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Sample records for fat alters pulmonary

  1. Intraosseous infusion and pulmonary fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M. Yousuf; Kissoon, Niranjan; Khan, Taj M.; Saldajeno, Virgilio; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Murphy, Suzanne P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of pulmonary fat embolism after the intraosseous (IO) infusion of normal saline and drugs and to determine whether pulmonary capillary blood is a predictor of lung fat embolism. DESIGN: A randomized, prospective, animal study. SETTING: Animal research laboratory of a university hospital. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight mixed breed piglets (average weight 30.9 kg). Interventions and Methods: Animals were anesthetized, intubated, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. IO needles were placed in the tibial bone. Animals were assigned to one of four groups: Group 1 received fluid (20 mL/kg) under 300 mm Hg pressure (n = 6); group 2 received fluid (20 mL/kg) at free flow under gravity (n = 6); group 3 received 100 mL of fluid over 20 mins (n = 8); and group 4 received 100 mL of fluid over 7 mins (n = 8). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Buffy coat samples were obtained from pulmonary arterial catheter in the occluded position at baseline, after IO needle placement, and at the end of infusion. Lung specimens (both upper and lower lobes) were obtained at the end of the infusion. Specimens were stained with oil red O and graded for fat emboli by a pathologist blinded to experimental conditions. Fat emboli (one to three emboli per high power field) were found in about 30% of the lung specimens. The difference in number of fat emboli between groups was not statistically significant. Buffy coat stains yielded fat emboli, which were distributed sporadically in all groups. CONCLUSION: Fat embolism is common; however, the method of IO fluid administration does not influence the number of emboli. Our study therefore implies that the risk of fat embolization is of concern, but its clinical relevance is unclear. Until the clinical significance of pulmonary fat emboli and the prevalence of fat emboli syndrome are delineated more precisely, the IO route is an effective but not necessarily safe route for delivery of fluids and drugs. PMID:12797872

  2. Factors that Alter Body Fat, Body Mass, and Fat-Free Mass in Pediatric Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMura, Linda M.; Maziekas, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effects of exercise programs on changes in body mass, fat-free mass, and body fat in obese children and adolescents. Research review indicated that exercise effectively helped reduce children's and adolescents' body composition variables. The most favorable body alterations occurred with low- intensity, long-duration exercise;…

  3. Compounds altering fat storage in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Rita; Garreta, Elba; Campos, Bruno; Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of lipid disruptive effects in invertebrates is limited by our poor knowledge of the lipid metabolic pathways. A recent study showed that tributyltin activated the ecdysteroid, juvenile hormone and retinoic X receptor signaling pathways, and disrupted the dynamics of neutral lipids in the crustacean Daphnia magna impairing the transfer of triacylglycerols to eggs and hence promoting their accumulation in post-spawning females. Tributyltin disruptive effects correlated with lower fitness for offspring and adults. The present study aims to addresses effects of existing compounds on storage lipids in post-spawning females and their health effects. D. magna individuals were exposed 12 chemicals that included vertebrate obesogens (tributyltin, triphenyltin, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate), other contaminants known to affect arthropods (pyriproxyfen, fenarimol, methoprene, emamectin benzoate and fluoxetine), as well as the natural hormones methyl farnesoate and 20-hydroxyecdysone. Reproductive effects were also assessed. Quantitative changes in storage lipids accumulated in lipid droplets were studied using Nile red staining, which showed a close relationship with whole organism levels of triacylglycerols. Ten compounds altered storage lipids in a concentration related manner enhancing (tributyltin, bisphenol A, methyl farnesoate, pyriproxyfen and 20-hydroxyecdysone) or decreasing (nonylphenol, fenarimol, emamectin benzoate, methoprene and fluoxetine) their levels in post-spawning females. Eight compounds that altered lipid levels also had detrimental effects on growth and/or reproduction. PMID:26747981

  4. Compounds altering fat storage in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Rita; Garreta, Elba; Campos, Bruno; Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of lipid disruptive effects in invertebrates is limited by our poor knowledge of the lipid metabolic pathways. A recent study showed that tributyltin activated the ecdysteroid, juvenile hormone and retinoic X receptor signaling pathways, and disrupted the dynamics of neutral lipids in the crustacean Daphnia magna impairing the transfer of triacylglycerols to eggs and hence promoting their accumulation in post-spawning females. Tributyltin disruptive effects correlated with lower fitness for offspring and adults. The present study aims to addresses effects of existing compounds on storage lipids in post-spawning females and their health effects. D. magna individuals were exposed 12 chemicals that included vertebrate obesogens (tributyltin, triphenyltin, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate), other contaminants known to affect arthropods (pyriproxyfen, fenarimol, methoprene, emamectin benzoate and fluoxetine), as well as the natural hormones methyl farnesoate and 20-hydroxyecdysone. Reproductive effects were also assessed. Quantitative changes in storage lipids accumulated in lipid droplets were studied using Nile red staining, which showed a close relationship with whole organism levels of triacylglycerols. Ten compounds altered storage lipids in a concentration related manner enhancing (tributyltin, bisphenol A, methyl farnesoate, pyriproxyfen and 20-hydroxyecdysone) or decreasing (nonylphenol, fenarimol, emamectin benzoate, methoprene and fluoxetine) their levels in post-spawning females. Eight compounds that altered lipid levels also had detrimental effects on growth and/or reproduction.

  5. Pentobarbital anesthesia alters pulmonary vascular response to neural antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Chen, B B; Fehr, D M; Clougherty, P W; Murray, P A

    1989-05-01

    We investigated the effects of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on vasoregulation of the pulmonary circulation. Our specific objectives were to 1) assess the net effect of pentobarbital on the base-line pulmonary vascular pressure-to-cardiac index (P/Q) relationship compared with that measured in conscious dogs, and 2) determine whether autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the intact P/Q relationship is altered during pentobarbital. P/Q plots were constructed by graded constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava, which produced stepwise decreases in Q. Pentobarbital (30 mg/kg iv) had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship. In contrast, changes in the conscious intact P/Q relationship in response to ANS antagonists were markedly altered during pentobarbital. Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block with prazosin caused active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs but caused vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) during pentobarbital. Sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block with propranolol caused active pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) in both groups, but the magnitude of the vasoconstriction was attenuated (P less than 0.05) during pentobarbital at most levels of Q. Finally, cholinergic receptor block with atropine resulted in active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs, whereas vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during pentobarbital. Thus, although pentobarbital had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship measured in conscious dogs, ANS regulation of the intact pulmonary vascular P/Q relationship was altered during pentobarbital anesthesia. PMID:2566280

  6. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level. PMID:24030595

  7. Altered artery mechanics and structure in monocrotaline pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, D; Szarek, J L; Coflesky, J T; Jones, R C; Reid, L M; Evans, J N

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in rats, induced by an injection of monocrotaline, is associated with changes in the wall structure of the pulmonary arterial bed. We have studied the effects of this remodeling on mechanical properties of cylindrical pulmonary artery segments from rats 21 days after monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Resting and active (KCl induced) circumference-tension relationships were established for segments of extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary arteries isolated from the hilum and the fifth lateral branch from the axial pathway (all preacinar). The thicknesses of the vessel wall, the media, and adventitia were measured at several positions around the circumference of the artery by computerized analysis of histological cross sections of the segments fixed at a standard circumference. Resting and active stress were also calculated. The study shows that active circumferential tension and active stress are reduced in vessels from MCT-treated rats. Based on our findings, it is unlikely that altered contractile function of preacinar arteries contributes significantly to the increased vascular resistance seen in this model. PMID:3145283

  8. Alterations of pulmonary function in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao-Qing; Ji, Yan-Bo; Wang, Shan-Xin; Zhang, Cai-Qing; Lu, De-Gan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). METHODS: Sixty-four IBD patients (31 Crohn's disease [CD] and 33 ulcerative colitis [UC]) and thirty healthy individuals (controls) were studied with regard to the following parameters of PFTs: Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio, mid-forced expiratory flow of 25–75% (FEF 25–75), residual volume, total lung capacity, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). The disease activity was calculated using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for CD and Mayo Clinic Score for UC. Correlation analysis was performed between disease activity and sputum cytology and PFTs. RESULTS: Nineteen of the 31 CD patients (61.29%) and 17 of the 33 UC patients (51.52%) but none of the controls showed at least one abnormal PFTs (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, both CD and UC patients exhibited a significant reduction in FEV1 (P < 0.05), FVC (P < 0.05), FEF 25–75 (P < 0.05), and DLCO (P < 0.05). The majority with decreased measurements of PFTs were in the active phase of diseases (P < 0.05). IBD activity scores correlated negatively with some parameters of PFTs and positively with lymphocytosis and eosinophilia of sputum (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary function disorders are significantly common in IBD patients. The impairment in active disease is significantly greater than in remission. PMID:27803750

  9. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  10. Fat feeding of rats during pubertal growth leads to neuroendocrine alterations in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Boukouvalas, George; Gerozissis, Kyriaki; Kitraki, Efthimia

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile obesity is a rising epidemic due largely to consumption of caloric dense, fat-enriched foods. Nevertheless, literature on fat-induced neuroendocrine and metabolic disturbances during adolescence, preceding obesity, is limited. This study aimed to examine early events induced by a fat diet (45% calories from saturated fat) in male rats fed the diet during the pre- and post-pubertal period. The neuroendocrine endpoints studied were the levels of circulating leptin, insulin and corticosterone, as well as their receptors in the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Hormonal levels were determined by radioimmunoassay and receptors' levels by western blot analysis. Leptinemia was increased in pubertal rats and in adult rats fed the fat diet from weaning to adulthood, but not in those fed from puberty to adulthood. Modifications in the developmental pattern from puberty to adulthood were observed for most of the brain receptors studied. In adult animals fed the fat diet from weaning onwards, the levels of leptin receptors in the hypothalamus and glucocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus were decreased compared to chow-fed controls. Switching from fat to normal chow at puberty onset restored the diet-induced alterations on circulating leptin, but not on its hypothalamic receptors. These data suggest that when a fat-enriched diet, resembling those consumed by many teenagers, provided in rats during pubertal growth, it can longitudinally influence the actions of leptin and corticosterone in the brain. The observed alterations at a preobese state may constitute early signs of the disturbed energy balance toward overweight and obesity.

  11. Fat adaptation science: low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets to alter fuel utilization and promote training adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of manipulating an individual's habitual diet on skeletal muscle fuel utilization has been of longstanding interest to scientists, and it is now well established that changes in dietary intake that alter the concentration of blood-borne substrates and hormones cause substantial perturbations in the macronutrient storage profile of muscle and exert profound effects on rates of substrate oxidation during exercise. Only recently, however, has it become appreciated that nutrient-exercise interventions can modulate many contraction- induced responses in muscle, and that fuel availability per se provides a 'trigger' for adaptation. Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets in the face of endurance training alters patterns of fuel utilization and subsequent exercise responses. Human studies show how low-carbohydrate, fat-rich diets interact with specific contractile stimulus to modulate many of the acute responses to exercise, thereby promoting or inhibiting subsequent training adaptation. PMID:22301836

  12. Pregnancy complicated by obesity induces global transcript expression alterations in visceral and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-08-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet not much is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n = 4/group) at the time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations led to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase, tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2, and ephrin type-B receptor 6, not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis as compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity.

  13. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  14. Neuropeptide Y administration into the amygdala alters high fat food intake.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; York, David A; Bray, George A

    2006-07-01

    The orexigenic effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are mediated through the hypothalamus, while the anxiolytic effects of NPY appear to be mediated through the amygdala. We hypothesized that intra-amygdalar administration of NPY might alter food preference without changing total food intake. Neuropeptide Y was administered into the central nucleus of the amygdala in both satiated and overnight-fasted rats, and intake and preference for a high fat diet (56%)/low carbohydrate (20%) diet or a low fat (10%)/high carbohydrate (66%) diet were measured. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration in satiated rats did not change total caloric intake, but it did produce a dose-dependent decrease in intake of and preference for high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h. In overnight-fasted rats, intra-amygdalar NPY also decreased the intake and preference for a high fat diet relative to low fat diet over 24 h, without altering total caloric intake. Intra-amygdalar NPY administration did not produce conditioned taste aversions to a novel saccharin solution. These results suggest that amygdalar NPY may have a role in macronutrient selection, without altering total caloric intake.

  15. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm2 and equal to 5–10 mm2 over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  16. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm(2) and equal to 5-10 mm(2) over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5-10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  17. Altered Immune Phenotype in Peripheral Blood Cells of Patients with Scleroderma-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Risbano, Michael G; Meadows, Christina A; Coldren, Christopher D; Jenkins, Tiffany J.; Edwards, Michael G; Collier, David; Huber, Wendy; Mack, Douglas G; Fontenot, Andrew P; Geraci, Mark W; Bull, Todd M

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common and fatal complication of scleroderma that may involve inflammatory and autoimmune mechanisms. Alterations in the gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been previously described in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our goal is to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in scleroderma patients with and without pulmonary hypertension as biomarkers of disease. Gene expression analysis was performed on a Microarray Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=10) and without (n=10) pulmonary hypertension. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed in the Microarray Cohort and validated in a Validation Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=15) and without (n=19) pulmonary hypertension by RT-qPCR. We identified inflammatory and immune-related genes including interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) and chemokine receptor 7 as differentially expressed in patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension. Flow cytometry confirmed decreased expression of IL-7R on circulating CD4+ T-cells from scleroderma patients with pulmonary hypertension. Differences exist in the expression of inflammatory and immune-related genes in peripheral blood cells from patients with scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension compared to those with normal pulmonary artery pressures. These findings may have implications as biomarkers to screen at-risk populations for early diagnosis and provide insight into mechanisms of scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20973920

  18. Inhaled nitric oxide does not alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeborg, D.M.; Kavanagh, B.P.; Van Meurs, K.

    1995-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide does not alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance. Because the effects of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) may be localized to its site of delivery, we studied the effects of inhaled NO on the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance during pulmonary hypertension in perfused rabbit lungs. Before NO administration, pulmonary hypertension was produced by infusion of the thromboxane A{sub 2} mimetic U-46619 in all lungs. Pulmonary vascular resistance was divided into arterial, microvascular, and venous components by arterial and venous occlusion techniques. In the buffer-perfused lung, all doses of inhaled NO (5, 20, and 80 ppm) produced small decreases ({approximately}3 mmHg) in pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. Similar results were obtained after an extended inhaled NO dose range of 20, 80, and 240 ppm. In the buffer-perfused lung, inhibition of endogenous NO synthesis with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) potentiated the effects of U-46619. Subsequent inhaled NO administration produced larger decreases ({approximately} 7 mmHg) in Ppa with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. In the blood-perfused lung, L-NAME did not alter baseline pulmonary pressures. Administration of inhaled NO during U-46619-induced pulmonary hypertension produced dose-related decreases in Ppa. The highest dose (80 ppm) of inhaled NO decreased Ppa by 3.5 mmHg, with equivalent proportional reductions in all segmental vascular resistances. We conclude that inhaled NO does not selectively alter the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance and that the magnitude of reduction in total pulmonary vascular resistance in the isolated perfused rabbit lung depends on the endogenous NO synthesis and on the use of buffer or blood as the perfusate. 47 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Pulmonary alterations associated with inhalation of occupational and environmental irritants.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Frazer, D G; Manley, L K; Dey, R D

    2002-02-01

    Many gases, vapors, or particles found in occupational and/or environmental settings can act as irritants. In the present study, sensory irritants are characterized by the stimulation of neuropeptide release from sensory nerves in the nasal mucosa, while pulmonary irritants are characterized by recruitment of PMN into bronchoalveolar airspaces, elevation of breathing frequency, and neuropeptide release from sensory fibers innervating the epithelium of the conducting airways. A review of data from our laboratory as well as results from others indicate that asphalt fume is a sensory irritant; toluene diisocyanate (TDI), methyl isocyanate, and machining fluid act as both sensory and pulmonary irritants; while cotton dust, agricultural dusts, microbial products, leather conditioner, and ozone exhibit responses characteristic of pulmonary irritants. PMID:11811921

  20. Pulmonary alterations associated with inhalation of occupational and environmental irritants.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Frazer, D G; Manley, L K; Dey, R D

    2002-02-01

    Many gases, vapors, or particles found in occupational and/or environmental settings can act as irritants. In the present study, sensory irritants are characterized by the stimulation of neuropeptide release from sensory nerves in the nasal mucosa, while pulmonary irritants are characterized by recruitment of PMN into bronchoalveolar airspaces, elevation of breathing frequency, and neuropeptide release from sensory fibers innervating the epithelium of the conducting airways. A review of data from our laboratory as well as results from others indicate that asphalt fume is a sensory irritant; toluene diisocyanate (TDI), methyl isocyanate, and machining fluid act as both sensory and pulmonary irritants; while cotton dust, agricultural dusts, microbial products, leather conditioner, and ozone exhibit responses characteristic of pulmonary irritants.

  1. High-fat diet enhances primary mammary tumorigenesis and pulmonary metastasis in MMTV-PyMT mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model is commonly used to study luminal B breast cancer, which has a lower prevalence but a worse prognosis. The objective of the present study was to determine whether an obesogenic, high-fat diet enhances primary tumorigenesis and pulmonary metastasis in female MMTV...

  2. Pulmonary arterial responses to reactive oxygen species are altered in newborn piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fike, Candice D.; Aschner, Judy L.; Slaughter, James C.; Kaplowitz, Mark R.; Zhang, Yongmei; Pfister, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. ROS might mediate vascular responses, at least in part, by stimulating prostanoid production. Our goals were to determine if the effect of ROS on vascular tone is altered in resistance pulmonary arteries (PRA) of newborn piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and the role, if any, of prostanoids in ROS-mediated responses. In cannulated, pressurized PRA, ROS generated by xanthine (X) plus xanthine oxidase (XO) had minimal effect on vascular tone in control piglets but caused significant vasoconstriction in hypoxic piglets. Both cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin and thromboxane synthase inhibition with dazoxiben significantly blunted constriction to X+XO in hypoxic PRA. X+XO increased prostacyclin production (70±8%) by a greater degree than thromboxane production (50±6%) in control PRA; this was not the case in hypoxic PRA where the increases in prostacyclin and thromboxane production were not statistically different (78±13% versus 216±93%, respectively). Thromboxane synthase expression was increased in PRA from hypoxic piglets while prostacyclin synthase expression was similar in PRA from hypoxic and control piglets. Under conditions of chronic hypoxia, altered vascular responses to ROS may contribute to pulmonary hypertension by a mechanism that involves the prostanoid vasoconstrictor, thromboxane. PMID:21516056

  3. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  4. Alteration of rumen fermentation, milk fat synthesis, and nutrient utilization with mineral salts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J A; Davis, C L; Clark, J H

    1982-04-01

    The ability of mineral salts to alter rumen fermentation, rumen fluid dilution rate, milk fat synthesis, and nutrient utilization was investigated in dairy cows fed a high-concentrate, milk-fat depressing diet. Four rumen-fistulated Holstein cows were in a 4 X 4 Latin square design. Treatments consisted of: 1) basal (25% corn silage: 75% concentrate on a dry matter basis), 2) basal + 2.0% sodium chloride, 3) basal + 2.0% sodium bicarbonate, and 4) basal + 2.4% limestone. Addition of limestone to the basal diet reduced dry matter intake but increased efficiency of dietary nutrient utilization for milk synthesis. Sodium bicarbonate increased synthesis of milk fat. Sodium chloride also tended to increase milk fat synthesis whereas limestone had no effect. Milk yields (kg/day) and milk fat (%) for the four treatments were 1) 29.5, 2.40; 2) 29.3, 2.66; 3) 28.9, 3.26; and 4) 29.2, 2.32. Rumen fluid pH, dilution rate (%/hour), and molar percentage of acetate and propionate were: 1) 5.98, 10.3, 49 and 39; 2) 6.02, 12.4, 55 and 32; 3) 6.16, 12.2, 58 and 25; and 4) 5.92, 10.7, 51 and 38. Limestone was totally ineffective in altering ruminal pH, fluid dilution rate, molar percentages of acetate and propionate, and synthesis of milk fat. Improved feed efficiency for milk production after addition of limestone was related to an increase in starch digestion compared to the basal ration (95 versus 88%).

  5. Surfactant Protein D Deficiency in Mice Is Associated with Hyperphagia, Altered Fat Deposition, Insulin Resistance, and Increased Basal Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Rahbek, Martin K. U.; Kirketerp-Møller, Katrine L.; Hansen, Pernille B. L.; Bie, Peter; Kejling, Karin; Mandrup, Susanne; Hawgood, Samuel; Nielsen, Ole; Nielsen, Claus H.; Owens, Trevor; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Grith L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defence lectin of the innate immune system that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. Recently it has been found that systemic SP-D is associated with metabolic disturbances and that SP-D deficient mice are mildly obese. However, the mechanism behind SP-D's role in energy metabolism is not known. Here we report that SP-D deficient mice had significantly higher ad libitum energy intake compared to wild-type mice and unchanged energy expenditure. This resulted in accumulation but also redistribution of fat tissue. Blood pressure was unchanged. The change in energy intake was unrelated to the basal levels of hypothalamic Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) gene expression. Neither short time systemic, nor intracereberoventricular SP-D treatment altered the hypothalamic signalling or body weight accumulation. In ad libitum fed animals, serum leptin, insulin, and glucose were significantly increased in mice deficient in SP-D, and indicative of insulin resistance. However, restricted diets eliminated all metabolic differences except the distribution of body fat. SP-D deficiency was further associated with elevated levels of systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide. In conclusion, our findings suggest that lack of SP-D mediates modulation of food intake not directly involving hypothalamic regulatory pathways. The resulting accumulation of adipose tissue was associated with insulin resistance. The data suggest SP-D as a regulator of energy intake and body composition and an inhibitor of metabolic endotoxemia. SP-D may play a causal role at the crossroads of inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance. PMID:22509382

  6. Alterations in the fat body and midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae following exposure to different insecticides.

    PubMed

    Alves, Stênio Nunes; Serrão, José Eduardo; Melo, Alan Lane

    2010-08-01

    This study describes morphological alterations in the fat body and midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae following exposure to different insecticides. To this end, both third and fourth instars of C. quinquefasciatus larvae were exposed for 30 and 60 min to organophosphate (50 ppb), pyrethroids (20 and 30 ppb), and avermectin derivates (1.5 and 54 ppb). Following incubation, pH measurements of the larvae gut were recorded. The fat body and midgut were also analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate a decrease in the pH of the larvae anterior midgut following exposure to all of the tested insecticides. Histochemical tests revealed a strong reaction for neutral lipids in the control group and a marked decrease in the group exposed to cypermethrin. Furthermore, a weak reaction with acidic lipids in larvae exposed to deltamethrin, temephos, ivermectin and abamectin was also observed. Insecticide-exposed larvae also exhibited cytoplasm granule differences, relative to control larvae. Finally, we noted a small reduction in microvilli size in the apex of digestive cells, although vesicles were found to be present. The destructive changes in the larvae were very similar regardless of the type of insecticide analyzed. These data suggest that alterations in the fat body and midgut are a common response to cellular intoxication.

  7. [Hepatic steatosis, visceral fat and metabolic alterations in apparently healthy overweight/obese individuals].

    PubMed

    Ryder, Elena; Mijac, Volga; Fernández, Erika; Palazzi, Nora; Morales, María Carolina; Connell, Lissette; Parra, Agner; Romero, Marlon; Fernández, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    Clinical observation indicates that many obese individuals do not display important metabolic alterations. Consequently, the objective of this study was to establish whether simple obesity, non concurrent with other important risk factors, was associated with metabolic alterations; or if the phenomenon known as "obesity paradox" was present. A clinical history, measurements of anthropometric and metabolic parameters and estimation of hepatic steatosis and visceral fat, were determined in 30, apparently healthy, individuals from Maracaibo, Venezuela, between 20 and 59 years of age and a body mass index (BMI) above 25 kg/m2, and compared to a lean control group of 11 individuals with BMI less than 25 kg/m2. The study demonstrated that only one third of overweight/obese individuals (OW/OB), with high body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), presented elevated values of insulin, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Nevertheless, the presence of hepatic steatosis was elevated in the OW/OB group (91%) vs. 9% in the control group. The visceral fat in the lean control group was associated with both, WC and glycemia; however, it was not related to the BMI or insulin, HOMA-IR and HDLc. The visceral fat in the OW/OB group, although elevated in relation to the lean group, revealed a loss of these associations. In the OW/OB it was the BMI that was associated with insulin and HOMA-IR. The results emphasize the importance of investigating for the presence of hepatic steatosis, rather than visceral fat, in individuals with OW/OB, to identify subjects with high cardiometabolic risk.

  8. Deregulation of the Protocadherin Gene FAT1 Alters Muscle Shapes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Nathalie; Herberth, Balàzs; Bartoli, Marc; Puppo, Francesca; Dumonceaux, Julie; Zimmermann, Angela; Denadai, Simon; Lebossé, Marie; Roche, Stephane; Geng, Linda; Magdinier, Frederique; Attarian, Shahram; Bernard, Rafaelle; Maina, Flavio; Levy, Nicolas; Helmbacher, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD. PMID:23785297

  9. Altering the fatty acids in milk fat by including canola seed in dairy cattle diets.

    PubMed

    Chichlowski, M W; Schroeder, J W; Park, C S; Keller, W L; Schimek, D E

    2005-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of feeding ground canola seed on the fatty acid profile, yield, and composition of milk from dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows (548.3 +/- 11.9 kg body weight and 28 +/- 9 d in lactation) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: Control (CON) or ground canola seed treatment (GCS) with 14% [of diet dry matter (DM)] of the total ration as ground canola seed containing 34% lipid. Diets contained 20% crude protein, but varied in net energy as a result of fat content differences of 2.5% and 6.4% (DM) for CON and GCS, respectively. Diets were composed of corn, corn silage, alfalfa (50:50 ground hay and haylage, DM basis), soybean and blood meal, and vitamins and minerals. Mechanically extruded canola meal was used in the CON diet to adjust for the protein from canola seed in the GCS diet. Cows were housed in tie-stalls and fed and milked twice daily for 10 wk. The inclusion of ground canola seed did not alter DM intake, weight gain, or body condition score of cows. Milk fat from GCS cows had greater proportions of long-chain fatty acids (> or = 18 carbons) and a lower ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids. Feeding GCS reduced the proportion of short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Milk fat from cows fed GCS had a greater proportion of vaccenic acid and tended to have a higher proportion of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid. Actual and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yields were similar between treatments. The milk fat and protein percentages were lower for GCS cows, but total yield of these components was similar between treatments. Milk urea nitrogen was lower and serum urea nitrogen tended to be lower in cows fed canola seed. Serum glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids were not altered, but serum triglycerides were higher in GCS cows. Ammonia and total volatile fatty acids tended to be lower in ruminal fluid from GCS cows; rumen pH was unchanged. Feeding canola seed to lactating dairy cows resulted in milk

  10. Altered carnitine homeostasis is associated with decreased mitochondrial function and altered nitric oxide signaling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Carter, A. Lee; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Rau, Thomas; Wilham, Jason; Harmon, Cynthia; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing aortopulmonary vascular graft placement in the fetal lamb, we have developed a model (shunt) of pulmonary hypertension that mimics congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our previous studies have identified a progressive development of endothelial dysfunction in shunt lambs that is dependent, at least in part, on decreased nitric oxide (NO) signaling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible role of a disruption in carnitine metabolism in shunt lambs and to determine the effect on NO signaling. Our data indicate that at 2 wk of age, shunt lambs have significantly reduced expression (P < 0.05) of the key enzymes in carnitine metabolism: carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 as well as carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT). In addition, we found that CrAT activity was inhibited due to increased nitration. Furthermore, free carnitine levels were significantly decreased whereas acylcarnitine levels were significantly higher in shunt lambs (P < 0.05). We also found that alterations in carnitine metabolism resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, since shunt lambs had significantly decreased pyruvate, increased lactate, and a reduced pyruvate/lactate ratio. In pulmonary arterial endothelial cells cultured from juvenile lambs, we found that mild uncoupling of the mitochondria led to a decrease in cellular ATP levels and a reduction in both endothelial NO synthase-heat shock protein 90 (eNOS-HSP90) interactions and NO signaling. Similarly, in shunt lambs we found a loss of eNOS-HSP90 interactions that correlated with a progressive decrease in NO signaling. Our data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:18024721

  11. Composition of Dietary Fat Source Shapes Gut Microbiota Architecture and Alters Host Inflammatory Mediators in Mouse Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edmond; Leone, Vanessa; Devkota, Suzanne; Wang, Yunwei; Brady, Matthew; Chang, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence shows that dietary factors can dramatically alter the gut microbiome in ways that contribute to metabolic disturbance and progression of obesity. In this regard, mesenteric adipose tissue has been implicated in mediating these processes through the elaboration of pro-inflammatory adipokines. In this study, we examined the relationship of these events by determining the effects of dietary fat content and source on gut microbiota, as well as the effects on adipokine profiles of mesenteric and peripheral adipocytes. Methods Adult male C57Bl/6 mice were fed milk fat-, lard-(SFA sources), or safflower oil (PUFA)- based high fat diets for four weeks. Body mass and food consumption were measured. Stool 16S rRNA was isolated and analyzed via T-RFLP as well as variable V3-4 sequence tags via next gen sequencing. Mesenteric and gonadal adipose samples were analyzed for both lipogenic and inflammatory mediators via qRT-PCR. Results High-fat feedings caused more weight gain with concomitant increases in caloric consumption relative to low-fat diets. Additionally, each of the high fat diets induced dramatic and specific 16S rRNA phylogenic profiles that were associated with different inflammatory and lipogenic mediator profile of mesenteric and gonadal fat depots. Conclusions Our findings support the notion that dietary fat composition can both reshape the gut microbiota as well as alter host adipose tissue inflammatory/lipogenic profiles. They also demonstrate the interdependency of dietary fat source, commensal gut microbiota, and inflammatory profile of mesenteric fat that can collectively impact the host metabolic state. PMID:23639897

  12. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K.; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Ley, Ruth E.; Qi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet (LFD), leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 (DKO hereafter). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotics treatment and transmissible to wildtype mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut microbiota-caused conditions are often life-threatening. PMID:24953658

  13. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C; Duhamel, Gerald E; Ley, Ruth E; Qi, Ling

    2014-07-10

    Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here, we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet, leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (DKO). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotic treatment and are transmissible to wild-type mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut-microbiota-caused conditions are often life threatening.

  14. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury.

  15. In utero and postnatal exposure to arsenic alters pulmonary structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R. Clark Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L.; Pivniouk, Vadim I.; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-02-15

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 {mu}m in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults.

  16. Caffeine ingestion does not alter carbohydrate or fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Terry E; Helge, Jorn W; MacLean, David A; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of ingesting caffeine (6 mg kg−1) on muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolism during steady-state exercise in humans. Young male subjects (n = 10) performed 1 h of exercise (70 % maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2,max)) on two occasions (after ingestion of placebo and caffeine) and leg metabolism was quantified by the combination of direct Fick measures and muscle biopsies. Following caffeine ingestion serum fatty acid and glycerol concentration increased (P ≤ 0.05) at rest, suggesting enhanced adipose tissue lipolysis. In addition circulating adrenaline concentration was increased (P ≤ 0.05) at rest following caffeine ingestion and this, as well as leg noradrenaline spillover, was elevated (P ≤ 0.05) above placebo values during exercise. Caffeine resulted in a modest increase (P ≤ 0.05) in leg vascular resistance, but no difference was found in leg blood flow. Arterial lactate and glucose concentrations were increased (P ≤ 0.05) by caffeine, while the rise in plasma potassium was dampened (P ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in respiratory exchange ratio or in leg glucose uptake, net muscle glycogenolysis, leg lactate release or muscle lactate, or glucose 6-phosphate concentration. Similarly there were no differences between treatments in leg fatty acid uptake, glycerol release or muscle acetyl CoA concentration. These findings indicate that caffeine ingestion stimulated the sympathetic nervous system but did not alter the carbohydrate or fat metabolism in the monitored leg. Other tissues must have been involved in the changes in circulating potassium, fatty acids, glucose and lactate. PMID:11118510

  17. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  18. Low carbohydrate/high-fat diet attenuates cardiac hypertrophy, remodeling, and altered gene expression in hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary fat intake on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and accompanying structural and molecular remodeling in response to hypertension are not understood. The present study compared the effects of a high-fat versus a low-fat diet on development of left ventricular hype...

  19. Cessation of daily wheel running differentially alters fat oxidation capacity in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Laye, Matthew J; Rector, R Scott; Borengasser, Sarah J; Naples, Scott P; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ibdah, Jamal A; Booth, Frank W; Thyfault, John P

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity is associated with the increased risk of developing chronic metabolic diseases. To understand early alterations caused by physical inactivity, we utilize an animal model in which rats are transitioned from daily voluntary wheel running to a sedentary condition. In the hours and days following this transition, adipose tissue mass rapidly increases, due in part to increased lipogenesis. However, whether a concurrent decrease in fatty acid oxidative capacity (FAO) in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue occurs during this period is unknown. Following 6 wk of access to voluntary running wheels (average distance of approximately 6 km a night), rats were rapidly transitioned to a sedentary state by locking the wheels for 5 h (WL5) or 173 h (WL173). Complete ([(14)C]palmitate oxidation to (14)CO(2)) and incomplete ([(14)C]palmitate oxidation to (14)C-labeled acid soluble metabolites) was determined in isolated mitochondrial and whole homogenate preparations from skeletal muscle and liver and in isolated adipocytes. Strikingly, the elevated complete FAO in the red gastrocnemius at WL5 fell to that of rats that never ran (SED) by WL173. In contrast, hepatic FAO was elevated at WL173 above both WL5 and SED groups, while in isolated adipocytes, FAO remained higher in both running groups (WL5 and WL173) compared with the SED group. The alterations in muscle and liver fat oxidation were associated with changes in carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 activity and inhibition, but not significant changes in other mitochondrial enzyme activities. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1alpha mRNA levels that were higher in both skeletal muscle and liver at WL5 fell to SED levels at WL173. This study is the first to demonstrate that the transition from high to low daily physical activity causes rapid, tissue-specific changes in FAO.

  20. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  1. Altered lymphatics in an ovine model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Johnson, Eric G; Oishi, Peter E; Johengen, Michael; Tang, Eric; Aramburo, Angela; Barton, Jubilee; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Bennett, Stephen; Xoinis, Konstantine; Reel, Bhupinder; Kalkan, Gokhan; Sajti, Eniko; Osorio, Oscar; Raff, Gary W; Matthay, Michael A; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2012-03-15

    Abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well recognized in patients with congenital heart defects. However, it is not known how the associated abnormal blood flow patterns, such as increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF), might affect pulmonary lymphatic function and structure. Using well-established ovine models of acute and chronic increases in PBF, we cannulated the efferent lymphatic duct of the caudal mediastinal node and collected and analyzed lymph effluent from the lungs of lambs with acutely increased PBF (n = 6), chronically increased PBF (n = 6), and age-matched normal lambs (n = 8). When normalized to PBF, we found that lymph flow was unchanged following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. The lymph:plasma protein ratio decreased with both acute and chronic increases in PBF. Lymph bioavailable nitric oxide increased following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. In addition, we found perturbations in the transit kinetics of contrast material through the pleural lymphatics of lambs with chronic increases in PBF. Finally, there were structural changes in the pulmonary lymphatic system in lambs with chronic increases in PBF: lymphatics from these lambs were larger and more dilated, and there were alterations in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C, lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, and Angiopoietin-2, proteins known to be important for lymphatic growth, development, and remodeling. Taken together these data suggest that chronic increases in PBF lead to both functional and structural aberrations of lung lymphatics. These findings have important therapeutic implications that warrant further study.

  2. Ct Anatomy of Buccal Fat Pad and its Role in Volumetric Alterations of Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanov, R. A.; Guryanov, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study is the revision of the anatomy of buccal fat pad and its role in a volumetric pattern of face. Bichat fat pad is a fatty anatomical structure with body and numerous process enclosed between the bony and muscular structures in temporal, pterygopalatine fossae and extents to the cheek area. Nevertheless, the opinion about its structure and role in forming of volume pattern of face sometimes could be controversial. The Bichat fat pad consists on predominately hormone insensitive fat tissue with underdeveloped stroma, this leads to the stability of the fat pad volume and lesser radiodensity in contrast to the subcutaneous fat. Moreover, the buccal fat pad is delimited from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area by the strong capsule. This feature allows us to use CT to divide the Bichat fat pad from the surrounding tissues. The thorough embryological data provide the distinction of Bichat fat pad from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area even at the stage of development. On the other hand, the border between the masticatory muscles and the processes of the fat pad is not evident and resembles cellular spaces in the other anatomical areas. To elicit the role of the buccal fat pad in volume pattern of face and its function we have performed the several experiments, analyzed the postoperative results after Bichat fat pad resection using surface scanner and CT data. At first, we have performed the gravity test: the patient's face photogrammetry scanning in horizontal and vertical position of head and it revealed the excess of volume in temporal area in horizontal position. To exclude mechanism of overflowing of the skin and subcutaneous fat over the zygomatic arch we have placed the markers on the skin surface at the different areas of face including the projection of ligaments and found out that the migration of soft tissue over the zygomatic arch is about 3-5 mm and almost the same in temporal area. However, the acquired result was unsatisfying because

  3. High fat-fed diabetic mice present with profound alterations of the osteocyte network.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Perrot, Rodolphe; Flatt, Peter R; Irwin, Nigel; Chappard, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered to be an independent risk factor for bone fragility fractures. Reductions in bone mass, observed only with type 1 diabetes mellitus, as well as modifications of bone microarchitectures and tissue material properties are landmarks of diabetes-related bone alterations. An interesting feature observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the augmented concentration in circulating sclerostin. This observation prompts us to hypothesize that modifications of osteocyte network and perilacunar mineralization occur in T2DM. As such, the aims of the present study were to ascertain by quantitative backscattered electron imaging, confocal microscopy and image analysis, modifications of perilacunar tissue mineral density, osteocyte morphology and osteocyte network topology in a mouse model of high fat-induced type 2 diabetes. As compared with lean control animals, diabetic mice exhibited a significant 48% decrease in perilacunar mineralization heterogeneity although mean perilacunar mineralization was unchanged. Furthermore, in diabetic animals, osteocyte volume was significantly augmented by 34% with no change in the overall number of dendrite processes. Finally, the network topology was profoundly modified in diabetic mice with increases in the mean node degree, mean node volume and hub numbers whilst the mean link length was reduced. Overall, it appeared that in diabetic animals, the dendritic network exhibited features of a scale-free network as opposed to the single-scale characteristic observed in lean controls. However, it is important to ascertain whether diabetic patients exhibit such modifications of the osteocyte network and whether anti-diabetic drugs could restore normal osteocyte and network parameters, thereby improving bone quality and protecting against fragility fractures. PMID:27312542

  4. Selective type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition alters pulmonary hemodynamics and lung liquid production in near-term fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Dukarm, Robert C; Steinhorn, Robin H; Russell, James A; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Swartz, Daniel; Cummings, James J

    2005-12-01

    Nitric oxide causes dilation of the pulmonary circulation and reduction in net lung liquid production in the fetal lamb, two critical perinatal events. Phosphodiesterase inhibition alone causes similar changes and also enhances the effects of nitric oxide. To better define the cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) pathway in these events, we studied the effects of a specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, E4021, on pulmonary arteries and veins isolated from near-term fetal lambs, as well as in intact, chronically instrumented late-gestation fetal lambs. In the in vitro experiments, both pulmonary arteries and veins relaxed to E4021 in a dose-dependent manner, although pulmonary veins were significantly more sensitive to E4021. Pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (L-NNA) abolished this response in arteries but not in veins. In both arteries and veins, pretreatment with beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothionate blunted relaxations to E4021. In the in vivo experiments, E4021 infusion into either the pulmonary artery or central venous circulation increased pulmonary blood flow and decreased pulmonary vascular resistance, and these responses were blunted by pretreatment with L-NNA. Net lung liquid production, measured by a dye-dilution technique using blue dextran, decreased when E4021 was infused directly into the pulmonary artery and this effect was not altered by L-NNA. There was no effect on lung liquid production when E4021 was infused into the central venous circulation. Taken together, these results suggest that the pulmonary hemodynamic effects of E4021 involve the cyclic GMP pathway and are primarily nitric oxide synthase dependent. In contrast, the effects on E4021 on net lung liquid production appear to be independent of nitric oxide synthase, suggesting that these two critical perinatal events might be modulated independently.

  5. Background diet and fat type alters plasma lipoprotein response but not aortic cholesterol accumulation in F1B golden syrian hamsters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary modification alters plasma lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerotic lesion progression in humans and some animal models. Variability in response to diet induced atherosclerosis has been reported in hamsters. Assessed was the interaction between background diet composition and dietary fat typ...

  6. Increased nitric oxide availability attenuates high fat diet metabolic alterations and gene expression associated with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High fat diet impairs nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and induces insulin resistance. The link between NO availability and the metabolic adaptation to a high fat diet is not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high fat diet on metabolism in mice with decreased (eNOS-/-) and increased (DDAH overexpressed) NO bioavailability. Methods eNOS-/- (n = 16), DDAH (n = 24), and WT (n = 19) mice were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 13 weeks. Body weight, biochemical parameters, adipokines and insulin were monitored. The matrigel in vivo model with CD31 immunostaining was used to assess angiogenesis. Gene expression in adipose tissues was analyzed by microarray and Real Time PCR. Comparisons of the mean values were made using the unpaired Student t test and p < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results eNOS-/- mice gained less weight than control WT and DDAH mice. In DDAH mice, a greater increase in serum adiponectin and a lesser increment in glucose level was observed. Fasting insulin and cholesterol levels remained unchanged. The angiogenic response was increased in DDAH mice. In adipose tissue of DDAH mice, genes characteristic of differentiated adipocytes were down-regulated, whereas in eNOS-/- mice, genes associated with adipogenesis, fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis were upregulated. Conclusions Our results indicate that increased NO availability attenuates some HFD induced alterations in metabolism and gene expression associated with insulin resistance. PMID:21781316

  7. Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Phenotypic Alterations in a Large Animal Model of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations Following the Glenn Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Eckhouse, Shaina R.; Rawls, William F.; Logdon, Christina; Stroud, Robert E.; Patel, Risha K.; Nadeau, Elizabeth K.; Spinale, Francis G.; Graham, Eric M.; Forbus, Geoffrey A.; Bradley, Scott M.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Longevity of the superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) is limited by the development of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). The goal of this study was to determine whether phenotypic changes in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) that favor angiogenesis occur with PAVM formation. Methods: A superior vena cava to right pulmonary artery connection was constructed in 5 pigs. Pulmonary arteries were harvested at 6-8 weeks following surgery to establish cultures of PAEC and smooth muscle cells, to determine cell proliferation, gene expression, and tubule formation. Abundance of proteins related to angiogenesis was measured in lung tissue. Results: Contrast echocardiography revealed right-to-left shunting, consistent with PAVM formation. While the proliferation of smooth muscle cells from the right pulmonary artery (RPA) (shunted side) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) (non- shunted side) were similar, right PAEC proliferation was significantly higher. Expression profiles of genes encoding cellular signaling proteins were higher in PAECs from the RPA vs. LPA. Protein abundance of angiopoietin-1, and Tie-2 (angiopoietin receptor) were increased in the right lung (both p<0.05). Tubule formation was increased in endothelial cells from the RPA compared to the LPA (404±16 vs. 199±71 tubules/mm2, respectively p<0.05). Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that PAVMs developed in a clinically relevant animal model of SCPC. This study found that PAVM development occurred concomitantly with differential changes in PAEC proliferative ability and phenotype. Moreover, there was a significant increase in the angiopoietin/Tie-2 complex in the right lung, which may provide novel therapeutic targets to attenuate PAVM formation following a SCPC. PMID:23968766

  8. Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Barnard, N D; Scialli, A R; Bertron, P; Hurlock, D; Edmonds, K; Talev, L

    2000-04-15

    Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women. In a crossover design, 35 women, aged 22 to 48, followed a low-fat vegetarian diet deriving approximately 10% of energy from fat for 2 menstrual cycles. For 2 additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while also taking a "supplement" (placebo) pill. Serum lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and during each intervention phase. Mean serum LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and total cholesterol concentrations decreased 16. 9%, 16.5%, and 13.2%, respectively, from baseline to the intervention diet phase (p<0.001), whereas mean serum triacylglycerol concentration increased 18.7% (p<0.01). LDL/HDL ratio remained unchanged. Thus, in healthy premenopausal women, a low-fat vegetarian diet led to rapid and sizable reductions in serum total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol concentrations.

  9. [Centripetal distribution of body fat, overweight and cardiorespiratory fitness: association with insulin sensitivity and metabolic alterations].

    PubMed

    da Silva, José Luciano T; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; de Oliveira, Jair Aparecido; Guedes, Dartagnan Pinto

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate associations between the centripetal distribution of the body fat and serum lipid-lipoproteins, blood pressure and the index Homa-IR of insulin resistance, adjusting for indicators of overweight and cardiorespiratory fitness. Eighty-nine voluntaries were analyzed (44 men and 45 women). The centripetal distribution of the body fat was analyzed through waist circumference (CC) and the overweight by the body mass index (BMI). The cardiorespiratory fitness was followed by the estimate VO(2)max by test of walking. After adjusted for BMI values were found significant coefficient of correlation between CC and levels of blood pressure and ApoB in men, and between CC and index Homa-IR and triglycerides in women. After adjusted for VO(2)max values were verified significant correlations between CC and ApoB and index Homa-IR in men, and between CC and index Homa-IR in women. In conclusion, depending on the sex, the quantity and distribution of the body fat can present different actions in the insulin resistance and associated dysfunctions. The cardiorespiratory fitness per se seems not to contribute on the minimization of the association between the centripetal distribution of the body fat and the index Homa-IR; but presents a considerable impact on the association between the centripetal distribution of the body fat and the lipid metabolism and the levels of blood pressure, mainly in men.

  10. Alterations in structure of elastic laminae of rat pulmonary arteries in hypoxic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q

    1996-11-01

    The effect of hypoxic hypertension on the remodeling process of the elastic laminae of the rat hilar pulmonary arteries (PAs) was studied by electron microscopy. Rats were exposed to hypoxia (10% O2) for periods of 0.5, 2,6,12,48,96,144, and 240 h. Changes in the structure of the PA elastic laminae were examined and analyzed with respect to changes in the PA wall tensile stress. The PA blood pressure increased rapidly within the first several hours of hypoxia and reached a stable level within 2 days, whereas the PA wall tensile stress increased initially due to elevated blood pressure and then decreased after 48 h due to vessel wall thickening and returned to the control level after 4 days. In association with these changes, the elastic laminae, which appeared homogeneous in normal control rats, changed into structures composed of randomly oriented filaments and edematous contents with an increase in the volume during the early period of hypoxia and regained their homogeneous appearance and normal volume after 4 days. The changes in the elastic laminae were correlated with changes in the tensile stress. These changes were associated with a transient decrease in the stiffness of the PAs. In hypoxic rats given nifedipine, no change was found in the blood pressure, the tensile stress, or the structure of the elastic laminae of the PAs despite continuous exposure to hypoxia. These results suggested that altered tensile stress in the PA wall played a critical role in the initiation and regulation of structural changes in the elastic laminae and that these changes might contribute to alterations in the mechanical properties of the PA in hypoxic hypertension. PMID:8941540

  11. ALTERATIONS IN CARDIOMYOCYTE FUNCTION AFTER PULMONARY TREATMENT WITH STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUME IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M.; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B.; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 post-exposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  12. Alterations in cardiomyocyte function after pulmonary treatment with stainless steel welding fume in rats.

    PubMed

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B; Kan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 postexposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  13. Alterations in cardiomyocyte function after pulmonary treatment with stainless steel welding fume in rats.

    PubMed

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B; Kan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 postexposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI.

  14. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile.

  15. Dietary fibers and fats alter rat colon protein kinase C activity: correlation to cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chapkin, R S; Gao, J; Lee, D Y; Lupton, J R

    1993-04-01

    Protein kinase C activity and cell proliferation in rat proximal colonic mucosa were determined following diet modification with select fibers and fats for 3 wk. Rats were assigned to one of nine dietary groups: three fibers (cellulose or pectin at 6 g/100 g diet or fiber free) x three fats (beef tallow, corn oil, fish oil at 15 g/100 g diet). Protein kinase C activity was determined by measuring the phosphorylation of a highly selective synthetic peptide derived from myelin basic protein. In vivo cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation into DNA. There was a significant main effect of fat (P = 0.0008) but not fiber (P = 0.375) on the ratio of membrane to cytosolic protein kinase C with diets containing fish oils resulting in the highest ratios, corn oils in the lowest ratios and beef tallow producing an intermediate ratio. There was an interactive effect of fat and fiber on the proliferative zone (P = 0.04). Pectin resulted in a significantly greater proliferative zone than did cellulose and the fiber-free diet but only when the fat source was corn oil. There was a positive correlation between proliferative zone and both membrane protein kinase C activity (r = 0.76, P = 0.02) and protein kinase C membrane:cytosol ratio (r = 0.64, P = 0.06). Although the positive relationship between proliferative zone and protein kinase C activity has been reported previously, the high membrane protein kinase C activity found with fish oil supplementation compared to the low activity found with corn oil supplementation was unexpected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A.; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Di Luigi, Luigi; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  17. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/ β -Catenin Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Baldari, Carlo; Di Luigi, Luigi; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Guidetti, Laura; Donini, Lorenzo M; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/ β -catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β -catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3 β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  18. Serum Cytokines in Young Pediatric Patients with Congenital Cardiac Shunts and Altered Pulmonary Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zorzanelli, Leína; Maeda, Nair Yukie; Clavé, Mariana Meira; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Inflammation is central in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. We investigated how serum cytokines correlate with clinical features, hemodynamics, and lung histology in young patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Design. Prospective, observational study. Methods and Results. Patients (n = 44) were aged 2.6 to 37.6 months. Group I patients (n = 31) were characterized by pulmonary congestion and higher pulmonary blood flow compared to group II (p = 0.022), with no need for preoperative cardiac catheterization. Group II patients (n = 13) had no congestive features. At catheterization, they had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (5.7 [4.4–7.4] Wood units·m2, geometric mean with 95% CI). Cytokines were measured by chemiluminescence. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was found to be inversely related to pulmonary blood flow (r = −0.33, p = 0.026) and was higher in group II (high pulmonary vascular resistance) compared to group I (high pulmonary blood flow) (p = 0.017). In contrast, RANTES chemokine (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) was characteristically elevated in Group I (p = 0.022). Interleukin 16 was also negatively related to pulmonary blood flow (rS = −0.33, p = 0.029) and was higher in patients with obstructive vasculopathy at intraoperative lung biopsy (p = 0.021). Conclusion. Cytokines seem to be important and differentially regulated in subpopulations of young patients with cardiac shunts.

  19. Serum Cytokines in Young Pediatric Patients with Congenital Cardiac Shunts and Altered Pulmonary Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zorzanelli, Leína; Maeda, Nair Yukie; Clavé, Mariana Meira; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Inflammation is central in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. We investigated how serum cytokines correlate with clinical features, hemodynamics, and lung histology in young patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Design. Prospective, observational study. Methods and Results. Patients (n = 44) were aged 2.6 to 37.6 months. Group I patients (n = 31) were characterized by pulmonary congestion and higher pulmonary blood flow compared to group II (p = 0.022), with no need for preoperative cardiac catheterization. Group II patients (n = 13) had no congestive features. At catheterization, they had elevated pulmonary vascular resistance (5.7 [4.4–7.4] Wood units·m2, geometric mean with 95% CI). Cytokines were measured by chemiluminescence. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was found to be inversely related to pulmonary blood flow (r = −0.33, p = 0.026) and was higher in group II (high pulmonary vascular resistance) compared to group I (high pulmonary blood flow) (p = 0.017). In contrast, RANTES chemokine (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) was characteristically elevated in Group I (p = 0.022). Interleukin 16 was also negatively related to pulmonary blood flow (rS = −0.33, p = 0.029) and was higher in patients with obstructive vasculopathy at intraoperative lung biopsy (p = 0.021). Conclusion. Cytokines seem to be important and differentially regulated in subpopulations of young patients with cardiac shunts. PMID:27656048

  20. High-fat diet transition reduces brain DHA levels associated with altered brain plasticity and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Zhuang, Yumei; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    To assess how the shift from a healthy diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids to a diet rich in saturated fatty acid affects the substrates for brain plasticity and function, we used pregnant rats fed with omega-3 supplemented diet from their 2nd day of gestation period as well as their male pups for 12 weeks. Afterwards, the animals were randomly assigned to either a group fed on the same diet or a group fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fats for 3 weeks. We found that the HFD increased vulnerability for anxiety-like behavior, and that these modifications harmonized with changes in the anxiety-related NPY1 receptor and the reduced levels of BDNF, and its signalling receptor pTrkB, as well as the CREB protein. Brain DHA contents were significantly associated with the levels of anxiety-like behavior in these rats. PMID:22666534

  1. Pubertal alterations in growth and body composition. V. Energy expenditure, adiposity, and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Roemmich, J N; Clark, P A; Walter, K; Patrie, J; Weltman, A; Rogol, A D

    2000-12-01

    We determined whether activity energy expenditure (AEE, from doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry) or physical activity [7-day physical activity recall (PAR)] was more related to adiposity and the validity of PAR estimated total energy expenditure (TEE(PAR)) in prepubertal and pubertal boys (n = 14 and 15) and girls (n = 13 and 18). AEE, but not physical activity hours, was inversely related to fat mass (FM) after accounting for the fat-free mass, maturation, and age (partial r = -0.35, P < or = 0.01). From forward stepwise regression, pubertal maturation, AEE, and gender predicted FM (r(2) = 0.36). Abdominal visceral fat and subcutaneous fat were not related to AEE or activity hours after partial correlation with FM, maturation, and age. When assuming one metabolic equivalent (MET) equals 1 kcal. kg body wt(-1). h(-1), TEE(PAR) underestimated TEE from doubly labeled water (TEE bias) by 555 kcal/day +/- 2 SD limits of agreement of 913 kcal/day. The measured basal metabolic rate (BMR) was >1 kcal. kg body wt(-1). h(-1) and remained so until 16 yr of age. TEE bias was reduced when setting 1 MET equal to the measured (bias = 60 +/- 51 kcal/day) or predicted (bias = 53 +/- 50 kcal/day) BMR but was not consistent for an individual child (+/- 2 SD limits of agreement of 784 and 764 kcal/day, respectively) or across all maturation groups. After BMR was corrected, TEE bias remained greatest in the prepubertal girls. In conclusion, in children and adolescents, FM is more strongly related to AEE than activity time, and AEE, pubertal maturation, and gender explain 36% of the variance in FM. PAR should not be used to determine TEE of individual children and adolescents in a research setting but may have utility in large population-based pediatric studies, if an appropriate MET value is used to convert physical activity data to TEE data.

  2. Table grape consumption reduces adiposity and markers of hepatic lipogenesis and alters gut microbiota in butter fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jessie; Collins, Brian; Wolf, Patricia G; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Zhong, Wei; Cooney, Paula; Cockrell, Chase; Chang, Eugene; Gaskins, H Rex; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if consuming table grapes reduces adiposity and its metabolic consequences and alters gut microbiota in mice fed a high-fat (HF), butter-rich diet. C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat (LF) diet or HF diet with 3% or 5% grapes for 11weeks. Total body and inguinal fat were moderately but significantly reduced in mice fed both levels of grapes compared to their controls. Mice fed 5% grapes had lower liver weights and triglyceride levels and decreased expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (Gpat1) compared to the 5% controls. Mice fed 3% grapes had lower hepatic mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, sterol-CoA desaturase 1, fatty-acid binding protein 4 and Gpat1 compared to the 3% controls. Although grape feeding had only a minor impact on markers of inflammation or lipogenesis in adipose tissue or intestine, 3% of grapes decreased the intestinal abundance of sulfidogenic Desulfobacter spp. and the Bilophila wadsworthia-specific dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene and tended to increase the abundance of the beneficial bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to controls. In addition, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Allobaculum and several other genera correlated negatively with adiposity. Allobaculum in particular was increased in the LF and 3% grapes groups compared to the HF-fed controls. Notably, grape feeding attenuated the HF-induced impairment in epithelial localization of the intestinal tight junction protein zonula occludens. Collectively, these data indicate that some of the adverse health consequences of consuming an HF diet rich in saturated fat can be attenuated by table grape consumption.

  3. Severe pulmonary hypertension is associated with altered right ventricle metabolic substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Mickael, Claudia; Sanders, Linda; Gebreab, Liya; Huber, Kendra M; Perez, Mario; Smith-Jones, Peter; Serkova, Natalie J; Tuder, Rubin M

    2015-09-01

    In severe pulmonary hypertension (SPH), prior studies have shown an increase in right ventricle (RV) uptake of glucose, but it is unclear whether there is a change in the relative utilization of fatty acids. We hypothesized that in the RV in SPH, as in left ventricular (LV) failure, there is altered substrate utilization, with increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake. SPH was induced in rats by treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SU5416 and 3 wk of hypoxia (10% FiO2 ), followed by an additional 4 wk of normoxia (SU-Hx group). Control rats were treated with carboxymethylcellulose vehicle and 7 wk of normoxia (CMC-Nx group). The rodents then underwent positron emission tomography with sequential administration of two radiotracers, 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoroglucose ((18)F-FDG) and 14-(R,S)-[(18)F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid ((18)F-FTHA), analogs of glucose and fatty acid, respectively. Five CMC-Nx and 3 SU-Hx rats completed the entire experimental protocol. In the RV, there was a mild increase in (18)F-FDG uptake (1.35-fold, P = 0.085) and a significant decrease in (18)F-FTHA uptake (-2.1-fold, P < 0.05) in the SU-Hx rats relative to the CMC-Nx rats. In the LV, SU-Hx rats had less uptake of both radiotracers compared with CMC-Nx rats. Less RV fatty acid uptake in SPH was corroborated by decreased fatty acid transporters and enzymes in the RV tissue, and specifically a decrease in lipoprotein lipase. In the RV in rats with SPH, there is a major shift in metabolic substrate preference, largely due to decreased fatty acid uptake. PMID:26115672

  4. Severe pulmonary hypertension is associated with altered right ventricle metabolic substrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Mickael, Claudia; Sanders, Linda; Gebreab, Liya; Huber, Kendra M.; Perez, Mario; Smith-Jones, Peter; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2015-01-01

    In severe pulmonary hypertension (SPH), prior studies have shown an increase in right ventricle (RV) uptake of glucose, but it is unclear whether there is a change in the relative utilization of fatty acids. We hypothesized that in the RV in SPH, as in left ventricular (LV) failure, there is altered substrate utilization, with increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake. SPH was induced in rats by treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SU5416 and 3 wk of hypoxia (10% FiO2), followed by an additional 4 wk of normoxia (SU-Hx group). Control rats were treated with carboxymethylcellulose vehicle and 7 wk of normoxia (CMC-Nx group). The rodents then underwent positron emission tomography with sequential administration of two radiotracers, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose (18F-FDG) and 14-(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (18F-FTHA), analogs of glucose and fatty acid, respectively. Five CMC-Nx and 3 SU-Hx rats completed the entire experimental protocol. In the RV, there was a mild increase in 18F-FDG uptake (1.35-fold, P = 0.085) and a significant decrease in 18F-FTHA uptake (−2.1-fold, P < 0.05) in the SU-Hx rats relative to the CMC-Nx rats. In the LV, SU-Hx rats had less uptake of both radiotracers compared with CMC-Nx rats. Less RV fatty acid uptake in SPH was corroborated by decreased fatty acid transporters and enzymes in the RV tissue, and specifically a decrease in lipoprotein lipase. In the RV in rats with SPH, there is a major shift in metabolic substrate preference, largely due to decreased fatty acid uptake. PMID:26115672

  5. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  6. Dietary triacylglycerol structure and saturated fat alter plasma and tissue fatty acids in piglets.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M; Dyer, R; Quinlan, P T; Diersen-Schade, D

    1996-05-01

    Human and pig milk triacylglycerols contain a large proportion of palmitic acid (16:0) which is predominately esterified in the 2-position. Other dietary fats contain variable amounts of 16:0, with unsaturated fatty acids predominantly esterified in the 2-position. These studies determined if the amount or position of 16:0 in dietary fat influences the composition or distribution of liver, adipose tissue, lung, or plasma fatty acids in developing piglets. Piglets were fed to 18 d with sow milk or formula with saturated fat from medium-chain triglyceride (MCT), coconut or palm oil, or synthesized triacylglycerols (synthesized to specifically direct 16:0 to the 2-position) with, in total fatty acids, 30.7, 4.3, 6.5, 27.0, and 29.6% 16:0, and in 2-position fatty acids, 55.3, 0.4, 1.3, 4.4, and 69.9% 16:0, respectively. The percentage of 16:0 in the 2-position of adipose fat from piglets fed sow milk, palm oil, and synthesized triacylglycerols were similar and higher than in piglets fed MCT or coconut oil. Thus, the amount, not the position, of dietary 16:0 determines piglet adipose tissue 16:0 content. The effects of the diets on the plasma and liver triacylglycerols were similar, with significantly lower 16:0 in total and 2-position fatty acids of the MCT and coconut oil groups, and significantly higher 16:0 in the plasma and liver triacylglycerol 2-position of piglets fed the synthesized triacylglycerols rather than sow milk or palm oil. The lung phospholipid total and 2-position 16:0 was significantly lower in the MCT, coconut, and palm oil groups, but similar in the synthesized triacylglycerol group and sow milk group. The lung phospholipid total and 2-position percentage of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was significantly lower in all of the formula-fed piglets than in milk-fed piglets. The physiological significance of this is not known. PMID:8727642

  7. Effect of feeding fat and altering weaning schedule on rebreeding in primiparous sows.

    PubMed

    Cox, N M; Britt, J H; Armstrong, W D; Alhusen, H D

    1983-01-01

    Primiparous sows that farrowed on a commercial farm during late summer in 1980 (n = 65) or late winter in 1981 (n = 62) and lactated 3 to 4 wk were used. Sows were assigned in a factorial experiment to one of two lactation diets (control or 10% fat-supplemented) and one of three periods (0, 2 or 5 d) of early weaning of the heaviest one-half of the litter. Days from weaning to estrus averaged 16.7 +/- 1.5 and 8.7 +/- 1.6 in summer and winter, respectively, and the season X diet interaction was significant for days from weaning to estrus and percentage of sows that exhibited estrus after weaning. In summer, supplementing diets with fat reduced the weaning-to-estrus interval from 20.9 +/- 2.1 to 12.6 +/- 2.1 d and increased percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d postweaning from 34 to 59. In winter, days from weaning to estrus tended to be greater and percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d postweaning tended to be less in sows fed fat-supplemented diets (10.3 +/- 2.5, 74%) than in sows fed control diets (7.1 +/- 2.9, 82%). Over both seasons, weaning one-half the litter 2 d early (2-d group) increased the percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d after weaning (77%) compared with 5-d (58%) or 0-d (51%) groups. Total litter weight at weaning was not affected by season, diet or days with one-half litter. However, piglets of lightest weight remaining on sows two or five extra days gained .09 +/- .03 kg/d more than lightest weight pigs in control (0-d) litters over the same interval. Early weaning of heaviest pigs may improve reproductive performance of primiparous sows in summer and winter, while supplementing lactation diets with fat may improve performance in summer, when weaning-to-estrus interval is longer than in winter. PMID:6826476

  8. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Johnstone, A F M; Beasley, T E; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Snow, S J; Kodavanti, U P

    2016-04-01

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (O3); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to O3 (acute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h, or subacute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h/d 1 d/week for 4 weeks). Body composition was measured non-invasively using NMR. Ventilatory parameters and exploratory behavior were measured after the third week of subacute exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood chemistry data were collected 18 h after acute O3 and 18 h after the fourth week of subacute O3. The diets led to increased body fat in male but not female rats. O3-induced changes in ventilatory function were either unaffected or improved with the fructose and fat diets. O3-induced reduction in exploratory behavior was attenuated with fructose and fat diets in males and partially in females. O3 led to a significant decrease in body fat of males fed control diet but not the fructose or fat diet. O3 led to significant increases in BALF eosinophils, increase in albumin, and reductions in macrophages. Female rats appeared to be more affected than males to O3 regardless of diet. Overall, treatment with high-fructose and high-fat diets attenuated some O3 induced effects on pulmonary function, behavior, and metabolism. Exacerbation of toxicity was observed less frequently. PMID:27092583

  9. Inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures alters pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism pathways without lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y C; Rengasamy, Apavoo; Frazer, Dave; Barger, Mark W; Hubbs, Ann F; Battelli, Lori; Tomblyn, Seith; Stone, Samuel; Castranova, Vince

    2003-01-01

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs require bioactivation by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system to exert toxic/carcinogenic effects. The present study was carried out to characterize the acute pulmonary inflammatory responses and the alterations of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways in rats exposed to asphalt fumes by inhalation. Rats were exposed at various doses and time periods to air or to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures. To assess the acute damage and inflammatory responses, differential cell counts, acellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alveolar macrophage (AM) function was assessed by monitoring generation of chemiluminescence and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. Alteration of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways was determined by monitoring the protein levels and activities of P-450 isozymes (CYP1A1 and CYP2B1), glutathioneS-transferase (GST), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). The results show that acute asphalt fume exposure did not cause neutrophil infiltration, alter LDH activity or protein content, or affect AM function, suggesting that short-term asphalt fume exposure did not induce acute lung damage or inflammation. However, acute asphalt fume exposure significantly increased the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 whereas it markedly reduced the activity and protein level of CYP2B1 in the lung. The induction of CYP1A1 was localized in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cells, alveolar septa, and endothelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cytosolic QR activity was significantly elevated after asphalt fume exposure, whereas GST activity was not affected by the exposure. This induction of CYP1A1 and QR with the concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 after asphalt fume exposure could alter PAH metabolism and may lead to potential

  10. Elevated dairy fat intake in lactating women alters milk lipid and fatty acids without detectible changes in expression of genes related to lipid uptake or synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yahvah, Katherine M; Brooker, Sarah L; Williams, Janet E; Settles, Matthew; McGuire, Mark A; McGuire, Michelle K

    2015-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that elevated maternal lipid intake (particularly from dairy products) is associated with increased lipids and altered fatty acid profile in milk produced by healthy lactating women. To investigate our primary hypothesis that a maternal diet rich in full-fat dairy products would simultaneously increase milk lipid percent and expression of genes related to the uptake and/or de novo biosynthesis of milk lipids, we provided 15 lactating women with diets enriched in full-fat or nonfat dairy products for 14 days each in a randomized, crossover study with a 2-week washout period. Milk fat (%) was lower when women consumed the low-fat compared with the full-fat dairy diet (2.41% ± 0.31% vs 3.35% ± 0.28%, respectively; P < .05); concentrations of more than 20 fatty acids also differed. However, neither conservatively evaluated microarray data nor quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis uncovered any treatment effects on expression of genes related to lipid synthesis or uptake. These data suggest that alteration in gene expression in the lactating human mammary gland is likely not the primary mechanism by which consumption of a high-fat diet affects milk fat percent in healthy, lactating women.

  11. Pulmonary structural and extracellular matrix alterations in Fischer 344 rats following subchronic phosgene exposure.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, U P; Costa, D L; Giri, S N; Starcher, B; Hatch, G E

    1997-05-01

    Phosgene, an acylating agent, is a very potent inducer of pulmonary edema. Subchronic effects of phosgene in laboratory animals are not well characterized. The purpose of the study was to elucidate potential long-term effects on collagen and elastin metabolism during pulmonary injury/recovery and obtain information about the concentration x time (C x T) behavior of low levels of phosgene. Male Fischer 344 rats (60 days old) were exposed either to clean air or phosgene, 6 hr/day: 0.1 ppm (5 days/week), 0.2 ppm (5 days/week), 0.5 ppm (2 days/week), and 1.0 ppm (1 day/week), for 4 or 12 weeks. A group of rats was allowed clean air recovery for 4 weeks after 12 weeks of phosgene exposure. This exposure scenario was designed to provide equal C x T product for all concentrations at one particular time point except for 0.1 ppm (50% C x T). Phosgene exposure for 4 or 12 weeks increased lung to body weight ratio and lung displacement volume in a concentration-dependent manner. The increase in lung displacement volume was significant even at 0.1 ppm phosgene at 4 weeks. Light microscopic level histopathology examination of lung was conducted at 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, and 1.0 ppm phosgene following 4 and 12 and 16 weeks (recovery). Small but clearly apparent terminal bronchiolar thickening and inflammation were evident with 0.1 ppm phosgene at both 4 and 12 weeks. At 0.2 ppm phosgene, terminal bronchiolar thickening and inflammation appeared to be more prominent when compared to the 0.1 ppm group and changes in alveolar parenchyma were minimal. At 1.0 ppm, extensive inflammation and thickening of terminal bronchioles as well as alveolar walls were evident. Concentration rather than C x T seems to drive pathology response. Trichrome staining for collagen at the terminal bronchiolar sites indicated a slight increase at 4 weeks and marked increase at 12 weeks in both 0.2 and 1.0 ppm groups (0.5 ppm was not examined), 1.0 ppm being more intense. Whole-lung prolyl hydroxylase activity and

  12. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Erica L.; Thompson, Lucien T.

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  13. BMP4-mediated brown fat-like changes in white adipose tissue alter glucose and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shu-Wen; Tang, Yan; Li, Xi; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, You-You; Huang, Hai-Yan; Xue, Rui-Dan; Yu, Hao-Yong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Hui-Di; Liu, Yan; Sun, Xia; Li, Yi-Ming; Jia, Wei-Ping; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2013-02-26

    Expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in adipocytes of white adipose tissue (WAT) produces "white adipocytes" with characteristics of brown fat and leads to a reduction of adiposity and its metabolic complications. Although BMP4 is known to induce commitment of pluripotent stem cells to the adipocyte lineage by producing cells that possess the characteristics of preadipocytes, its effects on the mature white adipocyte phenotype and function were unknown. Forced expression of a BMP4 transgene in white adipocytes of mice gives rise to reduced WAT mass and white adipocyte size along with an increased number of a white adipocyte cell types with brown adipocyte characteristics comparable to those of beige or brite adipocytes. These changes correlate closely with increased energy expenditure, improved insulin sensitivity, and protection against diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Conversely, BMP4-deficient mice exhibit enlarged white adipocyte morphology and impaired insulin sensitivity. We identify peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC1α) as the target of BMP signaling required for these brown fat-like changes in WAT. This effect of BMP4 on WAT appears to extend to human adipose tissue, because the level of expression of BMP4 in WAT correlates inversely with body mass index. These findings provide a genetic and metabolic basis for BMP4's role in altering insulin sensitivity by affecting WAT development.

  14. Association analysis reveals genetic variation altering bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Paun, Alexandra; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Tomko, Tomasz G; Haston, Christina K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease of significant morbidity, with an incompletely defined genetic basis. Here, we combine linkage and association studies to identify genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Mice were treated with bleomycin by osmotic minipump, and pulmonary fibrosis was histologically assessed 6 weeks later. Fibrosis was mapped in C57BL6/J (fibrosis-susceptible) × A/J (fibrosis-resistant) F2 mice, and the major identified linkage intervals were evaluated in consomic mice. Genome-wide and linkage-interval genes were assessed for their association with fibrosis, using phenotypic data from 23 inbred strains and the murine single-nucleotide polymorphism map. Susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis mapped to a locus on chromosome 17, which was verified with consomic mice, and to three additional suggestive loci that may interact with alleles on chromosome 17 to affect the trait in F2 mice. Two of the loci, including the region on chromosome 17, are homologous to previously mapped loci of human idiopathic fibrosis. Of the 23 phenotyped murine strains, four developed significant fibrosis, and the majority presented minimal disease. Genome-wide and linkage region-specific association studies revealed 11 pulmonary expressed genes (including the autophagy gene Cep55, and Masp2, which is a complement component) to contain polymorphisms significantly associated with bleomycin-induced fibrotic lung disease. In conclusion, genomic approaches were used to identify linkage intervals and specific genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. The common loci and similarities in phenotype suggest these findings to be of relevance to clinical pulmonary fibrosis.

  15. Alteration of pulmonary immunity to Listeria monocytogenes by diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). I. Effects of DEPs on early pulmonary responses.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Schafer, Rosana; Ma, Jane Y C; Antonini, James M; Weissman, David D; Siegel, Paul D; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Ma, Joseph K-H

    2002-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) aggravate pulmonary bacterial infection by both innate and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of DEP exposure on the functions of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lymphocytes from lung-draining lymph nodes using a rat Listeria monocytogenes infection model. In the present study, we focused on the effects of DEP exposure on AM functions, including phagocytic activity and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The Listeria infection model was characterized by an increase in neutrophil count, albumin content, and acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid at 3 and 7 days postinfection. Short-term DEP inhalation (50 and 100 mg/m(3), 4 hr) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of lung clearance of Listeria, with the highest bacteria count occurring at day 3. This aggravated bacterial infection was consistent with the inhibitory effect of DEPs on macrophage functions. DEPs suppressed phagocytosis and Listeria-induced basal secretion of interleukin-1ss (IL-1ss) and IL-12 by AMs in a dose-dependent manner. The amount of IL-1ss and IL-12 in the BAL fluid was also reduced by DEP exposure. In addition, DEPs decreased Listeria-induced lipopolysaccharide-stimulated secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1ss, and IL-12 from AMs. These results suggest that DEPs retard bacterial clearance by inhibiting AM phagocytosis and weaken the innate immunity by inhibiting AM secretion of IL-1ss and TNF-alpha. DEPs may also suppress cell-mediated immunity by inhibiting AM secretion of IL-12, a key cytokine for the initiation of T helper type 1 cell development in Listeria infection. PMID:12417481

  16. Interrelation between Alterations in Pulmonary Mechanics and hemodynamics in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Interiano, Benjamin; Hyde, Richard W.; Hodges, Morrison; Yu, Paul N.

    1973-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanics were evaluated in 30 patients with acute myocardial infarction by measuring forced expiratory flow rates and total pulmonary resistance (RT) with the oscillometric method at the resonant frequency of the chest (6-8) cycle/s). During the first 3 days after infarction, forced expiratory volume (FEV) and forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) were 69% and 60% of predicted values, respectively. 10 or more wk later these values were 95% and 91%. Initially, RT was 52% greater than predicted, but was only 4% greater 10 or more wk later. In 11 patients RT was measured at both resonant frequency and at 3 cycle/s. Five of these patients had no clinical signs of heart failure, but nine had abnormally high values of pulmonary artery pressure, “wedge” pressure and pulmonary extravascular water volume. All of these patients recovered. Initially, RT at resonance was 50% and RT at 3 cycle/s was 130% greater than predicted values. 2-3 wk later these figures were -3% and +6% of those predicted, respectively. At 10 wk or more, significant frequency dependence of RT had disappeared (RT at 3 cycle/s was 7% greater than RT at resonance). Isoproterenol inhalation in six patients caused no change in flow rates, RT at resonance, or RT at 3 cycle/s. RT at resonance and at 3 cycle/s, FEV, and FEF25-75% correlated significantly with the pulmonary vascular pressures. Patients with more marked arterial hypoxia and larger values for extravascular water volume had greater elevations of RT and depression of FEF25-75%, but linear correlations were not significant. Clinical signs of congestive heart failure significantly correlated with a fall in FEV and FEF25-75%, the development of frequency dependence of RT, and elevation of the pulmonary wedge pressure. The initial elevation of RT and low flow rates indicate a modest degree of airway obstruction in acute myocardial infarction. Lack of response to isoproterenol suggests that bronchial muscular constriction is not a

  17. Capsaicin-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus and alterations in gut microbial count in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baboota, Ritesh K; Murtaza, Nida; Jagtap, Sneha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Karmase, Aniket; Kaur, Jaspreet; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Premkumar, Louis S; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is a global health problem and recently it has been seen as a growing concern for developing countries. Several bioactive dietary molecules have been associated with amelioration of obesity and associated complications and capsaicin is one among them. The present work is an attempt to understand and provide evidence for the novel mechanisms of anti-obesity activity of capsaicin in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Swiss albino mice divided in three groups (n=8-10) i.e. control, HFD fed and capsaicin (2mg/kg, po)+HFD fed were administered respective treatment for 3months. After measuring phenotypic and serum related biochemical changes, effect of capsaicin on HFD-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT) (visceral and subcutaneous), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gut microbial alterations was studied and quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to its well-known effects, oral administration of capsaicin (a) modulates hypothalamic satiety associated genotype, (b) alters gut microbial composition, (c) induces "browning" genotype (BAT associated genes) in subcutaneous WAT and (d) increases expression of thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis genes in BAT. The present study provides evidence for novel and interesting mechanisms to explain the anti-obesity effect of capsaicin.

  18. Juvenile exposure to a high fat diet promotes behavioral and limbic alterations in the absence of obesity.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Angeles; Pomilio, Carlos; Menafra, Martin; Bonaventura, Maria Marta; Garay, Laura; Mercogliano, María Florencia; Schillaci, Roxana; Lux Lantos, Victoria; Brites, Fernando; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of metabolic disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome have seriously increased in the last decades. These diseases - with growing impact in modern societies - constitute major risk factors for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), sharing insulin resistance, inflammation and associated cognitive impairment. However, cerebral cellular and molecular pathways involved are not yet clearly understood. Thus, our aim was to study the impact of a non-severe high fat diet (HFD) that resembles western-like alimentary habits, particularly involving juvenile stages where the brain physiology and connectivity are in plain maturation. To this end, one-month-old C57BL/6J male mice were given either a control diet or HFD during 4 months. Exposure to HFD produced metabolic alterations along with changes in behavioral and central parameters, in the absence of obesity. Two-month-old HFD mice showed increased glycemia and plasmatic IL1β but these values normalized at the end of the HFD protocol at 5 months of age, probably representing an acute response that is compensated at later stages. After four months of HFD exposure, mice presented dyslipidemia, increased Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, hepatic insulin resistance and inflammation. Alterations in the behavioral profile of the HFD group were shown by the impediment in nest building behavior, deficiencies in short and mid-term spatial memories, anxious and depressive- like behavior. Regarding the latter disruptions in emotional processing, we found an increased neural activity in the amygdala, shown by a greater number of c-Fos+ nuclei. We found that hippocampal adult neurogenesis was decreased in HFD mice, showing diminished cell proliferation measured as Ki67+ cells and neuronal differentiation in SGZ by doublecortin labeling. These phenomena were accompanied by a neuroinflammatory and insulin-resistant state in the hippocampus

  19. Pattern of Pulmonary Involvement and Outcome of Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Altered Consciousness Admitted in Dhaka Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R A; Azad, A K; Sardar, H; Siddiqui, M R; Saad, S; Rahman, S; Sikder, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration is well recognized as a cause of pulmonary disease and is not uncommon in patients with altered consciousness.The mortality rate of aspiration pneumonia is approximately 1% in outpatient setting and upto 25% in those requiring hospitalization. This study was done to see the pattern of pulmonary involvement and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in patients with altered consciousness admitted in medicine department of a tertiary care hospital in our country. This was a prospective observational study conducted among the 52 adult patients of aspiration pneumonia with altered consciousness admitted in the medicine department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), during June 2010 to December 2010. Aspiration pneumonia was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Hematologic measurements (TC of WBC, Hb%, ESR, platelet count), chest X-ray, blood gas analysis, blood urea, creatinine and random blood sugar, sputum for Gram staining, sputum for culture sensitivity and blood culture were done in all patients.Assessment of altered conscious patient was done by application of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Case record forms with appropriate questionnaire were filled for all patients. The mean±SD age was 57.42±13.63 years with ranged from 25 to 90 years. Out of 52 patients, 37(71.15%) patients were male and 15(28.85%) patients were female. Following aspiration 76.92% patients developed pneumonitis, 13.46% patients developed lung abscess and only 9.62% patients developed ARDS. Most (33) of the patients had opacity in right lower zone and 13 patients had opacity in the left lower zone, 6 patients had opacity in right mid zone. Only 10 patients had opacity in both lower zones. In this study overall mortality rate was 23%. If only one lobe was involved radiologically, mortality was 8.33%. If two or more lobes on one or both sides were involved, mortality was in the range of 25-91%.

  20. Temporal plasma vitamin concentrations are altered by fat-soluble vitamin administration in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Ma, J Y; Monegue, J S; Monegue, H J; Stuart, R L; Lindemann, M D

    2015-11-01

    Piglets are born with purportedly low plasma vitamin D levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration, primarily vitamin D, by different administration routes on plasma vitamin concentrations in suckling pigs. A total of 45 pigs from 5 litters were allotted at birth to 3 treatments within each litter. Pigs were administered 400 IU of α-tocopherol, 40,000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and 40,000 IU of vitamin D at d 1 of age either orally or by i.m. injection and compared with control pigs with no supplemental vitamin administration. Blood samples were collected at d 0 (initial), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 14, and 20 after administration. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), α-tocopherol, retinyl palmitate, and retinol concentrations were analyzed. Except for retinol, the effects of treatment, day, and day × treatment interaction ( < 0.01) were observed on plasma vitamin concentrations. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD and α-tocopherol increased immediately regardless of administration routes to peak at d 2 and 1 after administration, respectively. Plasma retinyl palmitate concentrations increased only with the injection treatment, with the peak at d 1 after administration. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD in both administration treatments and α-tocopherol in the injection treatment were maintained at greater levels than those in the control treatment until d 20 after administration. With regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma 25OHD concentrations, the injection treatment had greater elimination half-life ( < 0.01), maximum plasma concentrations ( < 0.05), and all area under the curve parameters ( < 0.01) but a lower elimination rate constant ( < 0.01) than the oral treatment. Relative bioavailability of oral administration compared with injection administration was 55.26%. These results indicate that plasma status of 25OHD,α-tocopherol, and retinyl palmitate are differentially changed between types of

  1. Temporal plasma vitamin concentrations are altered by fat-soluble vitamin administration in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Ma, J Y; Monegue, J S; Monegue, H J; Stuart, R L; Lindemann, M D

    2015-11-01

    Piglets are born with purportedly low plasma vitamin D levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration, primarily vitamin D, by different administration routes on plasma vitamin concentrations in suckling pigs. A total of 45 pigs from 5 litters were allotted at birth to 3 treatments within each litter. Pigs were administered 400 IU of α-tocopherol, 40,000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and 40,000 IU of vitamin D at d 1 of age either orally or by i.m. injection and compared with control pigs with no supplemental vitamin administration. Blood samples were collected at d 0 (initial), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 14, and 20 after administration. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), α-tocopherol, retinyl palmitate, and retinol concentrations were analyzed. Except for retinol, the effects of treatment, day, and day × treatment interaction ( < 0.01) were observed on plasma vitamin concentrations. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD and α-tocopherol increased immediately regardless of administration routes to peak at d 2 and 1 after administration, respectively. Plasma retinyl palmitate concentrations increased only with the injection treatment, with the peak at d 1 after administration. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD in both administration treatments and α-tocopherol in the injection treatment were maintained at greater levels than those in the control treatment until d 20 after administration. With regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma 25OHD concentrations, the injection treatment had greater elimination half-life ( < 0.01), maximum plasma concentrations ( < 0.05), and all area under the curve parameters ( < 0.01) but a lower elimination rate constant ( < 0.01) than the oral treatment. Relative bioavailability of oral administration compared with injection administration was 55.26%. These results indicate that plasma status of 25OHD,α-tocopherol, and retinyl palmitate are differentially changed between types of

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8+ T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8+ T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8+ T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8+ T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8+ T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8+ T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology. PMID:25363329

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8(+) T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8(+) T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8(+) T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8(+) T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8(+) T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8(+) T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8(+) T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology.

  4. Bardoxolone methyl prevents high-fat diet-induced alterations in prefrontal cortex signalling molecules involved in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Fernandez, Francesca; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-06-01

    High fat (HF) diets are known to induce changes in synaptic plasticity in the forebrain leading to learning and memory impairments. Previous studies of oleanolic acid derivatives have found that these compounds can cross the blood-brain barrier to prevent neuronal cell death. We examined the hypothesis that the oleanolic acid derivative, bardoxolone methyl (BM) would prevent diet-induced cognitive deficits in mice fed a HF diet. C57BL/6J male mice were fed a lab chow (LC) (5% of energy as fat), a HF (40% of energy as fat), or a HF diet supplemented with 10mg/kg/day BM orally for 21weeks. Recognition memory was assessed by performing a novel object recognition test on the treated mice. Downstream brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling molecules were examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of mice via Western blotting and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding. BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced impairment in recognition memory (p<0.001). In HF diet fed mice, BM administration attenuated alterations in the NMDA receptor binding density in the PFC (p<0.05), however, no changes were seen in the hippocampus (p>0.05). In the PFC and hippocampus of the HF diet fed mice, BM administration improved downstream BDNF signalling as indicated by increased protein levels of BDNF, phosphorylated tropomyosin related kinase B (pTrkB) and phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), and increased phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) (p<0.05). BM administration also prevented the HF diet-induced increase in the protein levels of inflammatory molecules, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK) in the PFC, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in both the PFC and hippocampus. In summary, these findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet-induced impairments in recognition memory by improving downstream BDNF signal transduction, increasing pAMPK, and reducing inflammation in the PFC and hippocampus.

  5. Liver disease with altered bile acid transport in Niemann-Pick C mice on a high-fat, 1% cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Robert P; Bhattacharyya, Achyut; Hunter, Robert J; Heidenreich, Randall A; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2005-08-01

    Cholestatic hepatitis is frequently found in Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease. We studied the influence of diet and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR, Ldlr in mice, known to be the source of most of the stored cholesterol) on liver disease in the mouse model of NPC. Npc1-/- mice of both sexes, with or without the Ldlr knockout, were fed a 18% fat, 1% cholesterol ("high-fat") diet and were evaluated by chemical and histological methods. Bile acid transporters [multidrug resistance protein (Mrps) 1-5; Ntcp, Bsep, and OatP1, 2, and 4] were quantitated by real-time RT-PCR. Many mice died prematurely (within 6 wk) with hepatomegaly. Histopathology showed an increase in macrophage and hepatocyte lipids independent of Ldlr genotype. Non-zone-dependent diffuse fibrosis was found in the surviving mice. Serum alanine aminotransferase was elevated in Npc1-/- mice on the regular diet and frequently became markedly elevated with the high-fat diet. Serum cholesterol was increased in the controls but not the Npc1-/- mice on the high-fat diet; it was massively increased in the Ldlr-/- mice. Esterified cholesterol was greatly increased by the high-fat diet, independent of Ldlr genotype. gamma-Glutamyltransferase was also elevated in Npc1-/- mice, more so on the high-fat diet. Mrps 1-5 were elevated in Npc1-/- liver and became more elevated with the high-fat diet; Ntcp, Bsep, and OatP2 were elevated in Npc1-/- liver and were suppressed by the high-fat diet. In conclusion, Npc1-/- mice on a high-fat diet provide an animal model of NPC cholestatic hepatitis and indicate a role for altered bile acid transport in its pathogenesis.

  6. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Orihara, Kanami; Matsuda, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma. PMID:19281078

  7. Effects of altered left atrial pressure on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships.

    PubMed

    Ducas, J; Schick, U; Girling, L; Prewitt, R M

    1988-07-01

    We studied the effects of changes in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) on the slope (incremental resistance) and the extrapolated pressure intercept (PI) of the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP)-cardiac output (CO) relationship. Multipoint plots of PAP against CO were obtained in intact anesthetized dogs. Group 1 consisted of six dogs entirely in West zone 3 and group 2 of four dogs with mixed West zone 2-3. The four conditions studied were the following: 1) fixed low PCWP, 2) fixed high PCWP, 3) variable PCWP, and 4) time-control repeat of condition 1. The PI significantly exceeded PCWP at fixed low PCWP (group 1, 9.3 vs. 11.1 mmHg, group 2, 6.6 vs. 3.9 mmHg). PI became identical to PCWP only at fixed high PCWP in group 1 (19 +/- 2.0 vs. 19 +/- 1.1 mmHg). Thus PCWP reflects the effective vascular outflow pressure when PCWP is fixed and high. For both groups of dogs in condition 3, when PCWP was varied with CO, the slope of the resulting PAP-CO plot was significantly greater than when PCWP was constant. Also in 9 of 10 dogs, PI was less than PCWP when PCWP was varied. These findings demonstrate that when changes in PCWP are allowed to occur during the generation of a pulmonary artery pressure-flow plot, the resulting slope and intercept, as defined by a Starling resistor model, do not accurately represent the incremental resistance and outflow pressure of the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:3293470

  8. Alteration in cellular and biochemical markers of pulmonary toxicity in rat lung exposed to carpet dusts.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Musthapa, Syed; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ansari, Furquan Ahmad; Baig, Masroor Alam; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-09-15

    Epidemiological studies of workers in weaving units in carpet industries have shown relationships between the airborne dust concentrations and pulmonary ill health. Therefore, to predict the health risk of carpet weavers, this preliminary experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of carpet dust (knotted, tufted) on cellular and biochemical mediators considered as potential biological markers of lung injury. Lung cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), lysosomal (acid phosphatase, ACP), type II (alkaline phoshatase, ALP) and Clara-cell marker enzymes (gamma-glutamyl transferase, GGT) were monitored in rat cell-free lung lavage (BAL) during postexposure days 1, 4, 8, and 16. Furthermore, lung microsomal cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) and Clara-cell secretory protein (CC16) content in BAL was also evaluated. These pulmonary marker enzymes were significantly elevated during the postexposure period over the respective untreated control; however, tufted carpet dust shows more responses than knotted carpet dust. Lung CYP450 content was reduced significantly at early days; the pattern shows the reoccurrence of CYP450 content in the later stage of postexposure to carpet dust. Clara-cell secretory protein in BAL shows decline in the carpet-treated group; however, tufted carpet shows more decline than knotted carpet. Thus, reduction in CC16 level may have important implication in the development of chronic lung inflammation and diseases. Present investigation found that modulation of these cellular marker enzymes is clear evidence of pulmonary damage caused by exposure to carpet dust.

  9. Alterations in the antibacterial properties of rabbit pulmonary macrophages exposed to wood smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Fick, R.B. Jr.; Paul, E.S.; Merrill, W.W.; Reynolds, H.Y.; Loke, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    We studied the local response of the bronchoalveolar cell population after acute exposure to smoke from pyrolysis of Douglas fir wood. Cell viability experiments and function of the pulmonary macrophages were assessed, including adherence to surfaces, bacterial phagocytosis, and the intracellular bactericidal process. The smoke-exposed group (n.23) when compared with control animals (n.15) produced a significantly greater total cell yield (p less than 0.01) on bronchoalveolar lavage. There was no increase in the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As carboxyhemoglobin levels increased, macrophage adherence to glass decreased (r . -0.79, p . 0.0001). Pulmonary macrophages from exposed animals were 33% less adherent at 120 min in vitro; however, these nonadherent smoke-exposed macrophages remained viable (55 to 78% viable by trypan blue dye exclusion). Both the phagocytic rate (361 14C cpm/unit time) and the maximal number of bacteria associated (at 60 min) with the exposed macrophages were significantly less than in the sham-exposed animals (uptake . 672 14C cpm/time, p less than 0.002 for each). The antibacterial properties of pulmonary macrophages are adversely affected by exposure to wood pyrolysis.

  10. Effect of High-Fat Diet on the Formation of Pulmonary Neutrophil Extracellular Traps during Influenza Pneumonia in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Anandi Narayana; Tan, Kong Bing; Wang, Shi; Narasaraju, Teluguakula; Chow, Vincent T.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for severe outcome of influenza infection. Higher dietary fat consumption has been linked to greater morbidity and severe influenza in mouse models. However, the extent of generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs or NETosis) in obese individuals during influenza pneumonia is hitherto unknown. This study investigated pulmonary NETs generation in BALB/c mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD) and low-fat diet (LFD), during the course of influenza pneumonia. Clinical disease progression, histopathology, lung reactive oxygen species, and myeloperoxidase activity were also compared. Consumption of HFD over 18 weeks led to significantly higher body weight, body mass index, and adiposity in BALB/c mice compared with LFD. Lethal challenge of mice (on HFD and LFD) with influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus led to similar body weight loss and histopathologic severity. However, NETs were formed at relatively higher levels in mice fed with HFD, despite the absence of significant difference in disease progression between HFD- and LFD-fed mice. PMID:27531997

  11. Effect of High-Fat Diet on the Formation of Pulmonary Neutrophil Extracellular Traps during Influenza Pneumonia in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Anandi Narayana; Tan, Kong Bing; Wang, Shi; Narasaraju, Teluguakula; Chow, Vincent T

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for severe outcome of influenza infection. Higher dietary fat consumption has been linked to greater morbidity and severe influenza in mouse models. However, the extent of generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs or NETosis) in obese individuals during influenza pneumonia is hitherto unknown. This study investigated pulmonary NETs generation in BALB/c mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD) and low-fat diet (LFD), during the course of influenza pneumonia. Clinical disease progression, histopathology, lung reactive oxygen species, and myeloperoxidase activity were also compared. Consumption of HFD over 18 weeks led to significantly higher body weight, body mass index, and adiposity in BALB/c mice compared with LFD. Lethal challenge of mice (on HFD and LFD) with influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus led to similar body weight loss and histopathologic severity. However, NETs were formed at relatively higher levels in mice fed with HFD, despite the absence of significant difference in disease progression between HFD- and LFD-fed mice. PMID:27531997

  12. Lingonberries alter the gut microbiota and prevent low-grade inflammation in high-fat diet fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Heyman-Lindén, Lovisa; Kotowska, Dorota; Sand, Elin; Bjursell, Mikael; Plaza, Merichel; Turner, Charlotta; Holm, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Berger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of obesity and obesity-associated impairments such as low-grade inflammation. Lingonberries have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity and low-grade inflammation. However, it is not known whether the effect of lingonberry supplementation is related to modifications of the gut microbiota. The aim of the present study was to describe whether consumption of different batches of lingonberries alters the composition of the gut microbiota, which could be relevant for the protective effect against high fat (HF)-induced metabolic alterations. Methods Three groups of C57BL/6J mice were fed HF diet with or without a supplement of 20% lingonberries from two different batches (Lingon1 and Lingon2) during 11 weeks. The composition and functionality of the cecal microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and PICRUSt. In addition, parameters related to obesity, insulin sensitivity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and gut barrier function were examined. Results HF-induced obesity was only prevented by the Lingon1 diet, whereas both batches of lingonberries reduced plasma levels of markers of inflammation and endotoxemia (SAA and LBP) as well as modified the composition and functionality of the gut microbiota, compared to the HF control group. The relative abundance of Akkermansia and Faecalibacterium, genera associated with healthy gut mucosa and anti-inflammation, was found to increase in response to lingonberry intake. Conclusions Our results show that supplementation with lingonberries to an HF diet prevents low-grade inflammation and is associated with significant changes of the microbiota composition. Notably, the anti-inflammatory properties of lingonberries seem to be independent of effects on body weight gain. PMID:27125264

  13. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftrtm1UNC mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftrtm1UNC mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice. PMID:26754178

  14. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill. PMID:26115348

  15. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill.

  16. Dietary vitamin E and pulmonary biochemical and morphological alterations of rats exposed to 0. 1 ppM ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.K.; Plopper, C.G.; Chiu, M.; Dungworth, D.L.

    1981-04-01

    Three groups of 28 1-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats each were fed a basal vitamin E-deficient diet and supplemented with either 0, 11, or 110 ppM vitamin E for 38 days, and were then exposed to 0 or 0.1 ppM ozone continuously for 7 days. Following ozone exposure, the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and activities of GSH peroxidase, GSH reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not of malic dehydrogenase, were significantly elevated in the lungs of rats fed the vitamin E deficient diet. The level of GSH and activities of GSH peroxidase and G-6-PD were also significantly increased in the lungs of the animal group fed the 11 ppM vitamin E diet, while none of the biochemical measurements made was significantly altered by ozone in the 110-ppM vitamin E diet fed rats. Scanning electron microscope examination revealed that five out of six rats on the vitamin E-deficient diet and four out of six from the 11-ppM vitamin E diet had detectable lesions following ozone exposure, as compared with only one of the six exposed animals from the 110-ppM vitamin E diet. The lesion was restricted to bronchiolar epithelium and alveoli immediately adjacent to the bronchiole-alveolar duct junction. None of the control animals had detectable lesions. The results suggest that exposure to ozone at 0.1-ppM level can produce detectable pulmonary damage, and that dietary vitamin E alters pulmonary susceptibility to ozone exposure.

  17. High pressure processing alters water distribution enabling the production of reduced-fat and reduced-salt pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijuan; Han, Minyi; Bai, Yun; Han, Yanqing; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) was used to explore novel methods for modifying the textural properties of pork sausages with reduced-salt, reduced-fat and no fat replacement additions. A 2×7 factorial design was set up, incorporating two pressure levels (0.1 or 200 MPa) and seven fat levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%). Sausages treated at 200 MPa exhibited improved tenderness at all fat levels compared with 0.1 MPa treated samples, and the shear force of sausages treated at 200 MPa with 15 or 20% fat content was similar to the 0.1 MPa treated sausages with 30% fat. HPP significantly changed the P₂ peak ratio of the four water components in raw sausages, resulting in improved textural properties of emulsion-type sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt. Significant correlations were found between pH, color, shear force and water proportions. The scanning and transmission micrographs revealed the formation of smaller fat globules and an improved network structure in the pressure treated sausages. In conclusion, there is potential to manufacture sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt by using HPP to maintain textural qualities.

  18. High pressure processing alters water distribution enabling the production of reduced-fat and reduced-salt pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijuan; Han, Minyi; Bai, Yun; Han, Yanqing; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) was used to explore novel methods for modifying the textural properties of pork sausages with reduced-salt, reduced-fat and no fat replacement additions. A 2×7 factorial design was set up, incorporating two pressure levels (0.1 or 200 MPa) and seven fat levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%). Sausages treated at 200 MPa exhibited improved tenderness at all fat levels compared with 0.1 MPa treated samples, and the shear force of sausages treated at 200 MPa with 15 or 20% fat content was similar to the 0.1 MPa treated sausages with 30% fat. HPP significantly changed the P₂ peak ratio of the four water components in raw sausages, resulting in improved textural properties of emulsion-type sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt. Significant correlations were found between pH, color, shear force and water proportions. The scanning and transmission micrographs revealed the formation of smaller fat globules and an improved network structure in the pressure treated sausages. In conclusion, there is potential to manufacture sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt by using HPP to maintain textural qualities. PMID:25553411

  19. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  20. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease.

  1. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Paula B. M.; Neff, Laurence A.; Strosova, Miriam K.; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Dorchies, Olivier M.

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  2. Maternal protein restriction alters VEGF signaling and decreases pulmonary alveolar in fetal rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomei; Lin, Yan; Tian, Baoling; Miao, Jianing; Xi, Chunyan; Liu, Caixia

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for respiratory morbidity from infancy, throughout childhood and into adulthood. Chronic restriction of nutrients causes abnormalities in the airways and lungs of offspring, but whether IUGR adversely impacts fetal pulmonary vascular development and underlying mechanisms remain under investigation. In this study, we investigated the effects of protein malnutrition in utero on pulmonary alveolarization and vascular growth of the fetal lung and placentae. Pregnant rats were feed with an isocaloric low-protein diet (8% protein) until delivery. Placenta and fetal lungs were harvested on 20th day of gestation (term 21 days of gestation). Lung index (lung weight as a percentage of body weight), total DNA and protein, radial alveolar count, arteriolar wall thickness, lung maturity and angiogenic factor VEGF were assessed. The lung was hypoplastic in IUGR fetus, evidenced by reduction in lung weight, DNA and protein content. Protein restriction in utero led to higher glycogen levels, but reduced number of alveoli as confirmed by the measurement of radial alveolar counts. IUGR fetus had significantly reduced VEGF, Flk-1 levels in lung but no changes in Flt-1 mRNA. Furthermore, IUGR was associated with increased lung miR-126-3p levels, which modulated the expression of angiogenic factor. In contrast, with regard to the placenta, IUGR fetus presented with decreased expression of VEGF, with no changes in VEGF receptors and expression-regulating miRNAs. This work suggested that VEGF signaling defect plays an important role in the defective lung development, which may explain the increased incidence of respiratory infections in IUGR patients. PMID:25031729

  3. The dose–response association of urinary metals with altered pulmonary function and risks of restrictive and obstructive lung diseases: a population-based study in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Huang, Xiji; Zhang, Ce; Liu, Chuanyao; Cui, Xiuqing; Zhou, Yun; Sun, Huizhen; Qiu, Gaokun; Guo, Huan; He, Meian; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Weihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Reduced pulmonary function is an important predictor of environment-related pulmonary diseases; however, evidence of an association between exposures to various metals from all possible routes and altered pulmonary function is limited. We aimed to investigate the association of various metals in urine with pulmonary function, restrictive lung disease (RLD) and obstructive lung disease (OLD) risks in the general Chinese population. Design A cross-sectional investigation in the Wuhan cohort population. Setting A heavily polluted Chinese city. Participants A total of 2460 community-living Chinese adults from the Wuhan cohort were included in our analysis. Main outcome measures Spirometric parameters (FVC, forced vital capacity; FEV1, forced expiratory volumes in 1 s; FEV1/FVC ratio), RLD and OLD. Results The dose–response associations of pulmonary function, and RLD and OLD, with 23 urinary metals were assessed using regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders. The false discovery rate (FDR) method was used to correct for multiple hypothesis tests. Our results indicated that there were positive dose–response associations of urinary iron with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio, vanadium with FEV1, and copper and selenium with FEV1/FVC ratio, while a negative dose–response association was observed between urinary lead and FEV1/FVC ratio (all p<0.05). After additional adjusting for multiple comparisons, only iron was dose dependently related to FEV1/FVC ratio (FDR adjusted p<0.05). The dose–response association of iron and lead, with decreased and increased chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk, respectively, was also observed (both p<0.05). Additionally, we found significant association of urinary zinc with RLD and interaction effects of smoking status with lead on FEV1/FVC, and with cadmium on FVC and FEV1. Conclusions These results suggest that multiple urinary metals are associated with altered pulmonary function, and RLD and OLD

  4. Pulmonary pathological alterations in sheep exposed to a lethal dose of phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Assaad, A.; Nold, J.; Petrali, J.; Moore, D.; Mitcheltree, L.; Corcoran, K.; Phillips, K. )

    1991-03-11

    In this study, the authors demonstrated the acute pulmonary cellular changes associated with phosgene exposure, by both light (L.M.) and electron microscopy (E.M.). Adult, unanesthetized sheep were exposed for 10 minutes to either 767 ppm/min of phosgene or room air. Four hours post exposure, all animals were killed, wet lung weight was obtained, and lung tissue was collected for L.M. and E.M. In sheep exposed to phosgene, wet lung weight was significantly higher. Grossly, the lung was congested and edematous. Alveolar and interstitial edema, fibrin and neutrophil exudation in the air spaces, and increased alveolar macrophages, were prominent by L.M. E.M. of Type I pneumocytes showed intracellular swelling, necrosis, and denuding of basement membrane with preservation of the tight junctions. Type II pneumocytes showed loss of lamellar bodies, cytoplasmic swelling, and damage to the endoplasmic reticulum. Endothelial cells showed increased density and vesicular activity, cytoplasmic swelling, and displacement of basement membrane. This study supports the biochemical data the authors previously reported.

  5. A supplement containing trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid reduces milk fat yield but does not alter organ weight or body fat deposition in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Liam A; Weerasinghe, Weerasinghe M P B; Wilkinson, Robert G; de Veth, Michael J; Bauman, Dale E

    2010-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been demonstrated to be a potent inhibitor of milk fat synthesis in ruminants, but effects on carcass composition and organ weight are unknown. Our objectives in this experiment were to determine the dose response of ruminally protected CLA on the performance, organ weight, and fatty acid (FA) composition of early lactation dairy ewes. Twenty-four multiparous dairy ewes were fed a basal diet for 10 wk that was supplemented with a lipid-encapsulated CLA at 1 of 3 levels: no CLA (control, CON), low CLA (L-CLA), or high CLA (H-CLA) to supply 0, 1.5, or 3.8 g/d, respectively, of both trans-10, cis-12 and cis-9, trans-11 CLA. Dry matter intake was not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary treatment. Ewes fed H-CLA had a 13% higher milk yield compared with those receiving either CON or L-CLA. Compared with CON, milk fat yield (g/d) was 14 and 24% lower in ewes fed L-CLA or H-CLA, respectively. Supplementing ewes with CLA did not affect carcass or organ weights, carcass composition, or organ FA content. Compared with ewes receiving the CON diet, CLA supplementation had little effect on the FA composition of the Longissimus dorsi, although cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA were increased in ewes receiving H-CLA. The current findings are consistent with the view that the energy spared by the CLA reduction in milk fat content was mainly partitioned to milk yield and there was no evidence of organ hypertrophy or liver steatosis.

  6. Beef Fat Enriched with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biohydrogenation Products Improves Insulin Sensitivity Without Altering Dyslipidemia in Insulin Resistant JCR:LA-cp Rats.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Borthwick, Faye; Mapiye, Cletos; Vahmani, Payam; David, Rolland C; Vine, Donna F; Dugan, Michael E R; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-07-01

    The main dietary sources of trans fatty acids are partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO), and products derived from polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation (PUFA-BHP) in ruminants. Trans fatty acid intake has historically been associated with negative effects on health, generating an anti-trans fat campaign to reduce their consumption. The profiles and effects on health of PHVO and PUFA-BHP can, however, be quite different. Dairy products naturally enriched with vaccenic and rumenic acids have many purported health benefits, but the putative benefits of beef fat naturally enriched with PUFA-BHP have not been investigated. The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effects of beef peri-renal fat (PRF) with differing enrichments of PUFA-BHP on lipid and insulin metabolism in a rodent model of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (JCR:LA-cp rat). The results showed that 6 weeks of diet supplementation with beef PRF naturally enriched due to flaxseed (FS-PRF) or sunflower-seed (SS-PRF) feeding to cattle significantly improved plasma fasting insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, postprandial insulin levels (only in the FS-PRF) without altering dyslipidemia. Moreover, FS-PRF but not SS-PRF attenuated adipose tissue accumulation. Therefore, enhancing levels of PUFA-BHP in beef PRF with FS feeding may be a useful approach to maximize the health-conferring value of beef-derived fats. PMID:27072368

  7. Beef Fat Enriched with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biohydrogenation Products Improves Insulin Sensitivity Without Altering Dyslipidemia in Insulin Resistant JCR:LA-cp Rats.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Borthwick, Faye; Mapiye, Cletos; Vahmani, Payam; David, Rolland C; Vine, Donna F; Dugan, Michael E R; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-07-01

    The main dietary sources of trans fatty acids are partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO), and products derived from polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation (PUFA-BHP) in ruminants. Trans fatty acid intake has historically been associated with negative effects on health, generating an anti-trans fat campaign to reduce their consumption. The profiles and effects on health of PHVO and PUFA-BHP can, however, be quite different. Dairy products naturally enriched with vaccenic and rumenic acids have many purported health benefits, but the putative benefits of beef fat naturally enriched with PUFA-BHP have not been investigated. The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effects of beef peri-renal fat (PRF) with differing enrichments of PUFA-BHP on lipid and insulin metabolism in a rodent model of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (JCR:LA-cp rat). The results showed that 6 weeks of diet supplementation with beef PRF naturally enriched due to flaxseed (FS-PRF) or sunflower-seed (SS-PRF) feeding to cattle significantly improved plasma fasting insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, postprandial insulin levels (only in the FS-PRF) without altering dyslipidemia. Moreover, FS-PRF but not SS-PRF attenuated adipose tissue accumulation. Therefore, enhancing levels of PUFA-BHP in beef PRF with FS feeding may be a useful approach to maximize the health-conferring value of beef-derived fats.

  8. Regional structural and biomechanical alterations of the ovine main pulmonary artery during postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Fata, Bahar; Carruthers, Christopher A; Gibson, Gregory; Watkins, Simon C; Gottlieb, Danielle; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    The engineering foundation for novel approaches for the repair of congenital defects that involve the main pulmonary artery (PA) must rest on an understanding of changes in the structure-function relationship that occur during postnatal maturation. In the present study, we quantified the postnatal growth patterns in structural and biomechanical behavior in the ovine PA in the juvenile and adult stages. The biaxial mechanical properties and collagen and elastin fiber architecture were studied in four regions of the PA wall, with the collagen recruitment of the medial region analyzed using a custom biaxial mechanical-multiphoton microscopy system. Circumferential residual strain was also quantified at the sinotubular junction and bifurcation locations, which delimit the PA. The PA wall demonstrated significant mechanical anisotropy, except in the posterior region where it was nearly isotropic. Overall, we observed only moderate changes in regional mechanical properties with growth. We did observe that the medial and lateral locations experience a moderate increase in anisotropy. There was an average of about 24% circumferential residual stain present at the luminal surface in the juvenile stage that decreased to 16% in the adult stage with a significant decrease at the bifurcation, implying that the PA wall remodels toward the bifurcation with growth. There were no measurable changes in collagen and elastin content of the tunica media with growth. On average, the collagen fiber recruited more rapidly with strain in the adult compared to the juvenile. Interestingly, the PA thickness remained constant with growth. When this fact is combined with the observed stable overall mechanical behavior and increase in vessel diameter with growth, a simple Laplace Law wall stress estimate suggests an increase in effective PA wall stress with postnatal maturation. This observation is contrary to the accepted theory of maintenance of homeostatic stress levels in the regulation of

  9. Alcohol abuse and smoking alter inflammatory mediator production by pulmonary and systemic immune cells.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Jeanette; McNally, Alicia; Guo, Ruixin; Vandivier, R William; Simonian, Philip L; Burnham, Ellen L

    2016-03-15

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and tobacco smoking are associated with an increased predisposition for community-acquired pneumonia and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanisms are incompletely established but may include alterations in response to pathogens by immune cells, including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We sought to determine the relationship of AUDs and smoking to expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα by AMs and PBMCs from human subjects after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA). AMs and PBMCs from healthy subjects with AUDs and controls, matched on smoking, were cultured with LPS (1 μg/ml) or LTA (5 μg/ml) in the presence and absence of the antioxidant precursor N-acetylcysteine (10 mM). Cytokines were measured in cell culture supernatants. Expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα in AMs and PBMCs was significantly increased in response to stimulation with LPS and LTA. AUDs were associated with augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly IFNγ and IL-1β, by AMs and PBMCs in response to LPS. Smoking diminished the impact of AUDs on AM cytokine expression. Expression of basal AM and PBMC Toll-like receptors-2 and -4 was not clearly related to differences in cytokine expression; however, addition of N-acetylcysteine with LPS or LTA led to diminished AM and PBMC cytokine secretion, especially among current smokers. Our findings suggest that AM and PBMC immune cell responses to LPS and LTA are influenced by AUDs and smoking through mechanisms that may include alterations in cellular oxidative stress.

  10. Alterations in Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Eicosanoids in Patients with Mild to Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Luettich, Karsta; Leroy, Patrice; Boue, Stephanie; Vuillaume, Gregory; Vihervaara, Terhi; Ekroos, Kim; Martin, Florian; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for several diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To better understand the systemic effects of cigarette smoke exposure and mild to moderate COPD—and to support future biomarker development—we profiled the serum lipidomes of healthy smokers, smokers with mild to moderate COPD (GOLD stages 1 and 2), former smokers, and never-smokers (n = 40 per group) (ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT01780298). Serum lipidome profiling was conducted with untargeted and targeted mass spectrometry-based lipidomics. Guided by weighted lipid co-expression network analysis, we identified three main trends comparing smokers, especially those with COPD, with non-smokers: a general increase in glycero(phospho)lipids, including triglycerols; changes in fatty acid desaturation (decrease in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and an increase in monounsaturated fatty acids); and an imbalance in eicosanoids (increase in 11,12- and 14,15-DHETs (dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids), and a decrease in 9- and 13-HODEs (hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids)). The lipidome profiles supported classification of study subjects as smokers or non-smokers, but were not sufficient to distinguish between smokers with and without COPD. Overall, our study yielded further insights into the complex interplay between smoke exposure, lung disease, and systemic alterations in serum lipid profiles. PMID:27657052

  11. Partial Inhibition of Adipose Tissue Lipolysis Improves Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity Without Alteration of Fat Mass

    PubMed Central

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet–fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:23431266

  12. Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity without alteration of fat mass.

    PubMed

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet-fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:23431266

  13. Regular tart cherry intake alters abdominal adiposity, adipose gene transcription, and inflammation in obesity-prone rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E M; Lewis, Sarah K; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Tanone, Ignasia I; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity, systemic inflammation, and hyperlipidemia are among the components of metabolic syndrome, a spectrum of phenotypes that can precede the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Animal studies show that intake of anthocyanin-rich extracts can affect these phenotypes. Anthocyanins can alter the activity of tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which affect energy substrate metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown if physiologically relevant, anthocyanin-containing whole foods confer similar effects to concentrated, anthocyanin extracts. The effect of anthocyanin-rich tart cherries was tested in the Zucker fatty rat model of obesity and metabolic syndrome. For 90 days, rats were pair-fed a higher fat diet supplemented with either 1% (wt/wt) freeze-dried, whole tart cherry powder or with a calorie- and macronutrient-matched control diet. Tart cherry intake was associated with reduced hyperlipidemia, percentage fat mass, abdominal fat (retroperitoneal) weight, retroperitoneal interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression, and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Tart cherry diet also increased retroperitoneal fat PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma mRNA (P = .12), decreased IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNA, and decreased nuclear factor kappaB activity. In conclusion, in at-risk obese rats fed a high fat diet, physiologically relevant tart cherry consumption reduced several phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and reduced both systemic and local inflammation. Tart cherries may reduce the degree or trajectory of metabolic syndrome, thereby reducing risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. PMID:19857054

  14. Regular tart cherry intake alters abdominal adiposity, adipose gene transcription, and inflammation in obesity-prone rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E M; Lewis, Sarah K; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Tanone, Ignasia I; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity, systemic inflammation, and hyperlipidemia are among the components of metabolic syndrome, a spectrum of phenotypes that can precede the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Animal studies show that intake of anthocyanin-rich extracts can affect these phenotypes. Anthocyanins can alter the activity of tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which affect energy substrate metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown if physiologically relevant, anthocyanin-containing whole foods confer similar effects to concentrated, anthocyanin extracts. The effect of anthocyanin-rich tart cherries was tested in the Zucker fatty rat model of obesity and metabolic syndrome. For 90 days, rats were pair-fed a higher fat diet supplemented with either 1% (wt/wt) freeze-dried, whole tart cherry powder or with a calorie- and macronutrient-matched control diet. Tart cherry intake was associated with reduced hyperlipidemia, percentage fat mass, abdominal fat (retroperitoneal) weight, retroperitoneal interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression, and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Tart cherry diet also increased retroperitoneal fat PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma mRNA (P = .12), decreased IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNA, and decreased nuclear factor kappaB activity. In conclusion, in at-risk obese rats fed a high fat diet, physiologically relevant tart cherry consumption reduced several phenotypes of metabolic syndrome and reduced both systemic and local inflammation. Tart cherries may reduce the degree or trajectory of metabolic syndrome, thereby reducing risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

  15. A Multifaceted Analysis of Immune-Endocrine-Metabolic Alterations in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Natalia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Kovalevski, Leandro; Bozza, Verónica; Besedovsky, Hugo; del Rey, Adriana; Bay, María Luisa; Bottasso, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Our study investigated the circulating levels of factors involved in immune-inflammatory-endocrine-metabolic responses in patients with tuberculosis with the aim of uncovering a relation between certain immune and hormonal patterns, their clinical status and in vitro immune response. The concentration of leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, IL-1β, ghrelin, C-reactive protein (CRP), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and the in vitro immune response (lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production) was evaluated in 53 patients with active untreated tuberculosis, 27 household contacts and 25 healthy controls, without significant age- or sex-related differences. Patients had a lower body mass index (BMI), reduced levels of leptin and DHEA, and increased concentrations of CRP, IL-6, cortisol, IL-1β and nearly significant adiponectin values than household contacts and controls. Within tuberculosis patients the BMI and leptin levels were positively correlated and decreased with increasing disease severity, whereas higher concentrations of IL-6, CRP, IL-1β, cortisol, and ghrelin were seen in cases with moderate to severe tuberculosis. Household contacts had lower DHEA and higher IL-6 levels than controls. Group classification by means of discriminant analysis and the k-nearest neighbor method showed that tuberculosis patients were clearly different from the other groups, having higher levels of CRP and lower DHEA concentration and BMI. Furthermore, plasma leptin levels were positively associated with the basal in vitro IFN-γ production and the ConA-driven proliferation of cells from tuberculosis patients. Present alterations in the communication between the neuro-endocrine and immune systems in tuberculosis may contribute to disease worsening. PMID:22022605

  16. Pulmonary biochemical and histological alterations after repeated low-level blast overpressure exposures.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Nabil M; Gorbunov, Nikolai V

    2007-01-01

    Blast overpressure (BOP), also known as high energy impulse noise, is a damaging outcome of explosive detonations and firing of weapons. Exposure to BOP shock waves alone results in injury predominantly to the hollow organ systems such as auditory, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. In recent years, the hazards of BOP that once were confined to military and professional settings have become a global societal problem as terrorist bombings and armed conflicts involving both military and civilian populations increased significantly. We have previously investigated the effects of single BOP exposures at different peak pressures. In this study, we examined the effects of repeated exposure to a low-level BOP and whether the number of exposures or time after exposure would alter the injury outcome. We exposed deeply anesthetized rats to simulated BOP at 62 +/- 2 kPa peak pressure. The lungs were examined immediately after one exposure (1 + 0), or 1 h after one (1 + 1), two (2 + 1), or three (3 + 1) consecutive exposures at 3-min interval. In one group of animals, we examined the effects of repeated exposure on lung weight, methemoglobin, transferrin, antioxidants, and lipid peroxidation. In a second group, the lungs were fixed inflated at 25 cm water, sectioned, and examined histologically after one to three repeated exposures, or after one exposure at 1, 6, and 24 h. We found that single BOP exposure causes notable changes after 1 h, and that repeating BOP exposure did not add markedly to the effect of the first one. However, the effects increased significantly with time from 1 to 24 h. These observations have biological and occupational implications, and emphasize the need for protection from low-level BOP, and for prompt treatment within the first hour following BOP exposure. PMID:17060374

  17. Can alternating lower body negative and positive pressure during exercise alter regional body fat distribution or skin appearance?

    PubMed

    Löberbauer-Purer, Elisabeth; Meyer, Nanna L; Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne; Haudum, Judith; Kässmann, Helmut; Müller, Erich

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether physical activity, with and without lower body pressure, leads to increased regional fat loss in the lower extremities of overweight females. Eighty-six obese women with a female phenotype were randomly assigned into four groups: control group (C), diet only (D), diet plus exercise (DE) or diet, exercise and lower body pressure intervention (DEP). The three treatment groups followed the same diet, the two exercise groups (DE and DEP) additionally followed an endurance training program of 30 min of cycling at 50%VO(2)max three times per week with or without lower body pressure. Body composition and fat distribution were assessed by DXA. Body size circumference measurements were recorded as well as subjective ratings of cellulite and skin appearance. As expected, all test groups (D, DE, DEP) showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in total body mass and fat mass. DXA revealed significant differences between the experimental groups and C. The DEP group also lost significantly more body mass and fat mass when compared with D, while no significant difference was observed between the other groups. A similar pattern was seen for circumference measurement data. A significant perceived improvement was made by the DEP group when compared with C, D and DE groups for skin condition and also between the DEP versus C and D groups for cellulite. The combination of diet and exercise is successful for weight reduction. The additional application of lower body pressure especially affects skin appearance.

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by altering adipose tissue glycolytic and inflammatory function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. In this study, we dissected mechanisms mediating anti-inflammatory and anti-lipogenic actions of EPA, using histology/ immunohistochemistry, transcriptomi...

  19. Enzyme-treated wheat bran alters gut microbiota and liver metabolome in mice fed a high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme-treated wheat bran (ETWB) is a fermentable dietary fiber that has been shown to decrease body fat and modify the gut microbiome. However, it is not clear how these microbiome changes impact peripheral tissue metabolism. We hypothesized that supplementation with ETWB would change gut-derived...

  20. Effect of high-fat and high-carbohydrate diets on pulmonary O2 uptake kinetics during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Raper, J A; Love, L K; Paterson, D H; Peters, S J; Heigenhauser, G J F; Kowalchuk, J M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) regulates the delivery of carbohydrate-derived substrate to the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transport chain. PDH activity at rest and its activation during exercise is attenuated following high-fat (HFAT) compared with high-carbohydrate (HCHO) diets. Given the reliance on carbohydrate-derived substrate early in transitions to exercise, this study examined the effects of HFAT and HCHO on phase II pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2 p) kinetics during transitions into the moderate-intensity (MOD) exercise domain. Eight active adult men underwent dietary manipulations consisting of 6 days of HFAT (73% fat, 22% protein, 5% carbohydrate) followed immediately by 6 days of HCHO (10% fat, 10% protein, 80% carbohydrate); each dietary phase was preceded by a glycogen depletion protocol. Participants performed three MOD transitions from a 20 W cycling baseline to work rate equivalent to 80% of estimated lactate threshold on days 5 and 6 of each diet. Steady-state V̇o2 p was greater (P < 0.05), and respiratory exchange ratio and carbohydrate oxidation rates were lower (P < 0.05) during HFAT. The phase II V̇o2 p time constant (τV̇o2 p) [HFAT 40 ± 16, HCHO 32 ± 19 s (mean ± SD)] and V̇o2 p gain (HFAT 10.3 ± 0.8, HCHO 9.4 ± 0.7 ml·min(-1·)W(-1)) were greater (P < 0.05) in HFAT. The overall adjustment (effective time constant) of muscle deoxygenation (Δ[HHb]) was not different between diets (HFAT 24 ± 4 s, HCHO 23 ± 4 s), which coupled with a slower τV̇o2 p, indicates a slowed microvascular blood flow response. These results suggest that the slower V̇o2 p kinetics associated with HFAT are consistent with inhibition and slower activation of PDH, a lower rate of pyruvate production, and/or attenuated microvascular blood flow and O2 delivery.

  1. Effect of high-fat and high-carbohydrate diets on pulmonary O2 uptake kinetics during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Raper, J A; Love, L K; Paterson, D H; Peters, S J; Heigenhauser, G J F; Kowalchuk, J M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) regulates the delivery of carbohydrate-derived substrate to the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transport chain. PDH activity at rest and its activation during exercise is attenuated following high-fat (HFAT) compared with high-carbohydrate (HCHO) diets. Given the reliance on carbohydrate-derived substrate early in transitions to exercise, this study examined the effects of HFAT and HCHO on phase II pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2 p) kinetics during transitions into the moderate-intensity (MOD) exercise domain. Eight active adult men underwent dietary manipulations consisting of 6 days of HFAT (73% fat, 22% protein, 5% carbohydrate) followed immediately by 6 days of HCHO (10% fat, 10% protein, 80% carbohydrate); each dietary phase was preceded by a glycogen depletion protocol. Participants performed three MOD transitions from a 20 W cycling baseline to work rate equivalent to 80% of estimated lactate threshold on days 5 and 6 of each diet. Steady-state V̇o2 p was greater (P < 0.05), and respiratory exchange ratio and carbohydrate oxidation rates were lower (P < 0.05) during HFAT. The phase II V̇o2 p time constant (τV̇o2 p) [HFAT 40 ± 16, HCHO 32 ± 19 s (mean ± SD)] and V̇o2 p gain (HFAT 10.3 ± 0.8, HCHO 9.4 ± 0.7 ml·min(-1·)W(-1)) were greater (P < 0.05) in HFAT. The overall adjustment (effective time constant) of muscle deoxygenation (Δ[HHb]) was not different between diets (HFAT 24 ± 4 s, HCHO 23 ± 4 s), which coupled with a slower τV̇o2 p, indicates a slowed microvascular blood flow response. These results suggest that the slower V̇o2 p kinetics associated with HFAT are consistent with inhibition and slower activation of PDH, a lower rate of pyruvate production, and/or attenuated microvascular blood flow and O2 delivery. PMID:25277736

  2. Testosterone and farnesoid X receptor agonist INT-747 counteract high fat diet-induced bladder alterations in a rabbit model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Filippi, Sandra; Sarchielli, Erica; Cellai, Ilaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Yehiely-Cohen, Ravit; Maneschi, Elena; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Adorini, Luciano; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Maggi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the male, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated to an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A recently established rabbit model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced MetS showed hypogonadism and the presence of prostate gland alterations, including inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The present study investigated whether HFD-induced MetS might also alter bladder structure and function. Testosterone and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist INT-747, were evaluated for possible effects on HFD bladder. MetS rabbits develop bladder alterations, including fibrosis (reduced muscle/fiber ratio), hypoxia [2-fold increase as compared to regular diet (RD) group], low-grade inflammation (increased leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory markers) and RhoA/ROCK hyperactivity. Bladder strips from HFD rabbits, pre-contracted with carbachol, showed an overactive response to the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. All these HFD-induced bladder alterations were partially blunted by testosterone and almost completely reverted by INT-747. Both treatments prevented some MetS features (glucose intolerance and visceral fat increase), thus suggesting that their effects on bladder could be ascribed to an improvement of the metabolic and/or hypogonadal state. However, a pathogenetic role for hypogonadism has been ruled out as GnRH analog-induced hypogonadal rabbits, fed a regular diet, did not show any detectable bladder alterations. In addition, INT-747 did not revert the MetS-induced hypogonadal state. FXR mRNA was highly expressed in rabbit bladder and positively associated with visceral fat increase. A direct effect of INT-747 on bladder smooth muscle was further suggested by inhibition of RhoA/ROCK-mediated activity by in vitro experiments on isolated cells. In conclusion, HFD-related MetS features are associated to bladder derangements, which are ameliorated by testosterone or INT-747 administration. INT-747 showed the most marked

  3. Eight week exposure to a high sugar high fat diet results in adiposity gain and alterations in metabolic biomarkers in baboons (Papio hamadryas sp.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Baboons (Papio hamadryas Sp.) develop features of the cardiometabolic syndrome and represent a clinically-relevant animal model in which to study the aetiology of the disorder. To further evaluate the baboon as a model for the study of the cardiometabolic syndrome, we developed a high sugar high fat diet and hypothesized that it could be used to induce adiposity gain and affect associated circulating biomarkers. Methods We developed a diet enriched with monosaccharides and saturated fatty acids that was composed of solid and liquid energy sources. We provided a group of baboons (n = 9) ad libitum access to this diet for 8 weeks. Concurrently, a control group (n = 6) was maintained with ad libitum access to a low sugar low fat baseline diet and normal water for 8 weeks. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and circulating metabolic biomarkers were measured using standard methodology before and after the 8 week study period. Results Neither body composition nor circulating biomarkers changed in the control group. Following the 8 weeks, the intervention group had a significant increase in fat mass (1.71 ± 0.98 vs. 3.23 ± 1.70 kg, p = 0.004), triglyceride (55 ± 13 vs. 109 ± 67 mg/dL, p = 0.006,), and leptin (1.19 ± 1.40 vs. 3.29 ± 2.32 ng/mL, p = 0.001) and a decline in adiponectin concentrations (33530 ± 9744 vs. 23330 ± 7863 ng/mL, p = 0.002). Percentage haemoglobin A1C (4.0 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 1.4, p = 0.002) also increased in the intervention group. Conclusions Our findings indicate that when exposed to a high sugar high fat diet, young adult male baboons develop increased body fat and triglyceride concentrations, altered adipokine concentrations, and evidence of altered glucose metabolism. Our findings are in keeping with observations in humans and further demonstrate the potential utility of this highly clinically-relevant animal model for studying diet-induced metabolic dysregulation. PMID:21034486

  4. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status.

  5. High-fat diet alters serum fatty acid profiles in obesity prone rats: implications for in-vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-Wen; Heden, Timothy D.; Morris, E. Matthew; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diets (HFD) are commonly used in rodents to induce obesity, increase serum fatty acids, and induce lipotoxicity in various organs. In-vitro studies commonly utilize individual free fatty acids (FFA) to study lipid exposure in an effort to model what is occurring in-vivo, however, these approaches are not physiological as tissues are exposed to multiple fatty acids in-vivo. Here we characterize circulating lipids in obese-prone rats fed a HFD in both fasted and fed states with the goal of developing physiologically relevant fatty acid mixtures for subsequent in-vitro studies. Rats were fed a HFD (60% kcal fat) or a control diet (10% kcal fat) for 3 weeks; liver tissue, and both portal and systemic blood was collected. Fatty acid profiles and absolute concentrations of triglycerides (TAG) and FFA in the serum and TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), and phospholipids (PL) in the liver were measured. Surprisingly, both systemic and portal serum TAG were ~40% lower in HFD-fed compared to controls. Overall, compared to the control diet, HFD feeding consistently induced an increase in the proportion of circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with a concomitant decline in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and saturated fatty acids (SFA) in both serum TAG and FFA. The elevations of PUFA were mostly attributed to increases in n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. In conclusion, fatty acid mixtures enriched with linoleic and arachidonic acid in addition to SFA and MUFA should be utilized for in-vitro studies attempting to model lipid exposures that occur during in-vivo HFD condition. PMID:26318121

  6. Timing of fat and liquid sugar intake alters substrate oxidation and food efficiency in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Foppen, Ewout; van der Spek, Rianne; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the amount of ingested calories, both timing of food intake and meal composition are determinants of body weight gain. However, at present, it is unknown if the inappropriate timing of diet components is responsible for body weight gain. In the present study, we therefore studied a time-dependent effect of the diet composition on energy homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chow ad libitum (chow group) or a choice diet with saturated fat, a 30% sugar solution, chow and tap water. The choice diet was provided either with all components ad libitum (AL), with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and a 30% sugar solution, but with access to saturated fat only during the light period (LF), or with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and saturated fat, but access to a 30% sugar solution only during the light period (LS). Caloric intake and body weight gain were monitored during 31 days. Energy expenditure was measured in the third week in calorimetric cages. All rats on a choice diet showed hyperphagia and gained more body weight compared to the chow group. Within the choice diet groups, rats on the LS diet were most food efficient (i.e. gained most body weight per ingested calorie) and showed a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) with an anti-phasic pattern, whereas no differences in locomotor activity or heat production were found. Collectively these data indicate that the timing of the diet composition affects food efficiency, most likely due to a shifted oxidation pattern, which can predispose for obesity. Further studies are underway to assess putative mechanisms involved in this dysregulation.

  7. Dietary fish oil supplements depress milk fat yield and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kairenius, P; Ärölä, A; Leskinen, H; Toivonen, V; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Hurme, T; Griinari, J M; Shingfield, K J

    2015-08-01

    The potential of dietary fish oil (FO) supplements to increase milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations and the associated effects on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, intake, and milk production were examined. Four multiparous lactating cows offered a grass silage-based diet (forage:concentrate ratio 58:42, on a dry matter basis) supplemented with 0, 75, 150, or 300g of FO/d (FO0, FO75, FO150, and FO300, respectively) were used in a 4×4 Latin square with 28-d experimental periods. Milk FA composition was analyzed by complementary silver-ion thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and silver-ion HPLC. Supplements of FO decreased linearly dry matter intake, yields of energy-corrected milk, milk fat and protein, and milk fat content. Compared with FO0, milk fat content and yield were decreased by 30.1 and 40.6%, respectively, on the FO300 treatment. Supplements of FO linearly increased milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.18 and 0.03 to 0.10g/100g of FA, respectively. Enrichment of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 was accompanied by decreases in 4- to 18-carbon saturated FA and increases in total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans FA, and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Fish oil elevated milk fat cis-9,trans-11 CLA content in a quadratic manner, reaching a maximum on FO150 (from 0.61 to 2.15g/100g of FA), whereas further amounts of FO increased trans-10 18:1 with no change in trans-11 18:1 concentration. Supplements of FO also resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of 37 unique 20- and 22-carbon intermediates in milk fat. Concentrations of 16-, 18-, 20-, and 22-carbon trans FA were all increased by FO, with enrichment of trans 18:1 and trans 18:2 being quantitatively the most important. Decreases in milk fat yield to FO were not related to changes in milk trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentration or estimated milk fat melting point. Partial least square regression analysis indicated that FO-induced milk fat depression was associated with

  8. Dietary fish oil supplements depress milk fat yield and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kairenius, P; Ärölä, A; Leskinen, H; Toivonen, V; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Hurme, T; Griinari, J M; Shingfield, K J

    2015-08-01

    The potential of dietary fish oil (FO) supplements to increase milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations and the associated effects on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, intake, and milk production were examined. Four multiparous lactating cows offered a grass silage-based diet (forage:concentrate ratio 58:42, on a dry matter basis) supplemented with 0, 75, 150, or 300g of FO/d (FO0, FO75, FO150, and FO300, respectively) were used in a 4×4 Latin square with 28-d experimental periods. Milk FA composition was analyzed by complementary silver-ion thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and silver-ion HPLC. Supplements of FO decreased linearly dry matter intake, yields of energy-corrected milk, milk fat and protein, and milk fat content. Compared with FO0, milk fat content and yield were decreased by 30.1 and 40.6%, respectively, on the FO300 treatment. Supplements of FO linearly increased milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.18 and 0.03 to 0.10g/100g of FA, respectively. Enrichment of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 was accompanied by decreases in 4- to 18-carbon saturated FA and increases in total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans FA, and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Fish oil elevated milk fat cis-9,trans-11 CLA content in a quadratic manner, reaching a maximum on FO150 (from 0.61 to 2.15g/100g of FA), whereas further amounts of FO increased trans-10 18:1 with no change in trans-11 18:1 concentration. Supplements of FO also resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of 37 unique 20- and 22-carbon intermediates in milk fat. Concentrations of 16-, 18-, 20-, and 22-carbon trans FA were all increased by FO, with enrichment of trans 18:1 and trans 18:2 being quantitatively the most important. Decreases in milk fat yield to FO were not related to changes in milk trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentration or estimated milk fat melting point. Partial least square regression analysis indicated that FO-induced milk fat depression was associated with

  9. Short communication: Altered expression of specificity protein 1 impairs milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Luo, J; Xu, H F; Wang, H; Loor, J J

    2016-06-01

    Specificity protein 1 (encoded by SP1) is a novel transcription factor important for the regulation of lipid metabolism and the normal function of various hormones in model organisms. Its potential role, if any, on ruminant milk fat is unknown. Despite the lower expression of the lipolysis-related gene ATGL (by 44 and 37% respectively), both the adenoviral overexpression and the silencing of SP1 [via short interfering (si)RNA] markedly reduced cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content (by 28 and 25%, respectively), at least in part by decreasing the expression of DGAT1 (-36% in adenovirus treatment) and DGAT2 (-81 and -87%, respectively) that are involved in TAG synthesis. Consistent with the markedly lower expression of genes related to lipid droplet formation and secretion (TIP47 by 19 and 32%, and ADFP by 25 and 25%, respectively), cellular lipid droplet content was also decreased sharply, by 9 and 8.5%, respectively, after adenoviral overexpression of SP1 or its silencing via siRNA. Overall, the results underscored a potentially important role of SP1 in maintaining milk-fat droplet synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26995134

  10. Short communication: Altered expression of specificity protein 1 impairs milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Luo, J; Xu, H F; Wang, H; Loor, J J

    2016-06-01

    Specificity protein 1 (encoded by SP1) is a novel transcription factor important for the regulation of lipid metabolism and the normal function of various hormones in model organisms. Its potential role, if any, on ruminant milk fat is unknown. Despite the lower expression of the lipolysis-related gene ATGL (by 44 and 37% respectively), both the adenoviral overexpression and the silencing of SP1 [via short interfering (si)RNA] markedly reduced cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content (by 28 and 25%, respectively), at least in part by decreasing the expression of DGAT1 (-36% in adenovirus treatment) and DGAT2 (-81 and -87%, respectively) that are involved in TAG synthesis. Consistent with the markedly lower expression of genes related to lipid droplet formation and secretion (TIP47 by 19 and 32%, and ADFP by 25 and 25%, respectively), cellular lipid droplet content was also decreased sharply, by 9 and 8.5%, respectively, after adenoviral overexpression of SP1 or its silencing via siRNA. Overall, the results underscored a potentially important role of SP1 in maintaining milk-fat droplet synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

  11. Short-term high-fat-and-fructose feeding produces insulin signaling alterations accompanied by neurite and synaptic reduction and astroglial activation in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Hernández-Ortega, Karina; Ferrera, Patricia; Morimoto, Sumiko; Arias, Clorinda

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of high-fat-and-fructose diets (HFFD) is associated with the development of insulin resistance (InsRes) and obesity. Systemic insulin resistance resulting from long-term HFFD feeding has detrimental consequences on cognitive performance, neurogenesis, and long-term potentiation establishment, accompanied by neuronal alterations in the hippocampus. However, diet-induced hippocampal InsRes has not been reported. Therefore, we investigated whether short-term HFFD feeding produced hippocampal insulin signaling alterations associated with neuronal changes in the hippocampus. Rats were fed with a control diet or an HFFD consisting of 10% lard supplemented chow and 20% high-fructose syrup in the drinking water. Our results show that 7 days of HFFD feeding induce obesity and InsRes, associated with the following alterations in the hippocampus: (1) a decreased insulin signaling; (2) a decreased hippocampal weight; (3) a reduction in dendritic arborization in CA1 and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) levels; (4) a decreased dendritic spine number in CA1 and synaptophysin content, along with an increase in tau phosphorylation; and finally, (5) an increase in reactive astrocyte associated with microglial changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing hippocampal insulin signaling, as well as morphologic, structural, and functional modifications due to short-term HFFD feeding in the rat. PMID:24667917

  12. Re-esterified palm oils, compared to native palm oil, do not alter fat absorption, postprandial lipemia or growth performance in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Vilarrasa, E; Tres, A; Bayés-García, L; Parella, T; Esteve-Garcia, E; Barroeta, A C

    2014-08-01

    Re-esterified palm oils are obtained from the chemical esterification of palm acid oils (rich in free fatty acids) with glycerol, both economically interesting by-products from oil refining and biodiesel industries, respectively. Thus, re-esterified palm oils could be an economically interesting alternative to native palm oil in broiler chick diets. However, because they may have different physicochemical properties than have their corresponding native oil, we assessed the effect of fatty acid (FA) positional distribution within acylglycerol molecules and the effect of acylglycerol composition on FA apparent absorption, and their possible consequences on the evolution of postprandial lipemia and growth performance in broiler chicks. Seventy-two 1-day-old female broiler chicks were randomly distributed into 18 cages. The three treatments used were the result of a basal diet supplemented with 6 wt% of native palm oil (N-TAG), re-esterified palm oil (E-TAG), or re-esterified palm oil high in mono- and diacylglycerols (E-MDAG). Chemical esterification raised the fraction of palmitic acid at the sn-2 position from 9.63 mol% in N-TAG oil to 17.9 mol% in E-TAG oil. Furthermore, E-MDAG oil presented a high proportion of mono- (23.1 wt%) and diacylglycerols (51.2 wt%), with FA mainly located at the sn-1,3 positions, which resulted in a lower gross-energy content and an increased solid-fat index at the chicken's body temperature. However, re-esterified palm oils did not alter fat absorption, postprandial lipemia, or growth performance, compared to native palm oil, so they can be used as alternative fat sources in broiler chick diets.

  13. Maternal high-fat diet induces hyperproliferation and alters Pten/Akt signaling in prostates of offspring

    PubMed Central

    Benesh, Emily C.; Humphrey, Peter A.; Wang, Qiang; Moley, Kelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing recommendations for prostate cancer prevention requires identification of modifiable risk factors. Maternal exposure to high-fat diet (HFD) initiates a broad array of second-generation adult disorders in murine models and humans. Here, we investigate whether maternal HFD in mice affects incidence of prostate hyperplasia in offspring. Using three independent assays, we demonstrate that maternal HFD is sufficient to initiate prostate hyperproliferation in adult male offspring. HFD-exposed prostate tissues do not increase in size, but instead concomitantly up-regulate apoptosis. Maternal HFD-induced phenotypes are focally present in young adult subjects and greatly exacerbated in aged subjects. HFD-exposed prostate tissues additionally exhibit increased levels of activated Akt and deactivated Pten. Taken together, we conclude that maternal HFD diet is a candidate modifiable risk factor for prostate cancer initiation in later life. PMID:24322661

  14. Neurochemical and electrophysiological deficits in the ventral hippocampus and selective behavioral alterations caused by high-fat diet in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S; Keralapurath, M M; Lin, Z; Wagner, J J; de La Serre, C B; Harn, D A; Filipov, N M

    2015-06-25

    Mounting experimental evidence, predominantly from male rodents, demonstrates that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and ensuing obesity are detrimental to the brain. To shed additional light on the neurological consequences of HFD consumption in female rodents and to determine the relatively early impact of HFD in the likely continuum of neurological dysfunction in the context of chronic HFD intake, this study investigated effects of HFD feeding for up to 12weeks on selected behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological parameters in adult female C57BL/6 mice; particular focus was placed on the ventral hippocampus (vHIP). Selected locomotor, emotional and cognitive functions were evaluated using behavioral tests after 5weeks on HFD or control (low-fat diet) diets. One week later, mice were sacrificed and brain regional neurochemical (monoamine) analysis was performed. Behaviorally naïve mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 5-6weeks at which time synaptic plasticity was determined in ex vivo slices from the vHIP. HFD-fed female mice exhibited increased: (i) locomotor activity in the open field testing, (ii) mean turn time on the pole test, (iii) swimming time in the forced swim test, and (iv) number of marbles buried in the marble burying test. In contrast, the novel object recognition memory was unaffected. Mice on HFD also had decreased norepinephrine and dopamine turnover, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex and the vHIP. HFD consumption for a total of 11-12weeks altered vHIP synaptic plasticity, evidenced by significant reductions in the paired-pulse ratio and long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude. In summary, in female mice, HFD intake for several weeks induced multiple behavioral alterations of mainly anxiety-like nature and impaired monoamine pathways in a brain region-specific manner, suggesting that in the female, certain behavioral domains (anxiety) and associated brain regions, i.e., the vHIP, are preferentially

  15. A High Fat Diet Increases Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue (MAT) But Does Not Alter Trabecular or Cortical Bone Mass in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Casey R; Horowitz, Mark C; Berry, Ryan; MacDougald, Ormond A; Anunciado-Koza, Rea; Koza, Robert A; Rosen, Clifford J

    2015-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with high bone mineral density (BMD) but a greater propensity to fracture. Some obese individuals have increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT), but the impact of MAT on bone turnover remains controversial, as do changes in BMD associated with a high fat diet (HFD). In this study we hypothesized that MAT volume would increase in response to HFD but would be independent of changes in BMD. Hence, we fed C57BL/6J (B6) male mice at 3 weeks of age either a high fat diet (60 kcal %) or regular diet (10 kcal %) for 12 weeks (n = 10/group). We measured MAT volume by osmium staining and micro-CT (µCT) as well as bone parameters by µCT, histomorphometry, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We also performed a short-term pilot study using 13-week-old B6 males and females fed a HFD (58 kcal %) for 2 weeks (n = 3/sex). Both long- and short-term HFD feedings were associated with high MAT volume, however, femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone formation rate and cortical bone mass were not altered in the long-term study. In the short-term pilot study, areal BMD was unchanged after 2 weeks of HFD. We conclude that, for B6 mice fed a HFD starting at wean or 13 weeks of age, MAT increases whereas bone mass is not altered. More studies are needed to define the mechanism responsible for the rapid storage of energy in the marrow and its distinction from other adipose depots. PMID:25663195

  16. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Robin R.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonary, cerebral and cutaneous dysfunction and confirmed by the demonstration of arterial hypoxemia in the absence of other disorders. Treatment of fat embolism syndrome consists of general supportive measures, including splinting, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and the administration of oxygen. Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilatory assistance can be indicated. The role of corticosteroids remains controversial. Early stabilization of long bone fractures has been shown to decrease the incidence of pulmonary complications. Clinical and experimental studies suggest that the exact method of fracture fixation plays a minor role in the development of pulmonary dysfunction. As more is learned about the specifics of the various triggers for the development of fat embolism syndrome, it is hoped that the prospect of more specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of this disorder will become a reality. PMID:9336522

  17. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings. PMID:25825391

  18. Adventitial Alterations Are the Main Features in Pulmonary Artery Remodeling due to Long-Term Chronic Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Julio; Siques, Patricia; Arribas, Silvia M.; López de Pablo, Angel L.; González, M. Carmen; Naveas, Nelson; Flores, Karen; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Pulido, Ruth; Ordenes, Stefany; López, M. Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic intermittent exposure to altitude hypoxia is a labor phenomenon requiring further research. Using a rat model, we examined whether this type of exposure differed from chronic exposure in terms of pulmonary artery remodeling and other features. Rats were subjected to chronic hypoxia (CH, n = 9) and long-term intermittent hypoxia (CIH2x2; 2 days of hypoxia/2 days of normoxia, n = 10) in a chamber (428 Torr, 4,600 m of altitude) for 46 days and compared to rats under normoxia (NX, n = 10). Body weight, hematocrit, and right ventricle ratio were measured. Pulmonary artery remodeling was assessed using confocal microscopy of tissues stained with a nuclear dye (DAPI) and CD11b antibody. Both hypoxic conditions exhibited increased hematocrit and hypertrophy of the right ventricle, tunica adventitia, and tunica media, with no changes in lumen size. The medial hypertrophy area (larger in CH) depicted a significant increase in smooth muscle cell number. Additionally, CIH2x2 increased the adventitial hypertrophy area, with an increased cellularity and a larger prevalence of clustered inflammatory cells. In conclusion, CIH2x2 elicits milder effects on pulmonary artery medial layer muscularization and subsequent right ventricular hypertrophy than CH. However, CIH2x2 induces greater and characteristic alterations of the adventitial layer. PMID:25738150

  19. Adventitial alterations are the main features in pulmonary artery remodeling due to long-term chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Brito, Julio; Siques, Patricia; Arribas, Silvia M; López de Pablo, Angel L; González, M Carmen; Naveas, Nelson; Arriaza, Karem; Flores, Karen; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Pulido, Ruth; Ordenes, Stefany; López, M Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic intermittent exposure to altitude hypoxia is a labor phenomenon requiring further research. Using a rat model, we examined whether this type of exposure differed from chronic exposure in terms of pulmonary artery remodeling and other features. Rats were subjected to chronic hypoxia (CH, n = 9) and long-term intermittent hypoxia (CIH2x2; 2 days of hypoxia/2 days of normoxia, n = 10) in a chamber (428 Torr, 4,600 m of altitude) for 46 days and compared to rats under normoxia (NX, n = 10). Body weight, hematocrit, and right ventricle ratio were measured. Pulmonary artery remodeling was assessed using confocal microscopy of tissues stained with a nuclear dye (DAPI) and CD11b antibody. Both hypoxic conditions exhibited increased hematocrit and hypertrophy of the right ventricle, tunica adventitia, and tunica media, with no changes in lumen size. The medial hypertrophy area (larger in CH) depicted a significant increase in smooth muscle cell number. Additionally, CIH2x2 increased the adventitial hypertrophy area, with an increased cellularity and a larger prevalence of clustered inflammatory cells. In conclusion, CIH2x2 elicits milder effects on pulmonary artery medial layer muscularization and subsequent right ventricular hypertrophy than CH. However, CIH2x2 induces greater and characteristic alterations of the adventitial layer.

  20. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron-sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-03-30

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings.

  1. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  2. Unsuppressed lipolysis in adipocytes is linked with enhanced gluconeogenesis and altered bile acid physiology in InsrP1195L/+ mice fed high-fat-diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Sakurai, Kenichi; Zhang, Xilin; Toda, Chitoku; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shirasawa, Takuji; Tachibana, Kaori; Yokote, Koutaro; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Miki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) triggers insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, but their link remains unclear. Characterization of overt hyperglycemia in insulin receptor mutant (InsrP1195L/+) mice exposed to HFD (InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice) revealed increased glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) expression in liver and increased gluconeogenesis from glycerol. Lipolysis in white adipose tissues (WAT) and lipolysis-induced blood glucose rise were increased in InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice, while wild-type WAT transplantation ameliorated the hyperglycemia and the increased G6pc expression. We found that the expressions of genes involved in bile acid (BA) metabolism were altered in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. Among these, the expression of Cyp7a1, a BA synthesis enzyme, was insulin-dependent and was markedly decreased in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. Reduced Cyp7a1 expression in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver was rescued by WAT transplantation, and the expression of Cyp7a1 was suppressed by glycerol administration in wild-type liver. These findings suggest that unsuppressed lipolysis in adipocytes elicited by HFD feeding is linked with enhanced gluconeogenesis from glycerol and with alterations in BA physiology in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. PMID:26615883

  3. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  4. Exposure to a high fat diet during the perinatal period alters vagal motoneurone excitability, even in the absence of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Ruchi; Fortna, Samuel R; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is critically important to the development of autonomic neural circuits responsible for energy homeostasis. Vagal neurocircuits are vital to the regulation of upper gastrointestinal functions, including satiety. Diet-induced obesity modulates the excitability and responsiveness of both peripheral vagal afferents and central vagal efferents but less information is available regarding the effects of diet per se on vagal neurocircuit functions. The aims of this study were to investigate whether perinatal exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) dysregulated dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, prior to the development of obesity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from gastric-projecting DMV neurones in thin brainstem slices from rats that were exposed to either a control diet or HFD from pregnancy day 13. Our data demonstrate that following perinatal HFD: (i) DMV neurones had decreased excitability and input resistance with a reduced ability to fire action potentials; (ii) the proportion of DMV neurones excited by cholecystokinin (CCK) was unaltered but the proportion of neurones in which CCK increased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs was reduced; (iii) the tonic activation of presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors on inhibitory nerve terminals was attenuated, allowing modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission; and (iv) the size and dendritic arborization of gastric-projecting DMV neurones was increased. These results suggest that perinatal HFD exposure compromises the excitability and responsiveness of gastric-projecting DMV neurones, even in the absence of obesity, suggesting that attenuation of vago-vagal reflex signalling may precede the development of obesity. PMID:25556801

  5. Adenosine protects Sprague Dawley rats from high-fat diet and repeated acute restraint stress-induced intestinal inflammation and altered expression of nutrient transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated acute restraint stress and high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal expression of nutrient transporters, concomitant to intestinal inflammation. The ability of adenosine to reverse any change was examined. Six-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: control or non-stressed (C), rats exposed to restraint stress for 6 h per day for 14 days (S), control rats fed with HFD (CHF) and restraint-stressed rats fed with HFD (SHF); four additional groups received the same treatments and were also given 50 mg/l adenosine dissolved in drinking water. Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured. Intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2, NPC1L1 and TNF-α was analysed. Histological evaluation was conducted to observe for morphological and anatomical changes in the intestinal tissues. Results showed that HFD feeding increased glucose and insulin levels, and repeated acute restraint stress raised the corticosterone level by 22%. Exposure to both stress and HFD caused a further increase in corticosterone to 41%, while decreasing plasma adiponectin level. Restraint stress altered intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2 and NPC1L1. These changes were enhanced in SHF rats. Adenosine was found to alleviate HFD-induced increase in glucose and insulin levels, suppress elevation of corticosterone in S rats and improve the altered nutrient transporters expression profiles. It also prevented upregulation of TNF-α in the intestine of SHF rats. In summary, a combination of stress and HFD exaggerated stress- and HFD-induced pathophysiological changes in the intestine, and biochemical parameters related to obesity. Adenosine attenuated the elevation of corticosterone and altered expression of SLC5A1, NPC1L1 and TNF-α.

  6. Background diet and fat type alters plasma lipoprotein response but not aortic cholesterol accumulation in F1B Golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Alice; Matthan, Nirupa R; Spartano, Nicole L; Butkowski, Ann E; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-12-01

    Dietary modification alters plasma lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerotic lesion progression in humans and some animal models. Variability in response to diet induced atherosclerosis has been reported in hamsters. Assessed was the interaction between background diet composition and dietary fat type on aortic cholesterol accumulation, lipoprotein profiles, hepatic lipids and selected genes. F1B Golden Syrian hamsters (20/group) were fed (12 weeks) semi-purified or non-purified diets containing either 10 % (w/w) coconut oil or safflower oil and 0.15 % (w/w) cholesterol. The non-purified diets relative to semi-purified diets resulted in significantly higher TC (72 % [percent difference] and 38 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively) and nHDL-C (84 and 61 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively), and lower HDL-C (-47 and -45 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively) concentrations. Plasma triacylglycerol concentrations in the hamsters fed the non-purified coconut oil-supplemented diets were three- to fourfold higher than non-purified safflower oil-supplemented, and both semi-purified diets. With the exception of HDL-C, a significant effect of fat type was observed in TC, nHDL-C and triacylglycerol (all P < 0.05) concentrations. Regardless of diet induced differences in lipoprotein profiles, there was no significant effect on aortic cholesterol accumulation. There was an inverse relationship between plasma nHDL-C and triacylglycerol, and hepatic cholesteryl ester content (P < 0.001). Diet induced differences in hepatic gene transcription (LDL receptor, apoB-100, microsomal transfer protein) were not reflected in protein concentrations. Although hamsters fed non-purified and/or saturated fatty acid-supplemented diets had more atherogenic lipoprotein profiles compared to hamsters fed semi-purified and/or polyunsaturated fatty acid-supplemented diets these differences were not reflected in aortic cholesterol accumulation.

  7. Maternal Plane of Nutrition during Late Gestation and Weaning Age Alter Angus × Simmental Offspring Longissimus Muscle Transcriptome and Intramuscular Fat.

    PubMed

    Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Shoup, Lindsay; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Loor, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    In model organisms both the nutrition of the mother and the young offspring could induce long-lasting transcriptional changes in tissues. In livestock, such changes could have important roles in determining nutrient use and meat quality. The main objective was to evaluate if plane of maternal nutrition during late-gestation and weaning age alter the offspring's Longissimus muscle (LM) transcriptome, animal performance, and metabolic hormones. Whole-transcriptome microarray analysis was performed on LM samples of early (EW) and normal weaned (NW) Angus × Simmental calves born to grazing cows receiving no supplement [low plane of nutrition (LPN)] or 2.3 kg high-grain mix/day [medium plane of nutrition (MPN)] during the last 105 days of gestation. Biopsies of LM were harvested at 78 (EW), 187 (NW) and 354 (before slaughter) days of age. Despite greater feed intake in MPN offspring, blood insulin was greater in LPN offspring. Carcass intramuscular fat content was greater in EW offspring. Bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome highlighted a modest overall response to maternal plane of nutrition, resulting in only 35 differentially expressed genes (DEG). However, weaning age and a high-grain diet (EW) strongly impacted the transcriptome (DEG = 167), especially causing a lipogenic program activation. In addition, between 78 and 187 days of age, EW steers had an activation of the innate immune system due presumably to macrophage infiltration of intramuscular fat. Between 187 and 354 days of age (the "finishing" phase), NW steers had an activation of the lipogenic transcriptome machinery, while EW steers had a clear inhibition through the epigenetic control of histone acetylases. Results underscored the need to conduct further studies to understand better the functional outcome of transcriptome changes induced in the offspring by pre- and post-natal nutrition. Additional knowledge on molecular and functional outcomes would help produce more efficient beef cattle.

  8. Maternal Plane of Nutrition during Late Gestation and Weaning Age Alter Angus × Simmental Offspring Longissimus Muscle Transcriptome and Intramuscular Fat

    PubMed Central

    Moisá, Sonia J.; Shike, Daniel W.; Shoup, Lindsay; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Loor, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    In model organisms both the nutrition of the mother and the young offspring could induce long-lasting transcriptional changes in tissues. In livestock, such changes could have important roles in determining nutrient use and meat quality. The main objective was to evaluate if plane of maternal nutrition during late-gestation and weaning age alter the offspring’s Longissimus muscle (LM) transcriptome, animal performance, and metabolic hormones. Whole-transcriptome microarray analysis was performed on LM samples of early (EW) and normal weaned (NW) Angus × Simmental calves born to grazing cows receiving no supplement [low plane of nutrition (LPN)] or 2.3 kg high-grain mix/day [medium plane of nutrition (MPN)] during the last 105 days of gestation. Biopsies of LM were harvested at 78 (EW), 187 (NW) and 354 (before slaughter) days of age. Despite greater feed intake in MPN offspring, blood insulin was greater in LPN offspring. Carcass intramuscular fat content was greater in EW offspring. Bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome highlighted a modest overall response to maternal plane of nutrition, resulting in only 35 differentially expressed genes (DEG). However, weaning age and a high-grain diet (EW) strongly impacted the transcriptome (DEG = 167), especially causing a lipogenic program activation. In addition, between 78 and 187 days of age, EW steers had an activation of the innate immune system due presumably to macrophage infiltration of intramuscular fat. Between 187 and 354 days of age (the “finishing” phase), NW steers had an activation of the lipogenic transcriptome machinery, while EW steers had a clear inhibition through the epigenetic control of histone acetylases. Results underscored the need to conduct further studies to understand better the functional outcome of transcriptome changes induced in the offspring by pre- and post-natal nutrition. Additional knowledge on molecular and functional outcomes would help produce more efficient beef

  9. Maternal Plane of Nutrition during Late Gestation and Weaning Age Alter Angus × Simmental Offspring Longissimus Muscle Transcriptome and Intramuscular Fat.

    PubMed

    Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Shoup, Lindsay; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Loor, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    In model organisms both the nutrition of the mother and the young offspring could induce long-lasting transcriptional changes in tissues. In livestock, such changes could have important roles in determining nutrient use and meat quality. The main objective was to evaluate if plane of maternal nutrition during late-gestation and weaning age alter the offspring's Longissimus muscle (LM) transcriptome, animal performance, and metabolic hormones. Whole-transcriptome microarray analysis was performed on LM samples of early (EW) and normal weaned (NW) Angus × Simmental calves born to grazing cows receiving no supplement [low plane of nutrition (LPN)] or 2.3 kg high-grain mix/day [medium plane of nutrition (MPN)] during the last 105 days of gestation. Biopsies of LM were harvested at 78 (EW), 187 (NW) and 354 (before slaughter) days of age. Despite greater feed intake in MPN offspring, blood insulin was greater in LPN offspring. Carcass intramuscular fat content was greater in EW offspring. Bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome highlighted a modest overall response to maternal plane of nutrition, resulting in only 35 differentially expressed genes (DEG). However, weaning age and a high-grain diet (EW) strongly impacted the transcriptome (DEG = 167), especially causing a lipogenic program activation. In addition, between 78 and 187 days of age, EW steers had an activation of the innate immune system due presumably to macrophage infiltration of intramuscular fat. Between 187 and 354 days of age (the "finishing" phase), NW steers had an activation of the lipogenic transcriptome machinery, while EW steers had a clear inhibition through the epigenetic control of histone acetylases. Results underscored the need to conduct further studies to understand better the functional outcome of transcriptome changes induced in the offspring by pre- and post-natal nutrition. Additional knowledge on molecular and functional outcomes would help produce more efficient beef cattle

  10. Fecal fat

    MedlinePlus

    Quantitative stool fat determination; Fat absorption ... This test evaluates fat absorption to tell how well the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and intestines are working. Fat malabsorption can cause a change in your ...

  11. Cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in A/J mice is associated with pulmonary oxidative stress, apoptosis of lung cells, and global alterations in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Misra, Vikas; Zhen, Lijie; Tankersley, Clarke G.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of deaths in the United States. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of this disease remain elusive. We used Affymetrix Gene Chip arrays to determine the temporal alterations in global gene expression during the progression of pulmonary emphysema in A/J mice. Chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure caused pulmonary emphysema in A/J mice, which was associated with pronounced bronchoalveolar inflammation, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased apoptosis of alveolar septal cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of 1,190, 715, 260, and 246 genes and the downregulation of 1,840, 730, 442, and 236 genes in the lungs of mice exposed to CS for 5 h, 8 days, and 1.5 and 6 mo, respectively. Most of the genes belong to the functional categories of phase I genes, Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and phase II genes, phase III detoxification genes, and others including immune/inflammatory response genes. Induction of the genes encoding multiple phase I enzymes was markedly higher in the emphysematous lungs, whereas reduced expression of various cytoprotective genes constituting ubiquitin-proteasome complex, cell survival pathways, solute carriers and transporters, transcription factors, and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and phase II-responsive genes was noted. Our data indicate that the progression of CS-induced emphysema is associated with a steady decline in the expression of various genes involved in multiple pathways in the lungs of A/J mice. Many of the genes discovered in this study could rationally play an important role in the susceptibility to CS-induced emphysema. PMID:19286929

  12. Th2 but Not Th1 Immune Bias Results in Altered Lung Functions in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aditya V.; Zhang, Yanmei; Fields, W. Bradley; McNamara, David A.; Choe, Mun Y.; Chen, Gwo-hsiao; Erb-Downward, John; Osterholzer, John J.; Toews, Galen B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in airway dynamics have been reported in the rat model of pulmonary cryptococcosis. However, it is not known if Cryptococcus neoformans-induced changes in lung functions are related to the immunophenotype that develops in response to cryptococcal infection in the lungs. In this study we performed a parallel analysis of the immunophenotype and airway resistance (standard resistance of the airways [SRAW]) in BALB/c mice infected with highly virulent C. neoformans strain H99 and moderately virulent strain 52D. H99 infection evoked a Th2 response and was associated with increased SRAW, while the SRAW for 52D infection, which resulted in a predominantly Th1-skewed response, did not differ from the SRAW for uninfected mice. We found that an altered SRAW in mice did not positively or negatively correlate with the pulmonary fungal burden, the magnitude of inflammatory response, the numbers of T cells, eosinophils or eosinophil subsets, neutrophils, or monocytes/macrophages, or the levels of cytokines (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-10, gamma interferon, or IL-13) produced by lung leukocytes. However, the level of a systemic Th2 marker, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), correlated significantly with SRAW, indicating that the changes in lung functions were proportional to the level of Th2 skewing in this model. These data also imply that IgE may contribute to the altered SRAW observed in H99-infected mice. Lung histological analysis revealed severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis pathology in H99-infected mice and evidence of protective responses in 52D-infected mice with well-marginalized lesions. Taken together, the data show that C. neoformans can significantly affect airflow physiology, particularly in the context of a Th2 immune response with possible involvement of IgE as an important factor. PMID:19752036

  13. LIPGENE food-exchange model for alteration of dietary fat quantity and quality in free-living participants from eight European countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Danielle I; Tierney, Audrey C; McCarthy, Sinead; Upritchard, Jane; Vermunt, Susan; Gulseth, Hanne L; Drevon, Christian A; Blaak, Ellen E; Saris, Wim H M; Karlström, Brita; Helal, Olfa; Defoort, Catherine; Gallego, Raquel; López-Miranda, José; Siedlecka, Dominika; Malczewska-Malec, Małgorzata; Roche, Helen M; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2009-03-01

    Controlled human intervention trials are required to confirm the hypothesis that dietary fat quality may influence insulin action. The aim was to develop a food-exchange model, suitable for use in free-living volunteers, to investigate the effects of four experimental diets distinct in fat quantity and quality: high SFA (HSFA); high MUFA (HMUFA) and two low-fat (LF) diets, one supplemented with 1.24 g EPA and DHA/d (LFn-3). A theoretical food-exchange model was developed. The average quantity of exchangeable fat was calculated as the sum of fat provided by added fats (spreads and oils), milk, cheese, biscuits, cakes, buns and pastries using data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of UK adults. Most of the exchangeable fat was replaced by specifically designed study foods. Also critical to the model was the use of carbohydrate exchanges to ensure the diets were isoenergetic. Volunteers from eight centres across Europe completed the dietary intervention. Results indicated that compositional targets were largely achieved with significant differences in fat quantity between the high-fat diets (39.9 (sem 0.6) and 38.9 (sem 0.51) percentage energy (%E) from fat for the HSFA and HMUFA diets respectively) and the low-fat diets (29.6 (sem 0.6) and 29.1 (sem 0.5) %E from fat for the LF and LFn-3 diets respectively) and fat quality (17.5 (sem 0.3) and 10.4 (sem 0.2) %E from SFA and 12.7 (sem 0.3) and 18.7 (sem 0.4) %E MUFA for the HSFA and HMUFA diets respectively). In conclusion, a robust, flexible food-exchange model was developed and implemented successfully in the LIPGENE dietary intervention trial.

  14. Adult Neurogenesis in the Female Mouse Hypothalamus: Estradiol and High-Fat Diet Alter the Generation of Newborn Neurons Expressing Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jane; Nettles, Sabin A.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens and leptins act in the hypothalamus to maintain reproduction and energy homeostasis. Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hypothalamus has been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Recently, high-fat diet (HFD) and estradiol (E2) have been shown to alter cell proliferation and the number of newborn leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamus of adult female mice. The current study tested the hypothesis that new cells expressing estrogen receptor α (ERα) are generated in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) of the adult female mouse, hypothalamic regions that are critical in energy homeostasis. Adult mice were ovariectomized and implanted with capsules containing E2 or oil. Within each hormone group, mice were fed an HFD or standard chow for 6 weeks and treated with BrdU to label new cells. Newborn cells that respond to estrogens were identified in the ARC and VMH, of which a subpopulation was leptin sensitive, indicating that the subpopulation consists of neurons. Moreover, there was an interaction between diet and hormone with an effect on the number of these newborn ERα-expressing neurons that respond to leptin. Regardless of hormone treatment, HFD increased the number of ERα-expressing cells in the ARC and VMH. E2 decreased hypothalamic fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) gene expression in HFD mice, suggesting a role for Fgf10 in E2 effects on neurogenesis. These findings of newly created estrogen-responsive neurons in the adult brain provide a novel mechanism by which estrogens can act in the hypothalamus to regulate energy homeostasis in females. PMID:27679811

  15. Adult Neurogenesis in the Female Mouse Hypothalamus: Estradiol and High-Fat Diet Alter the Generation of Newborn Neurons Expressing Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jane; Nettles, Sabin A.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens and leptins act in the hypothalamus to maintain reproduction and energy homeostasis. Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hypothalamus has been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Recently, high-fat diet (HFD) and estradiol (E2) have been shown to alter cell proliferation and the number of newborn leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamus of adult female mice. The current study tested the hypothesis that new cells expressing estrogen receptor α (ERα) are generated in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) of the adult female mouse, hypothalamic regions that are critical in energy homeostasis. Adult mice were ovariectomized and implanted with capsules containing E2 or oil. Within each hormone group, mice were fed an HFD or standard chow for 6 weeks and treated with BrdU to label new cells. Newborn cells that respond to estrogens were identified in the ARC and VMH, of which a subpopulation was leptin sensitive, indicating that the subpopulation consists of neurons. Moreover, there was an interaction between diet and hormone with an effect on the number of these newborn ERα-expressing neurons that respond to leptin. Regardless of hormone treatment, HFD increased the number of ERα-expressing cells in the ARC and VMH. E2 decreased hypothalamic fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) gene expression in HFD mice, suggesting a role for Fgf10 in E2 effects on neurogenesis. These findings of newly created estrogen-responsive neurons in the adult brain provide a novel mechanism by which estrogens can act in the hypothalamus to regulate energy homeostasis in females.

  16. Resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity and altered expression of adipose-specific genes in HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kenji; Shen, Wen-Jun; Patel, Shailja; Natu, Vanita; Wang, Jining; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the role of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in diet-induced obesity, HSL-deficient (HSL-/-) and wild-type mice were fed normal chow or high-fat diets. HSL-/- mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity showing higher core body temperatures. Weight and triacylglycerol contents were decreased in white adipose tissue (WAT) but increased in both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of HSL-/- mice. Serum insulin levels in the fed state and tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA levels in adipose tissues were higher, whereas serum levels of adipocyte complement-related protein of 30 kDa (ACRP30)/adiponectin and leptin, as well as mRNA levels of ACRP30/adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and adipsin in WAT, were lower in HSL-/- mice than in controls. Expression of transcription factors associated with adipogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, CAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha) and lipogenesis (carbohydrate response element-binding protein, adipocyte determination- and differentiation-dependent factor-1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), as well as of adipose differentiation markers (adipocyte lipid-binding protein, perilipin, lipoprotein lipase), lipogenic enzymes (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 and -2, fatty acid synthase, ATP citrate lyase) and insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, GLUT4), was suppressed in WAT but not in BAT of HSL-/- mice. In contrast, expression of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism (sterol-regulatory element-binding protein-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1) and thermogenesis (uncoupling protein-2) was upregulated in both WAT and BAT of HSL-/- mice. Our results suggest that impaired lipolysis in HSL deficiency affects lipid metabolism through alterations of adipose differentiation and adipose-derived hormone levels.

  17. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi−/− mice following injury. Slpi−/−, and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi−/− animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post-bleomycin. In contrast Slpi−/− mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi−/− mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1 and Col4α1 gene

  18. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  19. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Q. Joyce; Witschey, Walter R. T.; Fang-Yen, Christopher M.; Arkles, Jeffrey S.; Barker, Alex J.; Forfia, Paul R.; Han, Yuchi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Right ventricular (RV) function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI) to derive RV kinetic energy (KE) work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA) to better characterize RV work in PAH patients. Methods 4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA. Results PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007) as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001) throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction. Conclusion This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function. PMID:26418553

  20. Inhaled nitric oxide alters the distribution of blood flow in the healthy human lung, suggesting active hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in normoxia

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Amran K.; Sá, Rui Carlos; Kim, Nick H.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is thought to actively regulate ventilation-perfusion (V̇a/Q̇) matching, reducing perfusion in regions of alveolar hypoxia. We assessed the extent of HPV in the healthy human lung using inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) under inspired oxygen fractions (FiO2) of 0.125, 0.21, and 0.30 (a hyperoxic stimulus designed to abolish HPV without the development of atelectasis). Dynamic measures of blood flow were made in a single sagittal slice of the right lung of five healthy male subjects using an arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI sequence, following a block stimulus pattern (3 × 60 breaths) with 40 ppm iNO administered in the central block. The overall spatial heterogeneity, spatiotemporal variability, and regional pattern of pulmonary blood flow was quantified as a function of condition (FiO2 × iNO state). While spatial heterogeneity did not change significantly with iNO administration or FiO2, there were statistically significant increases in Global Fluctuation Dispersion, (a marker of spatiotemporal flow variability) when iNO was administered during hypoxia (5.4 percentage point increase, P = 0.003). iNO had an effect on regional blood flow that was FiO2 dependent (P = 0.02), with regional changes in the pattern of blood flow occurring in hypoxia (P = 0.007) and normoxia (P = 0.008) tending to increase flow to dependent lung at the expense of nondependent lung. These findings indicate that inhaled nitric oxide significantly alters the distribution of blood flow in both hypoxic and normoxic healthy subjects, and suggests that some baseline HPV may indeed be present in the normoxic lung. PMID:25429099

  1. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and

  2. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  3. Oncoprotein mdig contributes to silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by altering balance between Th17 and Treg T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaying; Zhang, Yadong; Lu, Yongju; Battelli, Lori; Porter, Dale W.; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named Mina53) was first identified from alveolar macrophages of the coal miners with chronic lung inflammation or fibrosis, but how this gene is involved in lung diseases is poorly understood. Here we show that heterozygotic knockout of mdig (mdig+/−) ameliorates silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells. Relative to the wild type (WT) mice, infiltration of the macrophages and Th17 cells was reduced in lungs from silica-exposed mdig+/− mice. In contrast, an increased infiltration of the T regulatory (Treg) cells to the lung intestitium was observed in the mdig+/− mice treated with silica. Both the number of Th17 cells in the lung lymph nodes and the level of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were decreased in the mdig+/− mice in response to silica. Thus, these results suggest that mdig may contribute to silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Genetic deficiency of mdig impairs Th17 cell infiltration and function, but favors infiltration of the Treg cells, the immune suppressive T cells that are able to limit the inflammatory responses by repressing the Th17 cells and macrophages. PMID:25669985

  4. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  5. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  6. Short-term high-fat diet alters postprandial glucose metabolism and circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Numao, Shigeharu; Kawano, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoya; Yamada, Yuka; Takahashi, Masaki; Konishi, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2016-08-01

    Short-term intake of a high-fat diet aggravates postprandial glucose metabolism; however, the dose-response relationship has not been investigated. We hypothesized that short-term intake of a eucaloric low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet (LCHF) would aggravate postprandial glucose metabolism and circulating adhesion molecules in healthy males. Seven healthy young males (mean ± SE; age: 26 ± 1 years) consumed either a eucaloric control diet (C, approximately 25% fats), a eucaloric intermediate-carbohydrate/intermediate-fat diet (ICIF, approximately 50% fats), or an LCHF (approximately 70% fats) for 3 days. An oral meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed after the 3-day dietary intervention. The concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were determined at rest and during MTT. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of plasma glucose concentration during MTT was significantly higher in LCHF than in C (P = 0.009). The first-phase insulin secretion indexes were significantly lower in LCHF than in C (P = 0.04). Moreover, the iAUC of GLP-1 and VCAM-1 concentrations was significantly higher in LCHF than in C (P = 0.014 and P = 0.04, respectively). The metabolites from ICIF and C were not significantly different. In conclusion, short-term intake of eucaloric diet containing a high percentage of fats in healthy males excessively increased postprandial glucose and VCAM-1 concentrations and attenuated first-phase insulin release.

  7. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  8. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  9. Dietary fat source alters hepatic gene expression profile and determines the type of liver pathology in rats overfed via total enteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if the fatty acid composition of the diet affects the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5-6/group) were overfed low (5%) or high (70%) fat diets with different fatty acid sources: olive oil (OO,...

  10. Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Crinigan, Catherine; Calhoun, Matthew; Sweazea, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or standard chow (5% fat) for six weeks. Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure. Kidney function was measured by analyzing urinary protein, creatinine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, as well as plasma cystatin C concentrations. Renal damage was measured through assessment of urinary oxDNA/RNA concentrations as well as renal lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology. These findings suggest that moderate hyperglycemia and inflammation produced by short-term HFD are not sufficient to damage kidneys or that the ketogenic HFD may have protective effects within the kidneys.

  11. Female mice lacking p47phox have altered adipose tissue gene expression and are protected against high fat-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress in the fat and the liver has been linked to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular origin of reactive oxygen species and the role of these in obesity remain areas of active investigation. The NADPH oxidases (NOX) enzymes are a major source of ...

  12. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet alters myocardial oxidative stress and impairs recovery of cardiac function after ischemia and reperfusion in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lloyd, Steven G

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is associated with elevated risk of heart disease. A solid understanding of the safety and potential adverse effects of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HFLCD) similar to that used by humans for weight loss on the heart is crucial. High fat intake is known to promote increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage. We hypothesized that there would be adverse effects of HFLCD on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through enhancing oxidative stress injury and impairing mitochondrial biogenesis in a nongenetic, diet-induced rat model of obesity. To test the hypothesis, 250-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesity-promoting diet for 7 weeks to induce obesity, then switched to HFLCD or a low-fat control diet for 2 weeks. Isolated hearts underwent global low flow ischemia for 60 minutes and reperfusion for 60 minutes. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in greater weight gain and lower myocardial glycogen, plasma adiponectin, and insulin. Myocardial antioxidant gene transcript and protein expression of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in HFLCD, along with increased oxidative gene NADPH oxidase-4 transcript and xanthine oxidase activity, and a 37% increase in nitrated protein (nitrotyrosine) in HFLCD hearts. The cardiac expression of key mitochondrial regulatory factors such as nuclear respiratory factor-1 and transcription factor A-mitochondrial were inhibited and myocardial mitochondrial DNA copy number decreased. The cardiac expression of adiponectin and its receptors was down-regulated in HFLCD. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet impaired recovery of left ventricular rate-pressure product after ischemia/reperfusion and led to 3.5-fold increased injury as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release. In conclusion, HFLCD leads to increased ischemic myocardial injury and impaired recovery of function after reperfusion and was associated with attenuation of mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced oxidative stress in obese rats

  13. Coconut fats.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, W A L D; Dissanayake, A S

    2006-06-01

    In many areas of Sri Lanka the coconut tree and its products have for centuries been an integral part of life, and it has come to be called the "Tree of life". However, in the last few decades, the relationship between coconut fats and health has been the subject of much debate and misinformation. Coconut fats account for 80% of the fat intake among Sri Lankans. Around 92% of these fats are saturated fats. This has lead to the belief that coconut fats are 'bad for health', particularly in relation to ischaemic heart disease. Yet most of the saturated fats in coconut are medium chain fatty acids whose properties and metabolism are different to those of animal origin. Medium chain fatty acids do not undergo degradation and re-esterification processes and are directly used in the body to produce energy. They are not as 'bad for health' as saturated fats. There is the need to clarify issues relating to intake of coconut fats and health, more particularly for populations that still depend on coconut fats for much of their fat intake. This paper describes the metabolism of coconut fats and its potential benefits, and attempts to highlight its benefits to remove certain misconceptions regarding its use.

  14. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  15. A well-balanced diet combined or not with exercise induces fat mass loss without any decrease of bone mass despite bone micro-architecture alterations in obese rat.

    PubMed

    Gerbaix, Maude; Metz, Lore; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Lavet, Cédric; Guillet, Christelle; Walrand, Stéphane; Masgrau, Aurélie; Vico, Laurence; Courteix, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The association of a well-balanced diet with exercise is a key strategy to treat obesity. However, weight loss is linked to an accelerated bone loss. Furthermore, exercise is known to induce beneficial effects on bone. We investigated the impact of a well-balanced isoenergetic reducing diet (WBR) and exercise on bone tissue in obese rats. Sixty male rats had previously been fed with a high fat/high sucrose diet (HF/HS) for 4months to induce obesity. Then, 4 regimens were initiated for 2months: HF/HS diet plus exercise (treadmill: 50min/day, 5days/week), WBR diet plus exercise, HF/HS diet plus inactivity and WBR diet plus inactivity. Body composition and total BMD were assessed using DXA and visceral fat mass was weighed. Tibia densitometry was assessed by Piximus. Bone histomorphometry was performed on the proximal metaphysis of tibia and on L2 vertebrae (L2). Trabecular micro-architectural parameters were measured on tibia and L2 by 3D microtomography. Plasma concentration of osteocalcin and CTX were measured. Both WBR diet and exercise had decreased global weight, global fat and visceral fat mass (p<0.05). The WBR diet alone failed to alter total and tibia bone mass and BMD. However, Tb.Th, bone volume density and degree of anisotropy of tibia were decreased by the WBR diet (p<0.05). Moreover, the WBR diet had involved a significant lower MS/BS and BFR/BS in L2 (p<0.05). Exercise had significantly improved BMD of the tibia possibly by inhibiting the bone resorption, as evidenced by no change in plasma osteocalcin levels, a decrease of CTX levels (p<0.005) and trabecular osteoclast number (p<0.05). In the present study a diet inducing weight and fat mass losses did not affected bone mass and BMD of obese rats despite alterations of their bone micro-architecture. The moderate intensity exercise performed had improved the tibia BMD of obese rats without any trabecular and cortical adaptation.

  16. Carbohydrate/fat ratio in the diet alters histone acetylation on the sucrase-isomaltase gene and its expression in mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kazue; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2007-06-15

    A diet with a high carbohydrate/fat ratio enhances jejunal SI gene expression. Using ChIP assay, we revealed that the acetylation of histone H3 on transcriptional region and H4 on promoter region, respectively, of mouse SI gene are high. The acetylation of histone H3 and H4 as well as binding of HNF-1 and Cdx-2 on SI gene, was enhanced by increase in carbohydrate/fat ratio in the diet. These suggest that induction of SI gene by the diet rich in carbohydrate is associated with acetylation of histone H3 and H4 as well as binding of HNF-1 and Cdx-2 on SI gene.

  17. Altered Left Ventricular Ion Channel Transcriptome in a High-Fat-Fed Rat Model of Obesity: Insight into Obesity-Induced Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yon, Marianne; Pickavance, Lucy; Yanni Gerges, Joseph; Davis, Gershan; Wilding, John; Jian, Kun; Hart, George; Boyett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity is increasingly common and is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to see whether in obesity there is proarrhythmic gene expression of ventricular ion channels and related molecules. Methods and Results. Rats were fed on a high-fat diet and compared to control rats on a normal diet (n = 8). After 8 weeks, rats on the high-fat diet showed significantly greater weight gain and higher adiposity. Left ventricle samples were removed at 8 weeks and mRNA expression of ion channels and other molecules was measured using qPCR. Obese rats had significant upregulation of Cav1.2, HCN4, Kir2.1, RYR2, NCX1, SERCA2a, and RYR2 mRNA and downregulation of ERG mRNA. In the case of HCN4, it was confirmed that there was a significant increase in protein expression. The potential effects of the mRNA changes on the ventricular action potential and intracellular Ca2+ transient were predicted using computer modelling. Modelling predicted prolongation of the ventricular action potential and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ transient, both of which would be expected to be arrhythmogenic. Conclusion. High-fat diet causing obesity results in arrhythmogenic cardiac gene expression of ion channels and related molecules. PMID:27747100

  18. Salinity does not alter the effectiveness of menthol as an anesthetic and sedative during the handling and transport of juvenile fat snook (Centropomus parallelus).

    PubMed

    Sepulchro, L C O 'r; Carvalho, M A G; Gomes, L C

    2016-04-19

    The effectiveness of menthol as anesthetic and sedative for fat snook (Centropomus parallelus) was tested at different salinities. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to different concentrations of menthol (25, 37 and 50 mg L-1) in water at different salinities (0, 17 and 36 ppt). In the second experiment, the fish were transported for 10 hours in water with menthol at concentrations of 0, 3.7 and 7.4 mg L-1 under different salinities. Na+ and K+ ions from fish body and water were analyzed after transport. The optimal concentrations of menthol for a short handling period and surgical induction was 37 and 50 mg L-1, respectively, and these values were independent of salinity. After transport, neither mortality nor significant changes in ammonia or dissolved oxygen were observed between treatments at the different salinities. The nitrite levels were lower in freshwater than in brackish and saltwater, but did not change with mentol. The total body levels of Na+ increased with the salinity increase. Menthol is an effective anesthetic for handling of juvenile fat snook at different salinities. Menthol did not influence the measured water parameters and body ions, and it is not necessary for the transport of fat snook.

  19. Altered reactivity and nitric oxide signaling in the isolated thoracic duct from an ovine model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Oishi, Peter E; Gong, Wenhui; Bennett, Stephen H; Sun, Christine E; Johengen, Michael; Maki, Jun; Johnson, Rebecca C; Raff, Gary W; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    We have previously shown decreased pulmonary lymph flow in our lamb model of chronically increased pulmonary blood flow, created by the in utero placement of an 8-mm aortopulmonary shunt. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormal lymphatic function in shunt lambs is due to impaired lymphatic endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling resulting in increased lymphatic vascular constriction and/or impaired relaxation. Thoracic duct rings were isolated from 4-wk-old shunt (n = 7) and normal (n = 7) lambs to determine length-tension properties, vascular reactivity, and endothelial NO synthase protein. At baseline, shunt thoracic duct rings had 2.6-fold higher peak to peak tension and a 2-fold increase in the strength of contractions compared with normal rings (P < 0.05). In response to norepinephrine, shunt thoracic duct rings had a 2.4-fold increase in vascular tone compared with normal rings (P < 0.05) and impaired relaxation in response to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (63% vs. 13%, P < 0.05). In vivo, inhaled NO (40 ppm) increased pulmonary lymph flow (normalized for resistance) ∼1.5-fold in both normal and shunt lambs (P < 0.05). Inhaled NO exposure increased bioavailable NO [nitrite/nitrate (NOx); ∼2.5-fold in normal lambs and ∼3.4-fold in shunt lambs] and cGMP (∼2.5-fold in both) in the pulmonary lymph effluent (P < 0.05). Chronic exposure to increased pulmonary blood flow is associated with pulmonary lymphatic endothelial injury that disrupts NO-cGMP signaling, leading to increased resting vasoconstriction, increased maximal strength of contraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. Inhaled NO increases pulmonary lymph NOx and cGMP levels and pulmonary lymph flow in normal and shunt lambs. Therapies that augment NO-cGMP signaling within the lymphatic system may provide benefits, warranting further study.

  20. Fat Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Sean F.; Pike, Oscar A.

    Methods for characterizing edible lipids, fats, and oils can be separated into two categories: those developed to analyze bulk oils and fats, and those focusing on analysis of foodstuffs and their lipid extracts. In evaluating foodstuffs, it is usually necessary to extract the lipids prior to analysis. In these cases, if sufficient quantities of lipids are available, methods developed for bulk fats and oils can be utilized.

  1. A Difference in Fatty Acid Composition of Isocaloric High-Fat Diets Alters Metabolic Flexibility in Male C57BL/6JOlaHsd Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duivenvoorde, Loes P. M.; van Schothorst, Evert M.; Swarts, Hans M.; Kuda, Ondrej; Steenbergh, Esther; Termeulen, Sander; Kopecky, Jan; Keijer, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be healthier than saturated fatty acids (SFAs), but others postulate that especially the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs (n6/n3 ratio) determines health. Health can be determined with biomarkers, but functional health status is likely better reflected by challenge tests that assess metabolic flexibility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high-fat diets with different fatty acid compositions, but similar n6/n3 ratio, on metabolic flexibility. Therefore, adult male mice received isocaloric high-fat diets with either predominantly PUFAs (HFpu diet) or predominantly SFAs (HFs diet) but similar n6/n3 ratio for six months, during and after which several biomarkers for health were measured. Metabolic flexibility was assessed by the response to an oral glucose tolerance test, a fasting and re-feeding test and an oxygen restriction test (OxR; normobaric hypoxia). The latter two are non-invasive, indirect calorimetry-based tests that measure the adaptive capacity of the body as a whole. We found that the HFs diet, compared to the HFpu diet, increased mean adipocyte size, liver damage, and ectopic lipid storage in liver and muscle; although, we did not find differences in body weight, total adiposity, adipose tissue health, serum adipokines, whole body energy balance, or circadian rhythm between HFs and HFpu mice. HFs mice were, furthermore, less flexible in their response to both fasting- re-feeding and OxR, while glucose tolerance was indistinguishable. To conclude, the HFs versus the HFpu diet increased ectopic fat storage, liver damage, and mean adipocyte size and reduced metabolic flexibility in male mice. This study underscores the physiological relevance of indirect calorimetry-based challenge tests. PMID:26098756

  2. Substance P (SP)-Neurokinin-1 Receptor (NK-1R) Alters Adipose Tissue Responses to High-Fat Diet and Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Dimitris; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Kokkotou, Efi; Pirtskhalava, Tamara; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Bowe, Collin; Bugni, James M.; Nuño, Miriam; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P.; Leeman, Susan E.; Kirkland, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral administration of a specific neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonist to mice leads to reduced weight gain and circulating levels of insulin and leptin after high-fat diet (HFD). Here, we assessed the contribution of substance P (SP) and NK-1R in diet-induced obesity using NK-1R deficient [knockout (KO)] mice and extended our previous findings to show the effects of SP-NK-1R interactions on adipose tissue-associated insulin signaling and glucose metabolic responses. NK-1R KO and wild-type (WT) littermates were fed a HFD for 3 wk, and obesity-associated responses were determined. Compared with WT, NK-1 KO mice show reduced weight gain and circulating levels of leptin and insulin in response to HFD. Adiponectin receptor mRNA levels are higher in mesenteric fat and liver in NK-1 KO animals compared with WT, after HFD. Mesenteric fat from NK-1R KO mice fed with HFD has reduced stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase Cθ activation compared with WT mice. After glucose challenge, NK-1R KO mice remove glucose from the circulation more efficiently than WT and pair-fed controls, suggesting an additional peripheral effect of NK-1R-mediated signaling on glucose metabolism. Glucose uptake experiments in isolated rat adipocytes showed that SP directly inhibits insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Our results further establish a role for SP-NK-1R interactions in adipose tissue responses, specifically as they relate to obesity-associated pathologies such as glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Our results highlight this pathway as an important therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes. PMID:21467195

  3. 4,4′-Methylenedianiline Alters Serotonergic Transport in a Novel, Sex-Specific Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Turpin, Michelle; Hebert, Valeria; Chotibut, Tanya; Wensler, Heather; Krentzel, Dallas; Varner, Kurt James; Burn, Brendan R.; Chen, Yi-Fan; Abreo, Fleurette; Dugas, Tammy Renee

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure as a result of arterial wall thickening. Patients are 3–4 times more likely to be women than men. This gender discrepancy demonstrates a need for an animal model with similar sex differences. 4,4′-Methylenedianiline (DAPM) is an aromatic amine used industrially in the synthesis of polyurethanes. Chronic, intermittent treatment of male and female rats with DAPM resulted in medial hyperplasia of pulmonary arterioles, exclusively in females, coupled to increases in pulmonary arterial pressures. Significant increases in plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and serotonin, but decreases in nitrite (NO2−), were observed in females treated with DAPM. A decrease was observed in the serum ratio of the estrogen metabolites 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE1)/16α-hydroxyestrogen (16α-OHE1). In females, ET-1,NO2− , and 2-OHE1/16α-OHE1 were significantly correlated with peak pressure gradient, an indirect measure of pulmonary arterial pressure. Expression of the serotonin transport protein (SERT) was significantly higher in the arteries of DAPM-treated females. In vitro, DAPM induced human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and serotonin uptake, both of which were inhibited by treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. DAPM also induced the release of serotonin from human pulmonary endothelial cells in culture, which is blocked by ICI 182,780. Taken together, this suggests that DAPM-mediated dysregulation of serotonin transport is estrogen-receptor dependent. Thus, DAPM-induced PAH pathology may be a new tool to clarify the sex selectivity of PAH disease pathogenesis. PMID:26116029

  4. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - pulmonary atresia; Cyanotic heart disease - pulmonary atresia; Valve - disorder pulmonary atresia ... septum may also have a poorly developed tricuspid valve. They may also have an underdeveloped right ventricle ...

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  6. Skin-specific deletion of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 alters skin lipid composition and protects mice from high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Harini; Flowers, Matthew T; Liu, Xueqing; Paton, Chad M; Sullivan, Ruth; Chu, Kiki; Zhao, Minghui; Ntambi, James M

    2009-07-24

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and is an important regulator of whole body energy homeostasis. Severe cutaneous changes in mice globally deficient in SCD1 also indicate a role for SCD1 in maintaining skin lipids. We have generated mice with a skin-specific deletion of SCD1 (SKO) and report here that SKO mice display marked sebaceous gland hypoplasia and depletion of sebaceous lipids. In addition, SKO mice have significantly increased energy expenditure and are protected from high fat diet-induced obesity, thereby recapitulating the hypermetabolic phenotype of global SCD1 deficiency. Genes of fat oxidation, lipolysis, and thermogenesis, including uncoupling proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1alpha, are up-regulated in peripheral tissues of SKO mice. However, unlike mice globally deficient in SCD1, SKO mice have an intact hepatic lipogenic response to acute high carbohydrate feeding. Despite increased basal thermogenesis, SKO mice display severe cold intolerance because of rapid depletion of fuel substrates, including hepatic glycogen, to maintain core body temperature. These data collectively indicate that SKO mice have increased cold perception because of loss of insulating factors in the skin. This results in up-regulation of thermogenic processes for temperature maintenance at the expense of fuel economy, illustrating cross-talk between the skin and peripheral tissues in maintaining energy homeostasis.

  7. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  8. Dietary Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... PHOs to food. Try to replace them with oils such as canola, olive, safflower, sesame, or sunflower. Of course, eating too much fat will put on the pounds. Fat has twice as many calories as proteins or carbohydrates. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  9. Long-term intake of a high prebiotic fiber diet but not high protein reduces metabolic risk after a high fat challenge and uniquely alters gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dolan C; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-09-01

    A mismatch between early developmental diet and adulthood may increase obesity risk. Our objective was to determine the effects of re-matching rats to their weaning diets high in protein or fiber after transient high-fat/high-sucrose challenge in adulthood. We hypothesize that a long-term high fiber diet will be associated with a gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression reflective of reduced adiposity. Wistar rat pups were fed a control (C), high prebiotic fiber (HF), or high protein (HP) diet from 3-15 weeks of age; a high-fat/high-sucrose diet from 15-21 weeks; their respective C, HF, or HP diets from 21-25 weeks. Gut microbiota of cecal contents and hepatic gene expression were measured when rats were terminated at 25 weeks of age. HF rats had higher total bacteria, bifidobacteria and Bacteroides/Prevotella spp than C and HP at 25 weeks (P < 0.05). Firmicutes, especially Clostridium leptum, decreased in HF compared to C and HP (P < .05). The ratio of Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in HF versus C and HP at 25 weeks (P < .05). HF decreased hepatic cholesterol content compared to HP and C at 25 weeks. HF and HP increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA and decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase mRNA compared to C (P < .05). In conclusion, re-matching rats to a HF but not HP diet attenuated the typical increase in Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio associated with consumption of a high fat diet. Lower hepatic cholesterol with long-term HF diet intake may be related to alterations in gut microbiota and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  10. Mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with resistant starch display marked shifts in the liver metabolome concurrent with altered gut bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-amylose maize resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) is a fermentable dietary fiber known to alter the gut milieu, including the gut microbiota, which may explain reported effects of resistant starch to ameliorate obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction. Our working hypothesis is that HAMRS2-induced...

  11. High-fat and fructose intake induces insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis and alters in vivo macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Thiéblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Sulpice, Thierry

    2012-04-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) promotes the egress of cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for biliary and fecal excretion. Although not demonstrated in vivo, RCT is thought to be impaired in patients with metabolic syndrome, in which liver steatosis prevalence is relatively high. Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a nonpurified (CON) diet and normal drinking water or a high-fat (HF) diet containing 27% fat, 0.5% cholesterol, and 0.25% deoxycholate as well as 10% fructose in drinking water for 4 wk. Compared to CON, the HF diet induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, with significantly higher plasma non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity. The HF diet induced severe liver steatosis, with significantly higher cholesterol and TG levels compared to CON. In vivo RCT was assessed by i.p. injecting ³H-cholesterol labeled macrophages. Compared to CON, HF hamsters had significantly greater ³H-tracer recoveries in plasma, but not HDL. After 72 h, ³H-tracer recovery in HF hamsters was 318% higher in liver and 75% lower in bile (P < 0.01), indicating that the HF diet impaired hepatic cholesterol fluxes. However, macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion was 45% higher in HF hamsters than in CON hamsters. This effect was not related to intestinal cholesterol absorption, which was 89% higher in HF hamsters (P < 0.05), suggesting a possible upregulation of transintestinal cholesterol excretion. Our data indicate a significant increase in macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion in a hamster model of metabolic syndrome, which may not compensate for the diet-induced dyslipidemia and liver steatosis.

  12. Nephrocalcinosis and hyperlipidemia in rats fed a cholesterol- and fat-rich diet: association with hyperoxaluria, altered kidney and bone minerals, and renal tissue phospholipid-calcium interaction.

    PubMed

    Schmiedl, A; Schwille, P O; Bonucci, E; Erben, R G; Grayczyk, A; Sharma, V

    2000-12-01

    To determine whether an "atherogenic" diet (excess of cholesterol and neutral fat) induces pathological calcification in various organs, including the kidney, and abnormal oxalate metabolism, 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal lab chow (controls, n = 12) or the cholesterol- and fat-rich experimental diet (CH-F, n = 12) for 111 +/- 3 days. CH-F rats developed dyslipidemia [high blood levels of triglycerides, total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound cholesterol, total phospholipids], elevated serum total alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, in the absence of changes in overall renal function, extracellular mineral homeostasis [serum protein-corrected total calcium, magnesium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)], plasma glycolate and oxalate levels. There was a redistribution of bone calcium and enhanced exchange of this within the extraosseous space, which was accompanied by significant bone calcium loss, but normal bone histomorphometry. Liver oxalate levels, if expressed per unit of defatted (DF) dry liver, were three times higher than in the controls. Urinary glycolate, oxalate, calcium and total protein excretion levels were elevated, the latter showing an excess of proteins > 100 kD and a deficit of proteins > 30-50 kD. Urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation was increased, and calcium phosphate supersaturation was unchanged. There were dramatically increased (by number, circumference, and area) renal calcium phosphate calcifications in the cortico-medullary region, but calcium oxalate deposits were not detectable. Electron microscopy (EM) and elemental analysis revealed intratubular calcium phosphate, apparently needle-like hydroxyapatite. Immunohistochemistry of renal tissue calcifications revealed co-localization of phospholipids and calcium phosphate. It is concluded that rats fed the CH-F diet exhibited: (1) a

  13. Multiple univariate data analysis reveals the inulin effects on the high-fat-diet induced metabolic alterations in rat myocardium and testicles in the preobesity state.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yixuan; An, Yanpeng; Li, Ning; Liu, Bifeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2013-07-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and a well-known risk factor for many diseases affecting billions of people's health and well-being. However, little information is available for metabolic changes associated with the effects of obesity development and interventions on cardiovascular and reproduction systems. Here, we systematically analyzed the effects of high-fat diet (HFD) and inulin intake on the metabolite compositions of myocardium and testicle using NMR spectroscopy. We developed a useful high-throughput method based on multiple univariate data analysis (MUDA) to visualize and efficiently extract information on metabolites significantly affected by an intervention. We found that HFD caused widespread metabolic changes in both rat myocardium and testicles involving fatty acid β-oxidation together with the metabolisms of choline, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines even before HFD caused significant body-weight increases. Inulin intake ameliorated some of the HFD-induced metabolic changes in both myocardium (3-HB, lactate and guanosine) and testicle tissues (3-HB, inosine and betaine). A remarkable elevation of scyllo-inositol was also observable with inulin intake in both tissues. These findings offered essential information for the inulin effects on the HFD-induced metabolic changes and demonstrated this MUDA method as a powerful alternative to traditionally used multivariate data analysis for metabonomics.

  14. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Ghareeb, Doaa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) "NS" or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  15. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) “NS” or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  16. Diet-Induced Maternal Obesity Alters Insulin Signalling in Male Mice Offspring Rechallenged with a High-Fat Diet in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    de Fante, Thaís; Simino, Laís Angélica; Reginato, Andressa; Payolla, Tanyara Baliani; Vitoréli, Débora Cristina Gustavo; de Souza, Monique; Torsoni, Márcio Alberto; Milanski, Marciane; Torsoni, Adriana Souza

    2016-01-01

    Modern lifestyle has resulted in an increase in the prevalence of obesity and its comorbidities in pregnant women and the young population. It has been well established that the consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) has many direct effects on glucose metabolism. However, it is important to assess whether maternal consumption of a HFD during critical periods of development can lead to metabolic changes in the offspring metabolism. This study evaluated the potential effects of metabolic programming on the impairment of insulin signalling in recently weaned offspring from obese dams. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure to an obesogenic environment could exacerbate the impairment of glucose metabolism in adult life in response to a HFD. Swiss female mice were fed with Standard Chow (SC) or a HFD during gestation and lactation and tissues from male offspring were analysed at d28 and d82. Offspring from obese dams had greater weight gain and higher adiposity and food intake than offspring from control dams. Furthermore, they showed impairment in insulin signalling in central and peripheral tissues, which was associated with the activation of inflammatory pathways. Adipose tissue was ultimately the most affected in adult offspring after HFD rechallenge; this may have contributed to the metabolic deregulation observed. Overall, our results suggest that diet-induced maternal obesity leads to increased susceptibility to obesity and impairment of insulin signalling in offspring in early and late life that cannot be reversed by SC consumption, but can be aggravated by HFD re-exposure. PMID:27479001

  17. Diet and diet combined with chronic aerobic exercise decreases body fat mass and alters plasma and adipose tissue inflammatory markers in obese women.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Nadia; Denguezli, Myriam; Zaouali, Monia; Zbidi, Abdelkrim; Tabka, Zouhair; Bouassida, Anissa

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 months aerobic exercise and diet alone or in combination on markers of inflammation (MOI) in circulation and in adipose abdominal tissue (AT) in obese women. Thirty obese subjects were randomized into a 24-week intervention: (1) exercise (EX), (2) diet (DI), and (3) exercise and diet (EXD). Blood samples were collected at baseline, after 12 and 24 weeks. AT biopsies were obtained only at baseline and after 24 weeks. In the EXD and DI groups, the fat loss was after 12 weeks was -13.74 and -7.8 % (P < 0.01) and after 24 weeks was -21.82 and -17 % (P < 0.01) with no changes in the EX group. After 12 and 24 weeks, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was increased by 21.81-39.54 % (P < 0.05) in the EXD group and 18.09-40.95 % in the EX group with no changes in the DI group. In the EXD and DI groups, circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 were decreased after 24 weeks for both groups (P < 0.01). No changes in the EX group. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance decreased (P < 0.05) only after 24 weeks in the EXD group. In AT biopsies, subjects in the EXD and DI groups exhibited a significant decrease in MO (P < 0.01 for all). No changes in AT biopsies were found in the EX group. In conclusion, chronic aerobic exercise was found to have no effects on circulating and AT MOI despite an increased VO2max. Rather important body composition modifications were found to have beneficial effects on circulating and AT MOI in these obese women.

  18. Exposure to bisphenol-A during pregnancy partially mimics the effects of a high-fat diet altering glucose homeostasis and gene expression in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    García-Arevalo, Marta; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Rebelo Dos Santos, Junia; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M; Nadal, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT), the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 10 µg/kg/day of BPA or a vehicle from day 9 to 16 of pregnancy. One month old offspring were divided into four different groups: vehicle treated mice that ate a normal chow diet (Control group); BPA treated mice that also ate a normal chow diet (BPA); vehicle treated animals that had a high fat diet (HFD) and BPA treated animals that were fed HFD (HFD-BPA). The BPA group started to gain weight at 18 weeks old and caught up to the HFD group before week 28. The BPA group as well as the HFD and HFD-BPA ones presented fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma compared with the Control one. Glucose stimulated insulin release was disrupted, particularly in the HFD-BPA group. In WAT, the mRNA expression of the genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, Srebpc1, Pparα and Cpt1β was decreased by BPA to the same extent as with the HFD treatment. BPA treatment upregulated Pparγ and Prkaa1 genes in the liver; yet it diminished the expression of Cd36. Hepatic triglyceride levels were increased in all groups compared to control. In conclusion, male offspring from BPA-treated mothers presented symptoms of diabesity. This term refers to a form of diabetes which typically develops in later life and is associated with obesity.

  19. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  20. The genetics of fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Schleinitz, Dorit; Böttcher, Yvonne; Blüher, Matthias; Kovacs, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Fat stored in visceral depots makes obese individuals more prone to complications than subcutaneous fat. There is good evidence that body fat distribution (FD) is controlled by genetic factors. WHR, a surrogate measure of FD, shows significant heritability of up to ∼60%, even after adjusting for BMI. Genetic variants have been linked to various forms of altered FD such as lipodystrophies; however, the polygenic background of visceral obesity has only been sparsely investigated in the past. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for measures of FD revealed numerous loci harbouring genes potentially regulating FD. In addition, genes with fat depot-specific expression patterns (in particular subcutaneous vs visceral adipose tissue) provide plausible candidate genes involved in the regulation of FD. Many of these genes are differentially expressed in various fat compartments and correlate with obesity-related traits, thus further supporting their role as potential mediators of metabolic alterations associated with a distinct FD. Finally, developmental genes may at a very early stage determine specific FD in later life. Indeed, genes such as TBX15 not only manifest differential expression in various fat depots, but also correlate with obesity and related traits. Moreover, recent GWAS identified several polymorphisms in developmental genes (including TBX15, HOXC13, RSPO3 and CPEB4) strongly associated with FD. More accurate methods, including cardiometabolic imaging, for assessment of FD are needed to promote our understanding in this field, where the main focus is now to unravel the yet unknown biological function of these novel 'fat distribution genes'.

  1. Aging and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Selman, Moisés; Buendía-Roldán, Ivette; Pardo, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive, and usually fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology. The disease likely results from the interaction of genetic susceptibility architecture, environmental factors such as smoking, and an abnormal epigenetic reprogramming that leads to a complex pathogenesis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occurs in middle-aged and mainly elderly adults, and in this context age has emerged as its strongest risk factor. However, the mechanisms linking it to aging are uncertain. Recently, nine molecular and cellular hallmarks of aging have been proposed: genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of these molecular mechanisms and their involvement in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, while emphasizing that the studies on this disease are few and the findings are not definitive. PMID:27103043

  2. Early life stress and post-weaning high fat diet alter tyrosine hydroxylase regulation and AT1 receptor expression in the adrenal gland in a sex dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Maniam, Jayanthi; Ong, Lin Kooi; Dunkley, Peter R; Morris, Margaret J

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that early life stress induced by maternal separation or non-handling can lead to behavioural deficits in rats and that these deficits can be alleviated by providing palatable cafeteria high-fat diet (HFD). In these studies we investigated the effects of maternal separation or non-handling and HFD on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and TH phosphorylation at Ser40 (pSer40TH) and the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) protein in the adrenal gland as markers of sympatho-adrenomedullary activation. After littering, Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to short maternal separation, S15 (15 min), prolonged maternal separation, S180 (180 min) daily from postnatal days 2-14 or were non-handled (NH) until weaning. Siblings were exposed to HFD or chow from day 21 until 19 weeks when adrenals were harvested. Maternal separation and non-handling had no effects on adrenal TH protein in both sexes. We found an effect of HFD only in the females; HFD significantly increased TH levels in NH rats and pSer40TH in S180 rats (relative to corresponding chow-fed groups), but had no effect on AT1R expression in any group. In contrast, in male rats HFD had no effect on TH protein levels, but significantly increased pSer40TH across all treatment groups. There was no effect of HFD on AT1R expression in male rats; however, maternal separation (for 15 or 180 min) caused significant increases in AT1R expression (relative to NH group regardless of diet). This is the first study to report that early life stress and diet modulate TH protein, pSer40TH and AT1R protein levels in the adrenal gland in a sex dependent manner. These results are interpreted in respect to the potential adverse effects that these changes in the adrenal gland may have in males and females in adult life.

  3. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  4. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  5. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  7. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at risk of respiratory distress and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), conceivably through fuel-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. Prior research and preventative measures focus on controlling maternal hyperglycemia, but growing evidence suggests a role for additional circulating fuels including lipids. Little is known about the individual or additive effects of a maternal high-fat diet on fetal lung development. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a maternal high-fat diet, alone and alongside late-gestation diabetes, on lung alveologenesis and vasculogenesis, as well as to ascertain if consequences persist beyond the perinatal period. Methods A rat model was used to study lung development in offspring from control, diabetes-exposed, high-fat diet-exposed and combination-exposed pregnancies via morphometric, histologic (alveolarization and vasculogenesis) and physiologic (echocardiography, pulmonary function) analyses at birth and 3 weeks of age. Outcomes were interrogated for diet, diabetes and interaction effect using ANOVA with significance set at p≤0.05. Findings prompted additional mechanistic inquiry of key molecular pathways. Results Offspring exposed to maternal diabetes or high-fat diet, alone and in combination, had smaller lungs and larger hearts at birth. High-fat diet-exposed, but not diabetes-exposed offspring, had a higher perinatal death rate and echocardiographic evidence of PPHN at birth. Alveolar mean linear intercept, septal thickness, and airspace area (D2) were not significantly different between the groups; however, markers of lung maturity were. Both diabetes-exposed and diet-exposed offspring expressed more T1α protein, a marker of type I cells. Diet-exposed newborn pups expressed less surfactant protein B and had fewer pulmonary vessels enumerated. Mechanistic inquiry revealed alterations in AKT activation, higher endothelin-1

  8. Fat Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.; Pike, Oscar A.

    Lipids in food are subjected to many chemical reactions during processing and storage. While some of these reactions are desirable, others are undesirable; so, efforts are made to minimize the reactions and their effects. The laboratory deals with the characterization of fats and oils with respect to composition, structure, and reactivity.

  9. Fecal Fat: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Fat Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Qualitative or Quantitative Stool Fat; Stool Lipids; 72 Hour Fecal Fat; Fat Stain ...

  10. Fats and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fats and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Fats and ... an important part of a healthy diet. About Fat Fats are nutrients in food that the body ...

  11. Learning about Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Fats KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Fats Print A ... over each gram of fat. continue Types of Fat You might see ads for foods that say ...

  12. Know Your Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Know Your Fats Updated:Mar 28,2016 LDL cholesterol is affected ... eat for a period of time. Know Your Fats Saturated fat The majority of saturated fat comes ...

  13. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food label, pay close ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food label, pay close ...

  14. Facts about monounsaturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... packaged foods have a nutrition label that includes fat content. Reading food labels can help you keep track of how ... of fats. Some have higher amounts of healthy fats than others. Foods and oils with higher amounts of monounsaturated fats ...

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  16. Lung volume quantified by MRI reflects extracellular-matrix deposition and altered pulmonary function in bleomycin models of fibrosis: effects of SOM230.

    PubMed

    Egger, Christine; Gérard, Christelle; Vidotto, Nella; Accart, Nathalie; Cannet, Catherine; Dunbar, Andrew; Tigani, Bruno; Piaia, Alessandro; Jarai, Gabor; Jarman, Elizabeth; Schmid, Herbert A; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-06-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal disease, characterized by loss of lung elasticity and alveolar surface area, secondary to alveolar epithelial cell injury, reactive inflammation, proliferation of fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix. The effects of oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice, as well as of intratracheal administration of ovalbumin to actively sensitized Brown Norway rats on total lung volume as assessed noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated here. Lung injury and volume were quantified by using nongated or respiratory-gated MRI acquisitions [ultrashort echo time (UTE) or gradient-echo techniques]. Lung function of bleomycin-challenged rats was examined additionally using a flexiVent system. Postmortem analyses included histology of collagen and hydroxyproline assays. Bleomycin induced an increase of MRI-assessed total lung volume, lung dry and wet weights, and hydroxyproline content as well as collagen amount. In bleomycin-treated rats, gated MRI showed an increased volume of the lung in the inspiratory and expiratory phases of the respiratory cycle and a temporary decrease of tidal volume. Decreased dynamic lung compliance was found in bleomycin-challenged rats. Bleomycin-induced increase of MRI-detected lung volume was consistent with tissue deposition during fibrotic processes resulting in decreased lung elasticity, whereas influences by edema or emphysema could be excluded. In ovalbumin-challenged rats, total lung volume quantified by MRI remained unchanged. The somatostatin analog, SOM230, was shown to have therapeutic effects on established bleomycin-induced fibrosis in rats. This work suggests MRI-detected total lung volume as readout for tissue-deposition in small rodent bleomycin models of pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Fat Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, David B.; Ellefson, Wayne C.

    Lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates constitute the principal structural components of foods. Lipids are a group of substances that, in general, are soluble in ether, chloroform, or other organic solvents but are sparingly soluble in water. However, there exists no clear scientific definition of a lipid, primarily due to the water solubility of certain molecules that fall within one of the variable categories of food lipids (1). Some lipids, such as triacylglycerols, are very hydrophobic. Other lipids, such as di- and monoacylglycerols, have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties in their molecules and are soluble in relatively polar solvents (2). Short-chain fatty acids such as C1-C4 are completely miscible in water and insoluble in nonpolar solvents (1). The most widely accepted definition is based on solubility as previously stated. While most macromolecules are characterized by common structural features, the designation of "lipid" being defined by solubility characteristics is unique to lipids (2). Lipids comprise a broad group of substances that have some common properties and compositional similarities (3). Triacylglycerols are fats and oils that represent the most prevalent category of the group of compounds known as lipids. The terms lipids, fats, and oils are often used interchangeably. The term "lipid" commonly refers to the broad, total collection of food molecules that meet the definition previously stated. Fats generally refer to those lipids that are solid at room temperature and oils generally refer to those lipids that are liquid at room temperature. While there may not be an exact scientific definition, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a regulatory definition for nutrition labeling purposes. The FDA has defined total fat as the sum of fatty acids from C4 to C24, calculated as triglycerides. This definition provides a clear path for resolution of any nutrition labeling disputes.

  18. Prior Exercise Increases Subsequent Utilization of Dietary Fat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Votruba, Susan B.; Atkinson, Richard L.; Hirvonen, Matt D.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether exercise would alter the partitioning of dietary fat between oxidation and storage. Seven women participated in rest, light exercise, and heavy exercise. Researchers calculated stationary cycle exercise sessions and dietary fat oxidation. Prior exercise had a positive effect on oxidation of dietary monosaturated fat but not…

  19. Purinergic dysregulation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Visovatti, Scott H; Hyman, Matthew C; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Kanthi, Yogendra; Robichaud, Patrick; Wang, Jintao; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Rattan, Rahul; Burant, Charles F; Pinsky, David J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that nucleotides and adenosine help regulate vascular tone through purinergic signaling pathways, little is known regarding their contributions to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Even less is known about the potential role that alterations in CD39 (ENTPD1), the ectonucleotidase responsible for the conversion of the nucleotides ATP and ADP to AMP, may play in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we identified decreased CD39 expression on the pulmonary endothelium of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We next determined the effects of CD39 gene deletion in mice exposed to normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen). Compared with controls, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice were found to have a markedly elevated ATP-to-adenosine ratio, higher pulmonary arterial pressures, more right ventricular hypertrophy, more arterial medial hypertrophy, and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice exhibited a marked increase in lung P2X1 receptors. Systemic reconstitution of ATPase and ADPase enzymatic activities through continuous administration of apyrase decreased pulmonary arterial pressures in hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice to levels found in hypoxic CD39(+/+) controls. Treatment with NF279, a potent and selective P2X1 receptor antagonist, lowered pulmonary arterial pressures even further. Our study is the first to implicate decreased CD39 and resultant alterations in circulating purinergic signaling ligands and cognate receptors in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Reconstitution and receptor blocking experiments suggest that phosphohydrolysis of purinergic nucleotide tri- and diphosphates, or blocking of the P2X1 receptor could serve as treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27208163

  20. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  1. Localised pulmonary metastatic calcification associated with pulmonary artery obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, J; Tomashefski, J F

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metastatic pulmonary calcification, a complication of uraemia and disordered calcium metabolism, may be diffuse or localised. The factors that determine calcium precipitation are complex, but tissue alkalosis is thought to be important. As obstruction of the pulmonary artery theoretically causes local alkalosis a retrospective necropsy study was carried out to examine the relation between metastatic pulmonary calcification and vascular obstruction. METHODS: Five patients with focal and two with diffuse metastatic calcification in the lungs were identified over eight years. Lungs were studied macroscopically and by light microscopy, haematoxylin and eosin and histochemical stains being used for calcium. RESULTS: Underlying risk factors for calcification in these patients included renal failure in six and disseminated malignancy in five. In the five patients with localised calcification obstruction of the pulmonary artery by thrombus or tumour was found proximal or adjacent to areas of calcium deposition. In two patients metastatic calcification was confined to a lung with unilateral pulmonary artery thromboembolic occlusion. Calcification was not specifically associated with infarction, pneumonia, or diffuse alveolar damage. Lesions of the pulmonary artery were not seen in the two patients with diffuse bilateral metastatic calcification. CONCLUSION: In this small series there was a spatial association between pulmonary artery obstruction and localised metastatic calcification. It is proposed that pulmonary artery obstruction alters the microchemical environment of the lung, favouring tissue alkalosis and thereby enhancing parenchymal calcification in patients predisposed to this condition. Images PMID:1519194

  2. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  3. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  4. Facts about saturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... with trans fat . These fats are most often solid at room temperature. Foods like butter, palm and ... products (butter, ice cream, pudding, cheese, whole milk) Solid fats such as coconut oil, palm, and palm ...

  5. Facts about trans fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... made when food makers turn liquid oils into solid fats, like shortening or margarine. Trans fats can ... list. It means oils have been turned to solids and trans fats. Manufacturers can show 0 grams ...

  6. Dietary fat and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include fats found in fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. Limit foods with saturated and trans fats (such as meats, full-fat dairy products, and processed foods). Fruits and vegetables are healthy snack foods. Children should be taught ...

  7. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  8. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... that damage the lungs, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis Birth defects of the heart Blood clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood ...

  9. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  11. Figuring Out Fat and Calories

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Figuring Out Fat and Calories KidsHealth > For Teens > Figuring Out Fat ... the truth on fat and calories? What Are Fat and Calories? Fats, or lipids , are nutrients in ...

  12. Pulmonary haemodynamics in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Oreste; Bonsignore, Maria Rosaria

    2002-06-01

    In patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), pulmonary haemodynamics can show both transient perturbations during sleep and permanent alterations. During sleep, repeated fluctuations in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure, coincident with apnoeas, can be observed. Calculation of transmural pressure values is preferable to intravascular pressures in OSAS, due to the marked swings in intrathoracic pressure associated with obstructive apnoeas. Pulmonary artery pressure may progressively increase during sleep, particularly in close sequences of highly desaturating apnoeas. Apnoea-induced hypoxia appears as the most important determinant of this pulmonary artery pressure behaviour. Stroke volume and cardiac output during obstructive apnoeas show changes mainly related to intrathoracic pressure variations. Permanent precapillary pulmonary hypertension at rest is observed in <50% OSAS patients, and is poorly reversible after OSAS treatment. It correlates best with diurnal respiratory function parameters. However, the finding of pulmonary hypertension in some patients with near normal diurnal lung function led to suggest that sleep respiratory disorders may contribute to permanent pulmonary haemodynamic impairment in predisposed subjects. Knowledge on right ventricle hypertrophy in OSAS is inconsistent. As to right ventricle failure, it is clinically evident in subjects with associated lung disease or morbid obesity, while it may be detected instrumentally in subjects without such alterations, presumably as effect of apnoeas themselves. Besides, it appears more fully reversible after long-term OSAS treatment than pulmonary hypertension. PMID:12531120

  13. Understanding and treating pulmonary hypertension in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Pierro, M; Thébaud, B

    2014-12-01

    Lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension are classical features of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and represent the main determinants of survival. The mechanisms leading to pulmonary hypertension in this malformation are still poorly understood, but may combine altered vasoreactivity, pulmonary artery remodeling, and a hypoplastic pulmonary vascular bed. Efforts have been directed at correcting the "reversible" component of pulmonary hypertension of CDH. However, pulmonary hypertension in CDH is often refractory to pulmonary vasodilators. A new emerging pattern of late (months after birth) and chronic (months to years after birth) pulmonary hypertension are described in CDH survivors. The true incidence and implications for outcome and management need to be confirmed by follow-up studies from referral centers with high patient output. In order to develop more efficient strategies to treat pulmonary hypertension and improve survival in most severe cases, the ultimate therapeutic goal would be to promote lung and vascular growth. PMID:25456753

  14. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  15. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  16. Modulation of infant formula fat profile alters the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and plasma fatty acid distribution relative to those with breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Wood, R A; Guy, D G

    1992-04-01

    The effect of breast-feeding was compared with that of two fat-modified milk formulas in 45 infants (15 per group) studied by assessing body weight gain for 4 months and plasma lipids, lipoprotein profiles, fatty acid profiles of plasma and red blood cells, and plasma tocopherol status 3 months after birth. A saturated fat formula with coconut oil/soybean oil (COCO/SOY) had a fatty acid content and polyunsaturated/saturated ratio (P/S, 0.55) comparable with that of human milk fat (P/S, 0.39) and had the same fat energy content (50% kcal). The second formula, with corn oil/soybean oil (CORN/SOY), was highly unsaturated (P/S, 4.6), with only 35% kcal from fat. Energy intake and body weight gain were similar for all groups. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were significantly lower (greater than 20% on average) in infants fed the CORN/SOY formula than in infants fed either the COCO/SOY formula or human milk. Infants fed the CORN/SOY formula also had lower (25% to 35%) plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratios. Plasma, red blood cell, and cholesteryl ester fatty acids from infants fed COCO/SOY contained less 18:1 and more 18:2; cholesterol esters in plasma from breast-fed infants had the highest 20:4n-6 levels. Plasma tocopherol levels were higher in infants consuming formulas. The presence of cholesterol in human milk appeared to expand the low-density lipoprotein pool and exert an "unfavorable" increase in the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio. Thus modulation of infant lipoproteins by changing dietary fat and cholesterol is feasible and in keeping with the known response in adults. PMID:1560323

  17. Comparative integromics on FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 and FAT4.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-09-01

    WNT5A, WNT5B, WNT11, FZD3, FZD6, VANGL1, VANGL2, DVL1, DVL2, DVL3, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, ANKRD6, NKD1, NKD2, DAAM1, DAAM2, CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3, ROR1 and ROR2 are planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling molecules implicated in the regulation of cellular polarity, convergent extension, and invasion. FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 and FAT4 are Cadherin superfamily members homologous to Drosophila Fat, functioning as a positive regulator of PCP in the Drosophila wing. Complete coding sequence (CDS) for human FAT1 (NM_005245.3) and FAT2 (NM_001447.1) are available, while artificial CDS for human FAT3 (XM_926199 and XM_936538) and partial CDS for FAT4 (NM_024582.2). Here, complete CDS of human FAT3 and FAT4 were determined by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). FAT3 gene, consisting of 26 exons, encoded a 4557-aa protein with extracellular 33 Cadherin repeats, one Laminin G (LamG) domain and two EGF domains. FAT4 gene encoded a 4924-aa protein with extracellular 34 Cadherin repeats, two LamG domains and three EGF domains. Cytoplasmic VCSVxPxLP and SDYxS motifs were identified as novel motifs conserved among FAT1, FAT2 and FAT3 orthologs. Domain architecture comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that FAT1, FAT2 and FAR3 were divergent from FAT4. FAT1-MTNR1A locus at 4q35.2 and FAT3-MTNR1B locus at 11q14.3-q21 were paralogous regions within the human genome. FAT1 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural tissues, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and brain tumors. FAT2 mRNA was expressed in infant brain, cerebellum, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, skin squamous cell carcinoma, head and neck cancer. FAT3 mRNA was expressed in ES cells, primitive neuroectoderm, fetal brain, infant brain, adult neural tissues and prostate. FAT4 mRNA was expressed in fetal brain, infant brain, brain tumor and colorectal cancer. FAT family members were revealed to be targets of systems

  18. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD: old and new concepts.

    PubMed

    Barberà, J A; Peinado, V I; Santos, S

    2000-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common complication in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its presence and severity is closely related to disease prognosis. Remodelling of pulmonary vessels is the principal causative factor of pulmonary hypertension in COPD. In advanced COPD, pulmonary vascular remodelling is related to the severity of arterial hypoxaemia. However, recent studies have shown that structural abnormalities and alterations of vascular function are also apparent in patients with mild COPD who do not have hypoxaemia and even in smokers with normal lung function. Pulmonary endothelium plays a crucial role in the regulation of vascular tone and cell growth of the vessel wall. Alterations of endothelial function in pulmonary arteries are apparent at the early stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease evolution. Potential mechanisms of endothelial damage at these initial stages include the effects of cigarette smoke components and inflammatory changes. The resultant alteration of pulmonary endothelium by these factors might predispose patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to further vascular damage by additional factors, such as hypoxaemia, ultimately leading to pulmonary hypertension. PMID:11272628

  19. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  20. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  1. Pulmonary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R; Turk, E P

    1980-09-01

    Two cases are reported of the incidental finding of pulmonary schistosomiasis in the victims of a fatal aircraft accident. The presence of this disease had no bearing on the causation of the accident, but it gives insight into the potential hazards of dissemination of diseases by travellers. The finding also emphasises the value of routine postmortems and histology in all aircraft accident victims.

  2. Maternal death due to non-traumatic fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Karayel, Ferah; Arican, Nadir; Kavas, Gamze; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Pakis, Isil

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this report is to document a case of non-traumatic fat embolism (NTFE) and to address the need for considerition of fat embolism in suspicious deaths resulting from respiratory distress in the postpartum period. A 28-years-old woman autopsied at the Morgue Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine is included to the study. This female became unconscious and developed respiratory distress 4 h after delivery, and this was followed by respiratory arrest. External examination revealed resuscitation marks and normal postmortem changes. Light microscopy revealed massive fat embolization involving most of the alveolar capillaries on several sections. Only in one particular area was a bone marrow embolus. Pathological diagnosis of the lung was diffuse pulmonary fat embolism. There was no evidence of other organ involvement with emboli. Other visceral organs showed no striking findings other than mild congestion. The cause of death was considered to be respiratory insufficiency resulting from severe fat embolism of the lungs.

  3. Lipocytes (fat cells) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to energy output, there is no expansion of fat cells (lipocytes) to accommodate excess. It is only when more calories are taken in than used that the extra fat is stored in the lipocytes and the person ...

  4. Long-term exposure to [Cr3O(O2CCH2CH3)6(H2O)3]+ in Wistar rats fed normal or high-fat diets does not alter glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Betty J.; Logsdon, Amanda L.; Lockard, Jarrett E.; Miller, Brittany M.; Kim, Hanna; Calderon, Eric A.; Vincent, John B.; Bailey, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    The essentiality of chromium(III) has been the subject of much debate, particularly in healthy subjects. Chromium(III)-containing supplements are widely used for body mass loss, building of lean muscle mass, and improving glucose and lipid metabolism. [Cr3O(O2CCH2CH3)6(H2O)3]+, Cr3, is one of the most-studied chromium nutritional supplements. The current study evaluates the effects of long-term (15 months) supplementation with Cr3 on body mass and glucose metabolism in Wistar rats on traditional and cafeteria-style (high fat, high carbohydrate) diets. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: 1) control diet (milled Harlan Teklad LM-485 rodent diet), 2) control diet + 1 mg Cr3/kg body mass/day, 3) a cafeteria-style (CAF) diet (high fat, high carbohydrate), or 4) CAF diet + 1 mg Cr3/kg/day. Cr3 supplementation had no effect on fasting blood glucose levels or blood glucose levels in response to glucose and insulin challenges. Rats consuming the CAF + Cr3 diet tended to have a significantly higher body mass than rats consuming the CAF diet, but necropsy results showed no difference in visceral fat or body wall thickness between groups. These data suggest that long-term Cr3 supplementation does not significantly affect body mass in rats consuming a normal diet or glucose levels or metabolism in rats consuming either diet. PMID:23271681

  5. Weighing in on Dietary Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Weighing in on Dietary Fats Some Fats Are Healthier Than Others With the winter holidays ... of these foods, though, can be high in fat. Learn which fats are naughty and which are ...

  6. Fat Embolism in Patients with Fractured Hips

    PubMed Central

    Sevitt, Simon

    1972-01-01

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2·4 to 3·3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0·7 to 0·8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4·1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0·9 to 1·1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6·8 to 8·0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases. A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  7. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  8. Controversies in fat perception.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Jaana M; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas; Frank, Sabine

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional fat is one of the most controversial topics in nutritional research, particularly against the background of obesity. Studies investigating fat taste perception have revealed several associations with sensory, genetic, and personal factors (e.g. BMI). However, neuronal activation patterns, which are known to be highly sensitive to different tastes as well as to BMI differences, have not yet been included in the scheme of fat taste perception. We will therefore provide a comprehensive survey of the sensory, genetic, and personal factors associated with fat taste perception and highlight the benefits of applying neuroimaging research. We will also give a critical overview of studies investigating sensory fat perception and the challenges resulting from multifaceted methodological approaches. In conclusion, we will discuss a multifactorial approach to fat perception to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that cause varying fat sensitivity which could be responsible for overeating. Such knowledge might be beneficial in new treatment strategies for obesity and overweight.

  9. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  10. Effect of chronic p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) exposure on high fat diet-induced alterations in glucose and lipid metabolism in male C57BL/6H mice.

    PubMed

    Howell, George E; Mulligan, Charlee; Meek, Edward; Chambers, Janice E

    2015-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic disease affecting 29.1 million people or 9.3% of the population of the United States. The most prevalent form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes (T2D) which comprises 90-95% of all reported cases of diabetes. While the exact cause of T2D remains an enigma, known risk factors include age, weight, sedentary lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and genetic predisposition. However, these risk factors can not sufficiently explain the increasing prevalence of T2D. Recently, environmental exposures have been explored as potential risk factors. Indeed, epidemiological and limited empirical studies have revealed elevated serum concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including the bioaccumulative metabolite of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), are positively correlated with increased T2D prevalence. The goal of the present study is to determine if chronic exposure to DDE promotes T2D in a widely used in vivo model, the high saturated fat-fed mouse. Male C57BL/6H mice were exposed to DDE (2.0mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil; 1ml/kg) via gavage for 5 consecutive days, then every 7 days for the duration of the study. One week following the 5 day consecutive DDE dosing, animals were placed on either a low fat (10%kcal from lard) or high fat (45%kcal from lard) diet (HFD) for 13 weeks. Chronic exposure to DDE promoted fasting hyperglycemia after 4 and 8 weeks on the HFD diet and normalized fasting blood glucose levels at week 13. This DDE-mediated decrease in fasting hyperglycemia was preceded by improved glucose tolerance at week 12. In addition to normalizing fasting hyperglycemia at the end of high fat feeding, DDE exposure decreased HFD-induced fasting hyperinsulinemia, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, and hepatic steatosis. Therefore, based on the current data, chronic DDE exposure appears to have a biphasic effect on HFD

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  12. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  13. Acute pulmonary edema associated with naphazoline ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidetada; Norimoto, Kazunobu; Seki, Tadahiko; Nishiguchi, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Konobu, Toshifumi; Nishio, Kenji; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2008-03-01

    In published reports of naphazoline ingestion, clinical effects are hypertension, bradycardia, pallor, diaphoresis, and respiratory distress. We report three cases of acute pulmonary edema after the intentional ingestion of naphazoline-containing antiseptic first aid liquid. These cases presented with altered mental status, hypertension, bradycardia, and diaphoresis. Chest x-ray on admission revealed acute pulmonary edema. Two cases required mechanical ventilation. All of these clinical effects resolved within 24 hours and the patients were discharged with no sequelae. Since naphazoline stimulates the peripheral alpha-2 adrenergic receptor, we speculate that intense vasoconstriction may have elevated cardiac afterload and left atrial-ventricular blood volume and caused acute pulmonary edema.

  14. Dietary fat, fat subtypes and hepatocellular carcinoma in a large European cohort.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Salles, Talita; Fedirko, Veronika; Stepien, Magdalena; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Laursen, Anne Sofie Dam; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; His, Mathilde; Boeing, Heiner; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elissavet; Kritikou, Maria; Masala, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Sieri, Sabina; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Hjartåker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ardanaz, Eva; Bonet, Catalina; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J Ramón; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Wennberg, Maria; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Wareham, Nick; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc; Lu, Yunxia; Jenab, Mazda

    2015-12-01

    The role of amount and type of dietary fat consumption in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is poorly understood, despite suggestive biological plausibility. The associations of total fat, fat subtypes and fat sources with HCC incidence were investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, which includes 191 incident HCC cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2010. Diet was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. A single 24-hr diet recall from a cohort subsample was used for measurement error calibration. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV) status and biomarkers of liver function were assessed separately in a nested case-control subset with available blood samples (HCC = 122). In multivariable calibrated models, there was a statistically significant inverse association between total fat intake and risk of HCC (per 10 g/day, HR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.65-0.99), which was mainly driven by monounsaturated fats (per 5 g/day, HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92) rather than polyunsaturated fats (per 5 g/day, HR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.68-1.25). There was no association between saturated fats (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.88-1.34) and HCC risk. The ratio of polyunsaturated/monounsaturated fats to saturated fats was not significantly associated with HCC risk (per 0.2 point, HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.73-1.01). Restriction of analyses to HBV/HCV free participants or adjustment for liver function did not substantially alter the findings. In this large prospective European cohort, higher consumption of monounsaturated fats is associated with lower HCC risk. PMID:26081477

  15. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  16. A gestational diet high in fat-soluble vitamins alters expression of genes in brain pathways and reduces sucrose preference, but not food intake, in Wistar male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Diana; Poon, Abraham N; Kubant, Ruslan; Kim, Hwanki; Huot, Pedro S P; Cho, Clara E; Pannia, Emanuela; Pausova, Zdenka; Anderson, G Harvey

    2015-04-01

    High intakes of multivitamins (HV) during pregnancy by Wistar rats increase food intake, body weight, and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in male offspring. In this study, high-fat soluble vitamins were fed in combination during gestation to test the hypothesis that they partially account for the effects of the HV diet. Pregnant Wistar rats (14-16/group) were fed a recommended multivitamin diet (1-fold all vitamins) or high-fat soluble vitamin diet (HFS; 10-fold vitamins A, D, E, and K) during pregnancy. Offspring body weight, food intake, and preference as well as expression of selected genes in the hypothalamus and hippocampus were evaluated at birth, weaning, and 14 weeks postweaning. Body weight and food intake were not affected but sucrose preference decreased by 4% in those born to dams fed the HFS gestational diet. Gene expressions of the hypothalamic anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and orexogenic neuropeptide Y (Npy) (∼30% p = 0.008, ∼40% p = 0.007) were increased in weaning and adult rats, respectively. Hippocampal dopaminergic genes (35%-50% p < 0.05) were upregulated at birth and 14 weeks postweaning. DNA hypermethylation (2% p = 0.006) was observed in the dopamine receptor 1 (Drd1) promoter region. We conclude that a gestational diet high in vitamins A, D, E, and K does not show the effects of the HV diet on body weight or food intake but may affect the development of higher hedonic regulatory pathways associated with food preference.

  17. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  18. Pulmonary Biomarkers of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alecia; Bhandari, Vineet

    2008-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or BPD, is a chronic pulmonary disorder of premature infants, commonly defined as having an oxygen requirement at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. It is an important source of morbidity and mortality in premature neonates. Its’ etiology appears to be multifactorial with the most common associations being prematurity, need for mechanical ventilation, and oxygen exposure. Implied in the pathogenesis of BPD is the role of cytokines which are immune mediators produced by most cell types. This is evidenced by studies in which there exist alterations in the levels of “pro-inflammatory” and “anti-inflammatory” cytokines. The imbalance of these cytokines have either heralded the onset or predicted the presence of BPD, or indicated a decreased propensity to developing this chronic respiratory disorder of preterm infants. Many other pulmonary markers have been shown to be altered in patients with BPD. These include markers indicative of altered lung repair processes, decreased endothelial integrity, oxidative damage and abnormal fibrinolytic activity, all of which are thought to be mechanisms contributing to the development of BPD. In this review, we will discuss the physiologic role of specific biomarkers in the pulmonary tract of the human premature neonate, the perturbations that enable them to be deranged, and their proposed association with BPD. PMID:19430584

  19. Pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Ricardo de Amorim; Silva, Luciana Cristina dos Santos; Rezende, Cláudia Juliana; Bernardes, Rodrigo Castro; Prata, Tarciane Aline; Silva, Henrique Lima

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery dissection is a fatal complication of long-standing pulmonary hypertension, manifesting as acute, stabbing chest pain, progressive dyspnea, cardiogenic shock, or sudden death. Its incidence has been underestimated, and therapeutic options are still scarce. In patients with pulmonary hypertension, new chest pain, acute chest pain, or cardiogenic shock should raise the suspicion of pulmonary artery dissection, which can result in sudden death. PMID:23670510

  20. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma mimicking pulmonary carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Uçvet, Ahmet; Tözüm, Halil; Gürsoy, Soner; Gülle, Ali Alper; Yaldiz, Sadik; Aydoğdu Dinç, Zekiye

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma is a rare fibrosing nodular disease of the lung characterized by solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules. They can occur after inflammatory or post-inflammatory changes. A 60 years old asymptomatic patient admitted to our clinic because of a solid mass of 6 cm in his routine chest radiography. A lobectomy was performed and the histological diagnosis was reported as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This case, mimicking pulmonary carcinoma, is rarely found in the literature. PMID:16615022

  1. MicroRNA 21 regulates the proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and high-fat diet-induced obesity alters microRNA 21 expression in white adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Shin, Keun Koo; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) differentiation could provide new insights into a number of diseases including obesity. Our previous study demonstrated that microRNA-21 (miR-21) controls the adipogenic differentiation of hASCs. In this study, we determined the expression of miR-21 in white adipose tissues in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model to examine the relationship between miR-21 and obesity and the effect of miR-21 on hASCs proliferation. Our study showed biphasic changes of miR-21 expression and a correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the epididymal fat of HFD mice. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased cell proliferation, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased it. Over-expression of miR-21 decreased both protein and mRNA levels of STAT3, whereas inhibiting miR-21 with 2'-O-methyl-antisense RNA increased these levels. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the miR-21 target site from the STAT3 3'UTR was lower in LV-miR21-infected hASCs than in LV-miLacZ infected cells. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of STAT3 decreased cell proliferation without affecting adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation between miR-21 level and adipocyte number in the white adipose tissue of HFD-induced obese mice, which provides new insights into the mechanisms of obesity.

  2. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  3. Pulmonary intravascular lipid in neonatal necropsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Puntis, J W; Rushton, D I

    1991-01-01

    The lungs of 482 liveborn infants were examined at necropsy for the presence of intravascular lipid. Forty one patients had received parenteral feeding (including lipid emulsion in 30), and 441 had died before starting feeds or had received enteral feeds alone. Tissue was processed into wax and then stained with Sudan black; intravascular lipid was found in 15 of 30 infants who had received intravenous fat (Intralipid), but in no others. Those patients with positive lipid staining had received significantly more fat during parenteral nutrition than those in whom intravascular lipid was not found but the two groups were otherwise clinically indistinguishable. Using this staining technique intravascular lipid can be shown relatively often, although only in patients who have received intravenous lipid emulsion. The location of fat, predominantly in small pulmonary capillaries, and the absence of lipid emboli in other organs, suggests that lipid coalescence takes place before death and is not a postmortem artefact. The clinical relevance remains uncertain. PMID:1899990

  4. Pulmonary intravascular lipid in neonatal necropsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Puntis, J W; Rushton, D I

    1991-01-01

    The lungs of 482 liveborn infants were examined at necropsy for the presence of intravascular lipid. Forty one patients had received parenteral feeding (including lipid emulsion in 30), and 441 had died before starting feeds or had received enteral feeds alone. Tissue was processed into wax and then stained with Sudan black; intravascular lipid was found in 15 of 30 infants who had received intravenous fat (Intralipid), but in no others. Those patients with positive lipid staining had received significantly more fat during parenteral nutrition than those in whom intravascular lipid was not found but the two groups were otherwise clinically indistinguishable. Using this staining technique intravascular lipid can be shown relatively often, although only in patients who have received intravenous lipid emulsion. The location of fat, predominantly in small pulmonary capillaries, and the absence of lipid emboli in other organs, suggests that lipid coalescence takes place before death and is not a postmortem artefact. The clinical relevance remains uncertain.

  5. Integrative analysis of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data of white adipose and liver tissue of high-fat diet and rosiglitazone-treated insulin-resistant mice identified pathway alterations and molecular hubs.

    PubMed

    Meierhofer, David; Weidner, Christopher; Sauer, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    The incidences of obesity and type 2 diabetes are rapidly increasing and have evolved into a global epidemic. In this study, we analyzed the molecular effects of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin-resistance on mice in two metabolic target tissues, the white adipose tissue (WAT) and the liver. Additionally, we analyzed the effects of drug treatment using the specific PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone. We integrated transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome data sets for a combined holistic view of molecular mechanisms in type 2 diabetes. Using network and pathway analyses, we identified hub proteins such as SDHB and SUCLG1 in WAT and deregulation of major metabolic pathways in the insulin-resistant state, including the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and branched chain amino acid metabolism. Rosiglitazone treatment resulted mainly in modulation via PPAR signaling and oxidative phosphorylation in WAT only. Interestingly, in HFD liver, we could observe a decrease of proteins involved in vitamin B metabolism such as PDXDC1 and DHFR and the according metabolites. Furthermore, we could identify sphingosine (Sph) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (SP1) as a drug-specific marker pair in the liver. In summary, our data indicate physiological plasticity gained by interconnected molecular pathways to counteract metabolic dysregulation due to high calorie intake and drug treatment.

  6. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you ... to fried chicken, test your knowledge about the fats in some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the ...

  7. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous Topic Granular cell tumors Next Topic Mastitis Fat necrosis and oil cysts Fat necrosis happens when ... lumpy area if it becomes bothersome. How do fat necrosis and oil cysts affect your risk for ...

  8. Subcutaneous abdominal fat and thigh muscle composition predict insulin sensitivity independently of visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, B H; Thaete, F L; Simoneau, J A; Kelley, D E

    1997-10-01

    central adiposity, subcutaneous abdominal fat has as strong an association with insulin resistance as visceral fat, and altered muscle composition, suggestive of increased fat content, is an important independent marker of insulin resistance in obesity.

  9. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  10. Pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation after hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, B B; Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Clougherty, P W; Fehr, D M; Murray, P A

    1988-09-01

    Our objectives were 1) to investigate the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to increasing cardiac index after a period of hypotension and hypoperfusion (defined as reperfusion) measured in conscious dogs is altered during pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and 2) to determine whether pentobarbital anesthesia modifies autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the pulmonary circulation during reperfusion. Base-line and reperfusion pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were generated by stepwise inflation and deflation, respectively, of an inferior vena caval occluder to vary Q in conscious and pentobarbital-anesthetized (30 mg/kg iv) dogs. During pentobarbital anesthesia, controlled ventilation (without positive end-expiratory pressure) allowed matching of systemic arterial and mixed venous blood gases to conscious values. Marked pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized but not in conscious dogs. Both sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block and total ANS ganglionic block attenuated, but did not abolish, the pulmonary vasoconstriction during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Neither sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block nor cholinergic receptor block enhanced the magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to reperfusion during pentobarbital anesthesia. Thus, in contrast to the conscious state, the pulmonary vascular response to reperfusion is characterized by active, non-flow-dependent pulmonary vasoconstriction during pentobarbital anesthesia. This response is primarily, but not exclusively, mediated by sympathetic alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction and is not offset by either sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic vasodilation. These results indicate, that, compared with the conscious state, pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation, during reperfusion following hypotension and hypoperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250

  11. Fat burn X: burning more than fat.

    PubMed

    Hannabass, Kyle; Olsen, Kevin Robert

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of bilateral lower extremity cramping and dark urine. The patient was found to have a creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevated of up to 2306 U/L, a serum uric acid of 9.7 mg/dL and 101 red blood cell's per high-powered field on urinalysis. On questioning, the patient endorsed daily exercise with free weights. There were no changes in his regular exercise and medication regimen, no muscle trauma, no recent drug use and no illness. The patient did mention using a new fat burner known as 'Fat Burn X', which he had begun taking 2 days prior to the onset of his muscle cramps. The patient was given normal saline intravenous fluid resuscitation for 48 h with resultant normalisation of his CPK and creatinine, and was discharged with primary care follow-up.

  12. Facts about polyunsaturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... with higher amounts of polyunsaturated fats include: Walnuts Sunflower seeds Flax seeds or flax oil Fish, such ... flax seed on your meal. Add walnuts or sunflower seeds to salads. Cook with corn or safflower ...

  13. Dietary fats explained

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. Some vegetable oils, such as coconut, palm, and palm kernel oil, ... fats can help lower your LDL cholesterol. Most vegetable oils that are liquid at room temperature have unsaturated ...

  14. Dietary fat overload reprograms brown fat mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Vegliante, Rolando; Cannata, Stefano M.; Bernardini, Sergio; Ciriolo, Maria R.; Aquilano, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nutrient overload accelerates the onset of several aging-related diseases reducing life expectancy. Although the mechanisms by which overnutrition affects metabolic processes in many tissues are known, its role on BAT physiology is still unclear. Herein, we investigated the mitochondrial responses in BAT of female mice exposed to high fat diet (HFD) at different steps of life. Although adult mice showed an unchanged mitochondrial amount, both respiration and OxPHOS subunits were strongly affected. Differently, offspring pups exposed to HFD during pregnancy and lactation displayed reduced mitochondrial mass but high oxidative efficiency that, however, resulted in increased bioenergetics state of BAT rather than augmented uncoupling respiration. Interestingly, the metabolic responses triggered by HFD were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial dynamics characterized by decreased content of the fragmentation marker Drp1 both in mothers and offspring pups. HFD-induced inactivation of the FoxO1 transcription factor seemed to be the up-stream modulator of Drp1 levels in brown fat cells. Furthermore, HFD offspring pups weaned with normal diet only partially reverted the mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by HFD. Finally these mice failed in activating the thermogenic program upon cold exposure. Collectively our findings suggest that maternal dietary fat overload irreversibly commits BAT unresponsiveness to physiological stimuli such as cool temperature and this dysfunction in the early stage of life might negatively modulate health and lifespan. PMID:26483700

  15. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  16. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  17. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  18. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  19. Physiological mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, Iain R; Revell, Alistair; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is usually related to obstruction of pulmonary blood flow at the level of the pulmonary arteries (eg, pulmonary embolus), pulmonary arterioles (idiopathic pulmonary hypertension), pulmonary veins (pulmonary venoocclusive disease) or mitral valve (mitral stenosis and regurgitation). Pulmonary hypertension is also observed in heart failure due to left ventricle myocardial diseases regardless of the ejection fraction. Pulmonary hypertension is often regarded as a passive response to the obstruction to pulmonary flow. We review established fluid dynamics and physiology and discuss the mechanisms underlying pulmonary hypertension. The important role that the right ventricle plays in the development and maintenance of pulmonary hypertension is discussed. We use principles of thermodynamics and discuss a potential common mechanism for a number of disease states, including pulmonary edema, through adding pressure energy to the pulmonary circulation. PMID:27659877

  20. Time course of pulmonary vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs--an analysis using pulmonary vascular impedance.

    PubMed

    Tobise, K; Tosaka, S; Onodera, S

    1992-05-01

    To understand the mechanism leading to progressive pulmonary hypertension, we investigated the time course of vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs by using pulmonary vascular impedance. In a normal state, the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was transiently increased by emboli, and the impedance moduli of 0 Hz (= Rin), 1.5 Hz and 3 Hz were slightly increased. A four-element electrical vascular model showed the transient increase in peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance (R2) and inertia, and reduction in compliance (C). In contrast, in a state of a slight pulmonary hypertension, mPAP was continuously increased by the same amount of emboli, and the impedance moduli of both 0 Hz and 3 Hz were significantly increased. By a four-element model, a severe increase in R2 and reduction in C were observed, and these changes continued. Therefore, although the vascular response to pulmonary microembolism basically depends on the degree of mechanical obstruction, this response is thought to be modulated by the responsiveness of pulmonary vessels at that time, which is involved in the alteration in the local characteristics of pulmonary vessels, and/or the recruitment of a new blood flow.

  1. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Gans, S J; van der Elst, A M; Straks, W

    1988-04-01

    A patient with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is presented. PHG is a rare disease with very specific histological characteristics. Roentgenograms display multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules which may be cavitated. Evidence exists that the nodules are the result of an exaggerated chronic immune response. The course of the disease is generally favourable. PHG should be considered in patients showing multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. PMID:2456228

  2. Chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension increases main pulmonary artery stiffness and adventitial remodeling in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Matthew R.; Galambos, Csaba; Hunter, Kendall S.; Abman, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by high pulmonary vascular resistance due to changes in lung vascular growth, structure, and tone. PPHN has been primarily considered as a disease of the small pulmonary arteries (PA), but proximal vascular stiffness has been shown to be an important predictor of morbidity and mortality in other diseases associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The objective of this study is to characterize main PA (MPA) stiffness in experimental PPHN and to determine the relationship of altered biomechanics of the MPA with changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) content and orientation of collagen and elastin fibers. MPAs were isolated from control and PPHN fetal sheep model and were tested by planar biaxial testing to measure stiffness in circumferential and axial vessel orientations. Test specimens were fixed for histological assessments of the vascular wall ECM constituents collagen and elastin. MPAs from PPHN sheep had increased mechanical stiffness (P < 0.05) and altered ECM remodeling compared with control MPA. A constitutive mathematical model and histology demonstrated that PPHN vessels have a smaller contribution of elastin and a greater role for collagen fiber engagement compared with the control arteries. We conclude that exposure to chronic hemodynamic stress in late-gestation fetal sheep increases proximal PA stiffness and alters ECM remodeling. We speculate that proximal PA stiffness further contributes to increased right ventricular impedance in experimental PPHN, which contributes to abnormal transition of the pulmonary circulation at birth. PMID:25326575

  3. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-15

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction.

  4. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development

    PubMed Central

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A.; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D.; McNeill, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction. PMID:26209645

  5. Creatine supplementation during pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, J; Kilduff, L; Neder, J; Pitsiladis, Y; Lean, M; Ward, S; Cotton, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle wasting and dysfunction are strong independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Creatine nutritional supplementation produces increased muscle mass and exercise performance in health. A controlled study was performed to look for similar effects in 38 patients with COPD. Methods: Thirty eight patients with COPD (mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 46 (15)% predicted) were randomised to receive placebo (glucose polymer 40.7 g) or creatine (creatine monohydrate 5.7 g, glucose 35 g) supplements in a double blind trial. After 2 weeks loading (one dose three times daily), patients participated in an outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation programme combined with maintenance (once daily) supplementation. Pulmonary function, body composition, and exercise performance (peripheral muscle strength and endurance, shuttle walking, cycle ergometry) took place at baseline (n = 38), post loading (n = 36), and post rehabilitation (n = 25). Results: No difference was found in whole body exercise performance between the groups: for example, incremental shuttle walk distance mean –23.1 m (95% CI –71.7 to 25.5) post loading and –21.5 m (95% CI –90.6 to 47.7) post rehabilitation. Creatine increased fat-free mass by 1.09 kg (95% CI 0.43 to 1.74) post loading and 1.62 kg (95% CI 0.47 to 2.77) post rehabilitation. Peripheral muscle performance improved: knee extensor strength 4.2 N.m (95% CI 1.4 to 7.1) and endurance 411.1 J (95% CI 129.9 to 692.4) post loading, knee extensor strength 7.3 N.m (95% CI 0.69 to 13.92) and endurance 854.3 J (95% CI 131.3 to 1577.4) post rehabilitation. Creatine improved health status between baseline and post rehabilitation (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score –7.7 (95% CI –14.9 to –0.5)). Conclusions: Creatine supplementation led to increases in fat-free mass, peripheral muscle strength and endurance, health status, but not exercise

  6. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  7. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  8. Inflammation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Price, Laura C; Wort, S John; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Montani, David; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling of the precapillary pulmonary arteries, with excessive proliferation of vascular cells. Although the exact pathophysiology remains unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest an important role for inflammation. Firstly, pathologic specimens from patients with PAH reveal an accumulation of perivascular inflammatory cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes, and mast cells. Secondly, circulating levels of certain cytokines and chemokines are elevated, and these may correlate with a worse clinical outcome. Thirdly, certain inflammatory conditions such as connective tissue diseases are associated with an increased incidence of PAH. Finally, treatment of the underlying inflammatory condition may alleviate the associated PAH. Underlying pathologic mechanisms are likely to be "multihit" and complex. For instance, the inflammatory response may be regulated by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR II) status, and, in turn, BMPR II expression can be altered by certain cytokines. Although antiinflammatory therapies have been effective in certain connective-tissue-disease-associated PAH, this approach is untested in idiopathic PAH (iPAH). The potential benefit of antiinflammatory therapies in iPAH is of importance and requires further study. PMID:22215829

  9. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  10. Measurement of Visceral Fat: Should We Include Retroperitoneal Fat?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yi; Hsieh, Hung-Ren; Ma, Wen-Ya; Lin, Mao-Shin; Liu, Pi-Hua; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lin, Jou-Wei; Wei, Jung-Nan; Li, Hung-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Whether retroperitoneal fat should be included in the measurement of visceral fat remains controversial. We compared the relationships of fat areas in peritoneal, retroperitoneal, and subcutaneous compartments to metabolic syndrome, adipokines, and incident hypertension and diabetes. Methods We enrolled 432 adult participants (153 men and 279 women) in a community-based cohort study. Computed tomography at the umbilicus level was used to measure the fat areas. Results Retroperitoneal fat correlated significantly with metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 5.651, p<0.05) and the number of metabolic abnormalities (p<0.05). Retroperitoneal fat area was significantly associated with blood pressure, plasma glycemic indices, lipid profile, C-reactive protein, adiponectin (r = −0.244, P<0.05), and leptin (r = 0.323, p<0.05), but not plasma renin or aldosterone concentrations. During the 2.94±0.84 years of follow-up, 32 participants developed incident hypertension. Retroperitoneal fat area (hazard ration (HR) 1.62, p = 0.003) and peritoneal fat area (HR 1.62, p = 0.009), but not subcutaneous fat area (p = 0.14) were associated with incident hypertension. Neither retroperitoneal fat area, peritoneal fat area, nor subcutaneous fat areas was associated with incident diabetes after adjustment. Conclusions Retroperitoneal fat is similar to peritoneal fat, but differs from subcutaneous fat, in terms of its relationship with metabolic syndrome and incident hypertension. Retroperitoneal fat area should be included in the measurement of visceral fat for cardio-metabolic studies in human. PMID:25401949

  11. Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are not seeing trans fat on a product's label. First, products entering interstate commerce on or after ... already begun to declare trans fat on their products' labels. Second, FDA has granted enforcement discretion to some ...

  12. Visceral fat and liver fat are independent predictors of metabolic risk factors in men.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Duy, Thanh-Binh; Nichaman, Milton Z; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N; Ross, Robert

    2003-06-01

    We examined the independent associations among abdominal adipose tissue (AT), liver fat, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and lipid variables in 161 Caucasian men who had a wide variation in adiposity. We measured AT and liver fat by computed tomography and CRF by a maximal exercise test on a treadmill. Visceral AT remained a significant (P or= 0.05) correlate of any lipid variable after control for visceral AT and CRF. Furthermore, subdivision of subcutaneous AT into deep and superficial depots did not alter these observations. Visceral AT was the strongest correlate of liver fat and remained so after control for abdominal subcutaneous AT, CRF, and alcohol consumption (r = -0.34, P < 0.01). In contrast, abdominal subcutaneous AT and CRF were not significant (P > 0.10) correlates of liver fat after control for visceral AT. Visceral AT remained a significant (P < 0.01) correlate of TG, HDL-C, and TC/HDL-C independent of liver fat. However, liver fat was also a significant correlate (P fat carry independent health risk.

  13. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation.

  14. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Eun; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation. PMID:26894429

  15. Management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Mehta, Nimeshkumar; Rawat, Naveen; Lehrman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterized by systemic hypotension (defined as a systolic arterial pressure < 90 mm Hg or a drop in systolic arterial pressure of at least 40 mm Hg for at least 15 min which is not caused by new onset arrhythmias) or shock (manifested by evidence of tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia, including an altered level of consciousness, oliguria, or cool, clammy extremities). Massive pulmonary embolism has a high mortality rate despite advances in diagnosis and therapy. A subgroup of patients with nonmassive PE who are hemodynamically stable but with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or hypokinesis confirmed by echocardiography is classified as submassive PE. Their prognosis is different from that of others with non-massive PE and normal RV function. This article attempts to review the evidence-based risk stratification, diagnosis, initial stabilization, and management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism. PMID:23319967

  16. Saddle pulmonary thromboembolism with zero Wells' score.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rajasree Pai Ramachandra; Kangath, Raghesh Varot; Brown, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 2,218 patients with deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism during a 25-year period from 1966-1990 in Minnesota showed an annual incidence of venous thromboembolism of 117 per 100,000 (deep vein thrombosis, 48 per 100,000; pulmonary embolism, 69 per 100,000). Higher rates were found in males than females (130 vs 110 per 100,000, respectively) after adjusting for age. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of DVT and PE have been shown to significantly reduce mortality and morbidity. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism include alterations in blood flow (surgery, injury or long-distance air travel, pregnancy, obesity), hypercoagulability (factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin mutation, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, antithrombin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, antiphospholipid syndrome, nephrotic syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria) and vessel wall abnormalities. Eighty percent of deep venous thrombosis resolves spontaneously and less than 15% embolize to pulmonary arteries. PMID:21476378

  17. That Fat Cat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  18. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  19. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-04-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help future surgeons to establish the diagnosis peroperatively. PMID:27099753

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension: current aspects].

    PubMed

    Tello de Meneses, R; Gómez Sánchez, M A; Delgado Jiménez, J; Gómez Pajuelo, C; Sáenz de la Calzada, C; Zarco Gutiérrez, P

    1996-08-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension, although less frequent than secondary forms, represents the true paradigm of this disease. The recent investigations on pulmonary vascular response mechanisms to different stimuli has increased our knowledge about the mechanism of high pulmonary pressure. Molecular biology of the endothelial cell has provided evidence that endothelial injury plus a genetic individual predisposition may be the pathogenic mainstream of this disease. The histologic findings of pulmonary hypertension are still a matter of controversy, although the clinical, epidemiological and prognostic features are better defined. Therapeutically, there has been important advances, specially with various vasodilators, like calciumantagonists, prostacyclin, adenosine and nitric oxide, as well as new routes of administration. In more advance stages of the disease, atrial septostomy (only paliative) and pulmonary or cardio-pulmonary transplantation, are other therapeutic options to consider, after an adequate selection of patients.

  1. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  2. Maternal obesity and post-natal high fat diet disrupt hepatic circadian rhythm in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of obese (Ob) rat dams gain greater body wt and fat mass when fed high-fat diet (HFD) as compared to controls. Alterations of diurnal circadian rhythm are known to detrimentally impact metabolically active tissues such as liver. We sought to determine if maternal obesity (MOb) leads to p...

  3. Effects of pulmonary ischemia on lung morphology.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michael J; Bishai, John M; Mitzner, Wayne; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia resulting from chronic pulmonary embolism leads to proliferation of the systemic circulation within and surrounding the lung. However, it is not clear how well alveolar tissue is sustained during the time of complete pulmonary ischemia. In the present study, we investigated how pulmonary ischemia after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL) would alter lung mechanical properties and morphology. In this established mouse model of lung angiogenesis after chronic LPAL (10), we evaluated lung function and structure before (3 days) and after (14 days) a functional systemic circulation to the left lung is established. Age-matched naïve and sham-operated C57Bl/6 mice and mice undergoing chronic LPAL were studied. Left and right lung pressure-volume relationships were determined. Next, lungs were inflated in situ with warmed agarose (25-30 cmH(2)O) and fixed, and mean chord lengths (MCL) of histological sections were quantified. MCL of naïve mice averaged 43.9 +/- 1.8 mum. No significant changes in MCL were observed at either time point after LPAL. Left lung volumes and specific compliances were significantly reduced 3 days after LPAL. However, by 14 days after LPAL, lung pressure-volume relationships were not different from controls. These results suggest that severe pulmonary ischemia causes changes in lung mechanics early after LPAL that are reversed by the time a new systemic vasculature is known to perfuse pulmonary capillaries. The LPAL model thus affords a unique opportunity to study lung functional responses to tissue ischemia and subsequent recovery. PMID:17449796

  4. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  5. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Masquerading as Chronic Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ugur; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor—preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed—is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25425987

  6. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  7. Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 9 Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats Why should I choose healthy fats? Diabetes raises your chances of having a heart ... protect your heart and blood vessels by choosing fats wisely. Some kinds of fat, such as butter ...

  8. Milk Fat Globule structure & function; nanosciece comes to milk production

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Nurit; Lemay, Danielle G; German, J Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The biological process of fat globule assembly and secretion produces highly complex globule compositions and structures with many properties now recognized to be the direct result of these structures. During homogenization, fat globules are broken down and subsequently structures and surfaces different than the native state are formed. This process alters the milk fat globule unique macrostructure and the effects associated to their structure would be expected to be lost. In the present overview, the need for continued research of the fundamental aspects of the mechanism involved in milk fat globules synthesis secretion and size distribution, as well as establishing ways to regulate those processes are highlighted. Ultimately these insights will guide food technology to developing a new generation of structure based functional foods and as highlighted in this overview, dairy functional products should be the pioneering commodity. PMID:24363495

  9. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation. PMID:25379393

  10. Improving pulmonary rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    Beckford, Katy

    The Clinical Audit of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Services in England and Wales was the first national audit of pulmonary rehabilitation services in England and Wales. Forming part of the National Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Audit Programme, it was commissioned by Healthcare Quality Improvement Programme and conducted by the Royal College of Physicians and British Thoracic Society. The audit was undertaken to geographically map pulmonary rehabilitation services and identify how they can improve. This article summarises the key findings of the audit, and its recommendations. PMID:27400620

  11. Neostigmine and pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Nagella, Amrutha Bindu; Bijapur, Mubina Begum; Shreyavathi, Shreyavathi; R S, Raghavendra Rao

    2014-01-01

    A 1-year-old child with no pre-existing cardiac or respiratory disease developed frank pulmonary oedema after administration of a neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture to reverse neuromuscular blockade during general anaesthesia. Possible cardiac and extra-cardiac factors that could cause pulmonary oedema in this child were ruled out by appropriate investigations. As the pulmonary oedema manifested shortly after administration of the neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture, we concluded that neostigmine was the most probable cause. This article briefly reports the occurrence of events and successful management of perioperative pulmonary oedema. PMID:25199191

  12. Inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, Marlene; Guignabert, Christophe; Humbert, Marc; Nicolls, Mark R

    2014-06-20

    This review summarizes an expanding body of knowledge indicating that failure to resolve inflammation and altered immune processes underlie the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The chemokines and cytokines implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension that could form a biomarker platform are discussed. Pre-clinical studies that provide the basis for dysregulated immunity in animal models of the disease are reviewed. In addition, we present therapies that target inflammatory/immune mechanisms that are currently enrolling patients, and discuss others in development. We show how genetic and metabolic abnormalities are inextricably linked to dysregulated immunity and adverse remodeling in the pulmonary arteries. PMID:24951765

  13. [Suggesting the Significance of Pericardial Fat Pad in Bronchial Stump Fistula].

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tomoki; Sano, Masaaki; Tominaga, Nasa; Sanada, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuo; Oya, Hisaharu; Nishi, Tetsuo; Koshikawa, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    Bronchial stump fistula is a post-operative complication with poor outcome after pulmonary lobectomy. In order to prevent this complication, the bronchial stump is covered with pericardial fat tissue in our hospital. The case was 58 year old male who received adjuvant chemotherapy after sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer. As he developed multiple pulmonary metastases, 48 courses of chemotherapy were performed. The lesions had been localized at the right lower lobe, and neither increase in the size of these lesions nor development of other lesions were observed. Hence, an operation was performed. After right lower lobectomy, the bronchial stump was covered with the pericardial fat tissue. Three months after the operation, he developed pneumothorax, and bubbles were detected inside the fat. The pneumothorax was cured conservatively, and the bubbles disappeared spontaneously after 10 months. It is rare that the patient with bubbles in the covering tissue observed for a long time is cured conservatively, suggesting the significance of the stump pad.

  14. [Spuriously healthy plant fats].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2011-10-01

    Since long plant fats are considered by nutritionists, dieticians and doctors, as main source of essential unsaturated fatty acids) n-6 and n-3 in human diet. On the market there is plenty of oils that can be consumed directly or used to frying. Last four decades consumption of oils increased several times due to stimulated by advertisement popularization of their pro-health activity. Plant oils supply mostly multi unsaturated fatty acids n-6 excess of which disadvantageously influence human health. Determinations of changes of oxidative stability of plant fats (during processing and storage) proved that consumption of oxidation products of fatty acids and sterols may be a reason of various diseases. Both epidemiologic and clinic studies indicated that if plant fats (both oils except this from olives and margarines) have possessed pro-health properties, their several times increased consumption would liquidate the problem of arteriosclerosis and its clinical complications (heart attack, stroke). For the present, every second death in the industrial countries results from the cardiovascular disease. Morbidity of cancer is also increasing and of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases is growing up vigorously. PMID:22097183

  15. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-11-16

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

  16. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  17. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  18. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  19. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  20. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  1. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  2. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  3. Ectopic fat and cardiometabolic and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Meigs, James B

    2013-11-01

    Given that the variation in how regional adipose tissue handles and stores excess dietary energy has substantial cardiometabolic implications, ectopic fat distribution might be an important predictor of cardiometabolic and vascular risk, in addition to overall obesity itself. Conceptually, ectopic fat depots may be divided into systemically acting fat depots and locally acting fat depots. Systemically acting fat depots include visceral fat, fat in the liver, muscle, or neck, and subcutaneous fat. Accumulation in the abdominal visceral area, compared with overall obesity, has an equally or more important role in the development of cardiometabolic risk. Fat depots in liver/muscle tissue cause adverse cardiometabolic effects by affecting energy metabolism. Fat depots in lower-body subcutaneous areas may be protective regarding cardiometabolic risk, by trapping remnant energy. Fat accumulation in the neck is a unique type of fat depot that may increase cardiovascular risk by increasing insulin resistance. Locally acting fat depots include pericardial fat, perivascular fat, and renal sinus fat. These fat depots have effects primarily on adjacent anatomic organs, directly via lipotoxicity and indirectly via cytokine secretion. Pericardial fat is associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Perivascular fat may play an independent role in adverse vascular biology, including arterial stiffness. Renal sinus fat is a unique fat depot that may confer additional cardiometabolic risk. Thus, ectopic fat depots may contribute to the understanding of the link between body composition and cardiometabolic risk. In this review, we focus on the role and clinical implications of ectopic fat depots in cardiometabolic and vascular risk. PMID:24063931

  4. Under-recognised co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A review.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Kaïssa; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-08-01

    Co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are common. These co-morbidities include obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression. The presence of co-morbidities among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis contributes to worse quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Despite the high prevalence of certain co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the optimal screening and management of many of these conditions remains unclear. The impact of co-morbidities on this patient population is becoming more apparent. Their relevance will only increase as significant effort is being made to develop novel therapeutics that will alter the disease trajectory of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to focus on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of select co-morbidities, including obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression, in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Lee; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Thompson, Rachel; Sills, Deirdre; Roberts, Felicia G; Moore, Helen; Smith, George Davey

    2014-01-01

    .98, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.04, 71,790 participants) or cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.04, 65,978 participants). This did not alter with sub-grouping or sensitivity analysis. Few studies compared reduced with modified fat diets, so direct comparison was not possible. Authors’ conclusions The findings are suggestive of a small but potentially important reduction in cardiovascular risk on modification of dietary fat, but not reduction of total fat, in longer trials. Lifestyle advice to all those at risk of cardiovascular disease and to lower risk population groups, should continue to include permanent reduction of dietary saturated fat and partial replacement by unsaturates. The ideal type of unsaturated fat is unclear. PMID:21735388

  6. Pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis involving the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Monga, Varun; Silverman, Margarida

    2015-02-24

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs as a complication of hematologic disorders such as myelofibrosis, sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. The extramedullary tissue usually involves liver, spleen and lymph nodes, less frequently the chest. We present a recent case of a man with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to EMH in the lung and pulmonary artery. Radiation therapy was considered the best approach, but it didn't work and the patient died a week after radiation therapy was completed. We also review herein the present literature. PMID:25852851

  7. Changes in Vertebral Bone Marrow Fat and Bone Mass After Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, AL; Li, X; Schwartz, AV; Tufts, LS; Wheeler, AL; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, SJ; Carter, JT; Posselt, AM; Black, DM; Shoback, DM

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ±SD decline 19.1 ±6.1 kg or 36.5 ±10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2 ±3.5% and 4.1 ±2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4 ±2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (−7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=−0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  8. Topical fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A; Heber, D

    1995-11-01

    The fat on women's thighs is more difficult to mobilize due to increased alpha-2 adrenergic receptor activity induced by estrogen. Lipolysis can be initiated through adipocyte receptor stimulation (beta adrenergic) or inhibition (adenosine or alpha-2 adrenergic) or by inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since many women desire regional thigh fat loss, a series of clinical trials were initiated using one thigh as a double-blinded control. Trial #1: Five overweight women had injections of isoproterenol at intervals around the thigh three times a week for 4 weeks with diet and walking. Trial #2: Five overweight woman had ointment containing forskolin, yohimbine and aminophylline applied to the thigh five times a week for 4 weeks after hypertonic warm soaks with a diet and walking. Trial #3: Eighteen overweight women were divided into three groups of six and trial #2 was repeated with each agent alone vs. placebo using forskolin, yohimbine or aminophylline in separate ointments. Trial #4: Thirty overweight women had 10% aminophylline ointment applied to the thigh five times a week for 6 weeks with diet and walking. Chemistry panel, theophylline level and patch testing were performed. Trial #5: Twelve women had trial #4 repeated with 2% aminophylline cream without a diet or walking. Trial #6: Trial #5 was repeated with 0.5% aminophylline cream. All trials except yohimbine ointment gave significantly more girth loss from the treated thigh (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Chemistry panel showed no toxicity. Theophylline was undetectable and patch testing was negative. We conclude that topical fat reduction for women's thighs can be achieved without diet or exercise. PMID:8697059

  9. The Supersymmetric Fat Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni

    2004-10-27

    Supersymmetric models have traditionally been assumed to be perturbative up to high scales due to the requirement of calculable unification. In this note I review the recently proposed `Fat Higgs' model which relaxes the requirement of perturbativity. In this framework, an NMSSM-like trilinear coupling becomes strong at some intermediate scale. The NMSSM Higgses are meson composites of an asymptotically-free gauge theory. This allows us to raise the mass of the Higgs, thus alleviating the MSSM of its fine tuning problem. Despite the strong coupling at an intermediate scale, the UV completion allows us to maintain gauge coupling unification.

  10. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  11. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  12. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  13. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H; Delcroix, Marion; Jenkins, David P; Channick, Richard; Dartevelle, Philippe; Jansa, Pavel; Lang, Irene; Madani, Michael M; Ogino, Hitoshi; Pengo, Vittorio; Mayer, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Since the last World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in 2008, we have witnessed numerous and exciting developments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Emerging clinical data and advances in technology have led to reinforcing and updated guidance on diagnostic approaches to pulmonary hypertension, guidelines that we hope will lead to better recognition and more timely diagnosis of CTEPH. We have new data on treatment practices across international boundaries as well as long-term outcomes for CTEPH patients treated with or without pulmonary endarterectomy. Furthermore, we have expanded data on alternative treatment options for select CTEPH patients, including data from multiple clinical trials of medical therapy, including 1 recent pivotal trial, and compelling case series of percutaneous pulmonary angioplasty. Lastly, we have garnered more experience, and on a larger international scale, with pulmonary endarterectomy, which is the treatment of choice for operable CTEPH. This report overviews and highlights these important interval developments as deliberated among our task force of CTEPH experts and presented at the 2013 World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Nice, France. (J Am Coil Cardiol 2013;62:D92-9) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  14. Diet-mediated alteration of chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Castro, C E; Armstrong-Major, J; Ramirez, M E

    1986-08-01

    Higher-order chromatin structure and the process of transcription are related. The significance of a nutritional state's altering chromatin structure lies in the potential role of that nutritional state in the regulation of gene expression. In rats short-term feeding of semisynthetic diets varying in the proportion of carbohydrate, protein, or fat alters the configuration of liver chromatin as measured by sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (EC 3.1.31.1). A carbohydrate-rich, fat-free diet increases the sensitivity of rat liver chromatin to micrococcal nuclease and decreases the nucleosome repeat length. In contrast, a protein-free diet or a diet deficient in magnesium or zinc decreases the sensitivity of liver nuclear chromatin to micrococcal nuclease. Diet-mediated mechanisms that alter chromatin structure are now unknown, but the continued study of nutritional interaction with the genome should identify the responsible features as well as their significance to gene function.

  15. The potential for genetic change in milk fat composition.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J P

    1991-09-01

    Effecting genetic improvement requires genetic variation, a mechanism of selection, and an economic incentive for the improvement. Limited data suggest that there is within-breed genetic variation in milk fat composition, but accurate estimates are lacking. There is some evidence for modest differences among breeds. Substantial differences exist among species, indicating that substantial genetic change in fat composition is biologically possible. The economic incentives for genetic change are not clear. Changes in fat composition that would improve the quality of one milk product would often be detrimental to other products. Such changes would best work where subpopulations produced milk for specific end products. Such division of the industry would be difficult to organize and might impede existing improvement programs. Changes in fat composition that increased consumer acceptance of milk products, such as reduced saturated fat concentration, might increase the market for milk products. However, only large changes in composition are likely to affect consumer acceptance; thus, the gradual changes of conventional genetic improvement would produce little or no return to the breeder. Genetic changes that reduced processing costs or increased product value might have low to moderate economic value, inducing slow rates of change. Production of transgenic animals might provide a route for genetic alteration of fat composition in the future. Such improvement would most likely be cost effective in a subdivided production industry in which milk from cows of a particular genotype can be directed to a particular milk product. It is concluded that although alteration of fat composition could be achieved, it is unlikely to be an important component of genetic improvement of dairy cattle.

  16. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis.

  17. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis. PMID:1670290

  18. Mechanisms of Fat Graft Survival.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lee L Q

    2016-02-01

    Although more fat grafting procedures have been performed by plastic surgeons with the primary goal to restore soft tissue loss, the actual mechanism on how fat graft survives remains less completely understood. An established old theory on fat graft survival is still based on the cell survival theory proposed by Peer in the early 1950s. On the basis of his preliminary experimental study, he proposed that the mechanism of fat graft survival is based on established early blood circulation through anastomosis of the fat graft and host blood vessels. Recently, several investigators have demonstrated new concepts of the fat graft survival: One further advanced the old Peer cell survival theory and another based on new discovery and understanding of adipose-derived stem cells. This article serves as a scientific review on how fat graft survives after in vivo transplantation based on a number of well-conducted experimental studies. Both the graft survival and graft replacement theories on how fat graft survives are true based on the previously mentioned well-conducted experimental studies. Each theory may play a role in fat graft survival. It is possible that graft survival may be more dominant in some patients but the graft replacement may be more dominant in other patients.

  19. Making Fat Work*

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The burgeoning obesity and metabolic disease epidemics in the developed world are exerting a terrible toll on society, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for the emergence of these dramatic trends over a relatively short period of time remain poorly understood. Philip A. Wood’s book How Fat Works provides important insights into cellular lipid metabolism, as well as discussing some of the important external contributors to the development of human obesity. The foundation provided by this book allows for the exploration of how body fat has gone from hero during the millennia when starvation was the paramount nutritional risk to its current role as villain in our period of caloric excess. With the incredible personal and societal costs brought about by excess body weight, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for obesity is fundamentally necessary if we are to reverse these dire trends. Here, we delve deeper into some of the forces contributing to the obesity epidemic and discuss some individual measures as well as public policy decisions that may help reverse weight trends, while specifically focusing on the growing problem of pediatric obesity. PMID:21037416

  20. Effects of pineapple byproduct and canola oil as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory qualities of low-fat beef burger.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Saldaña, Erick; Spada, Fernanda P; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-02-01

    Pineapple byproduct and canola oil were evaluated as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-fat burgers. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple byproduct (PA), canola oil (CO), pineapple byproduct and canola oil (PC). Higher water and fat retention and lower cooking loss and diameter reduction were found in burgers with byproduct addition. In raw burgers, byproduct incorporation reduced L*, a*, and C* values, but these alterations were masked after cooking, leading to products similar to CN. Low-fat treatments were harder, chewier, and more cohesive than full-fat burgers. However, in Warner Bratzler shear measurements, PA and PC were as tender as CN. In QDA, no difference was found between CN and PC. Pineapple byproducts along with canola oil are promising fat replacers in beef burgers. In order to increase the feasibility of use of pineapple byproduct in the meat industry, alternative processes of byproduct preparation should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26562792

  1. Effects of pineapple byproduct and canola oil as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory qualities of low-fat beef burger.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Saldaña, Erick; Spada, Fernanda P; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-02-01

    Pineapple byproduct and canola oil were evaluated as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-fat burgers. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple byproduct (PA), canola oil (CO), pineapple byproduct and canola oil (PC). Higher water and fat retention and lower cooking loss and diameter reduction were found in burgers with byproduct addition. In raw burgers, byproduct incorporation reduced L*, a*, and C* values, but these alterations were masked after cooking, leading to products similar to CN. Low-fat treatments were harder, chewier, and more cohesive than full-fat burgers. However, in Warner Bratzler shear measurements, PA and PC were as tender as CN. In QDA, no difference was found between CN and PC. Pineapple byproducts along with canola oil are promising fat replacers in beef burgers. In order to increase the feasibility of use of pineapple byproduct in the meat industry, alternative processes of byproduct preparation should be evaluated in future studies.

  2. Regulation of neuronal migration by Dchs1-Fat4 planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Sana; Mao, Yaopan; Kuta, Anna; Ferreira de Sousa, Catia; Gaufo, Gary O; McNeill, Helen; Hindges, Robert; Guthrie, Sarah; Irvine, Kenneth D; Francis-West, Philippa H

    2014-07-21

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the polarization of cell structures and behaviors within the plane of a tissue. PCP is essential for the generation of tissue architecture during embryogenesis and for postnatal growth and tissue repair, yet how it is oriented to coordinate cell polarity remains poorly understood [1]. In Drosophila, PCP is mediated via the Frizzled-Flamingo (Fz-PCP) and Dachsous-Fat (Fat-PCP) pathways [1-3]. Fz-PCP is conserved in vertebrates, but an understanding in vertebrates of whether and how Fat-PCP polarizes cells, and its relationship to Fz-PCP signaling, is lacking. Mutations in human FAT4 and DCHS1, key components of Fat-PCP signaling, cause Van Maldergem syndrome, characterized by severe neuronal abnormalities indicative of altered neuronal migration [4]. Here, we investigate the role and mechanisms of Fat-PCP during neuronal migration using the murine facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons as a model. We find that Fat4 and Dchs1 are expressed in complementary gradients and are required for the collective tangential migration of FBM neurons and for their PCP. Fat4 and Dchs1 are required intrinsically within the FBM neurons and extrinsically within the neuroepithelium. Remarkably, Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP regulate FBM neuron migration along orthogonal axes. Disruption of the Dchs1 gradients by mosaic inactivation of Dchs1 alters FBM neuron polarity and migration. This study implies that PCP in vertebrates can be regulated via gradients of Fat4 and Dchs1 expression, which establish intracellular polarity across FBM cells during their migration. Our results also identify Fat-PCP as a novel neuronal guidance system and reveal that Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP can act along orthogonal axes. PMID:24998526

  3. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  4. Pulmonary phospholipidosis in rats respiring air containing diesel particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Eskelson, C.D.; Chvapil, M.; Strom, K.A.; Vostal, J.J.

    1987-12-01

    Rats chronically exposed to diesel particulates (dp) or given intratracheally a single dose of dp show increased levels of phospholipids in the lungs and in pulmonary lavage fluid. Pulmonary phospholipidosis is accompanied by increase lecithin levels and by increased palmitate content in lecithin of both lungs and pulmonary lavage fluid. A de novo increase of pulmonary and hepatic phospholipid (PL) formation was detected 5 days after rats were treated with dp. The authors hypothesize that a dp-stressed lung releases a pulmonary lipogenic factor (PLF), which stimulates hepatic lipogenesis. This was further tested by an in vitro study in which primary cultures of free hepatocytes were incubated with (2-/sup 14/C)acetate and various molecular weight fractions of a pulmonary homogenate from rats. The results from these studies indicated that in rat lung homogenates a PLF exists of greater than 100,000 Da molecular mass. The results also indicate that respired air containing a dp concentration of greater than 750 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air would result in a mild phospholipidosis in the lung, whereas a dp dose in respired air of 250 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air for 2 years did not alter pulmonary PL content in rats.

  5. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  6. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  7. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and low blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by an ... breath. Your health care provider may notice the oxygen levels in your blood drop when you walk. ...

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measurements of blood oxygen level (arterial blood gases) Pulmonary function tests 6-minute walk test Tests for connective tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis , lupus, or scleroderma Open lung (surgical) lung biopsy

  9. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Belts! For PFF Spend an evening with the stars on Monday, February 27, 2017. MORE PFF Moved ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  10. Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E V; Adolph, J

    1985-03-01

    Little has been written about pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma as a cause of nodules in the lungs. In a patient with a past history of carcinoma of the breast, the diagnosis made a significant difference in the prognosis. PMID:2984210

  11. Pulmonary rehabilitation in adults.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation can help people with long-term lung conditions whose symptoms, such as breathlessness and being easily tired out by daily activities, seriously impact their lives. PMID:27408642

  12. The fat:carbohydrate energy ratio of the weaning diet programs later susceptibility to obesity in male sprague dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Shahkhalili, Yasaman; Macé, Katherine; Moulin, Julie; Zbinden, Irene; Acheson, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    Dietary fat intake, which is high during suckling, is markedly reduced when food and drinks are introduced into the diet. We investigated whether alterations in the fat:carbohydrate (CHO) content of the weaning diet influenced the later development of adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Three groups of male rats (24/group) were fed from age 16-37 d (phase I) with weaning diets varying in their fat:CHO energy (E) ratios, 10:70 low-fat, high-CHO (LFHC); 30:50 medium-fat, medium-CHO (MFMC), and 60:30 high-fat, high-CHO (HFLC), on an isocaloric basis. Then, all groups consumed ad libitum first a low-fat diet (13% fat E) for 30 wk (phase II) and subsequently a high-fat diet (45% fat E) for another 18 wk (phase III). At the end of phase I, the group fed the HFLC diet demonstrated higher plasma glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (P < 0.05), but this effect was transient and did not persist into adulthood (phases II and III). By contrast, when challenged with a high-fat diet later in life (age 35.3-53.3 wk), the LFHC group had greater gains in weight (as percent initial weight) and body fat (as absolute and percent body weight) than the other 2 groups that had been weaned with diets higher in fat (P < 0.04 for all). These results provide evidence that metabolic programming by altering the dietary fat:CHO ratio can occur during the weaning period and emphasizes the importance of the fat:CHO ratio of the complementary diet and its relation to the susceptibility to develop adiposity later in life. PMID:21106926

  13. Morphological changes in small pulmonary vessels are associated with severe acute exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Yuzo; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Imokawa, Shiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular remodeling is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The total cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels has been reported to correlate with the pulmonary artery pressure, and this technique has enabled the assessment of pulmonary vascular involvements. We investigated the contribution of morphological alterations in the pulmonary vessels to severe acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD). Methods This study enrolled 81 patients with COPD and 28 non-COPD subjects as control and assessed the percentage of CSA (%CSA) less than 5 mm2 (%CSA<5) and %CSA in the range of 5–10 mm2 (%CSA5–10) on high-resolution computed tomography images. Results Compared with the non-COPD subjects, the COPD patients had lower %CSA<5. %CSA<5 was positively correlated with airflow limitation and negatively correlated with the extent of emphysema. COPD patients with lower %CSA<5 showed significantly increased incidences of severe AE-COPD (Gray’s test; P=0.011). Furthermore, lower %CSA<5 was significantly associated with severe AE-COPD (hazard ratio, 2.668; 95% confidence interval, 1.225–5.636; P=0.010). Conclusion %CSA<5 was associated with an increased risk of severe AE-COPD. The distal pruning of the small pulmonary vessels is a part of the risk associated with AE-COPD, and %CSA<5 might be a surrogate marker for predicting AE-COPD. PMID:27418816

  14. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  15. Fats and oils: An overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fat is a macronutrient that has historically engendered considerable controversy and continues to do so. Contentious areas include optimal amount and type for cardiovascular disease risk reduction, and role in body weight regulation. Dietary fats and oils are unique in modern times in that ...

  16. Tongue Fat Infiltration in Obese Versus Lean Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brennick, Michael J.; Delikatny, James; Pack, Allan I.; Pickup, Stephen; Shinde, Sarika; Zhu, Jing-Xu; Roscoe, Ivana; Kim, David Y.; Buxbaum, Laurence U.; Cater, Jacqueline R.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obesity is the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and the effects of obesity may be mediated by tongue fat. Our objective was to examine the effects of obesity on upper airway structures in obese (OBZ) and non-obese (NBZ) Zucker rats. Design: Animal study. Setting: Academic Medical Center. Participants: OBZ (638.2 ± 39 g; 14.9 ± 1.1 w) and age-matched NBZ Zucker (442.6 ± 37 g, 15.1 ± 1.5 w) rats. Interventions: Tongue fat and volume and were assessed using: in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), magnetic resonance imaging including Dixon imaging for tongue fat volume, ex vivo biochemistry (fat quantification; triglyceride (mg)/tissue (g), and histology (Oil Red O stain). Measurements and Results: MRS: overall OBZ tongue fat/water ratio was 2.9 times greater than NBZ (P < 0.002) with the anterior OBZ tongue up to 3.3 times greater than NBZ (P < 0.002). Biochemistry: Triglyceride (TG) in the tongue was 4.4 times greater in OBZ versus NBZ (P < 0.0006). TG was greater in OBZ tongue (3.57 ± 1.7 mg/g) than OBZ masseter muscle (0.28 ± 0.1; P < 0.0001) but tongue and masseter TG were not different in NBZ rats (0.82 ± 0.3 versus 0.28 ± 0.1 mg/g, P = 0.67). Dixon fat volume was significantly increased in OBZ (56 ± 15 mm3) versus NBZ (34 ± 5 mm3, P < 0.004). Histology demonstrated a greater degree of intracellular muscle fat and extramuscular fat infiltration in OBZ versus NBZ rats. Conclusions: Genetically obese rats had a large degree of fat infiltration in the tongue compared to both skeletal muscle and tongue tissues of the non-obese age-matched littermates. The significant fat increase and sequestration in the obese tongue may play a role in altered tongue neuromuscular function, tongue stiffness or metabolic function. Citation: Brennick MJ, Delikatny J, Pack AI, Pickup S, Shinde S, Zhu JX, Roscoe I, Kim DY, Buxbaum LU, Cater JR, Schwab RJ. Tongue fat infiltration in obese versus lean Zucker rats. SLEEP 2014

  17. What Are the Types of Fat?

    MedlinePlus

    ... also found in liquid tropical oils (palm and coconut). Trans fats (partially hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats) are ... fat dairy products (cream/milk) Butter Palm and coconut oil (snack foods, non- dairy creamers, whipped toppings) ...

  18. Fat burners: nutrition supplements that increase fat metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, A E; Randell, R

    2011-10-01

    The term 'fat burner' is used to describe nutrition supplements that are claimed to acutely increase fat metabolism or energy expenditure, impair fat absorption, increase weight loss, increase fat oxidation during exercise, or somehow cause long-term adaptations that promote fat metabolism. Often, these supplements contain a number of ingredients, each with its own proposed mechanism of action and it is often claimed that the combination of these substances will have additive effects. The list of supplements that are claimed to increase or improve fat metabolism is long; the most popular supplements include caffeine, carnitine, green tea, conjugated linoleic acid, forskolin, chromium, kelp and fucoxanthin. In this review the evidence for some of these supplements is briefly summarized. Based on the available literature, caffeine and green tea have data to back up its fat metabolism-enhancing properties. For many other supplements, although some show some promise, evidence is lacking. The list of supplements is industry-driven and is likely to grow at a rate that is not matched by a similar increase in scientific underpinning.

  19. Fat burners: nutrition supplements that increase fat metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, A E; Randell, R

    2011-10-01

    The term 'fat burner' is used to describe nutrition supplements that are claimed to acutely increase fat metabolism or energy expenditure, impair fat absorption, increase weight loss, increase fat oxidation during exercise, or somehow cause long-term adaptations that promote fat metabolism. Often, these supplements contain a number of ingredients, each with its own proposed mechanism of action and it is often claimed that the combination of these substances will have additive effects. The list of supplements that are claimed to increase or improve fat metabolism is long; the most popular supplements include caffeine, carnitine, green tea, conjugated linoleic acid, forskolin, chromium, kelp and fucoxanthin. In this review the evidence for some of these supplements is briefly summarized. Based on the available literature, caffeine and green tea have data to back up its fat metabolism-enhancing properties. For many other supplements, although some show some promise, evidence is lacking. The list of supplements is industry-driven and is likely to grow at a rate that is not matched by a similar increase in scientific underpinning. PMID:21951331

  20. Definition and classification of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Evgenov, Oleg V; Simonneau, Gérald

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined as an increase of mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg at rest as assessed by right heart catheterization. According to different combinations of values of pulmonary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output, a hemodynamic classification of pulmonary hypertension has been proposed. Of major importance is the pulmonary wedge pressure which allows to distinguish pre-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure ≤15 mmHg) and post-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure >15 mmHg) pulmonary hypertension. Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension includes the clinical groups 1 (pulmonary arterial hypertension), 3 (pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia), 4 (chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension) and 5 (pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms). Post-capillary pulmonary hypertension corresponds to the clinical group 2 (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases).

  1. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Caron M; Galvagno, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pulmonary disease is common among the surgical population and the importance of a thorough and detailed preoperative assessment is monumental for minimizing morbidity and mortality and reducing the risk of perioperative pulmonary complications. These comorbidities contribute to pulmonary postoperative complications, including atelectasis, pneumonia, and respiratory failure, and can predict long-term mortality. The important aspects of the preoperative assessment for patients with chronic pulmonary disease, and the value of preoperative testing and smoking cessation, are discussed. Specifically discussed are preoperative pulmonary assessment and management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity. PMID:24182721

  2. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  3. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension.

  4. Microbiology of Cheddar cheese made with different fat contents using a Lactococcus lactis single-strain starter.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, J R; Brighton, C; McMahon, D J; Farkye, N Y; Johnson, M E; Steele, J L

    2013-07-01

    Flavor development in low-fat Cheddar cheese is typified by delayed or muted evolution of desirable flavor and aroma, and a propensity to acquire undesirable meaty-brothy or burnt-brothy off-flavor notes early in ripening. The biochemical basis for these flavor deficiencies is unclear, but flavor production in bacterial-ripened cheese is known to rely on microorganisms and enzymes present in the cheese matrix. Lipid removal fundamentally alters cheese composition, which can modify the cheese microenvironment in ways that may affect growth and enzymatic activity of starter or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB). Additionally, manufacture of low-fat cheeses often involves changes to processing protocols that may substantially alter cheese redox potential, salt-in-moisture content, acid content, water activity, or pH. However, the consequences of these changes on microbial ecology and metabolism remain obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of fat content on population dynamics of starter bacteria and NSLAB over 9 mo of aging. Duplicate vats of full fat, 50% reduced-fat, and low-fat (containing <6% fat) Cheddar cheeses were manufactured at 3 different locations with a single-strain Lactococcus lactis starter culture using standardized procedures. Cheeses were ripened at 8°C and sampled periodically for microbiological attributes. Microbiological counts indicated that initial populations of nonstarter bacteria were much lower in full-fat compared with low-fat cheeses made at all 3 sites, and starter viability also declined at a more rapid rate during ripening in full-fat compared with 50% reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of cheese bacteria showed that the NSLAB fraction of all cheeses was dominated by Lactobacillus curvatus, but a few other species of bacteria were sporadically detected. Thus, changes in fat level were correlated with populations of different bacteria, but did not appear to

  5. Microbiology of Cheddar cheese made with different fat contents using a Lactococcus lactis single-strain starter.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, J R; Brighton, C; McMahon, D J; Farkye, N Y; Johnson, M E; Steele, J L

    2013-07-01

    Flavor development in low-fat Cheddar cheese is typified by delayed or muted evolution of desirable flavor and aroma, and a propensity to acquire undesirable meaty-brothy or burnt-brothy off-flavor notes early in ripening. The biochemical basis for these flavor deficiencies is unclear, but flavor production in bacterial-ripened cheese is known to rely on microorganisms and enzymes present in the cheese matrix. Lipid removal fundamentally alters cheese composition, which can modify the cheese microenvironment in ways that may affect growth and enzymatic activity of starter or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB). Additionally, manufacture of low-fat cheeses often involves changes to processing protocols that may substantially alter cheese redox potential, salt-in-moisture content, acid content, water activity, or pH. However, the consequences of these changes on microbial ecology and metabolism remain obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of fat content on population dynamics of starter bacteria and NSLAB over 9 mo of aging. Duplicate vats of full fat, 50% reduced-fat, and low-fat (containing <6% fat) Cheddar cheeses were manufactured at 3 different locations with a single-strain Lactococcus lactis starter culture using standardized procedures. Cheeses were ripened at 8°C and sampled periodically for microbiological attributes. Microbiological counts indicated that initial populations of nonstarter bacteria were much lower in full-fat compared with low-fat cheeses made at all 3 sites, and starter viability also declined at a more rapid rate during ripening in full-fat compared with 50% reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of cheese bacteria showed that the NSLAB fraction of all cheeses was dominated by Lactobacillus curvatus, but a few other species of bacteria were sporadically detected. Thus, changes in fat level were correlated with populations of different bacteria, but did not appear to

  6. History of fat grafting: from ram fat to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Riccardo F; Mazzola, Isabella C

    2015-04-01

    Fat injection empirically started 100 years ago to correct contour deformities mainly on the face and breast. The German surgeon Eugene Hollaender (1867-1932) proposed a cocktail of human and ram fat, to avoid reabsorption. Nowadays, fat injection has evolved, and it ranks among the most popular procedures, for it provides the physician with a range of aesthetic and reconstructive clinical applications with regenerative effects on the surrounding tissues. New research from all over the world has demonstrated the role of adipose-derived stem cells, present in the adipose tissue, in the repair of damaged or missing tissues.

  7. Potential pathogenesis and clinical aspects of pulmonary fibrosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gochuico, B R

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an extra-articular disorder that can occur in association with rheumatoid arthritis. The differential diagnosis of this disorder is similar to that of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but specific entities such as atypical pulmonary infections and drug-induced interstitial lung disease must be considered as causes of pulmonary fibrosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Although the cause of lung fibrosis in persons with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, factors that can potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of this pulmonary disease include genetic susceptibility, development of an altered immunologic response, and/or aberrant host repair processes. The clinical course of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis is heterogeneous but is generally insidious, chronic, and progressive. These patients respond unpredictably to available empiric therapeutic agents and, overall, their prognosis is poor; limited data suggests that the median survival time can be less than 4 years.

  8. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function. The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities. The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction. The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection. Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  9. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  10. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  11. Total dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids have modest effects on urinary sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total fat and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet may affect breast cancer risk by altering estrogen metabolism. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of differing total fat and omega-3 fatty acid content of diets on a panel of urinary estrogens and metabolites. A controlled, cross-ove...

  12. [Dietary fats and cardiovascular health].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lourdes Carrillo; Serra, Jaime Dalmau; Álvarez, Jesús Román Martínez; Alberich, Rosa Solà; Jiménez, Francisco Pérez

    2011-03-01

    Although dietary fat and its role in cardiovascular prevention has been one of the most extensively studied nutritional topics, it continues to be an ever-expanding research area. Particularly thanks to studies on Mediterranean diet, we now know that fat quality is more relevant than the amount of fat we eat in the diet. Thus, saturated and trans fats have been found to increase the risk of atherogenic disease. This is why it is recommended to substitute complex carbohydrates or unsaturated fat for unsaturated and trans fats with the aim of reducing saturated and trans fat intake to <10% and <1%, respectively, of the total calorie intake. Recent population studies, particularly that conducted in Kuopio, Finland, and those on Mediterranean diet, stress the important role of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats as key nutrients in preventing cardiovascular disease in modern societies. Furthermore, a special type of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e. those of the omega-3 (n-3) series, is increasingly becoming essential nutrients for a healthy diet, especially in the case of children. Therefore, there is a rationale for four the Scientific Societies that are strongly committed to disseminate the benefits of a healthy diet in preventing cardiovascular disease, and to prepare a joint statement with the purpose of spreading improved knowledge on the importance of changing to a healthy diet with a well-balanced fat intake for industrialized populations. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary panel of experts from the following institutions has developed the present joint statement targeted at both adults and children of different ages: Spanish Society of Arteriosclerosis, Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine, Spanish Association of Paediatrics, Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Paediatric Nutrition and Dietetics, and Spanish Society for Food Sciences.

  13. Pulmonary oedema of immersion.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Lepawsky, Michael; McKenzie, Donald C

    2005-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in individuals participating in three aquatic activities: (i) scuba diving; (ii) breath-hold diving; and (iii) endurance swimming. In this review, 60 published cases have been compiled for comparison. Variables considered included: age; past medical history; activity; water depth, type (salt or fresh) and temperature; clinical presentation; investigations; management; and outcome. From these data, we conclude that a similar phenomenon is occurring among scuba, breath-hold divers and swimmers. The pathophysiology is likely a pulmonary overperfusion mechanism. High pulmonary capillary pressures lead to extravasation of fluid into the interstitium. This overperfusion is caused by the increase in ambient pressure, peripheral vasoconstriction from ambient cold, and increased pulmonary blood flow resulting from exercise. Affected individuals are typically healthy males and females. Older individuals may be at higher risk. The most common symptoms are cough and dyspnoea, with haemoptysis also a frequent occurrence. Chest pain has never been reported. Radiography is the investigation of choice, demonstrating typical findings for pulmonary oedema. Management is supportive, with oxygen the mainstay of treatment. Cases usually resolve within 24 hours. In some cases, diuretics have been used, but there are no data as to their efficacy. Nifedipine has been used to prevent recurrence, but there is only anecdotal evidence to support its use.

  14. Fat grafting in facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Marten, Timothy J; Elyassnia, Dino

    2015-04-01

    Patients with significant facial atrophy and age-related loss of facial fat generally achieve suboptimal improvement from both surface treatments of facial skin and surgical lifts. Restoring lost facial volume by fat grafting is a powerful technique that is now acknowledged by most plastic surgeons and other physicians engaged in treating the aging face as one of the most important advances in aesthetic surgery. Properly performed, the addition of fat to areas of the face that have atrophied because of age or disease can produce a significant and sustained improvement in appearance that is unobtainable by other means.

  15. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  16. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  17. Maternal fat supplementation during late pregnancy and lactation influences the development of hepatic steatosis in offspring depending on the fat source.

    PubMed

    Llopis, Marina; Sánchez, Juana; Priego, Teresa; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2014-02-19

    In this study we investigate the effects of maternal supplementation with different fat sources (margarine, olive oil, or butter) during pregnancy and lactation on offspring metabolic health in adulthood and under obesogenic conditions. In adulthood and under a high-fat (HF) diet, the margarine group showed lower body fat content than the butter group and was also protected against the increase in hepatic lipid content occurring in the other groups, whereas the butter group showed signs of more advanced hepatic steatosis. Under an HF diet, all fat-supplemented animals showed greater hepatic expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes compared to their normal-fat diet counterparts, with higher levels in the margarine group. Under these conditions, the margarine group also showed higher white adipose tissue mRNA levels of adipogenic genes than the other fat-supplemented groups. Thus, compared to other fat sources, offspring from margarine-supplemented dams seem to be more protected from metabolic alterations related to the HF diet, particularly concerning hepatic fat accumulation.

  18. Determination of Fat Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Charles

    The term "lipid" refers to a group of compounds that are sparingly soluble in water, but show variable solubility in a number of organic solvents (e.g., ethyl ether, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol, benzene). The lipid content of a food determined by extraction with one solvent may be quite different from the lipid content as determined with another solvent of different polarity. Fat content is determined often by solvent extraction methods (e.g., Soxhlet, Goldfish, Mojonnier), but it also can be determined by nonsolvent wet extraction methods (e.g., Babcock, Gerber), and by instrumental methods that rely on the physical and chemical properties of lipids (e.g., infrared, density, X-ray absorption). The method of choice depends on a variety of factors, including the nature of the sample (e.g., dry versus moist), the purpose of the analysis (e.g., official nutrition labeling or rapid quality control), and instrumentation available (e.g., Babcock uses simple glassware and equipment; infrared requires an expensive instrument).

  19. Supplemental dietary fat and ruminally protected amino acids for lactating Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    Karunanandaa, K; Goodling, L E; Varga, G A; Muller, L D; McNeill, W W; Cassidy, T W; Lykos, T

    1994-11-01

    Eight Jersey cows receiving a 50:50 ratio of forage to concentrate on a DM basis were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of added fat (3.4% of dietary DM) and ruminally protected AA (8 g of Met and 24 g of Lys daily) on yield and composition of milk. Treatments were 1) basal control, 2) added fat, 3) added AA, and 4) fat plus AA. Compared with no added fat, fat supplementation increased 4% FCM yield (24.7 vs. 23.0 kg/d) and milk fat yield (1.05 vs. .97 kg), depressed milk protein content (3.58 vs. 3.74%), and altered fatty acid composition of milk. Blood triglyceride and NEFA were elevated (34.4 vs. 29.5 mg/dl and 175.1 vs. 143.7 microeq/L, respectively) by added fat. Supplementation with AA elevated blood Lys, Met, and urea N without increasing milk protein yield. Increase in blood NEFA was further augmented by fat plus AA supplementation, but no changes in concentrations of Lys or Met in blood were found. Addition of AA did not alleviate the depression of milk protein content when supplemental fat was added to the diet for Jersey cows.

  20. Aberrant Pulmonary Vascular Growth and Remodeling in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other organs, a significant portion of lung development occurs after birth during alveolarization, thus rendering the lung highly susceptible to injuries that may disrupt this developmental process. Premature birth heightens this susceptibility, with many premature infants developing the chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease characterized by arrested alveolarization. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the elucidation of mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development, including extensive data suggesting that impaired pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of BPD. Moreover, in addition to impaired vascular growth, patients with BPD also frequently demonstrate alterations in pulmonary vascular remodeling and tone, increasing the risk for persistent hypoxemia and the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, an overview of normal lung development will be presented, and the pathologic features of arrested development observed in BPD will be described, with a specific emphasis on the pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Key pathways that promote normal pulmonary vascular development will be reviewed, and the experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating alterations of these essential pathways in BPD summarized. PMID:27243014

  1. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  2. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  3. Symptomatic pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J; Mehta, J B; Taylor, R A; Byrd, R P; Roy, T M

    1998-09-01

    An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man came to the emergency room with left-sided dull chest pain of 4 weeks' duration. Physical examination, laboratory studies, and electrocardiogram were all unremarkable. A chest x-ray film revealed calcified pulmonary nodules. Computed tomography of the chest confirmed bilateral parenchymal cavitary lesions. Via limited thoracotomy, a tan nodule measuring 2.5 to 3.0 cm in diameter was excised from the left upper lobe. Histopathologic examination revealed a well circumscribed lesion and extensive lamellar hyalinization. A few foci of finely granular calcification were present within the hyalinizing areas. After surgery and short-term use of nonnarcotic analgesics, the chest pain resolved. Although pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is known to produce cavitating lesions, calcification at multiple sites is also consistent with this diagnosis. Clinicians should remember to include PHG in the differential diagnosis of multiple pulmonary nodules. PMID:9743062

  4. Divergent physical activity and novel alternative responses to high fat feeding in polygenic fat and lean mice.

    PubMed

    Simoncic, Matjaz; Horvat, Simon; Stevenson, Paula L; Bünger, Lutz; Holmes, Megan C; Kenyon, Christopher J; Speakman, John R; Morton, Nicholas M

    2008-05-01

    We determined whether altered physical activity levels might underlie the contrasting adiposity of a divergently selected polygenic murine model of metabolic syndrome (Fat; F) and leanness (Lean; L) mice. We measured physical activity with a long term running wheel experiment and performed an additional high fat diet intervention. Further, we measured posture allocation by visual monitoring within the home cage as a non-exercise correlate of 'normal' physical activity. Whilst initially similar, running wheel activity of the F line declined with age, while the activity of the L line increased. Food intake was higher in the L line and increased with wheel exposure. Vertical rearing measured by video quantification in the home cage, without the stimulus of a running wheel was also significantly higher in the L line. The two lines developed novel alternate strategies to defend their body weight when exposed to high fat diets with a running wheel. F mice increased their running wheel activity, and despite unaltered food intake, still gained weight. L mice reduced their food intake and maintained activity levels without a significant change in body weight. Phenotypic selection for divergence in body fat content has co-segregated with a genetic predisposition for divergent physical activity levels and different strategies for coping with exposure to high fat diets that will facilitate the discovery of the genes underlying these important obesity related traits.

  5. The right ventricle: interaction with the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The primary role of the right ventricle (RV) is to deliver all the blood it receives per beat into the pulmonary circulation without causing right atrial pressure to rise. To the extent that it also does not impede left ventricular (LV) filling, cardiac output responsiveness to increased metabolic demand is optimized. Since cardiac output is a function of metabolic demand of the body, during stress and exercise states the flow to the RV can vary widely. Also, instantaneous venous return varies widely for a constant cardiac output as ventilatory efforts alter the dynamic pressure gradient for venous return. Normally, blood flow varies with minimal changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. Similarly, RV filling normally occurs with minimal increases in right atrial pressure. When pulmonary vascular reserve is compromised RV ejection may also be compromised, increasing right atrial pressure and limiting maximal cardiac output. Acute increases in RV outflow resistance, as may occur with acute pulmonary embolism, will cause acute RV dilation and, by ventricular interdependence, markedly decreased LV diastolic compliance, rapidly spiraling to acute cardiogenic shock and death. Treatments include reversing the causes of pulmonary hypertension and sustaining mean arterial pressure higher than pulmonary artery pressure to maximal RV coronary blood flow. Chronic pulmonary hypertension induces progressive RV hypertrophy to match RV contractility to the increased pulmonary arterial elastance. Once fully developed, RV hypertrophy is associated with a sustained increase in right atrial pressure, impaired LV filling, and decreased exercise tolerance. Treatment focuses on pharmacologic therapies to selectively reduce pulmonary vasomotor tone and diuretics to minimize excessive RV dilation. Owning to the irreversible nature of most forms of pulmonary hypertension, when the pulmonary arterial elastance greatly exceeds the adaptive increase in RV systolic elastance, due to RV dilation

  6. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas are distinct fibrosing lesions of lung, having central whorled deposits of lamellar collagen. Twenty-four cases of this unusual pulmonary lesion are reported herein. Hyalinizing granulomas occur in middle-aged persons and are frequently mistaken for metastatic carcinoma radiographically. More than half of the patients had autoimmune phenomena or previous exposures to mycobacterial or fungal antigens. Four patients had sclerosing mediastinitis develop. A progressive debilitating clinical course was related to increasing dyspnea and bilateral disease on chest radiographs. A discussion of the histogenesis and histologic differential diagnosis is presented. PMID:3799538

  7. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  8. High fat diet causes rebound weight gain.

    PubMed

    McNay, David E G; Speakman, John R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is at epidemic proportions but treatment options remain limited. Treatment of obesity by calorie restriction (CR) despite having initial success often fails due to rebound weight gain. One possibility is that this reflects an increased body weight (BW) set-point. Indeed, high fat diets (HFD) reduce adult neurogenesis altering hypothalamic neuroarchitecture. However, it is uncertain if these changes are associated with weight rebound or if long-term weight management is associated with reversing this. Here we show that obese mice have an increased BW set-point and lowering this set-point is associated with rescuing hypothalamic remodelling. Treating obesity by CR using HFD causes weight loss, but not rescued remodelling resulting in rebound weight gain. However, treating obesity by CR using non-HFD causes weight loss, rescued remodelling and attenuates rebound weight gain. We propose that these phenomena may explain why successful short-term weight loss improves obesity in some people but not in others.

  9. Pulmonary effects of intravenous atropine induce ventilation perfusion mismatch.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Paydarfar, David

    2014-05-01

    Atropine is used for a number of medical conditions, predominantly for its cardiovascular effects. Cholinergic nerves that innervate pulmonary smooth muscle, glands, and vasculature may be affected by anticholinergic medications. We hypothesized that atropine causes alterations in pulmonary gas exchange. We conducted a prospective interventional study with detailed physiologic recordings in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats (n = 8). Animals breathing a normoxic gas mixture titrated to a partial arterial pressure of oxygen of 110-120 were exposed to an escalating dose of intravenous atropine (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 5.0, and 20.0 mg/kg body mass). Arterial blood gas measurements were recorded every 2 min (×5) at baseline, and following each of the 5 doses of atropine. In addition, the animals regional pulmonary blood flow was measured using neutron-activated microspheres. Oxygenation decreased immediately following intravenous administration of atropine, despite a small increase in the volume of inspired air with no change in respiratory rate. Arterial blood gas analysis showed an increase in pulmonary dysfunction, characterized by a widening of the alveolar-arteriole gradient (p < 0.003 all groups except for the lowest dose of atropine). The microsphere data demonstrates an abrupt and marked heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow following atropine treatment. In conclusion, atropine was found to decrease pulmonary gas exchange in a dose-dependent fashion in this rat model.

  10. The role of airway mucus in pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Cheng, P W

    1994-01-01

    Airway mucus is a complex airway secretion whose primary function as part of the mucociliary transport mechanism is to to serve as renewable and transportable barrier against inhaled particulates and toxic agents. The rheologic properties necessary for this function are imparted by glycoproteins, or mucins. Some respiratory disease states, e.g., asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchitis, are characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes in mucus biosynthesis that contribute to pulmonary pathology. Similar alterations in various aspects of mucin biochemistry and biophysics, leading to mucus hypersecretion and altered mucus rheology, result from inhalation of certain air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and cigarette smoke. The consequences of these pollutant-induced alterations in mucus biology are discussed in the context of pulmonary pathophysiology and toxicology. PMID:7925190

  11. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  12. Cell biology of fat storage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has greatly increased interest in the biology and physiology of adipose tissues. Adipose (fat) cells are specialized for the storage of energy in the form of triglycerides, but research in the last few decades has shown that fat cells also play a critical role in sensing and responding to changes in systemic energy balance. White fat cells secrete important hormone-like molecules such as leptin, adiponectin, and adipsin to influence processes such as food intake, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. Brown fat, on the other hand, dissipates chemical energy in the form of heat, thereby defending against hypothermia, obesity, and diabetes. It is now appreciated that there are two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells, termed brown and beige adipocytes. In addition to these distinct properties of fat cells, adipocytes exist within adipose tissue, where they are in dynamic communication with immune cells and closely influenced by innervation and blood supply. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to adipose cell biology and to familiarize the reader with how these cell types play a role in metabolic disease and, perhaps, as targets for therapeutic development. PMID:27528697

  13. Cell biology of fat storage

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has greatly increased interest in the biology and physiology of adipose tissues. Adipose (fat) cells are specialized for the storage of energy in the form of triglycerides, but research in the last few decades has shown that fat cells also play a critical role in sensing and responding to changes in systemic energy balance. White fat cells secrete important hormone-like molecules such as leptin, adiponectin, and adipsin to influence processes such as food intake, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. Brown fat, on the other hand, dissipates chemical energy in the form of heat, thereby defending against hypothermia, obesity, and diabetes. It is now appreciated that there are two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells, termed brown and beige adipocytes. In addition to these distinct properties of fat cells, adipocytes exist within adipose tissue, where they are in dynamic communication with immune cells and closely influenced by innervation and blood supply. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to adipose cell biology and to familiarize the reader with how these cell types play a role in metabolic disease and, perhaps, as targets for therapeutic development. PMID:27528697

  14. Cell biology of fat storage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has greatly increased interest in the biology and physiology of adipose tissues. Adipose (fat) cells are specialized for the storage of energy in the form of triglycerides, but research in the last few decades has shown that fat cells also play a critical role in sensing and responding to changes in systemic energy balance. White fat cells secrete important hormone-like molecules such as leptin, adiponectin, and adipsin to influence processes such as food intake, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. Brown fat, on the other hand, dissipates chemical energy in the form of heat, thereby defending against hypothermia, obesity, and diabetes. It is now appreciated that there are two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells, termed brown and beige adipocytes. In addition to these distinct properties of fat cells, adipocytes exist within adipose tissue, where they are in dynamic communication with immune cells and closely influenced by innervation and blood supply. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to adipose cell biology and to familiarize the reader with how these cell types play a role in metabolic disease and, perhaps, as targets for therapeutic development.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony.

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems.

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems. PMID:23101436

  17. Fat Grafting for Facial Filling and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Katzel, Evan B

    2015-07-01

    Plastic surgeons have come to realize that fat grafting can rejuvenate an aging face by restoring or creating fullness. However, fat grafting does much more than simply add volume. Grafted fat can transform or repair the tissues into which it is placed. Historically, surgeons have hesitated to embrace the rejuvenating potential of fat grafting because of poor graft take, fat necrosis, and inconsistent outcomes. This article describes fat grafting techniques and practices to assist readers in successful harvesting, processing, and placement of fat for optimal graft retention and facial esthetic outcomes.

  18. Betaine supplementation prevents fatty liver induced by a high-fat diet: effects on one-carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; da Silva, Robin P; Lamarre, Simon G; Kelly, Karen B; Jacobs, René L; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of betaine supplementation on the regulation of one-carbon metabolism and liver lipid accumulation induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Rats were fed one of three different liquid diets: control diet, high-fat diet and high-fat diet supplemented with betaine. The control and high-fat liquid diets contained, respectively, 35 and 71 % of energy derived from fat. Betaine supplementation involved the addition of 1 % (g/L) to the diet. After three weeks on the high-fat diet the rats had increased total liver fat concentration, liver triglycerides, liver TBARS and plasma TNF-α. The high-fat diet decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration and the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio compared to the control as well as altering the expression of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism. Betaine supplementation substantially increased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration (~fourfold) and prevented fatty liver and hepatic injury induced by the high-fat diet. It was accompanied by the normalization of the gene expression of BHMT, GNMT and MGAT, which code for key enzymes of one-carbon metabolism related to liver fat accumulation. In conclusion, the regulation of the expression of MGAT by betaine supplementation provides an additional and novel mechanism by which betaine supplementation regulates lipid metabolism and prevents accumulation of fat in the liver.

  19. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  20. Maternal fatness and viability of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, A; Morley, R; Cole, T J; Bamford, M F; Boon, A; Crowle, P; Dossetor, J F B; Pearse, R

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the effect of maternal fatness on the mortality of infants born preterm up to the corrected age of 18 months 795 mother-infant pairs were studied. Maternal fatness was defined by Quetelet's index (weight/(height2)) and all infants weighed less than 1850 g at birth. In 771 mother-infant pairs maternal age, complications of pregnancy, mode of delivery, parity, social class, and the baby's sex and gestation were analysed by a logistic regression model for associations with infant mortality (but deaths from severe congenital abnormalities and those occurring during the first 48 hours after birth were excluded). In a subgroup of 284 mother-infant pairs all infant deaths except those from severe congenital abnormalities were analysed in association with the infant's birth weight and gestation and the mother's height and weight; this second analysis included another 24 infants who had died within 48 hours after birth. In the first analysis mortality overall was 7% (55/771), rising from 4% (71/173) in thin mothers (Quetelet's index <20) to 15% (6/40) in mothers with grades II and III obesity (Quetelet's index >30). After adjusting for major demographic and antenatal factors, including serious complications of pregnancy, maternal fatness was second in importance only to length of gestation in predicting death of infants born preterm. In the second analysis mortality overall was 15% (44/284), rising from 9% (5/53) in thin mothers to 47% (8/17) in mothers with grades II and III obesity. In both analyses the relative risk of death by 18 months post-term was nearly four times greater in infants born to obese mothers than in those born to thin mothers. In addition, maternal fatness was associated with reduced birth weight, whereas it is associated with macrosomia in term infants. These data differ fundamentally from those reported in full term babies of obese mothers. It is speculated that the altered metabolic milieu in obesity may reduce the ability of the fetus

  1. Nodular pulmonary amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, A; Rasmussen, S L; Campbell, T M; Lester, W M

    1984-01-01

    An elderly man had a 10-year history of multiple pulmonary nodules that he had refused to have investigated. He died of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. At autopsy the nodules were shown to consist of amyloid. There was no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6744167

  2. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  3. [Multiple pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Haro, M; Ruiz, J; Vila, X; Avellanet, M; Izquierdo, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of multiple pulmonary nodules are many, with metastasis being the most feared. A rare but possible etiology, however, is hyalinizing multiple granuloma. We present a case that allows us to review this condition and its course, as well as a variety of associated immunological changes and possible complications. PMID:8087395

  4. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Litterst, P; Albert, M; Welim, B

    2015-01-01

    Benign lesions as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma may mimic a malign disease. A 63-year old patient complained dyspnea and a weight loss of 30 kg. CT-thorax scans showed a destructive and infiltrative pulmonary process with pleural thickening. Histologic examination of transbronchial and transthoracic biopsies as well as of biopsies taken by minithoracotomy was not conclusive. Due to further progression the patient underwent a left-sided pleuropneumonectomy despite a VO2 peak of 9 ml/kg/min. Histology revealed DIP-like infiltrations, a histiocytic reaction and hyaline granulomas. Among less than 100 published cases of pulmonary hyaline granuloma a comparable rapid progression with a total functional loss of the affected lung is not reported. Mostly hyalinizing granuloma presents with infiltrations, which may mimic lung cancer, or nodular lesions, partly with cavitations or calcifications. The etiology is unknown, a persistent immunologic response to an antigenic stimulus is discussed. Associations with infections, lymphomas, amyloidosis or IgG4-related disease are reported. Some cases have features of multifocal fibrosis. In the case reported none of these associations could be found. The prognosis of pulmonary hyaline granuloma is regarded as benign. There is no effective treatment yet. Once the diagnosis has been established a conservative approach as well as a resection of nodules and a therapeutic attempt with steroids are an option. Extensive resections as pleuropneumonectomy are an exception. PMID:25599140

  5. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Maijub, A G; Giltman, L I; Verner, J L; Peace, R J

    1985-03-01

    We describe a recent case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting classically in a young black American female. The diagnosis was made by histopathologic examination. The etiology of this entity remains elusive, however, an abnormal response involving the immune system to an undefined agent (or agents) is the most likely explanation. PMID:3977139

  6. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  7. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  8. The role of iron in pulmonary pathology.

    PubMed

    Khiroya, Heena; Turner, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory disease accounts for a large proportion of emergency admissions to hospital and diseaseassociated mortality. Genetic association studies demonstrate a link between iron metabolism and pulmonary disease phenotypes. IREB2 is a gene that produces iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), which has a key role in iron homeostasis. This review addresses pathways involved in iron metabolism, particularly focusing on the role of IREB2. In addition to this, environmental factors also influence phenotypic variation in respiratory disease, for example inhaled iron from cigarette smoke is deposited in the lung and causes tissue damage by altering iron homeostasis. The effects of cigarette smoke are detailed in this article, particularly in relation to lung conditions that favour the upper lobes, such as emphysema and lung cancer. Clinical applications of iron homeostasis are also discussed in this review, especially looking at the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Promising new treatments involving iron are also covered. PMID:26629341

  9. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  10. Serum osteopontin concentration is decreased by exercise-induced fat loss but is not correlated with body fat percentage in obese humans.

    PubMed

    You, Jeong Soon; Ji, Hye-In; Chang, Kyung Ja; Yoo, Myung Chul; Yang, Hyung-In; Jeong, In-Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Soo

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the extent to which fat mass contributes to serum osteopontin (OPN) concentration, we investigated whether serum OPN levels are decreased by exercise-induced fat mass loss and whether they are associated with body fat percentage in obese humans. Twenty‑three female college students were recruited to participate in an 8‑week body weight control program. Body composition [body weight, soft lean mass, body fat mass, body fat percentage, waist-hip ratio and body mass index (BMI)] were assessed prior to and following the program. Serum lipid profiles and serum adiponectin, leptin and osteopontin levels were measured from serum collected prior to and following the program. To understand the effect of fat mass loss on the serum levels of adipokine, which is mainly produced in adipose tissue, the leptin and adiponectin levels were also measured prior to and following the program. Serum leptin levels (mean ± standard error of the mean) decreased significantly following the program (from 9.82±0.98 to 7.23±0.67 ng/ml) and were closely correlated with body fat percentage. In addition, serum adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with body fat percentage, while serum adiponectin levels were not significantly altered. By contrast, serum OPN levels decreased significantly following the program (from 16.03±2.34 to 10.65±1.22 ng/ml). However, serum OPN levels were not correlated with body fat percentage, suggesting that serum OPN levels are controlled by several other factors in humans. In conclusion, a high expression of OPN in adipose tissues may not be correlated with serum OPN levels in obese humans. Thus, tissues or physiological factors other than fat mass may have a greater contribution to the serum OPN levels.

  11. Interaction of atypical cadherin Fat1 with SoHo adaptor proteins CAP/ponsin and ArgBP2.

    PubMed

    Braun, Gerald S; Kuszka, Andrzej; Dau, Cécile; Kriz, Wilhelm; Moeller, Marcus J

    2016-03-25

    Mammalian Fat1 is a giant atypical cadherin/tumor suppressor involved in the regulation of cellular orientation, migration, and growth. Fat1 is implicated in the development of the brain, eye, and kidney. Altered expression or mutations of FAT1 are also associated with cancer and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Yet, the mechanistic functions of this pathway remain incompletely understood. Here, we report the identification of Sorbin-homology (SoHo) proteins as novel interaction partners of Fat1 by virtue of a yeast-two-hybrid screen. SoHo proteins play diverse roles as adaptor proteins in cell signaling, cell adhesion and sarcomere architecture, including altered expression in cancer and FSHD. Specifically, we found SoHo proteins CAP/ponsin-1 and -2 (Sorbs1) and ArgBP2 (Sorbs2) to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of Fat1. We mapped the interaction to a prolin-rich classic type II PXXP motif within Fat1 and to the three Src-homology (SH3) domains within SoHo proteins using mutant expression in yeast, pulldown assays, and cell culture. Functionally, endogenous ponsin-2 expression of NRK-52E cells at cellular leading edges was lost upon knockdown of Fat1. In summary, our data point to an interaction of Fat1 with SoHo proteins that is able to recruit SoHo proteins to sites of Fat1 expression. PMID:26903299

  12. Fat tissue and inflammation in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rincón Bello, Abraham; Bucalo, Laura; Abad Estébanez, Soraya; Vega Martínez, Almudena; Barraca Núñez, Daniel; Yuste Lozano, Claudia; Pérez de José, Ana; López-Gómez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Body weight has been increasing in the general population and is an established risk factor for hypertension, diabetes, and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) gain weight, mainly during the first months of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between body composition and metabolic and inflammatory status in patients undergoing PD. Methods This was a prospective, non-interventional study of prevalent patients receiving PD. Body composition was studied every 3 months using bioelectrical impedance (BCM®). We performed linear regression for each patient, including all BCM® measurements, to calculate annual changes in body composition. Thirty-one patients in our PD unit met the inclusion criteria. Results Median follow-up was 26 (range 17–27) months. Mean increase in weight was 1.8 ± 2.8 kg/year. However, BCM® analysis revealed a mean increase in fat mass of 3.0 ± 3.2 kg/year with a loss of lean mass of 2.3 ± 4.1 kg/year during follow-up. The increase in fat mass was associated with the conicity index, suggesting that increases in fat mass are based mainly on abdominal adipose tissue. Changes in fat mass were directly associated with inflammation parameters such as C-reactive protein (r = 0.382, P = 0.045) and inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.50, P = 0.008). Conclusions Follow-up of weight and body mass index can underestimate the fat mass increase and miss lean mass loss. The increase in fat mass is associated with proinflammatory state and alteration in lipid profile. PMID:27274820

  13. Treatment of congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia using ethiodized oil lymphangiography.

    PubMed

    Gray, M; Kovatis, K Z; Stuart, T; Enlow, E; Itkin, M; Keller, M S; French, H M

    2014-09-01

    Historically, congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (CPL) has had poor treatment outcomes despite aggressive therapy. There are recent reports of ethiodized oil (Lipiodol) lymphangiography successfully treating lymphatic leakage in adults. In this report, we describe two infants with CPL complicated by chylothoraces successfully treated by instillation of ethiodized oil into the lymphatic system. Congenital atresia of the thoracic duct was demonstrated on the lymphangiogram in both patients before treatment. Both patients have shown good short-term outcomes without supplemental oxygen or fat restricted diets at 9 months of age. Ethiodized oil lymphangiography represents a new treatment modality for some patients with CPL.

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  16. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation. PMID:27282869

  17. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation.

  18. Some aspects of fatty acid oxidation in isolated fat-cell mitochondria from rat.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, R D; Saggerson, E D

    1975-01-01

    Mitochondrial were prepared from fat-cells isolated from rat epididymal adipose tissues of fed and 48 h-starved rats to study some aspects of fatty acid oxidation in this tissue. The data were compared with values obtained in parallel experiments with liver mitochondria that were prepared and incubated under identical conditions. 2. In the presence of malonate, fluorocitrate and arsenite, malate, but not pyruvate-bicarbonate, facilitated palmitoyl-group oxidation in both types of mitochondria. In the presence of malate, fat-cell mitochondria exhibited slightly higher rates of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation than liver. Rates of octanoylcarnitine oxidation were similar in liver and fat-cell mitochondria. Uncoupling stimulated acylcarnitine oxidation in liver, but not in fat-cell mitochondria. Oxidation of palmitoyl- and octanoyl-carnitine was partially additive in fat-cell but not in liver mitochondria. Starvation for 48 h significantly decreased both palmitoylcarnitine oxidation and latent carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity in fat-cell mitochondria. Starvation increased latent carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity in liver mitochondria but did not alter palmitoylcarnitine oxidation. These results suggested that palmitoylcarnitine oxidation in fat-cell but not in liver mitochondria may be limited by carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 activity. 3. Fat-cell mitochondria also differed from liver mitochondria in exhibiting considerably lower rates of carnitine-dependent oxidation of palmitoyl-CoA or palmitate, suggesting that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activity may severely rate-limit palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in adipose tissue. PMID:1227502

  19. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes. PMID:7854090

  20. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  1. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal-induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  2. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal–induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  3. Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    El Chami, Hala; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Altered immunity and inflammation are increasingly recognized features of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This is suggested by infiltration of various inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages, T and B lymphocytes), increased cytokine and growth factor (e.g., VEGF and PDGF) expression in remodeled pulmonary vessels, and the presence of circulating chemokines and cytokines. In certain diseases associated with PAH, increased expression of growth and transcriptional (e.g., Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells or NFAT) factors, and viral protein components (e.g., HIV-1 Nef), appear to contribute directly to recruitment of inflammatory cells in remodeled vessels, and may potentially serve as specific therapeutic targets. This section provides an overview of inflammatory pathways highlighting their potential role in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH and the possibility of future targeted therapy. PMID:23009917

  4. [CT imaging features of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Brillet, P Y; Mama, N; Nunes, H; Uzunhan, Y; Abbad, S; Brauner, M W

    2009-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders correspond to a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormal immune system activity leading to connective tissue alterations in multiple parts of the body. In adults, connective tissue disorders include rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Broncho-pulmonary involvement may be variable with involvement of all anatomical components of the lung. Involvement of other intrathoracic structures (pleura, respiratory muscles, heart, rib cage) is frequent. The most specific manifestations include interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. During follow-up, progressive respiratory diseases may occur due to the treatment, infections, pulmonary embolism or neoplasms.

  5. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    A recent outbreak of a severe pulmonary disease in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a previously unrecognized bantavirus. The virus has been isolated from its majorreservoir, the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus,and recently named Sin Nombre virus. Clinically, the disease has become known as the bantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Since May 1993, 44 fatal cases of HPS have been identified through clinicopathological review and immunobistochemical(IHC) testing of tissues from 273 patients who died of an unexplained noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. In 158 cases for which suitable specimens were available, serologicaltesting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of extracted RNA was also performed. IHC, serological, and PCR results were concordant for virtually all HPS and non-HPS patients when more than one assay was performed. The prodromal ilness of HPS is similar to that of many other viral diseases. Consistent bematological features include thrombocytopenia, bemoconcentration, neutropbilic leukocytosis with a left shift, and reactivel lymphocytes. Pulmonary bistopatbological features were similar in most of the fatal HPS cases (40/44) and consisted of an interstitial pneumonitis with a variable mononuclear cell infiltrate, edema, and focal byaline membranes. In four cases, bowever, pulmonary features were significantly different and included diffuse alveolar damage and variable degrees of severe air space disorganization. IHC analysis showed widespread presence of bantaviral antigens in endothelial cells of the microvasculature, particularly in the lung. Hantaviral antigens were also observed within follicular dendritic cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Hantaviral inclusions were observed in endothelial cells of lungs by thinsection electron microscopy, and their identity was verified by immunogold labeling. Virus-like particles were seen in pulmonary endothelial cells and macropbages. HPS is

  6. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  8. Subpleural pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting as a solitary pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Na, Kook Joo; Song, Sang Yun; Kim, Jo Heon; Kim, Young Chul

    2007-08-01

    We introduce a case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presented as a solitary pulmonary nodule located subpleurally. The patient was a 57-year-old man who had abnormal chest roentgenograms showing a solitary pulmonary nodule in the right lower lung field. The nodule was resected for definitive diagnosis and histopathologically proved to be pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. In previously reported cases, most patients had ill-defined margins and usually bilateral, multiple lesions radiographically. In our case, the subpleural location is an uncommon location of this rare entity. PMID:17762348

  9. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macneil, Adam; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2011-12-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe disease characterized by a rapid onset of pulmonary edema followed by respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock. The HPS associated viruses are members of the genus Hantavirus, family Bunyaviridae. Hantaviruses have a worldwide distribution and are broadly split into the New World hantaviruses, which includes those causing HPS, and the Old World hantaviruses [including the prototype Hantaan virus (HTNV)], which are associated with a different disease, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) are the most common causes of HPS in North and South America, respectively. Case fatality of HPS is approximately 40%. Pathogenic New World hantaviruses infect the lung microvascular endothelium without causing any virus induced cytopathic effect. However, virus infection results in microvascular leakage, which is the hallmark of HPS. This article briefly reviews the knowledge on HPS-associated hantaviruses accumulated since their discovery, less than 20 years ago.

  10. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Popper, H H

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is regarded as a reactive proliferation of the dendritic Langerhans cell population stimulated by chronic tobacco-derived plant proteins due to incomplete combustion but can also occur in childhood as a tumor-like systemic disease. Currently, both these forms cannot be morphologically distinguished. In the lungs a nodular proliferation of Langerhans cells occurs in the bronchial mucosa and also peripherally in the alveolar septa with an accompanying infiltration by eosinophilic granulocytes and destruction of the bronchial wall. Langerhans cells can be selectively detected with antibodies against CD1a and langerin. In the reactive isolated pulmonary form, abstinence from tobacco smoking in most patients leads to regression of infiltration and improvement of symptoms. In high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) the small star-like scars can still be detected even after complete cessation of tobacco smoking.

  11. Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Noakes, Timothy; Phinney, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    A key element contributing to deteriorating exercise capacity during physically demanding sport appears to be reduced carbohydrate availability coupled with an inability to effectively utilize alternative lipid fuel sources. Paradoxically, cognitive and physical decline associated with glycogen depletion occurs in the presence of an over-abundance of fuel stored as body fat that the athlete is apparently unable to access effectively. Current fuelling tactics that emphasize high-carbohydrate intakes before and during exercise inhibit fat utilization. The most efficient approach to accelerate the body's ability to oxidize fat is to lower dietary carbohydrate intake to a level that results in nutritional ketosis (i.e., circulating ketone levels >0.5 mmol/L) while increasing fat intake for a period of several weeks. The coordinated set of metabolic adaptations that ensures proper interorgan fuel supply in the face of low-carbohydrate availability is referred to as keto-adaptation. Beyond simply providing a stable source of fuel for the brain, the major circulating ketone body, beta-hydroxybutyrate, has recently been shown to act as a signalling molecule capable of altering gene expression, eliciting complementary effects of keto-adaptation that could extend human physical and mental performance beyond current expectation. In this paper, we review these new findings and propose that the shift to fatty acids and ketones as primary fuels when dietary carbohydrate is restricted could be of benefit for some athletes. PMID:25275931

  12. Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Noakes, Timothy; Phinney, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    A key element contributing to deteriorating exercise capacity during physically demanding sport appears to be reduced carbohydrate availability coupled with an inability to effectively utilize alternative lipid fuel sources. Paradoxically, cognitive and physical decline associated with glycogen depletion occurs in the presence of an over-abundance of fuel stored as body fat that the athlete is apparently unable to access effectively. Current fuelling tactics that emphasize high-carbohydrate intakes before and during exercise inhibit fat utilization. The most efficient approach to accelerate the body's ability to oxidize fat is to lower dietary carbohydrate intake to a level that results in nutritional ketosis (i.e., circulating ketone levels >0.5 mmol/L) while increasing fat intake for a period of several weeks. The coordinated set of metabolic adaptations that ensures proper interorgan fuel supply in the face of low-carbohydrate availability is referred to as keto-adaptation. Beyond simply providing a stable source of fuel for the brain, the major circulating ketone body, beta-hydroxybutyrate, has recently been shown to act as a signalling molecule capable of altering gene expression, eliciting complementary effects of keto-adaptation that could extend human physical and mental performance beyond current expectation. In this paper, we review these new findings and propose that the shift to fatty acids and ketones as primary fuels when dietary carbohydrate is restricted could be of benefit for some athletes.

  13. [Neonatal pulmonary fibrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Desrousseaux, B; Gourdin, C; Atat, I; Podvin, A; Vix, M; Dusol, F; Bayart, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of pulmonary fibrosarcoma in a newborn. The respiratory distress imposed an urgent thoracotomy at the fifth hour of live. A lobectomy was performed. Three months later a relapse occurred. A second thoracotomy permitted an incomplete resection. The total involution was achieved after 6 months of chemotherapy. Actually no recidive is shown after 20 months of follow up. Its an exceptional case. A unique one was published in 1977. PMID:2698289

  14. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  15. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  16. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  17. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective testing for pulmonary embolism is necessary, because clinical assessment alone is unreliable and the consequences of misdiagnosis are serious. No single test has ideal properties (100% sensitivity and specificity, no risk, low cost). Pulmonary angiography is regarded as the final arbiter but is ill suited for diagnosing a disease present in only a third of patients in whom it is suspected. Some tests are good for confirmation and some for exclusion of embolism; others are able to do both but are often non-diagnostic. For optimal efficiency, choice of the initial test should be guided by clinical assessment of the likelihood of embolism and by patient characteristics that may influence test accuracy. Standardised clinical estimates can be used to give a pre-test probability to assess, after appropriate objective testing, the post-test probability of embolism. Multidetector computed tomography can replace both scintigraphy and angiography for the exclusion and diagnosis of this disease and should now be considered the central imaging investigation in suspected pulmonary embolism. PMID:15192162

  18. Fumonisin toxicosis in swine: an overview of porcine pulmonary edema and current perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Haschek, W M; Gumprecht, L A; Smith, G; Tumbleson, M E; Constable, P D

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisin toxicosis in swine was named porcine pulmonary edema (PPE) after outbreaks of a fatal disease in pigs fed Fusarium verticillioides (F. moniliforme)-contaminated corn screenings from the 1989 corn crop in Iowa, Illinois, and Georgia. Pigs that died had severe pulmonary edema, which has not been identified in other species after exposure to fumonisins. The disease has been reproduced experimentally by feeding of naturally contaminated corn, F. verticillioides culture material, and by intravenous administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Hepatic lesions consisting of apoptosis, necrosis, and hepatocyte proliferation also are observed. As in other species, alterations in clinical pathology reflect hepatic injury as well as elevated serum cholesterol concentration. In chronic studies, esophageal plaques, hyperplastic hepatic nodules, and right ventricular hypertrophy were found. In pigs, as in other species, fumonisin alters sphingolipid biosynthesis, with the greatest alterations in sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations in kidney, liver, lung, and heart. Our recent studies on fumonisin toxicosis in pigs have focused on immune effects and the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema. The specific immune system was not affected; however, FB1 inhibited phagocytosis and sphingolipid biosynthesis in pulmonary macrophages. Fumonisin induced an accumulation of membranous material in pulmonary capillary endothelial cells; this change appears specific to this cell type and to swine. In short-term cardiovascular studies, fumonisin decreased left ventricular dP/dt(max) (an index of cardiac contractility), mean systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output, and increased mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. These changes are compatible with the inhibition of L-type calcium channels by increased sphingosine and/or sphinganine concentration. Therefore, fumonisin-induced pulmonary edema in swine appears to result from acute left

  19. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  20. Ultrasound for the Pulmonary Consultant

    PubMed Central

    Chichra, Astha; Makaryus, Mina; Chaudhri, Parag; Narasimhan, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Bedside ultrasonographic assessment of the lung and pleura provides rapid, noninvasive, and essential information in diagnosis and management of various pulmonary conditions. Ultrasonography helps in diagnosing common conditions, including consolidation, interstitial syndrome, pleural effusions and masses, pneumothorax, and diaphragmatic dysfunction. It provides procedural guidance for various pulmonary procedures, including thoracentesis, chest tube insertion, transthoracic aspiration, and biopsies. This article describes major applications of ultrasonography for the pulmonary consultant along with illustrative figures and videos. PMID:27398039

  1. The emerging role of epigenetics in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gamen, Elisabetta; Seeger, Werner; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetics is usually defined as the study of changes in phenotype and gene expression not related to sequence alterations, but rather the chemical modifications of DNA and of its associated chromatin proteins. These modifications can be acquired de novo, being inherited, and represent the way in which genome and environment interact. Recent evidence points to the involvement of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension, as they can partly explain how environmental and lifestyle factors can impose susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension and can explain the phenotypic alteration and maintenance of the disease state.In this article, we review the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are mediated by DNA methylation, the post-translational modifications of histone tails and noncoding RNAs in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, pharmacological interventions aimed at epigenetic regulators/modifiers and their outcomes in different cellular and preclinical rodent models are discussed. Lastly, the remaining challenges and future directions in which to explore epigenetic-based therapies in pulmonary hypertension are discussed. PMID:27492834

  2. Abdominal fat weight and thickness as predictors of total body fat in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sonaiya, E B

    1985-10-01

    In two experiments broilers of both sexes from two strains were reared to 16 weeks of age to determine how total body fat could be estimated and predicted from some carcase traits. In the first experiment, age, carcase weight and abdominal fat thickness were found to be significant factors in the prediction of total body fat weight estimated from abdominal fat weight. In the second experiment abdominal fat weight was the best predictor of total body fat weight, obtained by ether extraction of the minced whole carcase. Inclusion of abdominal fat weight in the prediction equation after carcase weight and abdominal fat thickness significantly improved the regression. If the carcase cannot be weighed and abdominal fat weight is not available, because of the more laborious nature of its determination, then the measurement of abdominal fat thickness can be useful in predicting the total body fat content.

  3. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    White, Laura E; Santora, Rachel J; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A; Hassoun, Heitham T

    2012-09-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1-/- mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets.

  4. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  5. Optimizing fat oxidation through exercise and diet.

    PubMed

    Achten, Juul; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2004-01-01

    Interventions aimed at increasing fat metabolism could potentially reduce the symptoms of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes and may have tremendous clinical relevance. Hence, an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease fat oxidation is important. Exercise intensity and duration are important determinants of fat oxidation. Fat oxidation rates increase from low to moderate intensities and then decrease when the intensity becomes high. Maximal rates of fat oxidation have been shown to be reached at intensities between 59% and 64% of maximum oxygen consumption in trained individuals and between 47% and 52% of maximum oxygen consumption in a large sample of the general population. The mode of exercise can also affect fat oxidation, with fat oxidation being higher during running than cycling. Endurance training induces a multitude of adaptations that result in increased fat oxidation. The duration and intensity of exercise training required to induce changes in fat oxidation is currently unknown. Ingestion of carbohydrate in the hours before or on commencement of exercise reduces the rate of fat oxidation significantly compared with fasted conditions, whereas fasting longer than 6 h optimizes fat oxidation. Fat oxidation rates have been shown to decrease after ingestion of high-fat diets, partly as a result of decreased glycogen stores and partly because of adaptations at the muscle level. PMID:15212756

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension and Computed Tomography Measurement of Small Pulmonary Vessels in Severe Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Shin; Washko, George R.; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Diaz, Alejandro; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hoffman, Eric; Fessler, Henry E.; Criner, Gerard J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Scharf, Steven M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Reilly, John J.; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Vascular alteration of small pulmonary vessels is one of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The in vivo relationship between pulmonary hypertension and morphological alteration of the small pulmonary vessels has not been assessed in patients with severe emphysema. Objectives: We evaluated the correlation of total cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) assessed on computed tomography (CT) scans with the degree of pulmonary hypertension estimated by right heart catheterization. Methods: In 79 patients with severe emphysema enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), we measured CSA less than 5 mm2 (CSA<5) and 5 to 10 mm2 (CSA5−10), and calculated the percentage of total CSA for the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively). The correlations of %CSA<5 and %CSA5–10 with pulmonary arterial mean pressure (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) obtained by right heart catheterization were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis using \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{Ppa}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} as the dependent outcome was also performed. Measurements and Main Results: The %CSA<5 had a significant negative correlation with \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage

  7. How Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Treated? Doctors may prescribe medicines, oxygen therapy , pulmonary ... PR), and lung transplant to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Medicines Currently, no medicines are proven to ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary pulmonary hypertension 2 Primary pulmonary hypertension 3 Primary pulmonary hypertension 4 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (4 links) ...

  9. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics.

  10. Post splenectomy related pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palkar, Atul V; Agrawal, Abhinav; Verma, Sameer; Iftikhar, Asma; Miller, Edmund J; Talwar, Arunabh

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy predisposes patients to a slew of infectious and non-infectious complications including pulmonary vascular disease. Patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolic events due to various mechanisms that may lead to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The development of CTEPH and pulmonary vasculopathy after splenectomy involves complex pathophysiologic mechanisms, some of which remain unclear. This review attempts congregate the current evidence behind our understanding about the etio-pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease related to splenectomy and highlight the controversies that surround its management. PMID:26949600

  11. Chronic idiopathic pulmonary hilar fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Magdi H.; Thompson, Vernon C.

    1971-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hilar fibrosis is a condition related to mediastinal fibrosis, characterized by localization of the fibrosing process to one or both pulmonary hila. This results in pulmonary hypertension and bronchial narrowing. Three patients suffering from this disease, in whom the diagnosis has been confirmed by thoracotomy, are reported. The clinical and pathological features are described and previously reported cases are reviewed. The syndrome is classified into two types, according to whether the obstruction affects mainly the pulmonary artery or veins. The disease is a self-limiting one but may lead to organic changes in the lungs causing severe disability. Images PMID:5565782

  12. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    PubMed

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment.

  13. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  14. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  15. Pulmonary Thromboembolism: Evaluation By Intravenous Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, Gerald D.; Cook, Glenn C.; Woolfenden, James M.; Dodge, Russell R.

    1981-11-01

    Using perfusion lung scans as a guide, digital video subtraction angiography of the pulmonary arteries was performed in human subjects suspected of having pulmonary embolism. Dogs were employed as a pulmonary embolism model and both routine pulmonary angiography and intravenous pulmonary angiograms were obtained for comparison purposes. We have shown by our preliminary results that the technique is extremely promising as a safe and accurate alternative to routine pulmonary angiography in selected patients.

  16. Diabetes mellitus with pulmonary tuberculosis--a double trouble.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Lata, Hem; Natu, S M; Mishra, Arvind Kumar; Verma, N S

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic patients are often at a higher risk for developing several types of infections and infection does alter the handling of glucose by tissues. Pulmonary infections in diabetics are characterised by alteration in host defence, in entire body and in the lung locally as well as in the function of respiratory epithelium and ciliary motility. Association between diabetes mellitus and pulmonary tuberculosis is well established, while the prevalence of tuberculosis is increased 4-5 times more among diabetics. Impairment of host defence plays an important role for changing the clinical, radiological and bacteriological presentation in diabetic patients. It is also reported by the various studies that hyperglycaemia favours the growth of tuberculosis bacilli. So the severity of tuberculosis appears more cirtical with the degree of hyperglycaemia and host defence activity. This overlap between the diabetic and tuberculosis epidemics could adversely affect global tuberculosis control efforts. PMID:24592761

  17. Computed tomography quantification of pulmonary vessels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as identified by 3D automated approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nan; Wei, Xia; Li, Yan; Deng, Lei; Jin, Chen-wang; Guo, Youmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular alteration of the whole lung and individual lobes in patients with COPD, and assess the association between pulmonary vessels and the extent and distribution of emphysema as well as pulmonary function by a 3-dimensional automated approach. A total of 83 computed tomography images from COPD patients were analyzed. Automated computerized approach was used to measure the total number of vessels at the fifth generation. The extent of emphysema (%LAA-950) in the whole lung and individual lobes were also calculated automatically. The association between the vascular number and the extent and distribution of emphysema, as well as the pulmonary function were assessed. Both the vascular number of fifth generation in the upper lobe and in the lower lobe were significantly negatively correlated with %LAA-950 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there were significant, yet weak correlations between the vascular number and FEV1% predicted (R = 0.556, P = 0.039) and FEV1/FVC (R = 0.538, P = 0.047). In contrast, the vascular numbers were strongly correlated with DLco (R = 0.770, P = 0.003). Finally, the vascular number correlated closer with %LAA-950 of upper lobes than with %LAA-950 of lower lobes. Pulmonary vessel alteration can be measured; it is related to the extent of emphysema rather than the distribution of emphysema. PMID:27749587

  18. Dietary Fats - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Dietary Fats URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Dietary Fats - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  19. Calories and fat per serving (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stores the rest in the form of fat. A calorie is a calorie, whether it comes ... between them is the number of calories, nutrients, fat, and other ingredients in a typical serving . Calories ...

  20. Gas exchange under altered gravitational stress.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G Kim

    2011-01-01

    Efficient gas exchange in the lung depends on the matching of ventilation and perfusion. However, the human lung is a readily deformable structure and as a result gravitational stresses generate gradients in both ventilation and perfusion. Nevertheless, the lung is capable of withstanding considerable change in the applied gravitational load before pulmonary gas exchange becomes impaired. The postural changes that are part of the everyday existence for most bipedal species are well tolerated, as is the removal of gravity (weightlessness). Increases in the applied gravitational load result only in a large impairment in pulmonary gas exchange above approximately three times that on the ground, at which point the matching of ventilation to perfusion is so impaired that efficient gas exchange is no longer possible. Much of the tolerance of the lung to alterations in gravitation stress comes from the fact that ventilation and perfusion are inextricably coupled. Deformations in the lung that alter ventilation necessarily alter perfusion, thus maintaining a degree of matching and minimizing the disruption in ventilation to perfusion ratio and thus gas exchange.

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation: The Reference Therapy for Undernourished Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Samaras, Dimitrios; Chambellan, Arnaud; Pichard, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) combines the deleterious effects of chronic hypoxia, chronic inflammation, insulin-resistance, increased energy expenditure, muscle wasting, and exercise deconditioning. As for other chronic disorders, loss of fat-free mass decreased survival. The preservation of muscle mass and function, through the protection of the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, is an important challenge in the management of COPD patients. As the prevalence of the disease is increasing and the medical advances make COPD patients live longer, the prevalence of COPD-associated nutritional disorders is expected to increase in future decades. Androgenopenia is observed in 40% of COPD patients. Due to the stimulating effects of androgens on muscle anabolism, androgenopenia favors loss of muscle mass. Studies have shown that androgen substitution could improve muscle mass in COPD patients, but alone, was insufficient to improve lung function. Two multicentric randomized clinical trials have shown that the association of androgen therapy with physical exercise and oral nutritional supplements containing omega-3 polyinsaturated fatty acids, during at least three months, is associated with an improved clinical outcome and survival. These approaches are optimized in the field of pulmonary rehabilitation which is the reference therapy of COPD-associated undernutrition. PMID:24701566

  2. Pulmonary capillary recruitment in response to hypoxia in healthy humans: a possible role for hypoxic pulmonary venoconstriction?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Snyder, Eric M.; Olson, Thomas P.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    We examined mechanisms by which hypoxia may elicit pulmonary capillary recruitment in humans. On separate occasions, twenty-five healthy adults underwent exposure to intravenous saline infusion (30 ml/kg ~15min) or 17-h normobaric hypoxia (FiO2=12.5%). Cardiac output (Q̇) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after saline infusion and hypoxic-exposure by a rebreathing method. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPpa) and left ventricular (LV) diastolic function were assessed before and after hypoxic-exposure via echocardiography. Saline infusion increased Q̇ and Vc (P<0.05) with no change in Vc/Q̇ (P=0.97). Hypoxic-exposure increased Vc (P<0.01) despite no change in Q̇ (P=0.25), increased sPpa (P<0.01), and impaired LV relaxation. Multiple regression suggested that ~37% of the hypoxia-mediated increase in Vc was attributable to alterations in Q̇, sPpa and LV diastolic function. In conclusion, hypoxia-induced pulmonary capillary recruitment in humans is only partly accounted for by changes in Q̇, sPpa and LV diastolic function. We speculate that hypoxic pulmonary venoconstriction may play a role in such recruitment. PMID:21513822

  3. Severe Pulmonary Arteriopathy Is Associated with Persistent Hypoxemia after Pulmonary Endarterectomy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ishida, Keiichi; Naito, Akira; Kato, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Takao; Sekine, Ayumi; Nishimura, Rintaro; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Shigeta, Ayako; Masuda, Masahisa; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by occlusion of pulmonary arteries by organized chronic thrombi. Persistent hypoxemia and residual pulmonary hypertension (PH) following successful pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) are clinically important problems; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have previously reported that residual PH is closely related to severe pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypothesize that this arteriopathy might also be involved in impaired gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between hypoxemia and pulmonary arteriopathy after PEA. Methods and Results Between December 2011 and November 2014, 23 CTEPH patients underwent PEA and lung biopsy. The extent of pulmonary arteriopathy was quantified pathologically in lung biopsy specimens. We then analyzed the relationship between the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy and gas exchange after PEA. We observed that the severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was negatively correlated with postoperative and follow-up PaO2 (postoperative PaO2: r = -0.73, p = 0.0004; follow-up PaO2: r = -0.66, p = 0.001), but not with preoperative PaO2 (r = -0.373, p = 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed that the obstruction ratio and patient age were determinants of PaO2 one month after PEA (R2 = 0.651, p = 0.00009). Furthermore, the obstruction ratio and improvement of pulmonary vascular resistance were determinants of PaO2 at follow-up (R2 = 0.545, p = 0.0002). Severe pulmonary arteriopathy might increase the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and impair diffusion capacity, resulting in hypoxemia following PEA. Conclusion The severity of pulmonary arteriopathy was closely associated with postoperative and follow-up hypoxemia. PMID:27571267

  4. Endothelial HIF signaling regulates pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Andrew J; Carrick, Ryan P; McConaha, Melinda E; Jones, Brittany R; Shay, Sheila D; Moore, Christy S; Blackwell, Thomas R; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L; Burman, Ankita; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Hemnes, Anna R; Karwandyar, Ayub K; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Talati, Megha A; Dong, Hui-Jia; Gleaves, Linda A; Carrier, Erica J; Gaskill, Christa; Scott, Edward W; Majka, Susan M; Fessel, Joshua P; Haase, Volker H; West, James D; Blackwell, Timothy S; Lawson, William E

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating chronic parenchymal lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Since the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway is important for development of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxia, we investigated whether HIF signaling in vascular endothelium regulates development of PH related to pulmonary fibrosis. We generated a transgenic model in which HIF is deleted within vascular endothelial cells and then exposed these mice to chronic intraperitoneal bleomycin to induce PH associated with lung fibrosis. Although no differences in the degree of fibrotic remodeling were observed, we found that endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected against development of PH, including right ventricle and pulmonary vessel remodeling. Similarly, endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected from PH after a 4-wk exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In vitro studies of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells isolated from the HIF-targeted mice and controls revealed that endothelial HIF signaling increases endothelial cell expression of connective tissue growth factor, enhances vascular permeability, and promotes pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and wound healing ability, all of which have the potential to impact the development of PH in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that vascular endothelial cell HIF signaling is necessary for development of hypoxia and pulmonary fibrosis associated PH. As such, HIF and HIF-regulated targets represent a therapeutic target in these conditions.

  5. Luteinized fat in Krukenberg tumor: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Seo, Jeong Jin; Nam, Jong Hee

    2002-12-01

    To our knowledge, there is no description of the fat-containing Krukenberg tumor. We report on a case of Krukenberg tumor associated with luteinized fat, which showed hyperintensity on T1-weighted MR image. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed. Hyperintense portion of the Krukenberg tumor on T1-weighted image showed diminished signal intensity on fat-saturated, T1-weighted images. Krukenberg tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses when fat signal is seen.

  6. Primary Breast Augmentation with Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Saboeiro, Alesia P

    2015-07-01

    The controversy over fat grafting to the breasts has now been settled. In 2009, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Fat Graft Task Force stated that "Fat grafting may be considered for breast augmentation and correction of defects associated with medical conditions and previous breast surgeries; however, results are dependent on technique and surgeon expertise." This article discusses the history, indications, planning, complications, and present technique of fat grafting to the breast using the Coleman technique.

  7. High-fat diet is associated with obesity-mediated insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Black, Mary Helen; Watanabe, Richard M; Trigo, Enrique; Takayanagi, Miwa; Lawrence, Jean M; Buchanan, Thomas A; Xiang, Anny H

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods has contributed to the rising incidence of obesity and may underlie insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. Macronutrient intake patterns were examined in relation to anthropometric and metabolic traits in participants of BetaGene, a family-based study of obesity, insulin resistance, and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans. Dietary intake, body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), and β-cell function [Disposition Index (DI)] were assessed by food-frequency questionnaires, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and intravenous glucose-tolerance tests, respectively. Patterns of macronutrient intake were identified by using a K-means model based on the proportion of total energy intake per day attributable to carbohydrate, fat, and protein and were tested for association with anthropometric and metabolic traits. Among 1150 subjects aged 18-65 y (73% female), tertiles of fat intake were associated with greater adiposity and lower SI, after adjustment for age, sex, and daily energy intake. Moreover, 3 distinct dietary patterns were identified: "high fat" (35% fat, 44% carbohydrate, 21% protein; n = 238), "moderate fat" (28% fat, 54% carbohydrate, 18% protein; n = 520), and "low fat" (20% fat, 65% carbohydrate, 15% protein; n = 392). Compared with the low-fat group, the high-fat group had higher age- and sex-adjusted mean body mass index, body fat percentage, and trunk fat and lower SI and DI. Further adjustment for daily energy intake by matching individuals across dietary pattern groups yielded similar results. None of the observed associations were altered after adjustment for physical activity; however, associations with SI and DI were attenuated after adjustment for adiposity. These findings suggest that high-fat diets may contribute to increased adiposity and concomitant insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in Mexican Americans.

  8. Adipocyte gene expression is altered in formerly obese mice and as a function of diet composition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Becker, Kevin G; Prabhu, Vinayakumar; Cooke, David W

    2008-06-01

    In the development of obesity, the source of excess energy may influence appetite and metabolism. To determine the effects of differences in diet composition in obesity, mice were fed either a high-carbohydrate diet (HC; 10% fat energy) or a high-fat energy-restricted diet (HFR; 60% fat energy) over 18 wk in weight-matched groups of mice. To identify obesity-associated genes with persistently altered expression following weight reduction, mice were fed either a standard low-fat diet (LF; 10% fat energy), an unrestricted high-fat diet (HF; 60% fat energy), or a HF diet followed by weight reduction (WR). Mice fed a HF diet had significantly greater gonadal fat mass and higher whole blood glucose concentrations than mice fed an HC diet. Of the mice fed a high-fat diet, total body weight and serum insulin concentrations were greater in HF than in HFR. Microarray analysis revealed that HF vs. HC feeding resulted in global differences in adipocyte gene expression patterns. Although we identified genes whose expression was altered in both moderately and severely obese mice, there were also a large number of genes with altered expression only in severe obesity. Formerly obese, WR mice did not differ significantly from lean controls in total body weight or physiological measures. However, microarray analysis revealed distinctly different patterns of adipocyte gene expression. Furthermore, there were 398 genes with altered expression in HF mice that persisted in WR mice. Genes with persistently altered expression following obesity may play a role in rebound weight gain following weight reduction.

  9. Chemical composition of fat and oil products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fats and oils are an important dietary component, and contribute to the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. This chapter focuses on the chemical composition of fats and oils, and how these compositions affect the functional properties of fats and oils in foods. The focus will remain on the mos...

  10. Response to consumer demand for reduced-fat foods; multi-functional fat replacers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The excessive dietary fat intake can result in health problems such as obesity and heart-related diseases, resulting in increased consumer demand for reduced fat foods. A number of food ingredients with fat-like functions have been developed as fat alternatives in the food industry. Especially, so...

  11. WNTLESS IS REQUIRED FOR PERIPHERAL LUNG DIFFERENTIATION AND PULMONARY VASCULAR DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, Bridget; Snowball, John; Varisco, Brian M.; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Wntless (Wls), a gene highly conserved across the animal kingdom, encodes for a transmembrane protein that mediates Wnt ligand secretion. Wls is expressed in developing lung, wherein Wnt signaling is necessary for pulmonary morphogenesis. We hypothesize that Wls plays a critical role in modulating Wnt signaling during lung development and therefore affects processes critical for pulmonary morphogenesis. We generated conditional Wls mutant mice utilizing Shh-Cre and Dermo1-Cre mice to delete Wls in the embryonic respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme, respectively. Epithelial deletion of Wls disrupted lung branching morphogenesis, peripheral lung development and pulmonary endothelial differentiation. Epithelial Wls mutant mice died at birth due to respiratory failure caused by lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hemorrhage. In the lungs of these mice, VEGF and Tie2-angiopoietin signaling pathways, which mediate vascular development, were downregulated from early stages of development. In contrast, deletion of Wls in mesenchymal cells of the developing lung did not alter branching morphogenesis or early mesenchymal differentiation. In vitro assays support the concept that Wls acts in part via Wnt5a to regulate pulmonary vascular development. We conclude that epithelial Wls modulates Wnt ligand activities critical for pulmonary vascular differentiation and peripheral lung morphogenesis. These studies provide a new framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying normal pulmonary vasculature formation and the dysmorphic pulmonary vasculature development associated with congenital lung disease. PMID:23523683

  12. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with a high colon cancer risk, and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF (45% energy) or low-fat (LF) (...

  13. Fat feeding potentiates the diabetogenic effect of dexamethasone in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Renuka, Shanmugam; Menon, Venugopal P

    2008-01-01

    Background The role of cortisol and its increased action/availability is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome but the mechanism of increased action/availability is not known. Availability of several other lipophilic hormones, drugs and pollutants are also reported to be increased in obesity. Increased lipids in the circulation are reported to alter the fluidity and permeability of membranes. Hyperlipidemia is also reported to alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lipophilic molecules and also membrane fluidity and permeability. In this context we assumed that the hyperlipidemia associated with human obesity might play a role in the altered action/availability of cortisol and this in turn might have initiated the metabolic complications. To evaluate our assumption we have administered dexamethasone [low [50 μg/kg/day] or high [250 μg/kg/day] dose] to high-fat [coconut oil & vanaspati] fed rats and the results were compared with rats administered with either dexamethasone or high-fat. Results and Discussion Within two weeks, the rats co-administered with high-fat and dexamethasone developed severe hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance compared to rats treated either of them alone. High-fat fed rats treated with higher dose of dexamethasone were presented with severe hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and also severe glycosuria. The hyperlipidemia caused by high-fat feeding might have altered the transport and distribution of dexamethasone, probably by altering the physical state of membranes and transport proteins. Conclusion From the results obtained, it can be speculated that the altered lipid and cortisol metabolism could affect one another, forming a vicious cycle. PMID:18500989

  14. Nutritional supplementation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Yang, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-08-01

    Malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with cachexia, sarcopenia, and weight loss, and may result in poorer pulmonary function, decreased exercise capacity, and increased risk of exacerbations. Providing nutritional supplementation is an important therapeutic intervention, particularly for severely ill COPD patients with malnutrition. Higher calorie intake through nutritional supplementation significantly increases body weight and muscle strength, and improves quality of life in malnourished COPD patients. Difficulties may be experienced by these COPD patients, who are struggling to breathe and eliminate CO2 from the lungs, resulting in dyspnea, hypercapnia, hypoxia, and respiratory acidosis, which exacerbates muscle loss through oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. To overcome these problems, nutritional supplements should aim to reduce metabolic CO2 production, lower respiratory quotient, and improve lung function. Several studies have shown that high-fat supplements produce less CO2 and have lower respiratory quotient value than high-carbohydrate supplements. In addition, high-fat supplements may be the most efficient means of providing a low-volume, calorie-dense supplement to COPD patients, and may be most beneficial to patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation where hypercapnia and malnutrition are most pronounced. Further studies are required to investigate the optimal nutritional supplements for COPD patients according to their disease severity. PMID:26822811

  15. Optimizing oral nutritional drink supplementation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Broekhuizen, Roelinka; Creutzberg, Eva C; Weling-Scheepers, Clarie A P M; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2005-06-01

    Nutritional support is indicated in some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to restore nutritional status and improve functional capacity. However, the efficacy of nutritional supplements is sometimes disappointing, partly owing to a compensatory drop in habitual food intake. We retrospectively studied the effect of nutritional drink supplements, differing in portion size and energy content, on weight gain and body composition. Thirty-nine patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, participating in an 8-week pulmonary rehabilitation programme and eligible for nutritional support, were studied. Group A (n 19) received three portions of 125 ml (2380 kJ), whereas group B (n 20) received three portions of 200 ml (3350 kJ) daily. The macronutrient composition of the regimens was similar (20 % protein, 60 % carbohydrates and 20 % fat). Lung function, body weight, body composition (by bio-electrical impedance analysis), habitual dietary intake (by dietary history) and resting energy expenditure (by ventilated hood) were determined. Weight gain was compared with expected weight as predicted by a computer simulation model. Although patients in both groups significantly increased in weight, this increase was higher in group A (A, 3.3 (sd 1.9) kg; B, 2.0 (sd 1.2) kg; P=0.019), while receiving less energy. The observed weight gain in group A was similar to that expected, but in group B it was lower than expected (P<0.001). In both groups, fat-free mass and fat mass were gained in a ratio of 2:1, fat-free mass increasing primarily during the first 4 weeks. This study illustrates that there might be an optimum for the portion size of nutritional drink supplements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that more is not always better.

  16. Distinct Disease Phases in Muscles of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients Identified by MR Detected Fat Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Barbara H.; Voet, Nicoline B. M.; Nabuurs, Christine I.; Kan, Hermien E.; de Rooy, Jacky W. J.; Geurts, Alexander C.; Padberg, George W.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    with distal fat infiltration and altered energy metabolite levels. Fat replacement then relatively rapidly spreads over the whole muscle. PMID:24454861

  17. Distinct disease phases in muscles of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy patients identified by MR detected fat infiltration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Barbara H; Voet, Nicoline B M; Nabuurs, Christine I; Kan, Hermien E; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Geurts, Alexander C; Padberg, George W; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    with distal fat infiltration and altered energy metabolite levels. Fat replacement then relatively rapidly spreads over the whole muscle.

  18. Pulmonary function test: its correlation with pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leonel, Daza; Lucia, Cervantes; A, Muñiz; Martha-Alicia, Hernández; Blanca, Murillo

    2012-07-01

    Our objective was to try to evaluate lung affection and to correlate an easier and cheaper method with the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with RA. Thirty-six RA patients were selected for HRCT lung scan (twelve patients with altered pulmonary function test (PFT) and 24 with normal PFT). The American Thoracic Society criteria were followed for the pulmonary test. Clinical and laboratory variables were recorded. A statistical analysis was done by Kaplan-Meyer survival curve and ROC curve. When HRCT was evaluated in all patients, only sixteen had an HRCT normal and twenty patients showed some radiologic alteration under HRCT such as: pleural thickness, bronchiectasis, interstitial pattern, micro-nodules pattern, ground-glass opacity, and a reticular pattern. A logistic regression showed that methotrexate use, evolution of the disease (beta 0.018), and FEV1 (beta 0.89) were statistically associated with HRCT alterations. A projection of patients, free from event (HRCT lung scan altered), was obtained through a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, using FEV1 as a predictor over time. The curve shows that in the next 240 months (20 years) nearly 40% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis will have FEV1 values less than 80% of the normal values predicted for the same age and sex. The FEV1 values have demonstrated a good correlation between PFT and HRCT lung scan. Therefore, they provide an accessible tool for tracking early pulmonary alterations. Methotrexate use and time evolution of the disease have been associated with altered FEV1.

  19. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  1. Pulmonary emphysema and proteolysis: 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.C.; Mittman, C. )

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with the topic of pulmonary emphysema. Included are the following chapters: Abnormality of secretion of Z Alpha-1-antitrypsin, Proteases, antiproteases, and oxidants in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, Alveolar Leukocytes and protease responses with continuous vs. intermittent exposures to NO{sub 2}.

  2. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder. Alternative Names Pulmonary vaso-occlusive disease Images Respiratory system References Channick RN, Rubin LJ. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus VC, Martin TR, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  3. Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against obesity induced by diets high in saturated fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeremy E; Gabler, Nicholas K; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Spurlock, Michael E

    2008-06-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (Tlr-4), a key pattern recognition receptor involved in innate immune response, is activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). To investigate the involvement of this receptor in obesity caused by consumption of diets high in fat, we utilized male Tlr-4-deficient 10ScN mice and 10J controls. Mice were fed either low fat (low-fat control (LFC)), high unsaturated fat (high-fat control (HFC)), or high saturated fat + palmitate (HFP) diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Relative to the LFC diet, the HFC diet resulted in greater epididymal fat pad weights and adipocyte hypertrophy in both Tlr-4-deficient and normal mice. However, the 10ScN mice were completely protected against the obesigenic effects of the HFP diet. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) transcript abundance were lower in adipose tissue of 10ScN mice fed the HFP diet, and the hyperinsulinemic response was negated. Tlr-4-deficient mice also had markedly lower circulating concentrations of MCP-1 and much less nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) protein in nuclear extracts prepared from adipose tissue, irrespective of diet. In contrast, Tlr-4 deficiency did not attenuate the induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in adipose tissue. These data indicate that Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against the obesigenic effects of SFA and alters obesity-related inflammatory responses in adipose tissue. PMID:18421279

  4. The impact of body fat on three dimensional motion of the paediatric foot during walking.

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, Ryan; Morrison, Stewart C; Bassett, Paul; Drechsler, Wendy I; Cramp, Mary C

    2016-02-01

    Childhood obesity is commonly associated with a pes planus foot type and altered lower limb joint function during walking. However, limited information has been reported on dynamic intersegment foot motion with the level of obesity in children. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between intersegment foot motion during gait and body fat in boys age 7-11 years. Fat mass was measured in fifty-five boys using air displacement plethysmography. Three-dimensional gait analysis was conducted on the right foot of each participant using the 3DFoot model to capture angular motion of the shank, calcaneus, midfoot and metatarsals. Two multivariate statistical techniques were employed; principle component analysis reduced the multidimensional nature of gait analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis accounted for potential confounding factors. Higher fat mass predicted greater plantarflexion of the calcaneus during the first half and end of stance phase and at the end of swing phase. Greater abduction of the calcaneus throughout stance and swing was predicted by greater fat mass. At the midfoot, higher fat mass predicted greater dorsiflexion and eversion throughout the gait cycle. The findings present novel information on the relationships between intersegment angular motion of the foot and body fat in young boys. The data indicates a more pronated foot type in boys with greater body fat. These findings have clinical implications for pes planus and a predisposition for pain and discomfort during weight bearing activities potentially reducing motivation in obese children to be physically active. PMID:27004650

  5. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk and immediate management options by both the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical. PMID:26210926

  6. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  7. Cavitary Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gadkowski, L. Beth; Stout, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: A pulmonary cavity is a gas-filled area of the lung in the center of a nodule or area of consolidation and may be clinically observed by use of plain chest radiography or computed tomography. Cavities are present in a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of pathological processes associated with lung cavities, focusing on infections associated with lung cavities. The goal is to provide the clinician and clinical microbiologist with an overview of the diseases most commonly associated with lung cavities, with attention to the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the host. PMID:18400799

  8. Primary pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Asadi Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz; Allameh, Seyyed Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a case of primary cryptococcal pneumonia in a 25-year-old woman who presented with several weeks' history of cough, dyspnoea and night sweating. These symptoms started in the third trimester of her pregnancy. She was being treated for infertility and got pregnant with in vitro fertilisation. On chest imaging, there were bilateral air space consolidation and cavitary lesions. Fungal pulmonary infection was diagnosed after surgical lung biopsy. She received fluconazole 400 mg per day orally for 6 months and recovered completely. PMID:24692384

  9. Macro fat and micro fat: insulin sensitivity and gender dependent response of adipose tissue to isocaloric diet change.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Gaillard, Jonathan R; McLaughlin, Tracey; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    The adipose cell-size distribution is a quantitative characterization of adipose tissue morphology. At a population level, the adipose cell-size distribution is insulin-sensitivity dependent, and the observed correlation between obesity and insulin resistance is believed to play a key role in the metabolic syndrome. Changes in fat mass can be induced by altered energy intake or even diet composition. These macroscopic changes must manifest themselves as dynamic adipose cell-size distribution alterations at the microscopic level. The dynamic relationship between these 2 independent measurements of body fat is unknown. In this study, we investigate adipose tissue dynamics in response to various isocaloric diet compositions, comparing gender- and insulin sensitivity-dependent differences. A body composition model is used to predict fat mass changes in response to changes in diet composition for 28 individuals, separated into 4 subgroups according to gender and insulin sensitivity/resistance. Adipose cell-size distribution changes in each individual are simulated with a dynamic model and parameters corresponding to lipid turnover and cell growth rates are determined for each subgroup to match the relative change of fat mass for each diet composition, respectively. We find that adipose cell-size dynamics are associated with different modulations dependent on gender and insulin resistance. Larger turnover and growth/shrinkage rates in insulin resistant individuals suggest they may be more sensitive to changes in energy intake and diet composition than insulin sensitive subjects. The different cell-size distribution changes of adipose cells of various sizes in different subject groups further suggest distinct modulations of adipose cell dynamics. PMID:26451281

  10. Macro fat and micro fat: insulin sensitivity and gender dependent response of adipose tissue to isocaloric diet change.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Gaillard, Jonathan R; McLaughlin, Tracey; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    The adipose cell-size distribution is a quantitative characterization of adipose tissue morphology. At a population level, the adipose cell-size distribution is insulin-sensitivity dependent, and the observed correlation between obesity and insulin resistance is believed to play a key role in the metabolic syndrome. Changes in fat mass can be induced by altered energy intake or even diet composition. These macroscopic changes must manifest themselves as dynamic adipose cell-size distribution alterations at the microscopic level. The dynamic relationship between these 2 independent measurements of body fat is unknown. In this study, we investigate adipose tissue dynamics in response to various isocaloric diet compositions, comparing gender- and insulin sensitivity-dependent differences. A body composition model is used to predict fat mass changes in response to changes in diet composition for 28 individuals, separated into 4 subgroups according to gender and insulin sensitivity/resistance. Adipose cell-size distribution changes in each individual are simulated with a dynamic model and parameters corresponding to lipid turnover and cell growth rates are determined for each subgroup to match the relative change of fat mass for each diet composition, respectively. We find that adipose cell-size dynamics are associated with different modulations dependent on gender and insulin resistance. Larger turnover and growth/shrinkage rates in insulin resistant individuals suggest they may be more sensitive to changes in energy intake and diet composition than insulin sensitive subjects. The different cell-size distribution changes of adipose cells of various sizes in different subject groups further suggest distinct modulations of adipose cell dynamics.

  11. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents Fat Deposition and Inflammation in Brown Adipose Tissue and Enhances Sympathetic Activity in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Chi H. L.; Szabo, Alexander; Yu, Yinghua; Camer, Danielle; Zhang, Qingsheng; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Obesity results in changes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) morphology, leading to fat deposition, inflammation, and alterations in sympathetic nerve activity. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) has been extensively studied for the treatment of chronic diseases. We present for the first time the effects of oral BARD treatment on BAT morphology and associated changes in the brainstem. Three groups (n = 7) of C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD), a high-fat diet supplemented with BARD (HFD/BARD), or a low-fat diet (LFD) for 21 weeks. BARD was administered daily in drinking water. Interscapular BAT, and ventrolateral medulla (VLM) and dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in the brainstem, were collected for analysis by histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. BARD prevented fat deposition in BAT, demonstrated by the decreased accumulation of lipid droplets. When administered BARD, HFD mice had lower numbers of F4/80 and CD11c macrophages in the BAT with an increased proportion of CD206 macrophages, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. BARD increased phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in BAT and VLM. In the VLM, BARD increased energy expenditure proteins, including beta 3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). Overall, oral BARD prevented fat deposition and inflammation in BAT, and stimulated sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:26066016

  12. Fat Embolism Syndrome After Femur Fracture Fixation: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Craig C; Schick, Cameron; Otero, Jesse; Karam, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a multi-organ disorder with potentially serious sequelae that is commonly seen in the orthopaedic patient population after femur fractures. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary dysfunction, mental status changes, petechiae, tachycardia, fever, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Due to technological advances in supportive care and intramedullary reaming techniques, the incidence of FES has been reported as low as 0.5 percent. Here, we present a rare case of FES with cerebral manifestations. A previously healthy 24-year old nonsmoking male was admitted to our hospital after an unrestrained head-on motor vehicle collision. The patient's injuries included a left olecranon fracture and closed bilateral comminuted midshaft femur fractures. The patient went on to develop cerebral fat embolism syndrome (CFES) twelve hours after immediate bilateral intramedullary nail fixation. His symptoms included unresponsiveness, disconjugate gaze, seizures, respiratory distress, fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and visual changes. Head computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed pathognomonic white-matter punctate lesions and watershed involvement. With early recognition and supportive therapy and seizure therapy, the patient went on to have complete resolution of symptoms without cognitive sequelae. PMID:25328460

  13. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  14. [Pulmonary manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Morawska, Justyna; Domysławska, Izabela; Bagrowska, Magdalena; Sierakowski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by destructive cartilages, bones and other structures formed joints. RA belongs to connective tissue diseases represented by systemic nature, internal illness, extra-articular features and rapidly progress of atherosceirosis. The extra-articular complications cause the reduction of patient longevity. The frequency of symptoms in patient with RA and respiratory disorders occur in 10-20% of cases. Pulmonary complications are the second most common cause of premature of patient deaths. Respiratory disorders associated with RA are devided into 3 groups: infection, lung disease caused by drugs and pulmonary manifestation connected by RA. These last affect interstitial tissue, bronchioli, pulmonary vessels, pleura, also are presented by pulmonary rheumatoid nodules and pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  16. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  17. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  18. Fat and Bone: An Odd Couple

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Richard; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we will first discuss the concept of bone strength and introduce how fat at different locations, including the bone marrow, directly or indirectly regulates bone turnover. We will then review the current literature supporting the mechanistic relationship between marrow fat and bone and our understanding of the relationship between body fat, body weight, and bone with emphasis on its hormonal regulation. Finally, we will briefly discuss the importance and challenges of accurately measuring the fat compartments using non-invasive methods. This review highlights the complex relationship between fat and bone and how these new concepts will impact our diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27014187

  19. Pulmonary Findings on Computed Tomography in Asymptomatic Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Riesgo, Aldo M; Lincoln, Denis; Markel, David C

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus (PE) in the early postoperative period has been attributed to the use of multidetector 64-slice computed tomographic (CT) scans. It was suspected that this finding was the result of marrow or fat emboli that are commonly associated with arthroplasty rather than a true venous thromboembolic phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to determine the baseline pulmonary findings in asymptomatic patients after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Over a 1-year period, an institutional review board-approved prospective study of 20 asymptomatic patients using a multidetector 64-slice CT scanner was performed. Overall, 15 TKAs and 5 total hip arthroplasties were included for analysis. All of the CT scans were negative for PE. There were no signs of microemboli or fat emboli on any scan. No patient went on to develop a PE at 2 years postoperatively. Despite the fact that emboli are created during TJA, if emboli are seen on a CT scan postoperatively, they should be assumed to be real events with clinical sequelae. If pulmonary symptoms develop postoperatively, they should not simply be assumed to be the result of fat or marrow embolism.

  20. Differential effects of pirfenidone on acute pulmonary injury and ensuing fibrosis in the hamster model of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Racz, William J; Brien, James F; Margolin, Solomon B; Massey, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    Pulmonary toxicity, including fibrosis, is a serious adverse effect associated with the antidysrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). We tested the potential usefulness of pirfenidone against AM-induced pulmonary toxicity in the hamster model. Intratracheal AM administration resulted in pulmonary fibrosis 21 days posttreatment, as evidenced by an increased hydroxyproline content and histological damage. Dietary pirfenidone administration (0.5% w/w in chow), for 3 days prior to and continuously after AM, prevented fibrosis and suppressed elevation of pulmonary transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA content at 7 and 21 days post-AM. Protection against AM-induced lung damage was not observed when supplementation with pirfenidone was delayed until 7 days following AM administration, suggesting that alteration of early events in AM lung toxicity is necessary for the protective effect of pirfenidone. Both AM and bleomycin, another pulmonary fibrogen, caused inflammation 24 h after intratracheal dosing, measured as increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, protein content, and cellular alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with the response to AM markedly greater than that to bleomycin. Administration of AM, but not bleomycin, also caused whole lung mitochondrial dysfunction, alveolar macrophage death, and an influx of eosinophils into the lung, of which pirfenidone was able to decrease only the latter. We conclude that: (1) AM induces alveolar macrophage death and severe, acute pulmonary inflammation with associated eosinophilia following intratracheal administration; (2) mitochondrial dysfunction may play an early role in AM pulmonary injury; and (3) pirfenidone decreases AM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster, probably through suppression of TGF-beta1 gene expression.