Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer (DISORT). Simulated lookup tables (LUTs) of cloud transmittances and reflectances are created by varying cloud optical thicknesses, cloud particle sizes, and solar zenith angles. Equations with optimized parameters are fitted to the cloud transmittances and reflectances to develop the model. The all-sky solar irradiance at the land surface can then be computed rapidly by combining REST2 with the cloud transmittances and reflectances. This new RT model is more than 1,000 times faster than those currently utilized in solar resource assessment and forecasting because it does not explicitly solve the RT equation for each individual cloud condition. Our results indicate that the accuracy of the fast radiative transfer model is comparable to or better than two-stream approximation in term of computing cloud transmittance and solar radiation.

  4. Design and development of a fast-response ionization gauge controller

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, J.W.; Dyer, G.R.; Simpkins, J.E )

    1989-01-01

    Fast pressure measurements in the divertor and pump limiter chambers used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments require a system that can respond to a broad range of pressures while maintaining good noise immunity. Available designs of gauge controllers were unable to provide a acceptable noise immunity. A fast ionization gauge controller that can respond to pressure changes in the range from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Torr in less than 10 ms using a Schultz-Phelps gauge assembly has been developed. The Schultz-Phelps gauge provides full coverage of the desired pressure range and is less susceptible to magnetic field interference than other available types of ionization gauges. The gauge controller as designed provides simultaneous readout of three decades of pressure. Major design concerns have been to minimize noise induced by the gauge tube filament drive and noise pickup by the ionization current electrometer. By using DC filament drive, a major shortcoming of available gauge controllers, i.e., 60-Hz pickup caused by filament modulation of the electron current, has been overcome. Second, by locating the electrometer amplifier as close to the Schultz-Phelps gauge as possible, cable-induced noise pickup has been reduced to an acceptable level. Problems encountered in the design and test of the gauge controller and future improvements are discussed. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Response to selection for fast growth in the second generation of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingzhi; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Ruihai

    2012-09-01

    Mass selection for fast growth was conducted in three Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) stocks from China, Japan and Korea using previously established lines (CS1, JS1, and KS1). To determine whether continuous progress can be achieved by selection for growth, the progeny of three second-generation Pacific oyster lines was selected for shell height and evaluated via a 400-day farming experiment. When harvested at the end of the experiment, the selected crosses of CS2, JS2, and KS2 lines grew by 9.2%, 10.2% and 9.6% larger than the control crosses, respectively. During grow-out stage, the genetic gain of three selected lines was (10.2 ± 1.4)%, (10.4 ± 0.3)%, and (8.4 ± 1.6)%, respectively; and the corresponding realized heritability was 0.457 ± 0.143, 0.312 ± 0.071 and 0.332 ± 0.009, respectively. These results indicated that the selection for fast growth achieved steady progress in the second generation of oyster. Our work provides supportive evidence for the continuity of the Pacific oyster selective breeding program.

  6. A huntingtin-mediated fast stress response halting endosomal trafficking is defective in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Siddharth; Munsie, Lise N.; Truant, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Cellular stress is a normal part of the aging process and is especially relevant in neurodegenerative disease. Canonical stress responses, such as the heat shock response, activate following exposure to stress and restore proteostasis through the action of isomerases and chaperones within the cytosol. Through live-cell imaging, we demonstrate involvement of the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin, in a rapid cell stress response that lies temporally upstream of canonical stress responses. This response is characterized by the formation of distinct cytosolic puncta and reversible localization of huntingtin to early endosomes. The formation of these puncta, which we have termed huntingtin stress bodies (HSBs), is associated with arrest of early-to-recycling and early-to-late endosomal trafficking. The critical domains for this response have been mapped to two regions of huntingtin flanking the polyglutamine tract, and we observe polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin-expressing cells to be defective in their ability to recover from this stress response. We propose that HSB formation rapidly diverts high ATP use from vesicular trafficking during stress, thus mobilizing canonical stress responses without relying on increased energy metabolism, and that restoration from this response is defective in HD. PMID:25205111

  7. Mobilization of mercury from lean tissues during simulated migratory fasting in a model songbird

    PubMed Central

    Seewagen, Chad L.; Cristol, Daniel A.; Gerson, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The pollutant methylmercury accumulates within lean tissues of birds and other animals. Migrating birds catabolize substantial amounts of lean tissue during flight which may mobilize methylmercury and increase circulating levels of this neurotoxin. As a model for a migrating songbird, we fasted zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) that had been dosed with 0.0, 0.1, and 0.6 parts per million (ppm) dietary methylmercury and measured changes in blood total mercury concentrations (THg) in relation to reductions in lean mass. Birds lost 6–16% of their lean mass during the fast, and THg increased an average of 12% and 11% in the 0.1 and 0.6 ppm treatments, respectively. Trace amounts of THg in the 0.0 ppm control group also increased as a result of fasting, but remained extremely low. THg increased 0.4 ppm for each gram of lean mass catabolized in the higher dose birds. Our findings indicate that methylmercury is mobilized from lean tissues during protein catabolism and results in acute increases in circulating concentrations. This is a previously undocumented potential threat to wild migratory birds, which may experience greater surges in circulating methylmercury than demonstrated here as a result of their greater reductions in lean mass. PMID:27173605

  8. Mobilization of mercury from lean tissues during simulated migratory fasting in a model songbird.

    PubMed

    Seewagen, Chad L; Cristol, Daniel A; Gerson, Alexander R

    2016-05-12

    The pollutant methylmercury accumulates within lean tissues of birds and other animals. Migrating birds catabolize substantial amounts of lean tissue during flight which may mobilize methylmercury and increase circulating levels of this neurotoxin. As a model for a migrating songbird, we fasted zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) that had been dosed with 0.0, 0.1, and 0.6 parts per million (ppm) dietary methylmercury and measured changes in blood total mercury concentrations (THg) in relation to reductions in lean mass. Birds lost 6-16% of their lean mass during the fast, and THg increased an average of 12% and 11% in the 0.1 and 0.6 ppm treatments, respectively. Trace amounts of THg in the 0.0 ppm control group also increased as a result of fasting, but remained extremely low. THg increased 0.4 ppm for each gram of lean mass catabolized in the higher dose birds. Our findings indicate that methylmercury is mobilized from lean tissues during protein catabolism and results in acute increases in circulating concentrations. This is a previously undocumented potential threat to wild migratory birds, which may experience greater surges in circulating methylmercury than demonstrated here as a result of their greater reductions in lean mass.

  9. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  10. Models for IP/MPLS routing performance: convergence, fast reroute, and QoS impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Gagan L.

    2004-09-01

    We show how to model the black-holing and looping of traffic during an Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) convergence event at an IP network and how to significantly improve both the convergence time and packet loss duration through IGP parameter tuning and algorithmic improvement. We also explore some congestion avoidance and congestion control algorithms that can significantly improve stability of networks in the face of occasional massive control message storms. Specifically we show the positive impacts of prioritizing Hello and Acknowledgement packets and slowing down LSA generation and retransmission generation on detecting congestion in the network. For some types of video, voice signaling and circuit emulation applications it is necessary to reduce traffic loss durations following a convergence event to below 100 ms and we explore that using Fast Reroute algorithms based on Multiprotocol Label Switching Traffic Engineering (MPLS-TE) that effectively bypasses IGP convergence. We explore the scalability of primary and backup MPLS-TE tunnels where MPLS-TE domain is in the backbone-only or edge-to-edge. We also show how much extra backbone resource is needed to support Fast Reroute and how can that be reduced by taking advantage of Constrained Shortest Path (CSPF) routing of MPLS-TE and by reserving less than 100% of primary tunnel bandwidth during Fast Reroute.

  11. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  12. Passive acoustic leak detection for sodium cooled fast reactors using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Riber Marklund, A.; Prakash, V.; Rajan, K.K.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic leak detection for steam generators of sodium fast reactors have been an active research topic since the early 1970's and several methods have been tested over the years. Inspired by its success in the field of automatic speech recognition, we here apply hidden Markov models (HMM) in combination with Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to the problem. To achieve this, we propose a new feature calculation scheme, based on the temporal evolution of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal. Using acoustic signals recorded during steam/water injection experiments done at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), the proposed method is tested. We perform parametric studies on the HMM+GMM model size and demonstrate that the proposed method a) performs well without a priori knowledge of injection noise, b) can incorporate several noise models and c) has an output distribution that simplifies false alarm rate control. (authors)

  13. SCOUT: a fast Monte-Carlo modeling tool of scintillation camera output†

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William C J; Barrett, Harrison H.; Muzi, John P.; McDougald, Wendy; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Lewellen, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo photon-tracking and readout simulator called SCOUT to study the stochastic behavior of signals output from a simplified rectangular scintillation-camera design. SCOUT models the salient processes affecting signal generation, transport, and readout of a scintillation camera. Presently, we compare output signal statistics from SCOUT to experimental results for both a discrete and a monolithic camera. We also benchmark the speed of this simulation tool and compare it to existing simulation tools. We find this modeling tool to be relatively fast and predictive of experimental results. Depending on the modeled camera geometry, we found SCOUT to be 4 to 140 times faster than other modeling tools. PMID:23640136

  14. Intercomparison of six fast-response sensors for the eddy-covariance flux measurement of nitrous oxide over agricultural grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, Eiko; Famulari, Daniela; Ibrom, Andreas; Vermeulen, Alex; Hensen, Arjan; van den Bulk, Pim; Loubet, Benjamin; Laville, Patricia; Mammarella, Ivan; Haapanala, Sami; Lohila, Annalea; Laurila, Tuomas; Eva, Rabot; Laborde, Marie; Cowan, Nicholas; Anderson, Margaret; Helfter, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas and its terrestrial budget remains poorly constraint, with bottom up and top down estimates of country emissions often disagreeing by more than a factor of two. Whilst the measurements of the biosphere / atmosphere exchange of CO2 with micrometeorological methods is commonplace, emissions of CH4 and N2O are more commonly measured with enclosure techniques due to limitations in fast-response sensors with good signal-to-noise characteristics. Recent years have seen the development of a range of instruments based on optical spectroscopy. This started in the early 1990s with instruments based on lead salt lasers, which had temperamental long-term characteristics. More recent developments in quantum cascade lasers has lead to increasingly stable instruments, initially based on pulsed, later on continuous wave lasers. Within the context of the European FP7 Infrastructure Project InGOS ('Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System'), we conducted an intercomparison of six fast response sensors for N2O: three more or less identical instruments based on off-axis Integrated Cavity Optical Spectrocopy (ICOS) (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and three instruments based on quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometry (Aerodyne Research Inc.): one older generation pulsed instrument (p-QCL) and two of the latest generation of compact continuous wave instruments (cw-QCL), operating at two different wavelengths. One of the ICOS instruments was operated with an inlet drier. In addition, the campaign was joined by a relaxed eddy-accumulation system linked to a FTIR spectrometer (Ecotech), a gradient system based on a home-built slower QCL (INRA Orleans) and a fast chamber system. Here we present the results of the study and a detailed examination of the various corrections and errors of the different instruments. Overall, with the exception of the older generation QCL, the average fluxes based on the different fast-response

  15. The genetic architecture of fasting plasma triglyceride response to fenofibrate treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic response to the triglyceride (TG)-lowering drug, fenofibrate, is shaped by interactions between genetic and environmental factors, yet knowledge regarding the genetic determinants of this response is primarily limited to single gene effects. Since very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) is the...

  16. Shell model response analysis of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shiro; Katagiri, Shin; Shinmi, Tatsuhiko

    1995-12-31

    A shell model analysis can calculate the cross-sectional deformation and hoop stress of buried pipelines. This paper proposes an analytical method to calculate the response of buried straight and bent pipelines modeled as cylindrical shell structures. A modified transfer matrix method is employed instead of a stiffness matrix method to avoid the problem of computational memory caused by huge matrixes. Results calculated by the developed program are compared with experimental ones obtained by a pipe bending test of straight and bent pipe segments. In addition, several differences of the pipe response between the beam model and the shell model are examined through response simulations of straight and bent pipelines subjected to ground subsidence.

  17. Exposure-response modeling of clinical end points using latent variable indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Hu, C

    2014-06-04

    Exposure-response modeling facilitates effective dosing regimen selection in clinical drug development, where the end points are often disease scores and not physiological variables. Appropriate models need to be consistent with pharmacology and identifiable from the time courses of available data. This article describes a general framework of applying mechanism-based models to various types of clinical end points. Placebo and drug model parameterization, interpretation, and assessment are discussed with a focus on the indirect response models.

  18. Exposure–Response Modeling of Clinical End Points Using Latent Variable Indirect Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Hu, C

    2014-01-01

    Exposure–response modeling facilitates effective dosing regimen selection in clinical drug development, where the end points are often disease scores and not physiological variables. Appropriate models need to be consistent with pharmacology and identifiable from the time courses of available data. This article describes a general framework of applying mechanism-based models to various types of clinical end points. Placebo and drug model parameterization, interpretation, and assessment are discussed with a focus on the indirect response models. PMID:24897307

  19. Simplified Warfarin Dose-response Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Gaweda, Adam E.; Wu, Dongfeng; Li, Lang; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is a frequently used oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Due to its narrow therapeutic range and large inter-individual dose-response variability, it is highly desirable to personalize warfarin dosing. However, the complexity of the conventional kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) models hampers the development of the personalized dose management. To avert this challenge, we propose simplified PD models for warfarin dose-response relationship, which is motivated by ideas from control theory. The simplified models were further applied to longitudinal data of 37 patients undergoing anticoagulation treatment using the standard two-stage approach and then compared with the conventional K-PD models. Data analysis shows that all models have a similar predictive ability, but the simplified models are most parsimonious. PMID:25750489

  20. Toward a selective, sensitive, fast-responsive, and biocompatible two-photon probe for hydrogen sulfide in live cells.

    PubMed

    Singha, Subhankar; Kim, Dokyoung; Moon, Hyunsoo; Wang, Taejun; Kim, Ki Hean; Shin, Youn Ho; Jung, Junyang; Seo, Eunseok; Lee, Sang-Joon; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2015-01-20

    Hydrogen sulfide has emerged as an exciting endogenous gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. Noninvasive detection methods for hydrogen sulfide thus become indispensable tools for studying its diverse roles in biological systems. Accordingly, fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide have received great attention in recent years. A practically useful fluorescent probe for bioimaging of hydrogen sulfide should be selective, sensitive, fast-responsive, biocompatible, observable in the biological optical window, and capable of deep-tissue imaging. These sensing properties, however, are extremely difficult to achieve at the same time. Disclosed here is the two-photon fluorescent probe that meets all of these criteria. The probe belongs to a Michael acceptor system, which raised a serious selectivity issue over the competing biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione. We have addressed the selectivity issue by optimizing the electronic and steric interactions between biothiols and the probe, in addition to achieving very high sensitivity, fast-response, and biocompatibility. Also, the sensing mechanism suggested in the literature was revised. The probe thus enables us to image the endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide with negligible interference from other biothiols in live cells. The excellent sensing properties of the probe combined with its capability of bioimaging thus make it a practically useful tool for further studying biological roles of hydrogen sulfide.

  1. Differential adaptive responses to 1- or 2-day fasting in various mouse tissues revealed by quantitative PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junya; Kamata, Shotaro; Miura, Asumi; Nagata, Tomoko; Kainuma, Ryo; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Dietary or caloric restriction confers various clinical benefits. Short-term fasting of mice is a common experimental procedure that may involve systemic metabolic remodeling, which may significantly affect experimental outputs. This study evaluated adaptive cellular responses after 1- or 2-day fasting in 13 mouse tissues by quantitative PCR using 15 marker primer sets for the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome (Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), autophagy–lysosome (LC3b, p62 and Lamp2), amino acid response (Asns, Trib3, Herpud1, xCT, and Chop), Nrf2-mediated antioxidant (HO-1 and Gsta1), and amino acid transport (Slc38a2, Slc7a5, and Slc7a1) systems. Differential activation profiles obtained in seven highly (thymus, liver, spleen, and small intestine) or mildly (stomach, kidney, and colon) atrophied tissues as well as in six non-atrophied tissues (brain, eye, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, and testis) suggested tissue-specific active metabolic remodeling. PMID:25973363

  2. Can Genetics Predict Response to Complex Behavioral Interventions? Evidence from a Genetic Analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W; Crowley, D Max; Latendresse, Shawn J; Aliev, Fazil; Riley, Brien; Sun, Cuie; Dick, Danielle M; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Early interventions are a preferred method for addressing behavioral problems in high-risk children, but often have only modest effects. Identifying sources of variation in intervention effects can suggest means to improve efficiency. One potential source of such variation is the genome. We conducted a genetic analysis of the Fast Track randomized control trial, a 10-year-long intervention to prevent high-risk kindergarteners from developing adult externalizing problems including substance abuse and antisocial behavior. We tested whether variants of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1 were associated with differences in response to the Fast Track intervention. We found that in European-American children, a variant of NR3C1 identified by the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 was associated with increased risk for externalizing psychopathology in control group children and decreased risk for externalizing psychopathology in intervention group children. Variation in NR3C1 measured in this study was not associated with differential intervention response in African-American children. We discuss implications for efforts to prevent externalizing problems in high-risk children and for public policy in the genomic era.

  3. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Chu, Q.; Rowlinson, A.; Gao, H.; Zhang, B.; Tingay, S. J.; Boër, M.; Wen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy γ-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines.

  4. Observations and modelling of fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay, Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Makshtas, Aleksandr; Grubiy, Andrey; Kustov, Vasiliy

    2016-04-01

    Fast ice is one of the main features of sea ice cover in the Laptev Sea. The formation of this immobile ice which occupies up to 30% of the sea area and significantly affects the intensity of air-sea energy exchange in the coastal zones had been investigated during winter 2014-2015 in the Tiksi Bay (Buor-Khaya Gulf). The temperature measurements within sea ice thickness and under-ice sea layer using GeoPrecision thermistor string of 10 sensors together with measurements of snow and ice thicknesses were carried out at the distance of 0.5 km from the shore at the 3.5 m water depth. According to measurements temperature variations qualitatively repeat air temperature variations and, damping with depth, approach to sea water freezing temperature. Vertical temperature distributions allow to recognize snow, ice and water layers by profile inclination in each layer. The temperature profiles within growing ice were quasi-linear, indicating permanence of heat flux inside ice. The linearity of temperature profiles increased during ice growth. For calculations of fast ice evolution one-dimensional thermodynamic model was used. Besides the empirical formulae, based on frost degree-days, developed in 1930th for the Tiksi Bay was applied. Numerical experiments were carried out with constant values of thermal properties of all media and 10 ppt water salinity, as initial condition. The daily average data from Hydrometeorological Observatory Tiksi, located approximately 1 km from the site of ice observations, were used as atmospheric forcing. For the examined area evolutions of ice cover thickness estimated from direct measurements, the thermodynamic model and the empirical formulae were almost identical. The result indicates stability of hydrological and meteorological conditions, determining fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay during last 75 years. Model simulations showed that in shallow waters the growth of ice thickness is stabilized due to increase of sub-ice water layer

  5. A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Popović, Nikola; Marr, Carsten; Swain, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic models for gene expression frequently exhibit dynamics on several different scales. One potential time-scale separation is caused by significant differences in the lifetimes of mRNA and protein; the ratio of the two degradation rates gives a natural small parameter in the resulting chemical master equation, allowing for the application of perturbation techniques. Here, we develop a framework for the analysis of a family of 'fast-slow' models for gene expression that is based on geometric singular perturbation theory. We illustrate our approach by giving a complete characterisation of a standard two-stage model which assumes transcription, translation, and degradation to be first-order reactions. In particular, we present a systematic expansion procedure for the probability-generating function that can in principle be taken to any order in the perturbation parameter, allowing for an approximation of the corresponding propagator probabilities to that same order. For illustrative purposes, we perform this expansion explicitly to first order, both on the fast and the slow time-scales; then, we combine the resulting asymptotics into a composite fast-slow expansion that is uniformly valid in time. In the process, we extend, and prove rigorously, results previously obtained by Shahrezaei and Swain (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(45):17256-17261, 2008) and Bokes et al. (J Math Biol 64(5):829-854, 2012; J Math Biol 65(3):493-520, 2012). We verify our asymptotics by numerical simulation, and we explore its practical applicability and the effects of a variation in the system parameters and the time-scale separation. Focussing on biologically relevant parameter regimes that induce translational bursting, as well as those in which mRNA is frequently transcribed, we find that the first-order correction can significantly improve the steady-state probability distribution. Similarly, in the time-dependent scenario, inclusion of the first-order fast asymptotics results in a

  6. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; ...

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externallymore » applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.« less

  7. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas [Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD spectroscopic observations of RWM stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, Francesca; Turnbull, Alan D.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Navratil, Gerald A.

    2015-02-03

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall βN limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing βN, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code, which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ~13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest βN levels (~90% of the ideal no-wall limit). Finally, the toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high βN.

  8. Extent and Determinants of Thermogenic Responses to 24 Hours of Fasting, Energy Balance, and Five Different Overfeeding Diets in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pannacciulli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan; Pacak, Karel; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Context: Individual variation in the ability to convert excess calories to heat and the effects of dietary macronutrient composition are unclear. Objective: Stability and determinants of the energy expenditure (EE) response to overconsumption were assessed. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty subjects (75% male) with normal glucose regulation were evaluated during 24 hours each of energy balance, fasting, and 5 different diets with 200% energy requirements in a clinical research unit. Interventions: Five 1-day overfeeding diets were given in random order: high carbohydrate (75%) and low protein (3%); high carbohydrate and normal protein (20%); high fat (46%) and low protein; high fat (60%) and normal protein; and balanced (50% carbohydrates, 20% protein). Main Outcome Measures: The 24-hour EE, sleeping EE, and thermic effect of food (TEF) during each diet were measured with a metabolic chamber. Appetitive hormones were measured before and after the diets. Results: The EE response to overfeeding exhibited good intraindividual reproducibility. Similar increases above eucaloric feeding in 24-hour EE (mean 10.7 ± 5.7%, P < .001; range 2.9–18.8%) and sleeping EE (14.4 ± 11.3%, P < .001; range 1.0–45.1%) occurred when overfeeding diets containing 20% protein, despite differences in fat and carbohydrate content, but the EE response during overfeeding diets containing 3% protein was attenuated. The percent body fat negatively correlated with TEF during normal protein overfeeding (r = −0.53, P < .01). Fasting peptide YY negatively correlated with TEF (r = −0.56, P < .01) and the increase in sleeping EE (r = −0.54, P < .01) during overfeeding. Conclusions: There is an intrinsic EE response to overfeeding that negatively associates with adiposity, although it represents a small percentage of consumed calories. PMID:23666976

  9. Modelling of stratification in cryogenic launch vehicle tanks in a fast engineering tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Foreest, Arnold

    Modelling of stratification in cryogenic launch vehicle tanks in a fast engineering tool Thermal stratification in cryogenic launch vehicle tanks can lead to several problems, such as sudden pressure drops in the tank due to sloshing of the stratified liquid or cavitation in rocket engine turbopumps. To obtain an optimal stage design, the stratification process muss be taken into account. Currently, stratification is often modelled by 3D CFD solvers, which is an extremely time consuming process. Analytical models do exists but are inaccurate. This paper will show how the currently existing analytical models are improved, by using experimental data and results obtained from numerical calculations using the 3D CFD tool FLOW 3D. The goal is to be able to model a stratification process of a few hundred seconds in just a few seconds of CPU time, so about a factor 100 faster than the physical process takes. A simulation using a 3D flow solver can take multiple days. Setting up the model for a 3D flow solver can even take longer. Therefore it would be a big advantage to have fast engineering tools describing the process so that stratification can be taken into account in the preliminary design phase. The stratification process has been investigated experimentally at ZARM (Centre of Applied Spaceflight and Microgravity), using a closed tank filled with liquid nitrogen. Due to unavoidable heat leaks from the surrounding, the liquid will start to heat up and thermal layers will form. The experiments are simulated using the commercial 3D flow solver "FLOW 3D". Once satisfying numerical results have been obtained, the stratification process can be investigated in more detail. The dimensioning parameters can be determined and their influence can be quantified. From these analyses it has been found that for example heat conduction through the tank wall in tangential direction has a big impact on the formation of thermal layers. The currently available analytical models for

  10. SPH modeling of adhesion in fast dynamics: Application to the Cold Spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profizi, Paul; Combescure, Alain; Ogawa, Kahuziro

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to show, in a specific case, the importance of modeling adhesive forces when simulating the bouncing of very small particles impacting a substrate at high speed. The implementation of this model into a fast-dynamics SPH code is described. Taking the example of an impacted elastic cylinder, we show that the adhesive forces, which are surface forces, play a significant role only if the particles are sufficiently small. The effect of the choice of the type of interaction law in the cohesive zone is studied and some conclusions on the relevance of the modeling of the adhesive forces for fast-dynamics impacts are drawn. Then, the adhesion model is used to simulate the Cold Spray process. An aluminum particle is projected against a substrate made of the same material at a velocity ranging from 200 to 1000 m ṡs-1. We study the effects of the various modeling assumptions on the final result: bouncing or sticking. Increasingly complex models are considered. At a 200 m ṡs-1 impact velocity, elastic behavior is assumed, the substrate being simply supported at its base and supplied with absorbing boundaries. The same absorbing boundaries are also used for all the other simulations. Then, plasticity is introduced and the impact velocity is increased up to 1000 m ṡs-1. At the highest velocities, the resulting strains are very significant. The calculations show that if the adhesion model is appropriately chosen, it is possible to reproduce the experimental observations: the particles stick to the substrate in a range of impact velocities surrounded by two velocity ranges in which the particles bounce.

  11. Evidence of fast serotonin transmission in frog slowly adapting type 1 responses.

    PubMed

    Press, Daniel; Mutlu, Sevinç; Güçlü, Burak

    2010-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite (MCN) complex generates slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) response when mechanically stimulated. Both serotonin (5-HT) and glutamate have been implicated in the generation of normal SA1 responses, but previous studies have been inconclusive as to what their roles are or how synaptic transmission occurs. In this study, excised dorsal skin patches from common water frogs (Rana ridibunda) were stimulated by von Frey hairs during perfusion in a tissue bath, and single-unit spike activity was recorded from SA1 fibres. Serotonin had no significant effect on the SA1 response at low (10 µM) concentration, significantly increased activity in a force-independent manner at 100 µM, but decreased activity with reduced responsiveness to force at 1 mM. Glutamate showed no effect on the responsiveness to force at 100 µM. MDL 72222 (100 µM), an ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, completely abolished the responsiveness to force, suggesting that serotonin is released from Merkel cells as a result of mechanical stimulation, and activated 5-HT3 receptors on the neurite. The metabotropic 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, greatly reduced the SA1 fibre's responsiveness to force, as did the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid. This supports a role for serotonin and glutamate as neuromodulators in the MCN complex, possibly by activation and/or inhibition of signalling cascades in the Merkel cell associated with vesicle release. Additionally, it was observed that SA1 responses contained a force-independent component, similar to a dynamic response observed during mechanical vibrations.

  12. Development of a Fast Forward Model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Schluessel, P.; Zhou, D.; Larar, A.; Smith, W.; Mango, S.

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer IASI is a modern satellite sensor with 8461 channels and a spectral resolution of 0 25 wavenumber It provides a wealth of information on atmospheric and surface properties Due to the high spectral resolution a large number of Radiative Transfer RT calculations through the inhomogeneous atmosphere are needed Usually only subsets of channels are used to perform physical inversions for atmospheric profiles This paper presents a novel radiative transfer model based on principal component analysis The Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model PCRTM predicts PC scores and associated derivatives with respect to various atmospheric and surface properties in PC space directly Usually less than 200 PCs are needed to regenerate the original radiance spectrum with accuracy better than instrument noise level Therefore the dimension of the spectrum is reduced by an order of magnitude for hyper spectral sensors with thousands of channels The reduction in dimension and the fast RTM make the physical inversion algorithm very fast and efficient Due to its significant savings in computational time the approach uses information from all measured channels There is no need to use only subset of channels The parameterization of the PCRTM model is derived from properties of PC scores and instrument line shape functions It is physical and accurate

  13. Fast and accurate computation of system matrix for area integral model-based algebraic reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Dinghua; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Wang, Ge; Cao, Guohua

    2014-11-01

    Iterative algorithms, such as the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), are popular for image reconstruction. For iterative reconstruction, the area integral model (AIM) is more accurate for better reconstruction quality than the line integral model (LIM). However, the computation of the system matrix for AIM is more complex and time-consuming than that for LIM. Here, we propose a fast and accurate method to compute the system matrix for AIM. First, we calculate the intersection of each boundary line of a narrow fan-beam with pixels in a recursive and efficient manner. Then, by grouping the beam-pixel intersection area into six types according to the slopes of the two boundary lines, we analytically compute the intersection area of the narrow fan-beam with the pixels in a simple algebraic fashion. Overall, experimental results show that our method is about three times faster than the Siddon algorithm and about two times faster than the distance-driven model (DDM) in computation of the system matrix. The reconstruction speed of our AIM-based ART is also faster than the LIM-based ART that uses the Siddon algorithm and DDM-based ART, for one iteration. The fast reconstruction speed of our method was accomplished without compromising the image quality.

  14. Modeling fast-ion transport during toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Medley, S. S.; White, R. B.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Tritz, K.

    2009-12-15

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] found strong bursts of toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA[C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep. 211, 1 (1992)] and ORBIT[R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE was modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE was then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate, however, further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast-ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  15. Creating a Team Archive During Fast-Paced Anomaly Response Activities in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Hicks, LaDessa; Overland, David; Thronesbery, Carroll; Christofferesen, Klaus; Chow, Renee

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a Web-based system to support the temporary Anomaly Response Team formed from distributed subteams in Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The system was designed for easy and flexible creation of small collections of files and links associated with work on a particular anomaly. The system supports privacy and levels of formality for the subteams. First we describe the supported groups and an anomaly response scenario. Then we describe the support system prototype, the Anomaly Response Tracking and Integration System (ARTIS). Finally, we describe our evaluation approach and the results of the evaluation.

  16. A critical role of fatty acid binding protein 4 and 5 (FABP4/5) in the systemic response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Obokata, Masaru; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Goto, Kosaku; Hishiki, Takako; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Matsui, Hiroki; Sano, Motoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Osamu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Masami; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Suematsu, Makoto; Tsushima, Yoshito; Endo, Keigo; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    During prolonged fasting, fatty acid (FA) released from adipose tissue is a major energy source for peripheral tissues, including the heart, skeletal muscle and liver. We recently showed that FA binding protein 4 (FABP4) and FABP5, which are abundantly expressed in adipocytes and macrophages, are prominently expressed in capillary endothelial cells in the heart and skeletal muscle. In addition, mice deficient for both FABP4 and FABP5 (FABP4/5 DKO mice) exhibited defective uptake of FA with compensatory up-regulation of glucose consumption in these tissues during fasting. Here we showed that deletion of FABP4/5 resulted in a marked perturbation of metabolism in response to prolonged fasting, including hyperketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic steatosis. Blood glucose levels were reduced, whereas the levels of non-esterified FA (NEFA) and ketone bodies were markedly increased during fasting. In addition, the uptake of the (125)I-BMIPP FA analogue in the DKO livers was markedly increased after fasting. Consistent with an increased influx of NEFA into the liver, DKO mice showed marked hepatic steatosis after a 48-hr fast. Although gluconeogenesis was observed shortly after fasting, the substrates for gluconeogenesis were reduced during prolonged fasting, resulting in insufficient gluconeogenesis and enhanced hypoglycemia. These metabolic responses to prolonged fasting in DKO mice were readily reversed by re-feeding. Taken together, these data strongly suggested that a maladaptive response to fasting in DKO mice occurred as a result of an increased influx of NEFA into the liver and pronounced hypoglycemia. Together with our previous study, the metabolic consequence found in the present study is likely to be attributed to an impairment of FA uptake in the heart and skeletal muscle. Thus, our data provided evidence that peripheral uptake of FA via capillary endothelial FABP4/5 is crucial for systemic metabolism and may establish FABP4/5 as potentially novel targets for the

  17. Fasting modifies Aroclor 1254 impact on plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate responses to a handling disturbance in Arctic charr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, E.H.; Vijayan, M.M.; Aluru, N.; Maule, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and nutritional status on responses to handling disturbance were investigated in the Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). The fish were orally contaminated with Aroclor 1254 and held either with or without food for 5 months before they were subjected to a 10-min handling disturbance. Food-deprived fish were given 0, 1, 10 or 100 mg PCB kg-1 and the fed fish 0 or 100 mg PCB kg-1. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were measured at 0 (pre-handling), 1, 3, 6 and 23 h after the handling disturbance. Food-deprived control fish had elevated plasma cortisol levels compared with fed fish before handling. These basal cortisol levels were suppressed by PCB in food-deprived fish, and elevated by PCB in fed fish. The immediate cortisol and glucose responses to handling disturbance were suppressed by PCB in a dose-dependent way in food-deprived fish. Although these responses were also lowered by PCB in the fed fish, the effect was much less pronounced than in food-deprived fish. There were only minor effects on plasma lactate responses. Our findings suggest that the stress responses of the Arctic charr are compromised by PCB and that the long-term fasting, typical of high-latitude fish, makes these species particularly sensitive to organochlorines such as PCB. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  19. Log-Multiplicative Association Models as Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Yu, Hsiu-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Log-multiplicative association (LMA) models, which are special cases of log-linear models, have interpretations in terms of latent continuous variables. Two theoretical derivations of LMA models based on item response theory (IRT) arguments are presented. First, we show that Anderson and colleagues (Anderson & Vermunt, 2000; Anderson & Bockenholt,…

  20. Assessment of synthetic winds through spectral modeling and validation using FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, A.; Kandukuri, S. T.; Beyer, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we analyse the simulated and measured wind data with respect to their spectral characteristics and their effect on wind turbine loads. The synthetic data is generated from a stochastic full-field turbulent wind simulator - TurbSim for neutral stability conditions. We first investigate a model for velocity spectra and, a coherence model, by comparing the model results with the measurements. In the second part we analyse the synthetic data via spectra and coherence for two cases; without and with adding coherent events. Finally, we compare wind turbine loads calculated by using FAST simulation of 5 MW reference wind turbine on the basis of simulated and measured data for the given mean wind speed.

  1. Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît; Baronian, Vahan

    2014-02-18

    To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  2. Crowd modeling framework using fast head detection and shape-aware matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Jie; Loza, Artur; Bhaskar, Harish; Al-Mualla, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    A framework for crowd modeling using a combination of multiple kernel learning (MKL)-based fast head detection and shape-aware matching is proposed. First, the MKL technique is used to train a classifier for head detection using a combination of the histogram of oriented gradient and local binary patterns feature sets. Further, the head detection process is accelerated by implementing the classification procedure only at those spatial locations in the image where the gradient points overlap with moving objects. Such moving objects are determined using an adaptive background subtraction technique. Finally, the crowd is modeled as a deformable shape through connected boundary points (head detection) and matched with the subsequent detection from the next frame in a shape-aware manner. Experimental results obtained from crowded videos show that the proposed framework, while being characterized by a low computation load, performs better than other state-of-art techniques and results in reliable crowd modeling.

  3. Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît; Baronian, Vahan

    2014-02-01

    To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  4. Benchmark specifications and data requirements for initial modeling of the China experimental fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-06-04

    A specification is proposed for an initial transient benchmark analysis of the China Experimental Fast Reactor design based on the analysis capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code. For the initial benchmark, a single-channel protected transient overpower accident is defined. Reactivity feedback coefficients will not be required and simplified material properties are recommended. This report also describes the data required for developing the modeling input. This data includes assembly geometry, reactor power distributions, kinetics and decay heat data, and material properties. Comparisons of benchmark results will take place at a future SAS4A/SASSYS-1 training meeting planned to occur at Argonne National Laboratory. Future benchmark specifications will be planned to expand upon this initial model to include more complex reactivity feedback models, material properties, additional assembly geometry, and primary and intermediate coolant systems.

  5. A fast iterative recursive least squares algorithm for Wiener model identification of highly nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mahdi; Arefi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an online identification algorithm is presented for nonlinear systems in the presence of output colored noise. The proposed method is based on extended recursive least squares (ERLS) algorithm, where the identified system is in polynomial Wiener form. To this end, an unknown intermediate signal is estimated by using an inner iterative algorithm. The iterative recursive algorithm adaptively modifies the vector of parameters of the presented Wiener model when the system parameters vary. In addition, to increase the robustness of the proposed method against variations, a robust RLS algorithm is applied to the model. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Results confirm that the proposed method has fast convergence rate with robust characteristics, which increases the efficiency of the proposed model and identification approach. For instance, the FIT criterion will be achieved 92% in CSTR process where about 400 data is used.

  6. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing.

    PubMed

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-10-15

    When two tones with slightly different frequencies are presented to both ears, they interact in the central auditory system and induce the sensation of a beating sound. At low difference frequencies, we perceive a single sound, which is moving across the head between the left and right ears. The percept changes to loudness fluctuation, roughness, and pitch with increasing beat rate. To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate between 3 Hz and 60 Hz. Binaural beat responses were analyzed as neuromagnetic oscillations following the trajectory of the stimulus rate. Responses were largest in the 40-Hz gamma range and at low frequencies. Binaural beat responses at 3 Hz showed opposite polarity in the left and right auditory cortices. We suggest that this difference in polarity reflects the opponent neural population code for representing sound location. Binaural beats at any rate induced gamma oscillations. However, the responses were largest at 40-Hz stimulation. We propose that the neuromagnetic gamma oscillations reflect postsynaptic modulation that allows for precise timing of cortical neural firing. Systematic phase differences between bilateral responses suggest that separate sound representations of a sound object exist in the left and right auditory cortices. We conclude that binaural processing at the cortical level occurs with the same temporal acuity as monaural processing whereas the identification of sound location requires further interpretation and is limited by the rate of object representations.

  7. Karst spring responses examined by process-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Birk, Steffen; Liedl, Rudolf; Sauter, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Ground water in karst terrains is highly vulnerable to contamination due to the rapid transport of contaminants through the highly conductive conduit system. For contamination risk assessment purposes, information about hydraulic and geometric characteristics of the conduits and their hydraulic interaction with the fissured porous rock is an important prerequisite. The relationship between aquifer characteristics and short-term responses to recharge events of both spring discharge and physicochemical parameters of the discharged water was examined using a process-based flow and transport model. In the respective software, a pipe-network model, representing fast conduit flow, is coupled to MODFLOW, which simulates flow in the fissured porous rock. This hybrid flow model was extended to include modules simulating heat and reactive solute transport in conduits. The application of this modeling tool demonstrates that variations of physicochemical parameters, such as solute concentration and water temperature, depend to a large extent on the intensity and duration of recharge events and provide information about the structure and geometry of the conduit system as well as about the interaction between conduits and fissured porous rock. Moreover, the responses of solute concentration and temperature of spring discharge appear to reflect different processes, thus complementing each other in the aquifer characterization.

  8. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  9. An Activation Threshold Model for Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Hayley J.; McMorland, Angus J. C.; Stinear, Cathy M.; Coxon, James P.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive response inhibition (RI) is the cancellation of a prepared response when it is no longer appropriate. Selectivity of RI can be examined by cueing the cancellation of one component of a prepared multi-component response. This substantially delays execution of other components. There is debate regarding whether this response delay is due to a selective neural mechanism. Here we propose a computational activation threshold model (ATM) and test it against a classical “horse-race” model using behavioural and neurophysiological data from partial RI experiments. The models comprise both facilitatory and inhibitory processes that compete upstream of motor output regions. Summary statistics (means and standard deviations) of predicted muscular and neurophysiological data were fit in both models to equivalent experimental measures by minimizing a Pearson Chi-square statistic. The ATM best captured behavioural and neurophysiological dynamics of partial RI. The ATM demonstrated that the observed modulation of corticomotor excitability during partial RI can be explained by nonselective inhibition of the prepared response. The inhibition raised the activation threshold to a level that could not be reached by the original response. This was necessarily followed by an additional phase of facilitation representing a secondary activation process in order to reach the new inhibition threshold and initiate the executed component of the response. The ATM offers a mechanistic description of the neural events underlying RI, in which partial movement cancellation results from a nonselective inhibitory event followed by subsequent initiation of a new response. The ATM provides a framework for considering and exploring the neuroanatomical constraints that underlie RI. PMID:28085907

  10. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  11. Fast hybrid SPECT simulation including efficient septal penetration modelling (SP-PSF).

    PubMed

    Staelens, Steven; de Wit, Tim; Beekman, Freek

    2007-06-07

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are degraded by the detection of scattered photons and photons that penetrate the collimator septa. In this paper, a previously proposed Monte Carlo software that employs fast object scatter simulation using convolution-based forced detection (CFD) is extended towards a wide range of medium and high energy isotopes measured using various collimators. To this end, a fast method was developed for incorporating effects of septal penetrating (SP) photons. The SP contributions are obtained by calculating the object attenuation along the path from primary emission to detection followed by sampling a pre-simulated and scalable septal penetration point spread function (SP-PSF). We found that with only a very slight reduction in accuracy, we could accelerate the SP simulation by four orders of magnitude. To achieve this, we combined: (i) coarse sampling of the activity and attenuation distribution; (ii) simulation of the penetration only for a coarse grid of detector pixels followed by interpolation and (iii) neglection of SP-PSF elements below a certain threshold. By inclusion of this SP-PSF-based simulation it became possible to model both primary and septal penetrated photons while only 10% extra computation time was added to the CFD-based Monte Carlo simulator. As a result, a SPECT simulation of a patient-like distribution including SP now takes less than 5 s per projection angle on a dual processor PC. Therefore, the simulator is well-suited as an efficient projector for fully 3D model-based reconstruction or as a fast data-set generator for applications such as image processing optimization or observer studies.

  12. An Approximation to the Adaptive Exponential Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Model Allows Fast and Predictive Fitting to Physiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Hertäg, Loreen; Hass, Joachim; Golovko, Tatiana; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    For large-scale network simulations, it is often desirable to have computationally tractable, yet in a defined sense still physiologically valid neuron models. In particular, these models should be able to reproduce physiological measurements, ideally in a predictive sense, and under different input regimes in which neurons may operate in vivo. Here we present an approach to parameter estimation for a simple spiking neuron model mainly based on standard f–I curves obtained from in vitro recordings. Such recordings are routinely obtained in standard protocols and assess a neuron’s response under a wide range of mean-input currents. Our fitting procedure makes use of closed-form expressions for the firing rate derived from an approximation to the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire (AdEx) model. The resulting fitting process is simple and about two orders of magnitude faster compared to methods based on numerical integration of the differential equations. We probe this method on different cell types recorded from rodent prefrontal cortex. After fitting to the f–I current-clamp data, the model cells are tested on completely different sets of recordings obtained by fluctuating (“in vivo-like”) input currents. For a wide range of different input regimes, cell types, and cortical layers, the model could predict spike times on these test traces quite accurately within the bounds of physiological reliability, although no information from these distinct test sets was used for model fitting. Further analyses delineated some of the empirical factors constraining model fitting and the model’s generalization performance. An even simpler adaptive LIF neuron was also examined in this context. Hence, we have developed a “high-throughput” model fitting procedure which is simple and fast, with good prediction performance, and which relies only on firing rate information and standard physiological data widely and easily available. PMID:22973220

  13. Analysis of fast boundary-integral approximations for modeling electrostatic contributions of molecular binding

    PubMed Central

    Kreienkamp, Amelia B.; Liu, Lucy Y.; Minkara, Mona S.; Knepley, Matthew G.; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Radhakrishnan, Mala L.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze and suggest improvements to a recently developed approximate continuum-electrostatic model for proteins. The model, called BIBEE/I (boundary-integral based electrostatics estimation with interpolation), was able to estimate electrostatic solvation free energies to within a mean unsigned error of 4% on a test set of more than 600 proteins—a significant improvement over previous BIBEE models. In this work, we tested the BIBEE/I model for its capability to predict residue-by-residue interactions in protein–protein binding, using the widely studied model system of trypsin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Finding that the BIBEE/I model performs surprisingly less well in this task than simpler BIBEE models, we seek to explain this behavior in terms of the models’ differing spectral approximations of the exact boundary-integral operator. Calculations of analytically solvable systems (spheres and tri-axial ellipsoids) suggest two possibilities for improvement. The first is a modified BIBEE/I approach that captures the asymptotic eigenvalue limit correctly, and the second involves the dipole and quadrupole modes for ellipsoidal approximations of protein geometries. Our analysis suggests that fast, rigorous approximate models derived from reduced-basis approximation of boundary-integral equations might reach unprecedented accuracy, if the dipole and quadrupole modes can be captured quickly for general shapes. PMID:24466561

  14. a Fast Method for Measuring the Similarity Between 3d Model and 3d Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Li, Jonathan; Li, Xin; Lin, Yangbin; Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC). It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC) are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM) is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  15. The development and application of an improved reactor analysis model for fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jia

    Accuracy in neutron cross sections calculation and consistency in reactor physics are fundamental requirements in advanced nuclear reactor design and analysis. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the development and advanced application of a reactor analysis model with updated cross section libraries that is suitable for online cross section generation for fast reactors. Research has been performed in two areas of interest in reactor physics. The first target of the research is to develop effcient modeling capacity of the 1- D lattice code MICROX-2 for its neutron spectrum calculation based on Collision Probability Method (CPM). Expanded master cross section libraries have been generated based on updated nuclear data and optimized fine-group energy structure to accommodate both thermal and fast reactor spectra as well as to comply with the need for advanced fuel cycle analysis. After verifying the new libraries, the solution methods have been reviewed and updated, including the update of interpolation scheme for resonance self-shielding factors and improvement of spatial self-shielding models for various fuel assembly geometries. The assessment of the updated lattice calculation models has shown that the prediction accuracy of lattice properties represented by the eigenvalue and reaction rate ratios is improved, especially for fast neutron spectrum lattices of which the importance of neutrons in the unresolved energy range is high. The second target of the research is to improve the accuracy of few-group nuclear cross section generation for the reactor core calculation. A 2-D pin-by-pin lattice model has been developed based on embedded CPM within the framework of the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM), which is capable of modeling the heterogeneity of the fuel assembly. Then, an online cross section generation methodology along with discontinuity factors has been developed based on Iterative Diffusion- Diffusion Methodology (IDDM), which can minimize the

  16. Origin and Properties of Striatal Local Field Potential Responses to Cortical Stimulation: Temporal Regulation by Fast Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Gregorio L.; Braz, Barbara Y.; Murer, Mario Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Evoked striatal field potentials are seldom used to study corticostriatal communication in vivo because little is known about their origin and significance. Here we show that striatal field responses evoked by stimulating the prelimbic cortex in mice are reduced by more than 90% after infusing the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX close to the recording electrode. Moreover, the amplitude of local field responses and dPSPs recorded in striatal medium spiny neurons increase in parallel with increasing stimulating current intensity. Finally, the evoked striatal fields show several of the basic known properties of corticostriatal transmission, including paired pulse facilitation and topographical organization. As a case study, we characterized the effect of local GABAA receptor blockade on striatal field and multiunitary action potential responses to prelimbic cortex stimulation. Striatal activity was recorded through a 24 channel silicon probe at about 600 µm from a microdialysis probe. Intrastriatal administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline increased by 65±7% the duration of the evoked field responses. Moreover, the associated action potential responses were markedly enhanced during bicuculline infusion. Bicuculline enhancement took place at all the striatal sites that showed a response to cortical stimulation before drug infusion, but sites showing no field response before bicuculline remained unresponsive during GABAA receptor blockade. Thus, the data demonstrate that fast inhibitory connections exert a marked temporal regulation of input-output transformations within spatially delimited striatal networks responding to a cortical input. Overall, we propose that evoked striatal fields may be a useful tool to study corticostriatal synaptic connectivity in relation to behavior. PMID:22163020

  17. Genetic selection for fast growth generates bone architecture characterised by enhanced periosteal expansion and limited consolidation of the cortices but a diminution in the early responses to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Rawlinson, Simon C F; Murray, Dianne H; Mosley, John R; Wright, Chris D P; Bredl, John C; Saxon, Leanne K; Loveridge, Nigel; Leterrier, Christine; Constantin, Paul; Farquharson, Colin; Pitsillides, Andrew A

    2009-08-01

    Bone strength is, in part, dependent on a mechanical input that regulates the (re)modelling of skeletal elements to an appropriate size and architecture to resist fracture during habitual use. The rate of longitudinal bone growth in juveniles can also affect fracture incidence in adulthood, suggesting an influence of growth rate on later bone quality. We have compared the effects of fast and slow growth on bone strength and architecture in the tibiotarsi of embryonic and juvenile birds. The loading-related biochemical responses (intracellular G6PD activity and NO release) to mechanical load were also determined. Further, we have analysed the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of primary tibiotarsal osteoblasts from fast and slow-growing strains. We found that bones from chicks with divergent growth rates display equal resistance to applied loads, but weight-correction revealed that the bones from juvenile fast growth birds are weaker, with reduced stiffness and lower resistance to fracture. Primary osteoblasts from slow-growing juvenile birds proliferated more rapidly and had lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Bones from fast-growing embryonic chicks display rapid radial expansion and incomplete osteonal infilling but, importantly, lack mechanical responsiveness. These findings are further evidence that the ability to respond to mechanical inputs is crucial to adapt skeletal architecture to generate a functionally appropriate bone structure and that fast embryonic and juvenile growth rates may predispose bone to particular architectures with increased fragility in the adult.

  18. Modeling of Time-correlated Detection of Fast Neutrons Emitted in Induced SNM Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckes, Amber; Barzilov, Alexander; Richardson, Norman

    Neutron multiplicity methods are widely used in the assay of fissile materials. Fission reactions release multiple neutrons simultaneously. Time-correlated detection of neutrons provides a coincidence signature that is unique to fission,which enables distinguishing it from other events. In general, fission neutrons are fast. Thermal neutron sensors require the moderation of neutrons prior to a detection event; therefore, the neutron's energy and the event's timing information may be distorted, resulting in the wide time windows in the correlation analysis. Fastneutron sensing using scintillators allows shortening the time correlation window. In this study, four EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detectors with neutron/photon pulse shape discrimination properties were modeled usingthe MCNP6 code. This sensor array was studied for time-correlated detection of fast neutrons emitted inthe induced fission of 239Pu and (α,n) neutron sources. This paper presents the results of computational modeling of arrays of these plastic scintillator sensors as well as3He detectors equipped with a moderator.

  19. Fast imaging measurements and modeling of neutral and impurity density on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstedt, Erik; Deng, B.; Dettrick, S.; Gupta, D. K.; Osin, D.; Roche, T.; Zhai, K.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection and end-biasing to sustain an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration plasma for 5+ ms, beyond characteristic transport time-scales. Three high-speed, filtered cameras observed visible light emission from neutral hydrogen and impurities, as well as deuterium pellet ablation and compact-toroid injection which were used for auxiliary particle fueling. Careful vacuum practices and titanium gettering successfully reduced neutral recycling from the confinement vessel wall. As a result, a large fraction of the remaining neutrals originate from charge-exchange between the neutral beams and plasma ions. Measured H/D- α emission is used with DEGAS2 neutral particle modeling to reconstruct the strongly non-axissymmetric neutral distribution. This is then used in fast-ion modeling to more accurately estimate their charge-exchange loss rate. Oxygen emission due to electron-impact excitation and charge-exchange recombination has also been measured using fast imaging. Reconstructed emissivity of O4+ is localized on the outboard side of the core plasma near the estimated location of the separatrix inferred by external magnetic measurements. Tri Alpha Energy.

  20. Spontaneous emergence of fast attractor dynamics in a model of developing primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miconi, Thomas; McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurons in primary sensory cortex arrange into competitive groups, representing stimuli by their joint activity rather than as independent feature analysers. A possible explanation for these results is that sensory cortex implements attractor dynamics, although this proposal remains controversial. Here we report that fast attractor dynamics emerge naturally in a computational model of a patch of primary visual cortex endowed with realistic plasticity (at both feedforward and lateral synapses) and mutual inhibition. When exposed to natural images (but not random pixels), the model spontaneously arranges into competitive groups of reciprocally connected, similarly tuned neurons, while developing realistic, orientation-selective receptive fields. Importantly, the same groups are observed in both stimulus-evoked and spontaneous (stimulus-absent) activity. The resulting network is inhibition-stabilized and exhibits fast, non-persistent attractor dynamics. Our results suggest that realistic plasticity, mutual inhibition and natural stimuli are jointly necessary and sufficient to generate attractor dynamics in primary sensory cortex. PMID:27796298

  1. Fast Off-Lattice Monte Carlo Simulations with a Novel Soft-Core Spherocylinder Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Jing; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Qiang (David)

    2011-03-01

    Fast off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations with soft-core repulsive potentials that allow particle overlapping give orders of magnitude faster/better sampling of the configurational space than conventional molecular simulations with hard-core repulsions (such as in the Lennard-Jones potential). Here we present our fast off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations on the structures and phase transitions of liquid crystals and rod-coil diblock copolymers based on a novel and computationally efficient anisotropic soft-core potential that gives exact treatment of the excluded-volume interactions between two spherocylinders (thus the orientational interaction between them favoring their parallel alignment). Our model further takes into account the degree of overlap of two spherocylinders, thus superior to other soft-core models that depend only on their shortest distance. It has great potential applications in the study of liquid crystals, block copolymers containing rod blocks, and liquid crystalline polymers. Q. Wang and Y. Yin, J. Chem. Phys., 130, 104903 (2009).

  2. Response of organic liquid scintillators to fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoertz, Paul G.; Mills, Karmann; Davis, Lynn; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Gupta, Vijay

    2013-03-01

    Liquid organic scintillators are cocktails of aromatic fluorophores in an aromatic solvent. They find widespread use in Liquid Scintillation Counters with applications in medical diagnostics as well as fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Ultima Gold™ XR, a commercially available organic liquid scintillator from Perkin Elmer, can be used in both aqueous and non-aqueous systems and is typically used for beta detection in medical diagnostics. Its performance under gamma radiation and neutron radiation is less well-characterized. Special and normal Ultima Gold™ XR liquid scintillators were exposed in separate experiments to fast neutrons and high energy photons from a nuclear reactor and to gamma rays from a Co-60 source. To perform the measurements in the radiation chamber, a custom light collection system consisting of a fiber optic cable, spectrometer and a diffuse reflecting optical cavity was fabricated. Advanced calibration procedures, traceable to NIST standards, were developed to determine photon fluxes and flux densities of the scintillators under ionizing radiation conditions. The scintillator emission spectra under gamma radiation from a Co-60 source and neutron radiation from a pool-type nuclear reactor were recorded and compared. Results on the spectrometer design and comparison of the spectra under different exposure are presented.

  3. A CFD model for biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingluan; Heindel, T. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of fluidized-bed reactors for fast pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil. A comprehensive CFD model, coupling a pyrolysis kinetic model with a detailed hydrodynamics model, is developed. A lumped kinetic model is applied to describe the pyrolysis of biomass particles. Variable particle porosity is used to account for the evolution of particle physical properties. The kinetic scheme includes primary decomposition and secondary cracking of tar. Biomass is composed of reference components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Products are categorized into groups: gaseous, tar vapor, and solid char. The particle kinetic processes and their interaction with the reactive gas phase are modeled with a multi-fluid model derived from the kinetic theory of granular flow. The gas, sand and biomass constitute three continuum phases coupled by the interphase source terms. The model is applied to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the tar yield in a fluidized-bed reactor. The influence of various parameters on tar yield, including operating temperature and others are investigated. Predicted optimal conditions for tar yield and scale-up of the reactor are discussed.

  4. Account of nonlocal ionization by fast electrons in the fluid models of a direct current glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rafatov, I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2012-09-15

    We developed and tested a simple hybrid model for a glow discharge, which incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into the 'simple' and 'extended' fluid frameworks. Calculations have been performed for an argon gas. Comparison with the experimental data as well as with the hybrid (particle) and fluid modelling results demonstated good applicability of the proposed model.

  5. A phase transition model for the speed-accuracy trade-off in response time experiments.

    PubMed

    Dutilh, Gilles; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Visser, Ingmar; van der Maas, Han L J

    2011-03-01

    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition model for RTs and accuracy. Analogous to the fast guess model (Ollman, 1966), our model postulates two modes of processing: a guess mode and a stimulus-controlled mode. From catastrophe theory, we derive two important predictions that allow us to test our model against the fast guess model and against the popular class of sequential sampling models. The first prediction--hysteresis in the transitions between guessing and stimulus-controlled behavior--was confirmed in an experiment that gradually changed the reward for speed versus accuracy. The second prediction--bimodal RT distributions--was confirmed in an experiment that required participants to respond in a way that is intermediate between guessing and accurate responding.

  6. Luminescent metal-organic framework films as highly sensitive and fast-response oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhongshang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Yang, Deren; Qian, Guodong

    2014-04-16

    Luminescent metal-organic framework films, CPM-5⊃Tb(3+) and MIL-100(In)⊃Tb(3+), have been constructed by postfunctionalization of two porous indium-organic frameworks with different structures, respectively. The MIL-100(In)⊃Tb(3+) film shows high oxygen sensitivity (KSV = 7.59) and short response/recovery time (6 s/53 s).

  7. High-efficiency and fast-response tunable phase grating using a blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate a tunable phase grating using a polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal. Because of the electric-field-induced rectangularlike phase profile, a high diffraction efficiency of 40% is achieved. Moreover, this device shows submillisecond response time. The proposed tunable phase grating holds great potential for photonics and display applications.

  8. Effect of fasting on body composition and responses to stress in sunshine bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract The integrated responses of the hormonal regulation of growth and stress in sunshine bass as regulated by feed deprivation were investigated. Groups of fish were fed 1.5% of the body weight per day or offered no feed for 4 weeks. Another group of fish was not fed for 3 weeks ...

  9. Measurements of response functions of EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator for fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J.; Barzilov, A.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron response functions were measured for an EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. The 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory was used to produce proton and deuteron beams for reactions with gaseous tritium and deuterium targets, yielding monoenergetic neutrons by means of the 3H(p,n)3He, 2H(d,n)3He, and 3H(d,n)4He reactions. The neutron energy was selected by tuning the charged-particle's energy and using the angular dependence of the neutron emission. The resulting response functions were measured for 0.1-MeV steps in neutron energy from 0.1 MeV to 8.2 MeV and from 12.2 MeV to 20.2 MeV. Experimental data were processed using a procedure for digital pulse-shape discrimination, which allowed characterization of the response functions of the plastic scintillator to neutrons only. The response functions are intended for use in neutron spectrum unfolding methods.

  10. Reader Response. Focused Access to Selected Topics (FAST) Bibliography No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Michael

    This annotated bibliography contains 30 references and provides resources to understand the theoretical foundations of reader response--a literary theory that is currently gaining increasing attention in literature instruction. The bibliography ranges from 1982 to 1989 and is divided into four sections. The first section, "Teaching of…

  11. A Fast Response Ammonia Sensor Based on Coaxial PPy–PAN Nanofiber Yarn

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Penghong; Wu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Hongnan; Qin, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Highly orientated polypyrrole (PPy)–coated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) (PPy–PAN) nanofiber yarn was prepared with an electrospinning technique and in-situ chemical polymerization. The morphology and chemical structure of PPy–PAN nanofiber yarn was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), which indicated that the PPy as the shell layer was homogeneously and uniformly polymerized on the surface of PAN nanofiber. The effects of different concentration of doping acid on the responses of PPy–PAN nanofiber yarn sensor were investigated. The electrical responses of the gas sensor based on the PPy–PAN nanofiber yarn to ammonia were investigated at room temperature. The nanoyarn sensor composed of uniaxially aligned PPy–PAN nanofibers with a one-dimensional structure exhibited a transient response, and the response time was less than 1 s. The excellent sensing properties mentioned above give rise to good potential application prospects in the field of ammonia sensor. PMID:28335248

  12. Coupled mechanical and hydrothermal modelling of crustal accretion at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Sonja; Iyer, Karthik; Rüpke, Lars H.; Phipps Morgan, Jason

    2010-05-01

    Several geophysical studies imaged a melt lens beneath intermediate to fast spreading ridges, with the depth to the melt lens depending on spreading velocity. It is also widely accepted that the heat released during cooling and crystallisation during the accretion/formation of new oceanic crust is removed by hydrothermal circulation. Two competing end member models explain the formation of the oceanic crust: In the gabbro glacier model the lower crust crystallises in a shallow melt lens and the solidified material is advected to its final position, whereas in the many sill model the crust crystallises in situ from multiple sills at different levels in the lower crust. Many numerical models of crustal accretion and hydrothermal cooling have been developed in the last years, but regardless of whether the models simulate the gabbro glacier or sheeted sill assumption, the previous models focus mainly on one of the processes. They solve either for hydrothermal circulation and create the lithospheric material continuously with spreading velocity [e.g.Cherkaoui et al., 2003] or for viscous advection but parameterise the hydrothermal cooling with an enhanced thermal conductivity/diffusivity as described by Morgan and Chen [1993]. Our new approach couples both processes in one model. The formation of new oceanic crust is implemented as in the gabbro glacier assumption, where all the lower crust crystallises in a shallow melt lens. It is a two dimensional model which uses the finite element method to solve simultaneously for crustal accretion and hydrothermal cooling. The solid velocities in crust and mantle are described by viscous flow of incompressible fluids. Magma injection is implemented by a dilation term and hydrothermal circulation is described by Darcy fluid flow for water. Although the time scales for accretion of the crust and cooling due to hydrothermal circulation are different it was possible to couple the processes in one model and to solve for a steady state

  13. Fast Modeling of Binding Affinities by Means of Superposing Significant Interaction Rules (SSIR) Method

    PubMed Central

    Besalú, Emili

    2016-01-01

    The Superposing Significant Interaction Rules (SSIR) method is described. It is a general combinatorial and symbolic procedure able to rank compounds belonging to combinatorial analogue series. The procedure generates structure-activity relationship (SAR) models and also serves as an inverse SAR tool. The method is fast and can deal with large databases. SSIR operates from statistical significances calculated from the available library of compounds and according to the previously attached molecular labels of interest or non-interest. The required symbolic codification allows dealing with almost any combinatorial data set, even in a confidential manner, if desired. The application example categorizes molecules as binding or non-binding, and consensus ranking SAR models are generated from training and two distinct cross-validation methods: leave-one-out and balanced leave-two-out (BL2O), the latter being suited for the treatment of binary properties. PMID:27240346

  14. Comparisons of Crosswind Velocity Profile Estimates Used in Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruis, Mathew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Five methods for estimating crosswind profiles used in fast-time wake vortex prediction models are compared in this study. Previous investigations have shown that temporal and spatial variations in the crosswind vertical profile have a large impact on the transport and time evolution of the trailing vortex pair. The most important crosswind parameters are the magnitude of the crosswind and the gradient in the crosswind shear. It is known that pulsed and continuous wave lidar measurements can provide good estimates of the wind profile in the vicinity of airports. In this study comparisons are made between estimates of the crosswind profiles from a priori information on the trajectory of the vortex pair as well as crosswind profiles derived from different sensors and a regional numerical weather prediction model.

  15. Particle-In-Cell modeling of Fast Ignition experiments on the Titan Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony; Akli, K. U.; Beg, F.; Chen, C. D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Li, K.; McLean, H. S.; Morace, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schumacher, D. W.; Sorokovikova, A. V.; Stephens, R.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Wertepny, D.; Westhover, B.

    2012-10-01

    We report on particle-in-cell-modeling (PIC) of fast ignition experiments conducted on the Titan laser. The Titan laser was used to irradiate multilayer planar targets at intensities greater than 10^20 Wcm-2 to diagnose the laser to electron coupling, electron beam divergence, and energy spectrum of the hot electrons at relativistic intensities. Hot electron beam properties were inferred through buried fluors, escaping electrons and bremsstrahlung measurements. The PIC simulations of the experiment were conducted in two stages: a high resolution laser plasma interaction (LPI) simulation using measured on shot laser parameters but with a subscale target; and a lower resolution transport simulation containing the full scale multilayer target. The transport simulation utilized the electron source based on the output of the LPI simulation and included necessary models to simulate the experimental diagnostics. Comparison of the predicted electron source properties and the experimental data will be presented.

  16. Electromagnetic modeling of an eddy-current position sensor for use in a fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Bowler, John R.

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we proposed a novel theoretical electromagnetic model of an eddy current probe used as a position sensor with respect to a tube in a fast reactor under standby conditions. In these circumstances the coil position cannot be guided by optical aids but electromagnetic sensing can be used. Initially, we derived analytical expressions for the quasi-static time-harmonic electromagnetic field of a circular current filament via the transverse magnetic potential expressed in terms of a single layer potential. This is then used to deduce the field of a circular sensor coil near a conductive tube, the axis of the coil having an arbitrary direction with respect to that of the tube. The fields for an external coil have been determined and can be used to deduce coil impedance variations with frequency, location and orientation. The model predictions can be used to guide the probe to a desire position with respect to the tube.

  17. Model for collisional fast ion diffusion into Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor loss cone

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. |; Zweben, S.J.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Scott, S.

    1994-08-01

    An analytic model is developed to estimate the classical pitch angle scattering loss of energetic fusion product ions into prompt loss orbits in a tokamak geometry. The result is applied to alpha particles produced by deutrium-tritium fusion reactions in a plasma condition relevant to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A poloidal angular distribution of collisional fast ion loss at the first wall is obtained and the numerical result from the TRANSP code is discussed. The present model includes the effect that the prompt loss boundary moves away from the slowing-down path due to reduction in banana thickness, which enables us to understand, for the first time. the dependence of the collisional loss rate on Z{sub eff}.

  18. Assembling tungsten oxide hydrate nanocrystal colloids formed by laser ablation in liquid into fast-response electrochromic films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shalong; Dou, Kang; Zou, Yousheng; Dong, Yuhang; Li, Jubin; Ju, Dan; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    High-performance electrochromic films based on tungsten oxide hydrate ([WO2(O2)H2O]·1.66H2O) colloidal nanocrystals with fast switching speed were fabricated by laser ablation in a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide followed by electrophoretic methods. Through electrophoretic deposition, the nanoparticles in the colloids synthesized by laser ablation aggregated onto the FTO coated glass substrate forming a lager cell with a uniform size of around 200nm, which subsequently self-assembled into a porous tungsten oxide hydrate film. By optimizing the electrophoretic time (800s) and voltage (-0.5V), the mesh-like porous tungsten oxide hydrate film achieved a wide optical modulation of 32% at 632nm, fast coloration and bleaching response speed of 7.8 s and 1.7s respectively due to the synergetic effect of the unique atomic structure of [WO2(O2)H2O]·1.66H2O and porous structure with large surface area that facilitates the ion insertion/extraction. Thus the tungsten oxide hydrate can be a promising electrochromic material for practical applications.

  19. Fast-response optical and near-infrared GRB science with RATIR and RIMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John; RIMAS Collaboration, RATIR project Team

    2016-01-01

    As the Universe's most luminous transient events, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are observed at cosmological distances. The afterglow emission generated by the burst's interaction with the surrounding medium presents the opportunity to study the local environment, as well as intervening systems. The transient nature of these events requires observations starting within minutes of the GRB to maximize the scientific opportunities.This dissertation work comprises efforts to advance the field with a new instrument, the Rapid Infrared Imager and Spectrograph (RIMAS). The optical design is complicated by the broad band coverage (0.97 to 2.39 microns) and the necessity of transmissive optics due to space and weight limitations on the telescope. Additionally, the entire optical system must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to decrease the background from thermal emission. The completed instrument will be permanently installed on Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) located in Happy Jack, Arizona. The fast slew time of the telescope, combined with the instrument's ability to image in two bands simultaneously and switch to spectroscopic configurations in under a minute will allow observers to obtain photometric data within minutes and spectra within ~ ten minutes.In addition to instrumentation work on RIMAS's optics, early time photometric light curves have been studied primarily using data from the Reionization and Transients Infrared/Optical Project (RATIR). Early time photometric data in six optical and near-infrared (NIR) bands has allowed a study of color evolution in the early to late time SEDs. This study probes possible impacts of the GRB on the local medium as well as intrinsic changes in the afterglow emission.This work is made possible by the RATIR and RIMAS collaborations as well as financial support by the NSF.

  20. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  1. A proposed Fast algorithm to construct the system matrices for a reduced-order groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Timothy T.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2017-04-01

    Past research has demonstrated that a reduced-order model (ROM) can be two-to-three orders of magnitude smaller than the original model and run considerably faster with acceptable error. A standard method to construct the system matrices for a ROM is Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), which projects the system matrices from the full model space onto a subspace whose range spans the full model space but has a much smaller dimension than the full model space. This projection can be prohibitively expensive to compute if it must be done repeatedly, as with a Monte Carlo simulation. We propose a Fast Algorithm to reduce the computational burden of constructing the system matrices for a parameterized, reduced-order groundwater model (i.e. one whose parameters are represented by zones or interpolation functions). The proposed algorithm decomposes the expensive system matrix projection into a set of simple scalar-matrix multiplications. This allows the algorithm to efficiently construct the system matrices of a POD reduced-order model at a significantly reduced computational cost compared with the standard projection-based method. The developed algorithm is applied to three test cases for demonstration purposes. The first test case is a small, two-dimensional, zoned-parameter, finite-difference model; the second test case is a small, two-dimensional, interpolated-parameter, finite-difference model; and the third test case is a realistically-scaled, two-dimensional, zoned-parameter, finite-element model. In each case, the algorithm is able to accurately and efficiently construct the system matrices of the reduced-order model.

  2. Characterization of thalamocortical responses of regular-spiking and fast-spiking neurons of the mouse auditory cortex in vitro and in silico

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alex D.

    2012-01-01

    We use a combination of in vitro whole cell recordings and computer simulations to characterize the cellular and synaptic properties that contribute to processing of auditory stimuli. Using a mouse thalamocortical slice preparation, we record the intrinsic membrane properties and synaptic properties of layer 3/4 regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal neurons and fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in primary auditory cortex (AI). We find that postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked in FS cells are significantly larger and depress more than those evoked in RS cells after thalamic stimulation. We use these data to construct a simple computational model of the auditory thalamocortical circuit and find that the differences between FS and RS cells observed in vitro generate model behavior similar to that observed in vivo. We examine how feedforward inhibition and synaptic depression affect cortical responses to time-varying inputs that mimic sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones. In the model, the balance of cortical inhibition and thalamic excitation evolves in a manner that depends on modulation frequency (MF) of the stimulus and determines cortical response tuning. PMID:22090462

  3. Mesoscale Modelling of the Response of Aluminas

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    The response of polycrystalline alumina to shock is not well addressed. There are several operating mechanisms that only hypothesized which results in models which are empirical. A similar state of affairs in reactive flow modelling led to the development of mesoscale representations of the flow to illuminate operating mechanisms. In this spirit, a similar effort is undergone for a polycrystalline alumina. Simulations are conducted to observe operating mechanisms at the micron scale. A method is then developed to extend the simulations to meet response at the continuum level where measurements are made. The approach is validated by comparison with continuum experiments. The method and results are presented, and some of the operating mechanisms are illuminated by the observed response.

  4. Phase space effects on fast ion distribution function modeling in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; White, R. B.

    2016-04-14

    Here, integrated simulations of tokamak discharges typically rely on classical physics to model energetic particle (EP) dynamics. However, there are numerous cases in which energetic particles can suffer additional transport that is not classical in nature. Examples include transport by applied 3D magnetic perturbations and, more notably, by plasma instabilities. Focusing on the effects of instabilities,ad-hocmodels can empirically reproduce increased transport, but the choice of transport coefficients is usually somehow arbitrary. New approaches based on physics-based reduced models are being developed to address those issues in a simplified way, while retaining a more correct treatment of resonant wave-particle interactions. The kick model implemented in the tokamaktransport code TRANSP is an example of such reduced models. It includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in real and velocity space, retaining correlations between transport in energy and space typical of resonant EP transport. The relevance of EP phase space modifications by instabilities is first discussed in terms of predicted fast ion distribution. Results are compared with those from a simple, ad-hoc diffusive model. It is then shown that the phase-space resolved model can also provide additional insight into important issues such as internal consistency of the simulations and mode stability through the analysis of the power exchanged between energetic particles and the instabilities.

  5. Phase space effects on fast ion distribution function modeling in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Podesta, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Fredrickson, E. D.; ...

    2016-04-14

    Here, integrated simulations of tokamak discharges typically rely on classical physics to model energetic particle (EP) dynamics. However, there are numerous cases in which energetic particles can suffer additional transport that is not classical in nature. Examples include transport by applied 3D magnetic perturbations and, more notably, by plasma instabilities. Focusing on the effects of instabilities,ad-hocmodels can empirically reproduce increased transport, but the choice of transport coefficients is usually somehow arbitrary. New approaches based on physics-based reduced models are being developed to address those issues in a simplified way, while retaining a more correct treatment of resonant wave-particle interactions. Themore » kick model implemented in the tokamaktransport code TRANSP is an example of such reduced models. It includes modifications of the EP distribution by instabilities in real and velocity space, retaining correlations between transport in energy and space typical of resonant EP transport. The relevance of EP phase space modifications by instabilities is first discussed in terms of predicted fast ion distribution. Results are compared with those from a simple, ad-hoc diffusive model. It is then shown that the phase-space resolved model can also provide additional insight into important issues such as internal consistency of the simulations and mode stability through the analysis of the power exchanged between energetic particles and the instabilities.« less

  6. Lawyer Proliferation and the Social Responsibility Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wines, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Drawing on the model of social responsibility that colleges of business have been teaching, the boom in lawyer education is examined. It is argued that law schools are irresponsible in overselling the benefits of law school graduation, creating a surplus of lawyers whose abilities could be used as well elsewhere. (MSE)

  7. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  8. Porcine Skin Thermal Response to Near-IR Lasers Using a Fast Infrared Camera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Model ÷ " * Predictive Line U 80- 0) 60 - E neR Temp, C shows)the Takata0. 40 -" • 1 n M a M f s g t " wt MonteCarlo 20 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.81 Energy, (J...60 Monte-Carlo/FE Model, ,, Takata Model Predictive Line Predictive Line 50 ,40 40 0. S• IR Temp, C E= --a- Takata I•20 -A- MonteCarlo 10 20 0 0.2 0.4

  9. Modeling Stimuli-Responsive Nanoparticle Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model a monolayer formed at the water-oil interface, which comprises stimuli-responsive nanoparticles. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with stimuli-responsive polymer chains. The surface-active nanoparticles adsorb to the interface from the suspension to minimize total energy of the system and create a monolayer covering the interface. We investigate the monolayer formation by characterizing the detailed adsorption kinetics. We explore the microstructure of the monolayer at different surface coverage, including the particle crowding and ordering, and elucidate the response of monolayer to external stimuli. The collective behavior of the particles within the monolayer is demonstrated quantitatively by vector-vector autocorrelation functions. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the interfacial behavior of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles.

  10. Study of bi-alkali photocathode growth on glass by X-ray techniques for fast timing response photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junqi; Demarteau, Marcel; Wagner, Robert; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Liang, Xue; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Attenkofer, Klaus; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Wong, Jared; Padmore, Howard; Woll, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode is an essential component in fast timing response photomultipliers. Real-time in-situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and post-growth x-ray reflectivity measurement were performed to study the photocathode deposition process on glass substrate. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction patterns show the formation of Sb crystalline, dissolution of crystalline phase Sb by the application of K vapor and reformation of refined crystal textures. XRR result exhibits that the film thickness increases ~ 4.5 times after K diffusion and almost have no change after Cs diffusion. Further investigation is expected to understand the photocathode growth process and provide guidelines for photocathode development.

  11. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  12. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario

    2015-10-15

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  13. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  14. Optimization of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck model for fast evaluation of diverse protein channels.

    PubMed

    Dyrka, Witold; Bartuzel, Maciej M; Kotulska, Malgorzata

    2013-10-01

    We show the accuracy and applicability of our fast algorithmic implementation of a three-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Planck (3D-PNP) flow model for characterizing different protein channels. Due to its high computational efficiency, our model can predict the full current-voltage characteristics of a channel within minutes, based on the experimental 3D structure of the channel or its computational model structure. Compared with other methods, such as Brownian dynamics, which currently needs a few weeks of the computational time, or even much more demanding molecular dynamics modeling, 3D-PNP is the only available method for a function-based evaluation of very numerous tentative structural channel models. Flow model tests of our algorithm and its optimal parametrization are provided for five native channels whose experimental structures are available in the protein data bank (PDB) in an open conductive state, and whose experimental current-voltage characteristics have been published. The channels represent very different geometric and structural properties, which makes it the widest test to date of the accuracy of 3D-PNP on real channels. We test whether the channel conductance, rectification, and charge selectivity obtained from the flow model, could be sufficiently sensitive to single-point mutations, related to unsignificant changes in the channel structure. Our results show that the classical 3D-PNP model, under proper parametrization, is able to achieve a qualitative agreement with experimental data for a majority of the tested characteristics and channels, including channels with narrow and irregular conductivity pores. We propose that although the standard PNP model cannot provide insight into complex physical phenomena due to its intrinsic limitations, its semiquantitative agreement is achievable for rectification and selectivity at a level sufficient for the bioinformatical purpose of selecting the best structural models with a great advantage of a very short

  15. Effects of Delayed Enteral Nutrition on Inflammatory Responses and Immune Function Competence in Critically Ill Patients with Prolonged Fasting.

    PubMed

    Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning; Geng, Yanxia; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Juanjuan; Jun, Tanshan; Lin, Zhiliang; Li, Weiqin; Zhu, Weiming; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou

    2014-05-01

    Although different studies suggest that early enteral nutrition (EEN) has benefits in reducing infectious complications, there is no data that addresses whether delayed enteral nutrition (EN) is detrimental and if it may have effects on inflammatory responses and immune function. Forty-five critically ill patients with long fasting were randomly allocated in two groups according to the type of nutritional support. The first group included patients assuming a standard enteral nutrition (EN, n = 22) and the second group assuming a parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 23). The daily nutritional amount was 25 kcal (105 kJ)/kg for all patients. The inflammatory markers white blood cells (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α, IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-4, IL- 10 and the immune T-lymphocyte sub-populations CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and HLA-DR+ were evaluated at day 1, and after 2, 3 and 7 days. IL-4, IL-10, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were not statistically different between the two groups. WBC and TNF-α in EN patients were higher than those in PN after 3 and 7 days (P < 0.05). CRP and IL-6 levels were higher in EN patients than those assuming a PN after 2 and 3 days (P < 0.05). HLA-DR levels in patients assuming an EN were found higher than those in PN at day 7 (P < 0.05). Delayed EN for critically ill patients with long-term fasting increased systemic inflammatory responses, whereas EN could modify immune function, therefore reducing hospital stay and costs.

  16. Calcium-activated force responses in fast- and slow-twitch skinned muscle fibres of the rat at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D G; Williams, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Force responses from mechanically skinned fibres of rat skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) were measured at different temperatures in the range 3-35 degrees C following sudden changes in Ca2+ concentration in the preparations. 2. At all temperatures there were characteristic differences between the slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres with respect to the relative steady-state force-[Ca2+] relation: such as a lower [Ca2+] threshold for activation and a less steep force-pCa curve in slow-twitch muscle fibres. 3. At 3-5 degrees C the force changes in both types of muscle fibres lagged considerably behind the estimated changes in [Ca2+] within the preparations and this enabled us to perform a comparative analysis of the Ca2+ kinetics in the process of force development in both muscle fibre types. This analysis suggest that two and six Ca2+ ions are involved in the regulatory unit for contraction of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres respectively. 4. The rate of relaxation following a sudden decrease in [Ca2+] was much lower in the slow-twitch than in the fast-twitch muscle at 5 degrees C, suggesting that properties of the contractile apparatus could play an essential role in determining the rate of relaxation in vivo. 5. There was substantial variation in Ca2+ sensitivity between muscle fibres of the same type from different animals at each temperature. However the steepness of the force-[Ca2+] relation was essentially the same for all fibres of the same type. 6. A change in temperature from 5 to 25 degrees C had a statistically significant effect on the sensitivity of the fast-twitch muscle fibres, rendering them less sensitive to Ca2+ by a factor of 2. However a further increase in temperature from 25 to 35 degrees C did not have any statistically significant effect on the force-[Ca2+] relation in fast-twitch muscle fibres. 7. The effect of temperature on the Ca2+ sensitivity of slow-twitch muscle fibres was not statistically significant

  17. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  18. Frequency analysis of the visual steady-state response measured with the fast optical signal in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gordon, Brian A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high frequency activity (>4 Hz) carries important information about the state of the brain or its response to high frequency events. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly used to study these changes because it possesses high temporal resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio. However, it provides limited spatial information. Non-invasive fast optical signals (FOS) have been proposed as a neuroimaging tool combining spatial and temporal resolution. Yet, this technique has not been applied to study high frequency brain oscillations because of its relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we investigate the sensitivity of FOS to relatively high-frequency brain oscillations. We measured the steady-state optical response elicited in medial and lateral occipital cortex by checkerboard reversals occurring at 4, 6, and 8 Hz in younger and older adults. Stimulus-dependent oscillations were observed at the predicted stimulation frequency. In addition, in the younger adults the FOS steady-state response was smaller in lateral than medial areas, whereas in the older adults it was reversed in these two cortical regions. This may reflect diminished top-down inhibitory control in the older adults. The results indicate that FOS can be used to study the modulation of relatively high-frequency brain oscillations in adjacent cortical regions. PMID:20566389

  19. Matrix models for size-structured populations: unrealistic fast growth or simply diffusion?

    PubMed

    Picard, Nicolas; Liang, Jingjing

    2014-01-01

    Matrix population models are widely used to study population dynamics but have been criticized because their outputs are sensitive to the dimension of the matrix (or, equivalently, to the class width). This sensitivity is concerning for the population growth rate (λ) because this is an intrinsic characteristic of the population that should not depend on the model specification. It has been suggested that the sensitivity of λ to matrix dimension was linked to the existence of fast pathways (i.e. the fraction of individuals that systematically move up a class), whose proportion increases when class width increases. We showed that for matrix population models with growth transition only from class i to class i + 1, λ was independent of the class width when the mortality and the recruitment rates were constant, irrespective of the growth rate. We also showed that if there were indeed fast pathways, there were also in about the same proportion slow pathways (i.e. the fraction of individuals that systematically remained in the same class), and that they jointly act as a diffusion process (where diffusion here is the movement in size of an individual whose size increments are random according to a normal distribution with mean zero). For 53 tree species from a tropical rain forest in the Central African Republic, the diffusion resulting from common matrix dimensions was much stronger than would be realistic. Yet, the sensitivity of λ to matrix dimension for a class width in the range 1-10 cm was small, much smaller than the sampling uncertainty on the value of λ. Moreover, λ could either increase or decrease when class width increased depending on the species. Overall, even if the class width should be kept small enough to limit diffusion, it had little impact on the estimate of λ for tree species.

  20. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, N.-B. . E-mail: nchang@even.tamuk.edu

    2005-07-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach - system dynamics modeling - for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool - Stella[reg]. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  1. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2005-01-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach--system dynamics modeling--for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool--Stella. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  2. Fast responses of metabolites in Vicia faba L. to moderate NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Niehaus, Karsten; Gödde, Victoria; Hasler, Mario; Zörb, Christian; Gorzolka, Karin; Jezek, Mareike; Senbayram, Mehmet; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Mühling, Karl H

    2015-07-01

    Salt stress impairs global agricultural crop production by reducing vegetative growth and yield. Despite this importance, a number of gaps exist in our knowledge about very early metabolic responses that ensue minutes after plants experience salt stress. Surprisingly, this early phase remains almost as a black box. Therefore, systematic studies focussing on very early plant physiological responses to salt stress (in this case NaCl) may enhance our understanding on strategies to develop crop plants with a better performance under saline conditions. In the present study, hydroponically grown Vicia faba L. plants were exposed to 90 min of NaCl stress, whereby every 15 min samples were taken for analyzing short-term physiologic responses. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiles were analysed by calculating a principal component analysis followed by multiple contrast tests. Follow-up experiments were run to analyze downstream effects of the metabolic changes on the physiological level. The novelty of this study is the demonstration of complex stress-induced metabolic changes at the very beginning of a moderate salt stress in V. faba, information that are very scant for this early stage. This study reports for the first that the proline analogue trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, known to inhibit cell elongation, was increasingly synthesized after NaCl-stress initiation. Leaf metabolites associated with the generation or scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were affected in leaves that showed a synchronized increase in ROS formation. A reduced glutamine synthetase activity indicated that disturbances in the nitrogen assimilation occur earlier than it was previously thought under salt stress.

  3. Fast Response, vertically oriented graphene nanosheet electric double layer capacitors synthesized from C(2)H(2).

    PubMed

    Cai, Minzhen; Outlaw, Ronald A; Quinlan, Ronald A; Premathilake, Dilshan; Butler, Sue M; Miller, John R

    2014-06-24

    The growth and electrical characteristics of vertically oriented graphene nanosheets grown by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from C2H2 feedstock on nickel substrates and used as electrodes in symmetric electric double layer capacitors (EDLC) are presented. The nanosheets exhibited 2.7 times faster growth rate and much greater specific capacitance for a given growth time than CH4 synthesized films. Raman spectra showed that the intensity ratio of the D band to G band versus temperature initially decreased to a minimum value of 0.45 at a growth temperature of 750 °C, but increased rapidly with further temperature increase (1.15 at 850 °C). The AC specific capacitance at 120 Hz of these EDLC devices increased in a linear fashion with growth temperature, up to 265 μF/cm(2) (2 μm high film, 850 °C with 10 min growth). These devices exhibited ultrafast frequency response: the frequency response at -45° phase angle reached over 20 kHz. Consistent with the increase in D band to G band ratio, the morphology of the films became less vertical, less crystalline, and disordered at substrate temperatures of 800 °C and above. This deterioration in morphology resulted in an increase in graphene surface area and defect density, which, in turn, contributed to the increased capacitance, as well as a slight decrease in frequency response. The low equivalent series resistance varied from 0.07 to 0.08 Ω and was attributed to the significant carbon incorporation into the Ni substrate.

  4. Fast Response Shape Memory Effect Titanium Nickel (TiNi) Foam Torque Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shape Change Technologies has developed a process to manufacture net-shaped TiNi foam torque tubes that demonstrate the shape memory effect. The torque tubes dramatically reduce response time by a factor of 10. This Phase II project matured the actuator technology by rigorously characterizing the process to optimize the quality of the TiNi and developing a set of metrics to provide ISO 9002 quality assurance. A laboratory virtual instrument engineering workbench (LabVIEW'TM')-based, real-time control of the torsional actuators was developed. These actuators were developed with The Boeing Company for aerospace applications.

  5. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber gas sensor with high sensitivity and fast response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2014-05-01

    The effects of modal interference (MI) on the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) gas sensors are investigated. By optimizing mode launch, applying wavelength modulation with proper modulation parameters as well as appropriate digital signal processing, an estimated lower detection limit of <1 ppmv acetylene is achieved with 13-m long HC-PBF. The impacts of drilling side-hole on the MI and response time are also studied. With a 62-cm long sensing HC-PBF drilled with multiple side-holes, an acetylene sensor with a lower detection limit of 11 ppmv and a recovery time of 2 minute is demonstrated.

  6. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered, the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study, we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light-curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light-curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  7. A Fast Radiative Transfer Model for the Meteor- M satellite-based hyperspectral IR sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, A. B.; Rublev, A. N.; Rusin, E. V.; Pyatkin, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The methodological and computational aspects of Fast Radiative Transfer Model (FRTM) development designed for the analysis and validation of the data of measurements using satellite-based instrument-hyperspectral IR sounders of high spectral resolution—are considered. A description of the FRTM is given for the analysis and modeling of the measurements by the IRFS-2 IR Fourier spectrometer for polarorbiting meteorological satellites of the Meteor-M series based on the known RTTOV FRTM. Computational efficiency is estimated and the results of the verification of developed FRTM are presented. They were obtained from a comparison of model simulations with exact line-by-line calculations for the IRFS-2 IR sounder. The increase in computational performance and the accuracy of the FRTM, caused by the application of the algorithms of the principal components method, are discussed. The construction of radiative models, which use the algorithm of the Monte Carlo method and are applicable for the analysis and modeling of the data of IR sounders under conditions of cloudiness in the instrument field of view, is considered.

  8. The in vivo performance of an alkali-free bioactive glass for bone grafting, FastOs(®) BG, assessed with an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Paulo P; Brito, Ana F; Kapoor, Saurabh; Correia, Ana F; Atayde, Luis M; Dias-Pereira, Patrícia; Maurício, Ana Colette; Afonso, Américo; Goel, Ashutosh; Ferreira, José M F

    2017-01-01

    Although bioactive glasses are successfully used as bone substitutes, recent studies have revealed that the high alkali content in these glasses leads to fast in vivo degradation rates that may not match the rate of new bone ingrowth. This prompted us to design and develop novel bioactive glasses that are devoid of alkali but still demonstrate high bioactivity in vitro. This article describes the in vivo performance of an alkali-free bioactive glass with the following composition (Wt %): 13.03 MgO-33.98 CaO-13.37 P2 O5 -38.84 SiO2 -0.77 CaF2 (labelled as FastOs(®) BG). An animal model was used to assess the in vivo performance of FastOs(®) BG, using 45S5 Bioglass(®) as control. The evaluation was performed through implantation of FastOs(®) BG and 45S5 Bioglass(®) , during one month, in femoral bone defects in sheep. Subcutaneous implantation of both glasses was also performed in order to assess tissue response through a standardized method. Histological and scanning electron microscopy assessment of retrieved subcutaneous and bone samples demonstrated that FastOs(®) BG is biocompatible, osteoconductive, that it can be osteointegrated, and that it is more slowly resorbed than 45S5 Bioglass(®) . These features suggest that FastOs(®) BG is a potential candidate for bone grafting. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 30-38, 2017.

  9. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  10. Cortistatin Is a Key Factor Regulating the Sex-Dependent Response of the GH and Stress Axes to Fasting in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; de Lecea, Luis; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2016-07-01

    Cortistatin (CORT) shares high structural and functional similarities with somatostatin (SST) but displays unique sex-dependent pituitary actions. Indeed, although female CORT-knockout (CORT-KO) mice exhibit enhanced GH expression/secretion, Proopiomelanocortin expression, and circulating ACTH/corticosterone/ghrelin levels, male CORT-KO mice only display increased plasma GH/corticosterone levels. Changes in peripheral ghrelin and SST (rather than hypothalamic levels) seem to regulate GH/ACTH axes in CORT-KOs under fed conditions. Because changes in GH/ACTH axes during fasting provide important adaptive mechanisms, we sought to determine whether CORT absence influences GH/ACTH axes during fasting. Accordingly, fed and fasted male/female CORT-KO were compared with littermate controls. Fasting increased circulating GH levels in male/female controls but not in CORT-KO, suggesting that CORT can be a relevant regulator of GH secretion during fasting. However, GH levels were already higher in CORT-KO than in controls in fed state, which might preclude a further elevation in GH levels. Interestingly, although fasting-induced pituitary GH expression was elevated in both male/female controls, GH expression only increased in fasted female CORT-KOs, likely owing to specific changes observed in key factors controlling somatotrope responsiveness (ie, circulating ghrelin and IGF-1, and pituitary GHRH and ghrelin receptor expression). Fasting increased corticosterone levels in control and, most prominently, in CORT-KO mice, which might be associated with a desensitization to SST signaling and to an augmentation in CRH and ghrelin-signaling regulating corticotrope function. Altogether, these results provide compelling evidence that CORT plays a key, sex-dependent role in the regulation of the GH/ACTH axes in response to fasting.

  11. AC conductivity scaling behavior in grain and grain boundary response regime of fast lithium ionic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, C. R.

    2014-05-01

    AC conductivity spectra of Li-analogues NASICON-type Li1.5Al0.5Ge1.5P3O12 (LAGP), Li-Al-Ti-P-O (LATP) glass-ceramics and garnet-type Li7La2Ta2O13 (LLTO) ceramic are analyzed by universal power law and Summerfield scaling approaches. The activation energies and pre-exponential factors of total and grain conductivities are following the Meyer-Neldel (M-N) rule for NASICON-type materials. However, the garnet-type LLTO material deviates from the M-N rule line of NASICON-type materials. The frequency- and temperature-dependent conductivity spectra of LAGP and LLTO are superimposed by Summerfield scaling. The scaled conductivity curves of LATP are not superimposed at the grain boundary response region. The superimposed conductivity curves are observed at cross-over frequencies of grain boundary response region for LATP by incorporating the exp ( {{{ - (EAt - EAg )} {{{ - (EAt - EAg )} {kT}}} ) factor along with Summerfield scaling factors on the frequency axis, where EAt and EAg are the activation energies of total and grain conductivities, respectively.

  12. Fabrication of non-polar GaN based highly responsive and fast UV photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundimeda, Abhiram; Krishna, Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Sharma, Alka; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Maurya, K. K.; Husale, Sudhir; Gupta, Govind

    2017-03-01

    We report the fabrication of ultraviolet photodetector on non-polar (11-20), nearly stress free, Gallium Nitride (GaN) film epitaxially grown on r-plane (1-102) sapphire substrate. High crystalline film leads to the formation of two faceted triangular islands like structures on the surface. The fabricated GaN ultraviolet photodetector exhibited a high responsivity of 340 mA/W at 5 V bias at room temperature which is the best performance reported for a-GaN/r-sapphire films. A detectivity of 1.24 × 109 Jones and noise equivalent power of 2.4 × 10-11 WHz-1/2 were also attained. The rise time and decay time of 280 ms and 450 ms have been calculated, respectively, which were the fastest response times reported for non-polar GaN ultraviolet photodetector. Such high performance devices substantiate that non-polar GaN can serve as an excellent photoconductive material for ultraviolet photodetector based applications.

  13. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  14. Fast electromagnetic modeling in cylindrically layered media excited by eccentred magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, Marina; Itskovich, Gregory B.; Seryakov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We developed a fast algorithm to calculate a response of cylindrically layered media excited by the vertical magnetic dipole eccentred with respect to the axis of symmetry. The algorithm calculates response in the range of frequencies typical for induction and dielectric logging. The media conductivity and dielectric constant are described by piecewise-constant functions. The corresponding boundary value problem is solved by method of separation of variables. Fourier transform is applied to Maxwell equations and boundary conditions to express field components through Fourier transforms of vertical components of an electrical and magnetic field. In addition, an expansion of vertical components into an infinite series with respect to angular harmonics is used to reduce the original problem to a series of 1-D problems that only depend on the radial coordinate. The solution to each 1-D radial problem for the angular harmonics is presented as a linear combination of modified Bessel functions. Finally, inverse Fourier transformation is applied to the angular harmonics of vertical components to derive electrical and magnetic field of the original boundary value problem. We provide detailed discussion on the elements that are critical for the numerical implementation of the algorithm: a proper normalization, convergence, and integration. Specifically, we show how to perform integration in the complex plane by avoiding intersection of the integration pass with the cuts located on the Riemann surface. Numerical results show the usefulness of the algorithm for solving inverse problems and for studying the effect of eccentricity in induction and dielectric logging.

  15. Modeling detector response for neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Downing, R. G.; Lamaze, G. P.; Hofsäss, H. C.; Biegel, J.; Ronning, C.

    1995-02-01

    In Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP), inferences about the concentration profile of an element in a material are based on the energy spectrum of charged particles emitted due to specific nuclear reactions. The detector response function relates the depth of emission to the expected energy spectrum of the emitted particles. Here, the detector response function is modeled for arbitrary source and detector geometries based on a model for the stopping power of the material, energy straggling, multiple scattering and random detector measurement error. At the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility, a NDP spectrum was collected for a diamond-like carbon (DLC) sample doped with boron. A vertical slit was placed in front of the detector for collimation. Based on the computed detector response function, a model for the depth profile of boron is fit to the observed NDP spectrum. The contribution of straggling to overall variability was increased by multiplying the Bohr Model prediction by a ramp factor. The adjustable parameter in the ramp was selected to give the best agreement between the fitted profile and the expected shape of the profile. The expected shape is determined from experimental process control measurements.

  16. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  17. Fast asthenosphere motion in high-resolution global mantle flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Huber, Markus; John, Lorenz; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-09-01

    A variety of geologic observations point to fast upper mantle flow that may exceed plate tectonic velocities by an order of magnitude. At the same time there is mounting evidence from seismology for flow-like structures in the upper 100-200 km of the mantle. Here we present a set of geodynamic simulations to link these observations. In a synthetic setting, we include asthenospheric channels of varying thickness, with an extreme case of 100 km, and a significant viscosity contrast of up to 4 orders of magnitude relative to the deeper mantle. Using our new global high-resolution code TERRA-NEO, we obtain an increase in velocity by a factor of 10 between a 1000 km thick and the very thin channel, translating into velocities of ˜ 20 cm/a within the narrow asthenosphere. We further present and verify a simple Poiseuille flow model, predicting that the upper mantle velocity scales with the inverse of the asthenosphere thickness.

  18. Profiling Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) of Family Health History based on the Clinical Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehoon; Hulse, Nathan C.; Wood, Grant M.; Oniki, Thomas A.; Huff, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we developed a Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) profile to support exchanging a full pedigree based family health history (FHH) information across multiple systems and applications used by clinicians, patients, and researchers. We used previously developed clinical element models (CEMs) that are capable of representing the FHH information, and derived essential data elements including attributes, constraints, and value sets. We analyzed gaps between the FHH CEM elements and existing FHIR resources. Based on the analysis, we developed a profile that consists of 1) FHIR resources for essential FHH data elements, 2) extensions for additional elements that were not covered by the resources, and 3) a structured definition to integrate patient and family member information in a FHIR message. We implemented the profile using an open-source based FHIR framework and validated it using patient-entered FHH data that was captured through a locally developed FHH tool. PMID:28269871

  19. Profiling Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) of Family Health History based on the Clinical Element Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Hulse, Nathan C; Wood, Grant M; Oniki, Thomas A; Huff, Stanley M

    2016-01-01

    In this study we developed a Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) profile to support exchanging a full pedigree based family health history (FHH) information across multiple systems and applications used by clinicians, patients, and researchers. We used previously developed clinical element models (CEMs) that are capable of representing the FHH information, and derived essential data elements including attributes, constraints, and value sets. We analyzed gaps between the FHH CEM elements and existing FHIR resources. Based on the analysis, we developed a profile that consists of 1) FHIR resources for essential FHH data elements, 2) extensions for additional elements that were not covered by the resources, and 3) a structured definition to integrate patient and family member information in a FHIR message. We implemented the profile using an open-source based FHIR framework and validated it using patient-entered FHH data that was captured through a locally developed FHH tool.

  20. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    PubMed Central

    Glaholt, SP; Kyker-Snowman, E; Shaw, JR; Chen, CY

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 hours) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO4 toxin. PMID:27847315

  1. Insulin sensitivity measured by the minimal model: no associations with fasting respiratory exchange ratio in trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, J H; Levitt, N S; St Clair Gibson, A; Grobler, L; Noakes, T D; Lambert, E V

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of fasting insulin concentrations and tissue insulin sensitivity on whole-body substrate oxidation in 61 well-trained subjects. Subjects underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGT) after a 10- to 12-hour overnight fast. Minimal model analysis was used to determine insulin sensitivity (S(i)). A week later, fasting (10- to 12-hour) respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was measured at rest and during exercise at 25%, 50%, and 70% of peak power output (W(peak)). Prior to these measurements, training volume, dietary intake, and muscle fiber composition, substrate concentrations, and enzyme activities were determined. The average fasting plasma insulin concentration was 7.3 +/- 2.4 microU/mL (4.0 to 10.5 microU/mL), and the mean S(i) was 14.0 +/- 6.1 x (10(-4) min(-1) x microU(-1) x mL(-1)) (2.6 to 26.3 x 10(-4) min(-1) x microU(-1) x mL(-1)). There was no significant correlation between fasting plasma insulin concentration and S(i) (r = -.14, P =.336) or between these measurements and fasting RER, measured at rest and during exercise at 25%, 50%, and 70% W(peak). Only VO(2max) and the proportion of type 1 muscle fibers were significantly correlated with S(i) (r =.30, P =.045 and r =.34, P =.026, respectively), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was significantly correlated with fasting plasma insulin concentration (r =.35, P =.006). In conclusion, S(i) and fasting plasma insulin concentration were not associated with fasting RER at rest and during exercise of increasing intensity in trained athletes who have high S(i).

  2. Parsimonious Hydrologic and Nitrate Response Models For Silver Springs, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Yaquian-Luna, Jose Antonio; Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Hatfield, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    Silver Springs with an approximate discharge of 25 m3/sec is one of Florida's first magnitude springs and among the largest springs worldwide. Its 2500-km2 springshed overlies the mostly unconfined Upper Floridan Aquifer. The aquifer is approximately 100 m thick and predominantly consists of porous, fractured and cavernous limestone, which leads to excellent surface drainage properties (no major stream network other than Silver Springs run) and complex groundwater flow patterns through both rock matrix and fast conduits. Over the past few decades, discharge from Silver Springs has been observed to slowly but continuously decline, while nitrate concentrations in the spring water have enormously increased from a background level of 0.05 mg/l to over 1 mg/l. In combination with concurrent increases in algae growth and turbidity, for example, and despite an otherwise relatively stable water quality, this has given rise to concerns about the ecological equilibrium in and near the spring run as well as possible impacts on tourism. The purpose of the present work is to elaborate parsimonious lumped parameter models that may be used by resource managers for evaluating the springshed's hydrologic and nitrate transport responses. Instead of attempting to explicitly consider the complex hydrogeologic features of the aquifer in a typically numerical and / or stochastic approach, we use a transfer function approach wherein input signals (i.e., time series of groundwater recharge and nitrate loading) are transformed into output signals (i.e., time series of spring discharge and spring nitrate concentrations) by some linear and time-invariant law. The dynamic response types and parameters are inferred from comparing input and output time series in frequency domain (e.g., after Fourier transformation). Results are converted into impulse (or step) response functions, which describe at what time and to what magnitude a unitary change in input manifests at the output. For the

  3. A successive three-point scheme for fast ray tracing in complex 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Xu, T.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new 3D ray-tracing method that can be applied to computations of traveltime and ray-paths of seismic transmitted, reflected and turning waves in complex geologic models, which consist of arbitrarily shaped blocks whose boundaries are matched by triangulated interfaces for computational efficiency. The new ray-tracing scheme combines the segmentally iterative ray tracing (SIRT) method and the pseudo-bending scheme so as to become a robust and fast ray-tracing method for seismic waves. The new method is extension