Science.gov

Sample records for fast rise time

  1. Fast rise-time, fiber optic pin

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1998-05-12

    A reliable, simple fast-rise-time diagnostic has been developed for measuring the breakout time of the detonation wave in a detonating high explosive. The intrinsic rise time of the signals generated is less than one nanosecond. The technique, called FAT (Fiber Arrival Time), consists of an optical fiber with one end coated with ~1500 Å Aluminum. The coated end is placed in intimate contact with the surface of the explosive. The detonation wave interacting with the Al surface causes a prompt flash of light which is recorded at the output end of the fiber. The active area of the FAT probe end is 100 µm in diameter and centered to within ±10 µm also giving excellent spatial precision. When used in this mode, FAT overcomes difficulties of electronic and past fiber optic pins. When looking at a flyer plate arrival the time response appears to be a function of the metal plate velocity.

  2. Accurate measurement of the rise and decay times of fast scintillators with solid state photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, S.; Steenbergen, J. H. L.; van Dam, H. T.; Schaart, D. R.

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a measurement setup for the determination of scintillation pulse shapes of fast scintillators. It is based on a time-correlated single photon counting approach that utilizes the correlation between 511 keV annihilation photons to produce start and stop signals in two separate crystals. The measurement is potentially cost-effective and simple to set up while maintaining an excellent system timing resolution of 125 ps. As a proof-of-concept the scintillation photon arrival time histograms were recorded for two well-known, fast scintillators: LYSO:Ce and LaBr3:5%Ce. The scintillation pulse shapes were modeled as a linear combination of exponentially distributed charge transfer and photon emission processes. Correcting for the system timing resolution, the exponential time constants were extracted from the recorded histograms. A decay time of 43 ns and a rise time of 72 ps were determined for LYSO:Ce thus demonstrating the capability of the system to accurately measure very fast rise times. In the case of LaBr3:5%Ce two processes were observed to contribute to the rising edge of the scintillation pulse. The faster component (270 ps) contributes with 72% to the rising edge of the scintillation pulse while the second, slower component (2.0 ns) contributes with 27%. The decay of the LaBr3:5%Ce scintillation pulse was measured to be 15.4 ns with a small contribution (2%) of a component with a larger time constant (130 ns).

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  5. High-Voltage Power Supply With Fast Rise and Fall Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearden, Douglas B.; Acker, Richard M.; Kapuslka, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    A special-purpose high-voltage power supply can be electronically switched on and off with fast rise and fall times, respectively. The output potential is programmable from 20 to 1,250 V. An output current of 50 A can be sustained at 1,250 V. The power supply was designed specifically for electronically shuttering a microchannel plate in an x-ray detector that must operate with exposure times as short as 1 ms. The basic design of the power supply is also adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for rapid slewing of high voltages. The power-supply circuitry (see figure) includes a preregulator, which is used to program the output at 1/30 of the desired output potential. After the desired voltage has been set, the outputs of a pulse width modulator (PWM) are enabled and used to amplify the preregulator output potential by 30. The amplification is achieved by use of two voltage doublers with a transformer that has two primary and two secondary windings. A resistor is used to limit the current by controlling the drive voltage of two field-effect transistors (FETs) during turn-on of the PWM. A pulse transformer is used to turn on four FETs to short-circuit four output capacitors when the outputs of the PWM have been disabled. The most notable aspects of the performance of the power supply are a rise time of only 80 s and a fall time of only 60 s at a load current of 50 A or less. Another notable aspect is that the application of a 0-to-5-V square wave to a shutdown pin of the PWM causes the production of a 0-to-1,250-V square wave at the output terminals.

  6. Considerations for human exposure standards for fast-rise-time high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J H; Kiel, J L; Hurt, W D

    1995-06-01

    Development of new emitter systems capable of producing high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses with very fast rise times and narrow pulse widths is continuing. Such directed energy weapons systems will be used in the future to defeat electronically vulnerable targets. Human exposures to these pulses can be expected during testing and operations. Development of these technologies for radar and communications purposes has the potential for wider environmental exposure, as well. Current IEEE C95.1-1991 human exposure guidelines do not specifically address these types of pulses, though limits are stated for pulsed emissions. The process for developing standards includes an evaluation of the relevant bioeffects data base. A recommendation has been made that human exposure to ultrashort electromagnetic pulses that engender electromagnetic transients, called precursor waves, should be avoided. Studies that purport to show the potential for tissue damage induced by such pulses were described. The studies cited in support of the recommendation were not relevant to the issues of tissue damage by propagated pulses. A number of investigations are cited in this review that directly address the biological effects of electromagnetic pulses. These studies have not shown evidence of tissue damage as a result of exposure to high-peak-power pulsed microwaves. It is our opinion that the current guidelines are sufficiently protective for human exposure to these pulses.

  7. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, N.C.; Coleman, M.D.; Ramrus, A.; Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos national Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70 ns pulses via four Blumieins. Each Blumiein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumiein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  8. Lithium niobate stress gauge current diagnostic for noninductive measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Williams, R. R.; Porter, J. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Matzen, M. K.

    1990-11-01

    Accurate modeling of load behavior in Z-pinch plasma radiation sources driven by high-current generators requires the measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere currents close to the load. Conventional current diagnostics mounted in inductive cavities (such as B-dot loops and Rogowski coils) fail at small radius because of electrical breakdown produced by high dI/dt. In this paper, we describe the use of large-signal, nanosecond-time-resolution lithium niobate piezoelectric stress gauges to directly measure the magnetic pressure B2/2μ0=μ0I2/8π2r2 generated at radius r by a current I flowing in a radial transmission line. Current measurements have been performed at radius r=2.54×10-2 m on Sandia National Laboratories' Proto-II (10 TW) and SATURN (30 TW) gas puff Z-pinch experiments with maximum currents of 10.1 MA and dI/dt to 2.1×1014 A/s. Comparisons with Faraday rotation and B-dot current diagnostic measurements at large radius are presented. Bremsstrahlung noise problems unique to the SATURN gas puff source are discussed. For a Y-cut lithium niobate stress gauge on a pure tungsten electrode, current densities up to I/2πr=78 MA/m can be measured before the electrode yield strength and the piezoelectric operating stress limit are exceeded. Above the Hugoniot elastic limit of the electrode material, the dynamic range and accuracy of the diagnostic are greatly reduced, but it appears that the technique can be extended to higher current densities using an X-cut quartz piezoelectric element and a tungsten-sapphire electrode impedance stack.

  9. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  10. Characteristics of a fast rise time power supply for a pulsed plasma reactor for chemical vapor destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, P.A.; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Shofran, S.P.; Boss, C.B.; Nunez, C.M.; Ramsey, G.H.; Engels, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages higher than can be obtained with dc. The resulting energetic plasma is effective for destroying a variety of molecules. The spark gap circuit configuration plays an important role in the effectiveness of the plasma generation. A single-gap circuit is effective for generating moderate peak voltages, but is limited by a multiple sparking phenomenon. A double-gap circuit can achieve equal peak voltages with every spark, but with a reduced number of pulses, compared to the single gap. Both configurations have an upper voltage imposed by the changing impedance of the reactor as voltage and frequency are varied. The pulse characteristics are reported for both types of circuits. The general performance of the reactors for destruction of some compounds with both circuits is also reported.

  11. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  12. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  13. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  14. Response of surge protection devices to fast rising pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindel, I. N.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of lightning protection modules incorporating leadless (pill type) Zener like devices were evaluated with regard to their ability to suppress EMP induced transients. Two series of tests were performed to evaluate the ability of these modules to react to fast rate of rise ( 1Kv/ns) transients, and the attenuation introduced and the ability to limit damped sinusoid pulses which may be induced due to an EMP resulting from a nuclear detonation.

  15. Response of surge protection devices to fast rising pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindel, I. N.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of lightning protection modules incorporating leadless (pill type) Zener like devices were evaluated with regard to their ability to suppress EMP induced transients. Two series of tests were performed to evaluate the ability of these modules to react to fast rate of rise ( 1Kv/ns) transients, and the attenuation introduced and the ability to limit damped sinusoid pulses which may be induced due to an EMP resulting from a nuclear detonation.

  16. Enhanced-rise-time bremsstrahlung Aurora environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bushell, M.; Graybill, S.; Litz, M.; Merkel, G.

    1984-12-01

    The technique of beam nose erosion has been employed at the Aurora flash x-ray machine to obtain a modified bremsstrahlung pulse with a shorter rise time. When the Aurora is operated in its conventional mode the individual thick target bremsstrahlung sources each have a rise time of about 40 to 50 nanoseconds. The modifications described here involve the insertion of a beam erosion chamber between one of the four anodes and its bremsstrahlung target. Bremsstrahlung rise times varied, depending on the anode-cathode gap and the chamber pressures, between 10 nanoseconds and 100 nanoseconds.

  17. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  18. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  19. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, G.J.; Sampayan, S.E.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-10-13

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 12 figs.

  20. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  1. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Lipunova, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  2. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  3. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  4. Diffusion of fast rising strong magnetic fields into conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Kuskova, N. I.; Rud, A. D.

    2014-11-01

    The basic processes occurring in a conductor exploding in a current skinning mode are the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in the conductor and the formation of low-temperature plasma at its surface. An experimental study of the phenomenon of nonlinear magnetic diffusion into conductors in magnetic fields of induction rising at a rate up to 3·109 T/s was carried out on the MIG generator capable of producing a peak current up to 2.5 MA within a rise time of 100 ns. It has been found experimentally that the average velocity of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in an aluminum conductor placed in a strong magnetic field (up to 300 T) rising at a high rate (on average, 3·109 T/s) is (2.7÷3.3)·105 cm/s. This is comparable to the velocity of sound in aluminum under normal conditions and reasonably agrees with predictions of numerical simulations.

  5. The rise-time of Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Tominaga, N.; Molina, J.; Galbany, L.; Bufano, F.; Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C.; Förster, F.; Pignata, G.; Bersten, M.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Carlberg, R.; de Jaeger, T.; Hamuy, M.; Baklanov, P. V.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early-time light curves of a large sample of 223 Type II supernovae (SNe II) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Having a cadence of a few days and sufficient non-detections prior to explosion, we constrain rise-times, i.e. the durations from estimated first to maximum light, as a function of effective wavelength. At rest-frame g' band (λeff = 4722 Å), we find a distribution of fast rise-times with median of (7.5 ± 0.3) d. Comparing these durations with analytical shock models of Rabinak & Waxman and Nakar & Sari, and hydrodynamical models of Tominaga et al., which are mostly sensitive to progenitor radius at these epochs, we find a median characteristic radius of less than 400 solar radii. The inferred radii are on average much smaller than the radii obtained for observed red supergiants (RSG). Investigating the post-maximum slopes as a function of effective wavelength in the light of theoretical models, we find that massive hydrogen envelopes are still needed to explain the plateaus of SNe II. We therefore argue that the SN II rise-times we observe are either (a) the shock cooling resulting from the core collapse of RSG with small and dense envelopes, or (b) the delayed and prolonged shock breakout of the collapse of an RSG with an extended atmosphere or embedded within pre-SN circumstellar material.

  6. Climate change. How fast are sea levels rising?

    PubMed

    Church, J A

    2001-10-26

    Sea levels are rising as a result of global warming, but assessing the rate of the rise is proving difficult. In his Perspective, Church highlights the report by Cabanes et al., who have reassessed observational data and find that it is closer to model estimates than previously found. However, observational data are still limited and models disagree in their regional projections. With present data and models, regional sea-level changes cannot be predicted with confidence.

  7. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns-55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach-Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  8. Mapping Rise Time Information with Down-Shift Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T. W., Machorro, E. A., Diaz, A. B.

    2011-11-01

    These viewgraphs summarize the application of recent developments in digital down-shift (DDS) analysis of up converted PDV data to map out how well the PDV diagnostic would capture rise time information (mid point and rise time) in short rise time (<1 ns) shock events. The mapping supports a PDV vs VISAR challenge. The analysis concepts are new (~September FY 2011), simple, and run quickly, which makes them good tools to map out (with ~1 million Monte Carlo simulations) how well PDV captures rise time information as function of baseline velocity, rise time, velocity jump, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  9. Initiation of the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament by Localized Emerging Magnetic Field via Microflaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    EUV data from EIT show that a filament of 2001 February 28 underwent a slow-rise phase lasting about 6 hrs, before rapidly erupting in a fast-rise phase. Concurrent images in soft X-rays (SXRs) from Yohkoh/SXT show that a series of three microflares, prominent in SXT images but weak in EIT approx.195 Ang EUV images, occurred near one end of the filament. The first and last microflares occurred respectively in conjunction with the start of the slow-rise phase and the start of the fast-rise phase, and the second microflare corresponded to a kink in the filament trajectory. Beginning within 10 hours of the start of the slow rise, new magnetic flux emerged at the location of the microflaring. This localized new flux emergence and the resulting microflares, consistent with reconnection between the emerging field and the sheared sigmoid core magnetic field holding the filament, apparently caused the slow rise of this field and the transition to explosive eruption. For the first time in such detail, the observations show this direct action of localized emerging flux in the progressive destabilization of a sheared core field in the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME). Similar processes may have occurred in other recently-studied events, NASA supported this work through NASA SR&T and SEC GI grants.

  10. Initiation of the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament by Localized Emerging Magnetic Field via Microflaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    EUV data from EIT show that a filament of 2001 February 28 underwent a slow-rise phase lasting about 6 hrs, before rapidly erupting in a fast-rise phase. Concurrent images in soft X-rays (SXRs) from Yohkoh/SXT show that a series of three microflares, prominent in SXT images but weak in EIT approx.195 Ang EUV images, occurred near one end of the filament. The first and last microflares occurred respectively in conjunction with the start of the slow-rise phase and the start of the fast-rise phase, and the second microflare corresponded to a kink in the filament trajectory. Beginning within 10 hours of the start of the slow rise, new magnetic flux emerged at the location of the microflaring. This localized new flux emergence and the resulting microflares, consistent with reconnection between the emerging field and the sheared sigmoid core magnetic field holding the filament, apparently caused the slow rise of this field and the transition to explosive eruption. For the first time in such detail, the observations show this direct action of localized emerging flux in the progressive destabilization of a sheared core field in the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME). Similar processes may have occurred in other recently-studied events, NASA supported this work through NASA SR&T and SEC GI grants.

  11. Chinas Rise: A Time for Choosing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    industrialization and empowerment through technology, the productive balances will shift. As productive balances shift, all other forms of power...population has a liability function. China’s rapid rise and empowerment of individuals with higher education and standards of living have forced the...all of these decisions are fraught with risk and none are palatable. The United States has consciously chosen schizophrenia in relation to China’s

  12. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  13. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  14. Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7464 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise...Laboratory Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries by Frank C Krieger and Michael S...From - To) 10/2014 to 09/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal

  15. Subpicosecond luminescence rise time in magnesium codoped GAGG:Ce scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, G.; Vaitkevičius, A.; Nargelas, S.; Augulis, R.; Gulbinas, V.; Bohacek, P.; Nikl, M.; Borisevich, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of co-doping of Gd3Al2GA3O12:Ce (GAGG:Ce) scintillator with magnesium on the rise time of luminescence response was studied in two GAGG:Ce crystals grown in nominally identical conditions except of Mg co-doping in one of them. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and free carrier absorption techniques were exploited. It is evidenced that the Mg co-doping decreases the rise time down to sub-picosecond domain. Meanwhile, the light yield decreases by ∼20%. Thus, the feasibility of exploitation of the fast rise edge in luminescence response for ultrafast timing in scintillation detectors is demonstrated. The role of Mg impurities in facilitating the excitation transfer to radiative recombination centers is discussed.

  16. A note on some statistical properties of rise time parameters used in muon arrival time measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwalt, D. J.; Devilliers, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most investigations of the muon arrival time distribution in EAS during the past decade made use of parameters which can collectively be called rise time parameters. The rise time parameter T sub A/B is defined as the time taken for the integrated pulse from a detector to rise from A% to B% of its full amplitude. The use of these parameters are usually restricted to the determination of the radial dependence thereof. This radial dependence of the rise time parameters are usually taken as a signature of the particle interaction characteristics in the shower. As these parameters have a stochastic nature, it seems reasonable that one should also take notice of this aspect of the rise time parameters. A statistical approach to rise time parameters is presented.

  17. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Peter, Varghese; Kalashnikova, Marina; Burnham, Denis

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate how children with dyslexia weight amplitude rise time (ART) and formant rise time (FRT) cues in phonetic discrimination. Passive mismatch responses (MMR) were recorded for a/ba/-/wa/contrast in a multiple deviant odd-ball paradigm to identify the neural response to cue weighting in 17 children with dyslexia and 17 age-matched control children. The deviant stimuli had either partial or full ART or FRT cues. The results showed that ART did not generate an MMR in either group, whereas both partial and full FRT cues generated MMR in control children while only full FRT cues generated MMR in children with dyslexia. These findings suggest that children, both controls and those with dyslexia, discriminate speech based on FRT cues and not ART cues. However, control children have greater sensitivity to FRT cues in speech compared to children with dyslexia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. A Luminous, Fast Rising UV-transient Discovered by ROTSE: A Tidal Disruption Event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinkó, J.; Yuan, F.; Quimby, R. M.; Wheeler, J. C.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Guillochon, J.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Marion, G. H.; Akerlof, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on 2009 January 21. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ~10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by 56Ni—56Co radioactive decay. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift, the peak magnitude of the OT is close to -22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a Sun-like star by the central supermassive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.

  19. A LUMINOUS, FAST RISING UV-TRANSIENT DISCOVERED BY ROTSE: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Vinkó, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Marion, G. H.; Yuan, F.; Akerlof, C.; Quimby, R. M.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Guillochon, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on 2009 January 21. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ∼10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by {sup 56}Ni—{sup 56}Co radioactive decay. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift, the peak magnitude of the OT is close to –22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a Sun-like star by the central supermassive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.

  20. Research on fast rise time EMP radiating-wave simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lisi; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Yun

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an antenna of High altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) radiating-wave simulator which expands the testing zone larger than the traditional transmission line simulator. The numerical results show that traverse electramagnetic (TEM) antenna can be used to radiate HEMP simulation radiating wave, but in low frequency band the emissive capability is poor. The experiment proves the numerical model is valid. The results of this paper show that TEM antenna can be used to HEMP radiating-wave simulator, and can prove the low frequency radiation capability through resistance loaded method.

  1. Simple sub-50-ps rise-time high voltage generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekez, M. M.

    1991-12-01

    This article relates to the development of an ultrafast (nanoseconds-picoseconds time scale) compact system(s) readily applicable to the field of EMP/radiation, x-ray-induced nondestructive testing, plasma fusion (energy) experiments, bioelectromagnetic (food-drug) sterilization, drivers for x-ray preionized XeCl laser and similar applications. The present work shows that the Marx and the Pulse forming section can be integrated into a single unit. The stray capacitance present in each stage acts as a peaking capacitor. For a charging voltage per stage of <40 kV, the rise time of the output pulse is below 50 ps at 200 kV into a 100-Ω load. Work is in progress to extend the voltage amplitude to 1.6 MV while maintaining the relative pulse waveform. With a contemporary optical diagnostic technique it is believed that the present concept may achieve 1-10 ps rise-time pulses at a megavolt level in ``smart gas mixtures.'' In addition a solution for the classical peaking circuit has been obtained and presented in the Appendix.

  2. Rise-Time Distortion of Signal without Carrying Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhman, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with one-dimensional problem of rise-time distortion signal without carrying signal, that appears in the starting point intermittently, that is signal distortion at front edge or one of its derivative. The authors show that front edge of signal isn't distorted in case of propagation in unrestricted (including absorbing) area (amplitude of starting signal step or of one of its derivatives doesn't change) and move with the accuracy of vacuum light speed. The paper proves that it is the time interval shortage that causes signal loss with the route extension, but not the reduction of its starting amplitude, during which front edge of signal retains its starting value. The research presents new values for this time interval.

  3. Fast-timing methods for semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, H.

    1982-03-01

    The basic parameters are discussed which determine the accuracy of timing measurements and their effect in a practical application, specifically timing with thin-surface barrier detectors. The discussion focusses on properties of the detector, low-noise amplifiers, trigger circuits and time converters. New material presented in this paper includes bipolar transistor input stages with noise performance superior to currently available FETs, noiseless input terminations in sub-nanosecond preamplifiers and methods using transmission lines to couple the detector to remotely mounted preamplifiers. Trigger circuits are characterized in terms of effective rise time, equivalent input noise and residual jitter.

  4. Fast timing methods for semiconductor detectors. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, H.

    1984-10-01

    This tutorial paper discusses the basic parameters which determine the accuracy of timing measurements and their effect in a practical application, specifically timing with thin-surface barrier detectors. The discussion focusses on properties of the detector, low-noise amplifiers, trigger circuits and time converters. New material presented in this paper includes bipolar transistor input stages with noise performance superior to currently available FETs, noiseless input terminations in sub-nanosecond preamplifiers and methods using transmission lines to couple the detector to remotely mounted preamplifiers. Trigger circuits are characterized in terms of effective rise time, equivalent input noise and residual jitter.

  5. Reaction times to neon, LED, and fast incandescent brake lamps.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M; Flannagan, M J; Sato, T; Traube, E C; Aoki, M

    1994-06-01

    Standard incandescent brake lamps have a relatively slow rise time. It takes approximately a quarter of a second for them to reach 90% of asymptotic light output, causing potential delays in responses by following drivers. The present study evaluated reaction times to brake signals from standard incandescent brake lamps and from three alternative brake lamps with substantially faster rise times: neon, LED, and fast incandescent. The study, performed in a laboratory, simulated a daytime driving condition. The subject's task was to respond as quickly as possible to the onset of either of two brake lamps in the visual periphery, while engaged in a central tracking task. Brake signals were presented at two levels of luminous intensity. The results showed that reaction times to the alternative brake lamps were faster than to the standard incandescent lamp, with the advantage averaging 166 ms for the LED and neon lamps, and 135 ms for the fast incandescent lamp. A reduction of the signals' luminous intensity from 42 cd to 5 cd increased the reaction time by 84 ms.

  6. Optical visualization and electrical characterization of fast-rising pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for airflow control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, Nicolas; Zouzou, Nourredine; Claverie, Alain; Sotton, Julien; Moreau, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Flow control consists of manipulating flows in an effective and robust manner to improve the global performances of transport systems or industrial processes. Plasma technologies, and particularly surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), can be a good candidate for such purpose. The present experimental study focuses on optical and electrical characterization of plasma sheet formed by applying a pulse of voltage with rising and falling periods of 50 ns for a typical surface DBD geometry. Positive and negative polarities are compared in terms of current behavior, deposited energy, fast-imaging of the plasma propagation, and resulting modifications of the surrounding medium by using shadowgraphy acquisitions. Positive and negative pulses of voltage produce streamers and corona type plasma, respectively. Both of them result in the production of a localized pressure wave propagating in the air with a speed maintained at 343 m/s (measurements at room temperature of 20 °C). This suggests that the produced pressure wave can be considered as a propagating sound wave. The intensity of the pressure wave is directly connected to the dissipated energy at the dielectric wall with a linear increase with the applied voltage amplitude and a strong dependence toward the rising time. At constant voltage amplitude, the pressure wave is reinforced by using a positive pulse. The present investigation also reveals that rising and decaying periods of a single pulse of voltage result in two distinct pressure waves. As a result, superposition or successive pressure wave can be produced by adjusting the width of the pulse.

  7. DOI Determination by Rise Time Discrimination in Single-Ended Readout for TOF PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R.I.; Surti, S.; Karp, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical TOF PET systems achieve detection efficiency using thick crystals, typically of thickness 2–3cm. The resulting dispersion in interaction depths degrades spatial resolution for increasing radial positions due to parallax error. Furthermore, interaction depth dispersion results in time pickoff dispersion and thus in degraded timing resolution, and is therefore of added concern in TOF scanners. Using fast signal digitization, we characterize the timing performance, pulse shape and light output of LaBr3:Ce, CeBr3 and LYSO. Coincidence timing resolution is shown to degrade by ~50ps/cm for scintillator pixels of constant cross section and increasing length. By controlling irradiation depth in a scintillator pixel, we show that DOI-dependence of time pickoff is a significant factor in the loss of timing performance in thick detectors. Using the correlated DOI-dependence of time pickoff and charge collection, we apply a charge-based correction to the time pickoff, obtaining improved coincidence timing resolution of <200ps for a uniform 4×4×30mm3 LaBr3 pixel. In order to obtain both DOI identification and improved timing resolution, we design a two layer LaBr3[5%Ce]/LaBr3[30%Ce] detector of total size 4×4×30mm3, exploiting the dependence of scintillator rise time on [Ce] in LaBr3:Ce. Using signal rise time to determine interaction layer, excellent interaction layer discrimination is achieved, while maintaining coincidence timing resolution of <250ps and energy resolution <7% using a R4998 PMT. Excellent layer separation and timing performance is measured with several other commercially-available TOF photodetectors, demonstrating the practicality of this design. These results indicate the feasibility of rise time discrimination as a technique for measuring event DOI while maintaining sensitivity, timing and energy performance, in a well-known detector architecture. PMID:24403611

  8. Gas injection and fast pressure-rise measurements for the Linac4 H- source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Chiggiato, P.; Lettry, J.; Mattei, S.; O'Neil, M.; Neupert, H.; Pasquino, C.; Schmitzer, C.

    2013-02-01

    In the era of the Large Hadron Collider, the CERN injector complex comprising the 34 years old Linac2 with its primary proton source, is presently upgraded with a new linear accelerator for H- (Linac4). The design, construction, and test of volume production and cesiated RF-driven H- ion sources is presently ongoing with the final goal of producing an H- beam with 80 mA beam current, 45 keV beam energy, 500 μs pulse length, and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. In order to have quantitative information of the hydrogen gas density at the moment of plasma ignition the dynamic vacuum properties of the plasma generator were studied experimentally. We describe the experimental setup and present fast pressure-rise measurements for different parameters of the gas injection system, such as gas species (H2, He, N2, Ar), piezo valve voltage pulse length (200 - 500 μs), and injection pressure (400 - 2800 mbar). The obtained data are compared with a conductance model of the plasma generator.

  9. LETTER: Fast electron driven Alfvén eigenmodes in the current rise in Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, J. A.; Parker, R. R.; Phillips, P. E.; Schmidt, A.; Wallace, G.

    2008-07-01

    The injection of 0.3-1 MW of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) from the very start of the plasma drives a suprathermal electron tail that excites a series of bursting high frequency (100-700 kHz) instabilities in the current rise in Alcator C-Mod. These high frequency bursting modes have relatively small amplitude (\\tilde {B}_\\theta \\le 5\\times 10^{-6}\\,T) measured with poloidal field pick-up coils on outboard limiters. They are observed very early in the current rise with one to three bands of frequencies. The frequency at each burst corresponds very closely to the centre of the gap frequency for toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs), ωTAE = vA/2qR, for integer and half integer q values ranging typically from 11 down to 5.5. Measured average hard x-ray photon energies in the range 20-35 keV are in reasonable agreement with the theoretically calculated fast electron energy that matches the precession drift resonance condition for exciting Alfvén eigenmodes.

  10. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  11. Tests show ability of vacuum circuit breaker to interrupt fast transient recovery voltage rates of rise of transformer secondary faults

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.K.

    1994-12-31

    A Vacuum Circuit Breaker demonstrated its ability to interrupt short circuits with faster than normal rates of rise of Transient Recovery Voltage (TRV) at levels greater than those produced by most transformer secondary faults. Two recent exploratory test programs evaluated the interrupting ability of a 15kV Vacuum Circuit Breaker containing interrupters of the rotating arc type with contacts made from a Chromium-Copper powder metal mixture. The interrupting conditions covered a wide range of currents from 10% to 130% of the 28kA rated short circuit current of the tested circuit breaker and a wide range of TRV rates of rise, including the relatively slow rate of rise, normally used in testing and found in most indoor circuit breaker applications; two faster rates of rise equaling and exceeding those found in a known power plant transformer secondary protection application; and the fastest rates of rise possible in the laboratory which exceed the requirements of most transformer secondary faults. These tests showed that the interrupting performance of the tested Vacuum Circuit Breaker was unaffected by the TRV rate of rise to the fastest rates available in the test lab. Such a Vacuum Circuit Breaker can therefore be used without TRV modifying capacitors to slow down the rate of rise provided by the power system. This ability is particularly important if analysis shows that the expected TRV from a transformer secondary fault has a fast rate of rise beyond the recognized ability of an older circuit breaker to acceptably interrupt.

  12. Tests show ability of vacuum circuit breaker to interrupt fast transient recovery voltage rates of rise of transformer secondary faults

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    A vacuum circuit breaker demonstrated its ability to interrupt short circuits with faster than normal rates of rise of transient recovery voltage (TRV) at levels greater than those produced by most transformer secondary faults. Two recent exploratory test programs evaluated the interrupting ability of a 15kV vacuum circuit breaker containing interrupters of the rotating arc type with contacts made from a chromium-copper powder metal mixture. The interrupting conditions covered a wide range of currents from 10% to 130% of the 28kA rated short circuit current of the tested circuit breaker and a wide range of TRV rates of rise, including the relatively slow rate of rise, normally used in testing and found in most indoor circuit breaker applications, two faster rates of rise equaling and exceeding those found in a known power plant transformer secondary protection application, and the fastest rates of rise possible in the laboratory which exceed the requirements of most transformer secondary faults. These tests showed that the interrupting performance of the tested vacuum circuit breaker was unaffected by the TRV rate of rise to the fastest rates available in the test lab. Such a vacuum circuit breaker can therefore be used without TRV modifying capacitors to slow down the rate of rise provided by the power system. This ability is particularly important if analysis shows that the expected TRV from a transformer secondary fault has a fast rate of rise beyond the recognized ability of an older circuit breaker to acceptably interrupt.

  13. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chaikovsky, S. A. Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100 ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300 T and average induction rise rate 3 × 10{sup 9} T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  14. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100 ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300 T and average induction rise rate 3 × 109 T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  15. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Loebner, Keith T K; Underwood, Thomas C; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  16. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Loebner, Keith T. K. Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-15

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  17. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith T. K.; Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  18. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Current fast-time wake models are reviewed and three basic types are defined. Predictions from several of the fast-time models are compared. Previous statistical evaluations of the APA-Sarpkaya and D2P fast-time models are discussed. Root Mean Square errors between fast-time model predictions and Lidar wake measurements are examined for a 24 hr period at Denver International Airport. Shortcomings in current methodology for evaluating wake errors are also discussed.

  19. Fast Simulation of Tsunamis in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, G. J.; Wang, D.; Becker, N. C.; Weinstein, S. A.; Walsh, D.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Tsunami Warning Centers primarily base their wave height forecasts on precomputed tsunami scenarios, such as the SIFT model (Standby Inundation Forecasting of Tsunamis) developed by NOAA's Center for Tsunami Research. In SIFT, tsunami simulations for about 1600 individual earthquake sources, each 100x50 km, define shallow subduction worldwide. These simulations are stored in a database and combined linearly to make up the tsunami from any great earthquake. Precomputation is necessary because the nonlinear shallow-water wave equations are too time consuming to compute during an event. While such scenario-based models are valuable, they tacitly assume all energy in a tsunami comes from thrust at the décollement. The thrust assumption is often violated (e.g., 1933 Sanriku, 2007 Kurils, 2009 Samoa), while a significant number of tsunamigenic earthquakes are completely unrelated to subduction (e.g., 1812 Santa Barbara, 1939 Accra, 1975 Kalapana). Finally, parts of some subduction zones are so poorly defined that precomputations may be of little value (e.g., 1762 Arakan, 1755 Lisbon). For all such sources, a fast means of estimating tsunami size is essential. At the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, we have been using our model RIFT (Real-time Inundation Forecasting of Tsunamis) experimentally for two years. RIFT is fast by design: it solves only the linearized form of the equations. At 4 arc-minutes resolution calculations for the entire Pacific take just a few minutes on an 8-processor Linux box. Part of the rationale for developing RIFT was earthquakes of M 7.8 or smaller, which approach the lower limit of the more complex SIFT's abilities. For such events we currently issue a fixed warning to areas within 1,000 km of the source, which typically means a lot of over-warning. With sources defined by W-phase CMTs, exhaustive comparison with runup data shows that we can reduce the warning area significantly. Even before CMTs are available, we routinely run models

  20. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  1. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-15

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  2. Fast transfer of crossmodal time interval training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihan; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    Sub-second time perception is essential for many important sensory and perceptual tasks including speech perception, motion perception, motor coordination, and crossmodal interaction. This study investigates to what extent the ability to discriminate sub-second time intervals acquired in one sensory modality can be transferred to another modality. To this end, we used perceptual classification of visual Ternus display (Ternus in Psychol Forsch 7:81-136, 1926) to implicitly measure participants' interval perception in pre- and posttests and implemented an intra- or crossmodal sub-second interval discrimination training protocol in between the tests. The Ternus display elicited either an "element motion" or a "group motion" percept, depending on the inter-stimulus interval between the two visual frames. The training protocol required participants to explicitly compare the interval length between a pair of visual, auditory, or tactile stimuli with a standard interval or to implicitly perceive the length of visual, auditory, or tactile intervals by completing a non-temporal task (discrimination of auditory pitch or tactile intensity). Results showed that after fast explicit training of interval discrimination (about 15 min), participants improved their ability to categorize the visual apparent motion in Ternus displays, although the training benefits were mild for visual timing training. However, the benefits were absent for implicit interval training protocols. This finding suggests that the timing ability in one modality can be rapidly acquired and used to improve timing-related performance in another modality and that there may exist a central clock for sub-second temporal processing, although modality-specific perceptual properties may constrain the functioning of this clock.

  3. Meal anticipatory rise in acylated ghrelin at dark onset is blunted after long-term fasting in rats.

    PubMed

    Zizzari, P; Hassouna, R; Longchamps, R; Epelbaum, J; Tolle, V

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid acylated peptide originally characterised for its capacity to stimulate growth hormone secretion. Ghrelin is also an orexigenic and adipogenic hormone and is thought to be a signal to increase locomotor activity in anticipation of a scheduled meal. Although ghrelin is considered to be up-regulated during fasting, there are still conflicting data regarding the impact of starvation on ghrelin secretion. To test whether the secretory pattern of acylated ghrelin is altered during fasting, plasma levels were monitored every 20 min for 6 h in freely-behaving rats at the light/dark cycle transition, when animals initiate feeding and activity and use preferentially free fatty acids (FFA) as a source of energy. Rats were fed ad lib. or fasted at dark onset for 24, 48 or 72 h, with or without refeeding rate. The anticipatory rise in ghrelin levels, as well as home-cage activity at the onset of darkness, was significantly reduced from 48 h of fasting compared to ad lib. conditions. A delayed ghrelin peak, sensitive to renutrition, was observed in fasted animals. Although their motivation to eat appeared to be intact, rats fasted for 72 h showed the smallest compensatory refeeding rate after fasting, possibly reflecting altered gut function. Expression of agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y, was significantly increased in 48- and 72-h fasted animals. Thus, following fasting, a blunted acylated ghrelin secretion at dark onset (i.e. a period when animals depend on FFA as a source of energy) is associated with reduced locomotor activity and refeeding and an up-regulation of anabolic neuropeptides. Such changes could be interpreted as compensatory mechanisms for helping to conserve energy under conditions where food is not available.

  4. Time-resolved temperature rise in a thin liquid film due to laser absorption.

    PubMed

    Cordero, María Luisa; Verneuil, Emilie; Gallaire, François; Baroud, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    The temperature increase of a thin water layer is investigated, both experimentally and numerically, when the layer is heated by an infrared laser. The laser is focused to a waist of 5.3 microm inside a 28 microm gap that contains fluorescent aqueous solutions between two glass slides. Temperature fields are measured using the temperature sensitivity of rhodamine-B, while correcting for thermal diffusion using rhodamine-101, which is insensitive to temperature. In the steady state, the shape of the hot region is well fitted with a Lorentzian function whose width ranges between 15 and 30 microm , increasing with laser power. At the same time, the maximum temperature rise ranges between 10 and 55 degrees C and can display a decrease at high laser powers. The total energy stored in the sample increases linearly with the laser power. The dynamics of the heating occurs with two distinct time scales: (i) a fast time ( tau_{Theta} = 4.2 ms in our case) which is the time taken to reach the maximum temperature at the laser position and the maximum temperature gradient, and (ii) a slow time scale for the spatial profile to reach its final width. The temperature field obtained numerically agrees quantitatively with the experiments for low laser powers but overpredicts the temperature rise while underpredicting the profile width for high powers. The total energy shows good agreement between experiments and simulations for all laser powers, suggesting that the discrepancies are due to a broadening of the laser, possibly due to a thermal lensing effect.

  5. Fasting, circadian rhythms, and time restricted feeding in healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Valter D.; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-01-01

    Summary Feeding in most animals is confined to a defined period, leaving short periods of fasting that coincide with sleep. Fasting enables organisms to enter alternative metabolic phases, which rely less on glucose and more on ketone body-like carbon sources. Both intermittent and periodic fasting result in benefits ranging from prevention to the enhanced treatment of diseases. Similarly, time-restricted feeding (TRF), in which feeding time is restricted to certain hours of the day, allows the daily fasting period to last >12 h, thus imparting pleiotropic benefits in multiple organisms. Understanding the mechanistic link between nutrients and the fasting benefits is leading to the identification of fasting mimicking diets (FMDs) that achieve changes similar to those caused by fasting. Given the pleiotropic and sustained benefits of TRF and FMD, both basic science and translational research are warranted to develop fasting-associated interventions into effective and inexpensive treatments with the potential to improve healthspan. PMID:27304506

  6. Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Zhao, Guannan; Hunsader, Eric; Qi, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas; Meng, Jing; Tivnan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds' of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena. PMID:24022120

  7. Coefficient of restitution dependence of intruder rise time in two-dimensional Brazil-nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesuma, T.; Aji, D. P. Purwa; Viridi, S.; Suprijadi

    2016-04-01

    Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is a granular material phenomenon, where larger grains (usually known as intruder) rise to the top when the granular system vibrated. We observe a single intruder rise time of BNE phenomenon in a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of hard spheres collision scheme. Some experiments have shown that some granular properties, such as size and density ratio, play an important role to determine the rise time. However, other property, such as coefficients of restitution, is considered not to have a measurable impact. We explore the intruder inelasticity dependence of the rise time by varying its coefficient of restitution. We found that the intruder rise time tends to be flat for relatively high coefficient of restitution and increases exponentially below a certain deflecting point for low coefficient of restitution. This holds for specific mass ratio.

  8. Note: A timing micro-channel plate detector with backside fast preamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang Lu, Rongchun; Liu, Junliang; Cai, Xiaohong

    2014-03-15

    A timing micro-channel plate detector with a backside double-channel fast preamplifier was developed to avoid distortion during signal propagation from the anode to the preamplifier. The mechanical and electronic structure is described. The detector including its backside preamplifier is tested by a {sup 241}Am α-source and a rise time of ∼2 ns with an output background noise of 4 mV{sub rms} was achieved.

  9. The Effect of Driver Rise-Time on Pinch Current and its Impact on Plasma Focus Performance and Neutron Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with faster drivers [Decker NIMP 1986]. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP [Schmidt PRL 2012], we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF [Ellsworth 2014], and demonstrate how driver rise time is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. Driver capacitance and voltage are varied to modify the current rise time, and anode length is adjusted so that run-in coincides with the peak current. We observe during run down that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities of the sheath shed blobs of plasma that remain in the inter-electrode gap during run in. This trailing plasma later acts as a low-inductance restrike path that shunts current from the pinch during maximum compression. While the MHD growth rate increases slightly with driver speed, the shorter anode of the fast driver allows fewer e-foldings and hence reduces the trailing mass between electrodes. As a result, the fast driver postpones parasitic restrikes and maintains peak current through the pinch during maximum compression. The fast driver pinch therefore achieves best simultaneity between its ion beam and peak target density, which maximizes neutron production. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Note: A rectangular pulse generator for 50 kV voltage, 0.8 ns rise time, and 10 ns pulse width based on polymer-film switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hanyu; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Cong, Peitian; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we describe a rectangular pulse generator, consisting of a polymer-film switch, a tri-plate transmission line, and parallel post-shaped ceramic resistor load, for 50-kV voltage, 0.8-ns rise time, and 10-ns width. The switch and resistors are arranged in atmospheric air and the transmission line can work in atmospheric air or in transformer oil to change the pulse width from 6.7 ns to 10 ns. The fast switching and low-inductance characteristics of the polymer-film switch ensure the fast rising wavefront of <1 ns. This generator can be applied in the calibration of nanosecond voltage dividers and used for electromagnetic pulse tests as a fast-rising current injection source.

  11. Identification and discrimination of rise time: is it categorical or noncategorical?

    PubMed

    Kewley-Port, D; Pisoni, D B

    1984-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that rise time of sawtooth waveforms may be discriminated in either a categorical-like manner under some experimental conditions or according to Weber's law under other conditions. In the present experiments, rise time discrimination was examined with two experimental procedures: the traditional labeling and ABX tasks used in speech perception studies and an adaptive tracking procedure used in psychophysical studies. Rise time varied from 0 to 80 ms in 10-ms intervals for sawtooth signals of 1-s duration. Discrimination functions for subjects who simply discriminated the signals on any basis whatsoever as well as functions for subjects who practiced labeling the endpoint stimuli as " pluck " and "bow" before ABX discrimination were not categorical in the ABX task. In the adaptive tracking procedure, the Weber fraction obtained from the jnds of rise time was found to be a constant above 20-ms rise time. The results from the two discrimination paradigms were then compared by predicting a jnd for rise time from the ABX discrimination data by reference to the underlying psychometric function. Using this method of analysis, discrimination results from previous studies were shown to be quite similar to the discrimination results observed in this study. Taken together the results demonstrate clearly that rise time discrimination of sawtooth signals follows predictions derived from Weber's law.

  12. [A model of photosystem II for the analysis of a fast fluorescence rise in plant leaves].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, N E; Bulychev, A A; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The polyphasic patterns of fluorescence induction rise in pea leaves in vivo and after the treatment with ionophores have been studied using a plant efficiency analyzer. To analyze in detail photosystem II (PS II) electron transfer processes, an extended PS II model was applied, which included the sums of exponential functions to specify explicitly the light-driven formation of the transmembrane electric potential (delta psi(t)) as well as pH in the lumen (pHL(t)) and stroma (pHs(t)). PS II model parameters and numerical coefficients in delta psi(t), and pHs(t) were evaluated to fit fluorescence induction data for different experimental conditions: leaf in vivo or after ionophore treatment at low or high light intensity. The model imitated changes in the pattern of fluorescence induction rise due to the elimination of transmembrane potential in the presence of ionophores, when delta psi = 0 and pHL(t), pHS(t) altered to small extent relative to control values in vivo, with maximum delta psi(t) approximately 90 MB and delta psi(t) approximately 40 MB, for the stationary state at deltapH aproximately equal to 1.8. As the light intensity was increased from 300 to 1200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), the heat dissipation rate constants increased threefold for nonradiative recombination of P680+Phe- and by approximately 30% for P680+Q(A)-. The parameters delta psi, pH(S) and pH(L) were analyzed as factors of PS II redox state populations and fluorescence yield. The kinetic mechanism of qE quenching is discussed, which is related with light induced pH(L) lumen acidification, when Q(A)- and P680+ recombination probability increases to regulate the QA reduction.

  13. Tectonic, magmatic, and hydrothermal processes imaged by high-resolution seismicity beneath the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Tolstoy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Cross-correlation and double-difference earthquake relocation methods have produced hypocenter locations with unprecedented resolution at many different scales and locations. The new locations typically image fine-scale seismogenic structures that help address important seismological and plate tectonic questions. In this paper we present results from a worldwide unique data set of more than 300,000 micro-earthquakes recorded at a dense OBS array (4x4 km) located on the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise at 9°50’ N. The array captured the build up of seismicity leading to a sea floor eruption in January 2006. We focus on improved relocations of ~16,000 earthquakes recorded during the first deployment between October 2003 and April 2004. An initial double-difference analysis using only analyst picks revealed the general structure of an along-axis oriented hydrothermal circulation cell, with an inferred down-flow zone near a 4th-order axial discontinuity and a cracking front overlying the axial magma chamber (AMC). To gain further insight into the detailed structure and kinematics of this divergent plate boundary we have increased the precision in event location by including cross-correlation delay times and improving relocation procedures that harness the high event density. We find that the majority of events within the down flow pipe represent frictional slip on short faults caused by regional tectonic stresses and thermal contraction as the cold sea water enters the hot crust. Along the eastern side of the ridge axis, just above the AMC at ~1.4 km depth, we observe repeated shear failure along well defined steeply east dipping structures. Composite first motion focal mechanisms for these strongly correlated events indicate reverse motion, suggesting that slip on these faults is caused by AMC inflation and associated injection of magma into a narrow sill. A broader sill appears to have formed at the bottom of the upflow zone beneath the active hydrothermal vents

  14. Effects of Resistivity and Viscosity on m =0 Rise and Fall Time in the RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futch, A. M.; Craig, D.; Hesse, R.; Jacobson, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    In the reversed field pinch (RFP), poloidal mode number m =0 fluctuations are driven in a sawtooth cycle via nonlinear coupling with unstable m =1 tearing modes. We explore how the rise and fall time of these m =0 fluctuations depends on resistivity and viscosity in visco-resistive MHD simulations using the DEBS code. Both the Lundquist number (S) and magnetic Prandtl number (Pr) affect the rise/fall time. Analysis of MST experimental data also shows that both the rise and fall times of the m =0 amplitude vary with S. The variation observed in experiment is consistent with simulation results for rise time, but shows some differences for fall time. Rise time is insensitive to the resistivity profile but depends slightly on the viscosity profile. Fall time is strongly correlated with the duration of the crash which depends on both resistivity and viscosity profiles. These results suggest that the rise and fall time of the m =0 modes at the sawtooth crash is not strongly influenced by the local resistivity near the resonant surface but instead is primarily determined by the overall dynamics of the entire sawtooth cycle. The role of viscosity is less clear though the edge viscosity affects the m =0 evolution more than the core. This work has been supported by the U.S.D.O.E.

  15. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-15

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  16. The risk of shorter fasting time for pediatric deep sedation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mathew; Birisci, Esma; Anderson, Jordan E.; Anliker, Christina M.; Bryant, Micheal A.; Downs, Craig; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics calls for prolonged fasting times before performing pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA). PSA is increasingly provided to children outside of the operating theater by sedation trained pediatric providers and does not require airway manipulation. We investigated the safety of a shorter fasting time compared to a longer and guideline compliant fasting time. We tried to identify the association between fasting time and sedation-related complications. Methods: This is a prospective observational study that included children 2 months to 18 years of age and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification of I or II, who underwent deep sedation for elective procedures, performed by pediatric critical care providers. Procedures included radiologic imaging studies, electroencephalograms, auditory brainstem response, echocardiograms, Botox injections, and other minor surgical procedures. Subjects were divided into two groups depending on the length of their fasting time (4–6 h and >6 h). Complication rates were calculated and compared between the three groups. Results: In the studied group of 2487 subjects, 1007 (40.5%) had fasting time of 4–6 h and the remaining 1480 (59.5%) subjects had fasted for >6 h. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the studied complications between the two groups. Conclusions: This study found no difference in complication rate in regard to the fasting time among our subjects cohort, which included only healthy children receiving elective procedures performed by sedation trained pediatric critical care providers. This suggests that using shorter fasting time may be safe for procedures performed outside of the operating theater that does not involve high-risk patients or airway manipulation. PMID:27746560

  17. Effect of unequal rise and fall times on the autocorrelation function of a PN sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, F. E.

    1990-10-01

    The rise and fall times of a pseudo-noise (PN) waveform are of concern in a short-range, CW radar such as a missile fuze radar. An inequality creates a spurious pair of sidelobes and a spiky ripple on the sidelobes of the autocorrelation function, which may cause false alarms in the radar. Analytical expressions are presented which relate the spurious responses of the autocorrelation function to the waveform rise and fall times.

  18. The role of interplanetary shock orientation on SC/SI rise time and geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Veenadhari, B.; Ebihara, Y.; Kumar, Sandeep; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    2017-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in compression of the magnetosphere which in turn increases the Earth's magnetic field termed as Sudden commencement/Sudden impulse (SC/SI). Apart from IP shock speed and solar wind dynamic pressure, IP shock orientation angle also plays a major role in deciding the SC rise time. In the present study, the IP shock orientation angle and SC/SI rise time for 179 IP shocks are estimated which occurred during solar cycle 23. More than 50% of the Shock orientations are in the range of 140°-160°. The SC/SI rise time decreases with the increase in the orientation angle and IP shock speed. In this work, the type of IP shocks i.e., Radio loud (RL) and Radio quiet (RQ) are examined in connection with SC/SI rise time. The RL associated IP shock speeds show a better correlation than RQ shocks with SC/SI rise time irrespective of the orientation angle. Magnetic Cloud (MC) associated shocks dominate in producing less rise time when compared to Ejecta (EJ) shocks. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used for three different IP shock orientation categories to see the importance of orientation angle in determining the geoeffectiveness. Simulations results reveal that shocks hitting parallel to the magnetosphere are more geoeffective as compared to oblique shocks by means of change in magnetic field, pressure and Field Aligned Current (FAC).

  19. Fast-timing spectroscopy at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    The advanced time-delayed β γ γ (t) method has been used at ISOLDE since the relocation of the facility from the synchrocyclotron to the CERN proton synchrotron booster, a quarter of a century ago. The method was designed for precision measurements with low-intensity beams, achieving good efficiency and excellent time resolution with a compact setup. Over this time the technique has evolved to cope with the challenge of measuring lifetimes of complex level schemes of increasingly exotic nuclei populated in β decay. The ISOLDE facility provides unsurpassed opportunities to study many regions of the nuclide chart. The physics case encompasses topics of interest across the nuclide chart, including the evolution of shell structure around neutron shell and subshell closures such as N = 20, N = 40 and N = 50, shape coexistence, and octupole correlations in heavy nuclei. The recently commissioned ISOLDE decay station provides enhanced capabilities that will be fully exploited with the increased beam intensities available at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility.

  20. Prelude to Cycle 23: The Case for a Fast-Rising, Large Amplitude Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1996-01-01

    For the common data-available interval of cycles 12 to 22, we show that annual averages of sunspot number for minimum years (R(min)) and maximum years (R(max)) and of the minimum value of the aa geomagnetic index in the vicinity of sunspot minimum (aa(min)) are consistent with the notion that each has embedded within its respective record a long-term, linear, secular increase. Extrapolating each of these fits to cycle 23, we infer that it will have R(min) = 12.7 +/- 5.7, R(max) = 176.7 +/- 61.8, and aa(min) = 21.0 +/- 5.0 (at the 95-percent level of confidence), suggesting that cycle 23 will have R(min) greater than 7.0, R(max) greater than 114.9, and aa(min) greater than 16.0 (at the 97.5-percent level of confidence). Such values imply that cycle 23 will be larger than average in size and, consequently (by the Waidmeier effect), will be a fast riser. We also infer from the R(max) and aa(min) records the existence of an even- odd cycle effect, one in which the odd-following cycle is numerically larger in value than the even-leading cycle. For cycle 23, the even-odd cycle effect suggests that R(max) greater than 157.6 and aa(min) greater than 19.0, values that were recorded for cycle 22, the even-leading cycle of the current even-odd cycle pair (cycles 22 and 23). For 1995, the annual average of the aa index measured about 22, while for sunspot number, it was about 18. Because aa(min) usually lags R(min) by 1 year (true for 8 of 11 cycles) and 1996 seems destined to be the year of R(min) for cycle 23, it may be that aa(min) will occur in 1997, although it could occur in 1996 in conjunction with R(min) (true for 3 of 11 cycles). Because of this ambiguity in determining aa(min), no formal prediction based on the correlation of R(max) against aa(min), having r = 0.90, or of R(max) against the combined effects of R(min) and aa(min)-the bivariate technique-having r = 0.99, is possible until 1997, at the earliest.

  1. A fast preamplifier concept for SiPM-based time-of-flight PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizenga, J.; Seifert, S.; Schreuder, F.; van Dam, H. T.; Dendooven, P.; Löhner, H.; Vinke, R.; Schaart, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer high gain and fast response to light, making them interesting for fast timing applications such as time-of-flight (TOF) PET. To fully exploit the potential of these photosensors, dedicated preamplifiers that do not deteriorate the rise time and signal-to-noise ratio are crucial. Challenges include the high sensor capacitance, typically >300 pF for a 3 mm×3 mm SiPM sensor, as well as oscillation issues. Here we present a preamplifier concept based on low noise, high speed transistors, designed for optimum timing performance. The input stage consists of a transimpedance common-base amplifier with a very low input impedance even at high frequencies, which assures a good linearity and avoids that the high detector capacitance affects the amplifier bandwidth. The amplifier has a fast timing output as well as a 'slow' energy output optimized for determining the total charge content of the pulse. The rise time of the amplifier is about 300 ps. The measured coincidence resolving time (CRT) for 511 keV photon pairs using the amplifiers in combination with 3 mm×3 mm SiPMs (Hamamatsu MPPC-S10362-33-050C) coupled to 3 mm×3 mm×5 mm LaBr3:Ce and LYSO:Ce crystals equals 95 ps FWHM and 138 ps FWHM, respectively.

  2. Fast Time Response Electromagnetic Disruption Mitigation Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; Menard, J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Ono, M.; Baylor, Larry R.; Lay, W. S.

    2015-09-28

    An important and urgent issue for ITER is predicting and controlling disruptions. Tokamaks and spherical tokamaks have the potential to disrupt. Methods to rapidly quench the discharge after an impending disruption is detected are essential to protect the vessel and internal components. The warning time for the onset of some disruptions in tokamaks could be <10 ms, which poses stringent requirements on the disruption mitigation system for reactor systems. In this proposed method, a cylindrical boron nitride projectile containing a radiative payload composed of boron, boron nitride, or beryllium particulate matter and weighing similar to 15 g is accelerated to velocities on the order of 1 to 2 km/s in <2 ms in a linear rail gun accelerator. A partially fragmented capsule is then injected into the tokamak discharge in the 3- to 6-ms timescale, where the radiative payload is dispersed. The device referred to as an electromagnetic particle injector has the potential to meet the short warning timescales for which a reactor disruption mitigation system must be built. The system is fully electromagnetic, with no mechanical moving parts, which ensures high reliability after a period of long standby.

  3. Fast Time Response Electromagnetic Disruption Mitigation Concept

    DOE PAGES

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; ...

    2015-09-28

    An important and urgent issue for ITER is predicting and controlling disruptions. Tokamaks and spherical tokamaks have the potential to disrupt. Methods to rapidly quench the discharge after an impending disruption is detected are essential to protect the vessel and internal components. The warning time for the onset of some disruptions in tokamaks could be <10 ms, which poses stringent requirements on the disruption mitigation system for reactor systems. In this proposed method, a cylindrical boron nitride projectile containing a radiative payload composed of boron, boron nitride, or beryllium particulate matter and weighing similar to 15 g is accelerated tomore » velocities on the order of 1 to 2 km/s in <2 ms in a linear rail gun accelerator. A partially fragmented capsule is then injected into the tokamak discharge in the 3- to 6-ms timescale, where the radiative payload is dispersed. The device referred to as an electromagnetic particle injector has the potential to meet the short warning timescales for which a reactor disruption mitigation system must be built. The system is fully electromagnetic, with no mechanical moving parts, which ensures high reliability after a period of long standby.« less

  4. CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE THROUGH RISE TIMES AND PEAK LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the diversity in the wind density, supernova ejecta energy, and ejecta mass in Type IIn supernovae based on their rise times and peak luminosities. We show that the wind density and supernova ejecta properties can be estimated independently if both the rise time and peak luminosity are observed. The peak luminosity is mostly determined by the supernova properties and the rise time can be used to estimate the wind density. We find that the ejecta energies of Type IIn supernovae need to vary by factors of 0.2-5 from the average if their ejecta masses are similar. The diversity in the observed rise times indicates that their wind densities vary by factors of 0.2-2 from the average. We show that Type IIn superluminous supernovae should have not only large wind density but also large ejecta energy and/or small ejecta mass to explain their large luminosities and the rise times at the same time. We also note that shock breakout does not necessarily occur in the wind even if it is optically thick, except for the case of superluminous supernovae, and we analyze the observational data both with and without assuming that the shock breakout occurs in the dense wind of Type IIn supernovae.

  5. Distinct effect of impact rise times on immediate and early neuropathology after brain injury in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Eric J; Wahab, Radia Abdul; Jayakumar, Archana; Pfister, Bryan J; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can occur from physical trauma from a wide spectrum of insults ranging from explosions to falls. The biomechanics of the trauma can vary in key features, including the rate and magnitude of the insult. Although the effect of peak injury pressure on neurological outcome has been examined in the fluid percussion injury (FPI) model, it is unknown whether differences in rate of rise of the injury waveform modify cellular and physiological changes after TBI. Using a programmable FPI device, we examined juvenile rats subjected to a constant peak pressure at two rates of injury: a standard FPI rate of rise and a faster rate of rise to the same peak pressure. Immediate postinjury assessment identified fewer seizures and relatively brief loss of consciousness after fast-rise injuries than after standard-rise injuries at similar peak pressures. Compared with rats injured at standard rise, fewer silver-stained injured neuronal profiles and degenerating hilar neurons were observed 4-6 hr after fast-rise FPI. However, 1 week postinjury, both fast- and standard-rise FPI resulted in hilar cell loss and enhanced perforant path-evoked granule cell field excitability compared with sham controls. Notably, the extent of neuronal loss and increase in dentate excitability were not different between rats injured at fast and standard rates of rise to peak pressure. Our data indicate that reduced cellular damage and improved immediate neurological outcome after fast rising primary concussive injuries mask the severity of the subsequent cellular and neurophysiological pathology and may be unreliable as a predictor of prognosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rise time perception in children with reading and combined reading and language difficulties.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Rachel L; Manis, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Using a non-speech-specific measure of prosody, rise time perception, Goswami and her colleagues have found that individuals with dyslexia perform significantly worse than nonimpaired readers. Studies have also found that children and adults with specific language impairment were impaired on these tasks. Despite the high comorbidity of these disorders, only one study has assessed rise time sensitivity in children with comorbid reading and oral language difficulties. The authors further examined rise time sensitivity in children with both reading and oral language difficulties. They compared performance on rise time perception tasks between 18 children with reading difficulties, 15 children with combined reading and oral language difficulties, and 17 chronological age-matched controls. The authors found a significant interaction between group and performance on auditory tasks. Further tests revealed that chronological age-matched controls were significantly better on the rise time measures compared to both groups of children with reading difficulties. Performance between the groups of children with reading difficulties did not significantly differ.

  7. Comparison of occlusion break responses and vacuum rise times of phacoemulsification systems.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Kashani, Pooria; Fanney, Douglas; Injev, Val

    2014-07-30

    Occlusion break surge during phacoemulsification cataract surgery can lead to potential surgical complications. The purpose of this study was to quantify occlusion break surge and vacuum rise time of current phacoemulsification systems used in cataract surgery. Occlusion break surge at vacuum pressures between 200 and 600 mmHg was assessed with the Infiniti® Vision System, the WhiteStar Signature® Phacoemulsification System, and the Centurion® Vision System using gravity-fed fluidics. Centurion Active FluidicsTM were also tested at multiple intraoperative pressure target settings. Vacuum rise time was evaluated for Infiniti, WhiteStar Signature, Centurion, and Stellaris® Vision Enhancement systems. Rise time to vacuum limits of 400 and 600 mmHg was assessed at flow rates of 30 and 60 cc/minute. Occlusion break surge was analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance. The Centurion system exhibited substantially less occlusion break surge than the other systems tested. Surge area with Centurion Active Fluidics was similar to gravity fluidics at an equivalent bottle height. At all Centurion Active Fluidics intraoperative pressure target settings tested, surge was smaller than with Infiniti and WhiteStar Signature. Infiniti had the fastest vacuum rise time and Stellaris had the slowest. No system tested reached the 600-mmHg vacuum limit. In this laboratory study, Centurion had the least occlusion break surge and similar vacuum rise times compared with the other systems tested. Reducing occlusion break surge may increase safety of phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

  8. Rise Time of the Simulated VERITAS 12 m Davies-Cotton Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard J.

    2005-02-21

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) will utilise Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) based on a Davies-Cotton design with f-number f/1.0 to detect cosmic gamma-rays. Unlike a parabolic reflector, light from the Davies-Cotton does not arrive isochronously at the camera. Here the effect of the telescope geometry on signal rise-time is examined. An almost square-pulse arrival time profile with a rise time of 1.7 ns is found analytically and confirmed through simulation.

  9. Very fast doped LaBr.sub.3 scintillators and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2006-10-31

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section. In one embodiment, the scintillator material comprises LaBr.sub.3 doped with cerium. Particular attention is drawn to LaBr.sub.3 doped with a quantity of Ce that is chosen for improving the timing properties, in particular the rise time and resultant timing resolution of the scintillator, and locational capabilities of the scintillator.

  10. Transistorized Marx bank pulse circuit provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Base-triggered avalanche transistor circuit used in a Marx bank pulser configuration provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time. The avalanche-mode transistors replace conventional spark gaps in the Marx bank. The delay time from an input signal to the output signal to the output is typically 6 nanoseconds.

  11. Rise Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W.

    The rise time test (along with the settleometer procedure) is used to monitor sludge behavior in the secondary clarifier of an activated sludge system. The test monitors the effect of the nitrification/denitrification process and aids the operator in determining optimum clarifier sludge detention time and, to some extent, optimum degree of…

  12. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  13. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  14. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; Audia, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetition rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.

  15. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalps of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time), inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes were analyzed. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise time but was unaffected by changes in fall time. Increases in stimulus duration, and therefore in loudness, resulted in a systematic increase in latency. This was probably due to response recovery processes, since the effect was eliminated with increases in stimulus off-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise and fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It was concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  16. Eldecalcitol improves chair-rising time in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    An open-label randomized controlled trial was conducted to clarify the effect of eldecalcitol (ED) on body balance and muscle power in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates. A total of 106 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age 70.8 years) were randomly divided into two groups (n=53 in each group): a bisphosphonate group (control group) and a bisphosphonate plus ED group (ED group). Biochemical markers, unipedal standing time (body balance), and five-repetition chair-rising time (muscle power) were evaluated. The duration of the study was 6 months. Ninety-six women who completed the trial were included in the subsequent analyses. At baseline, the age, body mass index, bone mass indices, bone turnover markers, unipedal standing time, and chair-rising time did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the 6-month treatment period, bone turnover markers decreased significantly from the baseline values similarly in the two groups. Although no significant improvement in the unipedal standing time was seen in the ED group, compared with the control group, the chair-rising time decreased significantly in the ED group compared with the control group. The present study showed that ED improved the chair-rising time in terms of muscle power in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates. PMID:24476669

  17. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) evoked responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalp of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time) inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes are reported and evaluated. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise-time but was unaffected by changes in fall-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise-and-fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It is concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  18. Time Resolution of Fast Photomultipliers for Time of Flight PET

    SciTech Connect

    Szczesniak, Tomasz; Iwanowska, Joanna

    2010-01-05

    Time resolution study of 1 inch Photonis XP1020 photomultiplier is reported. The number of photoelectrons, time jitter and time resolution with 4x4x20 mm{sup 3} LSO crystal were measured. All the mentioned PMT properties were measured at five positions on the photocathode.

  19. Nanosecond rise time air-core current transformer for long-pulse current measurement in pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, R.; Shyam, A.; Chaturvedi, S.; Kumar, R.; Lathi, D.; Chaudhary, V.; Verma, R.; Debnath, K.; Sharma, S.; Sonara, J.; Shah, K.; Adhikary, B.

    2005-12-01

    A slow-wave delay line type air-core (nonmagnetic Nylon former) current transformer fabricated using silver epoxy for the measurement of currents of long pulse durations and few nanoseconds rise times is reported in this article. The advantage of using silver epoxy is that it fills all the voids between coil and shield and enhances the proximity of the coil to the shield, leading to a high value of distributed capacitance. Thus the transit time of the coil increases and it can measure fast current pulses of longer durations. Increasing the inductance of the coil can compensate for the resulting reduction in the sensitivity of the coil for matched termination. An easy experimental technique to find the value of the matched terminating resistor is also reported in this article. We have also done simulations of the slow wave current transformer using PSPICE.

  20. In-flight fast-timing measurements in Sm152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisir, C.; Gaudefroy, L.; Méot, V.; Blanc, A.; Daugas, J. M.; Roig, O.; Arnal, N.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Roger, T.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Schmitt, C.; Fremont, G.; Goupil, J.; Pancin, J.; Spitaels, C.; Zielińska, M.

    2014-02-01

    We report on the first application of in-flight fast-timing measurements, a method developed in order to directly measure lifetimes in the picosecond to nanosecond range. As a proof of principle of the method, lifetimes of the states belonging to the ground-state band in Sm152 are measured up to the 81+ state. An excellent agreement with recommended values is found. A slightly improved determination of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the 41+ state is also reported. In-flight fast-timing measurements open interesting opportunities for future studies of collective properties in radioactive nuclei.

  1. Rise Time Perception in Children with Reading and Combined Reading and Language Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Rachel L.; Manis, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Using a non-speech-specific measure of prosody, rise time perception, Goswami and her colleagues have found that individuals with dyslexia perform significantly worse than nonimpaired readers. Studies have also found that children and adults with specific language impairment were impaired on these tasks. Despite the high comorbidity of these…

  2. Rise Time Perception and Detection of Syllable Stress in Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Victoria; Hamalainen, Jarmo; Soltesz, Fruzsina; Goswami, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The perception of syllable stress has not been widely studied in developmental dyslexia, despite strong evidence for auditory rhythmic perceptual difficulties. Here we investigate the hypothesis that perception of sound rise time is related to the perception of syllable stress in adults with developmental dyslexia. Methods: A…

  3. Investigating Two Different Training Time Frames during Ramadan Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Memari, Amir-Hossein; Najafabadi, Mahboubeh Ghayour

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Muslim athletes may continue training and competing while they are fasting. There is a concern about negative effects of fasting on sports performance. This study aimed to investigate the influence of two training time frames on athletes’ body composition and performance during Ramadan fasting. Methods An observational study was conducted and thirty four male volunteer athletes from different sports including volleyball, karate, taekwondo and football were assigned in two groups. The first group included 14 elite athletes who during Ramadan voluntarily participated in training sessions at 1 hour before Iftar (BI) and the second group of 20 elite athletes who during Ramadan participated in training sessions at 3 hours after Iftar (AI). Testing was performed one week before; in the first and fourth weeks of Ramadan and one week after Ramadan. Weights, heights and skinfold thickness were assessed at each time point and body mass index was calculated. Each player was assessed for agility and explosive strength as well. Results The mean weight and body mass index of both groups decreased significantly during Ramadan (P<0.001). Performance variables were not negatively affected by fasting in BI or AI group athletes. Conclusions Weight reduction might come with either BI or AI training schedules in Ramadan. Daytime or evening training did not inversely affect the agility and power performances in a group of elite athletes during Ramadan fasting. PMID:22375240

  4. Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector: Proof of Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.; Iedema, Martin J.; Ali, Hashim M.

    2010-10-12

    Atmospheric particles can be collected in the field on substrates for subsequent laboratory analysis via chemically sensitive single particle methods such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed x-ray analysis. With moving substrates one can achieve time resolution of seconds to minutes. We demonstrate how to increase the time resolution to a few milliseconds to provide real-time information in this paper. Our fast time-resolved aerosol collector (“Fast-TRAC”) microscopically observes the particle collection on substrate and record an on-line video. Particle arrivals are resolved to within a single frame (17 to 4 ms in this setup), and the spatial locations are matched to the subsequent single particle analysis. This approach provides real-time information on particle size and number concentration. Applications are expected in airborne studies of cloud microstructure, pollution plumes, and long term site monitoring.

  5. Comparison of occlusion break responses and vacuum rise times of phacoemulsification systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Occlusion break surge during phacoemulsification cataract surgery can lead to potential surgical complications. The purpose of this study was to quantify occlusion break surge and vacuum rise time of current phacoemulsification systems used in cataract surgery. Methods Occlusion break surge at vacuum pressures between 200 and 600 mmHg was assessed with the Infiniti® Vision System, the WhiteStar Signature® Phacoemulsification System, and the Centurion® Vision System using gravity-fed fluidics. Centurion Active FluidicsTM were also tested at multiple intraoperative pressure target settings. Vacuum rise time was evaluated for Infiniti, WhiteStar Signature, Centurion, and Stellaris® Vision Enhancement systems. Rise time to vacuum limits of 400 and 600 mmHg was assessed at flow rates of 30 and 60 cc/minute. Occlusion break surge was analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance. Results The Centurion system exhibited substantially less occlusion break surge than the other systems tested. Surge area with Centurion Active Fluidics was similar to gravity fluidics at an equivalent bottle height. At all Centurion Active Fluidics intraoperative pressure target settings tested, surge was smaller than with Infiniti and WhiteStar Signature. Infiniti had the fastest vacuum rise time and Stellaris had the slowest. No system tested reached the 600-mmHg vacuum limit. Conclusions In this laboratory study, Centurion had the least occlusion break surge and similar vacuum rise times compared with the other systems tested. Reducing occlusion break surge may increase safety of phacoemulsification cataract surgery. PMID:25074069

  6. Fast Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis for dynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Peled, Yair; Motil, Avi; Tur, Moshe

    2012-04-09

    A new technique for the fast implementation of Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) is proposed and demonstrated, carrying the classical BOTDA method to the dynamic sensing domain. By using a digital signal generator which enables fast switching among 100 scanning frequencies, we demonstrate a truly distributed and dynamic measurement of a 100 m long fiber with a sampling rate of ~10 kHz, limited only by the fiber length and the frequency granularity. With 10 averages the standard deviation of the measured strain was ~5 µε.

  7. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  8. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  9. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  10. Rise time of voltage pulses in NbN superconducting single photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, K. V.; Divochiy, A. V.; Karpova, U. V.; Morozov, P. V.; Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We have found experimentally that the rise time of voltage pulse in NbN superconducting single photon detectors increases nonlinearly with increasing the length of the detector L. The effect is connected with dependence of resistance of the detector R{sub n}, which appears after photon absorption, on its kinetic inductance L{sub k} and, hence, on the length of the detector. This conclusion is confirmed by our calculations in the framework of two temperature model.

  11. A Space/Fast-Time Adaptive Monopulse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Yaron; Williams, Douglas B.; Holder, E. Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Mainbeam jamming poses a particularly difficult challenge for conventional monopulse radars. In such cases spatially adaptive processing provides some interference suppression when the target and jammer are not exactly coaligned. However, as the target angle approaches that of the jammer, mitigation performance is increasingly hampered and distortions are introduced into the resulting beam pattern. Both of these factors limit the reliability of a spatially adaptive monopulse processor. The presence of coherent multipath in the form of terrain-scattered interference (TSI), although normally considered a nuisance, can be exploited to suppress mainbeam jamming with space/fast-time processing. A method is presented offering space/fast-time monopulse processing with distortionless spatial array patterns that can achieve improved angle estimation over spatially adaptive monopulse. Performance results for the monopulse processor are obtained for mountaintop data containing a jammer and TSI, which demonstrate a dramatic improvement in performance over conventional monopulse and spatially adaptive monopulse.

  12. Effects of rise-fall time, frequency, and intensity on the early/middle evoked response.

    PubMed

    Beattie, R C; Moretti, M; Warren, V

    1984-05-01

    Auditory evoked responses to tone pips were recorded on 10 normally hearing adults. Tone pips centered at 500 and 2000 Hz with 1, 2, and 4 ms rise-fall times were presented at intensities of 40, 30, 20, and 10 dB nHL. The band-pass of the recording-amplifier system was set to 55 and 3000 Hz. Responses were measured during the first 25 ms following the onset of the stimulus and the first three prominent waves were labeled P10, N15, and P20. The results indicated that varying rise-fall times from 1 to 4 ms had little effect on the detectability of these waves. Consequently, the 4-ms rise-fall time was recommended because of its greater frequency specificity. The number of identifiable responses was similar for both 500 and 2000 Hz for waves P10, N15, and P20. The similarity in the number of detectable responses suggests that any of these waves may be used as a threshold indicator. The acoustic/physiologic mechanisms underlying the latency changes are discussed.

  13. Music, rhythm, rise time perception and developmental dyslexia: perception of musical meter predicts reading and phonology.

    PubMed

    Huss, Martina; Verney, John P; Fosker, Tim; Mead, Natasha; Goswami, Usha

    2011-06-01

    Rhythm organises musical events into patterns and forms, and rhythm perception in music is usually studied by using metrical tasks. Metrical structure also plays an organisational function in the phonology of language, via speech prosody, and there is evidence for rhythmic perceptual difficulties in developmental dyslexia. Here we investigate the hypothesis that the accurate perception of musical metrical structure is related to basic auditory perception of rise time, and also to phonological and literacy development in children. A battery of behavioural tasks was devised to explore relations between musical metrical perception, auditory perception of amplitude envelope structure, phonological awareness (PA) and reading in a sample of 64 typically-developing children and children with developmental dyslexia. We show that individual differences in the perception of amplitude envelope rise time are linked to musical metrical sensitivity, and that musical metrical sensitivity predicts PA and reading development, accounting for over 60% of variance in reading along with age and I.Q. Even the simplest metrical task, based on a duple metrical structure, was performed significantly more poorly by the children with dyslexia. The accurate perception of metrical structure may be critical for phonological development and consequently for the development of literacy. Difficulties in metrical processing are associated with basic auditory rise time processing difficulties, suggesting a primary sensory impairment in developmental dyslexia in tracking the lower-frequency modulations in the speech envelope. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  14. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; ...

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetitionmore » rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.« less

  15. Rising methane: post-2007 growth, geographic loci, timings and isotopic shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, Euan G.; Manning, Martin R.; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Brownlow, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane is rising rapidly again, after a period of stability [1]. NOAA report a global growth rate from 2007-2013 of 5.7±1.2 ppb yr-1, followed by extreme growth of 12.6±0.5 ppb in 2014 and 10.0±0.7 ppb in 2015. Growth has been accompanied by a shift in δ13C(CH4) (a measure of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in methane) to significantly more negative values since 2007. This isotopic shift has been observed in independently calibrated NOAA, Royal Holloway and NIWA-New Zealand measurements: thus the negative trend is real, global, and not a calibration artifact. Fossil fuel methane emissions, which are mostly more positive than atmospheric values, are not driving the rise in methane. Instead, the geographic loci of post-2007 growth, and the timings of the methane rise and isotopic shift suggest growth was dominated by significant increases in biogenic methane emissions, particularly in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere: for example in years with heavy rainfall under the Inter-Tropical Convergence, from wetlands and increased agricultural sources such as ruminants and rice paddies. Changes in the removal rate of methane by the OH radical or other sinks may also have occurred but do not appear fully to explain short term variations in methane isotopes. All these drivers of rising methane - wetlands, ruminants, changing sinks - may reflect underlying decade-long trends in tropical climate: methane may thus be an important climate-change signal. 1. Nisbet, E.G. et al. (2016) Rising atmospheric methane: 2007-2014 growth and isotopic shift, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 30, doi:10.1002/ 2016GB005406.

  16. Fast computation of recurrences in long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawald, Tobias; Sips, Mike; Marwan, Norbert; Dransch, Doris

    2014-05-01

    The quadratic time complexity of calculating basic RQA measures, doubling the size of the input time series leads to a quadrupling in operations, impairs the fast computation of RQA in many application scenarios. As an example, we analyze the Potsdamer Reihe, an ongoing non-interrupted hourly temperature profile since 1893, consisting of 1,043,112 data points. Using an optimized single-threaded CPU implementation this analysis requires about six hours. Our approach conducts RQA for the Potsdamer Reihe in five minutes. We automatically split a long time series into smaller chunks (Divide) and distribute the computation of RQA measures across multiple GPU devices. To guarantee valid RQA results, we employ carryover buffers that allow sharing information between pairs of chunks (Recombine). We demonstrate the capabilities of our Divide and Recombine approach to process long time series by comparing the runtime of our implementation to existing RQA tools. We support a variety of platforms by employing the computing framework OpenCL. Our current implementation supports the computation of standard RQA measures (recurrence rate, determinism, laminarity, ratio, average diagonal line length, trapping time, longest diagonal line, longest vertical line, divergence, entropy, trend) and also calculates recurrence times. To utilize the potential of our approach for a number of applications, we plan to release our implementation under an Open Source software license. It will be available at http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/fast-rqa/. Since our approach allows to compute RQA measures for a long time series fast, we plan to extend our implementation to support multi-scale RQA.

  17. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-15

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  18. FastSP: linear time calculation of alignment accuracy.

    PubMed

    Mirarab, Siavash; Warnow, Tandy

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a basic part of much biological research, including phylogeny estimation and protein structure and function prediction. Different alignments on the same set of unaligned sequences are often compared, sometimes in order to assess the accuracy of alignment methods or to infer a consensus alignment from a set of estimated alignments. Three of the standard techniques for comparing alignments, Developer, Modeler and Total Column (TC) scores can be derived through calculations of the set of homologies that the alignments share. However, the brute-force technique for calculating this set is quadratic in the input size. The remaining standard technique, Cline Shift Score, inherently requires quadratic time. In this article, we prove that each of these scores can be computed in linear time, and we present FastSP, a linear-time algorithm for calculating these scores. Even on the largest alignments we explored (one with 50 000 sequences), FastSP completed <2 min and used at most 2 GB of the main memory. The best alternative is qscore, a method whose empirical running time is approximately the same as FastSP when given sufficient memory (at least 8 GB), but whose asymptotic running time has never been theoretically established. In addition, for comparisons of large alignments under lower memory conditions (at most 4 GB of main memory), qscore uses substantial memory (up to 10 GB for the datasets we studied), took more time and failed to analyze the largest datasets. The open-source software and executables are available online at http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~phylo/software/fastsp/. tandy@cs.utexas.edu.

  19. Measuring Sea Level Rise-Induced Shoreline Changes and Inundation in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilling, F.; Waetjen, D.; Grijalva, E.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a method to monitor shoreline inundation and changes in response to sea level rise (SLR) using a network of time-lapse cameras. We found for coastal tidal marshes that this method was sensitive to vertical changes in sea level of <1 cm, roughly equivalent to 1-2 years of sea level rise under the A1 scenario. SLR of >20 cm has occurred in the San Francisco Bay and other US coastal areas and is likely to rise by another 30-45 cm by mid-century, which will flood and erode many coastal ecosystems, highways, and urban areas. This rapid degree of rise means that it is imperative to co-plan for natural and built systems. Many public facilities are adjacent to shoreline ecosystems, which both protect infrastructure from wave and tide energy and are home to regulated species and habitats. Accurate and timely information about the actual extent of SLR impacts to shorelines will be critical during built-system adaptation. Currently, satellite-sourced imagery cannot provide the spatial or temporal resolution necessary to investigate fine-scale shoreline changes, leaving a gap between predictive models and knowing how, where and when these changes are occurring. The method described is feasible for near-term (1 to 10 years) to long-term application and can be used for measuring fine-resolution shoreline changes (<1 m2) in response to SLR and associated wave action inundation of marshes and infrastructure. We demonstrate the method with networks of cameras in 2 coastal states (CA and GA), using web-informatics and services to organize photographs that could be combined with related external data (e.g., gauged water levels) to create an information mashup. This information could be used to validate models predicting shoreline inundation and loss, inform SLR-adaptation planning, and to visualize SLR impacts to the public.

  20. Optimized fast mixing device for real-time NMR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Rémi; Favier, Adrien; Schanda, Paul; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    We present an improved fast mixing device based on the rapid mixing of two solutions inside the NMR probe, as originally proposed by Hore and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125 (2003) 12484-12492). Such a device is important for off-equilibrium studies of molecular kinetics by multidimensional real-time NMR spectrsocopy. The novelty of this device is that it allows removing the injector from the NMR detection volume after mixing, and thus provides good magnetic field homogeneity independently of the initial sample volume placed in the NMR probe. The apparatus is simple to build, inexpensive, and can be used without any hardware modification on any type of liquid-state NMR spectrometer. We demonstrate the performance of our fast mixing device in terms of improved magnetic field homogeneity, and show an application to the study of protein folding and the structural characterization of transiently populated folding intermediates.

  1. Reduction of characteristic RL time for fast, efficient magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the reduction of characteristic time in resistor-inductor (RL) circuit for fast, efficient magnetic levitation according to Kirchhoff's circuit laws. The loading time is reduced by a factor of ˜4 when a high-power resistor is added in series with the coils. By using the controllable output voltage of power supply and voltage of feedback circuit, the loading time is further reduced by ˜ 3 times. The overshoot loading in advance of the scheduled magnetic field gradient is equivalent to continuously adding a resistor without heating. The magnetic field gradient with the reduced loading time is used to form the upward magnetic force against to the gravity of the cooled Cs atoms, and we obtain an effectively levitated loading of the Cs atoms to a crossed optical dipole trap.

  2. Fast fall-time ion beam in neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q.; Kwan, J.; Regis, M.; Wu, Y.; Wilde, S.B.; Wallig, J.

    2008-08-10

    Ion beam with a fast fall time is useful in building neutron generators for the application of detecting hidden, gamma-shielded SNM using differential die-away (DDA) technique. Typically a fall time of less than 1 {micro}s can't be achieved by just turning off the power to the ion source due to the slow decay of plasma density (partly determined by the fall time of the RF power in the circuit). In this paper, we discuss the method of using an array of mini-apertures (instead of one large aperture beam) such that gating the beamlets can be done with low voltage and a small gap. This geometry minimizes the problem of voltage breakdown as well as reducing the time of flight to produce fast gating. We have designed and fabricated an array of 16 apertures (4 x 4) for a beam extraction experiment. Using a gating voltage of 1400 V and a gap distance of 1 mm, the fall time of extracted ion beam pulses is less than 1 {micro}s at various beam energies ranging between 400 eV to 800 eV. Usually merging an array of beamlets suffers the loss of beam brightness, i.e., emittance growth, but that is not an important issue for neutron source applications.

  3. Time dependent non-extinction probability for fast burst reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregson, Michael W.

    Sandia National Laboratories has successfully operated fast burst reactors over the past four decades. Fast burst reactors refer to a type of reactor that is able to achieve intense neutron pulses in very short periods of time using fissile material. Typically these systems are comprised of enriched metallic uranium fuel. During operation of a fast burst reactor, a phenomena known as a pre-initiation has been known to take place. A pre-initiation occurs when the neutron population exceeds some fiducial prior to achieving the final reactivity state in a pulse operation. Reactivity is determined from the physical configuration of the reactor and governs the average neutron population behavior. The purpose of this study is to examine the probability of initiation (or the pre-initiation probability) for a fast burst type of system, with emphasis on the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) for physics parameters. The magnitude of the pre-initiation problem for SPR-III was examined to establish the magnitude of the phenomena. This work focuses on developing and numerically solving an equation that describes the nonextinction probability in a prompt critical assembly when the population is so low that it deviates from the average behavior. A zero dimensional (0-D) model is derived to describe the neutron non-extinction probability in a system where the reactivity is changing as a function of time. Analytical solutions to the model are provided where solutions could be found. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of cases applicable to fast burst reactor operation. Use of 0-D Monte Carlo techniques is also presented as a means to examine the low population stochastic behavior and for comparison to the deterministic solution. The 1-D time dependent equation for slab geometry was evaluated to highlight the importance of neutron leakage. The non-extinction probability equation was solved using a modified form of the standard fixed point iteration method. Other

  4. Effect of stratification and geometrical spreading on sonic boom rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.; Hamilton, Mark F.; Blackstock, David T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation is to determine the effect of unsteadiness (not associated with turbulence) on rise time. The unsteadiness considered here is due to (1) geometrical spreading, (2) stratification, which includes variation in density, temperature, and relative humidity, and (3) N shaped waveform. A very general Burgers equation, which includes all these effects, is the propagation model for our study. The equation is solved by a new computational algorithm in which all the calculations are done in the time domain. The present paper is a progress report in which some of the factors contributing to unsteadiness are studied, namely geometrical spreading and variation in relative humidity. The work of Pierce and Kang, which motivated our study, is first reviewed. We proceed with a discussion of the Burgers equation model and the algorithm for solving the equation. Some comparison tests to establish the validity of the algorithm are presented. The algorithm is then used to determine the distance required for a steady-state shock, on encountering an abrupt change in relative humidity, to reach a new steady state based on the new humidity. It is found that the transition distance for plane shocks of amplitude 70 Pa is about 4 km when the change in relative humidity is 10 percent. Shocks of amplitude 140 Pa require less distance. The effect of spherical and cylindrical spreading is also considered. We demonstrate that a spreading shock wave never reaches steady state and that its rise time will be less than the equivalent steady state shock. Finally we show that an N wave has a slightly shorter rise time than a step shock of the same amplitude.

  5. Subjective response to sonic booms having different shapes, rise times, and durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify the subjective response of people to simulated outdoor sonic booms having different pressure signatures. The specific objectives of the experiments were to compare subjective response to sonic booms when described in terms of 'loudness' and 'annoyance'; to determine the ability of various noise metrics to predict subjective response to sonic booms; to determine the effects on subjective response of rise time, duration, and level; and to compare the subjective response to 'N-wave' sonic boom signatures with the subjective response to 'minimized' sonic boom signatures. The experiments were conducted in a computer-controlled, man-rated sonic boom simulator capable of reproducing user-specified pressure signatures for a wide range of sonic boom parameters. One hundred and fifty sonic booms representing different combinations of two wave shapes, four rise times, seven durations, and three peak overpressures were presented to 36 test subjects in each experiment. The test subjects in the first experiment made judgments of 'loudness' while the test subjects in the second experiment judged 'annoyance.' Subjective response to sonic booms was the same whether expressed in terms of loudness or in terms of annoyance. Analyses of several different noise metrics indicated that A-weighted sound exposure level and Perceived Level were the best predictors of subjective response. Further analyses indicated that, of these two noise metrics, only Perceived Level completely accounted for the effects of wave shape, rise time, and peak overpressure. Neither metric fully accounted for the effect of duration. However, the magnitude of the duration effect was small over the very wide range of durations considered.

  6. Real Time Fast Ultrasound Imaging Technology and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruza, J. F.; Perez, M.; Moreno, J. M.; Fritsch, C.

    In this work, a novel hardware architecture for fast ultrasound imaging based on FPGA devices is proposed. A key difference over other approaches is the unlimited scalability in terms of active channels without performance losses. Acquisition and processing tasks share the same hardware, eliminating communication bottlenecks with smaller size and power losses. These features make this system suitable to implement the most demanding imaging applications, like 3D Phased Array, Total Focusing Method, Vector Doppler, Image Compounding, High Speed Part Scanning and advanced elastographic techniques. A single medium sized FPGA allows beamforming up to 200 scan lines simultaneously, which is enough to perform most of the above mentioned applications in strict real time.

  7. Rise time of inverted triangular prism intruder in vibrating granular bed: Experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Adriani, I. K.; Baladram, M. S.; Viridi, S.

    2012-05-01

    Experiment results and a qualitative model of the phenomenon called Brazil nut effect (BNE) with inverted triangular prism are reported in this work. The model is constructed by considering some forces (earth gravitational force, buoyant force, and fluid viscous force) and using Newton's second law of motion. The rise time of BNE T is defined as time needed for the intruder to be on granular surface with all of his parts (no part is still immersed in the granular bed). One side of the triangular base of the intruder l is varied from 1.5 to 5 cm with other two sides are kept in constant values (1 and 3 cm). It has been observed in experiment that l with value 3-4 cm gives the smaller rise time. Plot of T versus l has the form of concave up parabolic curve with minimum lies at l between 3-4 cm. This observation has been confirmed by the proposed model with the same order of magnitude and similar curve trend.

  8. Fast time variations of supernova neutrino fluxes and their detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Tina; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Lunardini, Cecilia; Raffelt, Georg

    2010-09-15

    In the delayed explosion scenario of core-collapse supernovae, the accretion phase shows pronounced convective overturns and a low-multipole hydrodynamic instability, the standing accretion shock instability. These effects imprint detectable fast time variations on the emerging neutrino flux. Among existing detectors, IceCube is best suited to this task, providing an event rate of {approx}1000 ms{sup -1} during the accretion phase for a fiducial SN distance of 10 kpc, comparable to what could be achieved with a megaton water Cherenkov detector. If the standing accretion shock instability activity lasts for several hundred ms, a Fourier component with an amplitude of 1% of the average signal clearly sticks out from the shot noise. We analyze in detail the output of axially symmetric hydrodynamical simulations that predict much larger amplitudes up to frequencies of a few hundred Hz. If these models are roughly representative for realistic SNe, fast time variations of the neutrino signal are easily detectable in IceCube or future megaton-class instruments. We also discuss the information that could be deduced from such a measurement about the physics in the SN core and the explosion mechanism of the SN.

  9. Moon Rise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Aboard the International Space Station in May 2012, Expedition 31 astronaut Don Pettit opened the shutters covering the cupola observation windows in time to watch the moon rise. The time-lapse sce...

  10. Controllable high voltage source having fast settling time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doong, H.; Acuna, M. H. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high voltage dc stepping power supply for sampling a utilization device such as an electrostatic analyzer has a relatively fast settling time for voltage steps. The supply includes a waveform generator for deriving a low voltage staircase waveform that feeds a relatively long response time power supply, deriving a high output voltage generally equal to a predetermined multiple of the input voltage. In the power supply, an ac voltage modulated by the staircase waveform is applied to a step-up transformer and then to a voltage multiplier stack to form a high voltage, relatively poor replica of the input waveform at an intermediate output terminal. A constant dc source, applied to the input of the power supply, biases the voltage at the intermediate output terminal to be in excess of the predetermined multiple of the input voltage.

  11. Generation of high-voltage pulses with subnanosecond front rise times in open discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Lavrukhin, M. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2013-03-15

    The investigation results for plasma switching devices of high-voltage pulses with pulse rise times less than 1 ns are presented. The approach is based on using conditions suitable for bringing a gas discharge chamber in a state with high conductivity due to generation of an electron beam owing to photoelectron emission from the device cathode. It is shown that in co-axial geometry pulses, switching time 0.45 ns on an active load R{sub L} = 50 {Omega} at voltage U = 20 kV can be achieved. It is shown with the method of doubled impulses that such a device can regenerate the acceptable electric strength during 10 {mu}s. It is indicated of the principle possibility of working in the pulse-periodical regime to the repetition rate of 100 kHz.

  12. Pediatric fasting times before surgical and radiologic procedures: benchmarking institutional practices against national standards.

    PubMed

    Williams, Catherine; Johnson, Pat A; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Guzzetta, Philip C; Cohen, Ira Todd; Sill, Anne M; Vezina, Gilbert; Cain, Sherry; Harris, Christine; Murray, Jodi

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged preoperative fasting can be associated with adverse outcomes, particularly in children. Our aims were to assess the time pediatric patients fasted prior to surgical or radiologic procedures and evaluate whether fasting (NPO) orders complied with national guidelines. We measured NPO start time, time of last intake, and time test or surgery was scheduled, took place, or was cancelled in 219 pediatric patients. Findings demonstrate that pediatric patients experienced prolonged fasting before procedures and that the majority of NPO orders were non-compliant with national guidelines. We have developed strategies to reduce fasting times and ensure compliance with recommended national fasting standards.

  13. A GEANT4 study on the time resolution of a fast plastic scintillator read out by a G-APD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlak, K.; Stoykov, A.; Scheuermann, R.

    2012-12-01

    The time resolution of a fast scintillation counter, consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode, is studied over a wide range of the number of detected photons (primary photoelectrons) using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. Different timing definitions such as first photon detection, leading edge and constant fraction discrimination are considered. In the latter case the predictions are compared with the existing experimental data. We also show that due to the finite scintillation rise time, finite scintillator dimensions and also due to the finite single photon time resolution in G-APD cells, the time resolution for the first detected photon in real detectors substantially deviates from the σ˜1/Nphe dependence, theoretically predicted for a scintillator with zero rise time.

  14. A next generation Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO-100) for IR/optical observations of the rise phase of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. B.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; De La Taille, C.; Eyles, C.; Hermann, I.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.; Zhao, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observatory responds to GRB triggers with optical observations in ~ 100 s, butcannot respond faster than ~ 60 s. While some rapid-response ground-based telescopes have responded quickly, thenumber of sub-60 s detections remains small. In 2013 June, the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-Pathfinder is expected tobe launched on the Lomonosov spacecraft to investigate early optical GRB emission. Though possessing uniquecapability for optical rapid-response, this pathfinder mission is necessarily limited in sensitivity and event rate; here wediscuss the next generation of rapid-response space observatory instruments. We list science topics motivating ourinstruments, those that require rapid optical-IR GRB response, including: A survey of GRB rise shapes/times,measurements of optical bulk Lorentz factors, investigation of magnetic dominated (vs. non-magnetic) jet models,internal vs. external shock origin of prompt optical emission, the use of GRBs for cosmology, and dust evaporation inthe GRB environment. We also address the impacts of the characteristics of GRB observing on our instrument andobservatory design. We describe our instrument designs and choices for a next generation space observatory as a secondinstrument on a low-earth orbit spacecraft, with a 120 kg instrument mass budget. Restricted to relatively modest mass,power, and launch resources, we find that a coded mask X-ray camera with 1024 cm2 of detector area could rapidlylocate about 64 GRB triggers/year. Responding to the locations from the X-ray camera, a 30 cm aperture telescope witha beam-steering system for rapid (~ 1 s) response and a near-IR camera should detect ~ 29 GRB, given Swift GRBproperties. The additional optical camera would permit the measurement of a broadband optical-IR slope, allowingbetter characterization of the emission, and dynamic measurement of dust extinction at the source, for the first time.

  15. A quantitative analysis of behavioral selectivity for pulse rise-time in the gray treefrog, Hyla versicolor.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, H C; Schul, J

    1999-07-01

    The selectivity of female phonotactic responses to synthetic advertisement calls was tested in choice situations. Preferences based on differences in the linear rise-time of synthetic pulses depended on intensity and carrier frequency. When the carrier frequency was 1.1 kHz, simulating the low-frequency peak in the advertisement call, females preferred alternatives with slower rise-time pulses that differed by 5 ms at playback levels of 75 dB SPL and higher. A rise-time difference of 10 ms was discriminated at 65 dB SPL. When the carrier frequency was 2.2 kHz, simulating the high-frequency peak in the call, females discriminated a 5-ms difference in rise-time only at 85 dB SPL. Females showed no preference when the difference was 10 ms at lower playback levels. The difference in the thresholds (about 15-20 dB) for discriminating differences in rise-time at the two carrier frequencies was greater than the difference in behavioral thresholds for these two frequencies (about 10 dB). This result suggests that rise-time discrimination can be mediated solely by the neural channel mainly tuned to the low-frequency peak in the call. Females probably assess differences in rise-time by comparing the first few pulses of each call rather than by averaging over the entire call.

  16. Low power, high voltage power supply with fast rise/fall time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearden, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A low power, high voltage power supply system includes a high voltage power supply stage and a preregulator for programming the power supply stage so as to produce an output voltage which is a predetermined fraction of a desired voltage level. The power supply stage includes a high voltage, voltage doubler stage connected to receive the output voltage from the preregulator and for, when activated, providing amplification of the output voltage to the desired voltage level. A first feedback loop is connected between the output of the preregulator and an input of the preregulator while a second feedback loop is connected between the output of the power supply stage and the input of the preregulator.

  17. Laser pumping of thyristors for fast high current rise-times

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2013-06-11

    An optically triggered semiconductor switch includes an anode metallization layer; a cathode metallization layer; a semiconductor between the anode metallization layer and the cathode metallization layer and a photon source. The semiconductor includes at least four layers of alternating doping in the form P-N-P-N, in which an outer layer adjacent to the anode metallization layer forms an anode and an outer layer adjacent the cathode metallization layer forms a cathode and in which the anode metallization layer has a window pattern of optically transparent material exposing the anode layer to light. The photon source emits light having a wavelength, with the light from the photon source being configured to match the window pattern of the anode metallization layer.

  18. Low Power, High Voltage Power Supply with Fast Rise/Fall Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearden, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A low power, high voltage power supply system includes a high voltage power supply stage and a preregulator for programming the power supply stage so as to produce an output voltage which is a predetermined fraction of a desired voltage level. The power supply stage includes a high voltage, voltage doubler stage connected to receive the output voltage from the preregulator and for, when activated, providing amplification of the output voltage to the desired voltage level. A first feedback loop is connected between the output of the preregulator and an input of the preregulator while a second feedback loop is connected between the output of the power supply stage and the input of the preregulator.

  19. Rise time of proton cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, J.; Gizzi, L. A.; Londrillo, P.; Mirzanejad, S.; Rovelli, T.; Sinigardi, S.; Turchetti, G.

    2017-04-01

    The Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime for proton acceleration by laser pulses is experimentally consolidated and fairly well understood. However, uncertainties remain in the analysis of particle-in-cell simulation results. The energy spectrum is exponential with a cut-off, but the maximum energy depends on the simulation time, following different laws in two and three dimensional (2D, 3D) PIC simulations so that the determination of an asymptotic value has some arbitrariness. We propose two empirical laws for the rise time of the cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations, suggested by a model in which the proton acceleration is due to a surface charge distribution on the target rear side. The kinetic energy of the protons that we obtain follows two distinct laws, which appear to be nicely satisfied by PIC simulations, for a model target given by a uniform foil plus a contaminant layer that is hydrogen-rich. The laws depend on two parameters: the scaling time, at which the energy starts to rise, and the asymptotic cut-off energy. The values of the cut-off energy, obtained by fitting 2D and 3D simulations for the same target and laser pulse configuration, are comparable. This suggests that parametric scans can be performed with 2D simulations since 3D ones are computationally very expensive, delegating their role only to a correspondence check. In this paper, the simulations are carried out with the PIC code ALaDyn by changing the target thickness L and the incidence angle α, with a fixed a0 = 3. A monotonic dependence, on L for normal incidence and on α for fixed L, is found, as in the experimental results for high temporal contrast pulses.

  20. Temporal Features of Spectral Integration in the Inferior Colliculus: Effects of Stimulus Duration and Rise Time

    PubMed Central

    Gans, Donald; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Peterson, Diana Coomes; Wenstrup, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    This report examines temporal features of facilitation and suppression that underlie spectrally integrative responses to complex vocal signals. Auditory responses were recorded from 160 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of awake mustached bats. Sixty-two neurons showed combination-sensitive facilitation: responses to best frequency (BF) signals were facilitated by well-timed signals at least an octave lower in frequency, in the range 16–31 kHz. Temporal features and strength of facilitation were generally unaffected by changes in duration of facilitating signals from 4 to 31 ms. Changes in stimulus rise time from 0.5 to 5.0 ms had little effect on facilitatory strength. These results suggest that low frequency facilitating inputs to high BF neurons have phasic-on temporal patterns and are responsive to stimulus rise times over the tested range. We also recorded from 98 neurons showing low-frequency (11–32 kHz) suppression of higher BF responses. Effects of changing duration were related to the frequency of suppressive signals. Signals <23 kHz usually evoked suppression sustained throughout signal duration. This and other features of such suppression are consistent with a cochlear origin that results in masking of responses to higher, near-BF signal frequencies. Signals in the 23- to 30-kHz range—frequencies in the first sonar harmonic—generally evoked phasic suppression of BF responses. This may result from neural inhibitory interactions within and below IC. In many neurons, we observed two or more forms of the spectral interactions described here. Thus IC neurons display temporally and spectrally complex responses to sound that result from multiple spectral interactions at different levels of the ascending auditory pathway. PMID:19403742

  1. [Effect of stimulus rise time and high-pass masking on early auditory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Bunke, D; von Specht, H; Mühler, R; Pethe, J; Kevanishvili, Z

    1998-04-01

    Problems of frequency-specific objective assessment of hearing threshold by means of auditory brainstem response (ABR) have been discussed recently. While a number of workers have recommended methods of selective masking to improve the frequency specificity, others believe that frequency-specific potentials can also be obtained without masking. In this context, the effects of rise-decay time and high-pass masking on ABRs were investigated. ABRs were recorded in normal-hearing subjects and patients with high and low frequency hearing loss by means of surface electrodes between the vertex and the ipsilateral mastoid. The frequency of the stimulus was 1 kHz, and the rise-decay time 1 ms (1-0-1) or 2 ms (2-0-2). High-pass filtered noise (cutoff frequency 1.5 kHz; filter slope 250 dB/octave) was employed for masking. Particular attention was paid to the problem of efficient masking. In normal-hearing subjects under the influence of high-pass masking compared to non-masked ABRs, longer mean latencies and diminished means of the amplitudes of wave V were found, with differences in the near-threshold domain being less pronounced. Similar results were observed in patients with high frequency hearing loss. In patients with low frequency hearing loss, the influence of high-pass masking was especially marked distinctly near to threshold. Furthermore, latency and amplitude differences of wave V of the 1-0-1 and the 2-0-2 stimuli were determined from the ABRs obtained with and without high-pass masking. The differences between the latency differences of both stimuli in the suprathreshold range (70 dB nHL) only were statistically significant. The results are suggestive of an inadequate frequency specificity of unmasked stimuli in the suprathreshold range. Evaluation of the latencies revealed for both rise-decay times a similar frequency specificity near the threshold and a higher frequency specificity of the longer stimulus in the suprathreshold range.

  2. Correlated helium, neon, and melt production on the super-fast spreading East Pacific Rise near 17°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Mark D.; Moreira, Manuel; Curtice, Joshua; Lott, Dempsey E.; Mahoney, John J.; Sinton, John M.

    2005-03-01

    We report new helium and neon isotopic compositions in dredged basalt glasses from the superfast spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) between 13° and 23°S. The 3He/ 4He ratios vary from 8.0 to 11.0 times the atmospheric value (Ra) [ 4He/ 3He between 65,700 and 90,300], with the least radiogenic values in samples from near 16.75°S. Atmospheric contamination corrections on neon isotopes are made using step heating and extrapolated 21Ne/ 22Ne ratios (to a solar 20Ne/ 22Ne value of 13.8). The lowest corrected 21Ne/ 22Ne ratios are found near 16.75°S, and are consistent with the helium isotopes in suggesting a less degassed mantle source. The EPR at 17°S is unusual in displaying such isotopic anomalies in the absence of any known hotspot. The minima in 4He/ 3He and 21Ne/ 22Ne correspond to extremes in Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, but the length scale of the helium and neon anomalies are shorter along-axis than the peaks for the other isotopic ratios. The minimum in 4He/ 3He is observed from 16° to 18°S (a distance of ˜220 km), whereas the elevated Sr and Pb values, and lower 143Nd/ 144Nd, are observed between 16° and 20.7°S (a distance of ˜500 km); neon isotope anomalies are observed on an intermediate length scale along-axis. Unradiogenic helium and neon values correlate with low mantle Bouguer anomalies, and maxima in the axial cross-sectional area, all of which are attributed to higher melt production near 17°S. A conceptual model that fits the observations includes melting of an entrained heterogeneity beneath the EPR at 17 °S. The relationship between helium and neon isotopes and along-axis geophysical characteristics (and by inference melt distribution) is probably related to the extreme incompatibility of helium and neon. High concentrations of 3He and 21Ne (extrap) are found in the glasses near 17°S, which is consistent with higher noble gas concentrations in the anomalous mantle.

  3. Fast-timing lifetime measurement of 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, J.; Kern, R.; Lizarazo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Jolos, R. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Florea, N.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Mitu, I. O.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.; Olacel, A.; Pascu, S.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Turturica, A.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime τ (02+) of 152Gd has been measured using fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors. 152Gd was produced via an (α ,n ) reaction on a gold backed 149Sm target. The measured lifetime of τ (02+) =96 (6 ) ps corresponds to a reduced transition strength of B (E 2 ;02+→21+) =111 (7 ) W.u. and an E 0 transition strength of ρ2(E 0 ) =39 (3 ) ×10-3 to the ground state. This result provides experimental support for the validity of a correlation that would be a novel indicator for a quantum phase transition (QPT).

  4. Fast Context Switching in Real-Time Propositional Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayak, P. Pandurang; Williams, Brian C.

    1997-01-01

    The trend to increasingly capable and affordable control processors has generated an explosion of embedded real-time gadgets that serve almost every function imaginable. The daunting task of programming these gadgets is greatly alleviated with real-time deductive engines that perform all execution and monitoring functions from a single core model, Fast response times are achieved using an incremental propositional deductive database (an LTMS). Ideally the cost of an LTMS's incremental update should be linear in the number of labels that change between successive contexts. Unfortunately an LTMS can expend a significant percentage of its time working on labels that remain constant between contexts. This is caused by the LTMS's conservative approach: a context switch first removes all consequences of deleted clauses, whether or not those consequences hold in the new context. This paper presents a more aggressive incremental TMS, called the ITMS, that avoids processing a significant number of these consequences that are unchanged. Our empirical evaluation for spacecraft control shows that the overhead of processing unchanged consequences can be reduced by a factor of seven.

  5. Timing and magnitude of accelerated relative sea-level rise in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. C.; Horton, B. P.; Culver, S. J.; Corbett, D. R.; van de Plassche, O.

    2008-12-01

    We present a 1000 year, high resolution record of relative sea-level rise (RSLR) from foraminifera preserved in salt-marsh sediments at four sites in North Carolina. Reconstructions of sea level across the region enable us to identify regional trends and spatial variation in the timing and magnitude of RSLR. In the absence of long-term instrumental records in this region, geologically derived estimates of former sea level are necessary to detect changes in the rate of RSLR. Using a foraminifera-based transfer function we show that RSLR increased at the start of the 19th Century from a background rate of 0.8mm/yr ± 0.04mm to 1.5mm/yr ± 0.16mm. We identified a second acceleration around 1900AD to ~4mm/yr. This current rate of RSLR has been reconciled with the available tide gauge data and validates our approach. Contemporary foraminifera were collected from 11 salt marshes in North Carolina representing a wide range of physiographic settings. The strong relationship between foraminifera and elevation in the modern environment was used to develop a regional scale transfer function. We reconstructed RSL by applying this transfer function to assemblages of foraminifera in four cores of salt-marsh peat recovered from sites across the Albemarle - Pamlico Estuarine system. The timing of RSL changes is constrained by age models developed from composite chronologies of conventional, high precision and bomb spike radiocarbon, 210Pb, 137Cs dating and a pollen chrono-horizon (Ambrosia). Recent geological investigations of historic RSL in North America (e.g., Maine and Connecticut) have identified accelerated rates of sea-level rise beginning in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. Our study suggests that in North Carolina the onset of rapid RSL change began earlier (around the beginning of the 19th Century) and is comprised of two distinct accelerations. High resolution studies of RSL change and accurate dating of accelerations may be able to provide new information

  6. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  7. A hybrid model for simulation of secondary electron emission in plasma immersion ion implantation under different pulse rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Navab Safa, N. Ghomi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A hybrid fluid Particle in Cell–Monte Carlo Collision (PiC–MCC) model is presented to study the effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma immersion ion implantation process under different pulse rise time. The model describes the temporal evolution of various parameters of plasma such as ion density, ion velocity, secondary electron density, and secondary electron current for different rise times. A 3D–3 V PiC–MCC model is developed to simulate the secondary electrons which are emitted from the sample surface while the plasma ions and electrons are treated using a 1D fluid model. The simulation results indicate that the secondary electron density and secondary electron current increase as the rise time decreases. The main differences between the results for different rise times are found during the initial phase of the pulse. The results are explained through studying the fundamental parameters of plasma.

  8. SN 2008iy: an unusual Type IIn Supernova with an enduring 400-d rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. A.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Chornock, R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Klein, C. R.; Li, W.; Nugent, P. E.; Smith, N.; Steele, T. N.

    2010-05-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIn supernova (SN) 2008iy. SN 2008iy showed an unprecedentedly long rise time of ~400 d, making it the first known SN to take significantly longer than 100 d to reach peak optical luminosity. The peak absolute magnitude of SN 2008iy was Mr ~ -19.1 mag, and the total radiated energy over the first ~700 d was ~2 × 1050 erg. Spectroscopically, SN 2008iy is very similar to the Type IIn SN 1988Z at late times and, like SN 1988Z, it is a luminous X-ray source (both SNe had an X-ray luminosity LX > 1041 ergs-1). SN 2008iy has a growing near-infrared excess at late times similar to several other SNe IIn. The Hα emission-line profile of SN 2008iy shows a narrow P Cygni absorption component, implying a pre-SN wind speed of ~100kms-1. We argue that the luminosity of SN 2008iy is powered via the interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense, clumpy circumstellar medium. The ~400-d rise time can be understood if the number density of clumps increases with distance over a radius ~1.7 × 1016cm from the progenitor. This scenario is possible if the progenitor experienced an episodic phase of enhanced mass loss <1 century prior to explosion or if the progenitor wind speed increased during the decades before core collapse. We favour the former scenario, which is reminiscent of the eruptive mass-loss episodes observed for luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. The progenitor wind speed and increased mass-loss rates serve as further evidence that at least some, and perhaps all, Type IIn SNe experience LBV-like eruptions shortly before core collapse. We also discuss the host galaxy of SN 2008iy, a subluminous dwarf galaxy, and offer a few reasons why the recent suggestion that unusual, luminous SNe preferentially occur in dwarf galaxies may be the result of observational biases.

  9. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John T.; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is inducedtypically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gapsbubblespropagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  10. FTSPlot: Fast Time Series Visualization for Large Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Riss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of electrophysiological recordings often involves visual inspection of time series data to locate specific experiment epochs, mask artifacts, and verify the results of signal processing steps, such as filtering or spike detection. Long-term experiments with continuous data acquisition generate large amounts of data. Rapid browsing through these massive datasets poses a challenge to conventional data plotting software because the plotting time increases proportionately to the increase in the volume of data. This paper presents FTSPlot, which is a visualization concept for large-scale time series datasets using techniques from the field of high performance computer graphics, such as hierarchic level of detail and out-of-core data handling. In a preprocessing step, time series data, event, and interval annotations are converted into an optimized data format, which then permits fast, interactive visualization. The preprocessing step has a computational complexity of ; the visualization itself can be done with a complexity of and is therefore independent of the amount of data. A demonstration prototype has been implemented and benchmarks show that the technology is capable of displaying large amounts of time series data, event, and interval annotations lag-free with ms. The current 64-bit implementation theoretically supports datasets with up to bytes, on the x86_64 architecture currently up to bytes are supported, and benchmarks have been conducted with bytes/1 TiB or double precision samples. The presented software is freely available and can be included as a Qt GUI component in future software projects, providing a standard visualization method for long-term electrophysiological experiments. PMID:24732865

  11. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-07

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  12. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time ({τd} ) and the number of photons detected ({{n}\\prime} ), i.e. CTR\\propto \\sqrt{{τd}/{{n}\\prime}} . However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time ({τr} ) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the

  13. Real-time lucky imaging in FastCam project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ramos, L. F.; Piqueras Meseguer, J. J.; Martin Hernando, Y.; Oscoz, A.; Rebolo, R.

    2008-07-01

    Lucky imaging techniques implemented by the FastCam group (see http://www.iac.es/proyecto/fastcam/) at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias have demonstrated its ability to obtain spectacular diffraction limited images in telescopes ranging from 1 to 4.2 m in visible wavelengths (mainly in the I band), at the expense of using only a small percentage of the available images. This work presents the development of a real-time processor, FPGA-based, capable of performing all the required processing involved in the lucky imaging technique: Bias and flat-field correction, quality evaluation of images, quality threshold for image selection, image recentering and accumulation, and finally sending through Gigabit Ethernet both raw and processed images to a PC computer. Furthermore, a real time display is generated directly from FPGA showing both types of images, plus a histogram of the computed quality values and the threshold used. All processes can co-exist physically located in separated places inside the FPGA, using its natural parallel approach, and can easily handle the 512x512 pixels at 30 fps found at the sensor camera output (an Andor Ixon+ DU-897ECSO EMCCD). Flexibility and parallel processing features of the reconfigurable logic have been used to implement a novel imaging strategy for segmented-mirror telescopes, allowing separate evaluation of every segment and posterior accumulation to achieve the resolution limit of a single segment with the integration capability of the full primary mirror.

  14. IQPNNI: moving fast through tree space and stopping in time.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Le Sy; Von Haeseler, Arndt

    2004-08-01

    An efficient tree reconstruction method (IQPNNI) is introduced to reconstruct a phylogenetic tree based on DNA or amino acid sequence data. Our approach combines various fast algorithms to generate a list of potential candidate trees. The key ingredient is the definition of so-called important quartets (IQs), which allow the computation of an intermediate tree in O(n(2)) time for n sequences. The resulting tree is then further optimized by applying the nearest neighbor interchange (NNI) operation. Subsequently a random fraction of the sequences is deleted from the best tree found so far. The deleted sequences are then re-inserted in the smaller tree using the important quartet puzzling (IQP) algorithm. These steps are repeated several times and the best tree, with respect to the likelihood criterion, is considered as the inferred phylogenetic tree. Moreover, we suggest a rule which indicates when to stop the search. Simulations show that IQPNNI gives a slightly better accuracy than other programs tested. Moreover, we applied the approach to 218 small subunit rRNA sequences and 500 rbcL sequences. We found trees with higher likelihood compared to the results by others. A program to reconstruct DNA or amino acid based phylogenetic trees is available online (http://www.bi.uni-duesseldorf.de/software/iqpnni).

  15. Dynamic response of polyurea subjected to nanosecond rise-time stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, George; Gupta, Vijay

    2012-08-01

    Shaped charges and explosively formed projectiles used in modern warfare can attain speeds as high as 30,000 ft/s. Impacts from these threats are expected to load the armor materials in the 10 to 100 ns timeframe. During this time, the material strains are quite limited but the strain rates are extremely high. To develop armors against such threats it is imperative to understand the dynamic constitutive behavior of materials in the tens of nanoseconds timeframe. Material behavior in this parameter space cannot be obtained by even the most sophisticated plate-impact and split-Hopkinson bar setups that exist within the high energy materials field today. This paper introduces an apparatus and a test method that are based on laser-generated stress waves to obtain such material behaviors. Although applicable to any material system, the test procedures are demonstrated on polyurea which shows unusual dynamic properties. Thin polyurea layers were deformed using laser-generated stress waves with 1-2 ns rise times and 16 ns total duration. The total strain in the samples was less than 3%. Because of the transient nature of the stress wave, the strain rate varied throughout the deformation history of the sample. A peak value of 1.1×105 s-1 was calculated. It was found that the stress-strain characteristics, determined from experimentally recorded incident and transmitted wave profiles, matched satisfactorily with those computed from a 2D wave mechanics simulation in which the polyurea was modeled as a linearly viscoelastic solid with constants derived from the quasi-static experiments. Thus, the test data conformed to the Time-Temperature Superposition (TTS) principle even at extremely high strain rates of our test. This then extends the previous observations of Zhao et al. (Mech. Time-Depend. Mater. 11:289-308, 2007) who showed the applicability of the TTS principle for polyurea in the linearly viscoelastic regime up to peak strain rates of 1200 s-1.

  16. Timed Rise from Floor as a Predictor of Disease Progression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Elena S.; Coratti, Giorgia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Gardani, Alice; Lanzillotta, Valentina; D’Ambrosio, Paola; Petillo, Roberta; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Bonfiglio, Serena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Forcina, Nicola; Magri, Francesca; Vita, Gianluca; Palermo, Concetta; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Torrente, Yvan; Previtali, Stefano C.; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P.; D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of timed items, and more specifically, of the time to rise from the floor, has been reported as an early prognostic factor for disease progression and loss of ambulation. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible effect of the time to rise from the floor test on the changes observed on the 6MWT over 12 months in a cohort of ambulant Duchenne boys. Subjects and methods A total of 487 12-month data points were collected from 215 ambulant Duchenne boys. The age ranged between 5.0 and 20.0 years (mean 8.48 ±2.48 DS). Results The results of the time to rise from the floor at baseline ranged from 1.2 to 29.4 seconds in the boys who could perform the test. 49 patients were unable to perform the test at baseline and 87 at 12 month The 6MWT values ranged from 82 to 567 meters at baseline. 3 patients lost the ability to perform the 6mwt at 12 months. The correlation between time to rise from the floor and 6MWT at baseline was high (r = 0.6, p<0.01). Conclusions Both time to rise from the floor and baseline 6MWT were relevant for predicting 6MWT changes in the group above the age of 7 years, with no interaction between the two measures, as the impact of time to rise from the floor on 6MWT change was similar in the patients below and above 350 m. Our results suggest that, time to rise from the floor can be considered an additional important prognostic factor of 12 month changes on the 6MWT and, more generally, of disease progression. PMID:26982196

  17. Relationship between the rise-time of single-fibre action potentials and radial distance in human muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Javier; Navallas, Javier; Gila, Luis; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Malanda, Armando

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to check the theoretical predictions of the small changes in the rise-time of human single muscle fibre action potentials (SFAPs) experimentally when the recording electrode is in the proximity of the fibre. Using a single-fibre electrode, 93 sets of consecutive SFAPs were recorded under needle movement from the m. tibialis anterior of four normal subjects. In each SFAP set, the excitation source was assumed to remain unchanged and thus only the fibre-electrode distance varied between consecutive discharges. The changes of SFAP rise-time with peak-to-peak amplitude (V(pp)) within each SFAP set were used to study the relationship between rise-time and radial distance. SFAP rise-time was relatively unchanged when V(pp) was greater than 1.0-1.5 mV. For V(pp) smaller than 1.0-1.5 mV, the sensitivity of rise-time to changes in radial distance increased considerably. Although the SFAP rise-time is practically not influenced by changes in radial distance in the proximity of muscle fibres, future work is necessary to confirm the hypothesis of using the rise-time for estimating changes in the intracellular action potential (IAP) depolarisation phase. The studies are useful in diagnostics and following the results of treatment in patients suffering from muscular dystrophy or myopathy, they are known to be accompanied by severe changes in the duration of IAP. Copyright (c) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Taxi Time Prediction at Charlotte Airport Using Fast-Time Simulation and Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate taxi time prediction is required for enabling efficient runway scheduling that can increase runway throughput and reduce taxi times and fuel consumptions on the airport surface. Currently NASA and American Airlines are jointly developing a decision-support tool called Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) that assists airport ramp controllers to make gate pushback decisions and improve the overall efficiency of airport surface traffic. In this presentation, we propose to use Linear Optimized Sequencing (LINOS), a discrete-event fast-time simulation tool, to predict taxi times and provide the estimates to the runway scheduler in real-time airport operations. To assess its prediction accuracy, we also introduce a data-driven analytical method using machine learning techniques. These two taxi time prediction methods are evaluated with actual taxi time data obtained from the SARDA human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation for Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) using various performance measurement metrics. Based on the taxi time prediction results, we also discuss how the prediction accuracy can be affected by the operational complexity at this airport and how we can improve the fast time simulation model before implementing it with an airport scheduling algorithm in a real-time environment.

  19. Parallel Configuration For Fast Superconducting Strip Line Detectors With Very Large Area In Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.

    2009-12-16

    We realized a very fast and large Superconducting Strip Line Detector based on a parallel configuration of nanowires. The detector with size 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} recorded a sub-nanosecond pulse width of 700 ps in FWHM (400 ps rise time and 530 ps relaxation time) for lysozyme monomers/multimers molecules accelerated at 175 keV in a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This record is the best in the class of superconducting detectors and comparable with the fastest NbN superconducting single photon detector of 10x10 {mu}m{sup 2}. We succeeded in acquiring mass spectra as the first step for a scale-up to {approx}mm pixel size for high throughput MS analysis, while keeping a fast response.

  20. Magnitude and timing of episodic sea-level rise during the last deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locker, S.D.; Hine, A.C.; Tedesco, L.P.; Shinn, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A succession of elevated ridge deposits on the south Florida margin was mapped using high-resolution seismic and side-scan sonar imaging in water depths ranging from 50 to 124 m. The ridges are interpreted to be subtidal shoal complexes and paleoshorelines (eolian dune or beach) formed during the last sea-level transgression. Oolitic and skeletal grainstones and mixed skeletal-peloidal-ooid packstones were recovered using a research submersible. All of the grains are of shallow-water or intertidal origin, and both marine and nonmarine cements were identified. Formation and preservation of these features are attributed to episodic and rapid changes in the rate of the deglacial sea-level rise at the onset of the termination 1A ??18O excursion. This high-resolution record of sea-level change appears to be related to deglacial processes operating on submillennial time scales and supports increasing evidence of rapid episodic fluctuations in ice volume, climate, and ocean-circulation patterns during glacialinterglacial transitions.

  1. Synchronous timing of multi-energy fast beam extraction during a single AGS cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Gabusi, J.; Naase, S.

    1985-01-01

    Synchronous triggering of fast beams is required because the field of Kicker Magnets must rise within the open space between one beam bunch and the next. Within the Brookhaven AGS, Fast Extracted Beam (FEB) triggering combines nominal timing, based on beam energy with bunch-to-bunch synchronization, based on the accelerating rf waveform. During beam acceleration, a single bunch is extracted at 22 GeV/c and within the same AGS cycle, the remaining eleven bunches are extracted at 28.4 GeV/c. When the single bunch is extracted, a ''hole'', which is left in the remaining circulating beam, can appear in random locations within the second extraction during successive AGS cycles. To overcome this problem, a synchronous rf/12 counting scheme and logic circuitry are used to keep track of the bunch positions relative to each other, and to place the ''hole'' in any desired location within the second extraction. The rf/12 signal is used also to synchronize experimenters triggers.

  2. Diversity of Decline-Rate-Corrected Type 1a Supernova Rise times:One Mode or Two?

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-05-01

    B-band light-curve rise times for eight unusually well-observed nearby Type Ia supernova (SNe) are fitted by a newly developed template-building algorithm, using light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. From the available literature, photometric BVRI data collected over many months, including the earliest points, are reconciled, combined, and fitted to a unique time of explosion for each SN. On average, after they are corrected for light-curve decline rate, three SNe rise in 18.81 {+-} 0.36 days, while five SNe rise in 16.64 {+-} 0.21 days. If all eight SNe are sampled from a single parent population (a hypothesis not favored by statistical tests), the rms intrinsic scatter of the decline-rate-corrected SN rise time is 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.52} days--a first measurement of this dispersion. The corresponding global mean rise time is 17.44 {+-} 0.39 days, where the uncertainty is dominated by intrinsic variance. This value is {approx}2 days shorter than two published averages that nominally are twice as precise, though also based on small samples. When comparing high-z to low-z SN luminosities for determining cosmological parameters, bias can be introduced by use of a light-curve template with an unrealistic rise time. If the period over which light curves are sampled depends on z in a manner typical of current search and measurement strategies, a two-day discrepancy in template rise time can bias the luminosity comparison by {approx}0.03 magnitudes.

  3. The rising star formation histories of distant galaxies and implications for gas accretion with time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, Casey; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2011-04-01

    Distant galaxies show correlations between their current star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, implying that their star formation histories (SFHs) are highly similar. Moreover, observations show that the ultraviolet luminosities and stellar masses grow from z= 8 to 3, implying that the SFRs increase with time. We compare the cosmologically averaged evolution in galaxies at 3 < z < 8 at constant comoving number density, n= 2 × 10-4 Mpc-3. This allows us to study the evolution of stellar mass and star formation in the galaxy predecessors and descendants in ways not possible using galaxies selected at constant stellar mass or SFR, quantities that themselves evolve strongly in time. We show that the cosmologically averaged SFRs of these galaxies increase smoothly from z= 8 to 3 as Ψ(t) ˜tα with α= 1.7 ± 0.2. This conflicts with assumptions that the SFR is either constant or declines exponentially in time. Furthermore, we show that the stellar mass growth in these galaxies is consistent with this derived SFH. This provides evidence that the slope of the high-mass end of the initial mass function is approximately Salpeter unless the duty cycle of star formation is much less than unity. We argue that these relations follow from gas accretion (either through accretion or delivered by mergers) coupled with galaxy disc growth under the assumption that the SFR depends on the local gas surface density. This predicts that gas fractions decrease from z= 8 to 3 on average as fgas˜ (1 +z)0.9 for galaxies with this number density. The implied galaxy gas accretion rates at z > 4 are as fast and may even exceed the SFR: this is the ‘gas accretion epoch’. At z < 4 the SFR overtakes the implied gas accretion rate, indicating a period where galaxies consume gas faster than it is acquired. At z≲ 3, galaxies with this number density depart from these relations implying that star formation and gas accretion are slowed at later times.

  4. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fujio

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  5. A pipette-based calibration system for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with fast response times.

    PubMed

    Ramsson, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that utilizes the oxidation and/or reduction of an analyte of interest to infer rapid changes in concentrations. In order to calibrate the resulting oxidative or reductive current, known concentrations of an analyte must be introduced under controlled settings. Here, I describe a simple and cost-effective method, using a Petri dish and pipettes, for the calibration of carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMs) using FSCV.

  6. MOSFET solid state switching circuit improves the 0 to 99% rise time for framing camera deflection electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, A.T.; Thomas, S.

    1996-09-01

    We have improved the 0 to 99% rise time voltage on our 2 frame deflection plates from 160 to 65 nS with the addition of a peaking circuit that works in conjunction with our primary 2 frame deflection circuitry. Our peaking technique has applications to other HV pulsers including those which must drive 51 ohm loads. Generally, rise time voltages are measured between 10 and 90%. To minimize the camera image blur resulting from the dynamic influence of deflection plate potentials acting on photocathode electrons, it was necessary to design a circuit that would rise from 0 to the 99% voltage level in under 100nS. Once this voltage was reached, it was necessary to stay within 1% of the attained voltage level for a duration of 1 uS. This was accomplished with the use of MOSFET solid state switching.

  7. Perioperative fasting time among cancer patients submitted to gastrointestinal surgeries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nayara de Castro; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2017-05-25

    To identify the length of perioperative fasting among patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Retrospective cohort study, developed by consulting the medical records of 128 patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. The mean of total length of fasting was 107.6 hours. The total length of fasting was significantly associated with the number of symptoms presented before (p=0.000) and after the surgery (p=0.007), the length of hospital stay (p=0.000), blood transfusion (p=0.013), nasogastric tube (p=0.001) and nasojejunal tube (p=0,003), postoperative admission at ICU (p=0.002), postoperative death (p=0.000) and length of preoperative fasting (p=0.000). The length of fasting is associated with complications that affect the quality of the patients' postoperative recovery and nurses' work. The nursing team should be alert to this aspect and being responsible for overseeing the patients' interest, should not permit the unnecessary extension of fasting. Identificar la duración del ayuno perioperatorio entre los pacientes sometidos a cirugías de cáncer gastrointestinal. Estudio de cohorte retrospectivo, por consulta de los registros médicos de 128 pacientes sometidos a cirugías de cáncer gastrointestinal. La media de la duración total del ayuno fue de 107,6 horas. La duración total del ayuno se asoció significativamente con el número de síntomas presentados antes (p=0,000) y después de la cirugía (p=0,007), la duración de la estancia hospitalaria (p=0,000), transfusión de sangre (p=0,013),tubo nasogástrico (P=0,003), ingreso postoperatorio en la UCI (p=0,002), muerte postoperatoria (p=0,000) y duración del ayuno preoperatorio (p=0,000). La duración del ayuno se asocia con complicaciones que afectan la calidad de la recuperación postoperatoria de los pacientes y el trabajo de enfermería. El equipo de enfermería debe estar alerta en relación a este aspecto y ser responsable de supervisar el interés de los pacientes, no

  8. Preoperative fasting times in elective surgical patients at a referral Hospital in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Worknehe Agegnehu; Rukewe, Ambrose; Bekele, Negussie Alula; Stoffel, Moeng; Dichabeng, Mompelegi Nicoh; Shifa, Jemal Zeberga

    2016-01-01

    Adults and children are required to fast before anaesthesia to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. However, prolonged periods of fasting are unnecessary and may cause complications. This study was conducted to evaluate preoperative fasting period in our centre and compare it with the ASA recommendations and factors that influence fasting periods. This is a cross-sectional study of preoperative fasting times among elective surgical patients. A total numbers of 260 patients were interviewed as they arrived at the reception area of operating theatre using questionnaire. Majority of patients (98.1%) were instructed to fast from midnight. Fifteen patients (5.8%) reported that they were told the importance of preoperative fasting. The mean fasting period were 15.9±2.5 h (range 12.0-25.3 h) for solids and 15.3±2.3 h (range 12.0-22.0 h) for liquids. The mean duration of fasting was significantly longer for patients operated after midday compared to those operated before midday, p<0.001. The mean fasting periods were 7.65 times longer for clear liquid and 2.5 times for solids than the ASA guidelines. It is imperative that the Hospital should establish Preoperative fasting policies and teach the staff who should ensure compliance with guidelines.

  9. Preoperative fasting times in elective surgical patients at a referral Hospital in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Worknehe Agegnehu; Rukewe, Ambrose; Bekele, Negussie Alula; Stoffel, Moeng; Dichabeng, Mompelegi Nicoh; Shifa, Jemal Zeberga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adults and children are required to fast before anaesthesia to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. However, prolonged periods of fasting are unnecessary and may cause complications. This study was conducted to evaluate preoperative fasting period in our centre and compare it with the ASA recommendations and factors that influence fasting periods. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of preoperative fasting times among elective surgical patients. A total numbers of 260 patients were interviewed as they arrived at the reception area of operating theatre using questionnaire. Results Majority of patients (98.1%) were instructed to fast from midnight. Fifteen patients (5.8%) reported that they were told the importance of preoperative fasting. The mean fasting period were 15.9±2.5 h (range 12.0-25.3 h) for solids and 15.3±2.3 h (range 12.0-22.0 h) for liquids. The mean duration of fasting was significantly longer for patients operated after midday compared to those operated before midday, p<0.001. Conclusion The mean fasting periods were 7.65 times longer for clear liquid and 2.5 times for solids than the ASA guidelines. It is imperative that the Hospital should establish Preoperative fasting policies and teach the staff who should ensure compliance with guidelines. PMID:27222691

  10. Implementation of pipelined FastICA on FPGA for real-time blind source separation.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Lee, Ming-Huan; Wu, Yu-Te; Lee, Po-Lei

    2008-06-01

    Fast independent component analysis (FastICA) algorithm separates the independent sources from their mixtures by measuring non-Gaussian. FastICA is a common offline method to identify artifact and interference from their mixtures such as electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and electrocardiogram (ECG). Therefore, it is valuable to implement FastICA for real-time signal processing. In this paper, the FastICA algorithm is implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), with the ability of real-time sequential mixed signals processing by the proposed pipelined FastICA architecture. Moreover, in order to increase the numbers precision, the hardware floating-point (FP) arithmetic units had been carried out in the hardware FastICA. In addition, the proposed pipeline FastICA provides the high sampling rate (192 kHz) capability by hand coding the hardware FastICA in hardware description language (HDL). To verify the features of the proposed hardware FastICA, simulations are first performed, then real-time signal processing experimental results are presented using the fabricated platform. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented hardware FastICA as expected.

  11. Turbulence Scales, Rise Times, Caustics, and the Simulation of Sonic Boom Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Allan D.

    1996-01-01

    The general topic of atmospheric turbulence effects on sonic boom propagation is addressed with especial emphasis on taking proper and efficient account of the contributions of the portion oi the turbulence that is associated with extremely high wavenumber components. The recent work reported by Bart Lipkens in his doctoral thesis is reexamined to determine whether the good agreement between his measured rise times with the 1971 theory of the author is fortuitous. It is argued that Lipken's estimate of the distance to the first caustic was a gross overestimate because of the use of a sound speed correlation function shaped like a gaussian curve. In particular, it is argued that the expected distance to the first caustic varies with the kinematic viscosity nu and the energy epsilon dissipated per unit mass per unit time, and the sound speed c as : d(sub first caustic) = nu(exp 7/12) c(exp 2/3)/ epsilon(exp 5/12)(nu x epsilon/c(exp 4))(exp a), where the exponent a is greater than -7/12 and can be argued to be either O or 1/24. In any event, the surprising aspect of the relationship is that it actually goes to zero as the viscosity goes to zero with s held constant. It is argued that the apparent overabundance of caustics can be grossly reduced by a general computational and analytical perspective that partitions the turbulence into two parts, divided by a wavenumber k(sub c). Wavenumbers higher than kc correspond to small-scale turbulence, and the associated turbulence can be taken into account by a renormalization of the ambient sound speed so that the result has a small frequency dependence that results from a spatial averaging over of the smaller-scale turbulent fluctuations. Selection of k(sub c). can be made so large that only a very small number of caustics are encountered if one adopts the premise that the frequency dispersion of pulses is caused by that part of the turbulence spectrum which lies in the inertial range originally predicted by Kolmogoroff. The

  12. Actual preoperative fasting time in Brazilian hospitals: the BIGFAST multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    de Aguilar-Nascimento, José E; de Almeida Dias, Ana L; Dock-Nascimento, Diana B; Correia, Maria Isabel TD; Campos, Antonio CL; Portari-Filho, Pedro Eder; Oliveira, Sergio S

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged fasting increases organic response to trauma. This multicenter study investigated the gap between the prescribed and the actual preoperative fasting times in Brazilian hospitals and factors associated with this gap. Methods Patients (18–90-years-old) who underwent elective operations between August 2011 and September 2012 were included in the study. The actual and prescribed times for fasting were collected and correlated with sex, age, surgical disease (malignancies or benign disease), operation type, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, type of hospital (public or private), and nutritional status. Results A total of 3,715 patients (58.1% females) with a median age of 49 (18–94) years from 16 Brazilian hospitals entered the study. The median (range) preoperative fasting time was 12 (2–216) hours, and fasting time was longer (P<0.001) in hospitals using a traditional fasting protocol (13 [6–216] hours) than in others that had adopted new guidelines (8 [2–48] hours). Almost 80% (n=2,962) of the patients were operated on after 8 or more hours of fasting and 46.2% (n=1,718) after more than 12 hours. Prolonged fasting was not associated with physical score, age, sex, type of surgery, or type of hospital. Patients operated on due to a benign disease had an extended duration of preoperative fasting. Conclusion Actual preoperative fasting time is significantly longer than prescribed fasting time in Brazilian hospitals. Most of these hospitals still adopt traditional rather than modern fasting guidelines. All patients are at risk of long periods of fasting, especially those in hospitals that follow traditional practices. PMID:24627636

  13. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-15

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma.

  14. Learning Novel Phonological Representations in Developmental Dyslexia: Associations with Basic Auditory Processing of Rise Time and Phonological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia are known to have impaired lexical phonological representations. Here, we explore associations between learning new phonological representations, phonological awareness, and sensitivity to amplitude envelope onsets (rise time). We show that individual differences in learning novel phonological…

  15. U. S. oil production rises for the first time since 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports on production of crude oil and lease condensate in the U.S., which averaged 7,363,400 bopd (the first year-to-year gain in five years), up 1.1% from 1990. This 77,300-bpd rise compares to a 301,600-bpd drop last year, and helped to keep domestic production above the 7.0 million bopd mark.

  16. Pseudo-Steady Diffusional Growth or Collapse of Bubbles Rising in Time Dependent Pressure Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-13

    et al. [12], Ishikawa, et al. [13] and Payvar [14] to name a few. Brankovic, et al. collected data for air and carbon dioxide bubbles with a triple...hydrostatic pressure field. Payvar [141 examined the effects, both experimentally and analytically, of a rapid de- compression on bubble growth for C0 2...Furthermore, bubble experimental rise data have only been obtained for a static hydrostatic head, with the exception of Payvar [14], but that was for a

  17. Uncertainty quantification of Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise using the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet (f.ETISh) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulthuis, Kevin; Arnst, Maarten; Pattyn, Frank; Favier, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainties in sea-level rise projections are mostly due to uncertainties in Antarctic ice-sheet predictions (IPCC AR5 report, 2013), because key parameters related to the current state of the Antarctic ice sheet (e.g. sub-ice-shelf melting) and future climate forcing are poorly constrained. Here, we propose to improve the predictions of Antarctic ice-sheet behaviour using new uncertainty quantification methods. As opposed to ensemble modelling (Bindschadler et al., 2013) which provides a rather limited view on input and output dispersion, new stochastic methods (Le Maître and Knio, 2010) can provide deeper insight into the impact of uncertainties on complex system behaviour. Such stochastic methods usually begin with deducing a probabilistic description of input parameter uncertainties from the available data. Then, the impact of these input parameter uncertainties on output quantities is assessed by estimating the probability distribution of the outputs by means of uncertainty propagation methods such as Monte Carlo methods or stochastic expansion methods. The use of such uncertainty propagation methods in glaciology may be computationally costly because of the high computational complexity of ice-sheet models. This challenge emphasises the importance of developing reliable and computationally efficient ice-sheet models such as the f.ETISh ice-sheet model (Pattyn, 2015), a new fast thermomechanical coupled ice sheet/ice shelf model capable of handling complex and critical processes such as the marine ice-sheet instability mechanism. Here, we apply these methods to investigate the role of uncertainties in sub-ice-shelf melting, calving rates and climate projections in assessing Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise for the next centuries using the f.ETISh model. We detail the methods and show results that provide nominal values and uncertainty bounds for future sea-level rise as a reflection of the impact of the input parameter uncertainties under

  18. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controversial. Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker. Patients testing for serum PSA levels are often concomitantly submitting to other tests that require fasting, subjecting certain patients to a fasting PSA level while others not. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this discrepancy in fasting state translates into an effect on serum PSA levels. Serum PSA levels and fasting time records for 157 276 men who underwent testing at Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS; Calgary, Alberta, Canada) between 01 January 2010 and 31 March 2013 were accessed. Linear regression models of mean PSA levels and fasting times revealed a statistically important relationship at certain fasting times. Applying a dynamic mathematical model to explore the clinical effect of fasting suggests minimal impact on serum PSA result interpretation. Thus, patients can be tested for serum PSA levels regardless of their fasting state.

  19. Relationship between gastrointestinal transit time and anesthetic fasting protocols in the captive chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Ardente, A; Chinnadurai, S; De Voe, R; Stringer, E; Webb, T; Ireland, J; Saker, K

    2011-06-01

    Lengthy social separation and prolonged fasting time contribute to increased risks associated with anesthesia in captive primates. This study is an initial attempt to identify a safe pre-anesthetic fasting procedure by identifying gastric emptying time (GET) and gastrointestinal transit time (GTT) of captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. Seven adult chimpanzees at the North Carolina Zoo immobilized for annual physical examinations were fed barium-impregnated polyethylene spheres to measure GET. Eleven animals were individually fed a color dye marker and fecal passage was observed to determine GTT. Gastric emptying time (GET) was approximated to be >3 hours but <16 hours. The mean GTT was 16.5 hours. This study indicates that a fasting time of 3 hours would allow for complete gastric emptying and could potentially replace the current overnight fast (≥16 hour) to help minimize complications associated with pre-anesthetic fasting in captive primates. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Fast Turn-Off Times Observed in Experimental 4H SiC Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Room temperature measurements of the turn-off time (t(sub q)) are reported for several packaged, npnp developmental power thyristors based on 4H-type SiC and rated 400 V, 2 A. Turn-off is effected by a 50 V pulse of applied reverse voltage, from a state of a steady 1 A forward current. Plots of t(sub q) against the ramp rate (dV(sub AK)/dt) of reapplied forward voltage are presented for preset values of limiting anode-to-cathode voltage (V(sub AK,max)). The lowest t(sub q) measured was about 180 ns. A rapid rise of these t(sub q) curves was observed for values of V(sub AK,max) that are only about a fifth of the rated voltage, whereas comparative t(sub q) plots for a commercial, fast turn-off, Si-based thyristor at a proportionately reduced V(sub AK,max) showed no such behavior. Hence these SiC thyristors may have problems arising from material defects or surface passivation. The influence the R-C-D gate bypass circuit that was used is briefly discussed.

  1. Fast explicit diffiusion for long-time integration of parabolic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bähr, Martin; Breuß, Michael; Wunderlich, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to motivate the application of the recent numerical scheme called Fast Explicit Diffusion (FED) to solve long-term parabolic problems. With the purpose of performing long integration times the FED method is a simple and fast explicit solver, which has been introduced in the field of image processing. We show that FED is at least as fast as standard implicit methods, often has comparable or even better accuracy and is much easier to implement.

  2. Dead-Time Modifications to Fast Fourier Transform Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Jahoda, K.; Swank, J. H.; Morgan, E. H.; Giles, A. B.

    1995-08-01

    Time series analysis in X-ray astronomy is complicated by the effects of detector dead time which can cause significant departures of power spectra from those expected from simple Poisson statistics. In this paper we study the effects of both the paralyzable and nonparalyzable dead times on the underlying time series which obeys Poisson counting statistics. We present analytical formulae for the autocorrelation function, auto-covariances, and power spectra, for both kinds of dead time. These formulae, taken as a whole, offer a general qualitative and quantitative framework to further understand the effects of dead time in an X-ray detection and data processing system.

  3. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  4. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Doll, J. C.; Loizeau, F.; Hosseini, N.; Peng, A. W.; Fantner, G. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2017-04-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10-90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10-90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  5. Early to Rise? The Effect of Daily Start Times on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Finley

    2012-01-01

    Local school districts often stagger daily start times for their schools in order to reduce busing costs. This paper uses data on all middle school students in Wake County, NC from 1999 to 2006 to identify the causal effect of daily start times on academic performance. Using variation in start times within schools over time, the effect is a two…

  6. Early to Rise? The Effect of Daily Start Times on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Finley

    2012-01-01

    Local school districts often stagger daily start times for their schools in order to reduce busing costs. This paper uses data on all middle school students in Wake County, NC from 1999 to 2006 to identify the causal effect of daily start times on academic performance. Using variation in start times within schools over time, the effect is a two…

  7. Influence of voltage rise time on phase locking by priming effect in weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dewen; Deng, Yuqun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Wu, Ping; Chen, Changhua

    2017-05-01

    Phase locking is the key point of coherent power combination, which is very important for the development of high power microwave sources. In this paper, theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations investigate the influence of the diode voltage rise time on phase locking by the priming effect in a weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). When the diode voltage rise time becomes long and the final output frequency remains unchanged, the initial operation frequency may fluctuate around a value which is not equal to the final output frequency. Moreover, this state may last for several nanoseconds and then jumps to the final output frequency, which is very important for phase locking. Besides, it is suggested that, due to the weak resonance of the RF cavity without the electron beam, the microwave signal with frequency which is much lower than the final output frequency is usually excited at the beginning of the starting process. Finally, it is found that, when the injected frequency approaches the frequency of the initial microwave signal, the phase locking by the priming effect in the RBWO with long voltage rise time is noticeably improved, and the starting process becomes more rapid as well. The simulation results agree well with theoretical analysis.

  8. Spark-Timing Control Based on Correlation of Maximum-Economy Spark Timing, Flame-front Travel, and Cylinder-Pressure Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Harvey A; Heinicke, Orville H; Haynie, William H

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a full-scale air-cooled cylinder in order to establish an effective means of maintaining maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. Variable fuel-air-ratio runs were conducted in which relations were determined between the spark travel, and cylinder-pressure rise. An instrument for controlling spark timing was developed that automatically maintained maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. The instrument also indicated the occurrence of preignition.

  9. Fast and Accurate Estimates of Divergence Times from Big Data.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Tao, Qiqing; Tamura, Koichiro; Kumar, Sudhir

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing advances in sequencing technology have led to an explosive expansion in the molecular data available for building increasingly larger and more comprehensive timetrees. However, Bayesian relaxed-clock approaches frequently used to infer these timetrees impose a large computational burden and discourage critical assessment of the robustness of inferred times to model assumptions, influence of calibrations, and selection of optimal data subsets. We analyzed eight large, recently published, empirical datasets to compare time estimates produced by RelTime (a non-Bayesian method) with those reported by using Bayesian approaches. We find that RelTime estimates are very similar to Bayesian approaches, yet RelTime requires orders of magnitude less computational time. This means that the use of RelTime will enable greater rigor in molecular dating, because faster computational speeds encourage more extensive testing of the robustness of inferred timetrees to prior assumptions (models and calibrations) and data subsets. Thus, RelTime provides a reliable and computationally thrifty approach for dating the tree of life using large-scale molecular datasets.

  10. Achieving fast timing performance with multiplexed SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Cates, J. W.; Levin, C. S.

    2016-04-01

    Using time of flight (ToF) measurements for positron emission tomography (PET) is an attractive avenue for increasing the signal to noise (SNR) ratio of PET images. However, achieving excellent time resolution required for high SNR gain using silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) requires many resource heavy high bandwidth readout channels. A method of multiplexing many SiPM signals into a single electronic channel would greatly simplify ToF PET systems. However, multiplexing SiPMs degrades time resolution because of added dark counts and signal shaping. In this work the relative contribution of dark counts and signal shaping to timing degradation is simulated and a baseline correction technique to mitigate the effect of multiplexing on the time resolution of analog SiPMs is simulated and experimentally verified. A charge sharing network for multiplexing is proposed and tested. Results show a full width at half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of 232+/- 2 ps for a single 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  20 mm LYSO scintillation crystals coupled to an array of sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs that are multiplexed to a single timing channel (in addition to 4 position channels). A 4× 4 array of 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  20 mm LFS crystals showed an average FWHM coincidence time resolution of 278+/- 7 ps using the same timing scheme. All experiments were performed at room temperature with no thermal regulation. These results show that excellent time resolution for ToF can be achieved with a highly multiplexed analog SiPM readout.

  11. Achieving fast timing performance with multiplexed SiPMs.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Cates, J W; Levin, C S

    2016-04-07

    Using time of flight (ToF) measurements for positron emission tomography (PET) is an attractive avenue for increasing the signal to noise (SNR) ratio of PET images. However, achieving excellent time resolution required for high SNR gain using silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) requires many resource heavy high bandwidth readout channels. A method of multiplexing many SiPM signals into a single electronic channel would greatly simplify ToF PET systems. However, multiplexing SiPMs degrades time resolution because of added dark counts and signal shaping. In this work the relative contribution of dark counts and signal shaping to timing degradation is simulated and a baseline correction technique to mitigate the effect of multiplexing on the time resolution of analog SiPMs is simulated and experimentally verified. A charge sharing network for multiplexing is proposed and tested. Results show a full width at half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of [Formula: see text] ps for a single 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  20 mm LYSO scintillation crystals coupled to an array of sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs that are multiplexed to a single timing channel (in addition to 4 position channels). A [Formula: see text] array of 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  20 mm LFS crystals showed an average FWHM coincidence time resolution of [Formula: see text] ps using the same timing scheme. All experiments were performed at room temperature with no thermal regulation. These results show that excellent time resolution for ToF can be achieved with a highly multiplexed analog SiPM readout.

  12. Analog electro-optical readout of SiPMs achieves fast timing required for time-of-flight PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Bieniosek, MF

    2015-01-01

    The design of combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems presents a number of challenges to engineers, as it forces the PET system to acquire data in space constrained environment that is sensitive to electro-magnetic interference and contains high static, radio frequency (RF) and gradient fields. In this work we validate fast timing performance of a PET scintillation detector using a potentially very compact, very low power, and MR compatible readout method in which analog silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) signals are transmitted optically away from the MR bore with little or even no additional readout electronics. This analog ‘electro-optial’ method could reduce the entire PET readout in the MR bore to two compact, low power components (SiPMs and lasers). Our experiments show fast timing performance from analog electro-optical readout with and without pre-amplification. With 3mm × 3mm × 20mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals and Excelitas SiPMs the best two-sided fwhm coincident timing resolution achieved was 220 +/- 3ps in electrical mode, 230 +/- 2ps in electro-optical with preamp mode, and 253 +/- 2ps in electro-optical without preamp mode. Timing measurements were also performed with Hamamatsu SiPMs and 3mm × 3mm × 5mm crystals. In the future the timing degradation seen can be further reduced with lower laser noise or improvements SiPM rise time or gain. PMID:25905626

  13. Fast time-domain measurements on telecom single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allgaier, Markus; Vigh, Gesche; Ansari, Vahid; Eigner, Christof; Quiring, Viktor; Ricken, Raimund; Brecht, Benjamin; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Direct measurements on the temporal envelope of quantum light are a challenging task and not many examples are known because most classical pulse characterisation methods do not work on the single-photon level. Knowledge of both spectrum and timing can, however, give insights on properties that cannot be determined by the spectral intensity alone. While temporal measurements on single photons on timescales of tens of picoseconds are possible with superconducting photon detectors, and picosecond measurements have been performed using streak cameras, there are no commercial single-photon sensitive devices with femtosecond resolution available. While time-domain sampling using sum-frequency generation has already been exploited for such a measurement, inefficient conversion has necessitated long integration times to build the temporal profile. We demonstrate a highly efficient waveguided sum-frequency generation process in Lithium Niobate to measure the temporal envelope of single photons with femtosecond resolution with short enough acquisition time to provide a live-view of the measurement. We demonstrate the measurement technique and combine it with spectral measurements using a dispersive-fibre time-of-flight spectrometer to determine upper and lower bounds for the spectral purity of heralded single photons. The approach complements the joint spectral intensity measurements as a measure on the purity can be given without knowledge of the spectral phase.

  14. Fast underdetermined BSS architecture design methodology for real time applications.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Suresh; Reddy, P Sreenivasa; Acharyya, Amit; Naik, Ganesh R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a high speed architecture design methodology for the Under-determined Blind Source Separation (UBSS) algorithm using our recently proposed high speed Discrete Hilbert Transform (DHT) targeting real time applications. In UBSS algorithm, unlike the typical BSS, the number of sensors are less than the number of the sources, which is of more interest in the real time applications. The DHT architecture has been implemented based on sub matrix multiplication method to compute M point DHT, which uses N point architecture recursively and where M is an integer multiples of N. The DHT architecture and state of the art architecture are coded in VHDL for 16 bit word length and ASIC implementation is carried out using UMC 90 - nm technology @V DD = 1V and @ 1MHZ clock frequency. The proposed architecture implementation and experimental comparison results show that the DHT design is two times faster than state of the art architecture.

  15. Gender Differences in Time Use among Adolescents in Developing Countries: Implications of Rising School Enrollment Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Cynthia B.; Grant, Monica; Ritchie, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This comparative analysis of gender differences in time use among adolescents uses surveys from five developing countries and is motivated by an interest in gender role socialization and gendered patterns of behavior during adolescence. Exploring differences in work (both noneconomic household work and labor market work) and leisure time among…

  16. Gender Differences in Time Use among Adolescents in Developing Countries: Implications of Rising School Enrollment Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Cynthia B.; Grant, Monica; Ritchie, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This comparative analysis of gender differences in time use among adolescents uses surveys from five developing countries and is motivated by an interest in gender role socialization and gendered patterns of behavior during adolescence. Exploring differences in work (both noneconomic household work and labor market work) and leisure time among…

  17. Real time control of a fast RF impedance matching system

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Senko, T.; LaRue, P.; Wilson, J.R.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1996-12-31

    A real time control system has been developed to maintain an RF impedance match in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). This system is designed to adjust output parameters with a cycle period of approximately 100 {mu}seconds using commercially available VME based components and a UNIX workstation host. Advanced Ferrite Technologies (AFT) has developed the hybrid tuning system (HTS) which has the capability of tracking a mismatch on the time scale of milliseconds (2.5 MW, 60 MHz) by varying the magnetic field bias of ferrite loaded transmission lines. The control algorithm uses a combination of neural network and fuzzy logic techniques. Initial results of a test facility using a low power prototype are presented. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Fast and Flexible Multivariate Time Series Subsequence Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaduri, Kanishka; Oza, Nikunj C.; Zhu, Qiang; Srivastava, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Multivariate Time-Series (MTS) are ubiquitous, and are generated in areas as disparate as sensor recordings in aerospace systems, music and video streams, medical monitoring, and financial systems. Domain experts are often interested in searching for interesting multivariate patterns from these MTS databases which often contain several gigabytes of data. Surprisingly, research on MTS search is very limited. Most of the existing work only supports queries with the same length of data, or queries on a fixed set of variables. In this paper, we propose an efficient and flexible subsequence search framework for massive MTS databases, that, for the first time, enables querying on any subset of variables with arbitrary time delays between them. We propose two algorithms to solve this problem (1) a List Based Search (LBS) algorithm which uses sorted lists for indexing, and (2) a R*-tree Based Search (RBS) which uses Minimum Bounding Rectangles (MBR) to organize the subsequences. Both algorithms guarantee that all matching patterns within the specified thresholds will be returned (no false dismissals). The very few false alarms can be removed by a post-processing step. Since our framework is also capable of Univariate Time-Series (UTS) subsequence search, we first demonstrate the efficiency of our algorithms on several UTS datasets previously used in the literature. We follow this up with experiments using two large MTS databases from the aviation domain, each containing several millions of observations. Both these tests show that our algorithms have very high prune rates (>99%) thus needing actual disk access for only less than 1% of the observations. To the best of our knowledge, MTS subsequence search has never been attempted on datasets of the size we have used in this paper.

  19. Application of two-photon absorption in PWO scintillator for fast timing of interaction with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Buganov, O.; Korjik, M.; Fedorov, A.; Nargelas, S.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S.; Vaitkevičius, A.

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at searching for fast phenomena in scintillators in sub-10-ps range, a benchmark timing for the time response of radiation detectors in particle colliders. The pump-and-probe optical absorption technique with a tunable-wavelength parametric oscillator as the pump and a continuous-spectrum source as the probe beam was used to study lead tungstate PbWO4 (PWO) single crystals. It is shown that the rise time of the probe pulse absorption induced by the pump pulse is shorter than the pump pulse width of 200 fs. The approximately linear dependence of the probe absorption on the pump pulse energy density evidences that the induced absorption is caused by two-photon absorption involving one probe and one pump photon. We demonstrate that the intensity of the induced absorption at certain wavelengths is influenced by gamma irradiation, provided that an appropriate light polarization is selected. The application of the irradiation-sensitive nonlinearity for fast timing in radiation detectors is discussed.

  20. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity νDDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (ν0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (νf) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ν0 to ν0 + νf. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ν0 < νDDS < ν0 + νf. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  1. Impact of fasting time on hepatic lipid metabolism in nutritional animal studies.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo; Metoki, Kanae; Yamahira, Takashi; Kato, Masaki; Inoue, Nao; Nagao, Koji; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Many animal studies on improvement of lipid metabolism, using dietary components, fast the animals on the final day of the feeding. Although fasting has a significant impact on lipid metabolism, its time-dependent influence is not fully understood. We examined the effects of several fasting times on lipid metabolism. Rats fed with a semisynthetic diet for 2 wk were killed after 0 (9:00 am), 6 (7:00 am-1:00 pm), 9 (0:00 am-9:00 am), and 13 h (8:00 pm-9:00 am) of fasting. Compared to the 0 h group, marked reduction of liver weight and hepatic triacylglycerol content was observed in the 9 and 13 h groups. Activities of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis gradually decreased during fasting. In contrast, drastic time-dependent reduction of gene expression, of the enzymes, was observed. Expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase mRNA was higher in the fasting groups than in the 0 h group. Our study showed that fasting has a significant impact on several parameters related to lipid metabolism in rat liver.

  2. Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-06-14

    Most animals alternate periods of feeding with periods of fasting often coinciding with sleep. Upon >24 hr of fasting, humans, rodents, and other mammals enter alternative metabolic phases, which rely less on glucose and more on ketone body-like carbon sources. Both intermittent and periodic fasting result in benefits ranging from the prevention to the enhanced treatment of diseases. Similarly, time-restricted feeding (TRF), in which food consumption is restricted to certain hours of the day, allows the daily fasting period to last >12 hr, thus imparting pleiotropic benefits. Understanding the mechanistic link between nutrients and the fasting benefits is leading to the identification of fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs) that achieve changes similar to those caused by fasting. Given the pleiotropic and sustained benefits of TRF and FMDs, both basic science and translational research are warranted to develop fasting-associated interventions into feasible, effective, and inexpensive treatments with the potential to improve healthspan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Fast-Time Simulation Tool for Analysis of Airport Arrival Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Meyn, Larry A.; Neuman, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The basic objective of arrival sequencing in air traffic control automation is to match traffic demand and airport capacity while minimizing delays. The performance of an automated arrival scheduling system, such as the Traffic Management Advisor developed by NASA for the FAA, can be studied by a fast-time simulation that does not involve running expensive and time-consuming real-time simulations. The fast-time simulation models runway configurations, the characteristics of arrival traffic, deviations from predicted arrival times, as well as the arrival sequencing and scheduling algorithm. This report reviews the development of the fast-time simulation method used originally by NASA in the design of the sequencing and scheduling algorithm for the Traffic Management Advisor. The utility of this method of simulation is demonstrated by examining the effect on delays of altering arrival schedules at a hub airport.

  4. Optimal Fasting Time before Measurement of Serum Triglyceride Levels in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pongsuthana, Surapun; Tivatunsakul, Naris

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major public health problem. Elevated triglyceride levels are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Food intake interferes with the measurement of serum triglyceride levels, and in previous studies, fasting for 12 hours was recommended before blood sampling. In real-world practice, long fasting times cause patient discomfort and poor compliance, and the present study was, therefore, designed to determine the appropriate fasting time prior to measuring serum triglyceride levels. To determine the appropriate fasting time before measuring serum triglyceride levels. This was a pilot study performed using healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 30 years old from November 2013 to December 2013 at Rajavithi Hospital. The first blood sample was measured in the morning after fasting over 12 hours. The subjects then took their regular breakfast, after which they fasted for 8 hours. Blood samples were taken 6 and 8 hours later and sent to the laboratory for measurement of serum triglyceride levels. 40 volunteers, of whom 25 were female, were enrolled. Their mean age was 25.9 ± 2.81 years old, and their mean weight, height, and body mass index were 61.5 ± 12.5 kg, 167.2 ± 8.3 cm and 21.84 ± 3.1 kg/m2, respectively. Mean fasting serum triglyceride level at 12 hours was 80.23 ± 36.33 mg/dl, at 6 hours it was 110.65 ± 73.45 mg/dl, and at 8 hours it was 75.62 ± 46.81 mg/dl. The group fasting for 12 hours had significantly lower serum triglyceride levels than the group fasting for 6 hours (p-value = 0.003), but no significant difference was found between the group fasting for 12 hours and the one fasting for 8 hours (p-value = 0.493). The present study showed no significant difference in triglyceride levels in patients who had fasted or 8 hours and those who had done so for 12 hours. Fasting for only 8 hours before measurement of serum triglyceride may be sufficient.

  5. The rise of global warming skepticism: exploring affective image associations in the United States over time.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    This article explores how affective image associations to global warming have changed over time. Four nationally representative surveys of the American public were conducted between 2002 and 2010 to assess public global warming risk perceptions, policy preferences, and behavior. Affective images (positive or negative feelings and cognitive representations) were collected and content analyzed. The results demonstrate a large increase in "naysayer" associations, indicating extreme skepticism about the issue of climate change. Multiple regression analyses found that holistic affect and "naysayer" associations were more significant predictors of global warming risk perceptions than cultural worldviews or sociodemographic variables, including political party and ideology. The results demonstrate the important role affective imagery plays in judgment and decision-making processes, how these variables change over time, and how global warming is currently perceived by the American public. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. A CIMS Technique for Fast Time Response PAN Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, D. L.; Tanner, D. J.; Huey, G.

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) technique for detecting atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) utilizing I- chemistry. I- is a very selective reagent ion because it is unreactive with most atmospheric species including ozone, nitric acid, and water. It is synthesized by dissociative electron attachment to CF3I. Ambient air is sampled into the CIMS through heated 0.375" o.d. PFA Teflon tubing. PAN thermally dissociates in the Teflon tube to form CH3C(O)O2 (PA) and NO2. The CH3C(O)O2 reacts with I- in the CIMS flow tube at the gas kinetic rate [Villalta and Howard, 1996] to form CH3C(O)O- and IO, thus allowing for selective and sensitive detection of PAN. Preliminary data suggest that our sensitivity is at least one Hz/pptv of PAN. We routinely observed 1000-2000 Hz of CH3C(O)O- in room air this summer in Atlanta with a background of <50 Hz. The background was determined by either cooling the inlet or adding excess NO to the inlet to react away the peroxyacetyl radical before it entered the CIMS. These results indicate that a detection limit of less than 20 pptv for a one second integration period is feasible with this technique. A potential problem with this technique is destruction of the PA radicals via reaction with ambient NO. However, due to a very short effective reaction time in the inlet (5-10 ms), we estimate that reaction of PA with NO decreases the measured PAN level by less than 10% at a NO mixing ratio of 40 ppbv. Complications due to self reaction of the PA radical should also be insignificant for PAN levels less than 40 ppbv. Potential interferences from water, acetone, and other species will be addressed. Correlations of PAN with ozone and NOx measured in Atlanta will also be presented.

  7. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  8. Time Evolution of Plasma Parameters during the Rise of a Solar Prominence Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Díaz, A. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ~36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s-1. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (~9-12 km s-1) and large Doppler widths (~10 km s-1) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  9. Time Evolving Fission Chain Theory and Fast Neutron and Gamma-Ray Counting Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Here, we solve a simple theoretical model of time evolving fission chains due to Feynman that generalizes and asymptotically approaches the point model theory. The point model theory has been used to analyze thermal neutron counting data. This extension of the theory underlies fast counting data for both neutrons and gamma rays from metal systems. Fast neutron and gamma-ray counting is now possible using liquid scintillator arrays with nanosecond time resolution. For individual fission chains, the differential equations describing three correlated probability distributions are solved: the time-dependent internal neutron population, accumulation of fissions in time, and accumulation of leaked neutrons in time. Explicit analytic formulas are given for correlated moments of the time evolving chain populations. The equations for random time gate fast neutron and gamma-ray counting distributions, due to randomly initiated chains, are presented. Correlated moment equations are given for both random time gate and triggered time gate counting. There are explicit formulas for all correlated moments are given up to triple order, for all combinations of correlated fast neutrons and gamma rays. The nonlinear differential equations for probabilities for time dependent fission chain populations have a remarkably simple Monte Carlo realization. A Monte Carlo code was developed for this theory and is shown to statistically realize the solutions to the fission chain theory probability distributions. Combined with random initiation of chains and detection of external quanta, the Monte Carlo code generates time tagged data for neutron and gamma-ray counting and from these data the counting distributions.

  10. Composition and timing of carbonate vein precipitation within the igneous basement of the Early Cretaceous Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Li, S.; Hauff, F. F.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.; Yu, S.; Zhao, S.; Rausch, S.

    2013-12-01

    Shatsky Rise is an Early Cretaceous large igneous province located in the NW Pacific ca. 1500 km east of Japan and is the third-largest oceanic plateau on Earth (after Ontong Java and Kerguelen). Numerous calcium carbonate veins were recovered from the igneous basement of Shatsky Rise during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 324 (Sager et al., 2010). The chemical (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca) and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, δ18O, δ13C) compositions of these veins were determined to constrain the timing of vein formation and to provide valuable data for the reconstruction of past seawater composition. A dominant control of seawater chemistry on calcite composition is evident for most investigated vein samples with varying compositional contribution from the basaltic basement. The Sr/Ca ratio of the vein calcite is positively correlated with Mg/Ca and with δ18O, indicating warmer/colder precipitation temperatures with decreasing/increasing Sr/Ca (and Mg/Ca) ratios, respectively. Distinctly higher formation temperatures (as inferred from oxygen isotope ratios) indicative of hydrothermal vein formation are only observed at one site (Site U1350, drilled into the central part of Shatsky Rise). The highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios (least basement influence) of vein samples at each drill site range form 0.707264 to 0.707550 and are believed to best reflect contemporaneous Early Cretaceous seawater composition. In principle, age information can be deduced by correlating these ratios with the global seawater Sr isotope evolution. Since the Sr isotopic composition of seawater has fluctuated three times between the early and mid Cretaceous (McArthur et al., 2001) no unambiguous precipitation ages can be constrained by this method and vein precipitation could have occurred at any time between ˜80 and 140 Ma. However, based on combined chemical and isotopic data and correlations of vein composition with formation depth and inferred temperature, we argue for a rather early

  11. TIME EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING THE RISE OF A SOLAR PROMINENCE INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Díaz, A. J.

    2014-04-10

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ∼36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (∼9-12 km s{sup –1}) and large Doppler widths (∼10 km s{sup –1}) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  12. Are you hungry? Are you thirsty?--fasting times in elective outpatient pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Thomas; Wilson, Graham; Horne, Lesley; Weiss, Markus; Schmitz, Achim

    2011-09-01

    This study assessed the duration of pre-operative fasting in children and its impact on the subjective feeling of hunger and thirst prior to elective outpatient anesthesia. Pediatric fasting guidelines are designed to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents during general anesthesia, and a fasting regimen of 6-8 h for solids, 4 h for breast milk, and 2 h for clear fluids is commonly used. Anecdotal evidence suggests that fasting times are often excessive. A total of 1350 consecutive healthy children aged <16 (median 7.7, range 2-16) presenting for elective dental treatment under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective study. On hospital arrival, all children were asked when they last ate or drank and to rate their degree of hunger and thirst. The median (range) fasting times were 12:05 (00:45-21:50) hours and 07:57 (00:05-20:50) hours for solids and fluids, respectively. The majority of children were very hungry or starving (756/1350=56%), but less than a third of all children were very thirsty (361/1350=27%). Duration of solid food fast and severity of hunger correlated for patients fasted from before midnight (r=0.92) but not for food after midnight. No correlation was found for fluid intake and perception of thirst. This study shows that children presenting for elective outpatient surgery are suffering from a considerable amount of pre-operative discomfort because of excessive fasting. Strategies to guarantee minimal fasting at hospital admission are urgently needed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Characterizing and minimizing the effects of noise in tide gauge time series: relative and geocentric sea level rise around Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, Reed J.; Watson, Christopher S.; Church, John A.; White, Neil J.; Tregoning, Paul; Coleman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We quantify the rate of sea level rise around the Australian continent from an analysis of tide gauge and Global Positioning System (GPS) data sets. To estimate the underlying linear rates of sea level change in the presence of significant interannual and decadal variability (treated here as noise), we adopt and extend a novel network adjustment approach. We simultaneously estimate time-correlated noise as well as linear model parameters and realistic uncertainties from sea level time series at individual gauges, as well as from time-series differences computed between pairs of gauges. The noise content at individual gauges is consistent with a combination of white and time-correlated noise. We find that the noise in time series from the western coast of Australia is best described by a first-order Gauss-Markov model, whereas east coast stations generally exhibit lower levels of time-correlated noise that is better described by a power-law process. These findings suggest several decades of monthly tide gauge data are needed to reduce rate uncertainties to <0.5 mm yr-1 for undifferenced single site time series with typical noise characteristics. Our subsequent adjustment strategy exploits the more precise differential rates estimated from differenced time series from pairs of tide gauges to estimate rates among the network of 43 tide gauges that passed a stability analysis. We estimate relative sea level rates over three temporal windows (1900-2011, 1966-2011 and 1993-2011), accounting for covariance between time series. The resultant adjustment reduces the rate uncertainty across individual gauges, and partially mitigates the need for century-scale time series at all sites in the network. Our adjustment reveals a spatially coherent pattern of sea level rise around the coastline, with the highest rates in northern Australia. Over the time periods beginning in 1900, 1966 and 1993, we find weighted average rates of sea level rise of 1.4 ± 0.6, 1.7 ± 0.6 and 4.6 ± 0

  14. Electrophysiological aspects of the middle ear muscle reflex in the rat: latency, rise time and effect on sound transmission.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, H; Kingma, H; Kluge, C; Marres, E H

    1990-10-01

    The latency, the rise time and the influence of the acoustic reflex on sound transmission were investigated in the adult rat during ketamin anesthesia. This was done by recordings of the cochlear microphonics (CM) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the reflex responses of the tensor tympani muscle. The acoustic reflex was elicited by contralateral acoustic stimuli of which the intensity and frequency was varied. Ipsilaterally, the effect on sound transmission was determined by estimating the change in amplitude of the CM's of ipsilateral administered subliminal stimuli. It was shown that both the tensor tympani muscle and the stapedius muscle contribute in the reflex. The latency as well as the rise time of the reflex determined by CM recordings showed to be short (minimal values: 12 and 7 ms respectively). The mean latency of the tensor tympani muscle reflex, measured by EMG, was about 7 ms. The attenuation of 0.25-8 kHz tone bursts upto 115 dB SPL is limited to a mean maximum of 15 dB SPL. The maximal attenuation was shown to occur at 1 kHz. Frequencies above 2 kHz appeared to be the best elicitor of the middle ear muscle reflex.

  15. Analysis of the relationship between the rise-time and the amplitude of single-fibre potentials in human muscles.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Javier; Navallas, Javier; Gila, Luis; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Malanda, Armando

    2010-12-01

    Using the core-conductor theory, a single fibre action potential (SFAP) can be expressed as the convolution of a biolectrical source and a weight function. In the Dimitrov-Dimitrova (D-D) SFAP convolutional model, the first temporal derivative of the intracellular action potential (IAP) is used as the source. The present work evaluates the relationship between the SFAP peak-to-peak amplitude (V(pp)) and peak-to-peak interval (rise-time, RT) at different fibre-to-electrode distances using simulated signals obtained by the D-D model as well as real recordings. With a single fibre electrode, we recorded 63 sets of consecutive SFAPs from the m. tibialis anterior of four normal subjects. The needle was intentionally moved whilst recording each SFAP set. We used the observed changes in RT and V(pp) within each SFAP set as a point of reference with which to evaluate how closely the relationship between RT and V(pp) provided by the D-D model reflects real data. We found that half of the recorded SFAP sets had rise-times higher than those generated by the D-D model. We also showed the influence of the IAP spatial length on the sensitivity of RT and V(pp) with radial distance. The study reveals some inaccuracies in simulated SFAPs whose origin might be related to the assumptions made in the core-conductor theory. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Slow and Fast Transitions in the Rising Phase of Outbursts from NS-LMXB Transients, Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Serino, Motoko; Nakahira, Satoshi; Negoro, Hitoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed the initial rising behaviors of X-ray outbursts from two transient low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) containing a neutron-star (NS), Aquila X-1 (Aql X-1) and 4U 1608-52, which are continuously being monitored by MAXI/GSC in 2-20 keV, RXTE/ASM in 2-10 keV, and Swift/BAT in 15-50 keV. We found that the observed ten outbursts can be classified into two types based on the patterns of the relative intensity evolutions in the two energy bands below/above 15 keV. One type behaves as the 15-50 keV intensity achieves the maximum during the initial hard-state period, and drops greatly at the hard-to-soft state transition. On the other hand, the other type does as both the 2-15 keV and 15-50 keV intensities achieve the maximums after the transition. The former have the longer initial hard-state (gtrsim 9 d) than the latter (lesssim 5 d). Therefore, we named them as slow-type (S-type) and fast-type (F-type), respectively. These two types also show differences in the luminosity at the hard-to-soft state transition as well as in the average luminosity before the outburst started, where the S-type are higher than the F-type in both. These results suggest that the X-ray radiation during the pre-outburst period, which heats up the accretion disk and delays the disk transition (i.e., from a geometrically thick disk to a thin one), would determine whether the following outburst becomes S-type or F-type. The luminosity when the hard-to-soft state transition occurs is higher than ˜8 × 1036 erg s-1 in the S-type, which corresponds to 4% of the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 M⊙ NS.

  17. Fasting time and lipid parameters: association with hepatic steatosis — data from a random population sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend measuring plasma lipids in fasting patients. Recent studies, however, suggest that variation in plasma lipid concentrations secondary to fasting time may be minimal. Objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of fasting time on plasma lipid concentrations (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). A second objective was to determine the effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease exerted on the above-mentioned lipid levels. Method Subjects participating in a population-based cross-sectional study (2,445 subjects; 51.7% females) were questioned at time of phlebotomy regarding duration of pre-phlebotomy fasting. Total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were determined and correlated with length of fasting. An upper abdominal ultrasonographic examination was performed and body-mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their reported fasting periods of 1–4 h, 4–8 h and > 8 h. After application of the exclusion criteria, a total of 1,195 subjects (52.4% females) were included in the study collective. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for continuous variables and the chi-square test for categorical variables. The effects of age, BMI, WHR, alcohol consumption, fasting time and hepatic steatosis on the respective lipid variables were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results At multivariate analysis, fasting time was associated with elevated triglycerides (p = 0.0047 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0147 for 4–8 h among females; p < 0.0001 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0002 for 4–8 h among males) and reduced LDL cholesterol levels (p = 0.0003 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0327 for 4–8 h among males). Among males, hepatic steatosis represents an independent factor affecting elevated total cholesterol (p = 0.0278) and triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.0002). Conclusion

  18. Experimental results on time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography with fast-gated SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    We present experimental results of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) and show an increased imaged depth range for a given acquisition time compared to the non gated mode.

  19. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Models using Wake Encounter Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Bowles, Roland L.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.; Gloudesman, Thijs; van Lochem, Sander; Ras, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integration and evaluation of fast-time wake models with flight data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted detailed flight tests in 1995 and 1997 under the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Program to characterize wake vortex decay and wake encounter dynamics. In this study, data collected during Flight 705 were used to evaluate NASA's fast-time wake transport and decay models. Deterministic and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to define wake hazard bounds behind the wake generator. The methodology described in this paper can be used for further validation of fast-time wake models using en-route flight data, and for determining wake turbulence constraints in the design of air traffic management concepts.

  20. Performance evaluation of novel LaBr3(Ce) scintillator geometries for fast-timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedia, V.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Fraile, L. M.; Mach, H.; Udías, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of two LaBr3(Ce) crystals that were produced with special geometries, aimed at enhancing the scintillation light collection and thus the time resolution. Their design was motivated by the construction of high-performance fast-timing arrays like the FAst TIMing array for DESPEC (FATIMA), which demands a high packing factor in addition to good time and energy resolutions. Energy resolution and efficiency were measured using standard calibration sources. Timing measurements were performed at 60Co and 22Na γ-energies against a fast BaF2 reference detector. The time resolution was optimized by the choice of the photomultiplier bias voltage and the fine tuning of the constant fraction discriminator parameters. Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 toolkit were performed in order to achieve a better understanding of how the new geometries affect the light transport and thus the performance of the crystals. It is found that the conical-shaped LaBr3(Ce) crystals are optimal for fast-timing applications and for the construction of arrays such as FATIMA.

  1. RISE TIME DELAY DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1959-09-29

    A pulse-height discriminator for generating an output pulse when the accepted input pulse is approximately at its maximum value is described. A gating tube and a negative bias generator responsive to the derivative of the input pulse and means for impressing the output of the bias generator to at least one control electrode of the gating tube are included.

  2. Investigation on F layer height rise and equatorial spread F onset time: Signature of standing large-scale wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Balwada, S.; Pant, T. K.; Sumod, S. G.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial spread F observations have been categorized into three categories based on ionograms recorded over Sriharikota. First category comprised cases where the onset of equatorial spread F (ESF) was concurrent with the peak h'F time. Second and third categories comprised cases where the onset of ESF happened with a delay of 30 min and more than 30 min, respectively, with reference to the peak h'F time. Average peak h'F in the first category was more than 35 km higher than that in the second and third categories. Also, the peak vertical (upward) plasma drift was higher in the first category. Assuming the genesis of F region irregularity to have happened at or before the time of F layer attaining the peak height, late onset of ESF indicates the genesis of irregularities to have happened westward of Sriharikota. The fact that the peak h'F values were remarkably different in the three categories indicates a zonal variation of eastward electric field and postsunset height rise of F layer. The relative magnitude of the F layer height rise in the three different categories over Sriharikota has also been found to be significantly different than that over Thumba, an equatorial (magnetic) station located ~360 km westward of Sriharikota longitude. This scenario points toward the existence of a large-scale zonal standing wave in the F layer and its important role in F region instability process. Results presented in the manuscript have been discussed in the light of current understanding on the large-scale wave structure.

  3. High-voltage isolation transformer for sub-nanosecond rise time pulses constructed with annular parallel-strip transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Homma, Akira

    2011-07-01

    A novel annular parallel-strip transmission line was devised to construct high-voltage high-speed pulse isolation transformers. The transmission lines can easily realize stable high-voltage operation and good impedance matching between primary and secondary circuits. The time constant for the step response of the transformer was calculated by introducing a simple low-frequency equivalent circuit model. Results show that the relation between the time constant and low-cut-off frequency of the transformer conforms to the theory of the general first-order linear time-invariant system. Results also show that the test transformer composed of the new transmission lines can transmit about 600 ps rise time pulses across the dc potential difference of more than 150 kV with insertion loss of -2.5 dB. The measured effective time constant of 12 ns agreed exactly with the theoretically predicted value. For practical applications involving the delivery of synchronized trigger signals to a dc high-voltage electron gun station, the transformer described in this paper exhibited advantages over methods using fiber optic cables for the signal transfer system. This transformer has no jitter or breakdown problems that invariably occur in active circuit components.

  4. Mesoscale Simulation Data for Initializing Fast-Time Wake Transport and Decay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Mathew J.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The fast-time wake transport and decay models require vertical profiles of crosswinds, potential temperature and the eddy dissipation rate as initial conditions. These inputs are normally obtained from various field sensors. In case of data-denied scenarios or operational use, these initial conditions can be provided by mesoscale model simulations. In this study, the vertical profiles of potential temperature from a mesoscale model were used as initial conditions for the fast-time wake models. The mesoscale model simulations were compared against available observations and the wake model predictions were compared with the Lidar measurements from three wake vortex field experiments.

  5. A signal distribution board for the timing and fast control master of the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meder, L.; Dreschmann, M.; Sander, O.; Becker, J.

    2016-02-01

    For the CBM experiment a Timing and Fast-Control (TFC) system is being developed. In the detector readout, FPGA-based data processing boards (DPB) are organized in a large number of computing crates. At the crate level, the TFC master is connected to one TFC slave per crate, whereas the DPB AMCs are interconnected by the crates' infrastructure. In this article, an FMC-based signal distribution board is proposed allowing the transmission of a high-quality clock and timing and fast-control data from and to connected TFC slaves at distances of about 30 meters using twisted-pair cables.

  6. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  7. Development of a novel voltage divider for measurement of sub-nanosecond rise time high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Sharma, Archana

    2016-02-01

    This paper is about the development of a copper sulphate based aqueous-electrolytic voltage divider for the measurement of high voltage pulses, 100 kV, with pulse widths of 1-2 ns and rise time <1 ns. Novel features are incorporated in the design of the divider, to meet the performance requirements for the application. Analytical calculations to justify design are described. Structural simulation of the divider is carried out using field wave simulation software to verify the effectiveness. A calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the divider. Results obtained during calibration are subjected to statistical analysis to determine the confidence of measurement. Details of design, analysis, and simulation are described in this paper.

  8. Fasting time and vitamin B12 levels in a community-based population.

    PubMed

    Orton, Dennis J; Naugler, Christopher; Sadrzadeh, S M Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin (Cbl), is an essential vitamin that manifests with numerous severe but non-specific symptoms in cases of deficiency. Assessing Cbl status often requires fasting, although this requirement is not standard between institutions. This study evaluated the impact of fasting on Cbl levels in a large community-based cohort in an effort to promote standardization of Cbl testing between sites. Laboratory data for Cbl, fasting time, patient age and sex were obtained from laboratory information service from Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) for the period of April 2011 to June 2015. CLS is the sole supplier of laboratory services in the Southern Alberta region in Canada (population, approximately 1.4 million). To investigate potential sex-specific effects of fasting on Cbl levels, males and females were analyzed separately using linear regression models. A total of 346,957 individual patient results (196,849 females, 146,085 males) were obtained. The mean plasma Cbl level was 386.5 (±195.6) pmol/L and 412.0 (±220.8) pmol/L for males and females, respectively. Linear regression analysis showed fasting had no significant association with Cbl levels in females; however a statistically significant decrease of 0.9pmol/L/hour fasting (p<0.001) was noted in males. The broad population variance in Cbl suggests the slight gender-specific differences noted in this study are insignificant. Despite this, fasting has the potential to contribute to higher rates of Cbl deficiency in men. Together, these data suggest fasting should be excluded as a requirement for evaluating plasma Cbl. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Real-time detection of fast and thermal neutrons in radiotherapy with CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, Nicolas; Higueret, Stephane; Elazhar, Halima; Combe, Rodolphe; Meyer, Philippe; Dehaynin, Nicolas; Taupin, Florence; Husson, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    The peripheral dose distribution is a growing concern for the improvement of new external radiation modalities. Secondary particles, especially photo-neutrons produced by the accelerator, irradiate the patient more than tens of centimeters away from the tumor volume. However the out-of-field dose is still not estimated accurately by the treatment planning softwares. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a specially designed CMOS sensor for fast and thermal neutron monitoring in radiotherapy. The 14 microns-thick sensitive layer and the integrated electronic chain of the CMOS are particularly suitable for real-time measurements in γ/n mixed fields. An experimental field size dependency of the fast neutron production rate, supported by Monte Carlo simulations and CR-39 data, has been observed. This dependency points out the potential benefits of a real-time monitoring of fast and thermal neutron during beam intensity modulated radiation therapies.

  11. Analog electro-optical readout of SiPMs achieves fast timing required for time-of-flight PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Levin, C S

    2015-05-07

    The design of combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems presents a number of challenges to engineers, as it forces the PET system to acquire data in a space constrained environment that is sensitive to electro-magnetic interference and contains high static, radio frequency and gradient fields. In this work we validate fast timing performance of a PET scintillation detector using a potentially very compact, very low power, and MR compatible readout method in which analog silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) signals are transmitted optically away from the MR bore with little or even no additional readout electronics. This analog 'electro-optial' method could reduce the entire PET readout in the MR bore to two compact, low power components (SiPMs and lasers). Our experiments show fast timing performance from analog electro-optical readout with and without pre-amplification. With 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals and Excelitas SiPMs the best two-sided fwhm coincident timing resolution achieved was 220 +/- 3 ps in electrical mode, 230 +/- 2 ps in electro-optical with preamp mode, and 253 +/- 2 ps in electro-optical without preamp mode. Timing measurements were also performed with Hamamatsu SiPMs and 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm crystals. In the future the timing degradation seen can be further reduced with lower laser noise or improvements SiPM rise time or gain.

  12. Time-driven Activity-based Cost of Fast-Track Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Signe E; Holm, Henriette B; Jørgensen, Mira; Gromov, Kirill; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Husted, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Fast-track total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) has been shown to reduce the perioperative convalescence resulting in less postoperative morbidity, earlier fulfillment of functional milestones, and shorter hospital stay. As organizational optimization is also part of the fast-track methodology, the result could be a more cost-effective pathway altogether. As THA and TKA are potentially costly procedures and the numbers are increasing in an economical limited environment, the aim of this study is to present baseline detailed economical calculations of fast-track THA and TKA and compare this between 2 departments with different logistical set-ups. Prospective data collection was analyzed using the time-driven activity-based costing method (TDABC) on time consumed by different staff members involved in patient treatment in the perioperative period of fast-track THA and TKA in 2 Danish orthopedic departments with standardized fast-track settings, but different logistical set-ups. Length of stay was median 2 days in both departments. TDABC revealed minor differences in the perioperative settings between departments, but the total cost excluding the prosthesis was similar at USD 2511 and USD 2551, respectively. Fast-track THA and TKA results in similar cost despite differences in the organizational set-up. Compared to cost associated with longer more conventional published pathways, fast-track is cheaper, which on top of the favorable published clinical outcome adds to cost efficiency and the potential for economic savings. Detailed baseline TDABC calculations are provided for comparison and further optimization of cost-benefit effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid Qualitative Urinary Tract Infection Pathogen Identification by SeptiFast® Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malinka, Thomas; Klaschik, Sven; Weber, Stefan U.; Schewe, Jens-Christian; Stüber, Frank; Book, Malte

    2011-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) are frequent in outpatients. Fast pathogen identification is mandatory for shortening the time of discomfort and preventing serious complications. Urine culture needs up to 48 hours until pathogen identification. Consequently, the initial antibiotic regimen is empirical. Aim To evaluate the feasibility of qualitative urine pathogen identification by a commercially available real-time PCR blood pathogen test (SeptiFast®) and to compare the results with dipslide and microbiological culture. Design of study Pilot study with prospectively collected urine samples. Setting University hospital. Methods 82 prospectively collected urine samples from 81 patients with suspected UTI were included. Dipslide urine culture was followed by microbiological pathogen identification in dipslide positive samples. In parallel, qualitative DNA based pathogen identification (SeptiFast®) was performed in all samples. Results 61 samples were SeptiFast® positive, whereas 67 samples were dipslide culture positive. The inter-methodological concordance of positive and negative findings in the gram+, gram- and fungi sector was 371/410 (90%), 477/492 (97%) and 238/246 (97%), respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of the SeptiFast® test for the detection of an infection was 0.82 and 0.60, respectively. SeptiFast® pathogen identifications were available at least 43 hours prior to culture results. Conclusion The SeptiFast® platform identified bacterial DNA in urine specimens considerably faster compared to conventional culture. For UTI diagnosis sensitivity and specificity is limited by its present qualitative setup which does not allow pathogen quantification. Future quantitative assays may hold promise for PCR based UTI pathogen identification as a supplementation of conventional culture methods. PMID:21359187

  14. Investigation on the effect of exposure time on scintillator afterglow for ultra-fast tomography acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zefreh, K. Z.; Welford, F. M.; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Thanks to the ultra-fast endstation of the TOMCAT beamline, it is possible to do a tomographic scan with a sub-second temporal resolution which allows following dynamic processes in 4D (3D space + time). This ultra- high-rate tomography acquisition, exploiting the distinctive peculiarities of synchrotron radiation, provides nondestructive investigation of many dynamic processes which were not possible in the past. For example a continuous tensile test has been conducted recently in-situ for the first time with a frequency of 20 tomograms per second (20 Hz acquisition frequency). In the ultra-fast endstation a scintillator is used to convert X-ray to visible photons that can be detected by the camera. However, this conversion is not ideal and the scintillator response decays exponentially with afterglow. Afterglow can cause resolution degradation and artifacts (such as ring and band) especially with high rotation speed. On the other hand, to achieve a higher scan speed, thicker scintillators are more common because they result in higher emission intensities that can compensate the short exposure time in fast scans. However, the resolution deteriorates as the scintillator's thickness increases and thicker scintillators show higher afterglow. Performing many ultra-fast scans at the TOMCAT beamline with different acquisition rate, we demonstrate how the exposure time effects on the projection data and reconstructed images. Using two different thicknesses of LAG scintillator we also investigate the afterglow artifacts for different acquisition rate and exposure time.

  15. NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND PERIOPERATIVE FASTING TIME VERSUS COMPLICATIONS AND HOSPITAL STAY OF SURGICAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    de Amorim, Ana Carolina Ribeiro; Costa, Milena Damasceno de Souza; Nunes, Francisca Leide da Silva; da Silva, Maria da Guia Bezerra; de Souza Leão, Cristiano; Gadelha, Patrícia Calado Ferreira Pinheiro

    2015-08-01

    many factors can have a negative influence over surgical results, such as a compromised nutritional status and the extension of the perioperative fasting time. to evaluate the influence of the nutritional status and the perioperative fasting time over the occurrence of surgical complications and over hospital stay, in patients who have undergone surgery of the gastrointestinal tract and/or abdominal wall, and who were subjected to a nutritional care protocol. cohort study, conducted with 84 patients, from June to November 2014. Data collection was performed by applying a structured questionnaire, search over the records and medical and/or nutritional prescription. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA/SE 12.0 and significance level of 5%. nutritional risk was present in 26.2%, and from these 45.4% carried out preoperative nutritional therapy, having an average of 6.6 ± 2.79 days. The preoperative fasting was 4.5 (3.66; 5.50) hours and the postoperative fasting 5.1 (2.5; 20.5) hours. No associations were found between the parameters for assessing body composition and the presence of complications. A negative correlation was observed between the length of hospital stay and the BMI (p = 0.017),while a positive correlation was observed between weight loss and the length of hospital stay (p = 0.036). Patients with higher postoperative fasting time had a higher occurrence of complications (p = 0.021). the compromised nutritional status and the extension of perioperative fasting time are associated with the occurrence of surgical complications and increased length of hospital stay. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. A TRANSIT TIMING ANALYSIS OF NINE RISE LIGHT CURVES OF THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM TrES-3

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, N. P.; Pollacco, D.; Simpson, E. K.; Barros, S.; Joshi, Y. C.; Todd, I.; Keenan, F. P.; Skillen, I.; Benn, C.; Christian, D.; Hrudkova, M.; Steele, I. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be R{sub p} /R {sub *} = 0.1664{sup +0.0011} {sub -0.0018} and i = 81.73{sup +0.13} {sub -0.04}, respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving {chi}{sup 2} = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a constant period either have relatively little out-of-transit coverage or have clear systematics. A new ephemeris was calculated using the transit times and was found to be T{sub c} (0) = 2454632.62610 {+-} 0.00006 HJD and P = 1.3061864 {+-} 0.0000005 days. The transit times were then used to place upper mass limits as a function of the period ratio of a potential perturbing planet, showing that our data are sufficiently sensitive to have probed sub-Earth mass planets in both interior and exterior 2:1 resonances, assuming that the additional planet is in an initially circular orbit.

  17. Ultra-fast consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems under a unified framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the ultra-fast consensus problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems under a unified framework. A multi-step neighbour-error predictive mechanism is established based on the future evolution of the network dynamic without predictive information. By predicting the dynamics of a network several steps ahead and adding this information into the consensus protocol, a novel ultra-fast consensus protocol with the self-feedback term is proposed. The asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q + 1 compared to the routine consensus protocol. The ultra-fast consensus algorithm can overcome the influence of communication topology to the convergence speed toward consensus, and solve the difficult problem of selecting the optimal control gain which minimises the asymptotic convergence factor. Moveover, some sufficient conditions for ultra-fast consensus design are given herein. The ones decouple the design of the synchronising gains from the detailed graph properties, and explicitly reveal how the agent dynamic and the communication graph jointly affect ultra-fast consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems. A simulation is performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  18. Linear discrete population models with two time scales in fast changing environments I: autonomous case.

    PubMed

    Blasco, A; Sanz, L; Auger, P; Bravo de la Parra, R

    2001-01-01

    In this work we consider a structured population with groups and subgroups of individuals. The intra-group dynamics is assumed to be fast in comparison with the inter-group dynamics. We study linear discrete models where the slow dynamics is represented by a single matrix and the fast dynamics is described by means of the first k terms of a converging sequence of different matrices. The number k can be interpreted as the ratio between the two time scales. The aim of this work is to extend aggregation techniques to the case of fast changing environments. The main idea of aggregation is to build up a new system, with lower dimension, that summarizes the information concerning the fast process. This "aggregated" system provides essential information on the original one. It is shown that the asymptotic behavior of the original system can be approximated by the asymptotic behavior of the aggregated system when the ratio between the two time scales is large enough. We present an example of an age structured population in a patchy environment. The migration process is assumed to be fast in comparison with the demographic process. Numerical simulations illustrate that the asymptotic growth rate and the stable age distribution of the population in the original and the aggregated systems are getting closer as the ratio k increases.

  19. Time Evolving Fission Chain Theory and Fast Neutron and Gamma-Ray Counting Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; ...

    2015-11-01

    Here, we solve a simple theoretical model of time evolving fission chains due to Feynman that generalizes and asymptotically approaches the point model theory. The point model theory has been used to analyze thermal neutron counting data. This extension of the theory underlies fast counting data for both neutrons and gamma rays from metal systems. Fast neutron and gamma-ray counting is now possible using liquid scintillator arrays with nanosecond time resolution. For individual fission chains, the differential equations describing three correlated probability distributions are solved: the time-dependent internal neutron population, accumulation of fissions in time, and accumulation of leaked neutronsmore » in time. Explicit analytic formulas are given for correlated moments of the time evolving chain populations. The equations for random time gate fast neutron and gamma-ray counting distributions, due to randomly initiated chains, are presented. Correlated moment equations are given for both random time gate and triggered time gate counting. There are explicit formulas for all correlated moments are given up to triple order, for all combinations of correlated fast neutrons and gamma rays. The nonlinear differential equations for probabilities for time dependent fission chain populations have a remarkably simple Monte Carlo realization. A Monte Carlo code was developed for this theory and is shown to statistically realize the solutions to the fission chain theory probability distributions. Combined with random initiation of chains and detection of external quanta, the Monte Carlo code generates time tagged data for neutron and gamma-ray counting and from these data the counting distributions.« less

  20. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusinski, M.; Studenikin, S. A.; Aers, G.; Granger, G.; Kam, A.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  1. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving.

    PubMed

    Korkusinski, M; Studenikin, S A; Aers, G; Granger, G; Kam, A; Sachrajda, A S

    2017-02-10

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  2. Spectral and Timing Properties of IGR J17091-3624 in the Rising Hard State During Its 2016 Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanjun; Harrison, Fiona; Fuerst, Felix; Garcia, Javier; Walton, Dom; Tomsick, John

    2017-08-01

    We present a spectral and timing study of the NuSTAR and Swift observations of IGR J17091-3624 in the hard state during its outburst in 2016. IGR J17091-3624 is a galactic black hole binary candidate that has been previously observed to display variability patterns similar to GRS 1915+105, despite the apparent faintness compared to its counterpart. Disk reflection features are clearly revealed in the NuSTAR data taken in three epochs. Fitting with relativistic reflection models reveals the accretion disk is truncated during all epochs and the modeling favors a low disk inclination. The source flux increased by ~50% during the observations, the steepening of the spectral continuum is accompanied by a declination in the high energy cut-off. A type-C QPO increasing in frequency is detected in the NuSTAR data. In addition, we find a secondary peak centered at about 2.3 times the fundamental QPO frequency in the power spectra. This unconventional frequency questions the harmonic origin of the feature. We investigate the evolution of the timing and spectral properties on the rising phase of the outburst and discuss its physical implications.

  3. Secure FAST: Security Enhancement in the NATO Time Sensitive Targeting Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    RTO-MP-IST-091 P9 - 1 Secure FAST: Security Enhancement in the NATO Time Sensitive Targeting Tool Dr Orhan Cetinkaya, Dr Yakup Yildirim...OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 6 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c

  4. Fast converging exact power series for the time and period of the simple pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacka, Jan

    2017-03-01

    A time explicit fast converging exact power series solution to the pendulum equation is derived in this paper. A novel series for the period results from it. The approximate formula that comprises the first three terms gives an accuracy of 99.99% up to the amplitude of 90°. The accuracy was compared with that of 11 other approximate period formulas.

  5. Demonstration of two-dimensional time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.; Brubaker, E.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; McMillan, K.; Nowack, A.; Galloudec, N. Renard-Le; Sweany, M.

    2015-09-09

    Here, we present a neutron detector system based on time-encoded imaging, and demonstrate its applicability toward the spatial mapping of special nuclear material. We also demonstrate that two-dimensional fast-neutron imaging with 2° resolution at 2 m stand-off is feasible with only two instrumented detectors.

  6. A measurement of the fast luminescent decay time of P-15 phosphor.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The fast decay time of a 3900-A spectral component of an electron-beam excited P-15 phosphor has been measured using a delayed coincidence technique. The result, 1.04 nsec plus or minus nearly 2%, is in good agreement with previous estimates.

  7. Large aperture fast neutron imaging detector with 10-ns time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Y.; Matsubara, S.; Abe, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kishimoto, H.; Yogo, A.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Otake, Y.; Mima, K.; Honda, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Fast neutrons, which are neutrons with energies greater than 1 MeV, are expected to be a source of nondestructive inspection for a large-size infrastructure such as a bridge girder because of their mean free path exceeding the meter. A neutron-imaging device with 10-ns time resolution can discriminate pulsed neutrons from X-rays via time of flight. For this purpose, we require a fast-response neutron imager with large aperture and high image resolution. A neutron-imaging device with time resolution of 10 ns and aperture size of 40 cm × 60 cm was developed. It was filled with fast response liquid scintillator [1] in an aluminum honeycomb plate, which converts neutrons to optical light images. The scintillation light images were relayed using an optical lens and detected using a fast response image intensified CCD. The detector was tested at an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility in Osaka University. A short X-ray pulse (30 ps pulse duration) was generated using LINAC, and X-ray radiograph images were obtained with a 10- ns exposure time duration. The radiograph images were well attenuated within 10-ns from the X-ray injection. A high energy X-ray image and a neutron radiograph image of a 30-cm thick concrete block with iron blocks located behind it were successfully observed. This promising technique could facilitate nondestructive inspection of large concrete constructions.

  8. Demonstration of two-dimensional time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Brennan, J.; Brubaker, E.; Gerling, M.; ...

    2015-09-09

    Here, we present a neutron detector system based on time-encoded imaging, and demonstrate its applicability toward the spatial mapping of special nuclear material. We also demonstrate that two-dimensional fast-neutron imaging with 2° resolution at 2 m stand-off is feasible with only two instrumented detectors.

  9. Copernicus Rising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Michael A.

    2007-08-01

    Copernicus Rising began as a historical biography when it was first conceived, but as the writing progressed it quickly became a rather absurd play that took historical research and twisted it through the lens of my own wit, philosophy and personal affection for the characters. When working with historical figures--characters who existed in a very tangible way in our own history--the playwriting process opens a dialogue between different points in time and space. The difficulty lies in finding a unique and clear voice amongst the discordant personalities involved in this time and space overlap, both in the writing and production processes, in order to get to the heart of what the play is really all about. This thesis follows the journey of the play from its historical roots through the creation of an absurd journey both insides and outside time, space and the human mind. The first part of the thesis explains the beginnings of the concept and outlines much of the research and development that went into the play. The next part outlines the process of production and integrating the world on paper with that of moving bodies on stage. In the final part, post-production discussions and audience feedback sessions shape the play into the draft included in this thesis.

  10. Recovery time course in contractile function of fast and slow skeletal muscle after hindlimb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the time course and extent of recovery in the isometric and isotonic contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to an immobilized group or a control group. The results of the study show that fast and slow skeletal muscles possess the ability to completely recover normal contractile function following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. The rate of recovery is dependent on the fiber type composition of the affected muscle.

  11. Real-time measurement of temperature rise in a pulsed diode pumped rubidium vapor laser by potassium tracing atom based absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofan; Yang, Zining; Hua, Weihong; Wang, Hongyan; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we first propose and demonstrate a novel tracing atom based absorption spectroscopy method for the real-time measurement of the temperature rise inside the pump region of a pulsed diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL). By artificially adding potassium atoms into the gain medium of an operational rubidium laser, the information of the temperature rise can be obtained from the variation of the potassium absorption signal. Some important influencing factors are studied. Typical results show that, as the pump power (2 ms duration) increases from 22 W to 92 W, the temperature rise increases from 103 K to 227 K. As the pulse duration increases from 1ms to 5 ms, the temperature rise increases from 128 K to 314 K, and the heat relaxation time increases from 3.8 ms to 8.1 ms. The method is favored for its ability for real-time detection and high sensitivity, which provides a useful way for DPAL diagnostics.

  12. A novel fast gas chromatography method for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in ambient air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C9-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a 14.5 min analysis time. Moreover, in-situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an 11.7 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to 19.7 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). These analysis times potentially allow for a twofold to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in-situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC (OBVOC) linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest

  13. Fast Mapping Across Time: Memory Processes Support Children’s Retention of Learned Words

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, Haley A.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Children’s remarkable ability to map linguistic labels to referents in the world is commonly called fast mapping. The current study examined children’s (N = 216) and adults’ (N = 54) retention of fast-mapped words over time (immediately, after a 1-week delay, and after a 1-month delay). The fast mapping literature often characterizes children’s retention of words as consistently high across timescales. However, the current study demonstrates that learners forget word mappings at a rapid rate. Moreover, these patterns of forgetting parallel forgetting functions of domain-general memory processes. Memory processes are critical to children’s word learning and the role of one such process, forgetting, is discussed in detail – forgetting supports extended mapping by promoting the memory and generalization of words and categories. PMID:22375132

  14. Fast Mapping Across Time: Memory Processes Support Children's Retention of Learned Words.

    PubMed

    Vlach, Haley A; Sandhofer, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Children's remarkable ability to map linguistic labels to referents in the world is commonly called fast mapping. The current study examined children's (N = 216) and adults' (N = 54) retention of fast-mapped words over time (immediately, after a 1-week delay, and after a 1-month delay). The fast mapping literature often characterizes children's retention of words as consistently high across timescales. However, the current study demonstrates that learners forget word mappings at a rapid rate. Moreover, these patterns of forgetting parallel forgetting functions of domain-general memory processes. Memory processes are critical to children's word learning and the role of one such process, forgetting, is discussed in detail - forgetting supports extended mapping by promoting the memory and generalization of words and categories.

  15. The reality of the surgical fasting time in the era of the ERAS protocol.

    PubMed

    Cestonaro, Talita; Madalozzo Schieferdecker, Maria Eliana; Thieme, Rubia Daniela; Neto Cardoso, João; Ligocki Campos, Antônio Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Multimodal protocols to optimize perioperative care and to accelerate postoperative recovery include abbreviated pre-and postoperative fasting. The aim of this study was to investigate the pre and postoperative fasting period and the factors that influence it in patients who underwent elective operations. We included patients who underwent surgery of the digestive tract and abdominal wall. Data were collected from the patients and from their personal health records. We included 135 patients between 19 and 89 years old. Most were adults (75.55%), female (60.74%) and the most common procedures were hernioplasty (42.96%) and cholecystectomy (34.81%). The preoperative fasting periods for solids and liquids were similar, median 16.50 (5.50-56.92) and 15.75 (2.50- 56.92) hours, respectively. The preoperative fasting period was influenced by the instruction received and surgery time. Postoperative fasting period was 15.67 (1.67-90.42) hours and was influenced by type of surgery and lack of synchrony between the clinical meeting and the nutrition and dietetics service schedules. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernova rise times as exemplified by the case of LSQ13cuw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, E. E. E.; Polshaw, J.; Kotak, R.; Jerkstrand, A.; Leibundgut, B.; Rabinowitz, D.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Anderson, J. P.; Benetti, S.; Baltay, C.; Feindt, U.; Fraser, M.; González-Gaitán, S.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; McKinnon, R.; Valenti, S.; Young, D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on our findings based on the analysis of observations of the Type II-L supernova LSQ13cuw within the framework of currently accepted physical predictions of core-collapse supernova explosions. LSQ13cuw was discovered within a day of explosion, hitherto unprecedented for Type II-L supernovae. This motivated a comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernovae with relatively well-constrained explosion epochs and rise times to maximum (optical) light. From our sample of twenty such events, we find evidence of a positive correlation between the duration of the rise and the peak brightness. On average, SNe II-L tend to have brighter peak magnitudes and longer rise times than SNe II-P. However, this difference is clearest only at the extreme ends of the rise time versus peak brightness relation. Using two different analytical models, we performed a parameter study to investigate the physical parameters that control the rise time behaviour. In general, the models qualitatively reproduce aspects of the observed trends. We find that the brightness of the optical peak increases for larger progenitor radii and explosion energies, and decreases for larger masses. The dependence of the rise time on mass and explosion energy is smaller than the dependence on the progenitor radius. We find no evidence that the progenitors of SNe II-L have significantly smaller radii than those of SNe II-P. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Maneuvering Simulation of Sea Fighter Using a Fast Nonlinear Time Domain Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    ultrasonic wave height sensors. Results Efforts to develop and mature a nonlinear comparing the 6-dof measured response of SeaFighter operating in sea... Nonlinear Time Domain Technique DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This paper is part of the following report: TITLE...Hydrodynamics Ann Arbor, Michigan, August 5-8, 2007 Maneuvering Simulation of Sea Fighter Using A Fast Nonlinear Time Domain Technique David E. Hess1, William

  18. Performance study of the fast timing Cherenkov detector based on a microchannel plate PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finogeev, D. A.; Grigoriev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavichev, O. V.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Konevskikh, A. S.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A. N.; Loginov, V. A.; Mayevskaya, A. I.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Morozov, I. V.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Shabanov, A. I.; Slupecki, M.; Tikhonov, A. A.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Prototype of the fast timing Cherenkov detector, applicable in high-energy collider experiments, has been developed basing on the modified Planacon XP85012 MCP-PMT and fused silica radiators. We present the reasons and description of the MCP-PMT modification, timing and amplitude characteristics of the prototype including the summary of the detector’s response on particle hits at oblique angles and MCP-PMT performance at high illumination rates.

  19. R&D on a new type of micropattern gaseous detector: The Fast Timing Micropattern detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Akl, M. Abi; Aboamer, O.; Acosta, D.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Altieri, P.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barashko, V.; Barria, P.; Bencze, G.; Beni, N.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braghieri, A.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Calabria, C.; Caponero, M.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Garcia, A. Conde; Czellar, S.; Dabrowski, M. M.; Lentdecker, G. De; Oliveira, R. De; Robertis, G. de; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Endroczi, G.; Errico, F.; Fallavollita, F.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ferry, S.; Furic, I.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Guiducci, L.; Guilloux, F.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Iaydjiev, P.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.; Korytov, A.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Madorsky, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Maggi, M.; Magnani, A.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Majumdar, N.; Merlin, J. A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Molnar, J.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ranieri, A.; Rashevski, G.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Rodozov, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; RoyChowdhury, S.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Safonov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, R.; Shah, A. H.; Shopova, M.; Sturdy, J.; Sultanov, G.; Swain, S. K.; Szillasi, Z.; Talvitie, J.; Tatarinov, A.; Tuuva, T.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; Stenis, M. Van; Venditti, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2017-02-01

    This contribution introduces a new type of Micropattern Gaseous Detector, the Fast Timing Micropattern (FTM) detector, utilizing fully Resistive WELL structures. The structure of the prototype will be described in detail and the results of the characterization study performed with an X-ray gun will be presented, together with the first results on time resolution based on data collected with muon/pion test beams.

  20. Fast-ball sports experts depend on an inhibitory strategy to reprogram their movement timing.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ikudome, Sachi; Yotani, Kengo; Maruyama, Atsuo; Mori, Shiro

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify whether an inhibitory strategy is used for reprogramming of movement timing by experts in fast-ball sports when they correct their movement timing due to unexpected environmental changes. We evaluated the influence of disruption of inhibitory function of the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on reprogramming of movement timing of experts and non-experts in fast-ball sports. The task was to manually press a button to coincide with the arrival of a moving target. The target moved at a constant velocity, and its velocity was suddenly either increased or decreased in some trials. The task was performed either with or without transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which was delivered to the region of the rIFG. Under velocity change conditions without TMS, the experts showed significantly smaller timing errors and a higher rate of reprogramming of movement timing than the non-experts. Moreover, TMS application during the task significantly diminished the expert group's performance, but not the control group, particularly in the condition where the target velocity decreases. These results suggest that experts use an inhibitory strategy for reprogramming of movement timing. In addition, the rIFG inhibitory function contributes to the superior movement correction of experts in fast-ball sports.

  1. Rat psychomotor vigilance task with fast response times using a conditioned lick behavior

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jennifer L.; Walker, Brendan M.; Fuentes, Fernanda Monjaraz; Rector, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into the physiological mechanisms of sleep control require an animal psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) with fast response times (<300ms). Rats provide a good PVT model since whisker stimulation produces a rapid and robust cortical evoked response, and animals can be trained to lick following stimulation. Our prior experiments used deprivation-based approaches to maximize motivation for operant conditioned responses. However, deprivation can influence physiological and neurobehavioral effects. In order to maintain motivation without water deprivation, we conditioned rats for immobilization and head restraint, then trained them to lick for a 10% sucrose solution in response to whisker stimulation. After approximately 8 training sessions, animals produced greater than 80% correct hits to the stimulus. Over the course of training, reaction times became faster and correct hits increased. Performance in the PVT was examined after 3, 6 and 12 hours of sleep deprivation achieved by gentle handling. A significant decrease in percent correct hits occurred following 6 and 12 hours of sleep deprivation and reaction times increased significantly following 12 hours of sleep deprivation. While behaviorally the animals appeared to be awake, we observed significant increases in EEG delta power prior to misses. The rat PVT with fast response times allows investigation of sleep deprivation effects, time on task and pharmacological agents. Fast response times also allow closer parallel studies to ongoing human protocols. PMID:20696188

  2. Climate impacts on rising atmospheric CO2 from long-term time-series of CO2 and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, R. F.; Rafelski, L. E.; Piper, S. C.

    2009-04-01

    The long-term time series of atmospheric CO2 and O2 concentrations from the Scripps Institution of oceanography now span 51 and 19 years, respectively. These time series will be presented together with the ice-core CO2 records and discussed in terms of the processes controlling the atmospheric CO2 rise, particularly the sensitivity of the natural sinks for CO2 in the land and ocean to climate changes. The CO2 record provides constraints on the sensitivity of the land sinks to climate. The CO2 rise can be expressed as an anomaly relative to the trend expected from fossil-fuel burning, land use emissions, and uptake by the land biosphere and oceans, with the latter two processes depicted by simple reservoir models (land sink driven by CO2 fertilization). Despite uncertainties, the anomaly computed this way shows an evident link with global land temperature, with both the anomaly and temperature trend showing breaks in slope around 1940 and 1980. Climate effects on the land biosphere may thus explain two otherwise puzzling features in the CO2 record: the plateau in growth in the 1940s and the persistent high growth after 1980. The implied effect of warming on CO2 suggested by this decadal variability is too small to be a significant climate feedback, however. Additional constraints on the climate sensitivity of ocean sinks can be obtained by combining the CO2 and O2 records. The ocean CO2 sink that would have been obtained in the absence of climate change is quite well constrained based on ocean observations of chlorofluorocarbons. This sink can be compared to the sink computed from the global O2 budget, assuming the oceans have not been a long-term source or sink for O2. The comparison reveals a significant discrepancy, which suggests that climate changes are impacting some combination of the long-term O2 and CO2 fluxes. The climate effect is qualitatively consistent with ocean models, which predict that warming will reduce oceanic uptake of CO2 and induce oceanic

  3. New Evidence for the Role of Emerging Flux in a Solar Filament's Slow Rise Preceding its CME-Producing Fast Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louis K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We observe the eruption of a large-scale (approx.300,000 km) quiet-region solar filament, leading to an Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejection (CME). We use coronal imaging data in EUV from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, and in soft X-rays (SXRs) from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite. We also use spectroscopic data from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), magnetic data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and white-light coronal data from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO), all on SOHO. Initially the filament shows a slow (approx.1 km/s projected against the solar disk) and approximately constant-velocity rise for about 6 hours, before erupting rapidly, reaching a velocity of approx. 8 km/s over the next approx. 25 min. CDS Doppler data show Earth-directed filament velocities ranging from < 20 km/s (the noise limit) during the slow-rise phase, to approx. 100 km/s-1 early in the eruption. Beginning within 10 hours prior to the start of the slow rise, localized new magnetic flux emerged near one end of the filament. Near the start of and during the slow-rise phase, SXR microflaring occurred repeatedly at the flux-emergence site, in conjunction with the development of a fan of SXR illumination of the magnetic arcade over the filament. The SXR microflares, development of the SXR fan, and motion of the slow-rising filament are all consistent with "tether-weakening" reconnection occurring between the newly-emerging flux and the overlying arcade field containing the filament field. The microflares and fan structure are not prominent in EUV, and would not have been detected without the SXR data. Standard "twin dimmings" occur near the location of the filament, and "remote dimmings" and "brightenings" occur further removed from the filament.

  4. Fast time-reversible algorithms for molecular dynamics of rigid-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajima, Yasuhiro; Hiyama, Miyabi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present time-reversible simulation algorithms for rigid bodies in the quaternion representation. By advancing a time-reversible algorithm [Y. Kajima, M. Hiyama, S. Ogata, and T. Tamura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 114002 (2011), 10.1143/JPSJ.80.114002] that requires iterations in calculating the angular velocity at each time step, we propose two kinds of iteration-free fast time-reversible algorithms. They are easily implemented in codes. The codes are compared with that of existing algorithms through demonstrative simulation of a nanometer-sized water droplet to find their stability of the total energy and computation speeds.

  5. Fasting and sampling time affect liver gene expression of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2010-05-01

    Several physiological and biological variables are known to affect peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α-dependent signaling pathway and plasma biochemical profiles. However, less is known about the effect of these variables on high-fat diet-fed mice. In a 5-week study, C57BL/6 mice were divided into control (C) and high-fat diet-fed (H) groups, whereby before dissection, each group was subdivided into non-fasted (nC and nH) and a 15-h fasted mice (fC and fH) killed in the early light cycle, and a 15-h fasted mice (eC and eH) killed in the late phase of the light cycle. Liver and blood from the vena cava were collected. Non-fasted nC and nH mice have a marginal difference in their body weight gain, whereas significant differences were found for fasted mice. In nH mice, PPAR-α, acyl-CoA oxidase and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein expressions were significantly elevated, in contrast to fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl CoA-desaturase (SCD)-1, and elongase (ELOVL)-6 expressions. Fasn was profoundly induced in fH mice, while decreased sterol regulatory-binding protein-1 and SCD-1 were found only in eH mice. Different from the gene expression profiles, plasma total cholesterol level of the eH mice was higher than controls, whereas nH mice have increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Only glucose level of the fH mice was higher than that observed for controls. Results showed that fasting and sampling time have significantly affected liver gene expression and plasma biochemical indices of the high-fat diet-treated mice. An overlook in these aspects can cause serious discrepancies in the experimental data and their interpretations.

  6. Influence of all-out and fast start on 5-min cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Aisbett, Brad; Lerossignol, Peter; McConell, Glenn Kevin; Abbiss, Chris Richard; Snow, Rod

    2009-10-01

    To examine the influence of two different fast-start pacing strategies on performance and oxygen consumption (VO2) during cycle ergometer time trials lasting ∼5 min. Eight trained male cyclists performed four cycle ergometer time trials whereby the total work completed (113 ± 11.5 kJ; mean ± SD) was identical to the better of two 5-min self-paced familiarization trials. During the performance trials, initial power output was manipulated to induce either an all-out or a fast start. Power output during the first 60 s of the fast-start trial was maintained at 471.0 ± 48.0 W, whereas the all-out start approximated a maximal starting effort for the first 15 s (mean power: 753.6 ± 76.5 W) followed by 45 s at a constant power output (376.8 ± 38.5 W). Irrespective of starting strategy, power output was controlled so that participants would complete the first quarter of the trial (28.3 ± 2.9 kJ) in 60 s. Participants performed two trials using each condition, with their fastest time trial compared. Performance time was significantly faster when cyclists adopted the all-out start (4 min 48 s ± 8 s) compared with the fast start (4 min 51 s ± 8 s; P < 0.05). The first-quarter VO2 during the all-out start trial (3.4 ± 0.4 L·min(-1)) was significantly higher than during the fast-start trial (3.1 ± 0.4 L·min(-1); P < 0.05). After removal of an outlier, the percentage increase in first-quarter VO2 was significantly correlated (r = -0.86, P < 0.05) with the relative difference in finishing time. An all-out start produces superior middle distance cycling performance when compared with a fast start. The improvement in performance may be due to a faster VO2 response rather than time saved due to a rapid acceleration.

  7. Rise time and formant transition duration in the discrimination of speech sounds: the Ba-Wa distinction in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Usha; Fosker, Tim; Huss, Martina; Mead, Natasha; Szucs, Dénes

    2011-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia have a specific difficulty with the neural representation of the sound structure (phonological structure) of speech. One likely cause of their difficulties with phonology is a perceptual difficulty in auditory temporal processing (Tallal, 1980). Tallal (1980) proposed that basic auditory processing of brief, rapidly successive acoustic changes is compromised in dyslexia, thereby affecting phonetic discrimination (e.g. discriminating /b/ from /d/) via impaired discrimination of formant transitions (rapid acoustic changes in frequency and intensity). However, an alternative auditory temporal hypothesis is that the basic auditory processing of the slower amplitude modulation cues in speech is compromised (Goswami et al., 2002). Here, we contrast children's perception of a synthetic speech contrast (ba/wa) when it is based on the speed of the rate of change of frequency information (formant transition duration) versus the speed of the rate of change of amplitude modulation (rise time). We show that children with dyslexia have excellent phonetic discrimination based on formant transition duration, but poor phonetic discrimination based on envelope cues. The results explain why phonetic discrimination may be allophonic in developmental dyslexia (Serniclaes et al., 2004), and suggest new avenues for the remediation of developmental dyslexia.

  8. Measuring charge transport from transient photovoltage rise times. A new tool to investigate electron transport in nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Brian C; Bakker, Klaas; Kroeze, Jessica; Smit, Herman; Sommeling, Paul; Durrant, James R

    2006-08-31

    Charge transport rate at open-circuit potential (V(oc)) is proposed as a new characterization method for dye-sensitized (DS) and other nanostructured solar cells. At V(oc), charge density is flat and measurable, which simplifies quantitative comparison of transport and charge density. Transport measured at V(oc) also allows meaningful comparison of charge transport rates between different treatments, temperatures, and types of cells. However, in typical DS cells, charge transport rates at V(oc) often cannot be measured by photocurrent transients or modulation techniques due to RC limitations and/or recombination losses. To circumvent this limitation, we show that charge transport at V(oc) can be determined directly from the transient photovoltage rise time using a simple, zero-free-parameter model. This method is not sensitive to RC limitation or recombination losses. In trap limited devices, such as DS cells, the comparison of transport rates between different devices or conditions is only valid when the Fermi level in the limiting conductor is at the same distance from the band edge. We show how to perform such comparisons, correcting for conduction band shifts using the density of states (DOS) distribution determined from the same photovoltage transients. Last we show that the relationship between measured transport rate and measured charge density is consistent with the trap limited transport model.

  9. Europa Rising

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this image of the icy moon Europa rising above Jupiter's cloud tops with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 11:48 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, six hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter.

    The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for artistic, rather than scientific, value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter.

    The spacecraft was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from Jupiter and 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles) from Europa when the picture was taken. Europa's diameter is 3,120 kilometers (1,939 miles). The image is centered on Europa coordinates 5 degrees south, 6 degrees west. In keeping with its artistic intent - and to provide a more dramatic perspective - the image has been rotated so south is at the top.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  11. Real-time, fast radio transient searches with GPU de-dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magro, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Salvini, S.; Mort, B.; Dulwich, F.; Zarb Adami, K.

    2011-11-01

    The identification and subsequent discovery of fast radio transients using blind-search surveys require a large amount of processing power, in worst cases scaling as ?. For this reason, survey data are generally processed off-line, using high-performance computing architectures or hardware-based designs. In recent years, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been extensively used for numerical analysis and scientific simulations, especially after the introduction of new high-level application programming interfaces. Here, we show how GPUs can be used for fast transient discovery in real time. We present a solution to the problem of de-dispersion, providing performance comparisons with a typical computing machine and traditional pulsar processing software. We describe the architecture of a real-time, GPU-based transient search machine. In terms of performance, our GPU solution provides a speed-up factor of between 50 and 200, depending on the parameters of the search.

  12. AQUA: a very fast automatic reduction pipeline for near real-time GRBs early afterglow detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Paola, Andrea; Antonelli, Lucio A.; Testa, Vincenzo; Patria, Giorgio

    2002-12-01

    AQUA (Automated QUick Analysis) is the fast reduction pipeline of the Near Infra-Red (NIR) images obtained by the REM telescope. REM (Rapid Eye Mount) is a robotic NIR/Optical 60cm telescope for fast detection of early afterglow of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). NIR observations of GRBs early afterglow are of crucial importance for GRBs science, revealing even optical obscured or high redshift events. On the technical side, they pose a series of problems: luminous background, bright sources (as the counterparts should be observed few seconds after the satellite trigger) and fast detection force high rate images acquisition. Even if the observational strategy will change during the same event observation depending on the counterpart characteristics, we will start with 1 second exposures at the fastest possible rate. The main guideline in the AQUA pipeline development is to allow such a data rate along all the night with nearly real-time results delivery. AQUA will start from the raw images and will deliver an alert with coordinates, photometry and colors to larger telescopes to allow prompt spectroscopic and polarimetric observations. Very fast processing for the raw 512×512 32bit images and variable sources detection with both sources catalogs and images comparison have been implemented to obtain a processing speed of at least 1 image/sec. AQUA is based on ANSI-C code optimized to run on a dual Athlon Linux PC with careful MMX and SSE instructions utilization.

  13. NMR signal enhancement of >50 000 times in fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Pinto, L F; Marín-Montesinos, I; Lloveras, V; Muñoz-Gómez, J L; Pons, M; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2017-03-17

    Herein, we report the synthesis and the study of a novel mixed biradical with BDPA and TEMPO radical units that are covalently bound by an ester group (BDPAesterTEMPO) as a polarizing agent for fast dissolution DNP. The biradical exhibits an extremely high DNP NMR enhancement of >50 000 times, which constitutes one of the largest signal enhancements observed so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  14. Measurements of timing resolution of ultra-fast silicon detectors with the SAMPIC waveform digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, D.; De Cacqueray, V.; Delagnes, E.; Grabas, H.; Maalmi, J.; Minafra, N.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2016-11-01

    The SAMpler for PICosecond time (SAMPIC) chip has been designed by a collaboration including CEA/IRFU/SEDI, Saclay and CNRS/LAL/SERDI, Orsay. It benefits from both the quick response of a time to digital converter and the versatility of a waveform digitizer to perform accurate timing measurements. Thanks to the sampled signals, smart algorithms making best use of the pulse shape can be used to improve time resolution. A software framework has been developed to analyse the SAMPIC output data and extract timing information by using either a constant fraction discriminator or a fast cross-correlation algorithm. SAMPIC timing capabilities together with the software framework have been tested using pulses generated by a signal generator or by a silicon detector illuminated by a pulsed infrared laser. Under these ideal experimental conditions, the SAMPIC chip has proven to be capable of timing resolutions down to 4 ps with synthesized signals and 40 ps with silicon detector signals.

  15. The Time Delays of Gravitational Lens HE 0435-1223: An Early-Type Galaxy with a Rising Rotation Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.; Morgan, N. D.; Falco, E. E.; McLeod, B. A.; Winn, J. N.; Dembicky, J.; Ketzeback, B.

    2006-03-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope images and 2 years of optical photometry of the quadruple quasar HE 0435-1223. The time delays between the intrinsic quasar variations are ΔtAD=-14.37+0.75-0.85, ΔtAB=-8.00+0.73-0.82, and ΔtAC=-2.10+0.78-0.71 days. We also observed nonintrinsic variations of ~0.1 mag yr-1 that we attribute to microlensing. Instead of the traditional approach of assuming a rotation curve for the lens galaxy and then deriving the Hubble constant (H0), we assume H0=(72+/-7) km s-1 Mpc-1 and derive constraints on the rotation curve. On the scale over which the lensed images occur (1.2"=5 h-1 kpc~=1.5Re), the lens galaxy must have a rising rotation curve, and it cannot have a constant mass-to-light ratio. These results add to the evidence that the structures of early-type galaxies are heterogeneous. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m telescope of the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS), which is operated by the SMARTS Consortium; the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope as part of program HST-GO-9744 of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. Versatile synchronized real-time MEG hardware controller for large-scale fast data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Limin; Han, Menglai; Pratt, Kevin; Paulson, Douglas; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2017-05-01

    Versatile controllers for accurate, fast, and real-time synchronized acquisition of large-scale data are useful in many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Here, we describe the development of a controller software based on a technique called queued state machine for controlling the data acquisition (DAQ) hardware, continuously acquiring a large amount of data synchronized across a large number of channels (>400) at a fast rate (up to 20 kHz/channel) in real time, and interfacing with applications for real-time data analysis and display of electrophysiological data. This DAQ controller was developed specifically for a 384-channel pediatric whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, but its architecture is useful for wide applications. This controller running in a LabVIEW environment interfaces with microprocessors in the MEG sensor electronics to control their real-time operation. It also interfaces with a real-time MEG analysis software via transmission control protocol/internet protocol, to control the synchronous acquisition and transfer of the data in real time from >400 channels to acquisition and analysis workstations. The successful implementation of this controller for an MEG system with a large number of channels demonstrates the feasibility of employing the present architecture in several other applications.

  17. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  18. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  19. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems.

  20. Versatile synchronized real-time MEG hardware controller for large-scale fast data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Limin; Han, Menglai; Pratt, Kevin; Paulson, Douglas; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti

    2017-05-01

    Versatile controllers for accurate, fast, and real-time synchronized acquisition of large-scale data are useful in many areas of science, engineering, and technology. Here, we describe the development of a controller software based on a technique called queued state machine for controlling the data acquisition (DAQ) hardware, continuously acquiring a large amount of data synchronized across a large number of channels (>400) at a fast rate (up to 20 kHz/channel) in real time, and interfacing with applications for real-time data analysis and display of electrophysiological data. This DAQ controller was developed specifically for a 384-channel pediatric whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, but its architecture is useful for wide applications. This controller running in a LabVIEW environment interfaces with microprocessors in the MEG sensor electronics to control their real-time operation. It also interfaces with a real-time MEG analysis software via transmission control protocol/internet protocol, to control the synchronous acquisition and transfer of the data in real time from >400 channels to acquisition and analysis workstations. The successful implementation of this controller for an MEG system with a large number of channels demonstrates the feasibility of employing the present architecture in several other applications.

  1. Fast neutron measurements at the nELBE time-of-flight facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghansa, A. R.; Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Hannaske, R.; Kögler, T.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-01

    The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf has been rebuilt. A new enlarged experimental hall with a flight path of up to 10 m is available for neutron time-of-flight experiments in the fast energy range from about 50 keV to 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver nuclear data of fast neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. The experimental programme consists of transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section measurements, and neutron induced fission cross sections. The inelastic scattering to the first few excited states in 56Fe was investigated by measuring the gamma production cross section with an HPGe detector. The neutron induced fission of 242Pu was studied using fast ionisation chambers with large homogeneous actinide deposits.

  2. Finite Time Fault Tolerant Control for Robot Manipulators Using Time Delay Estimation and Continuous Nonsingular Fast Terminal Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Van, Mien; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Ren, Hongliang

    2016-04-28

    In this paper, a novel finite time fault tolerant control (FTC) is proposed for uncertain robot manipulators with actuator faults. First, a finite time passive FTC (PFTC) based on a robust nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode control (NFTSMC) is investigated. Be analyzed for addressing the disadvantages of the PFTC, an AFTC are then investigated by combining NFTSMC with a simple fault diagnosis scheme. In this scheme, an online fault estimation algorithm based on time delay estimation (TDE) is proposed to approximate actuator faults. The estimated fault information is used to detect, isolate, and accommodate the effect of the faults in the system. Then, a robust AFTC law is established by combining the obtained fault information and a robust NFTSMC. Finally, a high-order sliding mode (HOSM) control based on super-twisting algorithm is employed to eliminate the chattering. In comparison to the PFTC and other state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed AFTC scheme possess several advantages such as high precision, strong robustness, no singularity, less chattering, and fast finite-time convergence due to the combined NFTSMC and HOSM control, and requires no prior knowledge of the fault due to TDE-based fault estimation. Finally, simulation results are obtained to verify the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  3. Sparse temporal sampling for fast time-domain wide-field fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruoyang; Zhao, Lingling; Intes, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) is a powerful optical imaging tool for preclinical research. Especially, its implementation with time-domain (TD) techniques allows lifetime multiplexing for simultaneously imaging multiple biomarkers and provides enhanced data sets for improved resolution and quantification compared to continuous wave (CW) and frequency domain (FD) methodologies. When performing time-domain reconstructions, one important aspect is the selection of a temporal sub-data set. Typically, such selection is performed a posteriori after dense temporal sampling during the acquisition. In this work, we investigate the potential to collect a priori sparse data sets for fast experimental acquisition without compromising FMT performances.

  4. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  5. Optimal output fast feedback in two-time scale control of flexible arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siciliano, B.; Calise, A. J.; Jonnalagadda, V. R. P.

    1986-01-01

    Control of lightweight flexible arms moving along predefined paths can be successfully synthesized on the basis of a two-time scale approach. A model following control can be designed for the reduced order slow subsystem. The fast subsystem is a linear system in which the slow variables act as parameters. The flexible fast variables which model the deflections of the arm along the trajectory can be sensed through strain gage measurements. For full state feedback design the derivatives of the deflections need to be estimated. The main contribution of this work is the design of an output feedback controller which includes a fixed order dynamic compensator, based on a recent convergent numerical algorithm for calculating LQ optimal gains. The design procedure is tested by means of simulation results for the one link flexible arm prototype in the laboratory.

  6. FAST EVENTS IN PROTEIN FOLDING: The Time Evolution of Primary Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert H.; Dyer, R. Brian; Gilmanshin, Rudolf; Woodruff, William H.

    1998-10-01

    Most experimental studies on the dynamics of protein folding have been confined to timescales of 1 ms and longer. Yet it is obvious that many phenomena that are obligatory elements of the folding process occur on much faster timescales. For example, it is also now clear that the formation of secondary and tertiary structures can occur on nanosecond and microsecond times, respectively. Although fast events are essential to, and sometimes dominate, the overall folding process, with a few exceptions their experimental study has become possible only recently with the development of appropriate techniques. This review discusses new approaches that are capable of initiating and monitoring the fast events in protein folding with temporal resolution down to picoseconds. The first important results from those techniques, which have been obtained for the folding of some globular proteins and polypeptide models, are also discussed.

  7. FASTING IN ELECTIVE SURGICAL PATIENTS: COMPARISON AMONG THE TIME PRESCRIBED, PERFORMED AND RECOMMENDED ON PERIOPERATIVE CARE PROTOCOLS.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Saionara Cristina; Batista, Sandra Teixeira; Pena, Geórgia das Graças

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged preoperative fasting may impair nutritional status of the patient and their recovery. In contrast, some studies show that fasting abbreviation can improve the response to trauma and decrease the length of hospital stay. Investigate whether the prescribed perioperative fasting time and practiced by patients is in compliance with current multimodal protocols and identify the main factors associated. Cross-sectional study with 65 patients undergoing elective surgery of the digestive tract or abdominal wall. We investigated the fasting time in the perioperative period, hunger and thirst reports, physical status, diabetes diagnosis, type of surgery and anesthesia. The patients were between 19 and 87 years, mostly female (73.8%). The most performed procedure was cholecystectomy (47.69%) and general anesthesia the most used (89.23%). The most common approach was to start fasting from midnight for liquids and solids, and most of the patients received grade II (64.6%) to the physical state. The real fasting average time was 16 h (9.5-41.58) was higher than prescribed (11 h, 6.58 -26.75). The patients submitted to surgery in the afternoon were in more fasting time than those who did in the morning (p<0.001). The intensity of hunger and thirst increased in postoperative fasting period (p=0.010 and 0.027). The average period of postoperative fasting was 18.25 h (3.33-91.83) and only 23.07% restarted feeding on the same day. Patients were fasted for prolonged time, higher even than the prescribed time and intensity of the signs of discomfort such as hunger and thirst increased over time. To better recovery and the patient's well-being, it is necessary to establish a preoperative fasting abbreviation protocol.

  8. FASTING IN ELECTIVE SURGICAL PATIENTS: COMPARISON AMONG THE TIME PRESCRIBED, PERFORMED AND RECOMMENDED ON PERIOPERATIVE CARE PROTOCOLS

    PubMed Central

    FRANCISCO, Saionara Cristina; BATISTA, Sandra Teixeira; PENA, Geórgia das Graças

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged preoperative fasting may impair nutritional status of the patient and their recovery. In contrast, some studies show that fasting abbreviation can improve the response to trauma and decrease the length of hospital stay. Aim: Investigate whether the prescribed perioperative fasting time and practiced by patients is in compliance with current multimodal protocols and identify the main factors associated. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 65 patients undergoing elective surgery of the digestive tract or abdominal wall. We investigated the fasting time in the perioperative period, hunger and thirst reports, physical status, diabetes diagnosis, type of surgery and anesthesia. Results: The patients were between 19 and 87 years, mostly female (73.8%). The most performed procedure was cholecystectomy (47.69%) and general anesthesia the most used (89.23%). The most common approach was to start fasting from midnight for liquids and solids, and most of the patients received grade II (64.6%) to the physical state. The real fasting average time was 16 h (9.5-41.58) was higher than prescribed (11 h, 6.58 -26.75). The patients submitted to surgery in the afternoon were in more fasting time than those who did in the morning (p<0.001). The intensity of hunger and thirst increased in postoperative fasting period (p=0.010 and 0.027). The average period of postoperative fasting was 18.25 h (3.33-91.83) and only 23.07% restarted feeding on the same day. Conclusion: Patients were fasted for prolonged time, higher even than the prescribed time and intensity of the signs of discomfort such as hunger and thirst increased over time. To better recovery and the patient's well-being, it is necessary to establish a preoperative fasting abbreviation protocol. PMID:26734794

  9. Fast Time-Varying Volume Rendering Using Time-Space Partition (TSP) Tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1999-01-01

    We present a new, algorithm for rapid rendering of time-varying volumes. A new hierarchical data structure that is capable of capturing both the temporal and the spatial coherence is proposed. Conventional hierarchical data structures such as octrees are effective in characterizing the homogeneity of the field values existing in the spatial domain. However, when treating time merely as another dimension for a time-varying field, difficulties frequently arise due to the discrepancy between the field's spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, treating spatial and temporal dimensions equally often prevents the possibility of detecting the coherence that is unique in the temporal domain. Using the proposed data structure, our algorithm can meet the following goals. First, both spatial and temporal coherence are identified and exploited for accelerating the rendering process. Second, our algorithm allows the user to supply the desired error tolerances at run time for the purpose of image-quality/rendering-speed trade-off. Third, the amount of data that are required to be loaded into main memory is reduced, and thus the I/O overhead is minimized. This low I/O overhead makes our algorithm suitable for out-of-core applications.

  10. Characterizing a fast-response, low-afterglow liquid scintillator for neutron time-of-flight diagnostics in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y. Hosoda, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Iwasa, Y.; Iwano, K.; Yamanoi, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Sarukura, N.; Shiraga, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2014-11-15

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are investigated and optimized for application to a single-hit neutron spectrometer for fast ignition experiments. It is found that 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene has better characteristics as a liquid scintillator solvent than the conventional solvent, p-xylene. In addition, a benzophenon-doped BBQ liquid scintillator is shown to demonstrate very rapid time response, and therefore has potential for further use in neutron diagnostics with fast time resolution.

  11. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications.

  12. Instability in time-delayed switched systems induced by fast and random switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yuming; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a switched system comprising finitely or infinitely many subsystems described by linear time-delayed differential equations and a rule that orchestrates the system switching randomly among these subsystems, where the switching times are also randomly chosen. We first construct a counterintuitive example where even though all the time-delayed subsystems are exponentially stable, the behaviors of the randomly switched system change from stable dynamics to unstable dynamics with a decrease of the dwell time. Then by using the theories of stochastic processes and delay differential equations, we present a general result on when this fast and random switching induced instability should occur and we extend this to the case of nonlinear time-delayed switched systems as well.

  13. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    PubMed Central

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications. PMID:24009998

  14. A simple and fast representation space for classifying complex time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, Luciano; Olivares, Felipe; Bariviera, Aurelio F.; Rosso, Osvaldo A.

    2017-03-01

    In the context of time series analysis considerable effort has been directed towards the implementation of efficient discriminating statistical quantifiers. Very recently, a simple and fast representation space has been introduced, namely the number of turning points versus the Abbe value. It is able to separate time series from stationary and non-stationary processes with long-range dependences. In this work we show that this bidimensional approach is useful for distinguishing complex time series: different sets of financial and physiological data are efficiently discriminated. Additionally, a multiscale generalization that takes into account the multiple time scales often involved in complex systems has been also proposed. This multiscale analysis is essential to reach a higher discriminative power between physiological time series in health and disease.

  15. Time dependence of fast electron beam divergence in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Storm, M J; McMahon, M; Jiang, S; Ovchinnikov, V; Schumacher, D W; Freeman, R R; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2012-08-01

    We report on the measurement and computer simulation of the divergence of fast electrons generated in an ultraintense laser-plasma interaction (LPI) and the subsequent propagation in a nonrefluxing target. We show that, at Iλ(2) of 10(20) Wcm(-2)μm(2), the time-integrated electron beam full divergence angle is (60±5)°. However, our time-resolved 2D particle-in-cell simulations show the initial beam divergence to be much smaller (≤30°). Our simulations show the divergence to monotonically increase with time, reaching a final value of (68±7)° after the passage of the laser pulse, consistent with the experimental time-integrated measurements. By revealing the time-dependent nature of the LPI, we find that a substantial fraction of the laser energy (~7%) is transported up to 100 μm with a divergence of 32°.

  16. Modeling of Time-correlated Detection of Fast Neutrons Emitted in Induced SNM Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckes, Amber; Barzilov, Alexander; Richardson, Norman

    Neutron multiplicity methods are widely used in the assay of fissile materials. Fission reactions release multiple neutrons simultaneously. Time-correlated detection of neutrons provides a coincidence signature that is unique to fission,which enables distinguishing it from other events. In general, fission neutrons are fast. Thermal neutron sensors require the moderation of neutrons prior to a detection event; therefore, the neutron's energy and the event's timing information may be distorted, resulting in the wide time windows in the correlation analysis. Fastneutron sensing using scintillators allows shortening the time correlation window. In this study, four EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detectors with neutron/photon pulse shape discrimination properties were modeled usingthe MCNP6 code. This sensor array was studied for time-correlated detection of fast neutrons emitted inthe induced fission of 239Pu and (α,n) neutron sources. This paper presents the results of computational modeling of arrays of these plastic scintillator sensors as well as3He detectors equipped with a moderator.

  17. Fast silicon photomultiplier improves signal harvesting and reduces complexity in time-domain diffuse optics.

    PubMed

    Mora, Alberto Dalla; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Contini, Davide; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Durduran, Turgut; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Farina, Andrea; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    We present a proof of concept prototype of a time-domain diffuse optics probe exploiting a fast Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM), featuring a timing resolution better than 80 ps, a fast tail with just 90 ps decay time-constant and a wide active area of 1 mm2. The detector is hosted into the probe and used in direct contact with the sample under investigation, thus providing high harvesting efficiency by exploiting the whole SiPM numerical aperture and also reducing complexity by avoiding the use of cumbersome fiber bundles. Our tests also demonstrate high accuracy and linearity in retrieving the optical properties and suitable contrast and depth sensitivity for detecting localized inhomogeneities. In addition to a strong improvement in both instrumentation cost and size with respect to legacy solutions, the setup performances are comparable to those of state-of-the-art time-domain instrumentation, thus opening a new way to compact, low-cost and high-performance time-resolved devices for diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy.

  18. A Novel Method for Fast Change-Point Detection on Simulated Time Series and Electrocardiogram Data

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jin-Peng; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Ying; Qi, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Although Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistic is a widely used method, some weaknesses exist in investigating abrupt Change Point (CP) problems, e.g. it is time-consuming and invalid sometimes. To detect abrupt change from time series fast, a novel method is proposed based on Haar Wavelet (HW) and KS statistic (HWKS). First, the two Binary Search Trees (BSTs), termed TcA and TcD, are constructed by multi-level HW from a diagnosed time series; the framework of HWKS method is implemented by introducing a modified KS statistic and two search rules based on the two BSTs; and then fast CP detection is implemented by two HWKS-based algorithms. Second, the performance of HWKS is evaluated by simulated time series dataset. The simulations show that HWKS is faster, more sensitive and efficient than KS, HW, and T methods. Last, HWKS is applied to analyze the electrocardiogram (ECG) time series, the experiment results show that the proposed method can find abrupt change from ECG segment with maximal data fluctuation more quickly and efficiently, and it is very helpful to inspect and diagnose the different state of health from a patient's ECG signal. PMID:24690633

  19. Recognition of time-compressed speech does not predict recognition of natural fast-rate speech by older listeners.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Zion, Danielle J; Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated whether recognition of time-compressed speech predicts recognition of natural fast-rate speech, and whether this relationship is influenced by listener age. High and low context sentences were presented to younger and older normal-hearing adults at a normal speech rate, naturally fast speech rate, and fast rate implemented by time compressing the normal-rate sentences. Recognition of time-compressed sentences over-estimated recognition of natural fast sentences for both groups, especially for older listeners. The findings suggest that older listeners are at a much greater disadvantage when listening to natural fast speech than would be predicted by recognition performance for time-compressed speech.

  20. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hyroxyflavone isolated in solid argon: fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra and tautomer fluorescence rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, B.; Ernsting, N.P.

    1987-07-30

    The fluorescence properties of 3-hydroxyflavone isolated in solid argon at 15 K have been investigated. Upon electronic excitation the molecules undergo rapid intramolecular proton transfer. No fluorescence from the excited state of the normal form of the molecule could be detected. Perturbations due to hydrogen-bonding impurities which produce serious experimental problems in hydrocarbon glasses are largely suppressed in argon matrices. The rise of the green fluorescence of the tautomer was studied with excitation pulses of 230-fs duration and streak camera detection. An apparent tautomer fluorescence rise time of 2.7 ps was obtained by deconvolution. A comparative measurement of the dye coumarine 6 yielded an apparent fluorescence rise time of 2.5 ps, which can be entirely attributed to the group velocity dispersion of the streak camera optics. This indicates a rate constant for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone of greater than 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/.

  1. Nuclear physics experiments with in-beam fast-timing and plunger techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotty, C.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear lifetime and g factor are crucial observables in nuclear physics, as they give access to the excited states nuclear wave functions using the well-known electromagnetic transition operators. Thus, they are benchmarks to validate or discard nuclear structure theories. During the last decades, the evolution of the nuclear instruments and methods gave birth to several techniques used to measure lifetimes and moments. Among them, the in-beam Fast Electronic Scintillation Timing (FEST) technique is used to measure lifetimes of nuclear states in the picosecond to nanosecond range. Plunger devices originally developed to perform lifetime measurements of excited states in the picosecond range using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) are now also employed to measure g factor using the new Time-Differential Recoil-In-Vacuum (TDRIV) technique. Recently commissioned, the ROmanian array for SPectroscopy in HEavy ion REactions (ROSPHERE) is dedicated to perform γ-ray spectroscopy, specially suited for lifetime measurements using the RDDS and in-beam fast-timing techniques at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator facility of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). An introduction of above-mentioned techniques is provided and selected results are illustrating them with physics cases. The in-beam fast-timing and RDDS techniques are described using lifetime measurements respectively in 67Cu and 120Te measured at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator. Finally, the precise g factor measurement of the first-excited state in 24Mg using by the new TDRIV technique at the ALTO-Tandem Orsay facility is presented.

  2. Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

  3. A fast-saliency method for real-time infrared small target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shengxiang; Xu, Guojing; Mou, Zhiying; Huang, Dayu; Zheng, Xueli

    2016-07-01

    Infrared small target detection plays an important role in applications including military reconnaissance, early warning and terminal guidance. In this paper, we present a fast method, called fast-saliency, with very low computational complexity, for real-time small target detection in single image frame under various complex backgrounds. Different from traditional algorithms, the proposed method is inspired by a recent research on visual saliency detection indicating that small salient signals could be well detected by a gradient enhancement operation combined with Gaussian smoothing, which is able to delineate regions of small targets in infrared images. Concisely, there are only four simple steps contained in fast-saliency. In order, they are gradient operation, square computation, Gaussian smoothing and automatic thresholding, representing the four procedures as highpass filtering, target enhancement, noise suppression and target segmentation, respectively. Especially, for the most crucial step, gradient operation, we innovatively propose a 5 × 5 facet kernel operator that holds the key for separating the small targets from backgrounds. To verify the effectiveness of our proposed method, a set of real infrared images covering typical backgrounds with sea, sky and ground clutters are tested in experiments. The results demonstrate that it outperforms the state-of-the-art methods not only in detection accuracy, but also in computation efficiency.

  4. Axial Magma System Geometry beneath a Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge: Insight from Three-Dimensional Seismic Reflection Imaging on the East Pacific Rise 9º42' to 9º57'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, H. D.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The fast-spreading East Pacific Rise at the 9º50'N Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Site was the focus of the first academic 3D, multi-source, multi-streamer seismic survey, carried out aboard R/V Langseth in summer 2008. The main area of 3D coverage extends from 9º42-57'N, spanning the seafloor extent of two documented volcanic eruptions. There, the 3D geometry of the mid-crustal axial magma lens (AML), located ~1.5 km below the seafloor, was initially investigated using a best 1D stacking velocity function hung from the seafloor and two-pass post-stack time migration. Preliminary results suggested a relatively narrow (~0.5-1.8 km wide) AML showing fingering and overlap of individual magma bodies, particularly in association with several small-scale ridge-axis discontinuities identified from seafloor morphology and structure of the axial summit trough. A westward-dipping limb of the AML was imaged near 9º51'N, where the AML attains its largest width. From 9º53-56'N, the AML was seen to veer slightly westward, in accordance with a shift in orientation of the ridge. Sub-axial magma lenses (SAMLs) have been recently imaged between 9º20' and 9º56'N on along-axis reflection profiles from the same survey, with the suggestion that these deeper lenses may have contributed melts to the 2005/06 eruption. In the cross-axis dataset, SAML events are observed down to ~600-700 ms (~1.7-2 km) below the AML. They sometimes appear slightly offset with respect to the center of the AML. They are generally less bright than the AML reflection, some of them display prominent diffraction tails on un-migrated sections, and the deeper events have a distinctly lower frequency content than the shallower ones. New images for the 9º42-57'N area are currently being generated from a suite of detailed stacking velocities for the AML and SAML events and 3D post-stack time migration, which will provide insight into the width and along-axis continuity of individual magma bodies at multiple levels

  5. Modular time division multiplexer: Efficient simultaneous characterization of fast and slow transients in multiple samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Stephan D.; Luo, Jiajun; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, R. P. H.; Grayson, M.

    2016-09-01

    A modular time division multiplexer (MTDM) device is introduced to enable parallel measurement of multiple samples with both fast and slow decay transients spanning from millisecond to month-long time scales. This is achieved by dedicating a single high-speed measurement instrument for rapid data collection at the start of a transient, and by multiplexing a second low-speed measurement instrument for slow data collection of several samples in parallel for the later transients. The MTDM is a high-level design concept that can in principle measure an arbitrary number of samples, and the low cost implementation here allows up to 16 samples to be measured in parallel over several months, reducing the total ensemble measurement duration and equipment usage by as much as an order of magnitude without sacrificing fidelity. The MTDM was successfully demonstrated by simultaneously measuring the photoconductivity of three amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin films with 20 ms data resolution for fast transients and an uninterrupted parallel run time of over 20 days. The MTDM has potential applications in many areas of research that manifest response times spanning many orders of magnitude, such as photovoltaics, rechargeable batteries, amorphous semiconductors such as silicon and amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide.

  6. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartiglia, N.; Staiano, A.; Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Bellora, A.; Durando, S.; Mandurrino, M.; Minafra, N.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E.; Grabas, H.; Gruey, B.; Labitan, C. A.; Losakul, R.; Luce, Z.; McKinney-Martinez, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 μm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm2. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  7. Ultra-Fast Timing and the Application of High Energy Physics Technologies to Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Tu; Kao, Chien-Min; Xie, Quigguo; Frisch, Henry; Heinz, Mary; Sanders, Harold; Tang, Fukung; Anderson, John; Byrum, Karen; Drake, Gary; Heartly, Camden; Le Dû, Patrick; Royon, Christophe; Genat, Jean François; Va'Vra, Jerry

    2008-06-01

    We propose to apply the ultra fast Time Of Flight technique (TOF) developed for High Energy Physics (HEP) particle detectors to biomedical imaging. The similarity of the problem in the two fields as well as the remarkable opportunities in biomedical imaging to use technologies developed in HEP have the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We will describe and present some preliminary results of the development of a new complete read-out chain able to manage signals from various types of modern photo detectors (MCP, APD, SiPM). This innovative architecture is made of a fast front-end electronics ASIC with novel Digital Signal Processing (DSP) concepts able to reach the Pico-second timing resolution, a time-to-digital converter, a pipelined digital readout and an integrated trigger/filter with real-time data treatment and display. In parallel with the hardware development, we have begun a systematic program to simulate system characteristics from the initial particle interaction to the final digital data, including a bit-by-bit mapping of the front end/data acquisition system. The introduction of these techniques and tools, common in HEP, has the potential to make improvement to biomedical imaging systems.

  8. A modified fast analog technique for determining luminescence decay times of scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Borst, W.; Palsule, C.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have modified their previous fast analog technique to determine the luminescence decay times of scintillators following an excitation with a Sr{sup 90} {beta}-source. In the original technique, the sample was excited with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser, and the fluorescence pulses (consisting of typically 50 to 1,000 photons) were detected by a multichannel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT). The output from the MCP-PMT was directed to a fast waveform digitizer triggered externally by the exciting laser. In the modified technique, the digitizer acquires the fluorescence decay in the internal trigger mode, as no corresponding external trigger pulse is available from the Sr{sup 90} source. For efficient light collection from scintillators, an ellipsoidal mirror assembly has been tested. The fluorescence decays are acquired as multi-photon pulses and are subsequently corrected for the temporal instrument response by using a deconvolution technique. The overall time resolution of the technique is about 100 ps. The fluorescence decay time obtained using this technique for a commercial scintillator (SCSN-81) agrees well with literature. The authors also discuss the results on new epoxy-polymer based scintillators prepared in their laboratory. The primary motivation for this work was development of new scintillators with shorter fluorescence decay times for high collision rate experiments.

  9. Detecting changes in coupling with Granger causality method from time series with fast transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoev, Ilya V.; Sysoeva, Marina V.

    2015-08-01

    The ability of the Granger causality method to detect directed coupling between subsystems of a complex system in a moving time window is investigated on etalon oscillators. In particular, the time series consisting of alternate stationary regimes characterised by the different amplitude and shape of oscillations with fast transient processes between these regimes are considered, with similar transitions being possible due to changes either in the coupling or in the individual properties of subsystems. Two popular approaches to surrogate times series generation are used to check the significance of the method results. Two model structures: the standard linear and the special non-linear adapted to data are implemented. The Granger causality method using the model structure adapted to data is shown to be significantly advantageous in detecting coupling directionality and the instant time of the regime change than the standard linear method, while in some cases the sensitivity and the specificity of the adapted approach are insufficient.

  10. Fast timing bi-directional charge coupled devices for use in gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altice, Peter Parker, Jr.

    A Charge Coupled Device (CCD) coupled with a pixellated inorganic scintillator (such as segmented CsI) can provide high position resolution (˜300 mum). However, standard CCDs are integrating devices typically operating no faster than video rates. For a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope capable of measuring the energy of individual photons, the CCD must have a time resolution better than the average time interval between cosmic ray events on the veto shield (˜10 kHz). A Fast Timing Bi-Directional CCD has better than 10 mus time resolution and 50 mum position resolution. We describe the CCD readout architecture, the ASIC readout design, the present status of the development, and the application to a gamma-ray astronomy telescope suitable for a 100-day Ultra Long Duration Balloon mission.

  11. SeptiFast real-time PCR for detection of bloodborne pathogens in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

    PubMed

    Markota, Andrej; Seme, Katja; Golle, Andrej; Poljak, Mario; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have been performed investigating the role of a real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay LightCycler SeptiFast with inconsistent results. In prospective evaluation of adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock SeptiFast assay and blood culture results were compared regarding concordance, the impact of SeptiFast assay on antimicrobial therapy adjustment, time to results and the role of SeptiFast assay as a marker of disease severity. 63 blood sample sets were collected from 57 patients. 51 (80.9%) results were concordant negative and 7 (11.1%) concordant posi- tive. In one (1.6%) sample set blood culture was positive and SeptiFast assay negative, in three (4.8%) sample sets with negative blood cultures pathogens were detected by SeptiFast assay and in one (1.6%)patient an additional pathogen was detected by SeptiFast assay. If blood culture is considered as "gold standard", 1 (1.6%) SeptiFast false negative and 4 (6.3%) false positive results were identified (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 92.6%, negative predictive value 97.8%). Antibiotic treatment was adjusted according to SeptiFast assay in 4 (6.3%) cases. Time to final results was significantly shorter with SeptiFast assay (32 +/- 23 h vs. 97 +/- 28 h, p < 0.0001). Positive SeptiFast assay was not associated with higher mortality, C-reactive protein orprocalcitonin (p = 0.74, p = 0.44 and p = 0.12, respectively). According to our results SeptiFast assay can be used as a valuable add-on to blood culture in diagnostic workup ofpatients with severe sepsis and septic shock but it cannot replace the blood culture.

  12. Cost-effective method for fast Brillouin optical time-domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Minardo, Aldo; Catalano, Ester; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-10-31

    A new Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) technique for acquiring the full Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) at high speed is proposed and demonstrated. The method employs a frequency swept microwave source for the generation of the probe wave, so that the entire BOTDA measurement is taken within the duration of the frequency sweep itself. By properly setting the duration of the sweep, the repetition rate of the pump pulses and the number of averages, truly distributed and dynamic measurements of the BGS are possible using a set-up at a fraction of the cost and complexity of the previously reported fast-BOTDA methods.

  13. Fast real-time recognition and quality inspection of printed characters via point correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penz, Harald; Bajla, Ivan; Vrabl, Andreas; Krattenthaler, Werner; Mayer, Konrad

    2001-04-01

    Some technical applications need a fast and reliable OCR for critical circumstances like low resolution and poor contrast. A concrete example is the real-time quality inspection system of Austrian banknotes. One requirement to the system is that it has to read two serial numbers on each banknote and to check if they are identical To solve the problem we have developed a novel method based an idea similar to pattern matching. However, instead of comparing entire images we use reduced sets of pixels, one for each different numeral. The detection is performed by matching these pixel sets with the corresponding pixels in the image being analyzed. We present an algorithm based on two cost functions that computes in a reasonable time the reduced pixel sets from a given set of image templates. The efficiency of our OCR has been increased considerably by introducing an appropriate set of image preprocessing operations. These are tailored especially to images with low resolution and poor contrast, bu they are simple enough to allow a fast real-time implementation. They can be seen as a normalization step that improves the image properties which are essential for pattern matching.

  14. Fast template matching based on grey prediction for real-time object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mingming; Hou, Yuanlong; Liu, Rongzhong; Hou, Runmin

    2017-02-01

    Template matching is a basic algorithm for image processing, and real-time is a crucial requirement of object tracking. For real-time tracking, a fast template matching algorithm based on grey prediction is presented, where computation cost can be reduced dramatically by minimizing search range. First, location of the tracked object in the current image is estimated by Grey Model (GM). GM(1,1), which is the basic model of grey prediction, can use some known information to foretell the location. Second, the precise position of the object in the frame is computed by template matching. Herein, Sequential Similarity Detection Algorithm (SSDA) with a self-adaptive threshold is employed to obtain the matching position in the neighborhood of the predicted location. The role of threshold in SSDA is important, as a proper threshold can make template matching fast and accurate. Moreover, a practical weighted strategy is utilized to handle scale and rotation changes of the object, as well as illumination changes. The experimental results show the superior performance of the proposed algorithm over the conventional full-search method, especially in terms of executive time.

  15. Fast elaboration of diagnostic data for real time control in FTU tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, E.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Cirant, S.; Galperti, C.; Marchetto, C.; Nowak, S.; Sozzi, C.; Tudisco, O.

    2012-09-01

    The automatic controller developed for MHD instability control on FTU via the real time (RT) EC launcher [1, 2] is based on the a-priori estimate of the instabilities location and on the fast elaboration of the stream of diagnostic data. A fast data acquisition system, based on existing standard FTU diagnostics, collects thermal and magnetic signals by a 12-channels ECE polychromator [3] and by a set of 22 Mirnov coils respectively. Moreover, the EC time waveform from directional couplers along the transmission line is acquired as well. This set of signals is processed in a timescale significantly shorter than the typical time step of the controller (1ms). RT elaboration algorithms aim at supplying the controller [4] with reliable information about the existence and the spatial location of the instability and about the actual ECRH deposition layer in plasma. The main algorithms blocks are ECE-ECE, ECE-Mirnov and ECE-ECRH cross-correlation, and SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) of Mirnov signals. The capabilities of effective detection, false positive resilience, and mode discrimination will be discussed through the application to actual plasma data.

  16. Fast real-time PCR for the detection of crustacean allergen in foods.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Beatriz; Vieites, Juan M; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2012-02-29

    Crustaceans are one of the most common allergens causing severe food reaction. These food allergens are a health problem, and they have become very important; there are various regulations that establish that labeling must be present regarding these allergens to warn consumers. In the present work a fast real-time PCR, by a LNA probe, was developed. This allows the detection of crustaceans in all kinds of products, including processed products in which very aggressive treatments of temperature and pressure during the manufacturing process are used. This methodology provides greater sensitivity and specificity and reduces the analysis time of real-time PCR to 40 min. This methodology was further validated by means of simulating products likely to contain this allergen. For this, products present on the market were spiked with crustacean cooking water. The assay is a potential tool in issues related to the labeling of products and food security to protect the allergic consumer.

  17. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Yankelevich, Diego R; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Elson, Daniel S; Marcu, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8-7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence lifetime

  18. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yankelevich, Diego R.; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Elson, Daniel S.; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  19. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yankelevich, Diego R.; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  20. Using Graphs for Fast Error Term Approximation of Time-varying Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Nuber, C; LaMar, E C; Pascucci, V; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2003-02-27

    We present a method for the efficient computation and storage of approximations of error tables used for error estimation of a region between different time steps in time-varying datasets. The error between two time steps is defined as the distance between the data of these time steps. Error tables are used to look up the error between different time steps of a time-varying dataset, especially when run time error computation is expensive. However, even the generation of error tables itself can be expensive. For n time steps, the exact error look-up table (which stores the error values for all pairs of time steps in a matrix) has a memory complexity and pre-processing time complexity of O(n2), and O(1) for error retrieval. Our approximate error look-up table approach uses trees, where the leaf nodes represent original time steps, and interior nodes contain an average (or best-representative) of the children nodes. The error computed on an edge of a tree describes the distance between the two nodes on that edge. Evaluating the error between two different time steps requires traversing a path between the two leaf nodes, and accumulating the errors on the traversed edges. For n time steps, this scheme has a memory complexity and pre-processing time complexity of O(nlog(n)), a significant improvement over the exact scheme; the error retrieval complexity is O(log(n)). As we do not need to calculate all possible n2 error terms, our approach is a fast way to generate the approximation.

  1. Who Gets a Mentor? A Longitudinal Assessment of the Rising Star Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Romila; Ragins, Belle Rose; Tharenou, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the rising star hypothesis, which proposes that individuals who are on the fast track to career success are more likely to gain mentors than others. The study used a sample of employees who had never been mentored and examined the relationship between rising star attributes measured at Time 1 and the attainment of a mentor a…

  2. Time-resolved Fast Neutron Radiography of Air-water Two-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Bromberger, Benjamin; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    Neutron imaging, in general, is a useful technique for visualizing low-Z materials (such as water or plastics) obscured by high-Z materials. However, when significant amounts of both materials are present and full-bodied samples have to be examined, cold and thermal neutrons rapidly reach their applicability limit as the samples become opaque. In such cases one can benefit from the high penetrating power of fast neutrons. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of time-resolved, fast neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick flow channel with Aluminum walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. Exposure times down to 3.33 ms have been achieved at reasonable image quality and acceptable motion artifacts. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two-phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured.

  3. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  4. Initial Study of an Effective Fast-Time Simulation Platform for Unmanned Aircraft System Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Rios, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAVs), typically 55 lbs and below, are envisioned to play a major role in surveilling critical assets, collecting important information, and delivering goods. Large scale small UAV operations are expected to happen in low altitude airspace in the near future. Many static and dynamic constraints exist in low altitude airspace because of manned aircraft or helicopter activities, various wind conditions, restricted airspace, terrain and man-made buildings, and conflict-avoidance among sUAVs. High sensitivity and high maneuverability are unique characteristics of sUAVs that bring challenges to effective system evaluations and mandate such a simulation platform different from existing simulations that were built for manned air traffic system and large unmanned fixed aircraft. NASA's Unmanned aircraft system Traffic Management (UTM) research initiative focuses on enabling safe and efficient sUAV operations in the future. In order to help define requirements and policies for a safe and efficient UTM system to accommodate a large amount of sUAV operations, it is necessary to develop a fast-time simulation platform that can effectively evaluate requirements, policies, and concepts in a close-to-reality environment. This work analyzed the impacts of some key factors including aforementioned sUAV's characteristics and demonstrated the importance of these factors in a successful UTM fast-time simulation platform.

  5. Real-Time Robust Tracking for Motion Blur and Fast Motion via Correlation Filters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingyun; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Visual tracking has extensive applications in intelligent monitoring and guidance systems. Among state-of-the-art tracking algorithms, Correlation Filter methods perform favorably in robustness, accuracy and speed. However, it also has shortcomings when dealing with pervasive target scale variation, motion blur and fast motion. In this paper we proposed a new real-time robust scheme based on Kernelized Correlation Filter (KCF) to significantly improve performance on motion blur and fast motion. By fusing KCF and STC trackers, our algorithm also solve the estimation of scale variation in many scenarios. We theoretically analyze the problem for CFs towards motions and utilize the point sharpness function of the target patch to evaluate the motion state of target. Then we set up an efficient scheme to handle the motion and scale variation without much time consuming. Our algorithm preserves the properties of KCF besides the ability to handle special scenarios. In the end extensive experimental results on benchmark of VOT datasets show our algorithm performs advantageously competed with the top-rank trackers. PMID:27618046

  6. A Correlation-based Timing Calibration and Diagnostic Technique for Fast Digitizing ASICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kurtis; Romero-Wolf, Andrés; the Large Area Picosecond Photodetector Collaboration [1

    A general procedure for precision timing calibration of waveform digitizing systems is presented. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) implementing this functionality are increasingly used in high-energy physics as replacements for stand-alone time-to-digital and analog-to-digital modules. However, process variations cause such ASICs to have irregularly spaced timing intervals between samples, so careful calibration is required to improve the timing resolution of such systems. The procedure presented here exploits correlations between nearby samples of a sine wave of known frequency to obtain the time difference between them. As only the correlations are used, the procedure can be performed without knowledge of the phase of the input signal, and converges with smaller data samples than other common techniques. It also serves as a valuable diagnostic tool, allowing a fast, visual, qualitative check of gain mismatches between sampling cells and other ADC artifacts. Work is continuing to extend the procedure to fit for timing intervals in the face of such non-idealities. We present both the algorithm and example calibration results from a commercial oscilloscope and the PSEC-3 ASIC. For the latter, we have also applied the calibration to improve timing resolution in the readout of a prototype microchannel plate photomultiplier tube with a stripline anode configuration.

  7. Real-Time Fast Controller Prototype for J-TEXT Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, W.; Zhang, M.; Zhuang, G.; Weng, C.; Liu, R.; He, Y.; Ding, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-04-01

    The operation of a tokamak device is highly sophisticated, which usually requires high performance real-time controllers. The ITER Control, Data Access and Communication (CODAC) team has made standards for Fast Controller (FC). Following the ITER CODAC standards we have designed the real-time FC (RTFC) prototype for J-TEXT.RTFC represents a general framework for controllers in both real-time control and diagnostic systems. The RTFC is designed to improve the development efficiency of real-time controller, and with minor modification it can be used in different applications. The RTFC main features are the PXI/PXIe bus with multi-core processor hardware, the Reflective-Memory, the IEEE-1588 Precision Time Protocol (PTP) support and LabVIEW real-time software. The proposed framework is capable of performing close-loop control with a time cycle below 1 ms. The RTFC supports the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for both monitoring and system configuration. It can be easily integrated into J-TEXT CODAC system which is a newly developed control system for J-TEXT. This paper introduces the main features of the RTFC. The preliminary results obtained with the prototype of RTFC show the potential effectiveness of the proposed architecture.

  8. Fast time- and frequency-domain finite-element methods for electromagnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woochan

    Fast electromagnetic analysis in time and frequency domain is of critical importance to the design of integrated circuits (IC) and other advanced engineering products and systems. Many IC structures constitute a very large scale problem in modeling and simulation, the size of which also continuously grows with the advancement of the processing technology. This results in numerical problems beyond the reach of existing most powerful computational resources. Different from many other engineering problems, the structure of most ICs is special in the sense that its geometry is of Manhattan type and its dielectrics are layered. Hence, it is important to develop structure-aware algorithms that take advantage of the structure specialties to speed up the computation. In addition, among existing time-domain methods, explicit methods can avoid solving a matrix equation. However, their time step is traditionally restricted by the space step for ensuring the stability of a time-domain simulation. Therefore, making explicit time-domain methods unconditionally stable is important to accelerate the computation. In addition to time-domain methods, frequency-domain methods have suffered from an indefinite system that makes an iterative solution difficult to converge fast. The first contribution of this work is a fast time-domain finite-element algorithm for the analysis and design of very large-scale on-chip circuits. The structure specialty of on-chip circuits such as Manhattan geometry and layered permittivity is preserved in the proposed algorithm. As a result, the large-scale matrix solution encountered in the 3-D circuit analysis is turned into a simple scaling of the solution of a small 1-D matrix, which can be obtained in linear (optimal) complexity with negligible cost. Furthermore, the time step size is not sacrificed, and the total number of time steps to be simulated is also significantly reduced, thus achieving a total cost reduction in CPU time. The second contribution

  9. Comparisons of Crosswind Velocity Profile Estimates Used in Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruis, Mathew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Five methods for estimating crosswind profiles used in fast-time wake vortex prediction models are compared in this study. Previous investigations have shown that temporal and spatial variations in the crosswind vertical profile have a large impact on the transport and time evolution of the trailing vortex pair. The most important crosswind parameters are the magnitude of the crosswind and the gradient in the crosswind shear. It is known that pulsed and continuous wave lidar measurements can provide good estimates of the wind profile in the vicinity of airports. In this study comparisons are made between estimates of the crosswind profiles from a priori information on the trajectory of the vortex pair as well as crosswind profiles derived from different sensors and a regional numerical weather prediction model.

  10. FAST INVERSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLANETARY PARAMETERS FROM TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Beauge, Cristian

    2010-01-20

    The transit timing variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Non-transiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Here we describe a fast algorithm that can be used to determine the mass and orbit of the non-transiting planets from the TTV data. We apply our code, ttvim.f, to a wide variety of planetary systems to test the uniqueness of the TTV inversion problem and its dependence on the precision of TTV observations. We find that planetary parameters, including the mass and mutual orbital inclination of planets, can be determined from the TTV data sets that should become available in near future. Unlike the radial velocity technique, the TTV method can therefore be used to characterize the inclination distribution of multi-planet systems.

  11. Real-time fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Kazusa; Terashima, Yuta; Iwakawa, Kento; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Inubushi, Masanobu

    2017-03-20

    Random number generators are essential for applications in information security and numerical simulations. Most optical-chaos-based random number generators produce random bit sequences by offline post-processing with large optical components. We demonstrate a real-time hardware implementation of a fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) electronic board. We generate 1-Tbit random bit sequences and evaluate their statistical randomness using NIST Special Publication 800-22 and TestU01. All of the BigCrush tests in TestU01 are passed using 410-Gbit random bit sequences. A maximum real-time generation rate of 21.1 Gb/s is achieved for random bit sequences in binary format stored in a computer, which can be directly used for applications involving secret keys in cryptography and random seeds in large-scale numerical simulations.

  12. Fast real-time polymerase chain reaction for quantitative detection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages in milk.

    PubMed

    Martín, Maria Cruz; del Rio, Beatriz; Martínez, Noelia; Magadán, Alfonso H; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2008-12-01

    One of the main microbiological problems of the dairy industry is the susceptibility of starter bacteria to virus infections. Lactobacillus delbrueckii, a component of thermophilic starter cultures used in the manufacture of several fermented dairy products, including yogurt, is also sensitive to bacteriophage attacks. To avoid the problems associated with these viruses, quick and sensitive detection methods are necessary. In the present study, a fast real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the direct detection and quantification of L. delbrueckii phages in milk was developed. A set of primers and a TaqMan MGB probe was designed, based on the lysin gene sequence of different L. delbrueckii phages. The results show the proposed method to be a rapid (total processing time 30 min), specific and highly sensitive technique for detecting L. delbrueckii phages in milk.

  13. Finite Time Extinction for Stochastic Sign Fast Diffusion and Self-Organized Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gess, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    We prove finite time extinction for stochastic sign fast diffusion equations driven by linear multiplicative space-time noise, corresponding to the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model for self-organized criticality. This solves a problem posed and left open in several works: (Barbu, Methods Appl Sci 36:1726-1733, 2013; Röckner and Wang, J Lond Math Soc (2) 87:545-560, 2013; Barbu et al. J Math Anal Appl 389:147-164, 2012; Barbu and Röckner, Comm Math Phys 311:539-555, 2012; Barbu et al., Comm Math Phys 285:901-923, 2009, C R Math Acad Sci Paris 347(1-2):81-84, 2009). The highly singular-degenerate nature of the drift in interplay with the stochastic perturbation causes the need for new methods in the analysis of mass diffusion, and several new estimates and techniques are introduced.

  14. Open Probe fast GC-MS - combining ambient sampling ultra-fast separation and in-vacuum ionization for real-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Keshet, U; Alon, T; Fialkov, A B; Amirav, A

    2017-07-01

    An Open Probe inlet was combined with a low thermal mass ultra-fast gas chromatograph (GC), in-vacuum electron ionization ion source and a mass spectrometer (MS) of GC-MS for obtaining real-time analysis with separation. The Open Probe enables ambient sampling via sample vaporization in an oven that is open to room air, and the ultra-fast GC provides ~30-s separation, while if no separation is required, it can act as a transfer line with 2 to 3-s sample transfer time. Sample analysis is as simple as touching the sample, pushing the sample holder into the Open Probe oven and obtaining the results in 30 s. The Open Probe fast GC was mounted on a standard Agilent 7890 GC that was coupled with an Agilent 5977A MS. Open Probe fast GC-MS provides real-time analysis combined with GC separation and library identification, and it uses the low-cost MS of GC-MS. The operation of Open Probe fast GC-MS is demonstrated in the 30-s separation and 50-s full analysis cycle time of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol in Cannabis flower, sub 1-min analysis of trace trinitrotoluene transferred from a finger onto a glass surface, vitamin E in canola oil, sterols in olive oil, polybrominated flame retardants in plastics, alprazolam in Xanax drug pill and free fatty acids and cholesterol in human blood. The extrapolated limit of detection for pyrene is <1 fg, but the concentration is too high and the software noise calculation is untrustworthy. The broad range of compounds amenable for analysis is demonstrated in the analysis of reserpine. The possible use with alternate standard GC-MS and Open Probe fast GC-MS is demonstrated in the analysis of heroin in its street drug powder. The use of Open Probe with the fast GC acting as a transfer line is demonstrated in <10-s analysis without separation of ibuprofen and estradiol. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Time-resolved changes in equatorial x-ray diffraction and stiffness during rise of tetanic tension in intact length-clamped single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, G; Griffiths, P J; Bagni, M A; Ashley, C C; Maeda, Y

    1991-06-01

    We report the first time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies on tetanized intact single muscle fibers of the frog. The 10, 11, 20, 21, 30, and Z equatorial reflections were clearly resolved in the relaxed fiber. The preparation readily withstood 100 1-s duration (0.4-s beam exposure) tetani at 4 degrees C (less than 4% decline of force and no deterioration in the 10, 11 equatorial intensity ratio at rest or during activation). Equatorial intensity changes (10 and 11) and fiber stiffness led tension (t1/2 lead 20 ms at 4 degrees C) during the tetanus rise and lagged during the isometric phase of relaxation. These findings support the existence of a low force cross-bridge state during the rise of tetanic tension and isometric relaxation that is not evident at the tetanus plateau. In "fixed end" tetani lattice expansion occurred with a time course similar to stiffness during the tetanus rise. During relaxation, lattice spacing increased slightly, while the sarcomere length remained isometric, but underwent large changes after the "shoulder" of tension. Under length clamp control, lattice expansion during the tetanus rise was reduced or abolished, and compression (2%) of the lattice was observed. A lattice compression is predicted by certain cross-bridge models of force generation (Schoenberg, M. 1980. Biophys. J. 30:51-68; Schoenberg, M. 1980. Biophys. J. 30:69-78).

  16. Television viewing, internet use, and self-reported bedtime and rise time in adults: implications for sleep hygiene recommendations from an exploratory cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Custers, Kathleen; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the availability of the Internet and TV in the bedroom and overall Internet use and TV viewing were related to sleep variables in a sample of 711 residents of Flanders, Belgium. Although the relations were small, there was some evidence of time shifting: Internet access in the bedroom predicted later bedtime (β = .12, p < .05) and later rise time (β = .11, p < .05) on weekdays and later bedtime (β = .10, p < .001) on weekends. Internet use volume predicted later bedtime (β = .10, p < .001) and rise time (β = .07, p < .05) on weekends, and TV viewing predicted later bedtime (β = .10, p < .05) on weekends. However, neither the availability of the Internet or TV in the bedroom, nor the volume of Internet use or TV viewing, was a significant predictor of reduced sleep window or tiredness. Reducing media use might not be important for sleep hygiene advice to adults.

  17. Enabling Near Real-Time Remote Search for Fast Transient Events with Lossy Data Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohl, Dany; Pritchard, Tyler; Andreoni, Igor; Cooke, Jeffrey; Meade, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of JPEG2000 (ISO/IEC 15444) as a transport data format to enable rapid remote searches for fast transient events as part of the Deeper Wider Faster programme. Deeper Wider Faster programme uses 20 telescopes from radio to gamma rays to perform simultaneous and rapid-response follow-up searches for fast transient events on millisecond-to-hours timescales. Deeper Wider Faster programme search demands have a set of constraints that is becoming common amongst large collaborations. Here, we focus on the rapid optical data component of Deeper Wider Faster programme led by the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Each Dark Energy Camera image has 70 total coupled-charged devices saved as a 1.2 gigabyte FITS file. Near real-time data processing and fast transient candidate identifications-in minutes for rapid follow-up triggers on other telescopes-requires computational power exceeding what is currently available on-site at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. In this context, data files need to be transmitted rapidly to a foreign location for supercomputing post-processing, source finding, visualisation and analysis. This step in the search process poses a major bottleneck, and reducing the data size helps accommodate faster data transmission. To maximise our gain in transfer time and still achieve our science goals, we opt for lossy data compression-keeping in mind that raw data is archived and can be evaluated at a later time. We evaluate how lossy JPEG2000 compression affects the process of finding transients, and find only a negligible effect for compression ratios up to 25:1. We also find a linear relation between compression ratio and the mean estimated data transmission speed-up factor. Adding highly customised compression and decompression steps to the science pipeline considerably reduces the transmission time-validating its introduction to the Deeper Wider Faster programme science pipeline and

  18. Target Localization by Resolving the Time Synchronization Problem in Bistatic Radar Systems Using Space Fast-Time Adaptive Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurasinghe, D.; Shaw, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The proposed technique allows the radar receiver to accurately estimate the range of a large number of targets using a transmitter of opportunity as long as the location of the transmitter is known. The technique does not depend on the use of communication satellites or GPS systems, instead it relies on the availability of the direct transmit copy of the signal from the transmitter and the reflected paths off the various targets. An array-based space-fast time adaptive processor is implemented in order to estimate the path difference between the direct signal and the delayed signal, which bounces off the target. This procedure allows us to estimate the target distance as well as bearing.

  19. Effects of Ramadan on physical capacities of North African boys fasting for the first time

    PubMed Central

    Fenneni, Mohamed A.; Latiri, Imed; Aloui, Asma; Rouatbi, Sonia; Saafi, Mohamed A.; Bougmiza, Iheb; Chamari, Karim; Saad, Helmi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most of the literature related to the effects of Ramadan fasting on physical performance has focused on adults, and only three studies have examined its impact on children’s physical performance. Aims To examine the effects of Ramadan fasting on first-time fasting boys’ performance in short-term explosive exercises [vertical and horizontal jump tests (VJT and HJT), 20-m and 30-m sprints and medicine-ball throw (MBT)], as well as in sub-maximal endurance [6-min walking distance (6MWD) measured during the 6-min walk test (6MWT)]. Methods Eighteen Tunisian boys [mean±standard deviation (SD) of age and body mass (BM): 11.9±0.8 y and 55.4±18.2 kg, respectively] were included. The experimental design comprised four testing phases: 2-weeks before Ramadan (BR), the end of the second week (R2) and the fourth week (R4) of Ramadan, and 10–12 days after the end of Ramadan (AR). At each phase, boys performed two test sessions in the afternoon (15:00–17:00 h) interrupted by 48 h of recovery (first test session: BM, VJT, HJT, and 20-m and 30-m sprint tests; second session: MBT and 6MWT). The study was conducted during the summer of 2012 from July 5 to August 29. Results 6MWDs (m) were significantly shorter during R2 (652±101) and R4 (595±123) compared to BR (697±86) and came back to baseline values AR. BM (kg) mean±SD did not significantly change during R2 (52±15) and during R4 (53±15) compared to BR (55±17), and short-term explosive performances were unchanged throughout the study. Conclusion In non-athletic children, first-ever Ramadan fasting impairs sub-maximal aerobic capacity but has no effect on BM or short-term explosive performance. PMID:25261691

  20. Sleep-dependent consolidation benefits fast transfer of time interval training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihan; Guo, Lu; Bao, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Previous study has shown that short training (15 min) for explicitly discriminating temporal intervals between two paired auditory beeps, or between two paired tactile taps, can significantly improve observers' ability to classify the perceptual states of visual Ternus apparent motion while the training of task-irrelevant sensory properties did not help to improve visual timing (Chen and Zhou in Exp Brain Res 232(6):1855-1864, 2014). The present study examined the role of 'consolidation' after training of temporal task-irrelevant properties, or whether a pure delay (i.e., blank consolidation) following pretest of the target task would give rise to improved ability of visual interval timing, typified in visual Ternus display. A procedure of pretest-training-posttest was adopted, with the probe of discriminating Ternus apparent motion. The extended implicit training of timing in which the time intervals between paired auditory beeps or paired tactile taps were manipulated but the task was discrimination of the auditory pitches or tactile intensities, did not lead to the training benefits (Exps 1 and 3); however, a delay of 24 h after implicit training of timing, including solving 'Sudoku puzzles,' made the otherwise absent training benefits observable (Exps 2, 4, 5 and 6). The above improvements in performance were not due to a practice effect of Ternus motion (Exp 7). A general 'blank' consolidation period of 24 h also made improvements of visual timing observable (Exp 8). Taken together, the current findings indicated that sleep-dependent consolidation imposed a general effect, by potentially triggering and maintaining neuroplastic changes in the intrinsic (timing) network to enhance the ability of time perception.

  1. Fast or Frugal, but Not Both: Decision Heuristics Under Time Pressure.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Suarez, Sebastian; Love, Bradley C

    2017-05-29

    Heuristics are simple, yet effective, strategies that people use to make decisions. Because heuristics do not require all available information, they are thought to be easy to implement and to not tax limited cognitive resources, which has led heuristics to be characterized as fast-and-frugal. We question this monolithic conception of heuristics by contrasting the cognitive demands of two popular heuristics, Tallying and Take-the-Best. We contend that heuristics that are frugal in terms of information usage may not always be fast because of the attentional control required to implement this focus in certain contexts. In support of this hypothesis, we find that Take-the-Best, while being more frugal in terms of information usage, is slower to implement and fares worse under time pressure manipulations than Tallying. This effect is then reversed when search costs for Take-the-Best are reduced by changing the format of the stimuli. These findings suggest that heuristics are heterogeneous and should be unpacked according to their cognitive demands to determine the circumstances a heuristic best applies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Temporal Gillespie Algorithm: Fast Simulation of Contagion Processes on Time-Varying Networks.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Christian L; Génois, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Stochastic simulations are one of the cornerstones of the analysis of dynamical processes on complex networks, and are often the only accessible way to explore their behavior. The development of fast algorithms is paramount to allow large-scale simulations. The Gillespie algorithm can be used for fast simulation of stochastic processes, and variants of it have been applied to simulate dynamical processes on static networks. However, its adaptation to temporal networks remains non-trivial. We here present a temporal Gillespie algorithm that solves this problem. Our method is applicable to general Poisson (constant-rate) processes on temporal networks, stochastically exact, and up to multiple orders of magnitude faster than traditional simulation schemes based on rejection sampling. We also show how it can be extended to simulate non-Markovian processes. The algorithm is easily applicable in practice, and as an illustration we detail how to simulate both Poissonian and non-Markovian models of epidemic spreading. Namely, we provide pseudocode and its implementation in C++ for simulating the paradigmatic Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible and Susceptible-Infected-Recovered models and a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model with non-constant recovery rates. For empirical networks, the temporal Gillespie algorithm is here typically from 10 to 100 times faster than rejection sampling.

  3. Temporal Gillespie Algorithm: Fast Simulation of Contagion Processes on Time-Varying Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Génois, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic simulations are one of the cornerstones of the analysis of dynamical processes on complex networks, and are often the only accessible way to explore their behavior. The development of fast algorithms is paramount to allow large-scale simulations. The Gillespie algorithm can be used for fast simulation of stochastic processes, and variants of it have been applied to simulate dynamical processes on static networks. However, its adaptation to temporal networks remains non-trivial. We here present a temporal Gillespie algorithm that solves this problem. Our method is applicable to general Poisson (constant-rate) processes on temporal networks, stochastically exact, and up to multiple orders of magnitude faster than traditional simulation schemes based on rejection sampling. We also show how it can be extended to simulate non-Markovian processes. The algorithm is easily applicable in practice, and as an illustration we detail how to simulate both Poissonian and non-Markovian models of epidemic spreading. Namely, we provide pseudocode and its implementation in C++ for simulating the paradigmatic Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible and Susceptible-Infected-Recovered models and a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model with non-constant recovery rates. For empirical networks, the temporal Gillespie algorithm is here typically from 10 to 100 times faster than rejection sampling. PMID:26517860

  4. Projection reconstruction balanced fast field echo for interactive real-time cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Schaeffter, T; Weiss, S; Eggers, H; Rasche, V

    2001-12-01

    A balanced fast field echo (FFE) sequence (also referred to as true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP)), based on projection reconstruction (PR) is evaluated in combination with real-time reconstruction and interactive scanning capabilities for cardiac function studies. Cardiac image sequences obtained with the balanced PR-FFE method are compared with images obtained with a spin-warp (2D Fourier transform (2DFT)) technique. In particular, the representation of motion artifacts in both techniques is investigated. Balanced PR-FFE provides a similar contrast to spin-warp-related techniques, but is less sensitive to motion artifacts. The use of angular undersampling within balanced PR-FFE is examined as a means to increase temporal resolution while causing only minor artifacts. Furthermore, a modification of the profile order allows the reconstruction of PR images at different spatial and temporal resolution levels from the same data. This study shows that balanced PR-FFE is a robust tool for cardiac function studies. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Automatic Adaptation to Fast Input Changes in a Time-Invariant Neural Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Bharioke, Arjun; Chklovskii, Dmitri B.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons must faithfully encode signals that can vary over many orders of magnitude despite having only limited dynamic ranges. For a correlated signal, this dynamic range constraint can be relieved by subtracting away components of the signal that can be predicted from the past, a strategy known as predictive coding, that relies on learning the input statistics. However, the statistics of input natural signals can also vary over very short time scales e.g., following saccades across a visual scene. To maintain a reduced transmission cost to signals with rapidly varying statistics, neuronal circuits implementing predictive coding must also rapidly adapt their properties. Experimentally, in different sensory modalities, sensory neurons have shown such adaptations within 100 ms of an input change. Here, we show first that linear neurons connected in a feedback inhibitory circuit can implement predictive coding. We then show that adding a rectification nonlinearity to such a feedback inhibitory circuit allows it to automatically adapt and approximate the performance of an optimal linear predictive coding network, over a wide range of inputs, while keeping its underlying temporal and synaptic properties unchanged. We demonstrate that the resulting changes to the linearized temporal filters of this nonlinear network match the fast adaptations observed experimentally in different sensory modalities, in different vertebrate species. Therefore, the nonlinear feedback inhibitory network can provide automatic adaptation to fast varying signals, maintaining the dynamic range necessary for accurate neuronal transmission of natural inputs. PMID:26247884

  6. Ultra-fast reverse recovery time measurement for wide-bandgap diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Mauch, Daniel L.; Zutavern, Fred J.; Delhotal, Jarod J.; ...

    2017-03-01

    A system is presented that is capable of measuring sub-nanosecond reverse recovery times of diodes in wide-bandgap materials over a wide range of forward biases (0 – 1 A) and reverse voltages (0 – 10 kV). The system utilizes the step recovery technique and comprises a cable pulser based on a silicon (Si) Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch (PCSS) triggered with an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL), a pulse charging circuit, a diode biasing circuit, and resistive and capacitive voltage monitors. The PCSS based cable pulser transmits a 130 ps rise time pulse down a transmission line to a capacitively coupled diode,more » which acts as the terminating element of the transmission line. The temporal nature of the pulse reflected by the diode provides the reverse recovery characteristics of the diode, measured with a high bandwidth capacitive probe integrated into the cable pulser. Furthermore, this system was used to measure the reverse recovery times (including the creation and charging of the depletion region) for two Avogy gallium nitride (GaN) diodes; the initial reverse recovery time was found to be 4 ns and varied minimally over reverse biases of 50 – 100 V and forward current of 1 – 100 mA.« less

  7. A time series evaluation of the FAST National Stroke Awareness Campaign in England.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Darren; Ford, Gary A; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher; Steen, Nick; Thomson, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    In February 2009, the Department of Health in England launched the Face, Arm, Speech, and Time (FAST) mass media campaign, to raise public awareness of stroke symptoms and the need for an emergency response. We aimed to evaluate the impact of three consecutive phases of FAST using population-level measures of behaviour in England. Interrupted time series (May 2007 to February 2011) assessed the impact of the campaign on: access to a national stroke charity's information resources (Stroke Association [SA]); emergency hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of stroke (Hospital Episode Statistics for England); and thrombolysis activity from centres in England contributing data to the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke UK database. Before the campaign, emergency admissions (and patients admitted via accident and emergency [A&E]) and thrombolysis activity was increasing significantly over time, whereas emergency admissions via general practitioners (GPs) were decreasing significantly. SA webpage views, calls to their helpline and information materials dispatched increased significantly after phase one. Website hits/views, and information materials dispatched decreased after phase one; these outcomes increased significantly during phases two and three. After phase one there were significant increases in overall emergency admissions (505, 95% CI = 75 to 935) and patients admitted via A&E (451, 95% CI = 26 to 875). Significantly fewer monthly emergency admissions via GPs were reported after phase three (-19, 95% CI =  -29 to -9). Thrombolysis activity per month significantly increased after phases one (3, 95% CI = 1 to 6), and three (3, 95% CI = 1 to 4). Phase one had a statistically significant impact on information seeking behaviour and emergency admissions, with additional impact that may be attributable to subsequent phases on information seeking behaviour, emergency admissions via GPs, and thrombolysis activity. Future campaigns should be accompanied

  8. Analysis of alkenone unsaturation indices with fast gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hefter, J

    2008-03-15

    Extensively purified C37 alkenone references and mixtures thereof were analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and fast gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), to establish the latter as an alternative, fast, and reliable analysis method for alkenone unsaturation indices (U(k')(37)). This index is a tool for past sea surface temperature reconstructions with extensive use in paleoclimate and paleoceanographic research. TOF-MS was chosen because of its unique capability to acquire full-range spectra at high data rates (up to 500 spectra s(-1)) and to produce homogeneous spectra across a gaschromatographic peak, allowing faster separations than conventional GC/MS and the employment of enhanced peak deconvolution algorithms. Analysis time per sample could be reduced to run times of <10 min, i.e., by a factor of approximately 10 compared to conventional GC/FID (90-100 min) methods. However, %@mt;sys@%%@ital@%%@bold@%U%@reset@%%@rsf@%%@sx@%37%@be@%%@ital@%k%@rsf@%'%@sxx@%%@mx@% values from GC/TOF-MS showed deviations from those obtained by GC/FID, resulting from sensitivity differences between the C37:2 and C37:3 alkenone when analyzed by GC/TOF-MS. A solution to this bias is presented by determining compound-specific linear response factor equations to derive sensitivity ratios (SR) that allow conversion of GC/TOF-MS values into calibrated GC/FID data. Using alkenone mixtures of known composition and a variety of samples from natural environments, the applicability of this approach is demonstrated.

  9. A Time Series Evaluation of the FAST National Stroke Awareness Campaign in England

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Darren; Ford, Gary A.; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher; Steen, Nick; Thomson, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In February 2009, the Department of Health in England launched the Face, Arm, Speech, and Time (FAST) mass media campaign, to raise public awareness of stroke symptoms and the need for an emergency response. We aimed to evaluate the impact of three consecutive phases of FAST using population-level measures of behaviour in England. Methods Interrupted time series (May 2007 to February 2011) assessed the impact of the campaign on: access to a national stroke charity's information resources (Stroke Association [SA]); emergency hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of stroke (Hospital Episode Statistics for England); and thrombolysis activity from centres in England contributing data to the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke UK database. Results Before the campaign, emergency admissions (and patients admitted via accident and emergency [A&E]) and thrombolysis activity was increasing significantly over time, whereas emergency admissions via general practitioners (GPs) were decreasing significantly. SA webpage views, calls to their helpline and information materials dispatched increased significantly after phase one. Website hits/views, and information materials dispatched decreased after phase one; these outcomes increased significantly during phases two and three. After phase one there were significant increases in overall emergency admissions (505, 95% CI = 75 to 935) and patients admitted via A&E (451, 95% CI = 26 to 875). Significantly fewer monthly emergency admissions via GPs were reported after phase three (−19, 95% CI = −29 to −9). Thrombolysis activity per month significantly increased after phases one (3, 95% CI = 1 to 6), and three (3, 95% CI = 1 to 4). Conclusions Phase one had a statistically significant impact on information seeking behaviour and emergency admissions, with additional impact that may be attributable to subsequent phases on information seeking behaviour, emergency admissions via GPs, and

  10. Ultra-high throughput real-time instruments for capturing fast signals and rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon Walter

    Wide-band signals play important roles in the most exciting areas of science, engineering, and medicine. To keep up with the demands of exploding internet traffic, modern data centers and communication networks are employing increasingly faster data rates. Wide-band techniques such as pulsed radar jamming and spread spectrum frequency hopping are used on the battlefield to wrestle control of the electromagnetic spectrum. Neurons communicate with each other using transient action potentials that last for only milliseconds at a time. And in the search for rare cells, biologists flow large populations of cells single file down microfluidic channels, interrogating them one-by-one, tens of thousands of times per second. Studying and enabling such high-speed phenomena pose enormous technical challenges. For one, parasitic capacitance inherent in analog electrical components limits their response time. Additionally, converting these fast analog signals to the digital domain requires enormous sampling speeds, which can lead to significant jitter and distortion. State-of-the-art imaging technologies, essential for studying biological dynamics and cells in flow, are limited in speed and sensitivity by finite charge transfer and read rates, and by the small numbers of photo-electrons accumulated in short integration times. And finally, ultra-high throughput real-time digital processing is required at the backend to analyze the streaming data. In this thesis, I discuss my work in developing real-time instruments, employing ultrafast optical techniques, which overcome some of these obstacles. In particular, I use broadband dispersive optics to slow down fast signals to speeds accessible to high-bit depth digitizers and signal processors. I also apply telecommunication multiplexing techniques to boost the speeds of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The photonic time stretcher (TiSER) uses dispersive Fourier transformation to slow down analog signals before digitization and

  11. A fast density-based clustering algorithm for real-time Internet of Things stream.

    PubMed

    Amini, Amineh; Saboohi, Hadi; Wah, Teh Ying; Herawan, Tutut

    2014-01-01

    Data streams are continuously generated over time from Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The faster all of this data is analyzed, its hidden trends and patterns discovered, and new strategies created, the faster action can be taken, creating greater value for organizations. Density-based method is a prominent class in clustering data streams. It has the ability to detect arbitrary shape clusters, to handle outlier, and it does not need the number of clusters in advance. Therefore, density-based clustering algorithm is a proper choice for clustering IoT streams. Recently, several density-based algorithms have been proposed for clustering data streams. However, density-based clustering in limited time is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a density-based clustering algorithm for IoT streams. The method has fast processing time to be applicable in real-time application of IoT devices. Experimental results show that the proposed approach obtains high quality results with low computation time on real and synthetic datasets.

  12. A Fast Density-Based Clustering Algorithm for Real-Time Internet of Things Stream

    PubMed Central

    Ying Wah, Teh

    2014-01-01

    Data streams are continuously generated over time from Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The faster all of this data is analyzed, its hidden trends and patterns discovered, and new strategies created, the faster action can be taken, creating greater value for organizations. Density-based method is a prominent class in clustering data streams. It has the ability to detect arbitrary shape clusters, to handle outlier, and it does not need the number of clusters in advance. Therefore, density-based clustering algorithm is a proper choice for clustering IoT streams. Recently, several density-based algorithms have been proposed for clustering data streams. However, density-based clustering in limited time is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a density-based clustering algorithm for IoT streams. The method has fast processing time to be applicable in real-time application of IoT devices. Experimental results show that the proposed approach obtains high quality results with low computation time on real and synthetic datasets. PMID:25110753

  13. The timing of control signals underlying fast point-to-point arm movements.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, M; Feldman, A G

    2001-04-01

    on the handle, or computed with equations of motion. In some trials, an electromagnetic brake prevented movements. In such movements, the hand force and joint torques reached a steady state after a time that was much smaller than the movement duration in unobstructed movements and was approximately equal to the time to peak velocity (mean difference < 80 ms). In an additional experiment, subjects were instructed to rapidly initiate corrections of the pushing force in response to movement arrest. They were able to initiate such corrections only when the joint torques and the pushing force had practically reached a steady state. The latency of correction onset was, however, smaller than the duration of unobstructed movements. We concluded that during the time at which the steady state torques were reached, the control pattern of IC shifts remained the same despite the movement block. Thereby the duration of these shifts did not exceed the time of reaching the steady state torques. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, in unobstructed movements, the IC shifts and resulting shifts in the EP end approximately at peak velocity. In other words, during the latter part of the movement, the control signals responsible for the equilibrium shift remained constant, and the movement was driven by the arm inertial, viscous and elastic forces produced by the muscle-reflex system. Fast movements may thus be completed without continuous control guidance. As a consequence, central corrections and sequential commands may be issued rapidly, without waiting for the end of kinematic responses to each command, which may be important for many motor behaviours including typing, piano playing and speech. Our study also illustrates that the timing of the control signals may be substantially different from that of the resulting motor output and that the same control pattern may produce different motor outputs depending on external conditions.

  14. Ciguatera incidence in the US Virgin Islands has not increased over a 30-year time period despite rising seawater temperatures.

    PubMed

    Radke, Elizabeth G; Grattan, Lynn M; Cook, Robert L; Smith, Tyler B; Anderson, Donald M; Morris, J Glenn

    2013-05-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most common marine food poisoning worldwide. It has been hypothesized that increasing seawater temperature will result in increasing ciguatera incidence. In St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, we performed an island-wide telephone survey (N = 807) and a medical record review of diagnosed ciguatera cases at the emergency department of the sole hospital and compared these data with comparable data sources collected in 1980. Annual incidence from both recent data sources remained high (12 per 1,000 among adults in the telephone survey). However, the combined data sources suggest that incidence has declined by 20% or more or remained stable over 30 years, whereas seawater temperatures were increasing. Illness was associated with lower education levels, higher levels of fish consumption, and having previous episodes of ciguatera; population shifts from 1980 to 2010 in these factors could explain an incidence decline of approximately 3 per 1,000, obscuring effects from rising seawater temperature.

  15. Conducting an acute intense interval exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month: what is the optimal time of the day?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Chia, Michael Yong Hwa; Low, Chee Yong; Slater, Gary John; Png, Weileen; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the effects of Ramadan fasting on performance during an intense exercise session performed at three different times of the day, i.e., 08:00, 18:00, and 21:00 h. The purpose was to determine the optimal time of the day to perform an acute high-intensity interval exercise during the Ramadan fasting month. After familiarization, nine trained athletes performed six 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) cycle bouts followed by a time-to-exhaustion (T(exh)) cycle on six separate randomized and counterbalanced occasions. The three time-of-day nonfasting (control, CON) exercise sessions were performed before the Ramadan month, and the three corresponding time-of-day Ramadan fasting (RAM) exercise sessions were performed during the Ramadan month. Note that the 21:00 h session during Ramadan month was conducted in the nonfasted state after the breaking of the day's fast. Total work (TW) completed during the six WAnT bouts was significantly lower during RAM compared to CON for the 08:00 and 18:00 h (p < .017; effect size [d] = .55 [small] and .39 [small], respectively) sessions, but not for the 21:00 h (p = .03, d = .18 [trivial]) session. The T(exh) cycle duration was significantly shorter during RAM than CON in the 18:00 (p < .017, d = .93 [moderate]) session, but not in the 08:00 (p = .03, d = .57 [small]) and 21:00 h (p = .96, d = .02 [trivial]) sessions. In conclusion, Ramadan fasting had a small to moderate, negative impact on quality of performance during an acute high-intensity exercise session, particularly during the period of the daytime fast. The optimal time to conduct an acute high-intensity exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month is in the evening, after the breaking of the day's fast.

  16. Fast maximum likelihood estimation using continuous-time neural point process models.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Kyle Q; MacDonald, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    A recent report estimates that the number of simultaneously recorded neurons is growing exponentially. A commonly employed statistical paradigm using discrete-time point process models of neural activity involves the computation of a maximum-likelihood estimate. The time to computate this estimate, per neuron, is proportional to the number of bins in a finely spaced discretization of time. By using continuous-time models of neural activity and the optimally efficient Gaussian quadrature, memory requirements and computation times are dramatically decreased in the commonly encountered situation where the number of parameters p is much less than the number of time-bins n. In this regime, with q equal to the quadrature order, memory requirements are decreased from O(np) to O(qp), and the number of floating-point operations are decreased from O(np(2)) to O(qp(2)). Accuracy of the proposed estimates is assessed based upon physiological consideration, error bounds, and mathematical results describing the relation between numerical integration error and numerical error affecting both parameter estimates and the observed Fisher information. A check is provided which is used to adapt the order of numerical integration. The procedure is verified in simulation and for hippocampal recordings. It is found that in 95 % of hippocampal recordings a q of 60 yields numerical error negligible with respect to parameter estimate standard error. Statistical inference using the proposed methodology is a fast and convenient alternative to statistical inference performed using a discrete-time point process model of neural activity. It enables the employment of the statistical methodology available with discrete-time inference, but is faster, uses less memory, and avoids any error due to discretization.

  17. W-band exciter delivers fast switching speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleson, Chuk; Archdale, Anthony

    1990-10-01

    Millimeter-wave radar systems used in target discrimination applications require exciters that provide fast frequency switching, excellent phase noise, and fast pulse rise and fall times. A 512-channel W-band exciter design that uses MMIC oscillators and amplifiers and IF phase-locking techniques provides frequency switching with less than 1-microsec setting time and 2-deg absolute phase coherency.

  18. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  19. Fast state estimation subject to random data loss in discrete-time nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Alavi, S. M.; Saif, Mehrdad

    2013-12-01

    This paper focuses on the design of the standard observer in discrete-time nonlinear stochastic systems subject to random data loss. By the assumption that the system response is incrementally bounded, two sufficient conditions are subsequently derived that guarantee exponential mean-square stability and fast convergence of the estimation error for the problem at hand. An efficient algorithm is also presented to obtain the observer gain. Finally, the proposed methodology is employed for monitoring the Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) via a wireless communication network. The effectiveness of the designed observer is extensively assessed by using an experimental tested-bed that has been fabricated for performance evaluation of the over wireless-network estimation techniques under realistic radio channel conditions.

  20. SOA does not Reveal the Absolute Time Course of Cognitive Processing in Fast Priming Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Tzur, Boaz; Frost, Ram

    2007-01-01

    Applying Bloch's law to visual word recognition research, both exposure duration of the prime and its luminance determine the prime's overall energy, and consequently determine the size of the priming effect. Nevertheless, experimenters using fast-priming paradigms traditionally focus only on the SOA between prime and target to reflect the absolute speed of cognitive processes under investigation. Some of the discrepancies in results regarding the time course of orthographic and phonological activation in word recognition research may be due to this factor. This hypothesis was examined by manipulating parametrically the luminance of the prime and its exposure duration, measuring their joint impact on masked repetition priming. The results show that small and non-significant priming effects can be more than tripled as a result of simply increasing luminance, when SOA is kept constant. Moreover, increased luminance may compensate for briefer exposure duration and vice versa. PMID:18379635

  1. Fast ℓ1-regularized space-time adaptive processing using alternating direction method of multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lilong; Wu, Manqing; Wang, Xuan; Dong, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the sparsity of filter coefficients in full-dimension space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithms, this paper proposes a fast ℓ1-regularized STAP algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers to accelerate the convergence and reduce the calculations. The proposed algorithm uses a splitting variable to obtain an equivalent optimization formulation, which is addressed with an augmented Lagrangian method. Using the alternating recursive algorithm, the method can rapidly result in a low minimum mean-square error without a large number of calculations. Through theoretical analysis and experimental verification, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm provides a better output signal-to-clutter-noise ratio performance than other algorithms.

  2. Program for the analysis of time series. [by means of fast Fourier transform algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. J.; Brown, C. G.; Hardin, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A digital computer program for the Fourier analysis of discrete time data is described. The program was designed to handle multiple channels of digitized data on general purpose computer systems. It is written, primarily, in a version of FORTRAN 2 currently in use on CDC 6000 series computers. Some small portions are written in CDC COMPASS, an assembler level code. However, functional descriptions of these portions are provided so that the program may be adapted for use on any facility possessing a FORTRAN compiler and random-access capability. Properly formatted digital data are windowed and analyzed by means of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to generate the following functions: (1) auto and/or cross power spectra, (2) autocorrelations and/or cross correlations, (3) Fourier coefficients, (4) coherence functions, (5) transfer functions, and (6) histograms.

  3. Micro-channel plates in ionization mode as a fast timing device for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Katcin, A. A.; Malberti, M.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pigazzini, S.; Prisekin, V. G.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.

    2017-08-01

    At the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) about 200 concurrent interactions are expected, with a spread between the interaction vertices of few centimeters in the beam direction and 200 ps in the collision time. A time of flight resolution of the order of 30 ps would be able to reduce neutral particles pile-up contamination at the calorimeter level of about one order of magnitude, restoring pile-up conditions similar to what is routinely sustained in the current run of the LHC . Micro-channel plates have been used in PMT configuration as fast charged particles detector (resolution of better than 20 ps have been achieved with commercial devices), however they are not particularly radiation tolerant, mostly due to the ion feedback on the photocathode. The possibility of using micro-channel plates without a photocathode (i-MCP) has been studied in several test beams. Different MCP geometries are compared with the goal to identify the optimal configuration. Efficiency of more then 70% with a time resolution of better than 40 ps are achieved for single charged particles, leading to an efficiency close to 100% for EM shower after few radiation lengths. This open the possibility to use i-MCPs as a timing layer in a sampling calorimeter or to use it in a pre-shower device independent from the calorimeter technology.

  4. Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry for fast detection of dynamic strain incorporating double-edge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Wang, Chong; Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Dou, Xiankang; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-wei

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a direct detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is demonstrated for fast distributed dynamic strain sensing incorporating double-edge technique, time-division multiplexing technique and upconversion technique. In order to guarantee the robust stability of the system, the double-edge technique is implemented by using a convert single-channel FPI and a fiber-coupled upconversion single-photon detector, incorporating a time-division multiplexing method. The upconversion single-photon detector is adopted to upconvert the backscattering photons from 1548.1 nm to 863 nm, which is subsequently detected by a Silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD). In the experiment, dynamic strain disturbance up to 1.9 mε over 1.5 km of a polarization maintaining fiber is detected at a sampling rate of 30 Hz. An accuracy of ± 30 με and spatial resolution of 0.6 m are realized.

  5. Quantitative FRET Analysis by Fast Acquisition Time Domain FLIM at High Spatial Resolution in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Tramier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments in live cells for protein interaction studies is still a challenging issue. In a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), fitting of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data gives the fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (fD) and the intrinsic transfer efficiency. But when fast FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are not reliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the new concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), coming from the mathematical minimization of fD. We find particular advantage in the use of mfD because it can be obtained without fitting procedures and it is derived directly from FLIM data. mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for live cell studies because it is related to the minimal relative concentration of interacting proteins. For multi-lifetime donors, the process of fitting complex fluorescence decays to find at least four reliable lifetimes is a near impossible task. Here, mfD extension for multi-lifetime donors is the only quantitative determinant. We applied this methodology for imaging the interaction between the bromodomains of TAFII250 and acetylated histones H4 in living cells at high resolution. We show the existence of discrete acetylated chromatin domains where the minimal fraction of bromodomain interacting with acetylated H4 oscillates from 0.26 to 0.36 and whose size is smaller than half of one micron cube. We demonstrate that mfD by itself is a useful tool to investigate quantitatively protein interactions in live cells, especially when using fast FRET-FLIM acquisition times. PMID:18539634

  6. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Matys, Jacek; Flieger, Rafał; Dominiak, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles (n = 60) of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups (n = 15). Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1), 400 mJ (G2), piezosurgery unit (G3), and a saw (G4). The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ), and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery.

  7. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Rafał; Dominiak, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles (n = 60) of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups (n = 15). Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1), 400 mJ (G2), piezosurgery unit (G3), and a saw (G4). The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ), and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery. PMID:27957502

  8. Fast Padé Transform for Exact Quantification of Time Signals in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkic, Dzevad

    This work employs the fast Padé transform (FPT) for spectral analysis of theoretically generated time signals. The spectral characteristics of these synthesised signals are reminiscent of the corresponding data that are measured experimentally via encoding digitised free induction decay curves from a healthy human brain using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). In medicine, in vivo MRS is one of the most promising non-invasive diagnostic tools, especially in oncology, due to the provided biochemical information about functionality of metabolites of the scanned tissue. For success of such diagnostics, it is crucial to carry out the most reliable quantifications of the studied time signals. This quantification problem is the harmonic inversion via the spectral decomposition of the given time signal into its damped harmonic constituents. Such a reconstruction finds the unknown total number of resonances, their complex frequencies and the corresponding complex amplitudes. These spectral parameters of the fundamental harmonics give the peak positions, widths, heights, and phases of all the physical resonances. As per the unified theory of quantum-mechanical spectral analysis and signal processing, the FPT represents the exact solver of the quantification problem, which is mathematically ill-conditioned. The exact and unique solution via the FPT is valid for any noiseless synthesised time signal built from an arbitrary number of damped complex exponentials. These attenuated harmonics can appear as a linear combination with both stationary and non-stationary amplitudes. Such sums produce time signals that yield Lorentzian (non-degenerate) and non-Lorentzian (degenerate) spectra for isolated and overlapped resonances from MRS. We give a convergent validation for these virtues of the FPT. This is achieved through the proof-of-principle investigation by developing an algorithmic feasibility for robust and efficient computations of the exact numerical solution of a

  9. Probing Motion of Fast Radio Burst Sources by Timing Strongly Lensed Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Lu, Wenbin

    2017-09-01

    Given the possible repetitive nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), their cosmological origin, and their high occurrence, detection of strongly lensed sources due to intervening galaxy lenses is possible with forthcoming radio surveys. We show that if multiple images of a repeating source are resolved with VLBI, using a method independent of lens modeling, accurate timing could reveal non-uniform motion, either physical or apparent, of the emission spot. This can probe the physical nature of FRBs and their surrounding environments, constraining scenarios including orbital motion around a stellar companion if FRBs require a compact star in a special system, and jet-medium interactions for which the location of the emission spot may randomly vary. The high timing precision possible for FRBs (∼ms) compared with the typical time delays between images in galaxy lensing (≳10 days) enables the measurement of tiny fractional changes in the delays (∼ {10}-9) and hence the detection of time-delay variations induced by relative motions between the source, the lens, and the Earth. We show that uniform cosmic peculiar velocities only cause the delay time to drift linearly, and that the effect from the Earth’s orbital motion can be accurately subtracted, thus enabling a search for non-trivial source motion. For a timing accuracy of ∼1 ms and a repetition rate (of detected bursts) of ∼0.05 per day of a single FRB source, non-uniform displacement ≳0.1–1 au of the emission spot perpendicular to the line of sight is detectable if repetitions are seen over a period of hundreds of days.

  10. Accounting for Relaxation During Pulse Effects in Surface NMR for Long Pulses and Fast Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grombacher, D.; Behroozmand, A. A.; Auken, E.

    2016-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance provides the ability to non-invasively quantify and map subsurface water content. To ensure reliable water content estimates are produced the transmit portion of the experiment (called excitation) must be modeled accurately. This requires that relaxation during pulse (RDP) effects be accounted for as they may lead to biased water content estimates if neglected. The standard approach to account for these effects involves estimating the initial amplitude of the signal by extrapolating the measured decay to the midpoint of the pulse, while neglecting these effects in the excitation modeling. The reasoning behind such an approach is that initial amplitudes estimated by extrapolation to the midpoint of the pulse (in combination with excitation modeling that neglects RDP) can reliably reproduce the correct water content. This technique works well in the regime where the time constants describing the decay of the observed signal (called relaxation times) are greater than the pulse duration. However, recent hardware advancements now allow the routine measurement of much faster relaxation times where this approach may lead to poor water content estimates. Furthermore, a growing desire to use alternative transmit schemes demands a flexible protocol to account for RDP effects in the presence of fast relaxation times for arbitrary transmit schemes. To accomplish this goal a data driven approach involving direct modeling of RDP processes is presented. Relaxation times estimated from the observed decay are directly incorporated into the excitation modeling (while the initial amplitude is estimated at the end of the pulse) in order to produce more robust water content estimates. Synthetic and laboratory data is presented to demonstrate that such an approach is expected to broaden the range of relaxation times where water contents can be reliably estimated and better extends functionality to alternative transmit schemes.

  11. Evidence for influence of the Galápagos hotspot on the East Pacific Rise MORB composition during times of superfast spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Höfig, T.; Hauff, S. F.; Hoernle, K.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2011-12-01

    ODP/IODP Hole 1256D on the Cocos Plate is located on oceanic crust that formed 15 m.y. ago at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) during a period of superfast spreading (~11-20 Ma). This site is considered to be a reference site for crust formed during fast (>8 cm/y) and particularly superfast (>20 cm/y) spreading rates. The question exists whether its formation was geochemically influenced by the Galápagos hotspot. Today, the effect of the Galápagos hotspot on mid ocean ridge geochemistry can only be seen along the Cocos-Nasca Spreading Center (located immediately north of the hotspot). It has been speculated that Galápagos plume material might have reached the EPR during times of superfast spreading due to processes such as increased "ridge suction" (Niu & Hékinian, 2004). To test this idea, MORB samples from several DSDP, ODP and IODP drill sites that formed along the EPR between 3°S and 7°N and between 9 and 21 Ma have been studied to delineate any effect of the Galápagos hotspot on their geochemistry. N-MORB from sites formed during times of superfast spreading show slighty, but systematically, lower incompatible element ratios (e.g. La/Yb < 0.65, Ce/Lu <0.76), compared to rocks formed shortly before, or after, superfast spreading (La/Yb >0.66, Ce/Lu >0.8). In addition, the melts formed during superfast spreading show generally higher Eu/Hf and Eu/Eu* ratios which is interpreted to indicate a recycled gabbroic component in their source. Despite their more depleted incompatible trace element patterns, Pb (double-spike) and Nd isotope ratios of the superfast spreading MORB are enriched (higher 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and lower 143Nd/144Nd) compared to the samples from MORB created during normal spreading. The combined trace element and isotope data suggest that EPR MORB created during superfast spreading was formed by greater degrees of melting of a possibly trace element depleted, but isotopically enriched source component. It is suggested that the source of

  12. Effect of expertise on coincident-timing accuracy in a fast ball game.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, H; Latiri, I

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of intensive practice in table tennis on perceptual coincident timing. The main question was whether the perceptual demands encountered in fast ball sports produce modifications of the perceptual visual system. Expert table tennis players and novices were compared in a perceptual task which consisted of estimating, by pressing a key, the arrival of a moving stimulus at a target. The stimulus, which was presented either at constant velocity or at constant deceleration, reproduced as closely as possible the natural visual demands encountered in table tennis. The difference between the time of response and the time of arrival of the stimulus at a target position was measured over 40 trials for each of the 16 participants. The results showed no effect of expertise under the constant-velocity condition but an effect under the decelerative condition, indicating that experts were less trajectory-dependent than novices. This result was interpreted as reflecting a better adaptation of the perceptual system of experts to the constraints encountered during table tennis and specifically to the perceptual demands resulting from varied and decelerated ball trajectories. Finally, some limitations of the coincidence anticipation procedure are highlighted, concerning its use in practical settings for evaluating athletes or detecting sport talents, and the need for the simulation conditions during testing to reproduce as closely as possible the perceptual demands of real life is discussed.

  13. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high η CMS muon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, F.; Gouzevitch, M.; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A. A. O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, H. M. I.; Awan, I. M.; Hoorani, R.; Muhammad, S.; Shahzad, H.; Shah, M. A.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S. Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. H.; Park, S. K.; Kim, M. S.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Pedraza, I.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L. M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-09-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to 6 · 1034 cm-2s-1. The region of the forward muon spectrometer (|η| > 1.6) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles flux up to 2 kHz/cm2 (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The current CMS RPC technology cannot sustain the expected background level. The new technology that will be chosen should have a high rate capability and provide a good spatial and timing resolution. A new generation of Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low-resistivity glass is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high η muon stations of CMS. First the design of small size prototypes and studies of their performance in high-rate particles flux are presented. Then the proposed designs for large size chambers and their fast-timing electronic readout are examined and preliminary results are provided.

  14. Multi-purpose fast neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Puryga, E. A.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Burdakov, A. V.; Grishnyaev, E. V.

    2013-08-01

    Diagnostics of hot ion component of plasma on the products of fusion reactions is widely used on thermonuclear facilities. In case of employment of neutron spectrometers, based on organics scintillators, there is advanced technique developed to eliminate neutron pulses from gamma background—digital pulse shape discrimination. For every DPSD application it is necessary to use the fast (2-5 ns) and precise (12 bit) transient ADC unit with large amount of onboard memory for storing every digitized scintillation pulses during shot time. At present time the duration of hot thermonuclear plasma burning in large tokamaks approximate to 1 min, and this requires very high onboard memory capacity (˜100 GB). This paper describes a neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time DPSD algorithm, implemented to ADC unit. This approach saves about two orders of onboard memory capacity, gives the possibility of instant use of outcome to feedback systems. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with help of 60Co and 252Cf radiation sources, and deuterium neutron generator.

  15. Reaction time and movement duration influence on end point accuracy in a fast reaching task.

    PubMed

    Skurvidas, A; Mickevichiene, D; Cesnavichiene, V; Gutnik, B; Nash, D

    2012-01-01

    In labor and sport physiology a great deal of interest concerns the conceptual model of governance of both rapid and precise target-directed movements. Widely known in the theory of motor control, Fitts' paradigm determines the time of motion, calculated from the distance to the target and the diameter of the target. However this paradigm does not take into account the time of preparation for movement, which can have a significant impact on accuracy. In addition, the literature highlights little evidence of temporal and spatial asymmetry in the production of fast and accurate movements. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the duration of the preparatory phase (reaction time - T(R)) and duration of protractile motion of the arm (T(M)) on the speed and accuracy of movement. Also, the in-dividual asymmetry of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of performance of movements were studied. We measured three aspects of translational motion of the arm to the computerized target: reaction time (T(R), s), time of motion of the arm (T(M), s), and error in the achievement of the target (deltaL, mm). The group of participants consisted of 12 healthy, right-handed, untrained girls, each of whom completed 5 series of 10 discrete movements by each of the left and right arms. Mathematical analysis of the results revealed the existence of five models of performance. Each model was represented in the participant's performance with different probability. The combination of high speed and high precision when the arm moved towards the target was found only in model 5, which combines a long period of preparation for the movement (T(R)) and a short time of motion (T(M)). The probability of its occurrence in the untrained subjects was very low (2-3%). We suggest that it may be possible to develop special methods of training, geared towards the ability to increase the probability of appearance of this model. Asymmetry of motor action appeared clearly evident only in

  16. A Fast-Time Study of Aircraft Reordering in Arrival Sequencing and Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Neuman, Frank; Tobias, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    on estimated times of arrival, it does not take into account individual airline priorities among incoming flights. NASA is exploring the possibility of allowing airlines to express relative arrival priorities to air traffic management through the development of new CTAS scheduling algorithms which take into consideration airline arrival preferences. The accommodation of airline priorities in arrival sequencing and scheduling would under most circumstances result in a deviation from a "natural" or FCFS arrival order. As a First step toward developing airline influenced sequencing algorithms, an investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of reordering arrival traffic from a strict FCFS sequence. A fast-time simulation has been developed which allows statistical evaluation of sequencing and scheduling algorithms for arrival traffic at the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport. In contrast to real-time simulation or field tests, which would require on the order of ninety minutes to examine a single traffic rush period, the fast-time simulation allows examination of multiple rush periods in a matter of seconds.

  17. A Fast-Time Study of Aircraft Reordering in Arrival Sequencing and Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Neuman, Frank; Tobias, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    on estimated times of arrival, it does not take into account individual airline priorities among incoming flights. NASA is exploring the possibility of allowing airlines to express relative arrival priorities to air traffic management through the development of new CTAS scheduling algorithms which take into consideration airline arrival preferences. The accommodation of airline priorities in arrival sequencing and scheduling would under most circumstances result in a deviation from a "natural" or FCFS arrival order. As a First step toward developing airline influenced sequencing algorithms, an investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of reordering arrival traffic from a strict FCFS sequence. A fast-time simulation has been developed which allows statistical evaluation of sequencing and scheduling algorithms for arrival traffic at the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport. In contrast to real-time simulation or field tests, which would require on the order of ninety minutes to examine a single traffic rush period, the fast-time simulation allows examination of multiple rush periods in a matter of seconds.

  18. A Low-Cost and Fast Real-Time PCR System Based on Capillary Convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Ge, Shengxiang; Gao, Pengfei; Li, Ke; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Shiyin; Ye, Xiangzhong; Xia, Ningshao; Qian, Shizhi

    2017-02-01

    A low-cost and fast real-time PCR system in a pseudo-isothermal manner with disposable capillary tubes based on thermal convection for point-of-care diagnostics is developed and tested. Once stable temperature gradient along the capillary tube has been established, a continuous circulatory flow or thermal convection inside the capillary tube will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the DNA denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction. To establish stable temperature gradient along the capillary tube, a dual-temperature heating strategy with top and bottom heaters is adopted here. A thermal waveguide is adopted for precise maintenance of the temperature of the top heater. An optimized optical network is developed for monitoring up to eight amplification units for real-time fluorescence detection. The system performance was demonstrated with repeatable detection of influenza A (H1N1) virus nucleic acid targets with a limit of detection of 1.0 TCID50/mL within 30 min.

  19. High time resolution electron measurement by Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer (FESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Shinohara, Iku; Tsuda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Shintaro; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2009-06-16

    We have newly developed an electron energy analyzer FESA (Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer) for a future magnetospheric satellite mission SCOPE. The SCOPE mission is designed in order that observational studies from the cross-scale coupling viewpoint are enabled. One of the key observations necessary for the SCOPE mission is high-time resolution electron measurement. Eight FESAs on a spinning spacecraft are capable of measuring three dimensional electron distribution function with time resolution of 8 msec. FESA consists of two electrostatic analyzers that are composed of three nested hemispherical deflectors. Single FESA functions as four top-hat type electrostatic analyzers that can measure electrons with four different energies simultaneously. By measuring the characteristics of the test model FESA, we proved the validity of the design concept of FESA. Based on the measured characteristics, we designed FESA optimized for the SCOPE mission. This optimized analyzer has good enough performance to measure three dimensional electron distribution functions around the magnetic reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  20. Circinus X-1 revisited: Fast-timing properties in relation to spectral state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oosterbroek, T.; Van Der Klis, M.; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray spectral and fast-timing variations of Cir X-1 by performing a homogenous analysis of all EXOSAT ME data on this source using X-ray hardness-intensity diagrams (HIDs), color-color diagrams (CDs), and power spectra. Cir X-1 exhibits a wide range of power spectral shapes and a large variety in X-ray spectral shapes. At different epochs the power spectra variously resemble those of an atoll source, a Z source, a black-hole candidate, or are unlike any of these. At some epochs one-dimensional connected-branch patterns are seen in HID and CD, and at other times more complex structures are found. We interpret the complex behavior of Cir X-1 in terms of a model where accretion rate, orbital phase and epoch are the main determinants of the source behavior, and where the unique properties of the source are due to two special circumstances: (1) the source is the only known atoll source (accreting neutron star with a very low magnetic field) that can reach the Eddington critical accretion rate, and (2) it has a unique, highly eccentric and probably precessing orbit. Property (1) makes Cir X-1 a very important source for our understanding of the similarities in the observable properties of neutron stars and black holes as it allows to separate out black hole signatures from properties that are merely due to the presence of accretion compact with a low magnetic field.

  1. A new fast-response, real-time and continuous dissolved methane sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triest, Jack; Chappellaz, Jerome; Grilli, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Continuous high resolution profiling of dissolved methane down to ocean depths is made possible as a result of technological innovations achieved in the search for the oldest ice in Antarctica. Testing for the SUBGLACIOR probe, which is being developed at LGGE in response to the IPICS >1Ma old ice challenge, showed that much of the technology to extract the trapped gases from ice can also significantly improve the extraction and analysis of dissolved methane from the sea compared to current available sensors. To develop this potential, an oceanographic instrument 'SubOcean' was built and deployed over a gas-hydrate zone of western Svalbard, in collaboration with CAGE, in October 2015. Continuous measurements to depths of 400 m were made over three days resulting in high-resolution 3D profiles. The very fast response time of the sensor allows to display the in-situ measurements in real-time and compare them directly to data from other instrumentation aboard the ship whilst underway. The sensor contains a membrane based gas extraction system coupled to a laser spectrometer to provide accurate measurements over a wide concentration range. We will present the overall design of the instrument and highlight how it can help provide new insights into the spatial distribution and flux of methane in the marine environment.

  2. A fast forward algorithm for real-time geosteering of azimuthal gamma-ray logging.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Pan, Heping; Wang, Zhonghao; Wang, Bintao; Huang, Ke; Liu, Shaohua; Li, Gang; Amara Konaté, Ahmed; Fang, Sinan

    2017-05-01

    Geosteering is an effective method to increase the reservoir drilling rate in horizontal wells. Based on the features of an azimuthal gamma-ray logging tool and strata spatial location, a fast forward calculation method of azimuthal gamma-ray logging is deduced by using the natural gamma ray distribution equation in formation. The response characteristics of azimuthal gamma-ray logging while drilling in the layered formation models with different thickness and position are simulated and summarized by using the method. The result indicates that the method calculates quickly, and when the tool nears a boundary, the method can be used to identify the boundary and determine the distance from the logging tool to the boundary in time. Additionally, the formation parameters of the algorithm in the field can be determined after a simple method is proposed based on the information of an offset well. Therefore, the forward method can be used for geosteering in the field. A field example validates that the forward method can be used to determine the distance from the azimuthal gamma-ray logging tool to the boundary for geosteering in real-time.

  3. How fast are hospital prices really rising?

    PubMed

    Dranove, D; Shanley, M; White, W D

    1991-08-01

    The hospital services component of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures the cost of hospital services to private patients paying list prices. It is, however, widely used as an estimate of the overall rate of inflation in hospital prices in spite of the fact that there are strong reasons to believe that it is inappropriate to use the CPI for this purpose. This is because: 1) A growing number of patients are enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and preferred provider organizations (PPOs), which negotiate discounts from list prices; and 2) the size of the discounts may have been increasing. The potential result is a gap between the rate of inflation of list prices and the rate of inflation of actual prices paid in transactions. This study explores whether such a gap exists and determines its possible magnitude. In addition, parallel indices for list and actual prices are computed on the basis of data from California hospitals for fiscal years 1983-1988. The analysis suggests that list price inflation has greatly exceeded actual inflation--by a factor of two for recent years. These findings have broad implications for evaluating not only inflation but also the impact of cost containment strategies.

  4. Objective assessment of drowsiness and reaction time during intermittent Ramadan fasting in young men: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ramadan fasting and its attendant lifestyle changes induce changes in the circadian rhythm and in associated physiological and metabolic functions. Previous studies that have assessed psychomotor performance during Ramadan fasting have reported conflicting results. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of intermittent fasting during and outside Ramadan (to control for lifestyle changes) on drowsiness, blink total duration and mean reaction time (MRT) test while controlling for potential confounders. Methods Eight healthy volunteers with a mean age of 25.3 ± 2.9 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2 reported to the sleep laboratory on four occasions for polysomnography (PSG) and drowsiness and psychomotor assessments as follows: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing the Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting (Ramadan). OPTALERT™ was used to objectively assess daytime drowsiness using the Johns Drowsiness Scale (JDS), and blink total duration and a visual reaction time test were used to assess MRT. Results Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage was significantly lower at BLF (17.7 ± 8.1%) and at Ramadan (18.6 ± 10.7%) compared with BL (25.6 ± 4.8%) (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between JDS scores and blink total duration during the two test periods in BL, BLF and Ramadan. There were no significant changes in MRT during BL, BLF and Ramadan. Conclusions Under controlled conditions of fixed light/dark exposure, caloric intake, sleep/wake schedule and sleep quality, the Islamic intermittent fasting has no impact on drowsiness and vigilance as measured by the JDS, total blink duration and MRT. PMID:23937904

  5. Objective assessment of drowsiness and reaction time during intermittent Ramadan fasting in young men: a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Nashwan, Samar; Hammad, Omeima; Sharif, Munir M; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R

    2013-08-12

    Ramadan fasting and its attendant lifestyle changes induce changes in the circadian rhythm and in associated physiological and metabolic functions. Previous studies that have assessed psychomotor performance during Ramadan fasting have reported conflicting results. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of intermittent fasting during and outside Ramadan (to control for lifestyle changes) on drowsiness, blink total duration and mean reaction time (MRT) test while controlling for potential confounders. Eight healthy volunteers with a mean age of 25.3 ± 2.9 years and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2 reported to the sleep laboratory on four occasions for polysomnography (PSG) and drowsiness and psychomotor assessments as follows: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing the Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting (Ramadan). OPTALERT™ was used to objectively assess daytime drowsiness using the Johns Drowsiness Scale (JDS), and blink total duration and a visual reaction time test were used to assess MRT. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage was significantly lower at BLF (17.7 ± 8.1%) and at Ramadan (18.6 ± 10.7%) compared with BL (25.6 ± 4.8%) (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between JDS scores and blink total duration during the two test periods in BL, BLF and Ramadan. There were no significant changes in MRT during BL, BLF and Ramadan. Under controlled conditions of fixed light/dark exposure, caloric intake, sleep/wake schedule and sleep quality, the Islamic intermittent fasting has no impact on drowsiness and vigilance as measured by the JDS, total blink duration and MRT.

  6. A fast timing calorimetric layer using micro-channel plates in ionisation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A.; Barnyakov, M.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Pigazzini, S.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli De Fatis, T.

    2017-03-01

    Future high rate hadron colliders are expected to have hundreds of concurrent proton-proton interactions in the same bunch crossing, deteriorating the energy resolution and identification capabilities of calorimeters. The possibility to distinguish neutral particles coming from different interaction vertices is being pursued as a tool to reduce pile-up contamination in calorimeters, and restore optimal performance. A time of flight resolution of the order of 20 ps will be able to reduce neutral particles pile-up contamination at the calorimeter level by about one order of magnitude, restoring pile-up conditions similar to what is routinely sustained in the current run of the LHC . Micro-channel plates (MCP) can be used in PMT configuration as fast charged particles detector (resolution of better then 30 ps can be achieved with commercial devices). However they are not particularly radiation tolerant, mostly due to the ion feedback on the photocathode. The possibility of using micro-channel plates without a photocathode (i-MCP) has been studied in several test beams. Different MCP geometries are compared with the goal to identify the optimal configuration. Efficiency of more than 70% with a time resolution of better than 40 ps are achieved for single charged particles, leading to an efficiency close to 100% for EM shower after few radiation lengths. This opens the possibility to use i-MCPs as a timing layer in a sampling calorimeter or to use it in a pre-shower device independent from the calorimeter technology. Preliminary results on the radiation hardness of the i-MCP configuration will be also presented.

  7. Limits on fast radio bursts at 145 MHz with ARTEMIS, a real-time software backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastergiou, A.; Chennamangalam, J.; Armour, W.; Williams, C.; Mort, B.; Dulwich, F.; Salvini, S.; Magro, A.; Roberts, S.; Serylak, M.; Doo, A.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2015-09-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond radio signals that exhibit dispersion larger than what the Galactic electron density can account for. We have conducted a 1446 h survey for FRBs at 145 MHz, covering a total of 4193 deg2 on the sky. We used the UK station of the low frequency array (LOFAR) radio telescope - the Rawlings Array - accompanied for a majority of the time by the LOFAR station at Nançay, observing the same fields at the same frequency. Our real-time search backend, Advanced Radio Transient Event Monitor and Identification System - ARTEMIS, utilizes graphics processing units to search for pulses with dispersion measures up to 320 cm-3 pc. Previous derived FRB rates from surveys around 1.4 GHz, and favoured FRB interpretations, motivated this survey, despite all previous detections occurring at higher dispersion measures. We detected no new FRBs above a signal-to-noise threshold of 10, leading to the most stringent upper limit yet on the FRB event rate at these frequencies: 29 sky-1 d-1 for five ms-duration pulses above 62 Jy. The non-detection could be due to scatter-broadening, limitations on the volume and time searched, or the shape of FRB flux density spectra. Assuming the latter and that FRBs are standard candles, the non-detection is compatible with the published FRB sky rate, if their spectra follow a power law with frequency (∝ να), with α ≳ +0.1, demonstrating a marked difference from pulsar spectra. Our results suggest that surveys at higher frequencies, including the low frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, will have better chances to detect, estimate rates and understand the origin and properties of FRBs.

  8. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (<10 Hz). However, this consideration alone may not be adequate for real chromatograms when an appreciable amount of noise is present. Further, depending on the instrument, the manufacturer's choice of a particular data bunching/integration/response time condition may be integrally coupled to the sampling frequency. In any case, the exact nature of signal filtration often occurs in a manner neither transparent to nor controllable by the user. Using fast chromatography on a state-of-the-art column (38,000 plates), we evaluate the responses produced by different present generation instruments, each with their unique black box digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter

  9. Extended Time as a Testing Accommodation for Students with Reading Disabilities: Does a Rising Tide Lift All Ships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Lovett, Benjamin J.; Rogers, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    Testing accommodations have become a common component of services for students with disabilities at all levels of education. This study examined the effect of a common testing accommodation--extended time--on the reading comprehension test performance of high school students. Sixty-four students, half of whom had learning disabilities (LDs) in the…

  10. Extended Time as a Testing Accommodation for Students with Reading Disabilities: Does a Rising Tide Lift All Ships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Lovett, Benjamin J.; Rogers, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    Testing accommodations have become a common component of services for students with disabilities at all levels of education. This study examined the effect of a common testing accommodation--extended time--on the reading comprehension test performance of high school students. Sixty-four students, half of whom had learning disabilities (LDs) in the…

  11. Fast and Robust Real-Time Estimation of Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hodam; Kim, Jeong-Youn; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-09-14

    Respiratory rate (RR) is a useful vital sign that can not only provide auxiliary information on physiological changes within the human body, but also indicate early symptoms of various diseases. Recently, methods for the estimation of RR from photoplethysmography (PPG) have attracted increased interest, because PPG can be readily recorded using wearable sensors such as smart watches and smart bands. In the present study, we propose a new method for the fast and robust real-time estimation of RR using an adaptive infinite impulse response (IIR) notch filter, which has not yet been applied to the PPG-based estimation of RR. In our offline simulation study, the performance of the proposed method was compared to that of recently developed RR estimation methods called an adaptive lattice-type RR estimator and a Smart Fusion. The results of the simulation study show that the proposed method could not only estimate RR more quickly and more accurately than the conventional methods, but also is most suitable for online RR monitoring systems, as it does not use any overlapping moving windows that require increased computational costs. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of the proposed method, an online RR estimation system was implemented.

  12. Fast-Time Evaluations of Airborne Merging and Spacing in Terminal Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Barmore, Bryan; Bussink, Frank; Weitz, Lesley; Dahlene, Laura

    2005-01-01

    NASA researchers are developing new airborne technologies and procedures to increase runway throughput at capacity-constrained airports by improving the precision of inter-arrival spacing at the runway threshold. In this new operational concept, pilots of equipped aircraft are cleared to adjust aircraft speed to achieve a designated spacing interval at the runway threshold, relative to a designated lead aircraft. A new airborne toolset, prototypes of which are being developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, assists pilots in achieving this objective. The current prototype allows precision spacing operations to commence even when the aircraft and its lead are not yet in-trail, but are on merging arrival routes to the runway. A series of fast-time evaluations of the new toolset were conducted at the Langley Research Center during the summer of 2004. The study assessed toolset performance in a mixed fleet of aircraft on three merging arrival streams under a range of operating conditions. The results of the study indicate that the prototype possesses a high degree of robustness to moderate variations in operating conditions.

  13. Fast Segmentation of Stained Nuclei in Terabyte-Scale, Time Resolved 3D Microscopy Image Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Stegmaier, Johannes; Otte, Jens C.; Kobitski, Andrei; Bartschat, Andreas; Garcia, Ariel; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Strähle, Uwe; Mikut, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Automated analysis of multi-dimensional microscopy images has become an integral part of modern research in life science. Most available algorithms that provide sufficient segmentation quality, however, are infeasible for a large amount of data due to their high complexity. In this contribution we present a fast parallelized segmentation method that is especially suited for the extraction of stained nuclei from microscopy images, e.g., of developing zebrafish embryos. The idea is to transform the input image based on gradient and normal directions in the proximity of detected seed points such that it can be handled by straightforward global thresholding like Otsu’s method. We evaluate the quality of the obtained segmentation results on a set of real and simulated benchmark images in 2D and 3D and show the algorithm’s superior performance compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. We achieve an up to ten-fold decrease in processing times, allowing us to process large data sets while still providing reasonable segmentation results. PMID:24587204

  14. Fast pyrolysis kinetics of alkali lignin: Evaluation of apparent rate parameters and product time evolution.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Deepak Kumar; Viju, Daniel; Vinu, R

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the apparent kinetics of fast pyrolysis of alkali lignin was evaluated by obtaining isothermal mass loss data in the timescale of 2-30s at 400-700°C in an analytical pyrolyzer. The data were analyzed using different reaction models to determine the rate constants and apparent rate parameters. First order and one dimensional diffusion models resulted in good fits with experimental data with apparent activation energy of 23kJmol(-1). Kinetic compensation effect was established using a large number of kinetic parameters reported in the literature for pyrolysis of different lignins. The time evolution of the major functional groups in the pyrolysate was analyzed using in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Maximum production of the volatiles occurred around 10-12s. A clear transformation of guaiacols to phenol, catechol and their derivatives, and aromatic hydrocarbons was observed with increasing temperature. The plausible reaction steps involved in various transformations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fast-neutron Induced Reactions at the nELBE Time-of-flight Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, A. R.; Beyer, R.; Elekes, Z.; Grosse, E.; Hannaske, R.; Kögler, T.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2014-05-01

    The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is being rebuilt and extended with a low-background experimental hall. The neutron radiator consists of a liquid lead circuit without additional neutron moderators. The useful neutron spectrum extends from some tens of keV to about 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver cross section data of fast-neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. Before the extension of the facility, the photon production cross section of 56Fe was measured with an HPGe detector and the inelastic neutron scattering cross section to the first few excited states in 56Fe was determined. The neutron total cross sections of Au and Ta were determined in the energy from 200 keV to 7 MeV in a transmission experiment.

  16. Effect of intermittent fasting on circadian rhythms in mice depends on feeding time.

    PubMed

    Froy, Oren; Chapnik, Nava; Miskin, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) resets circadian rhythms and extends life span. Intermittent fasting (IF) also extends life span, but its affect on circadian rhythms has not been studied. To study the effect of IF alongside CR, we imposed IF in FVB/N mice or IF combined with CR using the transgenic FVB/N alphaMUPA mice that, when fed ad libitum, exhibit spontaneously reduced eating and extended life span. Our results show that when food was introduced during the light period, body temperature peak was not disrupted. In contrast, IF caused almost arrhythmicity in clock gene expression in the liver and advanced mPer2 and mClock expression. However, IF restored the amplitudes of clock gene expression under disruptive light condition regardless whether the animals were calorically restricted or not. Unlike daytime feeding, nighttime feeding yielded rhythms similar to those generated during ad libitum feeding. Taken together, our results show that IF can affect circadian rhythms differently depending on the timing of food availability, and suggest that this regimen induces a metabolic state that affects the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) clock.

  17. Pattern centric OPC flow: a special RET flow with fast turn-around-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tom; Wu, Joanne; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Gary; Wang, Benny; Su, Bo; Cheng, Guojie

    2008-03-01

    Low K1 photolithography process increases the complexity of RET applications in IC designs. As technology node shrinks, pattern density is much denser along with much smaller geometry dimensions. Model-based OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) and post-OPC verification require more complex models and through process window compensated approaches, which significantly increase computational burden. Both lithographical challenges and computational complexity associated with 45nm process and below create a need for advanced capabilities on commercial OPC tools. To answer those challenges, hardware-accelerated OPC solution made a debut to solve runtime bottleneck issues, but they came in with very expensive price tags. As today, there are no explorations on the linkage between design styles and layout pattern OPC reusability. This paper introduces a new OPC flow with pattern-centric approach to leverage OPC knowledge of repeated design cells and patterns to achieve fast full chip OPC convergence, shorter cycle time, better OPC quality, and eventually lead to high manufacturing yields. In this paper, the main concepts of pattern-based OPC flow are demonstrated in 65nm customer memory designs. Pattern-based OPC is a natural extension of Anchor's pattern-centric approaches in DFM (Design for Manufacturing) domain.

  18. Fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo MRI for quantitative T2 mapping: minimizing the apparent repetition time (TR) dependence for fast T2 measurement

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S.; Wang, Enfeng; Zhang, XiaoAn; Mandeville, Emiri; Lo, Eng H.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Transverse relaxation time (T2) is a basic but very informative MRI parameter, widely used in imaging to examine a host of diseases, including multiple sclerosis, stroke, and tumor. However, short repetition time (TR) is often used to minimize scan time, which may introduce non-negligible errors in T2 measurement. Specifically, due to the use of refocusing pulse, the steady state magnetization depends not only on TR but also on the TE. Hence, if the TE dependence is not properly accounted for, it may be mistaken as T2-induced signal attenuation, leading to non-negligible T2 underestimation. Our study proposed a fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo (SE) MRI sequence, which saturates the magnetization after the echo and ensures a TE-independent steady state. The proposed FRESS-SE MRI was evaluated with numerical simulation, implemented with echo planar imaging readout, and validated by both phantom and in vivo experiments. In summary, FRESS-SE T2 MRI technique was developed for fast and accurate T2 imaging, suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:21755552

  19. Discretization in time gives rise to noise-induced improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidović, A.; Huntington, E. H.; Frater, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    For some nonlinear systems the performance can improve with an increasing noise level. Such noise-induced improvement in static nonlinearities is of great interest for practical applications since many systems can be modeled in that way (e.g., sensors, quantizers, limiters, etc.). We present experimental evidence that noise-induced performance improvement occurs in those systems as a consequence of discretization in time with the achievable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain increasing with decreasing ratio of input noise bandwidth and total measurement bandwidth. By modifying the input noise bandwidth, noise-induced improvement with SNR gain larger than unity is demonstrated in a system where it was not previously thought possible. Our experimental results bring closer two different theoretical models for the same class of nonlinearities and shed light on the behavior of static nonlinear discrete-time systems.

  20. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Tibor; Lakatos, Tamás; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L.

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  1. Origin of abrupt rise in deuteron NMR longitudinal relaxation times of protein methyl groups below 90 K.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Lipton, Andrew S

    2013-05-23

    In order to examine the origin of the abrupt change in the temperature dependence of (2)H NMR longitudinal relaxation times observed previously for methyl groups of L69 in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein at around 90 K (Vugmeyster et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4038-4039), we extended the measurements to several other methyl groups in the hydrophobic core. We show that, for all methyl groups, relaxation times experience a dramatic jump several orders of magnitude around this temperature. Theoretical modeling supports the conclusion that the origin of the apparent transition in the relaxation times is due to the existence of the distribution of conformers distinguished by their activation energy for methyl three-site hops. It is also crucial to take into account the differential contribution of individual conformers into overall signal intensity. When a particular conformer approaches the regime at which its three-site hop rate constant is on the order of the quadrupolar coupling interaction constant, the intensity of the signal due to this conformer experiences a sharp drop, thus changing the balance of the contributions of different conformers into the overall signal. As a result, the observed apparent transition in the relaxation rates can be explained without the assumption of an underlying transition in the rate constants. This work in combination with earlier results also shows that the model based on the distribution of conformers explains the relaxation behavior in the entire temperature range between 300 and 70 K.

  2. Origin of Abrupt Rise in Deuteron NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Times of Protein Methyl Groups Below 90 K

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-05-23

    In order to examine the origin of the abrupt change in the temperature dependence of NMR longitudinal relaxation times observed earlier for methyl groups of L69 in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein at around 90 K (Vugmeyster et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4038), we extended the measurements to several other methyl groups in the hydrophobic core. We show that for all methyl groups, relaxation times experience a dramatic jump several orders of magnitude around this temperature. Theoretical modeling supports the conclusion that the origin of the apparent transition in the relaxation times is due to the existence of the distribution of conformers distinguished by their activation energy for methyl three-site hops. It is also crucial to take into account the differential contribution of individual conformers into overall signal intensity. When a particular conformer approaches the regime at which its three-site hops rate constant is on the order of the quadrupolar coupling interaction constant, the intensity of the signal due to this conformer experiences a sharp drop, thus changing the balance of the contributions of different conformers into the overall signal. As a result, the observed apparent transition in the relaxation rates can be explained without the assumption of an underlying transition in the rate constants. This work in combination with earlier results also shows that the model based on the distribution of conformers explains the relaxation behavior in the entire temperature range between 300-70 K.

  3. Investigation of time-resolved fast electron dynamics in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James; Robinson, Alex; Rusby, Dean; Wilson, Lucy; Murphy, Chris; Dance, Rachel; Gray, Ross; MacLellan, David; McKenna, Paul; Ridgers, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The study of fast electron transport in laser-solid interactions is crucial for many key applications. Laser-accelerated particle beams will require compact laser systems operating at high repetition rates, hence experimental effort to characterise acceleration processes using femtosecond laser sources is crucial. A thorough understanding of fast-electron acceleration and transport underpins the development of most of these applications, necessitating both temporally and spatially-resolved measurements. Here an overview will be presented of unique fast electron transport results from the Astra Gemini laser (1021 Wcm-2, 40 fs). Using high resolution rear surface optical probing, together with complementary ion acceleration measurements, we have undertaken a study of the earliest stages of fast electron dynamics. How various target and laser parameters directly affected both the electron distribution and subsequent ion acceleration will be detailed, with computational modeling supporting the experimental observations.

  4. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  5. Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different durations and rise times.

    PubMed

    Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Raeder, Sophie M; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated. This suggests that perceptual latency of a head movement is longer than a co-occurring sound. However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (~1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with a brief (10-50 ms) sound pulse. In the present study, the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope duration and shape. Participants judged the temporal order of the two stimuli, the onset of an active head movement and the onset of brief (50 ms) or long (1,400 ms) sounds with a square- or raised-cosine-shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order for the stimuli to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (~115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (temporal envelope duration and shape). Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is greater than the other senses.

  6. Development of an integrated four-channel fast avalanche-photodiode detector system with nanosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenjie; Li, Qiuju; Chang, Jinfan; Ma, Yichao; Liu, Peng; Wang, Zheng; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. E.; Xu, Wei; Tao, Ye; Wu, Chaoqun; Zhou, Yangfan

    2017-10-01

    A four-channel nanosecond time-resolved avalanche-photodiode (APD) detector system is developed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation. It uses a single module for signal processing and readout. This integrated system provides better reliability and flexibility for custom improvement. The detector system consists of three parts: (i) four APD sensors, (ii) four fast preamplifiers and (iii) a time-digital-converter (TDC) readout electronics. The C30703FH silicon APD chips fabricated by Excelitas are used as the sensors of the detectors. It has an effective light-sensitive area of 10 × 10 mm2 and an absorption layer thickness of 110 μm. A fast preamplifier with a gain of 59 dB and bandwidth of 2 GHz is designed to readout of the weak signal from the C30703FH APD. The TDC is realized by a Spartan-6 field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) with multiphase method in a resolution of 1ns. The arrival time of all scattering events between two start triggers can be recorded by the TDC. The detector has been used for nuclear resonant scattering study at both Advanced Photon Source and also at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. For the X-ray energy of 14.4 keV, the time resolution, the full width of half maximum (FWHM) of the detector (APD sensor + fast amplifier) is 0.86 ns, and the whole detector system (APD sensors + fast amplifiers + TDC readout electronics) achieves a time resolution of 1.4 ns.

  7. Tracking the speech signal--time-locked MEG signals during perception of ultra-fast and moderately fast speech in blind and in sighted listeners.

    PubMed

    Hertrich, Ingo; Dietrich, Susanne; Ackermann, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Blind people can learn to understand speech at ultra-high syllable rates (ca. 20 syllables/s), a capability associated with hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. To further elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying this skill, magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements during listening to sentence utterances were cross-correlated with time courses derived from the speech signal (envelope, syllable onsets and pitch periodicity) to capture phase-locked MEG components (14 blind, 12 sighted subjects; speech rate=8 or 16 syllables/s, pre-defined source regions: auditory and visual cortex, inferior frontal gyrus). Blind individuals showed stronger phase locking in auditory cortex than sighted controls, and right-hemisphere visual cortex activity correlated with syllable onsets in case of ultra-fast speech. Furthermore, inferior-frontal MEG components time-locked to pitch periodicity displayed opposite lateralization effects in sighted (towards right hemisphere) and blind subjects (left). Thus, ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind individuals appears associated with changes in early signal-related processing mechanisms both within and outside the central-auditory terrain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [The reasons and background for the rise of college education of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in modern times].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-jie; Huang, Ying; Li, Jie

    2009-09-01

    With western learning spreading throughout the orient, the survival and development of TCM was restrained to a large degree due to the medical administrative policy, educational system and diffusion of western medicine at different social levels. Facing this adversity, the TCM sector complied with the changing times and survived through persistent efforts as well as wide and solid popular foundations, striving actively for the legitimacy status of TCM education and establishing several TCM colleges. During the course of running the colleges, the TCM sector was brave in changing ideas and giving and accepting new knowledge, it explored a comprehensive educational syllabus, which not only promoted the development of TCM education in the Republican period of China, but also laid a foundation for TCM education in the new period.

  9. Fast, high peak capacity separations in gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ryan B; Hoggard, Jamin C; Synovec, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    Peak capacity production (i.e., peak capacity per separation run time) is substantially improved for gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) and applied to the fast separation of complex samples. The increase in peak capacity production is achieved by selecting appropriate experimental conditions based on theoretical modeling of on-column band broadening, and by reducing the injection pulse width. Modeling to estimate the on-column band broadening from experimental parameters provided insight for the potential of achieving GC separations in the absence of off-column band broadening, i.e., the additional band broadening not due to the on-column separation process. To optimize GC-TOFMS separations collected with a commercial instrumental platform, off-column band broadening from injection and detection needed to be significantly reduced. Specifically for injection, a commercially available thermal modulator is adapted and applied (referred to herein as thermal injection) to provide a narrow injection pulse, while the TOFMS provided a data collection rate of 500 Hz, initially averaged to 100 Hz for data storage. The use of long, relatively narrow open tubular capillary columns and a 30 °C/min programming rate were explored for GC-TOFMS, specifically a 20 m, 100 μm inner diameter (i.d.) capillary column with a 0.4 μm film thickness to benefit column capacity, operated slightly below the optimal average linear gas velocity (at ~2 mL/min, due to the flow rate constraint of the TOFMS). Standard autoinjection with a 1:100 split resulted in an average peak width of ~1.2 s, hence a peak capacity production of 50 peaks/min. Metabolites in the headspace of urine were sampled by solid-phase microextraction (SPME), followed by thermal injection and a ~7 min GC separation (with a ~6 min separation time window), producing ~660 ms peak widths on average, resulting in a total peak capacity of ~550 peaks (at unit resolution) and a peak capacity production of

  10. Microfossil measures of rapid sea-level rise: Timing of response of two microfossil groups to a sudden tidal-flooding experiment in Cascadia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, B.P.; Milker, Yvonne; Dura, T.; Wang, Kelin; Bridgeland, W.T.; Brophy, Laura S.; Ewald, M.; Khan, Nicole; Engelhart, S.E.; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons of pre-earthquake and post-earthquake microfossils in tidal sequences are accurate means to measure coastal subsidence during past subduction earthquakes, but the amount of subsidence is uncertain, because the response times of fossil taxa to coseismic relative sea-level (RSL) rise are unknown. We measured the response of diatoms and foraminifera to restoration of a salt marsh in southern Oregon, USA. Tidal flooding following dike removal caused an RSL rise of ∼1 m, as might occur by coseismic subsidence during momentum magnitude (Mw) 8.1–8.8 earthquakes on this section of the Cascadia subduction zone. Less than two weeks after dike removal, diatoms colonized low marsh and tidal flats in large numbers, showing that they can record seismically induced subsidence soon after earthquakes. In contrast, low-marsh foraminifera took at least 11 months to appear in sizeable numbers. Where subsidence measured with diatoms and foraminifera differs, their different response times may provide an estimate of postseismic vertical deformation in the months following past megathrust earthquakes.

  11. Simulation and measurement of pulse height and rise-time for electron signals in CZT detectors:. influence of material and electronics parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathy, F.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Gliere, A.; Mestais, C.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    A model for simulation of amplitude vs. rise-time biparametric spectra as a function of CZT materials properties was developed. This model takes into account the physical properties of the CZT detectors, the electric field profile and the physics of γ- ray interaction with CZT. The model has been refined to include the filtering effects of the front-end electronics and applied again to biparametric spectra. The electronic filtering is represented by a combination of linear band pass filters. The rise-time measurement circuit induces a non-linearity that is taken into account. A comparison between the electronics simulations and calibration measurements on the actual circuits is presented. In addition, physical and electrical properties of several CZT samples have been characterized and these properties have been incorporated in the model so that actual and simulated biparametric spectra can be compared. Finally, the model is applied to show the influence of the main physical parameters (mobility and lifetime) and of the applied electric field on the biparametric spectra.

  12. Determinants of Children's Use of and Time Spent in Fast-Food and Full-Service Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Alex; Kubena, Karen S.; Tolle, Glen; Dean, Wesley; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jan, Jie-Sheng; Anding, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Identify parental and children's determinants of children's use of and time spent in fast-food (FF) and full-service (FS) restaurants. Design: Analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting: Parents were interviewed by phone; children were interviewed in their homes. Participants: Parents and children ages 9-11 or 13-15 from 312 families…

  13. Determinants of Children's Use of and Time Spent in Fast-Food and Full-Service Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Alex; Kubena, Karen S.; Tolle, Glen; Dean, Wesley; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jan, Jie-Sheng; Anding, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Identify parental and children's determinants of children's use of and time spent in fast-food (FF) and full-service (FS) restaurants. Design: Analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting: Parents were interviewed by phone; children were interviewed in their homes. Participants: Parents and children ages 9-11 or 13-15 from 312 families…

  14. A Fast Topological Trigger for Real Time Analysis of Nanosecond Phenomena; Opening the Gamma Ray Window to Our Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, Frank

    2013-09-24

    This work was to enable the development of a proof-of-principle nanosecond trigger system that is designed to perform a real time analysis of fast Cherenkov light flashes from air showers. The basic building blocks of the trigger system have been designed and constructed, and a real world system is now operating in the VERITAS experiment.

  15. Fast microbubble dwell-time based ultrasonic molecular imaging approach for quantification and monitoring of angiogenesis in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Guracar, Ismayil; Tian, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a fast ultrasonic molecular imaging technique for quantification and monitoring of angiogenesis in cancer. Materials and methods A new software algorithm measuring the dwell time of contrast microbubbles in near real-time (henceforth, fast method) was developed and integrated in a clinical ultrasound system. In vivo quantification and monitoring of tumor angiogenesis during anti-VEGF antibody therapy was performed in human colon cancer xenografts in mice (n=20) using the new fast method following administration of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targeted contrast microbubbles. Imaging results were compared with a traditional destruction/replenishment approach (henceforth, traditional method) in an intra-animal comparison. Results There was excellent correlation (R2=0.93; P<0.001) between the fast method and the traditional method in terms of VEGFR2-targeted in vivo ultrasonic molecular imaging with significantly higher (P=0.002) imaging signal in colon cancer xenografts using VEGFR2-targeted compared to control non-targeted contrast microbubbles. The new fast method was highly reproducible (ICC=0.87). Following anti-angiogenic therapy, ultrasonic molecular imaging signal decreased by an average of 41±10%, whereas imaging signal increased by an average of 54±8% in non-treated tumors over a 72-hour period. Decreased VEGFR2 expression levels following anti-VEGF therapy were confirmed on ex vivo immunofluorescent staining. Conclusions Fast ultrasonic molecular imaging based on dwell time microbubble signal measurements correlates well with the traditional measurement method, and allows reliable in vivo monitoring of anti-angiogenic therapy in human colon cancer xenografts. The improved work-flow afforded by the new quantification approach may facilitate clinical translation of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:22943043

  16. Time-resolved measurements of fast electron-sourced sheath dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Dance, R. J.; Ridgers, C. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2013-10-01

    Here we present unique fast electron generation and transport results from a recent experimental campaign on the Astra Gemini laser facility. Using complementary diagnostics a unique picture is presented of the evolution of electron sheath dynamics, and thus electron transport, in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short pulse (40 fs) laser with a solid target. Targets were irradiated at up to (1021W cm - 2), with a chirped optical probe used to spatially and temporally resolve the rear surface target reflectivity. Clear snapshots of rapid ionisation and fast electron transport at the target rear surface were observed for a range of target and laser parameters. As well as providing a valuable insight into fast electron transport at the rear surface the role of fast electron refluxing inside thin targets was also investigated through the use of thin foils and novel targetry. These studies aim to see how the very earliest stages of the fast electron dynamics directly affect both the sheath evolution and ion acceleration at the rear surface.

  17. Association of leisure time physical activity and abdominal obesity with fasting serum insulin and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Borodulin, K; Tuomilehto, J; Peltonen, M; Lakka, T A; Sundvall, J; Jousilahti, P

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the joint associations of leisure time physical activity and abdominal obesity with fasting insulin and 2-h glucose levels and with the risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes (Type 2 DM). A cross-sectional population-based random sample of 1812 Finnish adults 45-74 years of age without a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Relative energy expenditure during the previous 12 months (METh/week), assessed by a questionnaire, was used as a measure of leisure time physical activity. Waist-hip ratio (WHR) was used as a measure of abdominal obesity. IGT and Type 2 DM were assessed by a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and were defined according to the World Health Organization guidelines. While 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels increased with increasing WHR (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively), both of them decreased with increasing physical activity (P = 0.015 and P < 0.001, respectively). The highest 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels were found among individuals who had most abdominal obesity and were least physically active. Physically inactive individuals had a higher prevalence of IGT and Type 2 DM in all WHR tertiles than physically active persons. Higher levels of leisure time physical activity are associated with lower 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels and a reduced risk of having IGT and Type 2 DM, independent of the level of abdominal obesity.

  18. Reduced spike-timing reliability correlates with the emergence of fast ripples in the rat epileptic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Uzcategui, Yoryani G; Gal, Beatriz; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2007-09-20

    Ripples are sharp-wave-associated field oscillations (100-300 Hz) recorded in the hippocampus during behavioral immobility and slow-wave sleep. In epileptic rats and humans, a different and faster oscillation (200-600 Hz), termed fast ripples, has been described. However, the basic mechanisms are unknown. Here, we propose that fast ripples emerge from a disorganized ripple pattern caused by unreliable firing in the epileptic hippocampus. Enhanced synaptic activity is responsible for the irregular bursting of CA3 pyramidal cells due to large membrane potential fluctuations. Lower field interactions and a reduced spike-timing reliability concur with decreased spatial synchronization and the emergence of fast ripples. Reducing synaptically driven membrane potential fluctuations improves both spike-timing reliability and spatial synchronization and restores ripples in the epileptic hippocampus. Conversely, a lower spike-timing reliability, with reduced potassium currents, is associated with ripple shuffling in normal hippocampus. Therefore, fast ripples may reflect a pathological desynchronization of the normal ripple pattern.

  19. Measurements of the fast ion slowing-down times in the HL-2A tokamak and comparison to classical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Song, X. M.; Cao, J. Y.; Lei, G. J.; Wei, H. L.; Li, Y. G.; Shi, Z. B.; Li, X.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Isobe, M.; Collaboration: HL-2A Team

    2012-11-15

    Physics related to fast ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is a very important issue, since these particles will play an important role in future burning plasmas. Indeed, they will act as primary heating source and will sustain the self-ignited condition. To measure the fast ion slowing-down times in a magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas in different scenarios, very short pulses of a deuterium neutral beam, so-called 'blip,' with duration of about 5 ms were tangentially co-injected into a deuterium plasmas at the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) tokamak [L. W. Yan, Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)]. The decay rate of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutrons produced by beam-plasma reactions following neutral beam termination was measured by means of a {sup 235}U fission chamber. Experimental results were compared with those predicted by a classical slowing-down model. These results show that the fast ions are well confined with a peaked profile and the ions are slowed down classically without significant loss in the HL-2A tokamak. Moreover, it has been observed that during electron cyclotron resonance heating the fast ions have a longer slowing-down time and the neutron emission rate decay time becomes longer.

  20. Precise timing of deglacial tropical warming and humidification in the Timor Sea vs Antarctic warming and global atmospheric CO2 rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Grootes, P. M.; Holbourn, A.; Kuhnt, W.

    2009-04-01

    The centennial-scale phasing of climate events in the ocean, cryo-, and atmosphere provides crucial new insights into causal linkages that have controlled the events of global climate change during the last deglacial. During Termination Ia, a first significant sea level rise occurred as early as 19.4-18.7 ka (Hanebuth et al., 2008), a first Antarctic warming followed only 18.0/17.8 to 14.7 ka (Kawamura et al., 2007), a minor atmospheric CO2 rise after 17.5 ka, and a major rise at 16.7-14.5 ka (Monnin et al., 2001). Major progress in the precise age control of associated marine climate events resulted from accepting the results of the 14C plateau-tuning method (Sarnthein et al., 2007). Accordingly, 14C reservoir ages of surface waters revealed strong temporal and spatial changes for different parts of the ocean in contrast to the previously assumed constant modern global average of 400 yr. New plateau-tuning based age estimates from the Timor Sea (Core MD01-2378) exhibit a decrease in surface water ages from >2200 yr prior to 16 ka to 410 yr subsequent to 15 ka, thus providing a much improved basis for radiocarbon-based age control of deglacial events in tropical paleoceanography. Accordingly, the benthic delta18O record of deglacial ice melt and intermediate-water warming (near 1700 m w.d.) indeed reflects a first minor response to Antarctic warming after 17.8 ka, a major response, however, only from 17.0-14.4 ka. Likewise, major sea surface warming started almost 1000 yr after Antarctic warming, at 17 ka, almost coeval with the major deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. In part, this warming may reflect a cease in the upwelling of intermediate waters along the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean, which is documented by a coeval major increase in the Mg/Ca-based temperature gradient between surface and thermocline waters and a halving of (chlorine) productivity at 16.8-16.5 ka, moreover, by the strong decrease in surface water reservoir ages, starting with 800 yr

  1. A novel Fast Gas Chromatography based technique for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C10-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a ~ 14 min analysis time. Moreover, in situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an ~ 11 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to ~ 19 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). This corresponds to a two- to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest ~ 30 km west of central Tokyo, Japan, the

  2. Fast time resolution measurements of high concentrations of iodine above a Laminaria Digitata seaweed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Stephen; Adams, Thomas; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    -distant seaweeds whose emissions are better-mixed into the atmosphere. The peak I2 concentrations observed here are three to five times greater than the maximum amounts recorded above/closeby laminaria beds in previous studies: 350 pptv max in O Grove, Galicia, Spain (Mahajan et al., ACP, 11, 2545, 2011), and 302 and 547 pptv max at Mweenish Bay, near Mace Head, County Galway, Ireland (Huang et al., GRL, 37, L03803, 2010; ACPD, 12, 25915, 2012). In part, the larger peak concentrations seen here are a consequence of deploying a fast response instrument very close to the source, enabling the emission's high temporal variability to be captured with fewer averaging effects. Nevertheless, the I2 concentrations averaged over the 30 minute period around the tidal minimum were still typically 750 pptv, suggesting laminaria beds are even stronger emitters of I2 into coastal atmospheres than previously thought. Some implications for such high concentrations of iodine for the local atmospheric chemistry are considered. We acknowledge support from the European Community FP7 project "ASSEMBLE", grant 227799.

  3. SOA Does Not Reveal the Absolute Time Course of Cognitive Processing in Fast Priming Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzur, Boaz; Frost, Ram

    2007-01-01

    Applying Bloch's law to visual word recognition research, both exposure duration of the prime and its luminance determine the prime's overall energy, and consequently determine the size of the priming effect. Nevertheless, experimenters using fast-priming paradigms traditionally focus only on the SOA between prime and target to reflect the…

  4. Fast scanning exafs: A useful tool in time-resolved studies of chemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, C.; Briois, V.; Parent, Ph.; Villain, F.; Lagarde, P.; Dexpert, H.; Fourman, B.; Michalowicz, A.; Verdaguer, M.

    1992-07-01

    The X-ray absorption spectroscopy station EXAFS III (of the D1 line of the D.C.I. ring at LURE) has been modified to record data in the fast scanning mode. After a brief description of the experimental set-up, results of selected kinetics experiments are presented. Interests and limitations are shortly discussed.

  5. SOA Does Not Reveal the Absolute Time Course of Cognitive Processing in Fast Priming Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzur, Boaz; Frost, Ram

    2007-01-01

    Applying Bloch's law to visual word recognition research, both exposure duration of the prime and its luminance determine the prime's overall energy, and consequently determine the size of the priming effect. Nevertheless, experimenters using fast-priming paradigms traditionally focus only on the SOA between prime and target to reflect the…

  6. A coupled high-resolution modeling system to simulate biomass burning emissions, plume rise and smoke transport in real time over the contiguous US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; James, E.; Freitas, S.; Pereira, G.; Csiszar, I. A.; Tsidulko, M.; Pierce, R. B.; McKeen, S. A.; Saide, P.; Alexander, C.; Benjamin, S.; Peckham, S.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires can have huge impact on air quality and visibility over large parts of the US. It is quite challenging to accurately predict wildfire air quality given significant uncertainties in modeling of biomass burning (BB) emissions, fire size, plume rise and smoke transport. We developed a new smoke modeling system (HRRR-Smoke) based on the coupled meteorology-chemistry model WRF-Chem. The HRRR-Smoke modeling system uses fire radiative power (FRP) data measured by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. Using the FRP data enables predicting fire emissions, fire size and plume rise more accurately. Another advantage of the VIIRS data is the fire detection and characterization at­ high spatial resolution during both day and nighttime. The HRRR-Smoke model is run in real-time for summer 2016 on 3km horizontal grid resolution over CONUS domain by NOAA/ESRL Global Systems Division (GSD). The model simulates advection and mixing of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 or smoke) emitted by calculated BB emissions. The BB emissions include both smoldering and flaming fractions. Fire plume rise is parameterized in an online mode during the model integration. In addition to smoke, anthropogenic emissions of PM2.5 are transported in an inline mode as a passive tracer by HRRR-Smoke. The HRRR-Smoke real-time runs use meteorological fields for initial and lateral boundary conditions from the experimental real-time HRRR(X) numerical weather prediction model also run at NOAA/ESRL/GSD. The model is initialized every 6 hours (00, 06, 12 and 18UTC) daily using newly generated meteorological fields and FRP data obtained during previous 24 hours. Then the model produces meteorological and smoke forecasts for next 36 hours. The smoke fields are cycled from one forecast to the next one. Predicted near-surface and vertically integrated smoke concentrations are visualized online on a web-site: http

  7. Fault plane orientations of small earthquakes of the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) seismic sequence from P-wave polarities and rise times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippucci, Marilena; de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Boschi, Enzo

    2006-07-01

    A two-step technique has been developed with the aim of retrieving the fault plane orientation of a small-magnitude earthquake. The technique uses a set of non-linear equations, which relate the rise times of first P waves to source parameters (source dimension L, dip δ and strike φ of the fault) and intrinsic Qp. At the first step of the technique, the inversion of P polarities provides two fault plane orientations for each focal mechanism solution. At the second step, the inversion of rise times is carried out to retrieve L and Qp by fixing δ and φ to the values of the fault plane orientation inferred at the first step. A robust analysis, based on the random deviates technique, allows us to evaluate if one fault plane exists which systematically better fits data and can be considered the `true' fault plane. A parameter is introduced to quantify the level of resolution of the `true' fault plane. A probabilistic approach, based on the assumption that errors on data are Gaussian distributed, allows us to a posteriori validate or reject the `true' fault plane. The technique has been applied to 47 small earthquakes (1.3 < ML < 3.9) occurred below the town of Sellano, during the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Central Italy) seismic crisis. The strike of the inferred fault planes is generally along the Apennine direction. Fault plane solutions can be mainly subdivided into two groups: a first group of SW-dipping faults and a second group of NE-dipping faults. These results agree with the present day knowledge of the fault systems in the area. An average Qp equal to 354 +/- 63 has been estimated, in agreement with previous attenuation studies.

  8. Real-time fMRI data analysis using region of interest selection based on fast ICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Xinyue; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying; Zhao, Xiaojie

    2011-03-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) is a new technique which can present (feedback) brain activity during scanning. Through fast acquisition and online analysis of BOLD signal, fMRI data are processed within one TR. Current rtfMRI provides an activation map under specific task mainly through the GLM analysis to select region of interest (ROI). This study was based on independent component analysis (ICA) and used the result of fast ICA analysis to select the node of the functional network as the ROI. Real-time brain activity within the ROI was presented to the subject who needed to find strategies to control his brain activity. The whole real-time processes involved three parts: pre-processing (including head motion correction and smoothing), fast ICA analysis and feedback. In addition, the result of fast head motion correction was also presented to the experimenter in a curve diagram. Based on the above analysis processes, a real time feedback experiment with a motor imagery task was performed. An overt finger movement task as localizer session was adopted for ICA analysis to get the motor network. Supplementary motor area (SMA) in such network was selected as the ROI. During the feedback session, the average of BOLD signals within ROI was presented to the subjects for self-regulation under a motor imagery task. In this experiment, TR was 1.5 seconds, and the whole time of processing and presentation was within 1 second. Experimental results not only showed that the SMA was controllable, but also proved that the analysis method was effective.

  9. Measuring Mars sand flux seasonality from a time series of HiRISE images and calibrating the threshold for sand mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, focused on the Nili Patera dune field on Mars, we measured the temporal variation of the migration rate of sand ripples from the correlation of a time-series of HiRISE images using COSI-Corr. The time-series covers approximately 1.5 Mars year which allows us to observe seasonal migration rate variability as well as taking an early glimpse on yearly variation. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the time-series to quantify more robustly the time evolution of the signal and filter out noise, in particular due to unrecorded satellite jitter. Using the first two components, which account for 82% of the variance, the seasonal variation of the ripple migration rate was estimated. We clearly observe continuously active migration throughout the year with a strong seasonal quasi-sinusoidal variation which peaks at perihelion. Coupling between surface winds and sand transport is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is likely crucial for both erosion of the surface and for the emission of finer (dust) particles into the atmosphere. Analysis of the distinctive seasonal variation of sand flux with an atmospheric model is used to infer an effective threshold for sand motion. This is the first direct estimate of the stress threshold at Mars on spatial scales relevant for dynamical atmospheric modeling of sand transport, surface erosion, and dust lifting.

  10. Evaluation of luminescence decay measurements probed on pure and doped Pt(IV) hexahalogeno complexes I. Exponential rise time and decay curves applying various statistical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biertümpel, Ingo; Schmidtke, Hans-Herbert

    1997-02-01

    Statistical methods are shown to be superior for evaluating luminescence lifetime curves of complex compounds to usual regression procedures. A simple model for the intensity change with time valid for the rise time and the decay period of emission is proposed which considers contributions of exponential decay in time intervals which compare to the time resolution of the equipment available. Mean square fittings to measured points furnish lifetimes and amplitudes of multi-exponential model functions (hypotheses) which are tested applying various statistical methods. Well-established procedures as residual analysis, the autocorrelation function, chi-square test, Durbin-Watson and the Run test are used for investigating whether the results are normal distributed and autocorrelated. For physical interpretation a hypothesis function is only acceptable if all test statistics support non-rejection. Curve fitting and statistical checks are applied on low-temperature lifetime measurements carried out on various Pt(IV) hexahalogeno complexes. Pure materials and compounds doped in suitable host crystals supply essentially identical decay parameters.

  11. Demanding response time requirements on coherent receivers due to fast polarization rotations caused by lightning events.

    PubMed

    Krummrich, Peter M; Ronnenberg, David; Schairer, Wolfgang; Wienold, Daniel; Jenau, Frank; Herrmann, Maximilian

    2016-05-30

    Lightning events can cause fast polarization rotations and phase changes in optical transmission fibers due to strong electrical currents and magnetic fields. Whereas these are unlikely to affect legacy transmission systems with direct detection, different mechanisms have to be considered in systems with local oscillator based coherent receivers and digital signal processing. A theoretical analysis reveals that lightning events can result in polarization rotations with speeds as fast as a few hundred kRad/s. We discuss possible mechanisms how such lightning events can affect coherent receivers with digital signal processing. In experimental investigations with a high current pulse generator and transponder prototypes, we observed post FEC errors after polarization rotation events which can be expected from lightning strikes.

  12. Getting back on the beat: links between auditory-motor integration and precise auditory processing at fast time scales.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2016-03-01

    The auditory system is unique in its ability to precisely detect the timing of perceptual events and use this information to update motor plans, a skill that is crucial for language. However, the characteristics of the auditory system that enable this temporal precision are only beginning to be understood. Previous work has shown that participants who can tap consistently to a metronome have neural responses to sound with greater phase coherence from trial to trial. We hypothesized that this relationship is driven by a link between the updating of motor output by auditory feedback and neural precision. Moreover, we hypothesized that neural phase coherence at both fast time scales (reflecting subcortical processing) and slow time scales (reflecting cortical processing) would be linked to auditory-motor timing integration. To test these hypotheses, we asked participants to synchronize to a pacing stimulus, and then changed either the tempo or the timing of the stimulus to assess whether they could rapidly adapt. Participants who could rapidly and accurately resume synchronization had neural responses to sound with greater phase coherence. However, this precise timing was limited to the time scale of 10 ms (100 Hz) or faster; neural phase coherence at slower time scales was unrelated to performance on this task. Auditory-motor adaptation therefore specifically depends upon consistent auditory processing at fast, but not slow, time scales. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Test of Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors for picosecond time measurements with a new multipurpose read-out board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, N.; Al Ghoul, H.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cartiglia, N.; Forthomme, L.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Royon, C.

    2017-09-01

    Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) are sensors optimized for timing measurements employing a thin multiplication layer to increase the output signal. A multipurpose read-out board hosting a low-cost, low-power fast amplifier was designed at the University of Kansas and tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) using a 180 GeV pion beam. The amplifier has been designed to read out a wide range of detectors and it was optimized in this test for the UFSD output signal. In this paper we report the results of the experimental tests using 50 μm thick UFSD with a sensitive area of 1 . 4mm2. A timing precision below 30 ps was achieved.

  14. Validation of a fast real-time PCR method to detect fraud and mislabeling in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, M; Di Giuseppe, M; Wicochea Rodríguez, J D; Cammà, C

    2017-01-01

    Fast real-time PCR TaqMan assays were developed and validated for species identification in dairy products. Based on the amplification of 12S rRNA and cytB partial genes of mitochondrial DNA, the methods were demonstrated to be sensitive, fast, and species-specific for Bos taurus, Ovis aries, Bubalus bubalis, and Capra hircus. The limit of detection calculated was lower than 1%, and the efficiency was reported to be higher than 96% in every assay. An internal amplification control was used to detect possible false negatives. The method was validated by means of laboratory-prepared samples mixing different species. Moreover, 18 commercial dairy samples were analyzed by both real-time PCR and isoelectric focusing, the official European Union reference method. The 4 TaqMan assays were confirmed to be a useful tool for milk and dairy product authentication.

  15. Fast monitoring of motor exhaust components by resonant multi-photon ionisation and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Jochen; Frey, Rüdiger; Nagel, Holger

    1995-03-01

    A new analytical procedure is provided by the combination of two types of spectroscopy. Resonant ionization of selected compounds by multiphoton ionization is based on results of absorption spectroscopy for the compound molecules of interest and time-of-flight mass spectrometry serves for the unambigious detection of these compounds. An interesting application of this method is the fast exhaust gas analysis. In the development of future combustion engines, the management of dynamic motor processes becomes predominant because by more than 90 % of all the dangerous exhaust pollutions are produced in instationary motor phases such as fast speed or load changes. The investigation of dynamic processes however, requires fast analytical procedures with millisecond time resolution together with the capability to measure individual components in a very complex gas mixture The objectives for a development project of such an instrument were set by the Research Association for Combustion Engines (Forschungsvereinigung Verbrennungskraftmaschinen, FVV, Germany): Up to ten substances should be monitored synchroneously with a time resolution of about 10 milliseconds, with concentration limits of 1 part per million and with a precision better than 10 % relative standard deviation. Such a laser mass spectrometer for fast multi-component automotive exhaust analyses has been developed in a joint research project by Bruker-Franzen Analytik GmbH, Dornier GmbH and the Technical University of Munich. The system has been applied at a motor test facility to investigate the emissions of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene and xylene, of nitric oxide and acetaldehyde in stationary and dynamic engine operation. These measurements demonstrate that strong emission of these pollutants takes place at instationary engine operation and in particular that these compounds are emitted at different times, giving new information about the processes in the combustion chamber and in the exhaust pipe.

  16. Melting Ice, Rising Seas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Sea level rise is an indicator that our planet is warming. Much of the world's population lives on or near the coast, and rising seas are something worth watching. Sea level can rise for two reason...

  17. Effect of a carbohydrate mouth rinse on simulated cycling time-trial performance commenced in a fed or fasted state.

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephen C; Bird, Stephen R; Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A

    2013-02-01

    It is presently unclear whether the reported ergogenic effect of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on cycling time-trial performance is affected by the acute nutritional status of an individual. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a CHO mouth rinse on a 60-min simulated cycling time-trial performance commenced in a fed or fasted state. Twelve competitive male cyclists each completed 4 experimental trials using a double-blinded Latin square design. Two trials were commenced 2 h after a meal that contained 2.5 g·kg(-1) body mass of CHO (FED) and 2 after an overnight fast (FST). Prior to and after every 12.5% of total time during a performance ride, either a 10% maltodextrin (CHO) or a taste-matched placebo (PLB) solution was mouth rinsed for 10 s then immediately expectorated. There were significant main effects for both pre-ride nutritional status (FED vs. FST; p < 0.01) and CHO mouth rinse (CHO vs. PLB; p < 0.01) on power output with an interaction evident between the interventions (p < 0.05). The CHO mouth rinse improved mean power to a greater extent after an overnight fast (282 vs. 273 W, 3.4%; p < 0.01) compared with a fed state (286 vs. 281 W, 1.8%; p < 0.05). We concluded that a CHO mouth rinse improved performance to a greater extent in a fasted compared with a fed state; however, optimal performance was achieved in a fed state with the addition of a CHO mouth rinse.

  18. Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high ..beta../sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R/sub 0/ + a indicate the presence of a non-..mu..-conserving acceleration mechanism.

  19. Real-time video transmission over a fast packet-switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Robert J.; Ma, Joong S.; Gonzales, Cesar A.

    1989-04-01

    Realtime transmission of packetized video is a relatively new but important area of research since tomorrow's networks will likely be based on a common fast packet-switching technology, replacing today's heterogeneous networks which are mixtures of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks dedicated for synchronous and asynchronous applications respectively. Unlike fixed bandwidth transmission channels, packet-switched networks can accommodate the bursty and highly variable rate of compressed motion video yet keep a constant level of image quality. Potential applications include motion video databases, video teleconferencing, and broadcasting over private networks. Unfortunately, traditional video-compression techniques which are applicable to synchronous, fixed bandwidth channels--cannot be applied in this new environment without substantial revisions that take into account the statistical nature of packet data transmission. Independent of their topology, fast packet-switched networks present unique challenges to the coding of motion video; one cannot simply divorce the coding of the source from the characteristics of the channel. The potential for loss of data integrity due to packet losses and transmission errors must be taken into account. The problem of re-synchronization must also be addressed since packet-switched networks are asynchronous by nature. In this paper, we evaluate image coding techniques for motion video in view of the constraints imposed by the packetized medium.

  20. Effects of corn type and fasting time before slaughter on growth and plasma index in weaning pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; He, J; Chen, D W; Yu, B; Yu, J; Mao, X B; Yang, K Y; Yuan, Z C

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary corn type (waxy corn [WC] vs. nonwaxy corn [NC]) and fasting period (2 h vs. 12-16 h) before slaughter on growth and plasma index in weaning pigs. Twenty-four crossbred barrows (8.26 ± 0.47 kg) were allotted to 4 treatments with 6 replications of 1 pig per replicate metabolism cage. Waxy corn contained less fat, a lower amylase:amylopectin ratio, more CP, and more starch than NC. Pigs fed the WC diet had lower jejunum digesta pH compared with those fed the NC diet ( < 0.05). Maltase activity in the jejunum and ileum mucosa ( < 0.01), sucrose activity in the ileum mucosa ( < 0.01), and amylase activity in the pancreas and jejunum digesta ( < 0.05) were increased in pigs fed the WC diet relative to those fed the NC diet. But the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) of starch and CP was lower for the WC group ( < 0.05). Ingestion of the NC diet resulted in higher ( < 0.05) ADG and ADFI in the second week but did not affect ADG ( = 0.091) and the feed:gain ratio (F:G; = 0.077) during the whole experiment period. The plasma glucose ( < 0.01) concentration was higher and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; < 0.01) concentrations was lower in the hepatic portal vein in pigs fed the WC diet relative to those fed the NC diet. Fasting 2 h before slaughter decreased the jejunum and ileum digesta pH compared with the 12-h fasting group ( < 0.01). Villus height increased in the duodenum ( < 0.01) and jejunum ( < 0.05) and the villus height:crypt depth ratio increased in the duodenum ( < 0.05) of pigs after shortening the fasting period before slaughter. Shortening the fasting time before slaughter resulted in higher plasma glucose ( < 0.05) concentrations and a higher HDL-C:low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ratio ( < 0.05) whereas the LDL-C ( < 0.05) concentrations were reduced in the hepatic portal vein. The results of this experiment indicate that although the production

  1. Fast optical channel recovery in field demonstration of 100-Gbit/s Ethernet over OTN using real-time DSP.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Etsushi; Yamanaka, Shogo; Kisaka, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Tadao; Murata, Koichi; Yoshida, Eiji; Sakano, Toshikazu; Tomizawa, Masahito; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Shinji; Matsui, Junichiro; Shibayama, Atsufumi; Abe, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Yuichi; Noguchi, Hidemi; Fukuchi, Kiyoshi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Fukumitsu, Katsumi; Komaki, Kousuke; Takeuchi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Nakashima, Hisao; Mizuochi, Takashi; Kubo, Kazuo; Miyata, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Hirano, Susumu; Onohara, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-04

    A field trial of 100-Gbit/s Ethernet over an optical transport network (OTN) is conducted using a real-time digital coherent signal processor. Error free operation with the Q-margin of 3.2 dB is confirmed at a 100 Gbit/s Ethernet analyzer by concatenating a low-density parity-check code with a OTN framer forward error correction, after 80-ch WDM transmission through 6 spans x 70 km of dispersion shifted fiber without inline-dispersion compensation. Also, the recovery time of 12 msec is observed in an optical route switching experiment, which is achieved through fast chromatic dispersion estimation functionality.

  2. Meal timing during alternate day fasting: Impact on body weight and cardiovascular disease risk in obese adults.

    PubMed

    Hoddy, Kristin K; Kroeger, Cynthia M; Trepanowski, John F; Barnosky, Adrienne; Bhutani, Surabhi; Varady, Krista A

    2014-12-01

    Alternate day fasting (ADF; 24-h feeding/24-h 25% energy intake at lunchtime), is effective for weight loss, but diet tolerability is questionable. Moving the fast day meal to dinnertime, or dividing it into smaller meals, may improve tolerability. Accordingly, this study compared the effects of ADF with three meal times on body weight and heart disease risk. Obese subjects (n = 74) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups for 8 weeks: 1) ADF-L: lunch, 2) ADF-D: dinner, or 3) ADF-SM: small meals. Body weight decreased similarly (P < 0.001) in all groups (ADF-L: 3.5 ± 0.4 kg, ADF-D 4.1 ± 0.5 kg, ADF-SM 4.0 ± 0.5 kg). Reductions (P < 0.001) in fat mass and visceral fat were also comparable. Plasma lipids remained unchanged, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size increased (P < 0.05) in all groups (1.3 ± 0.5 Å). Systolic blood pressure decreased (P < 0.05) by ADF-SM only. Fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR remained unchanged. Thus, allowing individuals to consume the fast day meal at dinner or small meals produces similar weight loss and cardio-protection as consuming the meal at lunch. This flexibility in meal timing may increase tolerability and long-term adherence to ADF protocols. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  3. Effects of a combination of 3,4-methylenedioxymeth amphetamine and caffeine on real time stimulated dopamine release in the rat striatum: Studies using fast cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J J; O'Boyle, K M; Lowry, J P

    2017-08-24

    It is well documented that caffeine exacerbates the hyperthermia associated with acute exposure to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in rats. Previous reports have also indicated that MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release is exacerbated in the presence of caffeine. In the present study we have examined whether the effects of MDMA on real-time stimulated dopamine release, in the absence of uptake inhibition, are accentuated in the presence of caffeine. Isolated striatal slices from adult male Wistar rats were treated acutely with MDMA, caffeine, or a combination, and their effects on single and 5pulse stimulated dopamine release monitored using the technique of fast cyclic voltammetry. Caffeine at 10 or 100μM had no significant effect on single pulse stimulated dopamine release. However 100μM caffeine caused a significant peak increase in 5pulse stimulated dopamine release. Both 1 and 30μM MDMA gave rise to a significant increase in both single and 5-pulse dopamine release and reuptake. A combination of 100μM caffeine and 1 or 30μM MDMA did not significantly enhance the effects of MDMA on single or 5pulse dopamine release and reuptake when compared to that applied alone. Utilizing single action potential dependent dopamine release, these results do not demonstrate a caffeine-enhanced MDMA-induced dopamine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relativistic rise measurements with very fine sampling intervals: prospects for Isabelle

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.; Platner, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    In a recent (and ongoing) series of tests it has been shown that the sensitivity for charged particle identification via the relativistic rise in ionization loss can be significantly enhanced by using longitudinal drift and fast electronics to effect very small sampling intervals. With the chamber geometry illustrated, electrons from individual ionizing collisions drift sequentially onto the anode wire with a time structure determined by the drift velocity in the gas. After fast pulse shaping (the signal is shaped by a tail-cancelling pole-zero filter with 40 nanosecond shaping time), the resultant waveform is digitized with a fast-sampling ADC at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  5. Early stage time evolution of a dense nanosecond microdischarge used in fast optical switching applications

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-12-15

    The mechanism of high-voltage nanosecond microdischarges is studied by the self-consistent two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. These microdischarges were recently proposed for use as fast switches of visible light in Bataller et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 223501 (2014)]. The microdischarge is found to develop in two stages. The first stage is associated with the electrons initially seeded in the cathode-anode gap. These electrons lead to the formation of a cathode-directed streamer. The second stage starts when the secondary electron emission from the cathode begins. In this stage, a rather dense plasma (∼10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) is generated which results in the narrow cathode sheath. The electric field in this sheath exceeds the critical electric field which is necessary for the runaway electrons generation. We have found that the presence of these energetic electrons is crucial for the discharge maintenance.

  6. Time Trends in Fast Food Consumption and Its Association with Obesity among Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Youfa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Study the trends in Western fast food consumption (FFC) among Chinese school-age children and the association between FFC and obesity using nationwide survey data. Design Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted to study the trends in FFC and the associations between FFC and weight status (overweight, obesity and body mass index (BMI) z-score). Setting Longitudinal data from families were collected in the 2004 and 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (covering nine provinces throughout China). Subjects The analysis included 2656 Chinese children aged 6 to 18 years (1542 and 1114 children in the 2004 and 2009 survey, respectively). Results FFC (reported having consumed Western fast food in the past three months) has increased between 2004 and 2009, from 18.5% to 23.9% in those aged 6–18, and increased more rapidly among those aged 13–17, from 17.9% to 26.3%. The increase was significant in almost all groups by age, sex, family income, and residence. Our cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses did not detect a significant association between FFC and obesity/overweight or BMI z-score (e.g., for BMI z-score, boys: β = 0.02, 95% CI: -0.71, 0.75; girls: β = -0.14, 95% CI: -1.03, 0.75). Conclusions FFC has increased in Chinese school-age children, especially in older children, boys, and those from low- and medium-income families, rural areas, and East China, but decreased among those from high-income families during 2004–2009. The data did not show a significant association between FFC and obesity. PMID:26974536

  7. Time Trends in Fast Food Consumption and Its Association with Obesity among Children in China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong; Wu, Yang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Youfa

    2016-01-01

    Study the trends in Western fast food consumption (FFC) among Chinese school-age children and the association between FFC and obesity using nationwide survey data. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted to study the trends in FFC and the associations between FFC and weight status (overweight, obesity and body mass index (BMI) z-score). Longitudinal data from families were collected in the 2004 and 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (covering nine provinces throughout China). The analysis included 2656 Chinese children aged 6 to 18 years (1542 and 1114 children in the 2004 and 2009 survey, respectively). FFC (reported having consumed Western fast food in the past three months) has increased between 2004 and 2009, from 18.5% to 23.9% in those aged 6-18, and increased more rapidly among those aged 13-17, from 17.9% to 26.3%. The increase was significant in almost all groups by age, sex, family income, and residence. Our cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses did not detect a significant association between FFC and obesity/overweight or BMI z-score (e.g., for BMI z-score, boys: β = 0.02, 95% CI: -0.71, 0.75; girls: β = -0.14, 95% CI: -1.03, 0.75). FFC has increased in Chinese school-age children, especially in older children, boys, and those from low- and medium-income families, rural areas, and East China, but decreased among those from high-income families during 2004-2009. The data did not show a significant association between FFC and obesity.

  8. Contemporary sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Anny; Llovel, William

    2010-01-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing observations have become available. Here we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level observations from tide gauges over the twentieth century and from satellite altimetry since the early 1990s. We next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on timescales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion of the oceans, land ice mass loss, and land water-storage change. We show that for the 1993-2007 time span, the sum of climate-related contributions (2.85 +/- 0.35 mm year(-1)) is only slightly less than altimetry-based sea level rise (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm year(-1)): approximately 30% of the observed rate of rise is due to ocean thermal expansion and approximately 55% results from land ice melt. Recent acceleration in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets increases the latter contribution up to 80% for the past five years. We also review the main causes of regional variability in sea level trends: The dominant contribution results from nonuniform changes in ocean thermal expansion.

  9. Neural Code-Neural Self-information Theory on How Cell-Assembly Code Rises from Spike Time and Neuronal Variability.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-01-01

    A major stumbling block to cracking the real-time neural code is neuronal variability - neurons discharge spikes with enormous variability not only across trials within the same experiments but also in resting states. Such variability is widely regarded as a noise which is often deliberately averaged out during data analyses. In contrast to such a dogma, we put forth the Neural Self-Information Theory that neural coding is operated based on the self-information principle under which variability in the time durations of inter-spike-intervals (ISI), or neuronal silence durations, is self-tagged with discrete information. As the self-information processor, each ISI carries a certain amount of information based on its variability-probability distribution; higher-probability ISIs which reflect the balanced excitation-inhibition ground state convey minimal information, whereas lower-probability ISIs which signify rare-occurrence surprisals in the form of extremely transient or prolonged silence carry most information. These variable silence durations are naturally coupled with intracellular biochemical cascades, energy equilibrium and dynamic regulation of protein and gene expression levels. As such, this silence variability-based self-information code is completely intrinsic to the neurons themselves, with no need for outside observers to set any reference point as typically used in the rate code, population code and temporal code models. Moreover, temporally coordinated ISI surprisals across cell population can inherently give rise to robust real-time cell-assembly codes which can be readily sensed by the downstream neural clique assemblies. One immediate utility of this self-information code is a general decoding strategy to uncover a variety of cell-assembly patterns underlying external and internal categorical or continuous variables in an unbiased manner.

  10. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Analysis of short subdiffusive time series: scatter of the time-averaged mean-squared displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-06-01

    We analyse the statistical behaviour of short time series in systems performing subdiffusion. Comparing the non-ergodic continuous time random walk model to the ergodic fractional Brownian motion, we demonstrate that the scatter between individual trajectories is not purely dominated by finite sample size effects but preserves some of the characteristics of the individual processes. In particular we show that the distribution of the time-averaged mean-squared displacements allows one to clearly distinguish between the two stochastic mechanisms even for a very short time series.

  11. Optimal battery charging, Part I: Minimizing time-to-charge, energy loss, and temperature rise for OCV-resistance battery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, A.; Han, X.; Avvari, G. V.; Raghunathan, N.; Balasingam, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a closed-form solution to the problem of optimally charging a Li-ion battery. A combination of three cost functions is considered as the objective function: time-to-charge (TTC), energy losses (EL), and a temperature rise index (TRI). First, we consider the cost function of the optimization problem as a weighted sum of TTC and EL. We show that the optimal charging strategy in this case is the well-known Constant Current-Constant Voltage (CC-CV) policy with the value of the current in the CC stage being a function of the ratio of weighting on TTC and EL and of the resistance of the battery. Then, we extend the cost function to a weighted sum of TTC, EL and TRI and derive an analytical solution for the problem. It is shown that the analytical solution can be approximated by a CC-CV with the value of current in the CC stage being a function of ratio of weighting on TTC and EL, resistance of the battery and the effective thermal resistance.

  12. Modulated single-bubble sonoluminescence: Dependence of phase of flashes, their intensity and rise/decay times on viscosity, the modulation strength, and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Djurkovic, Borko

    2004-05-01

    The single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) signal was studied for the case of driving frequency modulated by lower frequency with an offset. In our work, the driving frequency of 28 kHz and the modulation frequencies of 25-1000 Hz were used. The modulation strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as the difference of highest and lowest pressures over modulation period. The measurements were performed for water-glycerol mixtures of various viscosities. The measured SBSL signal appeared as a train of flashes for modulation frequencies below 250 Hz, and as a continuous modulated signal for higher frequencies. At the same frequency, the flashes covered similar phase intervals for different modulation strengths and, accordingly, pressure ranges. At higher glycerol concentrations (up to 24%) both the intensity and the stability of flashes increased, due to damped shape instabilities and reduced dancing; however, the phase interval of flashes remained about the same. Such phase-locked behavior can be explained by translational movements of the bubble due to modulated Bjerknes force and changes in the symmetry of the bubble collapse. The changes in intensities and rise/decay times can serve as a measure of the gas exchange between the bubble and its surroundings during silent and luminescent intervals.

  13. Sonic-boom measurements in the focus region during the ascent of Apollo 17. [maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bow-shock rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sonic-boom pressure signatures recorded during the ascent phase of Apollo 17 are presented. The measurements were obtained onboard six U.S. Navy ships positioned along the ground track of the spacecraft vehicle in the area of expected focus resulting from the flight path and acceleration of the vehicle. Tracings of the measured signatures are presented along with values of the maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bowshock rise time. Also included are brief descriptions of the ships and their location, the deployment of the sonic-boom instrumentation, flight profiles and operating conditions for the launch vehicle and spacecraft, surface-weather and sea-state information at the measuring sites, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas. Comparisons of the measured and predicted sonic-boom overpressures for the Apollo 17 mission are presented. The measured data are also compared with data from the Apollo 15 and 16 missions and data from flight test programs of various aircraft.

  14. Prior exercise reduces fast-start duration and end-spurt magnitude during cycling time-trial.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, A E; Correia-Oliveira, C R; Tenorio, L; Melo, A A; Bertuzzi, R; Bishop, D

    2013-08-01

    We examined the pacing strategy and the magnitude of the end spurt during a 200-kJ cycling time trial performed 12-14 h after an exercise protocol designed to reduce muscle glycogen content. 9 physically-active men performed 5 familiarization sessions and 2 experimental 200-kJ time trials in either a control condition (CON) or after an exercise protocol performed the previous evening that was designed to induce muscle glycogen depletion (EP). Mean total time was faster and power output was higher in the CON than in the EP (P<0.01). A fast-start was maintained until the 50-kJ section in CON, but only the 25-kJ section for EP (P<0.05). The power outputs during the 50-, 150- and 200-kJ sections, and the magnitude of the end-spurt, were significantly higher for the CON than for the EP condition (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the rating of perceived exertion (overall feeling and feeling in legs) between conditions. In conclusion, a protocol designed to decrease muscle glycogen stores reduced the duration of the fast-start and the magnitude of the end spurt during a 200-kJ cycling time trial, impairing the overall performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Interlaboratory Validation for a Real-Time PCR Salmonella Detection Method Using the ABI 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR System.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Doran, Tara; Lin, Wen; Chen, Kai-Shun; Williams-Hill, Donna; Pamboukian, Ruiqing

    2015-06-01

    Sixteen FERN (Food Emergency Response Network) member laboratories collaborated in this study to verify extension of the real-time PCR Salmonella detection method originally designed for the single-tube Cepheid SmartCycler II and validated against the Salmonella method of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual to the Applied Biosystems (ABI) 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR system multiwell plate platform. Four foods were selected for this study: chili powder, soft cheese, fish, and tomatoes; these foods represent products that are commonly analyzed for the presence of Salmonella for regulatory purposes. Each food consisted of six uninoculated control samples, six samples inoculated with low Salmonella levels (target 1 to 5 CFU/25 g), and six samples inoculated with high levels (target 10 to 50 CFU/25 g). All samples were tested for Salmonella using the 24-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for detecting Salmonella, which utilizes modified buffered peptone water as the sole enrichment medium and an internal control for the qPCR. Each of these 18 samples was individually analyzed for Salmonella by the collaborating laboratories using both the ABI 7500 FAST system (alternative method) and the SmartCycler II system (reference method). Statistical analysis of the data revealed no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between these two qPCR platforms except for the chili powder samples. The differences noted with chili powder (P = 0.0455) were attributed to the enhanced sensitivity of the ABI 7500 FAST system compared with the SmartCycler II system. The detection limit of both qPCR methods was 0.02 to 0.15 CFU/g. These results provide a solid basis for extending the 24-h qPCR Salmonella method to the ABI 7500 FAST system for high-throughput detection of Salmonella in foods.

  16. Fast X-Ray Timing: A Window into the Strong-Field Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical time-scales in the vicinity of neutron star surfaces and black hole horizons are in the millisecond range. Over the past decade, timing signatures on such scales, either quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and/or coherent pulsations, have been discovered and studied from both neutron stars and black holes with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Although theoretical interpretations are still hotly debated, these timing properties almost certainly reflect the dynamics of matter in regions dominated by relativistic gravity. I will survey our current understanding of these timing properties, with a focus on how they might he used as probes of fundamental physics.

  17. Fast-start strategy increases the time spent above 95 %VO2max during severe-intensity intermittent running exercise.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; de Oliveira Cruz, Rogério Santos; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to use the intermittent critical velocity (ICV) model to individualize intermittent exercise and analyze whether a fast-start strategy could increase the time spent at or above 95 %VO(2max) (t95VO(2max)) during intermittent exercise. After an incremental test, seven active male subjects performed three intermittent exercise tests until exhaustion at 100, 110, and 120 % of the maximal aerobic velocity to determine ICV. On three occasions, the subjects performed an intermittent exercise test until exhaustion at 105 % (IE105) and 125 % (IE125) of ICV, and at a speed that was initially set at 125 %ICV but which then decreased to 105 %ICV (IE125-105). The intermittent exercise consisted of repeated 30-s runs alternated with 15-s passive rest intervals. There was no difference between the predicted and actual Tlim for IE125 (300 ± 72 s and 284 ± 76 s) and IE105 (1,438 ± 423 s and 1,439 ± 518 s), but for IE125-105 the predicted Tlim underestimated the actual Tlim (888 ± 211 s and 1,051 ± 153 s, respectively). The t95VO(2max) during IE125-105 (289 ± 150 s) was significantly higher than IE125 (113 ± 40 s) and IE105 (106 ± 71 s), but no significant differences were found between IE125 and IE105. It can be concluded that predicting Tlim from the ICV model was affected by the fast-start protocol during intermittent exercise. Furthermore, fast-start protocol was able to increase the time spent at or above 95 %VO2max during intermittent exercise above ICV despite a longer total exercise time at IE105.

  18. Parvalbumin tunes spike-timing and efferent short-term plasticity in striatal fast spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Orduz, David; Bischop, Don Patrick; Schwaller, Beat; Schiffmann, Serge N; Gall, David

    2013-07-01

      Striatal fast spiking interneurons (FSIs) modulate output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). Recent studies have broadened our understanding of FSIs, showing that they are implicated in severe motor disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia and Tourette syndrome. FSIs are the only striatal neurons to express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). This selective expression of PV raises questions about the functional role of this Ca(2+) buffer in controlling FSI Ca(2+) dynamics and, consequently, FSI spiking mode and neurotransmission. To study the functional involvement of FSIs in striatal microcircuit activity and the role of PV in FSI function, we performed perforated patch recordings on enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing FSIs in brain slices from control and PV-/- mice. Our results revealed that PV-/- FSIs fired more regularly and were more excitable than control FSIs by a mechanism in which Ca(2+) buffering is linked to spiking activity as a result of the activation of small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. A modelling approach of striatal FSIs supports our experimental results. Furthermore, PV deletion modified frequency-specific short-term plasticity at inhibitory FSI to MSN synapses. Our results therefore reinforce the hypothesis that in FSIs, PV is crucial for fine-tuning of the temporal responses of the FSI network and for the orchestration of MSN populations. This, in turn, may play a direct role in the generation and pathology-related worsening of motor rhythms.

  19. Time-domain analysis for extracting fast-paced pupil responses

    PubMed Central

    Zénon, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The eye pupil reacts to cognitive processes, but its analysis is challenging when luminance varies or when stimulation is fast-paced. Current approaches relying on deconvolution techniques do not account for the strong low-frequency spontaneous changes in pupil size or the large interindividual variability in the shape of the responses. Here a system identification framework is proposed in which the pupil responses to different parameters are extracted by means of an autoregressive model with exogenous inputs. In an example application of this technique, pupil size was shown to respond to the luminance and arousal scores of affective pictures presented in rapid succession. This result was significant in each subject (N = 5), but the pupil response varied between individuals both in amplitude and latency, highlighting the need for determining impulse responses subjectwise. The same method was also used to account for pupil size variations caused by respiration, illustrating the possibility to model the relation between pupil size and other continuous signals. In conclusion, this new framework for the analysis of pupil size data allows us to dissociate the response of the eye pupil from intermingled sources of influence and can be used to study the relation between pupil size and other physiological signals. PMID:28134323

  20. Real-time 2D floating-point fast Fourier transforms for seeker simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Richard; Lord, Eric; Shand, David J.

    2002-07-01

    The floating point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is one of the most useful basic functions available to the image and signal processing engineer allowing many complex and detailed special functions to be implemented more simply in the frequency domain. In the Hardware-in-the-Loop field an image transformed using FFT would allow the designer to think about accurate frequency based simulation of seeker lens effects, motion blur, detector transfer functions and much more. Unfortunately, the transform requires many hundreds of thousands or millions of floating point operations on a single modest sized image making it impractical for realtime Hardware-in-the-Loop systems. .until now. This paper outlines the development, by Nallatech, of an FPGA based IEEE floating point core. It traces the subsequent use of this core to develop a full 256 X 256 FFT and filter process implemented on COTS hardware at frame rates up to 150Hz. This transform can be demonstrated to model optical transfer functions at a far greater accuracy than the current spatial models. Other applications and extensions of this technique will be discussed such as filtering for image tracking algorithms and in the simulation of radar processing in the frequency domain.

  1. Development of fast wave systems tolerant of time-varying loading

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.A.

    1996-06-01

    A new approach to fast wave antenna array design based on the traveling wave antenna has been successfully demonstrated on the JFT-2M tokamak. A traveling wave antenna is powered though a single feed and the power flow from element to element is only via mutual reactive coupling. A combine is a particular type of traveling wave antenna, in which only the fed element and the element at the downstream end of the array are connected to vacuum feed troughs, while the intermediate elements are terminated with reactances inside the vacuum chamber. A twelve element combine for operation at 200 MHz was designed and fabricated at General Atomics, and installed and operated on the JFT-2M tokamak. The full output power of a single transmitter, 0.2 MW, was coupled to tokamak discharges with very little conditioning required. The input impedance of the combine was well matched to the transmission line impedance for all loading conditions, including vacuum (no plasma), Taylor discharge cleaning plasmas, and ohmic, L- and H-mode tokamak discharges with neutral beam heating without any adjustment of tuning elements.

  2. Parvalbumin tunes spike-timing and efferent short-term plasticity in striatal fast spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Orduz, David; Bischop, Don Patrick; Schwaller, Beat; Schiffmann, Serge N; Gall, David

    2013-01-01

    Striatal fast spiking interneurons (FSIs) modulate output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). Recent studies have broadened our understanding of FSIs, showing that they are implicated in severe motor disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia and Tourette syndrome. FSIs are the only striatal neurons to express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). This selective expression of PV raises questions about the functional role of this Ca2+ buffer in controlling FSI Ca2+ dynamics and, consequently, FSI spiking mode and neurotransmission. To study the functional involvement of FSIs in striatal microcircuit activity and the role of PV in FSI function, we performed perforated patch recordings on enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing FSIs in brain slices from control and PV−/− mice. Our results revealed that PV−/− FSIs fired more regularly and were more excitable than control FSIs by a mechanism in which Ca2+ buffering is linked to spiking activity as a result of the activation of small conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channels. A modelling approach of striatal FSIs supports our experimental results. Furthermore, PV deletion modified frequency-specific short-term plasticity at inhibitory FSI to MSN synapses. Our results therefore reinforce the hypothesis that in FSIs, PV is crucial for fine-tuning of the temporal responses of the FSI network and for the orchestration of MSN populations. This, in turn, may play a direct role in the generation and pathology-related worsening of motor rhythms. PMID:23551945

  3. Fast calculations of the gradient and the Hessian in the time-domain global electromagnetic induction inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, M. A.; Velímský, J.

    2017-07-01

    The deterministic approach to the inverse problem of the time-domain electromagnetic induction in a spherical Earth requires the calculation of the first derivative of a misfit function in every step of the minimization process. In addition, an a-posteriori error analysis can benefit from the knowledge of the Hessian, the matrix of the second derivatives. We present the derivation of the formulas for the fast calculation of the misfit gradient, the Hessian, and the Hessian-vector product, based on the solution of an adjoint problem. We validate our results on a synthetic model against a slow finite-difference scheme.

  4. Real time adenosine fluctuations detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the rat striatum and motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Almonte, Antoine G; Blagovechtchenski, Evgeny; Grinevich, Valentina P; Weiner, Jeff L; Bonin, Keith D; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2015-12-30

    Adenosine serves many functions within the CNS, including inhibitory and excitatory control of neurotransmission. The understanding of adenosine dynamics in the brain is of fundamental importance. The goal of the present study was to explore subsecond adenosine fluctuations in the rat brain in vivo. Long Evans rats were anesthetized and a carbon fiber electrode was positioned in the motor cortex or dorsal striatum. Real time electrochemical recordings were made at the carbon fiber electrodes every 100ms by applying a triangular waveform (-0.4 to +1.5V, 400V/s). Adenosine spikes were identified by the background-subtracted cyclic voltammogram. The frequency of detected adenosine spikes was relatively stable in both tested regions, and the time intervals between spikes were regular and lasted from 1 to 5s within an animal. Spike frequency ranged from 0.5 to 1.5Hz in both the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum. Average spike amplitudes were 85±11 and 66±7nM for the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum, respectively. The current study established that adenosine signaling can operate on a fast time scale (within seconds) to modulate brain functions. This finding suggests that spontaneous adenosine release may play a fast, dynamic role in regulating an organism's response to external events. Therefore, adenosine transmission in the brain may have characteristics similar to those of classical neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fast x-ray detector system with simultaneous measurement of timing and energy for a single photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Okubo, S.; Hara, H.; Hiraki, T.; Kitao, S.; Miyamoto, Y.; Okai, K.; Ozaki, R.; Sasao, N.; Seto, M.; Uetake, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yoda, Y.; Yoshimi, A.; Yoshimura, K.

    2017-06-01

    We developed a fast X-ray detector system for nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) experiments. Our system employs silicon avalanche photo-diode (Si-APD) as a fast X-ray sensor. The system is able to acquire both timing and energy of a single X-ray photon simultaneously in a high rate condition, 106 counts per second for one Si-APD. The performance of the system was investigated in SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. Good time resolution of 120 ps (FWHM) was achieved with a slight tail distribution in the time spectrum by a level of 10-9 at 1 ns apart from the peak. Using this system, we successfully observed the NRS from the 26.27-keV level of mercury-201, which has a half-life of 630(50) ps. We also demonstrated the reduction of background events caused by radioactive decays in a radioactive sample by discriminating photon energy.

  6. Real time adenosine fluctuations detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the rat striatum and motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B.; Almonte, Antoine G.; Blagovechtchenski, Evgeny; Grinevich, Valentina P.; Weiner, Jeff L.; Bonin, Keith D.; Budygin, Evgeny A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenosine serves many functions within the CNS, including inhibitory and excitatory control of neurotransmission. The understanding of adenosine dynamics in the brain is of fundamental importance. The goal of the present study was to explore subsecond adenosine fluctuations in the rat brain in vivo. Method Long Evans rats were anesthetized and a carbon fiber electrode was positioned in the motor cortex or dorsal striatum. Real time electrochemical recordings were made at the carbon fiber electrodes every 100 ms by applying a triangular waveform (−0.4 to +1.5 V, 400 V/s). Adenosine spikes were identified by the background-subtracted cyclic voltammogram. Results The frequency of detected adenosine spikes was relatively stable in both tested regions, and the time intervals between spikes were regular and lasted from 1 to 5 seconds within an animal. Spike frequency ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz in both the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum. Average spike amplitudes were 85 ± 11 and 66 ± 7 nM for the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum, respectively. Comparison with Existing Methods The current study established that adenosine signaling can operate on a fast time scale (within seconds) to modulate brain functions. Conclusions This finding suggests that spontaneous adenosine release may play a fast, dynamic role in regulating an organism’s response to external events. Therefore, adenosine transmission in the brain may have characteristics similar to those of classical neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine PMID:26310181

  7. Modeling Fast Electron Dynamics with Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Application to Small Molecules and Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Kenneth; Govind, Niranjan

    2011-05-10

    The response of matter to external fields forms the basis for a vast wealth of fundamental physical processes ranging from light harvesting to nanoscale electron transport. Accurately modeling ultrafast electron dynamics in excited systems thus offers unparalleled insight but requires an inherently nonlinear time-resolved approach. To this end, an efficient and massively parallel real-time real-space time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) implementation in NWChem is presented. The implementation is first validated against linear-response TDDFT and experimental results for a series of molecules subjected to small electric field perturbations. Second, nonlinear excitation of green fluorescent protein is studied, which shows a blue-shift in the spectrum with increasing perturbation, as well as a saturation in absorption. Next, the charge dynamics of optically excited zinc porphyrin is presented in real time and real space, with relevance to charge injection in photovoltaic devices. Finally, intermolecular excitation in an adenine-thymine base pair is studied using the BNL range separated functional [ Baer , R. ; Neuhauser , D. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005 , 94 , 043002 ], demonstrating the utility of a real-time approach in capturing charge transfer processes.

  8. Modeling fast electron dynamics with real-time time-dependent density functional theory: application to small molecules and chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2011-05-10

    The response of matter to external fields forms the basis for a vast wealth of fundamental physical processes ranging from light harvesting to nanoscale electron transport. Accurately modeling ultrafast electron dynamics in excited systems thus o_ers unparalleled insight, but requires an inherently non-linear time-resolved approach. To this end, an e_cient and massively parallel real-time real-space time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) implementation in NWChem is presented. The implementation is first validated against linearresponse TDDFT and experimental results for a series of molecules subjected to small electric field perturbations. Second, non-linear excitation of green fluorescent protein is studied, which shows a blue-shift in the spectrum with increasing perturbation, as well as a saturation in absorption. Next, the charge dynamics of optically excited zinc porphyrin is presented in real-time and real-space, with relevance to charge injection in photovoltaic devices. Finally, intermolecular excitation in an adenine-thymine base pair is studied using the BNL range separated functional [Baer, R.; Neuhauser, D. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005, 94, 043002], demonstrating the utility of a real-time approach in capturing charge transfer processes.

  9. Study of bi-alkali photocathode growth on glass by X-ray techniques for fast timing response photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junqi; Demarteau, Marcel; Wagner, Robert; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Liang, Xue; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Attenkofer, Klaus; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Wong, Jared; Padmore, Howard; Woll, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode is an essential component in fast timing response photomultipliers. Real-time in-situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and post-growth x-ray reflectivity measurement were performed to study the photocathode deposition process on glass substrate. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction patterns show the formation of Sb crystalline, dissolution of crystalline phase Sb by the application of K vapor and reformation of refined crystal textures. XRR result exhibits that the film thickness increases ~ 4.5 times after K diffusion and almost have no change after Cs diffusion. Further investigation is expected to understand the photocathode growth process and provide guidelines for photocathode development.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Prototype 6 cm x 6 cm Microchannel Plate Photodetector with Bialkali Photocathode for Fast Timing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Junqi; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Gregar, Joseph; May, Edward; Virgo, Mathew; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Wang, Jingbo; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Huyue

    2015-06-01

    Planar microchannel plate-based photodetector with bialkali photocathode is capable of fast and accurate time and position resolutions. A new 6 cm x 6 cm photodetector production facility was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. Small form-factor MCP-based photodetectors completely constructed of glass were designed and prototypes were successfully fabricated. Knudsen effusion cells were incorporated in the photocathode growth chamber to achieve uniform and high quantum efficiency hotocathodes. The thin film uniformity distribution was simulated and measured for an antimony film deposition, showing uniformity of better than 10%. Several prototype devices with bialkali photocathodes have been fabricated with the described system and their characteristics were evaluated in the large signal (multi-PE) limit. A typical prototype device exhibits time-of-flight resolution of ~ 27 psec and differential time resolution of ~ 9 psec, corresponding to spatial resolution of ~ 0.65 mm.

  11. Fast two-dimensional position-sensitive detection of neutrons in a time-of-flight reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; de Blois, J.

    2002-04-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive neutron detector with a maximum count rate of 500 kHz is described. The high counting rate is obtained by making use of dedicated electronics for data handling. The electronics convert the wire charges of a position-sensitive photomultiplier into a position using internal look-up tables. Timing modules are presented for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) determination and for dynamic measurements with an independent time-base. The position and TOF information are stored by a fast Data Handling Module. The detector is calibrated with a grid of 256×256 channels, using channel widths of 0.25 mm.The maximum error in position determination is 0.25 mm.This error is reduced to less than 0.05 mm when the electronics are used one dimensionally instead of two dimensionally. The total detector resolution was determined to be 0.6 mm.

  12. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  13. Fast Numerical Evaluation of Time-Derivative Nonadiabatic Couplings for Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods.

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Nagesh, Jayashree; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-11-05

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme that eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative nonadiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was the bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  14. A fast algorithm for the estimation of statistical error in DNS (or experimental) time averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Serena; Luchini, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Time- and space-averaging of the instantaneous results of DNS (or experimental measurements) represent a standard final step, necessary for the estimation of their means or correlations or other statistical properties. These averages are necessarily performed over a finite time and space window, and are therefore more correctly just estimates of the 'true' statistical averages. The choice of the appropriate window size is most often subjectively based on individual experience, but as subtler statistics enter the focus of investigation, an objective criterion becomes desirable. Here a modification of the classical estimator of averaging error of finite time series, i.e. 'batch means' algorithm, will be presented, which retains its speed while removing its biasing error. As a side benefit, an automatic determination of batch size is also included. Examples will be given involving both an artificial time series of known statistics and an actual DNS of turbulence.

  15. Prediction of oral disintegration time of fast disintegrating tablets using texture analyzer and computational optimization.

    PubMed

    Szakonyi, G; Zelkó, R

    2013-05-20

    One of the promising approaches to predict in vivo disintegration time of orally disintegrating tablets (ODT) is the use of texture analyzer instrument. Once the method is able to provide good in vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC) in the case of different tablets, it might be able to predict the oral disintegration time of similar products. However, there are many tablet parameters that influence the in vivo and the in vitro disintegration time of ODT products. Therefore, the measured in vitro and in vivo disintegration times can occasionally differ, even if they coincide in most cases of the investigated products and the in vivo disintegration times may also change if the aimed patient group is suffering from a special illness. If the method is no longer able to provide good IVIVC, then the modification of a single instrumental parameter may not be successful and the in vitro method must be re-set in a complex manner in order to provide satisfactory results. In the present experiment, an optimization process was developed based on texture analysis measurements using five different tablets in order to predict their in vivo disintegration times, and the optimized texture analysis method was evaluated using independent tablets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2015-01-15

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a “fast” electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a “fast” mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas.

  17. Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions.

  18. Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, R.J.

    1989-04-04

    An apparatus is described for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions. 8 figs.

  19. Method of signal detection from silicon photomultipliers using fully differential Charge to Time Converter and fast shaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszczyk, M.; Dorosz, P.; Glab, S.; Kucewicz, W.; Mik, L.; Sapor, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents an implementation of fully differential readout method for Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). Front-end electronics consists of a fast and slow path. The former creates the trigger signal while the latter produces a pulse of width proportional to the input charge. The fast shaper generates unipolar pulse and utilizes the pole-zero cancelation circuit. The peaking time for single photoelectron is equal to 3.6 ns and the FWHM is 3.8 ns. The pulse width of the Charge to Time Converter (QTC) depends on the number of photons entering the SiPM at the moment of measurement. The QTC response is nonlinear but it allows us to work with signals in a wide dynamic range. The proposed readout method is effective in measurements of random signals where frequent events tend to pile-up. Thermal generation and afterpulses have a strong influence on the width of pulses from QTC. The proposed method enables us to distinguish those overlapping signals and get the reliable information on the number of detected photons.

  20. Fast mapping of the T2 relaxation time of cerebral metabolites using proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Ko, Cheng-Wen; Otazo, Ricardo; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2007-05-01

    Metabolite T2 is necessary for accurate quantification of the absolute concentration of metabolites using long-echo-time (TE) acquisition schemes. However, lengthy data acquisition times pose a major challenge to mapping metabolite T2. In this study we used proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T to obtain fast T2 maps of three major cerebral metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre), and choline (Cho). We showed that PEPSI spectra matched T2 values obtained using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS). Data acquisition for 2D metabolite maps with a voxel volume of 0.95 ml (32 x 32 image matrix) can be completed in 25 min using five TEs and eight averages. A sufficient spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for T2 estimation was validated by high Pearson's correlation coefficients between logarithmic MR signals and TEs (R2 = 0.98, 0.97, and 0.95 for NAA, Cre, and Cho, respectively). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the T2 values of NAA, but not Cre and Cho, were significantly different between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM; P < 0.001). The difference between the T2 estimates of the PEPSI and SVS scans was less than 9%. Consistent spatial distributions of T2 were found in six healthy subjects, and disagreement among subjects was less than 10%. In summary, the PEPSI technique is a robust method to obtain fast mapping of metabolite T2.

  1. Clinical applicability of real-time, prehospital image transmission for FAST (Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma).

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Hong, Ki Jeong; Cheon, Kyoung Woo; Shin, Ilhyoung; Song, Sung-Wook; Kim, Hee Chan

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated a real-time, prehospital ultrasound image transmission system for use in focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST). The wireless, real-time ultrasound image transmission system comprised an ultrasound scanner with a convex abdominal transducer and a notebook computer connected to a 3 G wireless network for video data transmission. In our simulation experiment, ultrasonography was performed by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) on a human body phantom with simulated haemoperitoneum. Transmitted ultrasound video clips were randomly rearranged and presented to emergency physicians to make a diagnosis of haemoperitoneum. A total of 21 ultrasound video clips was used and 13 emergency physicians participated in the study. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 83.5-94.6) and 85.3% (95% CI 78.4-90.7) respectively, and the accuracy of detecting abnormal ultrasound results was 87.7% (95% CI 83.8-91.6). Diagnosis of hemoperitonuem in trauma patients by an emergency physician based on the transmitted video images of FAST performed by an EMT is feasible, and has an accuracy of about 88%.

  2. CauseMap: fast inference of causality from complex time series.

    PubMed

    Maher, M Cyrus; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Background. Establishing health-related causal relationships is a central pursuit in biomedical research. Yet, the interdependent non-linearity of biological systems renders causal dynamics laborious and at times impractical to disentangle. This pursuit is further impeded by the dearth of time series that are sufficiently long to observe and understand recurrent patterns of flux. However, as data generation costs plummet and technologies like wearable devices democratize data collection, we anticipate a coming surge in the availability of biomedically-relevant time series data. Given the life-saving potential of these burgeoning resources, it is critical to invest in the development of open source software tools that are capable of drawing meaningful insight from vast amounts of time series data. Results. Here we present CauseMap, the first open source implementation of convergent cross mapping (CCM), a method for establishing causality from long time series data (≳25 observations). Compared to existing time series methods, CCM has the advantage of being model-free and robust to unmeasured confounding that could otherwise induce spurious associations. CCM builds on Takens' Theorem, a well-established result from dynamical systems theory that requires only mild assumptions. This theorem allows us to reconstruct high dimensional system dynamics using a time series of only a single variable. These reconstructions can be thought of as shadows of the true causal system. If reconstructed shadows can predict points from opposing time series, we can infer that the corresponding variables are providing views of the same causal system, and so are causally related. Unlike traditional metrics, this test can establish the directionality of causation, even in the presence of feedback loops. Furthermore, since CCM can extract causal relationships from times series of, e.g., a single individual, it may be a valuable tool to personalized medicine. We implement CCM in Julia, a

  3. Real-Time linux dynamic clamp: a fast and flexible way to construct virtual ion channels in living cells.

    PubMed

    Dorval, A D; Christini, D J; White, J A

    2001-10-01

    We describe a system for real-time control of biological and other experiments. This device, based around the Real-Time Linux operating system, was tested specifically in the context of dynamic clamping, a demanding real-time task in which a computational system mimics the effects of nonlinear membrane conductances in living cells. The system is fast enough to represent dozens of nonlinear conductances in real time at clock rates well above 10 kHz. Conductances can be represented in deterministic form, or more accurately as discrete collections of stochastically gating ion channels. Tests were performed using a variety of complex models of nonlinear membrane mechanisms in excitable cells, including simulations of spatially extended excitable structures, and multiple interacting cells. Only in extreme cases does the computational load interfere with high-speed "hard" real-time processing (i.e., real-time processing that never falters). Freely available on the worldwide web, this experimental control system combines good performance. immense flexibility, low cost, and reasonable ease of use. It is easily adapted to any task involving real-time control, and excels in particular for applications requiring complex control algorithms that must operate at speeds over 1 kHz.

  4. Determinants of children's use of and time spent in fast-food and full-service restaurants.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Alex; Kubena, Karen S; Tolle, Glen; Dean, Wesley; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jan, Jie-Sheng; Anding, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Identify parental and children's determinants of children's use of and time spent in fast-food (FF) and full-service (FS) restaurants. Analysis of cross-sectional data. Parents were interviewed by phone; children were interviewed in their homes. Parents and children ages 9-11 or 13-15 from 312 families were obtained via random-digit dialing. Dependent variables were the use of and the time spent in FF and FS restaurants by children. Determinants included parental work schedules, parenting style, and family meal ritual perceptions. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis of use of restaurants. Least squares regression was used for multivariate analysis of time spent in restaurants. Significance set at P < .05. Factors related to use of and time spent in FF and FS restaurants included parental work schedules, fathers' use of such restaurants, and children's time spent in the family automobile. Parenting style, parental work, parental eating habits and perceptions of family meals, and children's other uses of their time influence children's use of and time spent in FF and FS restaurants. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A modified infrared spectrometer with high time resolution and its application for investigating fast conformational changes of the GTPase Ras.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of proteins and protein interactions. The investigation of many biological processes is possible by means of caged compounds, which set free biologically active substances upon light activation. Some caged compounds could provide sub-nanosecond time resolution, e.g., para-hydroxyphenacyl-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) forms GTP in picoseconds. However, the time resolution in single shot experiments with rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers is limited to about 10 ms. Here we use an infrared diode laser instead of the conventional globar and achieve a time resolution of 100 ns. This allows for the time-resolved measurement of the fast Ras(off) to Ras(on) conformational change at room temperature. We quantified the activation parameters for this reaction and found that the free energy of activation for this reaction is mainly enthalpic. Investigation of the same reaction in the presence of the Ras binding domain of the effector Raf (RafRBD) reveals a four orders of magnitude faster reaction, indicating that Ras·RafRBD complex formation directly induces the conformational change. Recent developments of broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers will further improve time resolution and usability of the setup. The reported 100 ns time resolution is the best achieved for a non-repetitive experiment so far.

  6. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  7. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  8. A fast and Robust Algorithm for general inequality/equality constrained minimum time problems

    SciTech Connect

    Briessen, B.; Sadegh, N.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for solving general inequality/equality constrained minimum time problems. The algorithm`s solution time is linear in the number of Runge-Kutta steps and the number of parameters used to discretize the control input history. The method is being applied to a three link redundant robotic arm with torque bounds, joint angle bounds, and a specified tip path. It solves case after case within a graphical user interface in which the user chooses the initial joint angles and the tip path with a mouse. Solve times are from 30 to 120 seconds on a Hewlett Packard workstation. A zero torque history is always used in the initial guess, and the algorithm has never crashed, indicating its robustness. The algorithm solves for a feasible solution for large trajectory execution time t{sub f} and then reduces t{sub f} and then reduces t{sub f} by a small amount and re-solves. The fixed time re- solve uses a new method of finding a near-minimum-2-norm solution to a set of linear equations and inequalities that achieves quadratic convegence to a feasible solution of the full nonlinear problem.

  9. A New Characteristic Function for Fast Time-Reverse Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael; Jaya, Makky; Muksin, Muksin

    2015-04-01

    Microseismicity produced by natural activities is usually characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and huge amount of data as recording is conducted for a long period of time. Locating microseismic events is preferably carried out using migration-based methods such as time-reverse modeling (TRM). The original TRM is based on backpropagating the wavefield from the receiver down to the source location. Alternatively, we are using a characteristic function (CF) derived from the measured wavefield as input for the TRM. The motivation for such a strategy is to avoid undesired contributions from secondary arrivals which may generate artifacts in the final images. In this presentation, we introduce a new CF as input for TRM method. To obtain this CF, initially we apply kurtosis-based automatic onset detection and convolution with a given wavelet. The convolution with low frequency wavelets allows us to conduct time-reverse modeling using coarser sampling hence it will reduce computing time. We apply the method to locate seismic events measured along an active part of the Sumatra Fault around the Tarutung pull-apart basin (North Sumatra, Indonesia). The results show that seismic events are well-determined since they are concentrated along the Sumatran fault. Internal details of the Tarutung basin structure could be derived. Our results are consistent with those obtained from inversion of manually picked travel time data.

  10. Measuring fast gene dynamics in single cells with time-lapse luminescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mazo-Vargas, Anyimilehidi; Park, Heungwon; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for measuring in vivo gene dynamics in single cells. However, fluorescent proteins are limited by slow chromophore maturation times and the cellular autofluorescence or phototoxicity that arises from light excitation. An alternative is luciferase, an enzyme that emits photons and is active upon folding. The photon flux per luciferase is significantly lower than that for fluorescent proteins. Thus time-lapse luminescence microscopy has been successfully used to track gene dynamics only in larger organisms and for slower processes, for which more total photons can be collected in one exposure. Here we tested green, yellow, and red beetle luciferases and optimized substrate conditions for in vivo luminescence. By combining time-lapse luminescence microscopy with a microfluidic device, we tracked the dynamics of cell cycle genes in single yeast with subminute exposure times over many generations. Our method was faster and in cells with much smaller volumes than previous work. Fluorescence of an optimized reporter (Venus) lagged luminescence by 15–20 min, which is consistent with its known rate of chromophore maturation in yeast. Our work demonstrates that luciferases are better than fluorescent proteins at faithfully tracking the underlying gene expression. PMID:25232010

  11. Short time Fourier analysis of the electromyogram - Fast movements and constant contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake; Lehman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Short-time Fourier analysis was applied to surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded during rapid movements, and during isometric contractions at constant forces. A portion of the data to be transformed by multiplying th