Science.gov

Sample records for fatal pulmonary edema

  1. Pulmonary Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... suddenly or develop over time. Sudden (acute) pulmonary edema symptoms Extreme shortness of breath or difficulty breathing ( ... fatal if not treated. Long-term (chronic) pulmonary edema symptoms Having more shortness of breath than normal ...

  2. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  3. Molecular Pathology of Pulmonary Edema in Forensic Autopsy Cases with Special Regard to Fatal Methamphetamine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Jin, Hong-Nian; Zhao, Rui; Zhao, Dong; Xue, Ye; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Xie, Xiao-Li; Wang, Qi

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary edema is a common finding in fatal methamphetamine intoxication. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. This study investigated the molecular pathology of alveolar damage involving pulmonary edema in forensic autopsy cases. Seven candidate reference genes (RPL13A, YWHAZ, GUSB, SDHA, GAPDH, B2M, and ACTB) were evaluated in the lung by the geNorm module in qBase(plus) software. RPL13A, YWHAZ, and GUSB were identified as the most stable reference genes. Using these validated reference genes, intrapulmonary mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), claudin-5 (CLDN-5), and aquaporins (AQPs) were examined. Relative mRNA quantification using TaqMan real-time PCR assay demonstrated higher expressions of all markers except for AQP-5 in fatal METH intoxication cases. These findings suggested alveolar damage and compensatory response in fatal METH intoxication cases. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time qPCR is a useful tool in forensic death investigation.

  4. Molecular pathology of pulmonary edema in forensic autopsy cases with special regard to fatal hyperthermia and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2013-05-10

    Fatalities due to an extreme ambient temperature might present with poor or nonspecific pathologies; thus, the diagnosis of the cause of death in such cases is one of the most difficult tasks in forensic pathology. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of alveolar damage involving pulmonary edema with special regard to hyperthermia (heatstroke) and hypothermia (cold exposure) in forensic autopsy cases (total, n=122; within 48 h postmortem). Intrapulmonary mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), claudin-5 (CLDN-5) and aquaporins (AQPs) were examined. Relative mRNA quantification using Taqman real-time PCR assay demonstrated higher expressions of all markers except for AQP-5 in fatal hyperthermia, and higher expression of MMP-9 in fatal hypothermia. Acute cardiac death, mechanical asphyxiation, fire fatality and intoxication did not present any characteristic findings. In immunostaining, only MMPs showed evident differences among the causes of death: MMP-9 was intensely positive in most cases of hyperthermia and hypothermia, but MMP-2 expression was evident only in hyperthermia. These findings suggest alveolar damage involving pulmonary edema, characteristic of fatal hyperthermia and hypothermia. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR might be a useful procedure in forensic death investigation.

  5. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  6. Reexpansion pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Tarver, R D; Broderick, L S; Conces, D J

    1996-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema is a rare complication attending the rapid reexpansion of a chronically collapsed lung, such as occurs after evacuation of a large amount of air or fluid from the pleural space. The condition usually appears unexpectedly and dramatically-immediately or within 1 h in 64% of patients and within 24 h in the remainder. The clinical manifestations are varied; they range from roentgenographic findings alone in asymptomatic patients to severe cardiorespiratory insufficiency. The radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema is a unilateral alveolar filling pattern, seen within a few hours of reexpansion of the lung. The edema may progress for 24-48 h and persist for 4-5 days. Human data on the pathophysiology of reexpansion pulmonary edema derive from small series of patients, case reports, and reviews of the literature. On the other hand, a larger body of data exists on experimental reexpansion pulmonary edema in cats, monkeys, rabbits, sheep, and goats. This review examines the clinical and experimental evidence for reexpansion pulmonary edema. In addition, we detail the historical background, clinical setting, treatment, and outcome of reexpansion pulmonary edema.

  7. Lethal Factor, but Not Edema Factor, Is Required to Cause Fatal Anthrax in Cynomolgus Macaques after Pulmonary Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Julie A.; Lovchik, Julie A.; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L.; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F.; Lyons, C. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti–protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  8. Lethal factor, but not edema factor, is required to cause fatal anthrax in cynomolgus macaques after pulmonary spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F; Lyons, C Rick

    2014-12-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti-protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores.

  9. Postobstructive pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Udeshi, Ashish; Cantie, Shawn Michael; Pierre, Edgar

    2010-09-01

    Postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE; also known as negative pressure pulmonary edema) is a potentially life-threatening complication in which pulmonary edema occurs shortly after the relief of an upper airway obstruction. The incidence of POPE has been reported to be as high as 1 in 1000 general anesthetic cases and commonly presents as acute respiratory distress that requires immediate intervention. This review examines the 2 subclasses of POPE and describes the etiologic factors, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies associated with each. The aim of this review was to equip clinicians with the knowledge base necessary to identify patients at increased risk for POPE and to expeditiously diagnose and treat this potentially catastrophic complication.

  10. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. )

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  11. An uncommon cause of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Santosh; Giri, Smith; Bhusal, Mohan; Siwakoti, Krishmita; Pathak, Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is a very uncommon and fatal initial presentation of pheochromocytoma. However, with early clinical suspicion and aggressive management, the condition is reversible. This case report describes a patient who presented with hypertension, dyspnea, and cough with bloody streaks, and who recovered within 48 hours after appropriate treatment.

  12. Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mallar; Kallet, Richard H; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) or postobstructive pulmonary edema is a well-described cause of acute respiratory failure that occurs after intense inspiratory effort against an obstructed airway, usually from upper airway infection, tumor, or laryngospasm. Patients with NPPE generate very negative airway pressures, which augment transvascular fluid filtration and precipitate interstitial and alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema fluid collected from most patients with NPPE has a low protein concentration, suggesting hydrostatic forces as the primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of NPPE. Supportive care should be directed at relieving the upper airway obstruction by endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy, institution of lung-protective positive-pressure ventilation, and diuresis unless the patient is in shock. Resolution of the pulmonary edema is usually rapid, in part because alveolar fluid clearance mechanisms are intact. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and management of negative-pressure or postobstructive pulmonary edema.

  13. Clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gluecker, T; Capasso, P; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F; Schaller, M D; Revelly, J P; Chiolero, R; Vock, P; Wicky, S

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary edema may be classified as increased hydrostatic pressure edema, permeability edema with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), permeability edema without DAD, or mixed edema. Pulmonary edema has variable manifestations. Postobstructive pulmonary edema typically manifests radiologically as septal lines, peribronchial cuffing, and, in more severe cases, central alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema with chronic pulmonary embolism manifests as sharply demarcated areas of increased ground-glass attenuation. Pulmonary edema with veno-occlusive disease manifests as large pulmonary arteries, diffuse interstitial edema with numerous Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and a dilated right ventricle. Stage 1 near drowning pulmonary edema manifests as Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and patchy, perihilar alveolar areas of airspace consolidation; stage 2 and 3 lesions are radiologically nonspecific. Pulmonary edema following administration of cytokines demonstrates bilateral, symmetric interstitial edema with thickened septal lines. High-altitude pulmonary edema usually manifests as central interstitial edema associated with peribronchial cuffing, ill-defined vessels, and patchy airspace consolidation. Neurogenic pulmonary edema manifests as bilateral, rather homogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate at the apices in about 50% of cases. Reperfusion pulmonary edema usually demonstrates heterogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. Postreduction pulmonary edema manifests as mild airspace consolidation involving the ipsilateral lung, whereas pulmonary edema due to air embolism initially demonstrates interstitial edema followed by bilateral, peripheral alveolar areas of increased opacity that predominate at the lung bases. Familiarity with the spectrum of radiologic findings in pulmonary edema from various causes will often help narrow the differential diagnosis.

  14. Reexpansion pulmonary edema in children

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Antonio Lucas L.; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo; Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das N.; Fraga, Andrea de Melo A.; Pereira, Ricardo Mendes; Tresoldi, Antonia Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present a case of a patient with clinical and radiological features of reexpansion pulmonary edema, a rare and potentially fatal disease. CASE DESCRIPTION An 11-year-old boy presenting fever, clinical signs and radiological features of large pleural effusion initially treated as a parapneumonic process. Due to clinical deterioration he underwent tube thoracostomy, with evacuation of 3,000 mL of fluid; he shortly presented acute respiratory insufficiency and needed mechanical ventilation. He had an atypical evolution (extubated twice with no satisfactory response). Computerized tomography findings matched those of reexpansion edema. He recovered satisfactorily after intensive care, and pleural tuberculosis was diagnosed afterwards. COMMENTS Despite its rareness in the pediatric population (only five case reports gathered), the knowledge of this pathology and its prevention is very important, due to high mortality rates. It is recommended, among other measures, slow evacuation of the pleural effusion, not removing more than 1,500 mL of fluid at once. PMID:24142327

  15. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence. PMID:28149030

  16. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-12-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence.

  17. Late-onset pulmonary edema due to propofol.

    PubMed

    Inal, M T; Memis, D; Vatan, I; Cakir, U; Yildiz, B

    2008-08-01

    Pulmonary edema after the administration of propofol has rarely been reported. In this case report, we describe pulmonary edema due to the administration of propofol during a Cesarean section and while in the intensive care unit. The skin tests demonstrated strong positive weal and flare reactions to propofol. The patient was treated successfully with mechanical ventilatory support. This report emphasizes that this fatal complication may be seen with propofol and underlying mechanisms and therapeutic approach are discussed.

  18. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Saracen, A; Kotwica, Z; Woźniak-Kosek, A; Kasprzak, P

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is observed in cerebral injuries and has an impact on treatment results, being a predictor of fatal prognosis. In this study we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 250 consecutive patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for the frequency and treatment results of NPE. The following factors were taken under consideration: clinical status, aneurysm location, presence of NPE, intracranial pressure (ICP), and mortality. All patients had plain- and angio-computer tomography performed. NPE developed most frequently in case of the aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery. The patients with grades I-III of SAH, according to the World Federation of Neurosurgeons staging, were immediately operated on, while those with poor grades IV and V had only an ICP sensor's implantation procedure performed. A hundred and eighty five patients (74.4 %) were admitted with grades I to III and 32 patients (12.8 %) were with grade IV and V each. NPE was not observed in SAH patients with grade I to III, but it developed in nine patients with grade IV and 11 patients with grade V. Of the 20 patients with NPE, 19 died. Of the 44 poor grade patients (grades IV-V) without NPE, 20 died. All poor grade patients had elevated ICP in a range of 24-56 mmHg. The patients with NPE had a greater ICP than those without NPE. Gender and age had no influence on the occurrence of NPE. We conclude that the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in SAH patients with poor grades is a fatal prognostic as it about doubles the death rate to almost hundred percent.

  19. Glyphosate Poisoning with Acute Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Darshana Sudip; Khot, Rajashree; Joshi, P. P.; Pandharipande, Madhuri; Nagpure, Keshav

    2014-01-01

    GlySH-surfactant herbicide (GlySH), one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, has been considered as minimally toxic to humans. However, clinical toxicologists occasionally encounter cases of severe systemic toxicity. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that ‘GlySH’ is of relatively low oral and acute dermal toxicity. It does not have anticholinesterase effect and no organophosphate-like central nervous system (CNS) effects. The clinical features range from skin and throat irritation to hypotension and death. Severe GlySH-surfactant poisoning is manifested by gastroenteritis, respiratory disturbances, altered mental status, hypotension refractory to the treatment, renal failure, and shock.[1] GlySH intoxication has a case fatality rate 3.2–29.3%. Pulmonary toxicity and renal toxicity seem to be responsible for mortality. Metabolic acidosis, abnormal chest X-ray, arrhythmias, and elevated serum creatinine levels are useful prognostic factors for predicting GlySH mortality.[2] There is no antidote and the mainstay of treatment for systemic toxicity is decontamination and aggressive supportive therapy. We report a case of acute pulmonary edema, which is a rare but severe manifestation of oral GlySH poisoning, where patient survived with aggressive supportive therapy. PMID:25948977

  20. Independent ventilation and ECMO for severe unilateral pulmonary edema after SLT for primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Zamora, M R; Jones, S; Campbell, D W; Fullerton, D A

    1995-06-01

    Single lung transplantation (SLT) is now accepted therapy for selected cases of severe pulmonary hypertension. A recognized complication is the postoperative development of reperfusion edema in the graft, a potentially fatal cause of respiratory failure. Because reperfusion edema may be a reversible process, temporizing support measures can be life-saving. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman who developed severe reperfusion edema following right SLT for primary (unexplained) pulmonary hypertension. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was instituted. Independent lung ventilation was later begun and resulted in markedly improved oxygenation allowing withdrawal of ECMO. We conclude that reperfusion edema following SLT for pulmonary hypertension may be uniquely amenable to treatment with independent lung ventilation and ECMO if needed.

  1. Interstitial Pulmonary Edema Following Bromocarbamide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, H.; Hagedorn, M.; Bōttcher, D.; Neuhof, H.; Mittermayer, Ch.

    1974-01-01

    Bromocarbamides are sleep-inducing drugs which can lead, in man, to intoxication and death due to respiratory failure. To prove whether hemodynamic factors or the changed endothelial permeability induce pulmonary edema, animal experiments were performed. The fine structural changes in pulmonary edema in rabbits were observed at 60, 90 and 120 minutes after oral administration. The major findings were a) large blebs between capillary endothelium and alveolar epithelium and b) interstitial edema of the vessel wall. The bleb contents were much less electron dense than the blood contents in the capillary. Colloidal carbon did not enter the bleb or the edematous interstitial tissue. Exogenous peroxidase uptake in pinocytotie vesicles increased in pathologic cases. The hemodynamic measurements in animal receiving artificial respiration which maintained the blood pO2 at a steady state showed similar blebs in the pulmonary vessels, indicating that anoxia is not the major cause of the vascular lesion. Moreover, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance could be held in the normal range in artificially respirated animals under bromocarbamide intoxication. Thus, hemodynamic factors are not likely to play a pathogenetic role in bringing about pulmonary edema. The chief, early factor is the increased endothelial permeability due to increased cytoplasmic transport. From this a practical suggestion for treating patients with bromocarbamide intoxication is derived: the usual fluid replacement in shock patients should be handled with great care to avoid fluid overload of the lung. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4835993

  2. [Negative pressure pulmonary edema: 3 case reports].

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Gómez, J R; Paja Martí, I; Sos-Ortigosa, F; Pérez-Cajaraville, J J; Arteche-Andrés, M A; Bengoechea, C; Lobo-Palanco, J; Ahmad-Al-Ghool, M

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema is a complication, described since 1977, caused by upper airway obstruction in both children and adults. Although its aetiopathogeny is multifactorial, especially outstanding is excessive negative intrathoracic pressure caused by the forced spontaneous inspiration of a patient against a closed glottis, that causes high arteriole and capillary fluid pressures that favor transudation into the alveolar space The resulting pulmonary edema can appear a few minutes after the obstruction of the airway or in a deferred way after several hours. The clinical manifestations are potentially serious, but normally respond well to treatment with supplemental oxygen, positive pressure mechanical ventilation and diuretics. Diagnostic suspicion is important for acting promptly. We report three clinical cases with acute negative pressure pulmonary edema.

  3. [Acute pulmonary edema as a nursing emergency].

    PubMed

    Navarro Aldana, M C

    2001-01-01

    The presence of Acute Pulmonary Edema represents a severe emergency condition that requires immediate and efficient treatment; otherwise, imminent death of the patient occurs. Therefore it is of utter importance to perform frequent reviews of the literature to keep up with the newest procedures to warrant the best quality nursing care of our patients. This article reviews the physiopathology, clinical manifestations, and medical treatment of the Acute Pulmonary Edema, emphasizing on the nursing aspects of the treatment and pointing out the need to treat the predisposing cardiac alteration as soon as possible.

  4. Pulmonary edema induced by intravenous ethchlorvynol.

    PubMed

    Conces, D J; Kreipke, D L; Tarver, R D

    1986-11-01

    The intravenous injection of ethchlorvynol is an uncommon cause of noncardiac pulmonary edema. Two cases of intravenous ethchlorvynol-induced pulmonary edema are presented. The patients fell asleep after injecting the liquid contents of Placydil capsules (ethchlorvynol) and awoke several hours later with severe dyspnea. Arterial blood gases demonstrated marked hypoxia. Chest radiographs revealed bilateral diffuse alveolar densities. The patients' symptoms and radiographic findings resolved after several days of supportive care. Changes in the lung caused by ethchlorvynol may be the result of direct effect of the drug on the lung.

  5. Diagnosis and management of cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Alwi, Idrus

    2010-07-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) is a common cardiogenic emergency with a quite high in-hospital mortality rate. ACPE is defined as pulmonary edema with increased secondary hydrostatic capillary pressure due to elevated pulmonary venous pressure. Increased hydrostatic pressure may result from various causes including excessive administration of intravascular volume, obstruction of pulmonary venous outflow or secondary left ventricular failure due to left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction. ACPE must be distinguished from pulmonary edema associated with injury of alveolar capillary membrane caused by various etiologies, i.e. direct pulmonary injury such as pneumonia and indirect pulmonary injury such as sepsis. Numerous clinical manifestations may differentiate ACPE and Non-ACPE. ACPE usually presents with a history of acute cardiac catastrophe. Physical examination reveals a low-flow state, S3 gallop, jugular venous distention and fine crepitant rales with auscultation. The diagnosis of pulmonary edema is made based on symptoms and clinical signs are found through history taking, physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray, echocardiography and laboratory tests including blood gas analysis and specific biomarkers. Medical treatment of ACPE has 3 main objectives, i.e.: (1) reduced venous return (preload reduction); (2) reduced resistance of systemic vascular (afterload reduction); and (3) inotropic support in some cases. Treatment that can be administered includes: vasodilator when there is normal or high BP, diuretics when there is volume overload or fluid retention, and inotropic drugs when there is hypotension or signs of organ hypoperfusion. Intubation and mechanical ventilation may be necessary to achieve adequate oxygenation.

  6. Acute Pulmonary Edema Associated With Propofol: An Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mian Adnan; Oud, Lavi

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is frequently used in the emergency department to provide procedural sedation for patients undergoing various procedures and is considered to be safe when administered by trained personnel. Pulmonary edema after administration of propofol has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 23-year-old healthy male who developed acute cough, hemoptysis and hypoxia following administration of propofol for splinting of a foot fracture. Chest radiography showed bilateral patchy infiltrates. The patient was treated successfully with supportive care. This report emphasizes the importance of this potentially fatal propofol-associated complication and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and related literature. PMID:25493132

  7. Negative pressure pulmonary edema in healthy cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Tam; Upjohn, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Anesthetic complications are uncommon in young and healthy patients undergoing cosmetic surgery. We report 2 cases of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) in young patients, 1 who underwent rhinoplasty and another who underwent augmentation mammaplasty and suction-assisted lipoplasty of the thighs and buttocks This rare and potentially fatal complication requires admission to an intensive-care unit and delayed discharge. Although cases of NPPE have been reported in the medical and anesthetic literature, NPPE in plastic surgery has never been reported previously.

  8. The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema is described. When discovered in 1981, it was believed to be a cold-induced response in a submerged, otherwise healthy, scuba diver. The clinical features are described and discussed, as are the demographics. An alleged prevalence of 1.1% was complicated by problematic statistics and an apparent increase in reported cases. Recurrences both while diving and swimming or snorkeling were common. More recent case reports and surveys are described, identifying predisposing factors and associations, including cardiac pathology. Stress cardiomyopathies, reversible myocardial disorder or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, may complicate the presentation, especially in older females. Relevant cardiac investigations and autopsy findings are reviewed. Disease severity and potential lethality of scuba divers pulmonary edema became more apparent early this century, and these influence our current recommendations to survivors. First aid and treatment are also discussed.

  9. Influenza leaves a TRAIL to pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Rena; Chen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Influenza infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to poor disease outcome with high mortality. One of the driving features in the pathogenesis of ARDS is the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli, which causes severe pulmonary edema and impaired oxygen uptake. In this issue of the JCI, Peteranderl and colleagues define a paracrine communication between macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells during influenza infection where IFNα induces macrophage secretion of TRAIL that causes endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase by the alveolar epithelium. This reduction of Na,K-ATPase expression decreases alveolar fluid clearance, which in turn leads to pulmonary edema. Inhibition of the TRAIL signaling pathway has been shown to improve lung injury after influenza infection, and future studies will be needed to determine if blocking this pathway is a viable option in the treatment of ARDS.

  10. Characterization of an epizootic of pulmonary edema in swine associated with fumonisin in corn screenings.

    PubMed

    Osweiler, G D; Ross, P F; Wilson, T M; Nelson, P E; Witte, S T; Carson, T L; Rice, L G; Nelson, H A

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, corn screenings were associated with acute interstitial pulmonary edema, hydrothorax, and death in swine. Attack rate was 5-50%, case fatality rate was 50-90%, and clinical course was 1-2 days. Screenings from farms with pigs affected with pulmonary edema contained 20-330 micrograms fumonisin B1 per gram. Screenings containing 92 micrograms fumonisin B1 per gram fed to weanling pigs caused pulmonary edema and death. Sterilized corn inoculated with Fusarium moniliforme and diluted 1:1 with clean corn contained fumonisin B1 (17 micrograms/g) and caused acute pulmonary edema when fed for 5 days. Survivors developed subacute hepatotoxicosis with individual hepatocellular necrosis, hepatomegalocytosis, and increased numbers of mitotic figures. Similar liver lesions occurred in pigs given fumonisin B1 intravenously at 0.8 mg/kg body weight for 14 days.

  11. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment.

  12. Use of the Gamow Bag by EMT-basic park rangers for treatment of high-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kimberly; Shalit, Marc; Stroh, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    As part of an emergency medical system protocol, national park service rangers certified at the level of an emergency medical technician-basic (EMT-B) are taught to recognize and treat high-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema. In Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, this is done with the assistance of physician on-line medical control as a backup. High-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema are both potentially fatal altitude illnesses that can be particularly problematic in the backcountry, where evacuation may be delayed. We report a case of high-altitude pulmonary edema and high-altitude cerebral edema occurring at moderate altitude that was successfully treated by park rangers with the Gamow Bag.

  13. Drug-induced pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Matthay, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and, to a lesser extent, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common clinical manifestations of drug-induced lung diseases. Clinical features and radiographic appearances are generally indistinguishable from other causes of pulmonary edema and ARDS. Typical manifestations include dyspnea, chest discomfort, tachypnea, and hypoxemia. Chest radiographs commonly reveal interstitial and alveolar filling infiltrates. Unlike pulmonary edema that is due to congestive heart failure, cardiomegaly and pulmonary vascular redistribution are generally absent in cases that are drug-related. Rare cases of drug-induced myocarditis with heart failure and pulmonary edema have been described. Results from laboratory evaluation and respiratory function tests are nonspecific.

  14. Pulmonary tissue volume in dogs during pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Peterson, B T; Petrini, M F; Hyde, R W; Schreiner, B F

    1978-05-01

    Pulmonary tissue volume (Vt) and pulmonary capillary blood flow (Qc) were measured in anesthetized dogs by analyzing end-expiratory concentrations of dimethyl ether (DME), acetylene (C2H2), and sulfur hexafluoride during a 30-s rebreathing maneuver. Vt was compared to the postmortem lung weight of control dogs and dogs with hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic (alloxan) pulmonary edema. Qc was compared to the cardiac output measured by dye dilution. A 100-ml increase in alveolar volume (VA) in the range of 1-2 liters resulted in a 9 +/- 3 ml increase in Vt. Vt measured at a VA of 1.9 liters measures 114 +/- 18% of the postmortem lung weight in 20 control dogs and in 6 dogs with moderate edema (lung weight < 250% of predicted). Vt measured only 53 +/- 14% of the lung weight in 11 dogs with more severe edema. DME and C2H2 gave the smae mean values of Vt, but the reproducibility of a series of 3-7 measurements was greater with DME (coefficient of variation was 5% with DME and 8% C2H2). Qc measured 96 +/ 15% of the cardiac output during the rebreathing maneuver, but the maneuver caused a 4-40% fall in the cardiac output. These data show that Vt determined by rebreathing DME is between 86% and 135% of the lung weight in dogs with pulmonary edema until the lung weight is greater than 250% of the predicted value.

  15. [Pulmonary edemas due to acute heroin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Francois, G; Faizende, J; Reboul, J

    1975-01-01

    Their frequency is estimated with difficulty, although on autopsy pulmonary edema is found almost routinely. It is a major complication of overdoses (48 p. 100 of severe intoxications). Their formation can be suspected, when after the first phase of respiratory depressions, with coma, myosis, and a variable latent period, a second attack of respiratory insufficiency occurs with tachypnea, and cyanosis. The chest X-ray shows diffuse alveolar infiltration, sparing the apices. The heart being generally of normal size. Rapid disappearance of this infiltrate (24 to 48 hours) enables the elimination of two diagnoses: pneumonia due to inhalation of gastric fluid, an infectious pneumonia. Their pathogenesis remains very debatable: - in the majority of cases abrupt L.V.F. can be eliminated: -on the other hand it could be an allergic accident of the anaphylactic type, or local liberation of histamine, or a local toxic action on the pulmonary capillaries; - hypoxia, secondary to respiratory depression, could lead to pulmonary edema, by the same mechanism as at altitude; - finally, owing to the central neurological disorders a neurogenic theory can be put forward. Their treatment is essentially a combination of Nalorphine with oxygen therapy (by mask, or if necessary by assisted, controlled ventilation) with prevention of inhalation of gastric fluid (gastric emptying) or curative treatment of possible aspiration by antibiotics, and cortico-steroids. Diuretics can be useful, as well as cardiotonics.

  16. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  17. [A rare form of acute pulmonary edema: case report].

    PubMed

    Ricardo, José; Anaya, Maria José; Barbosa, Mário; André, Nelson; Magno, Pedro; Morais, José; Proença, Gonçalo; Rabaçal, Carlos; Gil, Victor

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 21-year-old man who underwent appendectomy under general anesthesia and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after extubation. We then review the literature, focusing on the pathophysiology and the most important aspects of diagnosis and treatment of post-extubation pulmonary edema.

  18. Noncardiac Pulmonary Edema induced by Sitagliptin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Belice, Tahir; Yuce, Suleyman; Kizilkaya, Bayram; Kurt, Aysel; Cure, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old male patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of progressive breathlessness, dry cough, and swollen lower extremities. Our patient had type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 3 years. His HbA1c was not within the target range so sitagliptin was added to on-going therapy. After 1 week of starting sitagliptin therapy, even though the patient had not heart failure he applied to the emergency department with a complaint of dyspnea. The cardiovascular safety and efficacy of many anti-hyperglycemic agents such as sitagliptin, saxagliptin are unclear. Our case has shown that dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors may cause pulmonary edema. Hence, it should be used with cautious, especially in patients with heart failure. PMID:25657966

  19. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  20. [Cardiogenic and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema: pathomechanisms and causes].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Schellenberg, S; Lang, J

    2010-07-01

    The development of pulmonary edema is divided in cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic. Cardiogenic edema pathogenically is caused by elevated hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries due to left sided congestive heart failure. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is categorized depending on the underlying pathogenesis in low-alveolar pressure, elevated permeability or neurogenic edema. Some important examples of causes are upper airway obstruction like in laryngeal paralysis or strangulation for low alveolar pressure, leptospirosis and ARDS for elevated permeability, and epilepsy, brain trauma and electrocution for neurogenic edema. The differentiation between cardiogenic versus non-cardiogenic genesis is not always straightforward, but most relevant, because treatment markedly differs between the two. Of further importance is the identification of the specific underlying cause in non-cardiogenic edema, not only for therapeutic but particularly for prognostic reasons. Depending on the cause the prognosis ranges from very poor to good chance of complete recovery.

  1. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise. PMID:26229538

  2. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Smita; Nayar, Pavan; Virmani, Pooja; Bansal, Shipra; Pawar, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor. PMID:26330724

  3. Reexpansion pulmonary edema after chest drainage for pneumothorax: A case report and literature overview

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, M.; van Buijtenen, J.M.; Geeraedts, L.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare complication that may occur after treatment of lung collapse caused by pneumothorax, atelectasis or pleural effusion and can be fatal in 20% of cases. The pathogenesis of RPE is probably related to histological changes of the lung parenchyma and reperfusion-damage by free radicals leading to an increased vascular permeability. RPE is often self-limiting and treatment is supportive. Case report A 76-year-old patient was treated by intercostal drainage for a traumatic pneumothorax. Shortly afterwards he developed reexpansion pulmonary edema and was transferred to the intensive care unit for ventilatory support. Gradually, the edema and dyspnea diminished and the patient could be discharged in good clinical condition. Conclusion RPE is characterized by rapidly progressive respiratory failure and tachycardia after intercostal chest drainage. Early recognition of signs and symptoms of RPE is important to initiate early management and allow for a favorable outcome. PMID:26029567

  4. Lung ultrasound for monitoring cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cortellaro, Francesca; Ceriani, Elisa; Spinelli, Monica; Campanella, Carlo; Bossi, Ilaria; Coen, Daniele; Casazza, Giovanni; Cogliati, Chiara

    2016-07-29

    Several studies address the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) in the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) evaluating the interstitial syndrome, which is characterized by multiple and diffuse vertical artifacts (B-lines), and correlates with extravascular lung water. We studied the potential role of LUS in monitoring CPE response to therapy, by evaluating the clearance of interstitial syndrome within the first 24 h after Emergency Department (ED) admission. LUS was performed at arrival (T0), after 3 (T3) and 24 (T24) hours. Eleven regions were evaluated in the antero-lateral chest; the B-lines burden was estimated in each region (0 = no B-lines, 1 = multiple B-lines, 2 = confluent B-lines/white lung) and a mean score (B-Score, range 0-2) was calculated. Patients received conventional CPE treatment. Blood chemistry, vital signs, blood gas analysis, diuresis at T0, T3, T24 were also recorded. A complete echocardiography was obtained during hospitalization. Forty-one patients were enrolled. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters improved in all patients between T0 and T3 and between T3 and T24. Mean B-score significantly decreased at T3 (from 1.59 ± 0.40 to 0.73 ± 0.44, P < 0.001) and between T3 and T 24 (from 0.73 ± 0.44 to 0.38 ± 0.33, P < 0.001). B-score was higher in the lower pulmonary regions at any time. At final evaluation (T24) 75 % of apical and only 38 % of basal regions were cleared. LUS allows one to assess the clearance of interstitial syndrome and its distribution in the early hours of treatment of CPE, thus representing a possible tool to guide therapy titration.

  5. [Acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute upper airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Carpintero-Moreno, F; Olivares-López, A; Borrás-Rubio, E; Alvarez-López, M J; García-Izquierdo, A

    1992-01-01

    We report a 72 years old woman with mild arterial hypertension and no other pathological history who presented an acute pulmonary edema due to acute obstruction of the upper airway secondary to vocal chord paralysis developing during the immediate postoperative phase of thyroidectomy. The acute pulmonary edema resolved after application of tracheal reintubation, mechanical ventilation controlled with end expiratory positive pressure, diuretics, morphine, and liquid restriction. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic possibilities of this infrequent clinical picture and we suggest that all patients who suffered and acute obstruction of the upper airways require a careful clinical surveillance in order to prevent the development of the pulmonary syndrome.

  6. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples. PMID:26459926

  7. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  8. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  9. Negative pressure pulmonary edema following choking on a cookie.

    PubMed

    Toukan, Yazeed; Gur, Michal; Bentur, Lea

    2016-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy developed severe acute respiratory distress during a school break requiring resuscitative measures. The episode started shortly after a short choking episode with a cookie. History, physical examination, laboratory results, chest X-ray, and clinical course supported the diagnosis of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE occurring outside a hospital setting, especially following a short episode of choking on a cookie, is rarely reported in children. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to pulmonary edema can help in distinguishing NPPE from other causes of fulminant respiratory distress, and especially from other causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E25-E27. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Anti-thymocyte globulin induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema during renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Beena K; Bhosale, Guruprasad P; Shah, Veena R

    2011-10-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (NCPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by simultaneous presence of severe hypoxemia, bilateral alveolar infiltrates on chest radiograph, without evidence of left atrial hypertension/congestive heart failure/fluid overload. The diagnosis of drugrelated NCPE relies upon documented exclusion of other causes of NCPE like gastric aspiration, sepsis, trauma, negative pressure pulmonary edema. We describe a 28year-old, 50 kg male with ASA risk III posted for laparoscopic renal transplantation, who developed NCPE after 4 hours of administration of rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (ATG). He was successfully treated with mechanical ventilatory support and adjuvant therapy. This report emphasizes that this fatal complication may occur with use of ATG.

  11. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with pulmonary edema presenting as respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Yung; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Wong, Kin-Sun; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Jen; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2004-11-01

    Acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis(PSGN) is characterized by an abrupt onset of edema,hypertension, and hematuria. Although the association of pulmonary edema with acute glomerulonephritis has been established, it is uncommon for children with PSGN to present with respiratory distress due to pulmonary edema. We encountered six such patients, aged 6-10 years, during a 10-month period. The demographic data, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, radiographic pictures, and clinical courses were collected. All patients presented to the primary pediatricians with dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates with bilateral pleural effusions on plain chest radiographs that were misinterpreted as pneumonia initially. The diagnosis of PSGN was de-layed until the awareness of the presence of pulmonary edema complicating PSGN. Subsequent urinalysis and blood pressure measurement all showed microscopic hematuria and hypertension. Elevated serum antistreptolysin 0 titers and depressed serum complement C3 levels confirmed the diagnosis of PSGN. Two patients progressed to respiratory failure because of a delayed diagnosis of PSGN. All patients recovered without sequelae following appropriate diuresis and antihypertensive therapy. We conclude that in preschool and school-age children who present with dyspneic respirations and a chest radiograph showing radiographic features of pulmonary edema, proper evaluation including blood pressure recording and urinalysis should be performed immediately. Prompt diagnosis and early therapy of PSGNmay avoid mortality and unnecessary therapeutic intervention.

  12. Neurogenic pulmonary edema: successful treatment with IV phentolamine.

    PubMed

    Davison, Danielle L; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Selassie, Leelie; Tevar, Rahul; Junker, Christopher; Seneff, Michael G

    2012-03-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant CNS insult. The cause is believed to be a surge of catecholamines that results in cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Although there are myriad case reports describing CNS events that are associated with this syndrome, few studies have identified specific treatment modalities. We present a case of NPE caused by an intracranial hemorrhage from a ruptured arteriovenous malformation. We uniquely document a rise and fall of serum catecholamine levels correlating with disease activity and a dramatic clinical response to IV phentolamine.

  13. Asymmetric pulmonary edema after scorpion sting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Razi, Ebrahim; Malekanrad, Elaheh

    2008-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy was referred with acute asymmetric pulmonary edema (APE) four-hour after scorpion sting to Emergency department. On admission, the main clinical manifestations were: dyspnea, tachypnea, and tachycardia. Chest x-ray revealed APE predominantly on the right hemithorax. The patient was treated with oxygen, intravenous frusemide and digoxin and discharged on the sixth hospital day in a good condition. This case report emphasizes the occurrence of asymmetric pulmonary edema after severe scorpion envenomation within few hours immediately after the sting.

  14. Pulmonary edema induced by calcium-channel blockade for tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Bal, Laurence; Thierry, Stéphane; Brocas, Elsa; Adam, Marie; Van de Louw, Andry; Tenaillon, Alain

    2004-09-01

    Nicardipine is used in the treatment of premature labor. There are no previous reports in the anesthesia literature of serious side effects associated with this drug. We report a case of pulmonary edema induced by nicardipine therapy for tocolysis in a pregnant 27-yr-old patient admitted to our hospital for preterm labor with intact membranes at 27 wk of gestation.

  15. Post-anesthetic pulmonary edema in two horses.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, M Johanna; Pang, Daniel S J; Cuvelliez, Sophie G

    2010-03-01

    CASE 1: A two-year old, 462 kg Standard bred horse was anesthetized for arthroscopy and castration. During anesthesia, hyperemia of the mucosal membranes and urticaria were noticed. During 5 hours of anesthesia subcutaneous edema of the eyelids and neck region developed. In the recovery box, the orotracheal (OT) tube was left in situ and secured in place with tape. Following initial attempts to stand, the horse became highly agitated and signs consistent with pulmonary edema developed subsequently. Arterial hypoxemia (PaO(2): 3.7 kPa [28 mmHg]) and hypocapnia (PaCO(2): 3.1 kPa [23 mmHg]) were confirmed. Oxygen and furosemide were administered. The horse was assisted to standing with a sling. Therapy continued with bilateral intra-nasal oxygen insufflation. Ancillary medical therapy included flunixin meglumine, penicillin, gentamycin and dimethylsulfoxide. Following 7 hours of treatment the arterial oxygen tensions began to increase towards normal values. CASE 2: An 11-year old, 528 kg Paint horse was anesthetized for surgery of a submandibular mass. The 4-hour anesthetic period was unremarkable. The OT tube was left in situ for the recovery. During recovery, the horse was slightly agitated and stood after three attempts. Clinical signs consistent with pulmonary edema and arterial hypoxemia (PaO(2): 5 kPa [37.5 mmHg]) subsequently developed following extubation. Respiratory signs resolved with medical therapy, including unilateral nasal oxygen insufflation, furosemide, flunixin meglumine and dimethylsulfoxide. The diagnosis of pulmonary edema in these horses was made by clinical signs and arterial blood-gas analysis. While pulmonary radiographs were not taken to confirm the diagnosis, the clinical signs following anesthesia support the diagnosis in both cases. The etiology of pulmonary edema was most likely multifactorial.

  16. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y( n) = α ṡ n β where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism.

  17. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  18. Aripiprazole induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Mustafa; Celik, Mustafa; Cakıcı, Musa; Polat, Mustafa; Suner, Arif

    2014-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic drug with partial dopamine agonistic activity. Although the adverse cardiovascular effects of both typical and atypical antipsychotics are well known, similar data on aripiprazole, which was recently introduced, are scarce. Herein we report a 35-year-old female that presented to our emergency department with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT showed pulmonary edema and bilateral pleural effusion. Anamnesis showed that she had been taking sertraline 200 mg d-1 for obsessive-compulsive disorder for a long time and that aripiprazole10 mg d-1 was added for augmentation 2 months prior to presentation. We think that the CYP 2D6 inhibitor sertraline might have played a role in increasing the plasma concentration and toxicity of aripiprazole in the presented patient.

  19. [The role of BDNF in brain ischemia pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hui; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Brain ischemia pulmonary edema(BIPE)is a critical type of the neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE), with acute development and progression and high mortality. The study on mechanism of BIPE has important scientific significance and substantial practice values. NPE, as a complicated physiopathology condition, is not resulted from single factor but systemic events including the changes in nervous system, body fluid regulation and endocrine involved in central nervous system after the injury. The studies on this topic in this current issue suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could involve in the pathogenesis procedure of NPE following brain ischemia, which indicated that the crucial role of BDNF in the NPE after BIPE. The findings of these studies pave a way for the treatment of BIPE by using BDNF administration in future clinic trail.

  20. Pulmonary edema following transcatheter closure of atrial septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Chigurupati, Keerthi; Reshmi, Liza Jose; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas; Venkateshwaran, S.; Sreedhar, Rupa

    2015-01-01

    We describe an incident of development of acute pulmonary edema after the device closure of a secundum atrial septal defect in a 52-year-old lady, which was treated with inotropes, diuretics and artificial ventilation. Possibility of acute left ventricular dysfunction should be considered after the defect closure in the middle-aged patients as the left ventricular compliance may be reduced due to increased elastic stiffness and diastolic dysfunction. Baseline left atrial pressure may be > 10 mmHg in these patients. Associated risk factors for the left ventricular dysfunction are a large Qp:Qs ratio, systemic hypertension, severe pulmonary hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. PMID:26139760

  1. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  2. Our patients followed up with a diagnosis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Mehmet Yusuf; Yıldızdaş, Rıza Dinçer; Yükselmiş, Ufuk; Horoz, Özden Ögür

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical situation which developes as a result of central nervous system injury. It is rare in the childhood. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical diagnosis. Although the pathogenesis is not elucidated well, there is increase in pulmonary interstitial and alveolar fluid. The main principle in treatment of neurogenic pulmonary edema is supportive treatment and decreasing intracranial pressure as in acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this article, clinical properties of our two patients diagnosed with neurogenic pulmonary edema developed as a result of central nervous system injury are presented. PMID:26884694

  3. Acute pulmonary edema after diazepam-ketamine in a dog.

    PubMed

    Boutureira, Joseph; Trim, Cynthia M; Cornell, Karen K

    2007-09-01

    An 8-year-old mixed-breed dog was anesthetized for colonoscopy. Moderate sedation was produced by premedication with glycopyrrolate, acepromazine, and hydromorphone, and anesthesia was induced by IV injection of diazepam and ketamine. Frothy, reddish-colored fluid flowed from the endotracheal tube immediately after endotracheal intubation but ceased after several minutes. Furosemide was injected IV. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane in oxygen. Ventilation and arterial blood pressure were satisfactory, however, after oxygen was administered to maintain normal hemoglobin saturation. Radiography revealed changes consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary edema. The following day, ventricular premature contractions developed and atrial dissociation, valvular regurgitation, and pulmonary hypertension were diagnosed on echocardiography. The proposed etiology is either profound transient hypotension and/or pulmonary hypertension induced by ketamine. The cardiac abnormalities that were present the following day suggest that myocardial dysfunction after induction of anesthesia was more severe than was apparent as assessed by routine physical examination and monitoring methods.

  4. Pulmonary Edema Assessed by Ultrasound: Impact in Cardiology and Intensive Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Pablo A; Cianciulli, Tomás F

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary edema is a frequent condition found in adult patients hospitalized in cardiology wards and intensive care units. Ultrasonography is a diagnostic modality with a high sensitivity for the detection of extravascular lung water, visualized as B lines, and usually caused by cardiogenic or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. This paper highlights a simple method for the assessment of patients with pulmonary edema, which allows for a differential diagnosis of its possible mechanism and contributes to therapeutic intervention guiding and monitoring.

  5. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic.

  6. Pulmonary edema following scorpion envenomation: mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Chaari, Anis; Dammak, Hassen; Samet, Mohamed; Chtara, Kamilia; Chelly, Hedi; Ben Hamida, Chokri; Kallel, Hatem; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2013-01-10

    Scorpion envenomation is common in tropical and subtropical regions. Cardio-respiratory manifestations, mainly cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema, are the leading causes of death after scorpion envenomation. The mechanism of pulmonary edema remains unclear and contradictory conclusions were published. However, most publications confirm that pulmonary edema has been attributed to acute left ventricular failure. Cardiac failure can result from massive release of catecholamines, myocardial damage induced by the venom or myocardial ischemia. Factors usually associated with the diagnosis of pulmonary edema were young age, tachypnea, agitation, sweating, or the presence of high plasma protein concentrations. Treatment of scorpion envenomation has two components: antivenom administration and supportive care. The latter mainly targets hemodynamic impairment and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In Latin America, and India, the use of Prazosin is recommended for treatment of pulmonary edema because pulmonary edema is associated with arterial hypertension. However, in North Africa, scorpion leads to cardiac failure with systolic dysfunction with normal vascular resistance and dobutamine was recommended. Dobutamine infusion should be used as soon as we have enough evidence suggesting the presence of pulmonary edema, since it has been demonstrated that scorpion envenomation can result in pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular failure. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation can be required.

  7. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  8. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353–358, 2016.—Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk. PMID:27768392

  9. Acute pulmonary edema secondary to hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Paul, Vishesh; Chadha, Sameer; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, air embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning and gas gangrene with minimal adverse effects. Very few cases of HBOT causing acute pulmonary edema (PE) has been described; with a study on dogs suggesting that a complication of this therapy could be PE. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of stable systolic heart failure and diabetes mellitus presenting with acute PE following treatment with HBOT for diabetic foot. PMID:25988073

  10. Acute pulmonary edema following inflation of arterial tourniquet.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M C B; Pai, R B; Rao, R P

    2014-10-01

    Arterial tourniquets are used as one of the methods for reducing blood loss and for allowing blood free surgical field. A 20-year-old, 45 kg healthy female with a sphere shaped pendunculated hemangioma in the popliteal fossa of her left lower limb was applied with arterial tourniquet after exsanguination. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia. Soon after exsanguination and tourniquet inflation, the patient developed pulmonary edema which subsided after deflating the tourniquet. The clinical evolution, treatment and pathophysiology of this complication are described.

  11. Is high altitude pulmonary edema relevant to Hawai'i?

    PubMed

    Cornell, Seth Lewis

    2014-11-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai'i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema.

  12. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  13. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Associated with Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Masana; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) that occurred immediately after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The patient was a 25-year-old man who sustained a facet fracture-dislocation of C5 during a traffic accident. After ACDF, he developed NPPE and needed mechanical ventilation. Fortunately, he recovered fully within 24 hours. NPPE is a rare postoperative complication that may occur after cervical spine surgery. The aims of this report are to present information regarding the diagnosis and emergent treatment of NPPE, and to review the previous literature regarding this serious complication. PMID:25558327

  14. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in the Setting of Immersion Pulmonary Edema: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Dante; Azuma, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Immersion Pulmonary Edema is a unique medical condition being increasingly described in the medical literature as sudden-onset pulmonary edema in the setting of scuba diving and or swimming. Case reports have associated immersion pulmonary edema with cardiac dysfunction, but there are no known case reports describing submersion pulmonary edema resulting in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We report on three patients with unique presentations of immersion pulmonary edema with associated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. All three cases occurred in O‘ahu, Hawai‘i and were seen by the same cardiologist within a span of seven years. Each patient was scuba diving with sudden dyspnea with pulmonary edema on chest X-ray. Cardiac catheterization revealed no significant epicardial stenosis. Wall motion abnormalities resolved. EKG's showed typical evolution of symmetric T wave inversion. Immersion pulmonary edema and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy may occur together and may be more common than initially thought. Dyspnea has been long known to be stressful as in “waterboarding.” Stressful events are known to trigger Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy should be considered as a possible complication of immersion pulmonary edema and EKG's, troponins, echocardiogram and in the appropriate situation cardiac catheterization should be considered.

  15. Acute pulmonary edema caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman undergoing transvaginal cervical cerclage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Park, Sang-Wook; Lee, Yu-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The physiological changes associated with pregnancy may predispose pregnant women to pulmonary edema. Other known causes of pulmonary edema during pregnancy include tocolytic drugs, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and peripartum cardiomyopathy. Methods: We describe a rare case of pulmonary edema caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman at 14 weeks of gestation who was undergoing emergency transvaginal cervical cerclage. Results: Intraoperative chest radiography revealed severe pulmonary edema and echocardiography indicated moderate left ventricular dysfunction with akinesia of the mid to apical left ventricular wall segment, which is reflective of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Conclusion: With early detection and appropriate management, the patient was stabilized in a relatively short period of time. Based on her clinical signs and symptoms, we suspect that the pulmonary edema was caused by takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:28072695

  16. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Edema Edema Condition Family HealthSeniors Share Edema Table of Contents1. Overview2. Causes3. Diagnosis4. Treatment5. Questions ...

  17. Risk of fatal pulmonary embolism with oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Poulter, N R

    2000-06-17

    This commentary addresses the New Zealand study (case report) of a fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use by L. Parkin and colleagues. The study significantly adds to the knowledge on the relationship between fatal PE and OC use, because most of the evidence up to now has related to nonfatal venous thromboembolic events (VTE). Several areas of the study, however, are criticized. These include the method used, definition, and the adjustment of data. However, these criticisms have been offered explanations in this commentary. It is noted that data from the study indicated that OCs containing desogestrel or gestodene are associated with higher risks of fatal PE than are those containing levonorgestrel. This is consistent with most previous studies comparing the effects of second-generation progestogens on VTE. Overall, data support previous pragmatic recommendations that second-generation pills, which contain levonorgestrel, are the combined OCs of choice.

  18. A Rare Cause of Pulmonary Edema in the Postoperative Period

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Mittadodla, Penchala S.; Colaco, Clinton; Jagana, Rajani

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing longevity of the population, the annual rates of hip arthroplasties performed have been steadily increasing over the past decade. Given the presence of medical comorbidities in the older patients, the peri-operative care of these individuals requires multi-specialty care, now more than ever. Hip arthroplasty is generally well tolerated, with early mortality after the procedure being <1%. Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is an entity that is occasionally encountered during or after the surgery. It is characterized by hypoxemia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiac arrest leading to death, in severe cases. We report a case of a middle-aged female who developed refractory hypotension and pulmonary edema while undergoing hemiarthroplasty for a pathological femoral neck fracture and experienced cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative period. Critical care physicians must familiarize themselves with promptly diagnosing and managing BCIS. PMID:28250610

  19. A Rare Cause of Pulmonary Edema in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Mittadodla, Penchala S; Colaco, Clinton; Jagana, Rajani

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing longevity of the population, the annual rates of hip arthroplasties performed have been steadily increasing over the past decade. Given the presence of medical comorbidities in the older patients, the peri-operative care of these individuals requires multi-specialty care, now more than ever. Hip arthroplasty is generally well tolerated, with early mortality after the procedure being <1%. Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is an entity that is occasionally encountered during or after the surgery. It is characterized by hypoxemia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiac arrest leading to death, in severe cases. We report a case of a middle-aged female who developed refractory hypotension and pulmonary edema while undergoing hemiarthroplasty for a pathological femoral neck fracture and experienced cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative period. Critical care physicians must familiarize themselves with promptly diagnosing and managing BCIS.

  20. [Nursing assessment and management of patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jyuan; Liao, Chieh-Yin; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) is a clinical health problem that induces impaired gas exchange, dyspnea and hypoxia. This serious condition results in acute respiratory failure and high mortality rate. This article suggests an effective approach to CPE patient clinical symptom assessment and management. In accordance with evidence-based methods, we searched Cochrane, CINAHL and ScienceDirect and identified four Oxford Ia or Ib reports that employed a randomized controlled trial, systematic review and meta-analysis. Results suggest that prompt application of a non-invasive positive ventilator, especially continuous positive or bi-level positive airway pressure, can help patients reduce intubation risks, ICU stay days, and mortality rates. The authors hope to see more clinical trials on this topic to support evidence-based clinical nursing care.

  1. [High altitude pulmonary edema. An experiment of nature to study the underlying mechanisms of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary edema in humans].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Jayet, Pierre-Yves; Allemann, Yves; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2007-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the results of high-altitude research may have important implications not only for the understanding of diseases in the millions of people living permanently at high altitude, but also for the treatment of hypoxemia-related disease states in patients living at low altitude. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a life-threatening condition occurring in predisposed, but otherwise healthy subjects, and, therefore, allows to study underlying mechanisms of pulmonary edema in humans, in the absence of confounding factors. Over the past decade, evidence has accumulated that HAPE results from the conjunction of two major defects, augmented alveolar fluid flooding resulting from exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and impaired alveolar fluid clearance related to defective respiratory transepithelial sodium transport. Here, after a brief presentation of the clinical features of HAPE, we review this novel concept. We provide experimental evidence for the novel concept that impaired pulmonary endothelial and epithelial nitric oxide synthesis and/or bioavailability may represent the central underlying defect predisposing to exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and alveolar fluid flooding. We demonstrate that exaggerated pulmonary hypertension, while possibly a condition sine qua non, may not be sufficient to cause HAPE, and how defective alveolar fluid clearance may represent a second important pathogenic mechanism. Finally, we outline how this insight gained from studies in HAPE may be translated into the management of hypoxemia related disease states in general.

  2. Ibuprofen prevents synthetic smoke-induced pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozawa, Y.; Hales, C.; Jung, W.; Burke, J.

    1986-12-01

    Multiple potentially injurious agents are present in smoke but the importance of each of these agents in producing lung injury as well as the mechanisms by which the lung injury is produced are unknown. In order to study smoke inhalation injury, we developed a synthetic smoke composed of a carrier of hot carbon particles of known size to which a single known common toxic agent in smoke, in this case HCI, could be added. We then exposed rats to the smoke, assayed their blood for the metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, and intervened shortly after smoke with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or ibuprofen to see if the resulting lung injury could be prevented. Smoke exposure produced mild pulmonary edema after 6 h with a wet-to-dry weight ratio of 5.6 +/- 0.2 SEM (n = 11) compared with the non-smoke-exposed control animals with a wet-to-dry weight ratio of 4.3 +/- 0.2 (n = 12), p less than 0.001. Thromboxane B, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha rose to 1660 +/- 250 pg/ml (p less than 0.01) and to 600 +/- 100 pg/ml (p greater than 0.1), respectively, in the smoke-injured animals compared with 770 +/- 150 pg/ml and 400 +/- 100 pg/ml in the non-smoke-exposed control animals. Indomethacin (n = 11) blocked the increase in both thromboxane and prostacyclin metabolites but failed to prevent lung edema.

  3. Fatal Pulmonary Embolus After Uterine Artery Fibroid Embolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamoda, Haitham; Tait, P.; Edmonds, D. K.

    2009-09-15

    We report a 44-year-old woman who developed a fatal pulmonary embolus after uterine artery fibroid embolisation (UAE). Bilateral UAE was carried out through a single right-femoral artery puncture. The largest fibroid in the anterior fundal wall measured 4.5 cm, and the largest fibroid in the posterior fundal wall measured 6 cm. The appearances after UAE were satisfactory, and the procedure was apparently uneventful. No immediate complications were noted. The patient developed sudden-onset shortness of breath and went into cardiac arrest 19 h after the procedure. Postmortem autopsy confirmed that the cause of a death was a pulmonary embolism. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the United Kingdom in which death occurred from a pulmonary embolus after UAE.

  4. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage.

  5. [Continuous spectrophotometry as a method to study pulmonary edema in isolated canine pulmonary lobe].

    PubMed

    Palomar Lever, A; Furuya Meguro, M E; Gómez González, A; Martínez Guerra, M L; Gertrudiz Salvador, N; Oppenheimer, L; Sandoval Zárate, J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the spectrophotometric method to the study of pulmonary edema in isolated ex-vivo canine pulmonary lobe preparation. This spectrophotometric method is based on the on-line measure of light transmission in a column of blood, that is proportional to hematocrit. A second light is used to follow Evans blue dyed proteins. With this method we were able to measure the amount of edema in 10 isolated canine lobes. Both the filtration and reflection coefficient of the membrane as well as the characteristics of the filtrate could be calculated. The filtration coefficient was 0.6 +/- 0.4 ml/min (1.3 +/- 0.9 ml/min/100 g pulmonary, tissue) at maximum capillary pressure and the reflection coefficient was 0.53 +/- 0.07. With the spectrophotometric method we have the capability to study different aspects of lung edema formation. This method has the advantage of being exact and independent from pressure and volume induced vascular changes. It also allows the measurement of solute transport.

  6. [Effectiveness of oxygen therapy for pulmonary edema in patients with hypertensive crisis before hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, V T; Epifanov, V G; Lukach, V N

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen therapy, involving the KI-3M respiratory apparatus administered in the positive pressure regimen on expiration (8-10 cm aq. c.), used, before hospitalization, within the complex therapy of patients with pulmonary edema triggered by hypertensive crisis arrests fast enough the pulmonary edema, cuts the working time of an ER crew and promotes the ER efficiency. The key clinical manifestations of pulmonary edema were found to begin to go down on minutes 5 to 10 after the administration of artificial lungs ventilation (ALV) by oxygen with the positive pressure being on expiration end; such signs were totally stopped in 20-25 minutes.

  7. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles ... it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include Eating too much salt Sunburn Heart failure ...

  8. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis and myocardial injury following heroin inhalation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bazoukis, G; Spiliopoulou, A; Mourouzis, K; Grigoropoulou, P; Yalouris, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heroin use by non-injecting routes of administration (snorting, swallowing, “chasing the dragon”) is considered to be safer but is not risk-free for fatal overdose or serious side effects. We report the case of an adolescent who was transferred unconscious to the emergency department after heroin inhalation. Description of the case: A 17-year-old male was transferred to the emergency department unconscious (Glasgow coma scale: 6/15) after heroin inhalation. He was treated with non-rebreather mask and intravenous infusion of naloxone with gradual improvement of consciousness and arterial blood gasses. The chest computed tomography showed signs of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Laboratory exams on the second day of hospitalization showed elevated creatine kinase (CK) and troponin-I levels while his electrocardiography (ECG) showed J-point elevation in V1, V2, and V3 precordial leads. On the second day of hospitalization the pulmonary infiltrates were not present in his chest X-ray while on the eighth day, troponin-I and CK levels were normalized without dynamic ECG changes and the patient was discharged uneventfully. Conclusion: Heroin inhalation may cause severe complications, such as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis or myocardial injury. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 84-87 PMID:27895451

  9. Refractory Pulmonary Edema Caused by Late Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis After Lung Transplantation: A Rare Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve J; Rischin, Adam; McGiffin, David; Williams, Trevor J; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg

    2016-09-01

    After lung transplantation, pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially life-threatening adverse event arising at the pulmonary venous anastomosis that typically occurs early and presents as graft failure and hemodynamic compromise with an associated mortality of up to 40%. The incidence, presentation, outcomes, and treatment of late pulmonary vein thrombosis remain poorly defined. Management options include anticoagulant agents for asymptomatic clots, and thrombolytic agents or surgical thrombectomy for hemodynamically significant clots. We present a rare case highlighting a delayed presentation of pulmonary vein thrombosis occurring longer than 2 weeks after lung transplantation and manifesting clinically as graft failure secondary to refractory pulmonary edema. The patient was treated successfully with surgical thrombectomy and remains well. We recommend a high index of suspicion of pulmonary vein thrombosis when graft failure after lung transplantation occurs and is not responsive to conventional therapy, and consideration of investigation with transesophageal echocardiography or computed tomography with venous phase contrast in such patients even more than 2 weeks after lung transplantation.

  10. Emergent Unilateral Renal Artery Stenting for Treatment of Flash Pulmonary Edema: Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad Akbar; McFadden, Eugene Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Flash pulmonary edema is characteristically sudden in onset with rapid resolution once appropriate therapy has been instituted (Messerli et al., 2011). Acute increase of left ventricular (LV) end diastolic pressure is the usual cause of sudden decompensated cardiac failure in this patient population. Presence of bilateral renal artery stenosis or unilateral stenosis in combination with a single functional kidney in the susceptible cohort is usually blamed for this condition. We describe a patient who presented with flash pulmonary edema in the setting of normal coronary arteries. Our case is distinct as our patient developed flash pulmonary edema secondary to unilateral renal artery stenosis in the presence of bilateral functioning kidneys. Percutaneous stent implantation in the affected renal artery resulted in rapid resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:25793128

  11. [Cardiogenic pulmonary edema - truth and myths in the perspective of emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Osterwalder, J J

    2012-09-19

    This critical analysis of the traditional pathophysiological approach to the diagnosis and treatment of cardiogenic pulmonary edema calls into question some long-established ideas and interventions that ought to be replaced by better evidence-based concepts.

  12. Management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) is a pathology frequently seen in patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) and can usually be attributed to preexisting cardiovascular disease. Heart failure alone accounts for more than 1 million hospital admissions annually and has one of the highest ED morbidity and mortality to date (). Historically, CPE has been managed by the treating clinician in a manner that is based largely on anecdotal evidence. Furosemide (Lasix), morphine, and nitroglycerin have historically been the baseline standard for drug therapy in CPE management. A lack of drastic improvement in the patient's condition over the course of the ED visit may reflect a management style that results in higher morbidity and mortality for CPE patients. Several recent articles provide evidence-based outcomes that suggest changing standard therapy along with the adjunctive use of other medications. These articles also describe treatment modalities that result in a marked improvement in the management of patients with CPE along with decreases in adverse outcomes and hospital length of stay. The goal of this article is to present a summary of the evidence regarding the management of CPE and discuss the implications for current practice.

  13. Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema after Amlodipine Overdose without Refractory Hypotension and Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Hedaiaty, M.; Eizadi-Mood, N.; Sabzghabaee, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Amlodipine overdose can be life-threatening when manifesting as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment remains challenging. We describe a case of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema without refractory hypotension and bradycardia after ingestion of 500 milligram amlodipine with suicidal intent. Mechanical ventilation, dexamethasone, atrovent HFA (ipratropium), pulmicort inhalation, and antibiotic therapy were used for the management. Length of hospital stay was 11 days. The patient was discharged with full recovery. PMID:26075111

  14. Profiling of ARDS Pulmonary Edema Fluid Identifies a Metabolically Distinct Subset.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Angela J; Contrepois, Kevin; Wu, Manhong; Zheng, Ming; Peltz, Gary; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-03-03

    There is considerable biologic and physiologic heterogeneity among patients who meet standard clinical criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that there exists a sub-group of ARDS patients who exhibit a metabolically distinct profile. We examined undiluted pulmonary edema fluid obtained at the time of endotracheal intubation from 16 clinically phenotyped ARDS patients and 13 control patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Non-targeted metabolic profiling was carried out on the undiluted edema fluid. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses including principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) were conducted to find discriminant metabolites. 760 unique metabolites were identified in the pulmonary edema fluid of these 29 patients. We found that a subset of ARDS patients (6/16, 38%) presented a distinct metabolic profile with the overrepresentation of 235 metabolites compared to edema fluid from the other 10 ARDS patients, whose edema fluid metabolic profile was indistinguishable from those of the 13 control patients with hydrostatic edema. This "high metabolite" endotype was characterized by higher concentrations of metabolites belonging to all of the main metabolic classes including lipids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. This distinct group with high metabolite levels in the edema fluid was also associated with a higher mortality rate. Thus, metabolic profiling of the edema fluid of ARDS patients supports the hypothesis that there is considerable biologic heterogeneity among ARDS patients who meet standard clinical and physiologic criteria for ARDS.

  15. Prevalence of pulmonary edema among the deceased cases with acute Methadone poisoning: A report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Naeini, Seyed Amir Hossein Madani; Hedaiaty, Mahrang; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Moudi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Methadone poisoning is common in our society, mainly in drug addicts. One of its lethal complications is pulmonary edema. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of pulmonary edema in the deceased cases with methadone poisoning and its possible relationship with some medical variables. Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was done in 2014, we have investigated the deceased patients with methadone toxicity who underwent autopsy at Isfahan Forensic Medicine Department (Iran). All variables including age, gender, and autopsy findings were recorded and analyzed. Demographic characteristics and medical complications of the patients were compared between the patients with or without pulmonary edema in the autopsy findings. Findings: There were 64 cases who died with methadone poisoning during the 1-year study period. The average age of cases (±standard deviation) was 32.1 ± 10.29 years, among which 92.2% were male. Based on the autopsy findings, 64.1% were diagnosed with pulmonary edema. There was no statistically significant relationship between pulmonary edema and age, gender, history of addiction, and hepatic or cardiovascular complications. Conclusion: Pulmonary edema is a common finding in deceased methadone poisoning cases and must be considered and ruled out in patients with acute methadone toxicity. PMID:27843967

  16. Transthoracic lung ultrasound in normal dogs and dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Pariaut, Romain; Pate, Julie; Saelinger, Carley; Kearney, Michael T; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is the most common complication of left-sided heart failure in dogs and early detection is important for effective clinical management. In people, pulmonary edema is commonly diagnosed based on transthoracic ultrasonography and detection of B line artifacts (vertical, narrow-based, well-defined hyperechoic rays arising from the pleural surface). The purpose of this study was to determine whether B line artifacts could also be useful diagnostic predictors for cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. Thirty-one normal dogs and nine dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were prospectively recruited. For each dog, presence or absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema was based on physical examination, heartworm testing, thoracic radiographs, and echocardiography. A single observer performed transthoracic ultrasonography in all dogs and recorded video clips and still images for each of four quadrants in each hemithorax. Distribution, sonographic characteristics, and number of B lines per thoracic quadrant were determined and compared between groups. B lines were detected in 31% of normal dogs (mean 0.9 ± 0.3 SD per dog) and 100% of dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (mean 6.2 ± 3.8 SD per dog). Artifacts were more numerous and widely distributed in dogs with congestive heart failure (P < 0.0001). In severe cases, B lines increased in number and became confluent. The locations of B line artifacts appeared consistent with locations of edema on radiographs. Findings from the current study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography and detection of B lines as techniques for diagnosing cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs.

  17. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  18. Perforin expression by CD8 T cells is sufficient to cause fatal brain edema during experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Matthew; Johnson, Holly L; Jin, Fang; N'Songo, Aurelie; Hanson, Lisa M; LaFrance, Stephanie J; Butler, Noah S; Harty, John T; Johnson, Aaron J

    2017-03-06

    Human cerebral malaria (HCM) is a serious complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. The most severe outcomes for patients include coma, permanent neurological deficits, and death. Recently, a large-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in humans identified brain swelling as the most prominent predictor of fatal HCM. Therefore, in this study we sought to define the mechanism controlling brain edema through the use of the murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model. Specifically, we investigated the ability of CD8 T cells to initiate brain edema during ECM. We determined that areas of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability colocalized with a reduction of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. Furthermore, through small animal MRI we analyzed edema and vascular leakage. Using gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MRI we determined that vascular permeability is not homogeneous, but rather confined to specific regions of the brain. Our findings show that BBB permeability was localized within the brainstem, olfactory bulb, and lateral ventricle. Concurrently with the initiation of vascular permeability, T2-weighted MRI revealed edema and brain swelling. Importantly, ablation of the cytolytic effector molecule perforin fully protected against vascular permeability and edema. Furthermore, perforin production specifically by CD8 T cells was required to cause fatal edema during ECM. We propose that CD8 T cells initiate BBB breakdown through perforin mediated disruption of tight junctions. In turn, leakage from the vasculature into the parenchyma causes brain swelling and edema. This results in a breakdown of homeostatic maintenance that likely contributes to ECM pathology.

  19. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension and lung edema at high altitude. Role of endothelial dysfunction and fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Allemann, Yves; Rexhaj, Emrush; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2012-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. While initially, the aim of high-altitude research was to understand the adaptation of the organism to hypoxia and find treatments for altitude-related diseases, over the past decade or so, the scope of this research has broadened considerably. Two important observations led to the foundation for the broadening of the scientific scope of high-altitude research. First, high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) represents a unique model which allows studying fundamental mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension and lung edema in humans. Secondly, the ambient hypoxia associated with high-altitude exposure facilitates the detection of pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction at an early stage. Here, we review studies that, by capitalizing on these observations, have led to the description of novel mechanisms underpinning lung edema and pulmonary hypertension and to the first direct demonstration of fetal programming of vascular dysfunction in humans.

  1. [The x-ray diagnosis of a predisposition to nephrogenic pulmonary edema in glomerulonephritis patients].

    PubMed

    Kamenetskiĭ, M S; Pervak, M B; Tkachenko, G D; Vernikov, B L

    1995-01-01

    To develop criteria for determining predisposition to pulmonary edema in patients with glomerulonephritis, clinical, laboratory and X-ray examinations were made in 697 patients with glomerulonephritis at different stages of its development. X-ray examination included chest tele X-ray and its densitometric analysis. Twenty two patients underwent computerized tomography with histographic analysis. In 106 patients, X-ray findings were compared with the volume of circulating blood, cardiac and stroke indices. Changes in the lungs and pleural cavities were found in 22.7%, pulmonary edema was revealed in 15.7% of the patients. The prognostically unfavourable criteria for the development of pulmonary edema were found to be Stage II pulmonary venous hypertension with hypervolemia and peripheral edemas. The densitometrically detected increase in the density of the lower lungs in patients with Stage II venous hypertension suggests early manifestations of interstitial edema of the lung and the narrowing of the histogram angle limited by its ascending and descending lines is indicative of the fact that interstitial edema progresses to alveolar one.

  2. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... one position for too long Eating too much salty food Premenstrual signs and symptoms Pregnancy Edema can ... Do you restrict your intake of salt and salty foods? Do you drink alcohol? Do you seem ...

  3. Increased pulmonary vascular permeability as a cause of re-expansion edema in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlin, D.J.; Nessly, M.L.; Cheney, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism(s) underlying re-expansion edema, we measured the concentration of labeled albumin (RISA) in the extravascular, extracellular water (EVECW) of the lung as a measure of pulmonary vascular permeability. Re-expansion edema was first induced by rapid re-expansion of rabbit lungs that had been collapsed for 1 wk by pneumothorax. The RISA in EVECW was expressed as a fraction of its plasma concentration: (RISA)L/(RISA)PL. The volume of EVECW (ml/gm dry lung) was measured using a /sup 24/Na indicator. Results in re-expansion edema were compared with normal control lungs and with oleic acid edema as a model of permeability edema. In re-expanded lungs, EVECW (3.41 +/- SD 1.24 ml/g) and (RISA)L/(RISA)PL 0.84 +/- SD 0.15) were significantly increased when compared with normal control lungs (2.25 +/- 0.41 ml/g and 0.51 +/- 0.20, respectively). Results in oleic acid edema (5.66 +/- 2.23 ml/g and 0.84 +/- 0.23) were similar to re-expansion edema. This suggested that re-expansion edema is due to increased pulmonary vascular permeability caused by mechanical stresses applied to the lung during re-expansion.

  4. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  5. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-07-21

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES.

  6. Beta-adrenergic agonist therapy accelerates the resolution of hydrostatic pulmonary edema in sheep and rats.

    PubMed

    Frank, J A; Wang, Y; Osorio, O; Matthay, M A

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether beta-adrenergic agonist therapy increases alveolar liquid clearance during the resolution phase of hydrostatic pulmonary edema, we studied alveolar and lung liquid clearance in two animal models of hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Hydrostatic pulmonary edema was induced in sheep by acutely elevating left atrial pressure to 25 cmH(2)O and instilling 6 ml/kg body wt isotonic 5% albumin (prepared from bovine albumin) in normal saline into the distal air spaces of each lung. After 1 h, sheep were treated with a nebulized beta-agonist (salmeterol) or nebulized saline (controls), and left atrial pressure was then returned to normal. beta-Agonist therapy resulted in a 60% increase in alveolar liquid clearance over 3 h (P < 0.001). Because the rate of alveolar fluid clearance in rats is closer to human rates, we studied beta-agonist therapy in rats, with hydrostatic pulmonary edema induced by volume overload (40% body wt infusion of Ringer lactate). beta-Agonist therapy resulted in a significant decrease in excess lung water (P < 0.01) and significant improvement in arterial blood gases by 2 h (P < 0.03). These preclinical experimental studies support the need for controlled clinical trials to determine whether beta-adrenergic agonist therapy would be of value in accelerating the resolution of hydrostatic pulmonary edema in patients.

  7. Swimming-induced immersion pulmonary edema while snorkeling can be rapidly life-threatening: case reports.

    PubMed

    Cochard, G; Henckes, A; Deslandes, S; Noël-Savina, E; Bedossa, M; Gladu, G; Ozier, Y

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that immersion pulmonary edema can be life-threatening for divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). Swimming-induced pulmonary edema in otherwise healthy individuals is not an object of dispute but its real severity is not well known and is probably underestimated. We report two cases of life-threatening acute respiratory distress while swimming and snorkeling, one of which is well documented for swimming-induced pulmonary edema. The interest of these case reports lies in the suddenness of these life-threatening events. Such accidents can mimic a loss of consciousness due to cardiac dysrhythmia and lead to drowning. In the case of swimming-induced pulmonary edema, the prognosis is far better than for a cardiac disorder, but it is also dependent on the efficiency of the supervision. Swimmers, divers, race organizers and supervising physicians should be given knowledge of this pathology and its potentially acute occurrence. Adequate organizational dispositions are mandatory to prevent swimming-induced pulmonary edema-related deaths.

  8. Platelet-rich plasma extract prevents pulmonary edema through angiopoietin-Tie2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Mammoto, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular permeability contributes to life-threatening pathological conditions, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Current treatments for sepsis-induced pulmonary edema rely on low-tidal volume mechanical ventilation, fluid management, and pharmacological use of a single angiogenic or chemical factor with antipermeability activity. However, it is becoming clear that a combination of multiple angiogenic/chemical factors rather than a single factor is required for maintaining stable and functional blood vessels. We have demonstrated that mouse platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extract contains abundant angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and multiple other factors (e.g., platelet-derived growth factor), which potentially stabilize vascular integrity. Here, we show that PRP extract increases tyrosine phosphorylation levels of Tunica internal endothelial cell kinase (Tie2) and attenuates disruption of cell-cell junctional integrity induced by inflammatory cytokine in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Systemic injection of PRP extract also increases Tie2 phosphorylation in mouse lung and prevents endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema and the consequent decreases in lung compliance and exercise intolerance resulting from endotoxin challenge. Soluble Tie2 receptor, which inhibits Ang-Tie2 signaling, suppresses the ability of PRP extract to inhibit pulmonary edema in mouse lung. These results suggest that PRP extract prevents endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema mainly through Ang-Tie2 signaling, and PRP extract could be a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced pulmonary edema and various lung diseases caused by abnormal vascular permeability.

  9. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-09-23

    BACKGROUND Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. CASE REPORT We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome.

  10. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 35 Final Diagnosis: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Seizures Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean section Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. Case Report: We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. Conclusions: Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome. PMID:27658947

  11. Cocaine-induced myocardial infarction associated with severe reversible systolic dysfunction and pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Arzola-Castañer, Daniel; Johnson, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) associated to cocaine use was originally reported in 1982 and cases are being encountered more frequently in our milieu. The literature regarding this diagnosis has included mostly cases of cocaine associated chest pain and MI without serious sequelae. A lesser number of reports however focus on the clinical presentation of severe myocardial dysfunction and severe pulmonary edema, with the mechanism for pulmonary edema still being debated. Although previously described individually, these manifestations are thought to be an uncommon complication of cocaine ingestion. In this article the subject is reviewed and we report our experience with two patients that presented to our care with severe pulmonary edema and concomitant severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction that resolved spontaneously with supportive therapy. It is felt that this clinical picture after cocaine use may be more common than expected. In this article we discuss the possible mechanisms associated to this presentation as well as review the literature regarding this subject.

  12. Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema in a Dog Following Initiation of Therapy for Concurrent Hypoadrenocorticism and Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Paik, Jooyae; Kang, Ji-Houn; Chang, Dongwoo; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    A 5 yr old intact female cocker spaniel dog weighing 7.8 kg was referred with anorexia, vomiting, and depression. At referral, the dog was diagnosed initially with typical hypoadrenocorticism, and 2 d later, concurrent primary hypothyroidism was detected. Hormonal replacement therapies, including fludrocortisone, prednisolone, and levothyroxine, were initiated, but a few days later the dog became abruptly tachypneic, and thoracic radiographs indicated the development of pulmonary edema. Echocardiography showed that there were abnormalities indicating impaired left ventricular function, although the heart valves were normal. Following treatment with pimobendan and furosemide, the pulmonary edema resolved. The dog had no recurrence of the clinical signs after 10 mo of follow-up, despite being off all cardiac medications; consequently, the cardiac failure was transient or reversible in this dog. The case report describes the stepwise diagnosis and successful treatment of cardiogenic pulmonary edema after initiation of hormonal replacement therapy for concurrent hypoadrenocorticism and hypothyroidism in a dog.

  13. [Cardiogenic pulmonary edema following β2 agonist infusion for acute, severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, M; Chaari, A; Dammak, H; Medhioub, F; Abid, L; Chtourou, K; Rekik, N; Chelly, H; Kallel, H; Bouaziz, M

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a severe acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of salbutamol to a patient admitted for severe asthma. The diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was suspected on the clinical examination, chest radiography, biological (plasmatic Pro-BNP rate) and echocardiographic findings. Rapid improvement under dobutamine and mechanical ventilation argue in favour of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The young age of our patient, the absence of history of cardiovascular disease and the chronology of this complication onset regarded to salbutamol infusion could suggest β2 agonist involvement in this event. The improvement of cardiac function on echocardiography and the normal results obtained with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy performed 35 days later show the left ventricular reversible dysfunction.

  14. New Developments in the Pathogenesis of Smoke Inhalation-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Witten, Mark L.; Quan, Stuart F.; Sobonya, Richard E.; Lemen, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Smoke inhalation causes most of the deaths in fire-related injuries, with pulmonary edema as a major determinant in the outcome of smoke-inhalation injury. The pathophysiology of pulmonary edema is thought to be related to the products of incomplete combustion. Damage to the integrity of the alveolar epithelium is one of the determinants of the development of smoke-induced pulmonary edema. In recent studies using lung clearance of aerosolized pentetic acid (DTPA [diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid]) labeled with technetium Tc 99m to assess the permeability of the alveolar epithelium, several factors were identified that may increase a person's susceptibility to smoke-induced acute lung injury. These are increased initial alveolar permeability and alterations in the number and activity of alveolar macrophages. Clinical measurement of 99mTcDTPA clearance may provide a sensitive and convenient method for the early detection and serial assessment of smoke-induced alveolar epithelial permeability changes. Images PMID:3277334

  15. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after nasal fracture reduction in an obese female patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunkyung; Yi, Junggu; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well-known life-threatening complication of acute upper airway obstruction (UAO) which develops after general anesthesia. The pronounced inspiratory efforts following UAO lead to excessive negative inspiratory pressure, which may cause acute pulmonary edema. Early recognition and prompt treatment of NPPE is necessary to prevent patient morbidity and mortality. In addition, the physician should carefully manage the patient who has risk factors of UAO to prevent this situation. We experienced a case of NPPE following laryngospasm after tracheal extubation in an obese patient who underwent open reduction of orbital wall and nasal bone surgery. PMID:26316826

  16. A case of negative pressure pulmonary edema in an asthmatic patient after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Asim; Palaria, Urmila; Rani, Dolly; Sharma, Shatrunjay

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema is often misdiagnosed or can go clinically unrecognized by anesthesiologists. It is characterized by a markedly low intrapleural pressure which leads to exudation of fluid and red blood cells in the interstitium. Recognition of patients with predisposing factors for upper airway obstruction is important in the diagnosis which is often confused with pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Signs and symptoms are subtle and edema is usually self-limited. Our patient was management conservatively with maintenance of a patent airway and administration of supplemental oxygen and had a successful outcome. PMID:25886111

  17. Hypothyroidism and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema: are we missing something here?

    PubMed Central

    Nikolla, Dhimitri; Metta, V V S Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a 42-year-old female with a history of hypothyroidism and asthma presenting with progressive dyspnea and orthopnea after 2 days of an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Based on the clinical and radiological findings, the patient was admitted as a case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to possible viral myocarditis. However, a normal brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level with a normal ejection fraction (EF) on echocardiogram changed our working diagnosis from cardiogenic to non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Further questioning revealed a history of nocturnal snoring, frequent awakening, and daytime fatigue, suggesting a possible sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). In conclusion, we believe that SAS was the missing link between our patient's hypothyroidism and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Learning points Always keep an open mind and look for a pathology that would explain the whole clinical scenario.The involvement of the respiratory system in hypothyroidism can range from SAS, pulmonary hypertension, hypoventilation, and severe respiratory failure.Hypothyroidism and SAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema.Patients should be instructed to take levothyroxine on an empty stomach 30–60 min before food to avoid erratic absorption of the hormone. PMID:25866647

  18. Epithelial sodium channel is involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yixin; Su, Chenglei; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Huazhong; Zhu, Baoli; Zhang, Hengdong; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema is one of the major outcomes of exposure to high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, the mechanisms involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema are still poorly understood. Therefore, the present study is designed to evaluate the role of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to sublethal concentrations of inhaled H2S, then the pulmonary histological and lung epithelial cell injury were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin staining and electron microscopy, respectively. In addition to morphological investigation, our results also revealed that H2S exposure significantly decreased the alveolar fluid clearance and increased the lung tissue wet-dry ratio. These changes were demonstrated to be associated with decreased ENaC expression. Furthermore, the extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1/2 pathway was demonstrated to be implicated in H2S-mediated ENaC expression, because PD98059, an ERK1/2 antagonist, significantly mitigated H2S-mediated ENaC down-regulation. Therefore, our results show that ENaC might represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of acute pulmonary edema induced by H2S and other hazardous gases.

  19. New concepts about the pathophysiology of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Staub, N C

    1988-07-01

    Three new concepts concerning lung liquid and protein exchange are considered. The first is that the microvascular surface area is as important as the microvascular hydrostatic pressure in assessing filtration in the lung. One of the problems in differentiating hemodynamic from increased permeability edema is the inability to determine whether the microvascular surface area has changed. Several agents, as well as exercise, affect liquid filtration. A new, dynamic procedure that is more sensitive for the detection of increased permeability than static measurements of lung water content is described, along with its limitations. The second concept is that water and electrolytes are cleared from the alveoli by a separate mechanism from protein. Water clearance is fast and occurs mainly by an active process, which can be inhibited by amiloride or phloridzin and accelerated by beta-agonists. The mechanism appears to depend on metabolically regulated sodium transport across the alveolar epithelium. Protein clearance is very slow and is relatively independent of alveolar concentration. The protein clearance mechanism is unknown but may involve transcytosis. The third concept is that during edema formation there are two pathways for liquid clearance in addition to the lymphatic system: into the pleural space and along the bronchovascular connective tissue into the mediastinum. During recovery from edema, reabsorption into blood is important if the edema liquid has a low protein osmotic pressure. Clearance into the mediastinum may be the major pathway for liquid sequestered in the loose, binding connective tissue.

  20. Efficacy of pimobendan on survival and reoccurrence of pulmonary edema in canine congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masashi; YAMANO, Shigeki; CHIMURA, Shuichi; HIRAKAWA, Atsushi; TAKUSAGAWA, Yoshimi; SAWADA, Tamotsu; MAETANI, Shigeki; TAKAHASHI, Arane; MIZUNO, Takeshi; HARADA, Kayoko; SHINODA, Asako; UCHIDA, Shuhei; TAKEUCHI, Junichiro; MIZUKOSHI, Takahiro; ENDO, Masaaki; UECHI, Masami

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pimobendan with conventional therapies on survival and reocurrence of pulmonary edema in dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF) caused by myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Records of 197 client-owned dogs from 14 veterinary hospitals were included in this study. Dogs were administered conventional treatments with or without pimobendan. Sixty-four dogs received a standard dose of pimobendan (0.20–0.48 mg/kg every 12 hr (q12hr)), 49 dogs received a low dose of pimobendan (0.05–0.19 mg/kg q12hr), and 84 dogs received conventional therapy alone. Dogs in the standard-dose and low-dose pimobendan groups had significantly longer median survival times than dogs in the conventional group (334, 277 and 136 days, respectively; P<0.001). The reoccurrence rate of pulmonary edema in the standard-dose group was significantly lower than in the low-dose and conventional groups (43%, 59% and 62%, respectively; P<0.05). Combination of pimobendan with a conventional treatment regimen significantly prolonged survival time after an initial episode of pulmonary edema in dogs with CHF caused by MMVD. There was no difference in survival between dogs administered standard and low doses of pimobendan, but pimobendan did prevent the reoccurrence of pulmonary edema in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27644192

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of presumptive postobstructive pulmonary edema in a Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi).

    PubMed

    Fiorello, Christine V; Cunningham, Mark W; Cantwell, Shauna L; Levy, Julie K; Neer, Erin M; Conley, Kenneth; Rist, Paul M

    2007-06-01

    A free-ranging, adult male Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) was immobilized and evaluated for hematuria following routine capture. Prior to anesthetic recovery, the panther was fitted with a telemetry collar. After an initially quiet recovery, the panther began thrashing in the transport cage, and was again immobilized. Pink foam was evident from the nostrils, and crackles were ausculted over the chest, indicating pulmonary edema. Postobstructive pulmonary edema was diagnosed based on history, clinical signs, radiographic evaluation, and blood gas analysis. The animal was treated intensively for several hours with diuretics, oxygen, and manual ventilation. The panther responded rapidly to therapy and was released back into the wild 48 hr after presentation. Postobstructive pulmonary edema, also called negative-pressure pulmonary edema, may be underrecognized in veterinary medicine. In this case, the telemetry collar, in conjunction with anesthetic recovery in a small transport crate, may have contributed to tracheal obstruction. Wildlife veterinarians and biologists should be aware of the risk of airway obstruction when placing tracking collars, and animals should be continuously monitored during anesthetic recovery to ensure the presence of a patent airway.

  2. Efficacy of pimobendan on survival and reoccurrence of pulmonary edema in canine congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masashi; Yamano, Shigeki; Chimura, Shuichi; Hirakawa, Atsushi; Takusagawa, Yoshimi; Sawada, Tamotsu; Maetani, Shigeki; Takahashi, Arane; Mizuno, Takeshi; Harada, Kayoko; Shinoda, Asako; Uchida, Shuhei; Takeuchi, Junichiro; Mizukoshi, Takahiro; Endo, Masaaki; Uechi, Masami

    2017-01-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pimobendan with conventional therapies on survival and reocurrence of pulmonary edema in dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF) caused by myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Records of 197 client-owned dogs from 14 veterinary hospitals were included in this study. Dogs were administered conventional treatments with or without pimobendan. Sixty-four dogs received a standard dose of pimobendan (0.20-0.48 mg/kg every 12 hr (q12hr)), 49 dogs received a low dose of pimobendan (0.05-0.19 mg/kg q12hr), and 84 dogs received conventional therapy alone. Dogs in the standard-dose and low-dose pimobendan groups had significantly longer median survival times than dogs in the conventional group (334, 277 and 136 days, respectively; P<0.001). The reoccurrence rate of pulmonary edema in the standard-dose group was significantly lower than in the low-dose and conventional groups (43%, 59% and 62%, respectively; P<0.05). Combination of pimobendan with a conventional treatment regimen significantly prolonged survival time after an initial episode of pulmonary edema in dogs with CHF caused by MMVD. There was no difference in survival between dogs administered standard and low doses of pimobendan, but pimobendan did prevent the reoccurrence of pulmonary edema in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. RADIOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF PRESUMED NONCARDIOGENIC PULMONARY EDEMA AND CORRELATION WITH THE UNDERLYING CAUSE IN DOGS AND CATS.

    PubMed

    Bouyssou, Sarah; Specchi, Swan; Desquilbet, Loïc; Pey, Pascaline

    2016-12-22

    Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is an important cause of respiratory disease in dogs and cats but few reports describe its radiographic appearance. The purpose of this retrospective case series study was to describe radiographic findings in a large cohort of dogs and cats with presumed noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and to test associations among radiographic findings versus cause of edema. Medical records were retrieved for dogs and cats with presumed noncardiogenic edema based on history, radiographic findings, and outcome. Radiographs were reviewed to assess lung pattern and distribution of the edema. Correlation with the cause of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema was evaluated with a Fisher's exact test. A total of 49 dogs and 11 cats were included. Causes for the noncardiogenic edema were airway obstruction (n = 23), direct pulmonary injury (n = 13), severe neurologic stimulation (n = 12), systemic disease (n = 6), near-drowning (n = 3), anaphylaxis (n = 2) and blood transfusion (n = 1). Mixed, symmetric, peripheral, multifocal, bilateral, and dorsal lung patterns were observed in 44 (73.3%), 46 (76.7%), 55 (91.7%), 46 (76.7%), 46 (76.7%), and 34 (57.6%) of 60 animals, respectively. When the distribution was unilateral, pulmonary infiltration involved mainly the right lung lobes (12 of 14, 85.7%). Increased pulmonary opacity was more often asymmetric, unilateral, and dorsal for postobstructive pulmonary edema compared to other types of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, but no other significant correlations could be identified. In conclusion, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema may present with a quite variable radiographic appearance in dogs and cats.

  4. Update on pulmonary edema: the role and regulation of endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C E; Lum, H

    2001-01-01

    Discovery of the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary edema and identification of effective strategies for prevention remain significant clinical concerns. Endothelial barrier function is a key component for maintenance of the integrity of the vascular boundary in the lung, particularly since the gas exchange surface area of the alveolar-capillary membrane is large. This review is focused on new insights in the pulmonary endothelial response to injury and recovery, reversible activation by edemagenic agents, and the biochemical/structural basis for regulation of endothelial barrier function. This information is discussed in the context of fundamental concepts of lung fluid balance and pulmonary function.

  5. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema complicating electroconvulsive therapy: short review of the pathophysiology and diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Manne, Janaki R; Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-08-01

    Acute pulmonary edema complicating electroconvulsive therapy is an extremely uncommon event that has rarely been described in the literature. Different theories, including one suggesting a cardiogenic component, have been proposed to explain its genesis. The present report describes a classic presentation of this condition with review of its potential mechanisms and diagnostic approach. After successful completion of a session of electroconvulsive therapy, a 42-year-old woman with major depressive disorder developed acute systemic high blood pressure, shortness of breath, and hemoptysis. A chest radiograph demonstrated diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Initially cardiogenic pulmonary edema was presumed, but an extensive diagnostic work-up demonstrated normal systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and with only supportive measures, a complete clinical and radiographic recovery was achieved within 48 hours. The present case does not support any cardiogenic mechanism in the genesis of this condition.

  6. ["Flash" pulmonary edema as a clinical manifestation of renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kalimonovska-Ostrić, Dimitra; Ivanović, Branislava; Ostrić, Vladimir; Knezivić, Vesna; Stojanov, Vesna; Simić, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    One of the clinical manifestations of renovascular hypertension (RVH) may be a recurrent pulmonary oedema both in the absence or in the presence of systolic left ventricular dysfunction. This type of pulmonary oedema characterized as "flash" pulmonary oedema is ascribed to elevated angiotensin II concentrations with consequent hypertension as well as to volume overload resulting from decreased pressor natriuresis when there are significant stenoses of both or one renal arteries. The investigation included 30 patients with RVH treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the stenosed renal artery (PTRA) and/or stent implantation (PTR-ST) and 30 patients with surgical resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The first group was divided in two subgroups according to the etiology of renal artery stenosis (RAS). In the subgroup with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) the mean age was 37.5 years, in the subgroup with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) 54.8 years and in the group with operated AAA 68.6 years. There were more females than males only in the FMD subgroup (10:3). Two patients of the first group experienced pulmonary oedema, both in the subgroup with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis associated with atherosclerosis of other arteries. Normalization of the blood pressure following PTRA in both and an uncomplicated course after a surgical myocardial revascularization in one of them illustrates the importance of renal revascularization. Pulmonary oedema occurred preoperatively in four out of 30 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm in whom significant renal artery stenoses coexisted. Two patients died despite surgery, one patient is clinically stable and the medicament treatment of heart failure is inevitable in the fourth with a left ventricular aneurysm following myocardial infarction. The occurrence or recurrence of pulmonary oedema in the absence of other explanation should suggest the possibility of bilateral or unilateral renal

  7. Concurrent early-onset peripartum cardiomyopathy in a preeclampsia patient with acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Belen, Erdal; Tipi, Fahri Fatih; Helvaci, Aysen; Bayyigit, Akif

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a preeclampsia patient with comorbid peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCMP). A 22-year-old woman in the 26th week of gestation was admitted with acute pulmonary edema. Hypertension and proteinuria were detected, and echocardiography showed an ejection fraction of 33%. It is remarkable that PPCMP particularly that associated with preeclampsia was observed in the early gestational period. In conclusion, while dyspnea and pretibial edema are often noted during normal pregnancies, the potential for PPCMP should be considered if these symptoms are excessive and/or comorbid paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and orthopnea are present, even in patients with preeclampsia.

  8. [Hyponatremic encephalopathy with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Development following marathon run].

    PubMed

    Wellershoff, G

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the case of a 52-year-old woman who developed exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) complicated by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema after a marathon run. The condition of EAH is a potentially life-threatening complication of endurance exercise. The main cause seems to be inadequate intake of free water during or following exercise with enduring antidiuresis due to nonosmotic stimulation of ADH secretion. Known risk factors are female gender, slow running pace and lack of weight loss. Emergency therapy is fluid restriction and bolus infusion of 3% NaCl solution to rapidly reduce brain edema.

  9. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F; Hoyle, Gary W

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury.

  10. Nifedipine for Treatment of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-30

    cohsistent effect on spirometry. In addition, we undertook a survey of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) at high altitude, and surprisingly discovered excessive...Systems model #503), auscultation of all lung fields, and systemic blood pressure both supine and standing. Forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow...the same chew and swallow manner. The protocol called for repeat dosing every thirty minutes, depending upon the blood pressure response of the

  11. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  12. A case of recurrent swimming-induced pulmonary edema in a triathlete: the need for awareness.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Brooke, D; Kipps, C; Skaria, B; Subramaniam, V

    2016-08-03

    This report discusses a rare case of a 55-year-old female triathlete who developed recurrent episodes of swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). She had two hospital admissions with pulmonary edema after developing breathlessness while swimming, including a near-drowning experience in an open water swim. With increasing popularity of triathlon and open water sports, this case highlights the importance of a greater awareness of SIPE among health professionals, event organizers, and athletes. This report explores the previous reported cases in triathletes and those who have suffered recurrent episodes. It is paramount that an accurate diagnosis is made as these individuals may be at an increased risk of future life-threatening episodes.

  13. Radiographically Severe but Clinically Mild Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema following Decompression of a Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Harner, William E.; Crawley, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    The case is a 48-year-old female who presented with mild dyspnea on exertion and cough with unremarkable vital signs and was found to have a large right sided pneumothorax. She underwent small bore chest tube decompression with immediate reexpansion of the collapsed lung. However, she rapidly developed moderate hypoxemia and radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema (REPE) on both the treated and contralateral sides. Within a week, she had a normal chest X-ray and was asymptomatic. This case describes a rare complication of spontaneous pneumothorax and highlights the lack of correlation between symptoms, sequelae, and radiographic severity of pneumothorax and reexpansion pulmonary edema. Proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms include increased production of reactive oxygen species with subsequent loss of surfactant and increased vascular permeability, and loss of vasoregulatory tone. PMID:25165607

  14. Delayed Pneumoperitoneum and Acute Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Acute Gastric Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Kim, Jong Kun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum caused by acute gastric dilatation (AGD) is a very rare complication. We report a case of pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. A 78-year-old woman presented with pneumonia and AGD. We inserted a nasogastric tube and administered empirical antibiotics. We performed an endoscopy, and perforation or necrosis of the stomach and pyloric stenosis were not observed. Thirty-six hours after admission, the patient suddenly developed dyspnea and shock, and eventually died. We suspected the cause of death was pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD during the conservative treatment period. Immunocompromised patients with chronic illness require close observation even if they do not show any symptoms suggestive of complications. Even if the initial endoscopic or abdominal radiologic findings do not show gastric necrosis or perforation, follow-up with endoscopy is essential to recognize complications of AGD early. PMID:26668807

  15. [Acute Postoperative Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Caused by the Compression of Brachiocephalic Artery].

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Miki; Iwai, Hidetaka; Fukatsu, Ken; Shimada, Mami; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of negative-pressure pulmonary edema occurring by tracheal obstruction caused by the brachiocephalic artery. The patient had deformed thorax with cerebral palsy, which deformed thorax placing the brachiocephalic artery high over the trachea, resulting in close and tight contact between the artery and trachea. Additional deformity of the thorax associated with myotonic attacks after general anesthesia might shorten the distance between the sternal notch and the vertebral body, resulting in the tracheal obstruction by the artery.

  16. Acute pulmonary edema due to rosiglitazone use in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cekmen, Nedim; Cesur, Mustafa; Cetinbas, Riza; Bedel, Pasa; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator active receptor. gamma agonist, which increases insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver. Rosiglitazone is a member of the thiazolidinedione group, and because of its significantly positive effect on glycemic control, it is especially preferred in type 2 diabetic patients with a high cardiovascular disease risk. This drug, because of its decreasing effect on insulin resistance, is used alone or combined with type 2 diabetic drugs. A 73-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea, pink frothing phlegm, cyanosis, and tiredness. She was lethargic, uncooperative, and had no orientation. In arterial blood gases, hypoxemia and hypercapnia were found. She was taken to the general intensive care unit, and oxygen was applied via mask. The patient had a history of 10 years of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerotic cardiac disease, and she was using rosiglitazone for the past 6 weeks. Her chest x-ray was taken, and acute pulmonary edema was diagnosed. In her last echocardiography, which was performed 1 year before, no signs indicating cardiac failure and pleural effusion could be found. Therefore, it was concluded that pulmonary edema occurred as a complication of rosiglitazone use. After stabilizing the patient's vital signs, blood glucose levels, and lactate levels, medical treatment of diabetes mellitus was rearranged, and she was discharged on the seventh day after her admittance. In a patient with diabetes mellitus who has been admitted to the intensive care unit because of acute pulmonary edema, for differential diagnosis, use of rosiglitazone should be kept in mind during the determination of treatment. Therefore, the authors aim to discuss the effect of rosiglitazone on creating acute pulmonary edema with a case report presentation.

  17. Acute pulmonary edema and airway hemorrhage in a goat during sevoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Levionnois, O; Spadavecchia, C

    2011-02-01

    A goat was scheduled for experimental surgery under general anesthesia. The first attempt of performing endotracheal intubation failed and provoked laryngeal spasm. After repeated succesful intubation of inhalation anesthesia was delivered in high concentrations of sevoflurane. Suddenly hypertension and tachycardia were observed, followed by foamy airway secretion and then severe airway hemorrhage. The authors hypothesize that laryngeal spasm provoked respiratory distress and pulmonary edema. The delivered high concentrations of sevoflurane probably enhanced a hyperadrenergic response, predisposing to the development of airway hemorrhage.

  18. The Effects of Portulaca oleracea on Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Tan; Xiaosa, Wen; Ruirui, Qi; Wencai, Shi; Hailiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tan Yue, Wen Xiaosa, Qi Ruirui, Shi Wencai, Xin Hailiang, and Li Min. The effects of Portulaca oleracea on hypoxia-induced pulmonary edema in mice. High Alt Med Biol 16:43–51, 2015—Portulaca oleracea L. (PO) is known as “a vegetable for long life” due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other pharmacological activities. However, the protective activity of the ethanol extract of PO (EEPO) against hypoxia-induced pulmonary edema has not been fully investigated. In this study, we exposed mice to a simulated altitude of 7000 meters for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 h to observe changes in the water content and transvascular leakage of the mouse lung. It was found that transvascular leakage increased to the maximum in the mouse lung after 6 h exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Prophylactic administration of EEPO before hypoxic exposure markedly reduced the transvascular leakage and oxidative stress, and inhibited the upregulation of NF-kB in the mouse lung, as compared with the control group. In addition, EEPO significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules in the lungs of mice, as compared with the hypoxia group. Our results show that EEPO can reduce initial transvascular leakage and pulmonary edema under hypobaric hypoxia conditions. PMID:25761168

  19. Basiliximab induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in two pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Niamh; Waldron, Mary; O'Connell, Marie; Eustace, Nick; Carson, Kevin; Awan, Atif

    2009-11-01

    We report two cases of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema as a complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric renal transplant patients identified following a retrospective review of all pediatric renal transplant cases performed in the National Paediatric Transplant Centre, Childrens University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin, Ireland. Twenty-eight renal transplantations, of which five were living-related (LRD) and 23 were from deceased donors (DD), were performed in 28 children between 2003 and 2006. In six cases, transplantations were pre-emptive. Immunosuppression was induced pre-operatively using a combination of basiliximab, tacrolimus and methylprednisolone in all patients. Basiliximab induction was initiated 2 h prior to surgery in all cases and, in 26 patients, basiliximab was re-administered on post-operative day 4. Two patients, one LRD and one DD, aged 6 and 11 years, respectively, developed acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 36 h of surgery. Renal dysplasia was identified as the primary etiological factor for renal failure in both cases. Both children required assisted ventilation for between 4 and 6 days. While both grafts had primary function, the DD transplant patient subsequently developed acute tubular necrosis and was eventually lost within 3 weeks due to thrombotic microangiopathy and severe acute antibody-mediated rejection despite adequate immunosuppression. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a potentially devastating post-operative complication of basiliximab induction therapy in young pediatric patients following renal transplantation. Early recognition and appropriate supportive therapy is vital for patient and, where possible, graft survival.

  20. Pattern of fluid accumulation in NO2-induced pulmonary edema in dogs. A morphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Vassilyadi, M.; Michel, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    To ascertain whether the pattern of fluid accumulation could be altered by an agent introduced through the airways, the authors studied the physiology and morphology of 11 dogs exposed to 150-494 ppm.hr NO2 and compared them with 3 new and 5 previously reported control dogs. NO2 caused a partly reversible decrease in systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output, a fall in arterial PO2, and rapid shallow breathing, while pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures remained normal. Post mortem, lower (LL) and middle (ML) lobes were frozen, sections fixed for light microscopy by freeze-substitution, and wet weight/dry weight (W/D) ratios were measured. Alveolar edema was graded, and the distribution of interstitial edema around arteries and veins and within bronchovascular bundles was studied with morphometry: edema ratios (ER) were calculated as area of interstitium/area of vessel or airway. We found that NO2 produced an exposure-dependent increase in lung water (r = 0.73), and that both LL and ML had similar W/D ratios (7.77 and 8.39, respectively) and percent alveolar edema (30% and 34%). Morphometry of interstitial edema showed that the ER for vessels and airways of edematous LL were essentially similar to controls, while those of the ML were markedly increased. It is concluded that NO2 produces exposure-related lung edema and preferential alveolar flooding with probable secondary interstitial accumulation. The discrepancies in interstitial edema between middle and lower lobes may be due to differences in lung volume or in ventilation. Images Figure 6 Figure 9 PMID:3337206

  1. Morphine blocks the Mesobuthus tamulus venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide reflex and pulmonary edema in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Akella, Aparna; Tiwari, Anil K.; Rai, Om P.; Deshpande, Shripad B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary edema, a manifestation of scorpion envenomation syndrome, is attributed to cardiogenic or noncardiogenic factors. Morphine is a drug used for cardiogenic pulmonary edema and its effect on Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) venom-induced changes is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that morphine blocks the MBT venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide (PDG) reflex and pulmonary edema. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on anesthetized adult female rats. Trachea and jugular vein were cannulated, and the electrocardiographic potentials were recorded by connecting needle electrodes in limb lead II configuration. PDG (10 ΅g/kg, IV, bolus injection) responses were elicited by bolus injection initially, after saline/morphine (1 mg/kg) and after injecting MBT venom (100 μg/kg). The time-response area of the PDG-induced bradycardiac response after treatment was calculated as % of the initial PDG response area. At the end of experiments, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content. Results: PDG produced bradycardiac response that lasted for >60 s. MBT venom augmented the PDG reflex response by 2.5 times. In morphine pretreated group, augmentation of bradycardiac response induced by MBT venom was absent. MBT venom increased the pulmonary water content, and the increase was absent in morphine pretreated animals. Conclusion: The results reveal that morphine prevents the MBT venom-induced augmentation of PDG reflex response and pulmonary edema. Thus, morphine can be useful in scorpion envenomation syndrome associated with pulmonary edema. PMID:26997727

  2. Three-view bedside ultrasound for the differentiation of acute respiratory distress syndrome from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun; Stone, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Bedside ultrasound is being increasingly used by emergency physicians (EPs) for the differentiation of acute dyspnea in critically ill patients. Lung ultrasound is emerging as a highly sensitive tool in diagnosing alveolar interstitial edema with the presence of diffuse “B-lines” arising from the pleural line. However, when used independently, lung ultrasound is unable to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. This case report describes a rapid 3-view or “triple scan” sonographic examination to differentiate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  3. Susceptibility To High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Is Associated With A More Uniform Distribution Of Regional Specific Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Patz, Michael D; Sá, Rui Carlos; Darquenne, Chantal; Elliott, Ann R; Assadi, Amran K; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Dubowitz, David J; Swenson, Erik Richard; Prisk, Gordon Kim; Hopkins, Susan Roberta

    2017-01-05

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition affecting high altitude sojourners. The biggest predictor of HAPE development is a history of prior HAPE. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows HAPE-susceptible, with a history of HAPE, but not HAPE-resistant (a history of repeated ascents without illness) individuals develop greater heterogeneity of regional pulmonary perfusion breathing hypoxic gas (O2=12.5%), consistent with uneven hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Why HPV is uneven in HAPE-susceptibles is unknown, but may arise from regionally heterogeneous ventilation resulting in an uneven stimulus to HPV. We tested the hypothesis that ventilation is more heterogeneous in HAPE-susceptible subjects (n=6) compared to HAPE-resistant controls (n=7). MRI Specific Ventilation Imaging (SVI), was used to measure regional specific ventilation and the relative dispersion (SD/mean) of SVI used to quantify baseline heterogeneity. Ventilation heterogeneity from conductive and respiratory airways was measured in normoxia and hypoxia (O2=12.5%) using multiple breath washout and heterogeneity quantified from the indices Scond and Sacin, respectively. Contrary to our hypothesis, HAPE-susceptibles had significantly lower relative dispersion of specific ventilation than the HAPE-resistant controls (Susceptible=1.33±0.67, Resistant=2.36±0.98, p=0.05) and Sacin tended to be more uniform (Susceptible=0.085±0.009, Resistant=0.113±0.030, p=0.07). Scond was not significantly different between groups (Susceptible=0.019±0.007, Resistant=0.020±0.004, p=0.67). Sacin and Scond did not change significantly in hypoxia (p=0.56, 0.19, respectively). In conclusion, ventilation heterogeneity does not change with short-term hypoxia irrespective of HAPE susceptibility and lesser rather than greater ventilation heterogeneity is observed in HAPE-susceptible subjects. This suggests the basis for uneven HPV in HAPE involves vascular phenomena.

  4. Case Report: Bilateral reexpansion pulmonary edema following treatment of a unilateral hemothorax

    PubMed Central

    de Wolf, Steven P; Deunk, Jaap; Cornet, Alexander D; Elbers, Paul WG

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral re-expansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is an extremely rare entity. We report the unique case of bilateral RPE following a traumatic, unilateral hemopneumothorax in a young healthy male. Bilateral RPE occurred only one hour after drainage of a unilateral hemopneumothorax. The patient was treated with diuretics and supplemental oxygen. Diagnosis was confirmed by excluding other causes, using laboratory findings, chest radiography, pulmonary and cardiac ultrasound and high resolution computed tomography. His recovery was uneventful. The pathophysiology of bilateral RPE is not well known. Treatment is mainly supportive and consists of diuretics, mechanical ventilation, inotropes and steroids. In case of a pulmonary deterioration after the drainage of a traumatic pneumothorax, bilateral RPE should be considered after exclusion of more common causes of dyspnea. PMID:25713699

  5. Role of tidal volume, FRC, and end-inspiratory volume in the development of pulmonary edema following mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, D; Saumon, G

    1993-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressure and large tidal volume (VT) produces permeability pulmonary edema. Whether it is mean or peak inspiratory pressure (i.e., mean or end-inspiratory volume) that is the major determinant of ventilation-induced lung injury is unsettled. Rats were ventilated with increasing tidal volumes starting from different degrees of FRC that were set by increasing end-expiratory pressure during positive-pressure ventilation. Pulmonary edema was assessed by the measurement of extravascular lung water content. The importance of permeability alterations was evaluated by measurement of dry lung weight and determination of albumin distribution space. Pulmonary edema with permeability alterations occurred regardless of the value of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), provided the increase in VT was large enough. Similarly, edema occurred even during normal VT ventilation provided the increase in PEEP was large enough. Furthermore, moderate increases in VT or PEEP that were innocuous when applied alone, produced edema when combined. The effect of PEEP was not the consequence of raised airway pressure but of the increase in FRC since similar observations were made in animals ventilated with negative inspiratory pressure. However, although permeability alterations were similar, edema was less marked in animals ventilated with PEEP than in those ventilated with zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) with the same end-inspiratory pressure. This "beneficial" effect of PEEP was probably the consequence of hemodynamic alterations. Indeed, infusion of dopamine to correct the drop in systemic arterial pressure that occurred during PEEP ventilation resulted in a significant increase in pulmonary edema. In conclusion, rather than VT or FRC value, the end-inspiratory volume is probably the main determinant of ventilation-induced edema. Hemodynamic status plays an important role in modulating the amount of edema during lung overinflation

  6. Fatal Pulmonary Tumor Embolic Microangiopathy in Young Lady without Known Primary Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azem, M. Ali; Hanafy, Ahmed; Nakkar, Talal

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Malignancy, prolonged recumbence, and chemotherapy are renowned risk factors for development of clinically significant PE. Cancer exerts a multitude of pathophysiological processes, for example, hypercoagulability and abnormal vessels with sluggish circulation that can lead to PE. One of the peculiar characteristics of tumor cells is their ability to reach the circulation and behave as blood clot—not a metastasis-occluding the pulmonary circulation. We present a case of fatal pulmonary embolism diagnosed histologically to be due to tumor cell embolism. PMID:25478243

  7. Medial defects of the small pulmonary arteries in fatal pulmonary hypertension in infants with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masahiro; Shimozono, Saiko; Nitta, Tetsuya; Yamaki, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of early death in patients with trisomy 13 or 18 and congenital heart disease (CHD). Pulmonary artery banding for these patients early in life is preferred to protect the lungs from high pulmonary flow rates and improve survival. We performed open lung biopsies in 11 patients with trisomy 13 or 18 accompanied by CHD and severe pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) between 2009 and 2011. Two (18.2%) of these 11 patients had medial defects of the small pulmonary arteries. One patient with trisomy 13 and an atrial septal defect developed lung hemorrhage and lung edema at the age of 9 months and died at the age of 13 months. The lumens of the small pulmonary arteries of the other patient with trisomy 18 and a ventricular septal defect became occluded due to the intimal proliferation of fibrous tissues at the age of 2 months. This patient died at the age of 27 months. The deaths of both patients were associated with heart-related factors. Patients with medial defects are vulnerable to intimal proliferation in the small pulmonary arteries. More patients with trisomy 13 or 18 and CHD might have similar pulmonary vascular changes. The small pulmonary arteries of patients with trisomy 13 and 18 should be further analyzed.

  8. Chest ultrasonography in emergency Cesarean delivery in multi-valvular heart disease with pulmonary edema during spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Ghatak, Tanmoy; Grover, V K

    2014-05-01

    Valvular heart disease in a parturient presenting for Cesarean section is challenging. A 25 year old primigravida parturient with severe mitral stenosis, mild mitral regurgitation, mild aortic regurgitation, and mild pulmonary arterial hypertension required Cesarean delivery after developing pulmonary edema. Low-dose spinal with hyperbaric bupivacine 0.5% 1.8 mL plus 25 μg of fentanyl was used for anesthesia. Chest ultrasonography (US) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were used for monitoring purposes. Spinal-induced preload reduction improved the pulmonary edema, as evidenced by chest US. Chest US and TTE helped in fluid management.

  9. A 45-Year-Old Man With Recurrent Dyspnea and Hemoptysis during Exercise: Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Minhyeok; Kwon, Oh Jung; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis during exercise. A chest computed tomography (CT) revealed multifocal diffuse patchy ground glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both the lungs. Permeability pulmonary edema or pulmonary hemorrhage was suspected. Serologic studies for autoimmune disorders and vasculitis were negative. There was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, other hematopoietic disease or infectious disease. Considering correlation with exercise, we diagnosed exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) or exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE). The patient was managed with antifibrinolytics, antibiotics, and antitussive agent. After a week, follow-up chest CT revealed completely resolved pulmonary hemorrhage. About 2 months after the first event, he visited again with dyspnea and hemoptysis during running. In the present study, we report a case of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage after exercise. PMID:26508928

  10. Exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema at sea-level in young and old healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Carlson, Alex R.; Miller, Andrew D.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether aged adults are more susceptible to exercise-induced pulmonary edema relative to younger individuals. Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after exhaustive discontinuous incremental exercise in 10 young (YNG; 27±3 yr) and 10 old (OLD; 69±5 yr) males. In YNG subjects, Dm increased (11±7%, P=0.031), Vc decreased (−10±9%, P=0.01) and DLCO was unchanged (30.5±4.1 vs. 29.7±2.9 ml/min/mmHg, P=0.44) pre- to post-exercise. In OLD subjects, DLCO and Dm increased (11±14%, P=0.042; 16±14%, P=0.025) but Vc was unchanged (58±23 vs. 56±23 ml, P=0.570) pre- to post-exercise. Group-mean Dm/Vc was greater after vs. before exercise in the YNG and OLD subjects. However, Dm/Vc was lower post-exercise in 2 of the 10 YNG (−7±4%) and 2 of the 10 OLD subjects (−10±5%). These data suggest that exercise decreases interstitial lung fluid in most YNG and OLD subjects, with a small number exhibiting evidence for exercise-induced pulmonary edema. PMID:24200644

  11. Reexpansion pulmonary edema after surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Ichimura, Hideo; Sakai, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several adverse effects on the pulmonary system in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been reported. We present a case of AN who presented with a complicated reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for spontaneous pneumothorax. Presentation of case A 23-year-old woman with severe anorexia nervosa (weight: 25 kg, body mass index: 8.96 kg/m2) underwent VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax. Five hours after the surgery, she immediately presented acute cardiorespiratory insufficiency. Chest radiography showed an infiltrating shadow in the entire right lung. She was diagnosed with reexpansion pulmonary edema that was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and mechanical ventilation. She recovered and was extubated on postoperative day 4. The chest drain tube was removed on postoperative day 5. Discussion Bullectomy or ligation of bullae for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with AN has never been reported. In our case, bullae were identified in preoperative CT and we chose ligation of the bullae instead of the bullectomy using automatic suture device because of poor wound healing concerned. Conclusion We present a case of RPE after VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with AN. Malnutrition owing to AN results in critical complications such as RPE. PMID:27158490

  12. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH.

  13. A delayed, unusual non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema after intravascular administration of non-ionic, low osmolar radiocontrast media for coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Ho; Nah, Jong-Chun

    2013-07-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (NCPE) is a rare adverse reaction to iodinated radiocontrast media (RCM), in which all previous cases were immediate reactions. A 56-year-old male was given iopamidol, a non-ionic, low osmolar RCM, during coronary artery angiography. He developed pulmonary edema and fever a day after the procedure. Despite diuretic therapy, the patient's pulmonary edema worsened and his high fever persisted. The patient's pulmonary edema was eventually resolved with intravenous steroid treatment. We interpreted the patient's condition as NCPE manifesting as a delayed reaction to RCM. To our knowledge, our case is the first to show NCPE as a delayed hypersensitivity reaction.

  14. Therapeutic efficacy of milrinone in the management of enterovirus 71-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Lei, Huan-Yao; Huang, Mei-Chih; Wu, Jing-Min; Chen, Chun-Ta; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jen-Ren; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2005-03-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease and herpangina are the major clinical manifestations of enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections. Brain-stem encephalitis and pulmonary edema are severe complications that can lead to death. This study was designed to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of milrinone, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, in the treatment of patients with EV71-induced pulmonary edema. We conducted a historically controlled trial of 24 children with severe EV71-induced pulmonary edema from April 1998-June 2003 in southern Taiwan. Patients were divided into groups treated before and after the introduction of milrinone therapy. Etiological diagnosis was established by viral cultures and confirmed by specific immunofluorescence and neutralization tests. All 24 patients were below 5 years of age. The mortality was lower in the milrinone-treated vs. nontreated group (36.4% vs. 92.3%, P=0.005). Sympathetic tachycardia was decreased in patients treated with milrinone compared to controls (144 +/- 17/min vs. 206 +/- 26/min, P=0.004). A marked decrease in IL-13 (77 +/- 9 pg/ml vs. 162 +/- 88 pg/ml, P=0.001) was observed in milrinone-treated patients compared to controls. There was a significant reduction in white blood cell (10,838 +/- 4,537/mm3 vs. 19,475 +/- 7,798/mm3, P=0.009) and platelet (257 +/- 45 x 10(3)/mm3 vs. 400 +/- 87 x 10(3)/mm3, P=0.001) counts in milrinone-treated patients compared to controls. These results were associated with improvement in sympathetic regulation and decrease in IL-13 production. Milrinone therapy may provide a useful therapeutic approach for this highly lethal disorder.

  15. [Fatal pulmonary mycosis in a diabetic and cirrhotic patient].

    PubMed

    Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Braham, Emna; Marghli, Adel; Ismail, Olfa; Helal, Imen; Mlika, Mona; Kilani, Tarak; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a rare, devastating, opportunistic fungal infection, caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the Mucorales order of the class of Zygomycetes. This infection occurs principally in some particular conditions, specially in diabetic patients and immunocompromised host, and rarely in cirrhotic patients. The diagnosis of mucormycosis can only be confirmed by pathological and mycological examination of biopsy specimens. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis in a 68-year-old woman with underlying liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. Endoscopic and radiologic findings supported the diagnosis of hydatid cyst of the lung. The patient underwent surgical resection and was started on amphotericin B, after pathological examination. Unfortunately, she succumbed to the infection within one month of surgery.

  16. Swimming-Induced Pulmonary Edema: Pathophysiology and Risk Reduction With Sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Richard E.; Martina, Stefanie D.; Peacher, Dionne F.; Potter, Jennifer F.; Wester, Tracy E.; Cherry, Anne D.; Natoli, Michael J.; Otteni, Claire E.; Kernagis, Dawn N.; White, William D.; Freiberger, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) occurs during swimming or scuba diving, often in young individuals with no predisposing conditions, and its pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery wedge pressures are higher in SIPE-susceptible individuals during submerged exercise compared to the general population and are reduced by sildenafil. Methods and Results Ten study subjects with a history of SIPE (mean age 41.6 years) and 20 control subjects (mean age 36.2 years) were instrumented with radial artery and pulmonary artery catheters and performed moderate cycle ergometer exercise for 6–7 minutes while submersed in 20°C water. SIPE-susceptible subjects repeated the exercise 150 minutes after oral administration of 50 mg sildenafil. Work rate and mean arterial pressure during exercise were similar in controls and SIPE-susceptibles. Average VO2 and cardiac output (CO) in SIPE-susceptibles and controls were: VO2 2.42 L.min−1 vs. 1.95 L.min−1, P=0.2; CO 17.9 L.min−1 vs. 13.8 L.min−1, P=0.01). Accounting for differences in CO between groups, mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) at CO=13.8 L.min−1 was 22.5 mmHg in controls vs. 34.0 mmHg in SIPE-susceptibles (P=0.004) and the corresponding pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) 11.0 mmHg vs. 18.8 mmHg (P=0.028). After sildenafil, there were no statistically significant differences in MPAP or PAWP between SIPE-susceptibles and controls. Conclusions These observations confirm that SIPE is a form of hemodynamic pulmonary edema. The reduction in pulmonary vascular pressures after sildenafil with no adverse effect on exercise hemodynamics suggests that it may be useful in SIPE prevention. Clinical Trial Registration Information ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00815646. PMID:26882910

  17. Delayed renal dysfunction and flash pulmonary edema post endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Carron, Pierre-Louis; Piliero, Nicolas; Heitz, Morgane; Kribs, Marc; Rodière, Mathieu; Jousse, Patrick; Gunther-Calvino, Silvia; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    After endovascular aortic repair (EVAR), the deterioration in long-term renal function is probably multifactorial. Preoperative renal failure is an independent risk factor. Postoperative renal dysfunction can be associated with inadvertent renal artery occlusion, renal artery complications as stenosis, plaque dislodgement, or dissection. Ischemic nephropathy can accelerate hypertension and circulatory congestion. We report a case of coverage of the renal arteries symptomatic with flash pulmonary edema and renal failure 15 months after EVAR, suggesting a delayed endograft migration. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms and renal function after renal artery stenting with placement between endograft and aneurysm to the left renal artery.

  18. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in an Experienced Mountaineer. Possible Genetic Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Whitlow, Kenneth S.; Davis, Babette W.

    2014-01-01

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a form of high altitude illness characterized by cough, dyspnea upon exertion progressing to dyspnea at rest and eventual death, seen in patients who ascend over 2,500 meters, particularly if that ascent is rapid. This case describes a patient with no prior history of HAPE and extensive experience hiking above 2,500 meters who developed progressive dyspnea and cough while ascending to 3,200 meters. His risk factors included rapid ascent, high altitude, male sex, and a possible genetic predisposition for HAPE. PMID:25493133

  19. A Case of Salicylate Intoxication Complicated by Coagulopathy, Pulmonary Edema, and Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Itay; Alder, Matthew Noble; Langner, Travis Ryan; Hafberg, Einar Thor; Miethke, Alexander Gerhard; Kaplan, Jennifer Melissa

    The large availability of salicylic acid products makes them an often encountered source of poisoning in the emergency department. Even though in most cases the prognosis is good, with a low incidence of long-term morbidity and mortality, complications do occur, and some of those can be life threatening. We present an unusual case of salicylate intoxication in an adolescent in which several uncommon complications (severe coagulopathy, pulmonary edema, and pancreatitis) conjoined together. We review the literature and discuss the complications pathogenesis and differential diagnosis. We suggest that these potentially life-threatening complications be acknowledged, investigated, and rapidly treated.

  20. An Unusual Type of Localized Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome Presenting With Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Gunduz, Huseyin; Gurel, Safiye; Kocayigit, Ibrahim; Vural, Ahmet; Demirtas, Saadet; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Gunduz, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease that is the most common genetic cardiac disorder. The disease is characterized by excessive thickening of the left ventricular myocardium. The anterior portion of the interventricular ventricular septum is often involved. Asymmetric hypertrophy of apical site, left ventricular free wall, and right ventricle are less common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that occur in 1% cases. We report a case of a patient with an unusual type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolf Parkinson White (WPW) presenting with pulmonary edema.

  1. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy. PMID:27127397

  2. Nicardipine-Induced Acute Pulmonary Edema: A Rare but Severe Complication of Tocolysis

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  3. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative.

  4. Unilateral pulmonary edema: a rare initial presentation of cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Jinkyu; Lim, Young-Hyo; Park, Hwan-Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Shin, Jinho; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Gil; Hong, Mun K; Lee, Jae Ung

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary edema (UPE) is a rare clinical entity that is often misdiagnosed at first. Most cases of cardiogenic UPE occur in the right upper lobe and are caused by severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We present an unusual case of right-sided UPE in a patient with cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without severe MR. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary intervention and medical therapy for heart failure. Follow-up chest Radiography showed complete resolution of the UPE. This case reminds us that AMI can present as UPE even in patients without severe MR or any preexisting pulmonary disease affecting the vasculature or parenchyma of the lung.

  5. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy.

  6. Pulmonary aspergilloma with renal oxalosis: fatal effect at a distance.

    PubMed

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Sakhdeo, Uma M

    2009-05-01

    Some species of the fungus Aspergillus, especially Aspergillus niger, produce oxalic acid as a fermentation byproduct. The acid combines with calcium ions at physiological pH to form insoluble calcium oxalate crystals that are mainly deposited at local sites. This is often seen in the lungs, where the crystals tend to potentiate the destructive capacity of the fungus. In rare instances, there is hyperoxaluria and deposition of the crystals in the renal tubules. We report this rare occurrence in a 59-year-old man with pulmonary aspergilloma and acute renal failure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fifth case to be reported.

  7. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  8. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Without Appropriate Action Progresses to Right Ventricular Strain: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Logan; Harper, Chris; Rozwadowski, Sophie; Imray, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Mills, Logan, Chris Harper, Sophie Rozwadowski, and Chris Imray. High altitude pulmonary edema without appropriate action progresses to right ventricular strain: A case study. High Alt Med Biol. 17:228-232, 2016.-A 24-year-old male developed high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) after three ascents to 4061 m over 3 days, sleeping each night at 2735 m. He complained of exertional dyspnea, dry cough, chest pain, fever, nausea, vertigo, and a severe frontal headache. Inappropriate continuation of ascent despite symptoms led to functional impairment and forced a return to the valley, but dyspnea persisted in addition to new orthopnea. Hospital admission showed hypoxemia, resting tachycardia, and systemic hypertension. ECG revealed right ventricular strain and a chest X-ray revealed right lower zone infiltrates. This case demonstrates that HAPE can develop in previously unaffected individuals given certain precipitating factors, and that in the presence of HAPE, prolonged exposure to altitude with exercise (or exertion) does not confer acclimatization with protective adaptations and that rest and descent are the appropriate actions. The case additionally demonstrates well-characterized right ventricular involvement.

  9. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after craniotomy through the endonasal transsphenoidal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Mengchan; Luo, Zhen; Liu, Juan; Yang, Yaoxin; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema that occurred in the post-anesthesia care unit in a patient who had undergone transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma. Negative pressure pulmonary edema is an uncommon complication of general anesthesia. In this case, the patient’s nasal cavity had been filled with surgical packs and she had not become accustomed to breathing through her mouth, in addition to her large tongue and small oropharyngeal cavity, residual effect of anesthetic may resulting in tongue falling which caused airway obstruction. The main causative factor is excessive negative intrathoracic pressure generated by the patient’s spontaneous forced inspiration in an effort to overcome the airway obstruction. It typically developed rapidly, and may be life threatening if not diagnosed promptly. After re-intubation for a short period of mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP 10 cm H2O) and a bolus of intravenous furosemide, the patient recovered rapidly and discharged 8 days after surgery. PMID:26131257

  10. [Re-expansion pulmonary edema as a complication of a spontaneous pneumothorax drainage--a case review].

    PubMed

    Toporcer, T; Il'ková, J; Lakyová, L; Belák, J; Radonak, J

    2008-07-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema is an iatrogenic complication occurring after reinflation of the collapsed lung of a patient with pneumothorax or fluidothorax. The following risk factors have been associated with reexpansion pulmonary edema: younger age, longer duration of a lung collapse, its large extend and a quick lung reexpansion. We report a case of 26-years-old man. The patient was admited to the second surgical clinic FNLP, Kosice because of a spontaneous pneumothorax. A chest tube was inserted in local anesthesia in the right anterior axilar line and the fourth intercostal space. An active negative pressure of 20 cm H2O was applied. Dyspnea, decrease of blood pressure, tachycardia, tachypnoe and expectoration of pink sputum were recorded after negative pressure application. Oxygen saturation decreased to 90% despite the addition of oxygen. Glucocorticoids, diuretic stimulants, analgesic and bronchodilatators were administered. Chest X-rays and computer tomography showed a strong ipsilateral pulmonary edema and an incipient contralateral pulmonary edema. The patient was stabilized and after 16 hours continuous oxygen administration was not longer needed. Because of continuous pneumothorax, a video assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed on the seventh day after the chest tube insertion. After 13 days of hospitalization the patient was discharged in good condition without any further complications to the ambulatory care. Reexpansion pulmonary edema is a rare complication of the chest tube insertion and thoracocentesis because of pneumothorax and fluidothorax. The mortality of reexpansion pulmonary edema reaches up to 20%. Chest tube insertion and thoracocentesis are therapeutic procedures to be performed solely on medical department which can provide artificial lung ventilation.

  11. A fatal case of pulmonary chromobacterium violaceum infection in an adult.

    PubMed

    Cheong, B M K

    2010-06-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram negative, facultative anaerobic coccobacillus. Human infections are rare and usually occur after exposure to contaminated soil or water. Infections can present with fulminant septicemia, multiple abscesses and rapidly spreading soft tissue infections. Here we present a fatal case of pulmonary Chromobacterium violaceum infection following aspiration of drain water. Treatment with fluroquinolones in combination with either co-trimoxazole or amikacin has been described in successfully treated cases.

  12. VA/Q distribution during heavy exercise and recovery in humans: implications for pulmonary edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffartzik, W.; Poole, D. C.; Derion, T.; Tsukimoto, K.; Hogan, M. C.; Arcos, J. P.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality has been shown to increase with exercise. Potential mechanisms for this increase include nonuniform pulmonary vasoconstriction, ventilatory time constant inequality, reduced large airway gas mixing, and development of interstitial pulmonary edema. We hypothesized that persistence of VA/Q mismatch after ventilation and cardiac output subside during recovery would be consistent with edema; however, rapid resolution would suggest mechanisms related to changes in ventilation and blood flow per se. Thirteen healthy males performed near-maximal cycle ergometry at an inspiratory PO2 of 91 Torr (because hypoxia accentuates VA/Q mismatch on exercise). Cardiorespiratory variables and inert gas elimination patterns were measured at rest, during exercise, and between 2 and 30 min of recovery. Two profiles of VA/Q distribution behavior emerged during heavy exercise: in group 1 an increase in VA/Q mismatch (log SDQ of 0.35 +/- 0.02 at rest and 0.44 +/- 0.02 at exercise; P less than 0.05, n = 7) and in group 2 no change in VA/Q mismatch (n = 6). There were no differences in anthropometric data, work rate, O2 uptake, or ventilation during heavy exercise between groups. Group 1 demonstrated significantly greater VA/Q inequality, lower vital capacity, and higher forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity for the first 20 min during recovery than group 2. Cardiac index was higher in group 1 both during heavy exercise and 4 and 6 min postexercise. However, both ventilation and cardiac output returned toward baseline values more rapidly than did VA/Q relationships. Arterial pH was lower in group 1 during exercise and recovery. We conclude that greater VA/Q inequality in group 1 and its persistence during recovery are consistent with the hypothesis that edema occurs and contributes to the increase in VA/Q inequality during exercise. This is supported by observation of greater blood flows and acidosis and, presumably therefore

  13. VA/Q distribution during heavy exercise and recovery in humans: implications for pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, W; Poole, D C; Derion, T; Tsukimoto, K; Hogan, M C; Arcos, J P; Bebout, D E; Wagner, P D

    1992-05-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality has been shown to increase with exercise. Potential mechanisms for this increase include nonuniform pulmonary vasoconstriction, ventilatory time constant inequality, reduced large airway gas mixing, and development of interstitial pulmonary edema. We hypothesized that persistence of VA/Q mismatch after ventilation and cardiac output subside during recovery would be consistent with edema; however, rapid resolution would suggest mechanisms related to changes in ventilation and blood flow per se. Thirteen healthy males performed near-maximal cycle ergometry at an inspiratory PO2 of 91 Torr (because hypoxia accentuates VA/Q mismatch on exercise). Cardiorespiratory variables and inert gas elimination patterns were measured at rest, during exercise, and between 2 and 30 min of recovery. Two profiles of VA/Q distribution behavior emerged during heavy exercise: in group 1 an increase in VA/Q mismatch (log SDQ of 0.35 +/- 0.02 at rest and 0.44 +/- 0.02 at exercise; P less than 0.05, n = 7) and in group 2 no change in VA/Q mismatch (n = 6). There were no differences in anthropometric data, work rate, O2 uptake, or ventilation during heavy exercise between groups. Group 1 demonstrated significantly greater VA/Q inequality, lower vital capacity, and higher forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity for the first 20 min during recovery than group 2. Cardiac index was higher in group 1 both during heavy exercise and 4 and 6 min postexercise. However, both ventilation and cardiac output returned toward baseline values more rapidly than did VA/Q relationships. Arterial pH was lower in group 1 during exercise and recovery. We conclude that greater VA/Q inequality in group 1 and its persistence during recovery are consistent with the hypothesis that edema occurs and contributes to the increase in VA/Q inequality during exercise. This is supported by observation of greater blood flows and acidosis and, presumably therefore

  14. Superior Vena Cava Stent Migration into the Pulmonary Artery Causing Fatal Pulmonary Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Girija Lewanski, Conrad R.; Cowman, Steven A.; Jackson, James E.

    2011-02-15

    Migration of superior vena cava (SVC) stents is a well-recognised complication of their deployment, and numerous strategies exist for their retrieval. To our knowledge, only three cases of migration of an SVC stent to the pulmonary vasculature have previously been reported. None of these patients developed complications that resulted in death. We report a case of SVC stent migration to the pulmonary vasculature with delayed pulmonary artery thrombosis and death from pulmonary infarction. We conclude that early retrieval of migrated stents should be performed to decrease the risk of serious complications.

  15. Neurogenic pulmonary edema combined with febrile seizures in early childhood-A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Keiji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Hori, Masayuki; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Isome, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Yu; Nagai, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical entity that can occur following central nervous system disorders. However, NPE occurs quite rarely in early childhood, and there has only been one report about pediatric NPE associated with febrile seizures. Two cases are reported here. One case involved a 2-year-old girl who presented with febrile seizures, which rapidly progressed to severe NPE. Since the NPE occurred in the emergency department room, the patient was able to be resuscitated via immediate endotracheal intubation. The other case involved an 11-month-old boy who developed respiratory distress following a 50-min episode of febrile status epilepticus. Both patients required respiratory management in the intensive care unit. However their conditions were dramatically improved within several days and fully recovered without any sequelae.

  16. Experience of step-wise protocol using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for treating cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Momii, Hidetoshi; Tashima, Yuki; Kadokami, Toshiaki; Narita, Sumito; Yoshida, Masayoshi; Ando, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    Initiating and weaning procedure of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) on acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) has been determined empirically, and the total time of its use has been sometimes prolonged unnecessarily. A simple protocol for its use may facilitate initiation and avoids prolongation of the NIPPV treatment. We designed a step-wise protocol for NIPPV use and retrospectively examined the clinical outcome of our protocol for initiation and weaning of NIPPV in 45 patients with ACPE. Almost all patients recovered from respiratory distress successfully. There was no intubation nor complication related to NIPPV. In most of the cases, maximal-end expiratory pressure was less than 7-cm H2O. The mean duration of NIPPV was 19.5±28.0 h and the median duration was 8.0 h (interquartile range=14.0 h). This simple step-wise NIPPV protocol for ACPE can facilitate quick and safe initiation and termination of the treatment.

  17. Baroreflex failure increases the risk of pulmonary edema in conscious rats with normal left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Saku, Keita; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Tobushi, Tomoyuki; Oga, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-15

    In heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), the complex pathogenesis hinders development of effective therapies. Since HFpEF and arteriosclerosis share common risk factors, it is conceivable that stiffened arterial wall in HFpEF impairs baroreflex function. Previous investigations have indicated that the baroreflex regulates intravascular stressed volume and arterial resistance in addition to cardiac contractility and heart rate. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction impairs regulation of left atrial pressure (LAP) and increases the risk of pulmonary edema in freely moving rats. In 15-wk Sprague-Dawley male rats, we conducted sinoaortic denervation (SAD, n = 6) or sham surgery (Sham, n = 9), and telemetrically monitored ambulatory arterial pressure (AP) and LAP. We compared the mean and SD (lability) of AP and LAP between SAD and Sham under normal-salt diet (NS) or high-salt diet (HS). SAD did not increase mean AP but significantly increased AP lability under both NS (P = 0.001) and HS (P = 0.001). SAD did not change mean LAP but significantly increased LAP lability under both NS (SAD: 2.57 ± 0.43 vs. Sham: 1.73 ± 0.30 mmHg, P = 0.01) and HS (4.13 ± 1.18 vs. 2.45 ± 0.33 mmHg, P = 0.02). SAD markedly increased the frequency of high LAP, and SAD with HS prolonged the duration of LAP > 18 mmHg by nearly 20-fold compared with Sham (SAD + HS: 2,831 ± 2,366 vs. Sham + HS: 148 ± 248 s, P = 0.01). We conclude that baroreflex failure impairs volume tolerance and together with salt loading increases the risk of pulmonary edema even in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction. Baroreflex failure may contribute in part to the pathogenesis of HFpEF.

  18. Radiation induced endothelial cell retraction in vitro: correlation with acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Kantak, S S; Diglio, C A

    1999-01-01

    We determined the effects of low dose radiation (<200 cGy) on the cell-cell integrity of confluent monolayers of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC). We observed dose- and time-dependent reversible radiation induced injuries to PMEC monolayers characterized by retraction (loss of cell-cell contact) mediated by cytoskeletal F-actin reorganization. Radiation induced reorganization of F-actin microfilament stress fibers was observed > or =30 minutes post irradiation and correlated positively with loss of cell-cell integrity. Cells of irradiated monolayers recovered to form contact inhibited monolayers > or =24 hours post irradiation; concomitantly, the depolymerized microfilaments organized to their pre-irradiated state as microfilament stress fibers arrayed parallel to the boundaries of adjacent contact-inhibited cells. Previous studies by other investigators have measured slight but significant increases in mouse lung wet weight >1 day post thoracic or whole body radiation (> or =500 cGy). Little or no data is available concerning time intervals <1 day post irradiation, possibly because of the presumption that edema is mediated, at least in part, by endothelial cell death or irreversible loss of barrier permeability functions which may only arise 1 day post irradiation. However, our in vitro data suggest that loss of endothelial barrier function may occur rapidly and at low dose levels (< or =200 cGy). Therefore, we determined radiation effects on lung wet weight and observed significant increases in wet weight (standardized per dry weight or per mouse weight) in < or =5 hours post thoracic exposure to 50 200 cGy x-radiation. We suggest that a single fraction of radiation even at low dose levels used in radiotherapy, may induce pulmonary edema by a reversible loss of endothelial cell-cell integrity and permeability barrier function.

  19. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajinder K.; Himashree, G.; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K.; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  20. Postobstructive Pulmonary Edema following Tonsillectomy/Adenoidectomy in a 2-Year-Old with Poland-Moebius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Tanisha; Sharma, Nirupma; McKie, Kathleen T.

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old male with Poland-Moebius syndrome was transferred from a local hospital to the Pediatric ICU at Children's Hospital of Georgia for suspected postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy (T&A). The patient's respiratory status ultimately declined and he developed respiratory failure. Imaging suggested pulmonary edema as well as a left-sided pneumonia. Echocardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension and airway exam via direct fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. He developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and remained intubated for ten days. This case highlights the association between congenital upper body abnormalities with cranial nerve dysfunction and the development of POPE with delayed resolution of symptoms. Patients with upper body abnormalities as above are at great risk of postoperative complications and should therefore be managed in a tertiary-care facility. PMID:26942029

  1. Postobstructive Pulmonary Edema following Tonsillectomy/Adenoidectomy in a 2-Year-Old with Poland-Moebius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Powell, Tanisha; Sharma, Nirupma; McKie, Kathleen T

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old male with Poland-Moebius syndrome was transferred from a local hospital to the Pediatric ICU at Children's Hospital of Georgia for suspected postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy (T&A). The patient's respiratory status ultimately declined and he developed respiratory failure. Imaging suggested pulmonary edema as well as a left-sided pneumonia. Echocardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension and airway exam via direct fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. He developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and remained intubated for ten days. This case highlights the association between congenital upper body abnormalities with cranial nerve dysfunction and the development of POPE with delayed resolution of symptoms. Patients with upper body abnormalities as above are at great risk of postoperative complications and should therefore be managed in a tertiary-care facility.

  2. Neonatal high-permeability pulmonary edema based on serial cytokine profiles and KL-6 in serum: case report.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Mari; Takahashi, Naoto

    2017-03-22

    A newborn male with pulmonary edema was delivered at term by elective Caesarian section. Cytokine profiles of 17 cytokines and KL-6 in cord blood and serial serum values were investigated. The cord blood values of all 17 cytokines and KL-6 were within normal limits. Subsequently, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, and IFNγ rapidly elevated during the first several hours after birth and dramatically decreased thereafter, whereas KL-6 rose to 611 U/ml on the 3(rd) day of life and then gradually decreased. These cytokines may induce pulmonary permeability, and KL-6 secreted in lining fluid could result in influx into the bloodstream. This is the first report that we have differentiated neonatal pulmonary edema from TTN by the measurement of serial cytokine profiles and KL-6 in serum.

  3. [Pulmonary edema due to venous air embolism during craniotomy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kumiko; Hishinuma, Miwako; Miyazawa, Mikiko; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Ken; Kitoh, Takeshi

    2008-10-01

    We present a 35-year-old healthy male patient who developed pulmonary edema (PE) probably due to venous air embolism during craniotomy in the semi-sitting position for arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide, propofol and fentanyl. During craniotomy, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure decreased suddenly from 26 to 9 mmHg. Concurrently, a decrease in oxygen saturation from 99% to 91% occurred. There were no serious changes in blood pressure and heart rate. A "mill-wheel murmur" was confirmed. PE due to venous air embolism was suspected. The operation was discontinued and the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. In the post-operative period, the patient developed PE and made a full recovery within a week. Four months later, the patient was scheduled again for surgical excision of AVM in the semi-sitting position in the same way as the first time. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, air, propofol and fentanyl. Transoesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery catheter were used. Saline was filled at the surgical site to prevent aspiration of air bubbles and surgical procedure was performed carefully without large vein injury and uneventfully. During neurosurgical intervention in the sitting position, special attention should be paid to entry of air bubbles into the venous system which may lead to PE.

  4. Raised HIF1α during normoxia in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers.

    PubMed

    Soree, Poonam; Gupta, Rajinder K; Singh, Krishan; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Vats, Praveen; Bharadwaj, Abhishek; Baburaj, T P; Chaudhary, Pooja; Singh, Vijay K; Verma, Saroj; Bajaj, Amir Chand; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-05-23

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptibility is associated with EGLN1 polymorphisms, we hypothesized that HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-S, had HAPE episode in past) subjects may exhibit abnormal HIF1α levels in normoxic conditions. We measured HIF1α levels in HAPE-S and HAPE resistant (HAPE-R, no HAPE episode) individuals with similar pulmonary functions. Hemodynamic responses were also measured before and after normobaric hypoxia (Fi02 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in both groups. . HIF1α was higher in HAPE-S (320.3 ± 267.5 vs 58.75 ± 33.88 pg/ml, P < 0.05) than HAPE-R, at baseline, despite no significant difference in baseline oxygen saturations (97.7 ± 1.7% and 98.8 ± 0.7). As expected, HAPE-S showed an exaggerated increase in pulmonary artery pressure (27.9 ± 6 vs 19.3 ± 3.7 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and a fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (66.9 ± 11.7 vs 78.7 ± 3.8%, P < 0.05), when exposed to hypoxia. HIF1α levels at baseline could accurately classify members of the two groups (AUC = 0.87). In a subset of the groups where hemoglobin fractions were additionally measured to understand the cause of elevated hypoxic response at baseline, two of four HAPE-S subjects showed reduced HbA. In conclusion, HIF 1 α levels during normoxia may represent an important marker for determination of HAPE susceptibility.

  5. Raised HIF1α during normoxia in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Soree, Poonam; Gupta, Rajinder K.; Singh, Krishan; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Vats, Praveen; Bharadwaj, Abhishek; Baburaj, T. P.; Chaudhary, Pooja; Singh, Vijay K.; Verma, Saroj; Bajaj, Amir Chand; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptibility is associated with EGLN1 polymorphisms, we hypothesized that HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-S, had HAPE episode in past) subjects may exhibit abnormal HIF1α levels in normoxic conditions. We measured HIF1α levels in HAPE-S and HAPE resistant (HAPE-R, no HAPE episode) individuals with similar pulmonary functions. Hemodynamic responses were also measured before and after normobaric hypoxia (Fi02 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in both groups. . HIF1α was higher in HAPE-S (320.3 ± 267.5 vs 58.75 ± 33.88 pg/ml, P < 0.05) than HAPE-R, at baseline, despite no significant difference in baseline oxygen saturations (97.7 ± 1.7% and 98.8 ± 0.7). As expected, HAPE-S showed an exaggerated increase in pulmonary artery pressure (27.9 ± 6 vs 19.3 ± 3.7 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and a fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (66.9 ± 11.7 vs 78.7 ± 3.8%, P < 0.05), when exposed to hypoxia. HIF1α levels at baseline could accurately classify members of the two groups (AUC = 0.87). In a subset of the groups where hemoglobin fractions were additionally measured to understand the cause of elevated hypoxic response at baseline, two of four HAPE-S subjects showed reduced HbA. In conclusion, HIF 1 α levels during normoxia may represent an important marker for determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:27210110

  6. Fatal Pulmonary Infection Due to Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ardito, Fausta; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; La Sorda, Marilena; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Ricciotti, Gabriella; Fadda, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of fatal pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus in a young patient with cystic fibrosis, who underwent bipulmonary transplantation after a 1-year history of severe lung disease. Fifteen days after surgery he developed septic fever with progressive deterioration in lung function. M. abscessus, initially isolated from a pleural fluid specimen, was then recovered from repeated blood samples, suggesting a disseminated nature of the mycobacterial disease. Drug susceptibility testing assay, performed on two sequential isolates of the microorganism, showed a pattern of multidrug resistance. Despite aggressive therapy with several antimycobacterial drugs, including clarithromycin, the infection persisted, and the patient died. PMID:11158161

  7. A rare presentation of patent ductus arteriosus in an adult patient with normal pulmonary hypertension and limb edema

    PubMed Central

    Pishgoo, Bahram; Saburi, Amin; Khosravi, Arezoo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) at childhood is one of the five major and frequent congenital abnormalities, but it can be rarely seen in adults. Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) and other presentations such as heart failure and edema are the identified complications of longstanding PDA, but adult case with no permanent heart symptoms and PHTN was rare. We reported a rare case of with an obvious PDA and normal pulmonary pressure. CASE REPORT A 61-year-old woman presented with dyspnea (New York Heart Association class 2), chest pain, and lower limb edema. Echocardiogram showed; normal left ventricular chamber size and function, normal size of both atria. Furthermore, an obvious PDA (diameter = 6-7 mm) connecting the aortic arch to the pulmonary artery was reported in echocardiography. No lung congestion and evidence for PHTN was reported by computed tomographic angiography [Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) = 30 mmHg]. The patient was treated with antihypertensive drugs and after 1 and 3 months follow-up, edema and other symptoms were resolved. CONCLUSION Finally, we conclude that PDA in adulthood can present with nonspecific cardiovascular symptoms, and it seems that PHTN is not a fixed echocardiographic finding in these patients. PMID:25477985

  8. Managing High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema with Oxygen Alone: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Nair, Velu; Singh, Surinderpal; Gupta, Amul; Mulajkar, Deepak; Yanamandra, Sushma; Norgais, Konchok; Mukherjee, Ruchira; Singh, Vikrant; Bhattachar, Srinivasa A; Patyal, Sagarika; Grewal, Rajan; Chopra, Bhushan

    2016-12-01

    Yanamandra, Uday, Velu Nair, Surinderpal Singh, Amul Gupta, Deepak Mulajkar, Sushma Yanamandra, Konchok Norgais, Ruchira Mukherjee, Vikrant Singh, Srinivasa A. Bhattachar, Sagarika Patyal, and Rajan Grewal. High-altitude pulmonary edema management: Is anything other than oxygen required? Results of a randomized controlled trial. High Alt Med Biol. 17:294-299, 2016.-Treatment strategies for management of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) are mainly based on the observational studies with only two randomized controlled trials, thus the practice is very heterogeneous and individualized as per the choice of treating physician. To compare the response to different modalities of therapy in patients with HAPE in a randomized controlled manner. We conducted an open-label, randomized noninferiority trial to compare three modalities of therapy (Therapy 1: supplemental O2 with oral dexamethasone 8 mg q8 hours [n = 42], Therapy 2: supplemental O2 with sustained release oral nifedipine 20 mg q8 hours [n = 41], and Therapy 3: only supplemental O2 [n = 50]). Bed rest was mandated in all patients. The study was conducted in a cohort of previously healthy young lowlander males at an altitude of 3500 m. Baseline characteristics of the patients were comparable in the study arms. Complete response was defined as clinical and radiological resolution of features of HAPE, no oxygen dependency, a normal 6-minute walk test (6MWT) on 2 consecutive days, and normal two-dimensional echocardiography. Results were compared by analysis of variance using SPSS version 16.0. There was no statistical difference in duration of therapy to complete response between the three groups (Therapy 1: 8.1 ± 4.0 days, Therapy 2: 6.7 ± 3.9 days, Therapy 3: 6.8 ± 3.2 days; p = 0.15). There were no deaths in any of the groups. We conclude that oxygen and bed rest alone are adequate therapy for HAPE and that adjuvant pharmacotherapy with either dexamethasone or nifedipine

  9. A new view of pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ketai, L H; Godwin, J D

    1998-07-01

    The old division of lung edema into two categories--cardiogenic (hydrostatic) and noncardiogenic (increased permeability)--is no longer adequate. For instance, it fails to distinguish between the capillary leak caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome from that caused by interleukin-2 treatment. Further, it fails to account for the capillary leak ('stress-failure') that may accompany edema. A modern view of edema must recognize the natural barriers to the formation and spread of edema. These barriers are the capillary endothelium and the alveolar epithelium. Varying degrees of damage to them can account for the varying radiographic and clinical manifestations of lung edema. Thus, interleukin-2 administration causes increased endothelial permeability without causing alveolar epithelial damage. The result is lung edema that is largely confined to the interstitium, causing little hypoxia and clearing rapidly. However, acute respiratory distress syndrome, which is characterized by extensive alveolar damage, causes air-space consolidation, severe hypoxia, and slow resolution. Thus, a reasonable classification of lung edema requires at least four categories: 1) hydrostatic edema; 2) acute respiratory distress syndrome (permeability edema caused by diffuse alveolar damage); 3) permeability edema without alveolar damage; and (4) mixed hydrostatic and permeability edema. The authors emphasize the importance of the barriers provided by the capillary endothelium and the alveolar epithelium in determining the clinical and radiographic manifestations of edema. In general, when the alveolar epithelium is intact, the radiographic manifestations are those of interstitial (not air-space) edema; this radiographic pattern predicts a mild clinical course and prompt resolution.

  10. Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defect protects from pulmonary edema: septal occluder device gradually reduces LR shunt.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu; Nakazawa, Gaku; Horinouchi, Hitomi; Torii, Sho; Ijichi, Takeshi; Ohno, Yohei; Amino, Mari; Shinozaki, Norihiko; Ogata, Nobuhiko; Yoshimachi, Fuminobu; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Ikari, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman was diagnosed as atrial septal defect (ASD) with pulmonary hypertension; pulmonary blood flow/systemic blood flow (Qp/Qs) of 2.3, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) of 71/23(39) mmHg and diastolic dysfunction of left ventricle. PAP was improved after medical therapy; therefore, transcatheter ASD closure was performed. Seven days later, left-sided heart failure occurred, however, the improvement of Qp/Qs (1.7) and PAP of 51/21(32) was confirmed. Diuretic therapy was introduced which led to further decrease of PAP 40/12(25) and Qp/Qs (1.1). Because of gradual decrease of Qp/Qs, this patient appeared to be protected from acute pulmonary edema.

  11. Combination of constant-flow and continuous positive-pressure ventilation in canine pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sznajder, J I; Becker, C J; Crawford, G P; Wood, L D

    1989-08-01

    Constant-flow ventilation (CFV) maintains alveolar ventilation without tidal excursion in dogs with normal lungs, but this ventilatory mode requires high CFV and bronchoscopic guidance for effective subcarinal placement of two inflow catheters. We designed a circuit that combines CFV with continuous positive-pressure ventilation (CPPV; CFV-CPPV), which negates the need for bronchoscopic positioning of CFV cannula, and tested this system in seven dogs having oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema. Addition of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, 10 cmH2O) reduced venous admixture from 44 +/- 17 to 10.4 +/- 5.4% and kept arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) normal. With the innovative CFV-CPPV circuit at the same PEEP and respiratory rate (RR), we were able to reduce tidal volume (VT) from 437 +/- 28 to 184 +/- 18 ml (P less than 0.001) and elastic end-inspiratory pressures (PEI) from 25.6 +/- 4.6 to 17.7 +/- 2.8 cmH2O (P less than 0.001) without adverse effects on cardiac output or pulmonary exchange of O2 or CO2; indeed, PaCO2 remained at 35 +/- 4 Torr even though CFV was delivered above the carina and at lower (1.6 l.kg-1.min-1) flows than usually required to maintain eucapnia during CFV alone. At the same PEEP and RR, reduction of VT in the CPPV mode without CFV resulted in CO2 retention (PaCO2 59 +/- 8 Torr). We conclude that CFV-CPPV allows CFV to effectively mix alveolar and dead spaces by a small bulk flow bypassing the zone of increased resistance to gas mixing, thereby allowing reduction of the CFV rate, VT, and PEI for adequate gas exchange.

  12. Global end-diastolic volume is associated with the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia and pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiro; Tagami, Takashi; Yokobori, Shoji; Matsumoto, Gaku; Igarashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Go; Onda, Hidetaka; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Predictive variables of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and pulmonary edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remain unknown. We aimed to determine associations between transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables and DCI and pulmonary edema occurrence after SAH. We reviewed 34 consecutive SAH patients monitored by the PiCCO system. Six patients developed DCI at 7 days after SAH on average; 28 did not (non-DCI). We compared the variable measures for 1 day before DCI occurred (DCI day -1) in the DCI group and 6 days after SAH (non-DCI day -1) in the non-DCI group for control. The mean value of the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI) for DCI day -1 was lower than that for non-DCI day -1 (676 ± 65 vs. 872 ± 85 mL/m, P = 0.04). Central venous pressure (CVP) was not significantly different (7.8 ± 3.1 vs. 9.4 ± 1.9 cm H2O, P = 0.45). At day -1 for both DCI and non-DCI, 11 patients (32%) had pulmonary edema. Global end-diastolic volume index was significantly higher in patients with pulmonary edema than in those without this condition (947 ± 126 vs. 766 ± 81 mL/m, P = 0.02); CVP was not significantly different (8.7 ± 2.8 vs. 9.2 ± 2.1 cm H2O, P = 0.78). Although significant correlation was found between extravascular lung water (EVLW) measures and GEDI (r = 0.58, P = 0.001), EVLW and CVP were not correlated (r = 0.03, P = 0.88). Thus, GEDI might be associated with DCI occurrence and EVLW accumulation after SAH.

  13. Involvement of water channel Aquaporin 5 in H2S-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyang; Jiang, Lei; Zou, Yuxia; Xing, Jingjing; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Baoli; Zhang, Hengdong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Acute exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poses a significant threat to life, and the lung is one of the primary target organs of H2S. However, the mechanisms involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the effects of H2S on the expression of water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) and to elucidate the signaling pathways involved in AQP5 regulation. In an in vivo study, C57BL6 mice were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of inhaled H2S, and histological injury of the lungs and ultrastructure injury of the epithelial cells were evaluated. With real-time PCR and western blot assays, we found that H2S exposure contributed to a significant decrease in AQP5 expression both in murine lung tissue and the A549 cell line, and the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were demonstrated to be implicated in AQP5 regulation. Therefore, adjusting AQP5 protein levels could be considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of APE induced by H2S and other hazardous gases.

  14. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  15. An analysis of and new risk factors for reexpansion pulmonary edema following spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Tsutomu; Ichi, Takaharu; Yohena, Tomofumi; Kawasaki, Hidenori; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background The major risk factor for reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) following the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax is thought to be chronic lung collapse. However, a long-term collapsed lung does not always cause RPE. The purpose of this study was to define other risk factors for RPE among patients undergoing drainage for the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who had been treated at our hospital during a 5-year period. The duration of symptoms, location and size of the pneumothorax, size of the chest tube, and pleural effusion, which can occur coincidentally with pneumothorax, were compared in patients who did and did not experience RPE. Results Forty patients were underwent drainage for the treatment of a spontaneous pneumothorax between January 2007 and December 2012. RPE developed in 13 of the 40 (32.5%) patients. In the multivariate analysis, the presence of pleural effusion coincident with pneumothorax contributed to the risk for RPE [odds ratios (OR), 1.557; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.290-1.880]. The duration of symptoms, location and size of the pneumothorax and size of the chest tube were similar between the groups. Symptomatic RPE was associated with a larger pneumothorax size. Conclusions The rate of RPE following spontaneous pneumothorax is higher than was previously reported. Our findings suggest the presence of pleural effusion coincidentally with pneumothorax may therefore be a new risk factor for RPE. PMID:25276359

  16. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype “AG” was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype “AA” increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals. PMID:27732943

  17. Fatal postoperative systemic pulmonary hypertension in benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baufreton, Christophe; Bruneval, Patrick; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Fouquet, Olivier; Giraud, Raphael; Banfi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DI-VHD) remains an under-recognized entity. Patient concerns: This report describes a heart valve replacement which was complicated by intractable systemic pulmonary arterial hypertension in a 61-year-old female with severe restrictive mitral and aortic disease. The diagnosis of valvular disease was preceded by a history of unexplained respiratory distress. The patient had been exposed to benfluorex for 6.5 years. Diagnoses: The diagnostic procedure documented specific drug-induced valvular fibrosis. Interventions: Surgical mitral and aortic valve replacement was performed. Outcomes: Heart valve replacement was postoperatively complicated by unanticipated disproportionate pulmonary hypertension. This issue was fatal despite intensive care including prolonged extracorporeal life support. Lessons: Benfluorex is a fenfluramine derivative which has been marketed between 1976 and 2009. Although norfenfluramine is the common active and toxic metabolite of all fenfluramine derivatives, the valvular and pulmonary arterial toxicity of benfluorex was much less known than that of fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine. The vast majority of benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease remains misdiagnosed as hypothetical rheumatic fever due to similarities between both etiologies. Better recognition of DI-VHD is likely to improve patient outcome. PMID:28079786

  18. ROCK2 and MYLK variants under hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude associate with high altitude pulmonary edema and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Priyanka; Mohammad, Ghulam; Singh, Yogendra; Qadar Pasha, MA

    2015-01-01

    Objective To date, a major class of kinases, serine–threonine kinase, has been scantly investigated in stress-induced rare, fatal (if not treated early), and morbid disorder, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). This study examined three major serine–threonine kinases, ROCK2, MYLK, and JNK1, along with six other genes, tyrosine hydroxylase, G-protein subunits GNA11 and GNB3, and alpha1 adrenergic receptor isoforms 1A, 1B, and 1D as candidate gene markers of HAPE and adaptation. Methods For this, 57 variants across these nine genes were genotyped in HAPE patients (n=225), HAPE controls (n=210), and highlanders (n=259) by Sequenom MS (TOF)-based MassARRAY® platform using iPLEX™ Gold technology. In addition, to study the gene expression, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the three study groups. Results A significant association was observed for C allele (ROCK2 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs10929728) with HAPE (P=0.03) and C, T, and A alleles (MYLK single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs11717814, rs40305, and rs820336) with both HAPE and adaptation (P=0.001, P=0.006, and P=0.02, respectively). ROCK2 88 kb GGGTTGGT haplotype was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.0009). MYLK 7 kb haplotype CTA, composed of variant alleles, was associated with higher risk of HAPE (P=0.0006) and lower association with adaptation (P=1E–06), whereas haplotype GCG, composed of wild-type alleles, was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.001) and higher association with adaptation (P=1E–06). Haplotype–haplotype and gene–gene interactions demonstrated a correlation in working of ROCK2 and MYLK. Conclusion The data suggest the association of ROCK2 with HAPE and MYLK with HAPE and adaptation in Indian population. The outcome has provided new insights into the physiology of HAPE and adaptation. PMID:26586960

  19. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  20. Bolus intravenous 0.9% saline, but not 4% albumin or 5% glucose, causes interstitial pulmonary edema in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Wiersema, Ubbo F; Schembri, David; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Prakash, Shivesh; Lawrence, Mark D; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid intravenous (iv) infusion of 0.9% saline alters respiratory mechanics in healthy subjects. However, the relative cardiovascular and respiratory effects of bolus iv crystalloid vs. colloid are unknown. Six healthy male volunteers were given 30 ml/kg iv 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, and 5% glucose at a rate of 100 ml/min on 3 separate days in a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and blood samples were measured before and after fluid administration. Lung ultrasound B-line score (indicating interstitial pulmonary edema) and Doppler echocardiography indices of cardiac preload were measured before, midway, immediately after, and 1 h after fluid administration. Infusion of 0.9% saline increased small airway resistance at 5 Hz (P = 0.04) and lung ultrasound B-line score (P = 0.01) without changes in Doppler echocardiography measures of preload. In contrast, 4% albumin increased DLCO, decreased lung volumes, and increased the Doppler echocardiography mitral E velocity (P = 0.001) and E-to-lateral/septal e' ratio, estimated blood volume, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (P = 0.01) but not lung ultrasound B-line score, consistent with increased pulmonary blood volume without interstitial pulmonary edema. There were no significant changes with 5% glucose. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentration increased only after 0.9% saline (P = 0.001), suggesting an inflammatory mechanism associated with edema formation. In healthy subjects, 0.9% saline and 4% albumin have differential pulmonary effects not attributable to passive fluid filtration. This may reflect either different effects of these fluids on active signaling in the pulmonary circulation or a protective effect of albumin.

  1. Fatal pulmonary complication during induction therapy in a patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Brigita, Jonaitytė; Rūta, Kibarskytė; Edvardas, Danila; Marius, Miglinas; Dmitrij, Šeinin; Rokas, Stulpinas; Jurgita, Mitrikevičienė; Vygantas, Gruslys; Virginija, Šileikienė; Rolandas, Zablockis

    2016-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is an inflammatory systemic disorder affecting small to medium sized vessels and likely leading to any organ dysfunction. Adequate treatment is important to avoid mortality or severe organ damage. In most cases initial treatment (induction therapy) allows to achieve remission. Induction therapy leads to immunosuppression and may cause severe infections. However, in vasculitis patients even an intensive immunosuppressive therapy is rarely complicated by an invasive fungal infection. We present a case in a 29-year old male patient with newly diagnosed AAV. He suffered a fatal pulmonary complication of the induction immunosuppressive treatment. Pathological (infectious) changes in the lungs were misinterpreted as progression of the vasculitis and he died due to disseminated angioinvasive aspergillosis. A clinical course, imaging and histopathology of this case are described and discussed. PMID:28356801

  2. The critical roles of platelet activation and reduced NO bioavailability in fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension in a murine hemolysis model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weiguo; Jin, Richard; Zhang, Jinyan; You, Tao; Peng, Zhihai; Ge, Xiaowen; Bronson, Roderick T.; Halperin, Jose A.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is suspected to be a strong mortality determinant of hemolytic disorders. However, direct contribution of acute intravascular hemolysis to fatal PAH has not been investigated. The roles of nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency and platelet activation in hemolysis-associated fatal PAH have been suspected but not been experimentally studied. We recently generated a unique intravascular hemolysis mouse model in which the membrane toxin, intermedilysin (ILY), exclusively lyses the erythrocytes of transgenically expressing human CD59 mice (ThCD59RBC), thereby inducing ILY-dose–dependent massive hemolysis. Using this murine hemolysis model, we found that the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right ventricle failure caused sudden death. Reduced NO bioavailability and massive platelet activation/aggregation leading to the formation of massive thrombosis specifically in the pulmonary microvasculature played the critical roles in pathogenesis of acute hemolysis-associated fatal PAH. Therapeutic interventions enhancing NO bioactivity or inhibiting platelet activation prevented sudden death or prolonged survival time via the suppression of the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and improvement of right ventricle function. These findings further highlight the importance of the inhibition of platelet activation and the enhancement of NO bioavailability for the treatment and prevention of hemolysis-associated (fatal) PAH. PMID:20511540

  3. Pulmonary edema following generalized tonic clonic seizures is directly associated with seizure duration

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jeffrey D.; Hardin, Kimberly A.; Parikh, Palak; Li, Chin-Shang; Seyal, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postictal pulmonary edema (PPE) is almost invariably present in human and animal cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) coming to autopsy. PPE may be a contributing factor in SUDEP. The incidence of postictal PPE is unknown. We retrospectively investigated PPE following generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) in the epilepsy monitoring unit. Methods Chest X-Rays (CXR) following each GTCS were obtained in 24 consecutive patients. Relationship of CXR abnormality to seizure duration, ictal/postictal oxygen desaturation (SpO2), apnea and presence of postictal generalized EEG suppression (PGES) was investigated using logistic regression. Results Eleven of 24 patients had CXR abnormalities following a GTCS. In these 11 patients, 22 CXR were obtained and abnormalities were present in 15 CXR. Abnormalities included PPE in 7 patients, of which 2 also had focal infiltrates. In 4 patients focal infiltrates were present without PPE. There was no significant difference in mean time to CXR (225 min) following GTCS in the abnormal CXR group versus the normal group of patients (196 min). Mean preceding seizure duration was longer (p=0.002) in GTCS with abnormal CXR (259.7 sec) versus GTCS with normal CXR (101.2 sec). Odds-ratio for CXR abnormality was 20.46 (p=0.006) with seizure duration greater than 100 sec versus less than 100 sec. On multivariable analysis, only the seizure duration was a significant predictor of CXR abnormality (p=0.015). Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities are not uncommon following GTCS. The presence of CXR abnormality is significantly associated with the duration of the preceding GTCS. Severe, untreated PPE may be relevant to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:25844030

  4. Negative-pressure pulmonary edema complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus abelii).

    PubMed

    Kenny, David E; Knightly, Felicia; Haas, Bradley; Hergott, Lawrence; Kutinsky, Ilana; Eller, Jimmie L

    2003-12-01

    A 22-yr-old, 86-kg, morbidly obese female orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) was immobilized and transported to the Denver Zoological Gardens hospital for a routine physical examination. Immediately after arriving at the hospital, cyanosis and apparent inadequate ventilatory efforts were noted. Clinically significant hypoxia occurred despite attempts to ventilate the orangutan through face mask, and attempts to place an endotracheal tube began. A large volume of pink-tinged frothy fluid flowed from the trachea when the laryngoscope was inserted into the oropharynx. Severe pulmonary edema due to negative-pressure pulmonary edema, precipitating life-threatening hypoxia was suspected. The orangutan was maintained on a mechanical ventilator using the neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium besylate and sedation with periodic doses of isoflurane and midazolam for 48 hr. Positive end-expiratory pressure was used while the orangutan was ventilated mechanically to improve respiratory function. The edema and hypoxia improved, but respiratory arrest ensued 30 min after extubation, when the orangutan was removed from mechanical ventilation. Necropsy and histopathology demonstrated that serious lung injury had led to acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. [Acute pulmonary edema occurred during tocolytic treatment using nicardipine in a twin pregnancy. Report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Philippe, H-J; Le Trong, A; Pigeau, H; Demeure, D; Desjars, P; Esbelin, J; Caroit, Y; Winer, N

    2009-02-01

    We report three cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in twin pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. The three patients were admitted into our unit on account of the risk of premature birth after 29 to 32 weeks of amenorrhea. The treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine combined with glucocorticoids therapy had been undertaken in the previous maternity ward. The three patients presented symptoms of acute dyspnea 48 hours after the beginning of the treatment. Paraclinical examinations eliminated the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. The patients'condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. There are currently few studies proving the benefits of nicardipine in tocolysis treatment. Few similar cases of acute pulmonary edema have been noted in twin pregnancy patients treated with nicardipine. Haemodynamic modifications specific to twin pregnancy, intravenous hydratation and glucocorticoid maturation may explain a part of this complication. Therefore, it is appropriated to limit the use of intravenous nicardipine in the sole indication of tocolysis in twin pregnancy, and to prefer the use of nifedipine and atosiban, that have proven their effectiveness in this indication.

  6. Inhibition of secretory phospholipase A2 activity attenuates acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema induced by isoproterenol infusion in mice after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Kenichi; Fujioka, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Yukio; Obata, Jun-Ei; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Yano, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Mishina, Hideto; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2010-10-01

    Several types of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) are expressed in lung tissue, yielding various eicosanoids that might cause pulmonary edema. This study examined whether inhibition of sPLA2 activity attenuates acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema in mice. Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema was induced in C57BL/6J male mice by an increase in heart rate with continuous intravenous infusion of isoproterenol (ISP) (10 mg/kg/h) at 2 weeks after the creation of myocardial infarction by left coronary artery ligation. Just before ISP infusion, a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg LY374388, a prodrug of LY329722 that inhibits sPLA2 activity, or vehicle was administered. The ISP infusion after myocardial infarction induced interstitial and alveolar edema on lung histology. Furthermore, it increased the lung-to-body weight ratio, pulmonary vascular permeability evaluated by the Evans blue extravasation method, lung activity of sPLA2, and lung content of thromboxane A2 and leukotriene B4. These changes were significantly attenuated by LY374388 treatment. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the survival rate during the ISP infusion after myocardial infarction was significantly higher in LY374388- than in vehicle-treated mice. Similar results were obtained with another inhibitor of sPLA2 activity, para-bromophenacyl bromide. In conclusion, inhibition of sPLA2 activity suppressed acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  7. The characteristic of Indonesia's pre-eclampsia: From obstetric intensive care with ventilator until epidemiologic and its molecular biology profile of pulmonary edema in severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hermanto; Adityawarman; Sulistyono; Ardian, M; Dachlan, E G

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary edema is among the least frequently diagnosed criteria for severe pre-eclampsia. A higher incidence of pulmonary edema was noted in older patients, multigravidas, and patients with underlying chronic hypertension that developed prior to delivery. The development of pulmonary edema was also associated with the administration of excess colloid or crystaloid infusion. Two hundreds and thirty millions people occupying Indonesia as tropical and coastal country gave rise the problem of highly maternal mortality rate of 225/100,000 deliveries where pre-eclampsia and eclampsia as most possible cause. Over 5years from the year 2005 through 2009 our 160 eclampsia study observed about significantly correlation between typical estafet referred case and maternal mortality (Odds ratio 19.1 and P=0.065). Specifically those referred eclampsia cases arriving lately to our tertiary hospital, complication of pulmonary edema also apparently became determinant factor to uphold the increased maternal mortality (Odds ratio 6.1 and P=0.083) We found at our teaching hospital Dr. Soetomo Surabaya as referral center along the year 2012, 477 pre-eclampsia-eclampsia cases which complicated by 27 cases of pulmonary from which we apply obstetric intensive care unit for tightly monitoring treatment. The majority use of ventilator were applied on 22 cases (81.4%), that most approximately 16 cases (72%) need 48h under ventilator use and the remaining 6 cases was not untill 5days of extubation. The etiology of pulmonary edema in preeclamptic patients involves multi-factors; abnormal COP-PWCP gradient, increased pulmonary capillary permeability, and left ventricular failure were identified causes. It has been well known that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in severe pre-eclampsia-eclampsia initiated by capillary alveolar leakage that leading increased capillary permeability and extravascular fluid oncotic as well as decreased plasma oncotic pressure. In severe pre-eclampsia appear that

  8. Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Min Hyun; Cho, Hyun Oh; Park, Soon Eun

    2017-01-01

    Laryngospasm, an occlusion of the glottis, can occur at any time during anesthesia, and is associated with serious perioperative complications such as hypoxia, hypercabia, aspiration, bronchospasm, arrhythmia, prolonged recovery, cardiac collapse, and eventually catastrophic death. Importantly, postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well described life-threatening complication related to acute and chronic upper airway obstruction. Sugammadex well known for affirmatively reducing the postoperative pulmonary complications associated with residual neuromuscular blockade may have an indirect role in triggering the negative intrathoracic pressure by raising a rapid and efficacious respiratory muscle strength in acute upper airway obstruction. Herein, we report a case of postoperative NPPE following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade using sugammadex. PMID:28184275

  9. Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Min Hyun; Cho, Hyun Oh; Park, Soon Eun

    2017-02-01

    Laryngospasm, an occlusion of the glottis, can occur at any time during anesthesia, and is associated with serious perioperative complications such as hypoxia, hypercabia, aspiration, bronchospasm, arrhythmia, prolonged recovery, cardiac collapse, and eventually catastrophic death. Importantly, postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well described life-threatening complication related to acute and chronic upper airway obstruction. Sugammadex well known for affirmatively reducing the postoperative pulmonary complications associated with residual neuromuscular blockade may have an indirect role in triggering the negative intrathoracic pressure by raising a rapid and efficacious respiratory muscle strength in acute upper airway obstruction. Herein, we report a case of postoperative NPPE following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade using sugammadex.

  10. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M.; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder. Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013–June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia. We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE

  11. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder.Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013-June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia.We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE patients had a high

  12. Donor smoking is associated with pulmonary edema, inflammation and epithelial dysfunction in ex vivo human donor lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae W.; Wickersham, Nancy; Nguyen, John; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Although recipients of donor lungs from smokers have worse clinical outcomes, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We tested the association between donor smoking and the degree of pulmonary edema (as estimated by lung weight), the rate of alveolar fluid clearance (measured by airspace instillation of 5% albumin) and biomarkers of lung epithelial injury and inflammation (bronchoalveolar lavage surfactant protein-D and IL-8) in ex vivo lungs recovered from 298 organ donors. The extent of pulmonary edema was higher in current smokers (n=127) compared to non-smokers (median 408g, IQR 364-500 vs. 385g, IQR 340 - 460, p=0.009). Oxygenation at study enrollment was worse in current smokers versus non-smokers (median PaO2/FiO2 214 mmHg, IQR 126-323 vs. 266 mmHg, IQR 154-370, p=0.02). Current smokers with the highest exposure (≥20 pack-years) had significantly lower rates of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial fluid transport function may be dose related. BAL IL-8 was significantly higher in smokers while surfactant protein-D was lower. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke has important effects on inflammation, gas exchange, lung epithelial function and lung fluid balance in the organ donor that could influence lung function in the lung transplant recipient. PMID:25146497

  13. [Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Eclampsia, Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Pulmonary Edema due to Pregnancy-induced Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Aida, Junko; Okutani, Hiroai; Oda, Yutaka; Okutani, Ryu

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with mental retardation was admitted to a nearby hospital for an abrupt onset of seizure. Physical examination revealed remarkable hypertension and pregnancy with estimated gestational age of 28th week. Severe pulmonary edema and hypoxia led to a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) accompanied by eclampsia. She was orotracheally intubated because of refractory seizure and hypoxemia, and transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Besides severe hypoxia and hypercapnea, an enhanced lesion was detected in the left posterior cerebrum by brain MRI. No abnormal findings were detected in the fetus, with heart rate of 150 beats x min. She was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) caused by PIH and emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia was scheduled. A male newborn was delivered with Apgar score of 1/4 (1/5 min), followed by starting continuous infusion of nicardipine for controlling hypertension. Chest X-P on completion of surgery revealed remarkably alleviated pulmonary edema. She received intensive treatment and continued positive pressure ventilation for four days after delivery. She recovered with no neurological deficits and her child was well without any complications.

  14. Role of Survival Time and Injury Severity in Fatal Pulmonary Fat Embolism.

    PubMed

    Jarmer, Juliane; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Thali, Michael J; Bolliger, Stephan A

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary fat embolism (PFE) is frequent in blunt trauma and may occasionally lead to death. A correlation between fracture grade and severity and PFE grade has been described before, but no correlation between PFE and survival time, fat crushing extent, fat crush grade, or number of body regions with fractures could be noted in this small study. To further examine this, we decided to examine the aforementioned points in a far larger study group.Autopsy protocols of 188 nonresuscitated fatalities with blunt trauma and without right heart injury, which underwent whole body dissection, were retrospectively reviewed concerning the presence and the severity of PFE, injuries, survival time, age, sex, and the body mass index.The fracture grade, the fracture severity, and the number of the fractured regions correlated very well with the grade of PFE, but the crushed regions, crush grade, and crush severity did not. We observed a time correlation between survival time and PFE only in the sense that very rapid deaths were often PFE negative. High-grade PFE was observed most often in patients having died less than 6 hours after the incident, and PFE grades of 2 or more were occasionally noted even after 48 hours.

  15. Fatal right ventricular failure and pulmonary hypertension after protamine administration during cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Bibek S; Sanghavi, Devang K; Guru, Pramod K; Reddy, Dereddi Raja; Iyer, Vivek N

    2016-03-01

    Protamine sulfate is the only Food and Drug administration approved medication for reversal of intraoperative heparin-induced anticoagulation during cardiac and vascular surgeries. One of the rare side effects of protamine sulfate is an idiosyncratic reaction resulting in acute pulmonary hypertension (APH) and right ventricular (RV) failure occurring after protamine administration. These reactions are rare but catastrophic with high mortality. A 36-year-old female with severe congestive heart failure was undergoing cardiac transplant surgery. After successful implantation of the donor heart, the patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass. Protamine was then administered to reverse the heparin anticoagulation. She immediately developed APH and RV failure immediately after protamine infusion. The patient required immediate administration of inotropic agents, nitric oxide (NO), and subsequently required a number of mechanical support devices including an RV assist device (RVAD) and ultimately full veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). Despite heroic efforts, the patient developed refractory multi-organ failure in the Intensive Care Unit and died after family requested discontinuation of resuscitative efforts. This case probably represents the first reported occurrence of fatal protamine-induced APH and ventricular failure in the setting of cardiac transplantation surgery. A number of interventions including inhaled NO, systemic vasopressors, RVAD, and ultimately VA-ECMO failed to reverse the situation, and the patient died of multi-organ failure.

  16. Levels of interleukin-6, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue of a rat model of hypoxia-induced acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    GAO, HENGBO; TIAN, YINGPING; WANG, WEI; YAO, DONGQI; ZHENG, TUOKANG; MENG, QINGBING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and interleukin (IL)-6 in the lung tissue of a rat model of acute pulmonary edema induced by acute hypoxia, and its pathophysiological significance. A total of 48 adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into group A, a normal group; group B, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 24 h; group C, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 48 h; and group D, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 72 h. The rats in groups B-D were intraperitoneally injected with 6% ammonium chloride to establish the model of acute pulmonary edema, and were subsequently sacrificed following successful modeling for 24, 48 and 72 h. The plasma of rats was isolated and the lungs of the rats were removed. Subsequently, a 10% lung homogenate was prepared and the contents and the activities of MDA, SOD and IL-6 in the lung tissue and IL-6 in the plasma were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MDA and IL-6 expression levels increased and SOD activity decreased in the lung tissue in group B as compared with group A; however the difference did not reach significance (P>0.05). MDA, IL-6 and SOD levels in the lung tissue of rats were significantly altered following the increased duration of pulmonary edema in groups C and D, as compared group A (P<0.05). The plasma IL-6 levels of the rats in groups B-D significantly increased, as compared with those in group A (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that the incidence of acute pulmonary edema may be associated with oxidative stress. Furthermore, decreased antioxidant capacity and increased free radical levels may be associated with pulmonary edema, as in the present study the levels of IL-6, SOD and MDA in the lung tissue were observed to be associated with the pathological changes of the disease. PMID:26998026

  17. Receptor for advanced glycation end products and neuronal deficit in the fatal brain edema of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William H; Artlett, Carol M; Zhang, Weixian; Kreipke, Christian W; Passmore, Gregory G; Rafols, Jose A; Sima, Anders A F

    2008-10-31

    Radiologic and neuropsychologic studies suggest that diabetes mellitus causes structural changes in the brain and adversely effects cognitive development. Experimental animal models of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have advanced these findings by demonstrating duration-related neuronal and cognitive deficits in T1DM BB/Wor rats. We studied the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and neuronal densities in the brains of two patients who died as the result of clinical brain edema(BE)that developed during the treatment of severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RAGE was markedly and diffusely expressed in blood vessels, neurons, and the choroid plexus and co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in astrocytes. Significant neuronal loss was seen in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Astrocytosis was present and white matter was atrophied in both cases when compared to age-matched controls. Our data supports that a neuroinflammatory response occurs in the BE associated with DKA, and that even after a relatively short duration of poorly controlled T1DM, the pathogenesis of primary diabetic encephalopathy can be initiated.

  18. Coagulation factor V Leiden mutation in sudden fatal pulmonary embolism and in a general northern European population sample.

    PubMed

    Kuismanen, K; Savontaus, M L; Kozlov, A; Vuorio, A F; Sajantila, A

    1999-12-06

    The R506Q point mutation in the gene coding for coagulation factor V (Leiden mutation) is the major underlying defect in resistance to activated protein C (APC), which predisposes to venous thrombosis. The risk of deep vein thrombosis is clearly elevated in carriers of the mutation, but the risk for pulmonary embolism has not been demonstrated to be as high. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of the Leiden mutation in an autopsy series of sudden fatal pulmonary embolism cases. PCR and subsequent restriction enzyme digestion were applied for genotyping 164 cases of pulmonary embolism. According to our data, the allele frequency of the Leiden mutation is not higher in sudden fatal pulmonary embolism cases (0.8%, 95% CI 0-1.9%) than in the general Finnish population (1.5%, 95% CI 0-3.3%). In addition to the 97 Finns, we determined the frequency of the Leiden mutation in 255 individuals from the neighbouring populations (Saami, Komi, and Karelians from Russia and Estonians), and found the Saami to have the highest frequency of the Leiden mutation (6.3%, 95% CI 3.2-9.2) in the general northern European population sample studied here.

  19. Role of PiCCO monitoring for the integrated management of neurogenic pulmonary edema following traumatic brain injury: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoping; Xu, Zhijun; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Gensheng

    2016-10-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is occasionally observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, this condition is often underappreciated. NPE is frequently misdiagnosed due to its atypical clinical performance, thus delaying appropriate treatment. A comprehensive management protocol of NPE in patients with TBI has yet to be established. The current study reported the case of a 67-year-old man with severe TBI who was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU). On day 7 after hospitalization, the patient suddenly suffered tachypnea, tachycardia, systemic hypertension and hypoxemia during lumbar cistern drainage. Intravenous diuretics, tranquilizer and glucocorticoid were administered due to suspected left heart failure attack. Chest radiography examination supported the diagnosis of pulmonary edema; however, hypotension and hypovolemia were subsequently observed. Pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) hemodynamic monitoring and bedside echocardiography were performed, which excluded the diagnosis of cardiac pulmonary edema, and thus the diagnosis of NPE was confirmed. Goal-directed therapy by dynamic PiCCO monitoring was then implemented. In addition, levosimendan, an inotropic agent, was introduced to improve cardiac output. The patient had complete recovered from pulmonary edema and regained consciousness on day 11 of hospitalization. The current case demonstrated that PiCCO monitoring may serve a central role in the integrated management of NPE in patients with TBI. Levosimendan may be a potential medicine in treating cardiac dysfunction, along with its benefit from improving neurological function in NPE patients.

  20. Role of PiCCO monitoring for the integrated management of neurogenic pulmonary edema following traumatic brain injury: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoping; Xu, Zhijun; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Gensheng

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is occasionally observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, this condition is often underappreciated. NPE is frequently misdiagnosed due to its atypical clinical performance, thus delaying appropriate treatment. A comprehensive management protocol of NPE in patients with TBI has yet to be established. The current study reported the case of a 67-year-old man with severe TBI who was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU). On day 7 after hospitalization, the patient suddenly suffered tachypnea, tachycardia, systemic hypertension and hypoxemia during lumbar cistern drainage. Intravenous diuretics, tranquilizer and glucocorticoid were administered due to suspected left heart failure attack. Chest radiography examination supported the diagnosis of pulmonary edema; however, hypotension and hypovolemia were subsequently observed. Pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) hemodynamic monitoring and bedside echocardiography were performed, which excluded the diagnosis of cardiac pulmonary edema, and thus the diagnosis of NPE was confirmed. Goal-directed therapy by dynamic PiCCO monitoring was then implemented. In addition, levosimendan, an inotropic agent, was introduced to improve cardiac output. The patient had complete recovered from pulmonary edema and regained consciousness on day 11 of hospitalization. The current case demonstrated that PiCCO monitoring may serve a central role in the integrated management of NPE in patients with TBI. Levosimendan may be a potential medicine in treating cardiac dysfunction, along with its benefit from improving neurological function in NPE patients. PMID:27698733

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide for the brain dead donor with neurogenic pulmonary edema during anesthesia for organ donation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Sun; Lee, A-Ran; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, An Suk; Park, Soon Eun; Cho, Young Woo

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) in brain dead organ donors occurring after an acute central nervous system insult threatens organ preservation of potential organ donors and the outcome of organ donation. Hence the active and immediate management of NPE is critical. In this case, a 50-year-old male was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for organ donation. He was hypoxic due to NPE induced by spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage. Protective ventilatory management, intermittent recruitment maneuvers, and supportive treatment were maintained in the ICU and the operating room (OR). Despite this management, the hypoxemia worsened after the OR admission. So inhaled nitric oxide (NO) therapy was performed during the operation, and the hypoxic phenomena showed remarkable improvement. The organ retrieval was successfully completed. Therefore, NO inhalation can be helpful in the improvement of hypoxemia caused by NPE in brain dead organ donors during anesthesia for the organ donation. PMID:25237451

  2. An uncommon complication of a common clinical scenario: exploring reexpansion pulmonary edema with a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Jared W.; Jaeger, Amy L.; Tillis, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare complication that can occur after rapid reinflation of the lung following thoracentesis of a pleural effusion or chest tube drainage of pneumothorax. The severity in clinical presentation can be widely varied from radiographic changes only to rapidly progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The quick nature of onset and potential for serious decline in a previously stable patient makes it important to prepare, recognize, diagnose, and appropriately manage patients who develop RPE. The standard treatment for RPE consists of supportive care, and there are certain measures that may be taken to reduce the risk, including limiting the amount drained and avoiding excessive negative pleural pressure. Exactly how to prevent RPE remains unclear, however, and varying recommendations exist. This is a case report of RPE after thoracentesis for a pleural effusion and a brief review of literature to date, including potential preventative strategies. PMID:27406463

  3. An uncommon complication of a common clinical scenario: exploring reexpansion pulmonary edema with a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Jared W; Jaeger, Amy L; Tillis, William P

    2016-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare complication that can occur after rapid reinflation of the lung following thoracentesis of a pleural effusion or chest tube drainage of pneumothorax. The severity in clinical presentation can be widely varied from radiographic changes only to rapidly progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The quick nature of onset and potential for serious decline in a previously stable patient makes it important to prepare, recognize, diagnose, and appropriately manage patients who develop RPE. The standard treatment for RPE consists of supportive care, and there are certain measures that may be taken to reduce the risk, including limiting the amount drained and avoiding excessive negative pleural pressure. Exactly how to prevent RPE remains unclear, however, and varying recommendations exist. This is a case report of RPE after thoracentesis for a pleural effusion and a brief review of literature to date, including potential preventative strategies.

  4. Hydrothorax with alveolar-pleural fistula mimicking re-expansion pulmonary edema during liver transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an alveolar-pleural fistula with hepatic hydrothorax in a patient undergoing orthotropic liver transplantation, which was detected by drainage of transudate through an endotracheal tube during operation. A standard endotracheal tube was changed to a double-lumen tube to provide differential lung ventilation. The patient was diagnosed with an alveolar-pleural fistula by direct vision of an air leak during positive-pressure ventilation through a diaphragmatic incision. There was still a concern about worsening his ventilation due to persistent aspiration of pleural effusion towards the ipsilateral lung during the remaining operation period. Surgeon repaired the defect on the exposed lung surface via diaphragmatic opening. Anesthesiologists should consider an alveolar-pleural fistula as a possible differential diagnosis with re-expansion pulmonary edema when transudate emanating from the endotracheal tube is obtained in patients with massive hydrothorax. PMID:25844139

  5. Selective HDAC6 inhibition prevents TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyan; Ma, Zhongsen; Shetty, Sreerama; Ma, Mengshi; Fu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Lung endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. New strategies against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction may provide therapeutic benefits against lung vascular injury. Cell-cell junctions and microtubule cytoskeleton are basic components in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. HDAC6, a deacetylase primarily localized in the cytoplasm, has been reported to modulate nonnuclear protein function through deacetylation. Both α-tubulin and β-catenin are substrates for HDAC6. Here, we examined the effects of tubastatin A, a highly selective HDAC6 inhibitor, on TNF-α induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A blocked TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell hyperpermeability, which was associated with increased α-tubulin acetylation and microtubule stability. Tubastatin A pretreatment inhibited TNF-α-induced endothelial cell contraction and actin stress fiber formation with reduced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A also induced β-catenin acetylation in human lung endothelial cells, which was associated with increased membrane localization of β-catenin and stabilization of adherens junctions. HDAC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA also prevented TNF-α-induced barrier dysfunction and increased α-tubulin and β-catenin acetylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, in a mouse model of endotoxemia, tubastatin A was able to prevent endotoxin-induced deacetylation of α-tubulin and β-catenin in lung tissues, which was associated with reduced pulmonary edema. Collectively, our data indicate that selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A is a potent approach against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  6. Benzo(a)pyrene-induced pulmonary inflammation, edema, surfactant dysfunction, and injuries in rats: alleviation by farnesol.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Wajhul; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Khan, Rehan; Lateef, Abdul; Tahir, Mir; Rehman, Muneeb U; Ali, Farrah; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-02-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) is a well-known environmental contaminant and carcinogen. Its sources include tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust, forest fire, and other combustion processes. Farnesol, an active principle of Vachellia farnesiana and other aromatic plants, possesses preventive properties against various toxicities. Present study was designed to estimate chemopreventive effects of farnesol against B(a)P-induced pulmonary injuries. To determine the protective effects of farnesol, it was administered orally at 2 doses (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) once daily for 14 days. Rats were exposed intratracheally to B(a)P, 5 mg/kg b.w. on days 12 and 14, thereafter assessed for pulmonary toxicities 24 hours post last dose of B(a)P. B(a)P-induced edema, inflammation, oxidative stress, and consequent damages in lungs were assessed in terms of total protein, total cell count, nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). B(a)P also reduced the levels of phospholipids (lung surfactants) in BALF. However, pretreatment with farnesol at both the doses significantly reduced the lung injuries and inflammatory responses. Farnesol also protected the levels of phospholipids to normal when compared with control. It also modified the activities of B(a)P metabolizing enzymes NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in lung tissue of rats. Present findings suggest a prominent role of farnesol against B(a)P-induced lung inflammation, edema, surfactant dysfunction, and epithelial damages in Wistar rats. In conclusion, farnesol shows lung protection against B(a)P toxicities in Wistar rats.

  7. Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis with fatal pulmonary thromboembolism caused by benign pelvic space-occupying lesions--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Hannah; Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Venous stasis predisposes to thrombosis. One hundred and sixty cases of fatal pulmonary thromboembolism were reviewed to determine how many cases had deep venous thromboses associated with venous blood flow reduction caused by external pressure from benign pelvic masses. Three cases were identified, representing 2% of cases overall (3/160): a 44-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma (1048 g); a 74-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 1 L of urine); and a 70-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 3 L of urine). Although a rare cause of fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, space-occupying pelvic lesions can lead to extrinsic pressure on adjacent veins reducing blood flow and causing stasis and thrombosis. Individuals with large pelvic masses may, therefore, be at increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism from deep venous thrombosis, particularly in the presence of concurrent risk factors such as immobility, thrombophilias, malignancy, and significant cardiopulmonary disease.

  8. Clara Cell Protein (CC16), a Marker of Lung Epithelial Injury, Is Decreased in Plasma and Pulmonary Edema Fluid From Patients With Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kropski, Jonathan A.; Fremont, Richard D.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are common clinical syndromes that are underdiagnosed. Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is an antiinflammatory protein secreted by the Clara cells of the distal respiratory epithelium that has been proposed as a biomarker of lung epithelial injury. We tested the diagnostic and prognostic utility of CC16 in patients with non–trauma-related ALI/ARDS compared to a control group of patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE). Methods: Plasma and pulmonary edema fluid samples were obtained from medical and surgical patients with ALI/ARDS or CPE requiring intubation for mechanical ventilation. The etiology of pulmonary edema was determined using consensus clinical criteria for ALI/ARDS and CPE and the edema fluid-to-plasma protein ratio. Plasma and edema fluid CC16 levels were measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CC16 levels were log transformed for analysis, and comparisons were made by the Student t test or χ2 as appropriate. Results: Compared to patients with CPE (n = 9), patients with ALI/ARDS (n = 23) had lower median CC16 levels in plasma (22 ng/mL [interquartile range (IQR), 9 to 44 ng/mL] vs 55 ng/mL [IQR, 18 to 123 ng/mL], respectively; p = 0.053) and pulmonary edema fluid (1,950 ng/mL [IQR, 1,780 to 4,024 ng/mL] vs 4,835 ng/mL [IQR, 2,006 to 6,350 ng/mL], respectively; p = 0.044). Relative to total pulmonary edema fluid protein concentration, the median CC16 level was significantly lower in patients with ALI/ARDS (45 ng CC16/mg total protein [IQR, 4 to 64 ng CC16/mg total protein] vs 120 ng CC16/mg total protein [IQR, 87 to 257 ng CC16/mg total protein], respectively; p = 0.005). Neither plasma nor edema fluid CC16 levels predicted mortality, the number of days of unassisted ventilation, or ICU length of stay. Conclusion: CC16 is a promising diagnostic biomarker for helping to discriminate ALI from CPE. Larger scale validation is warranted to better characterize the utility of CC16

  9. A patient with possible TRALI who developed pulmonary hypertensive crisis and acute pulmonary edema during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Nishisako, Ryo; Sato, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    There are very few case reports of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) under close hemodynamic monitoring. We encountered a case of possible TRALI during on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A 66-year-old man who had undergone on-pump CABG was administered fresh frozen plasma (FFP). One hour after FFP transfusion, pulmonary hypertensive crisis and subsequent hypoxic decompensation occurred. A second cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was needed for circulatory and respiratory deterioration. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS), intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP), and nitric oxide therapy were required after the surgery. Despite the severity of the initial state, his recovery was comparatively smooth. ECLS and IABP were removed on postoperative day (POD)1; the patient was extubated and discharged from the ICU on POD7 and POD12, respectively. The diagnosis of TRALI was confirmed by human leukocyte antigen antibody detection in the administered FFP. In addition, lymphocytic immunofluorescence test showed that a cross-match of the plasma from the pooled FFP against the recipient leukocytes was positive. The clinical course of the pulmonary artery hypertension was followed by a decrease in dynamic lung compliance. The mechanism of this phenomenon is unclear. However, it might suggest the possibility of vasoconstriction or obstruction of the peripheral pulmonary artery preceding lung damage, as in the case in animal models reported previously.

  10. [Acute pulmonary edema from inhalation of the bite-block after anesthesia with a laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Banchereau, F; Marié, S; Pez, H; Boully-Balihaut, A; Tueux, O

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of acute pulmonary oedema, consecutive to upper airway obstruction due to the inhalation of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) bite block during recovery. The LMA was used for general anaesthesia with the bite-block provided in France. No trouble occurred during LMA insertion and anaesthesia. Symptomatic treatment provided complete resolution within a few days.

  11. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Finsterwalder, Richard; Friedl, Heinz P.; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Kocher, Alfred; Wagner, Christine; Wagner, Stephan N.; Fischer, Gottfried; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wiedemann, Dominik; Petzelbauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself. Methods We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting. Results XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host. Conclusions In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation. PMID:26536466

  12. Ruptured Mycotic Common Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Fatal Pulmonary Embolism after Emergency Stent-Grafting in a Drug Abuser

    PubMed Central

    Kalogirou, Thomas E.; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T.; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O.

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of a mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser is a limb- and life-threatening condition that necessitates emergency intervention. Emergency stent-grafting appears to be a viable, minimally invasive alternative, or a bridge, to subsequent open surgery. Caution is required in cases of suspected concomitant deep vein thrombosis in order to minimize the possibility of massive pulmonary embolism during stent-grafting, perhaps by omitting stent-graft postdilation or by inserting an inferior vena cava filter first. We describe the emergency endovascular management, in a 60-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, of a ruptured mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, which was complicated by a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:25593530

  13. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pelaez, Ana Isabel; del Mar Garcia-Suarez, Maria; Manteca, Angel; Melon, Ovidio; Aranaz, Carlos; Cimadevilla, Rafael; Mendez, Francisco Javier; Vazquez, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:19366439

  14. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Ana Isabel; Garcia-Suarez, Maria del Mar; Manteca, Angel; Melon, Ovidio; Aranaz, Carlos; Cimadevilla, Rafael; Mendez, Francisco Javier; Vazquez, Fernando

    2009-04-14

    We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  15. 2009 H1N1 fatalities: the New Mexico experience.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Erin G; Bryce, Clare H; Avery, Catherine; Smelser, Chad; Thompson, Deborah; Nolte, Kurt B

    2012-11-01

    Histopathologic features of New Mexico 2009 H1N1 fatalities have not been representative of those reported nationwide. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all New Mexico 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) fatalities (n = 50). In cases in which autopsy was performed (n = 12), histologic sections and culture results were examined. In contrast to previously published studies, the majority of our fatalities did not have diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (2/12; 16.7%). Common findings included pulmonary interstitial inflammation and edema, tracheobronchitis, and pneumonia. Two cases had significant extra-pulmonary manifestations: myocarditis and cerebral edema with herniation. The majority had a rapid disease course: range from 1 to 12 days (median, 2 days), and Native Americans were disproportionately represented among fatalities. These findings suggest that New Mexico H1N1 fatalities generally did not survive long enough to develop the classic picture of DAD. Pathologists should be aware that H1N1 may cause extra-pulmonary pathology and perform postmortem cultures and histologic sampling accordingly.

  16. Genetic differences and aberrant methylation in the apelin system predict the risk of high-altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Aastha; Kohli, Samantha; Dua, Sanchi; Thinlas, Tashi; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M. A. Qadar

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor stimulates the expression of apelin, a potent vasodilator, in response to reduced blood arterial oxygen saturation. However, aberrations in the apelin system impair pulmonary vascular function, potentially resulting in the development of high-altitude (HA)-related disorders. This study aimed to elucidate the genetic and epigenetic regulation of apelin, apelin receptor (APLNR), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) in HA adaptation and HA pulmonary edema (HAPE). A genome-wide association study and sequencing identified variants of apelin, APLNR, and NOS3 that were validated in a larger sample size of HAPE-patients (HAPE-p), HAPE-free controls (HAPE-f), and healthy highland natives (HLs). Apelin-13 and nitrite levels and apelin and NOS3 expression were down-regulated in HAPE-p (P < 0.001). Among the several studied polymorphisms, apelin rs3761581, rs2235312, and rs3115757; APLNR rs11544374 and rs2282623; and NOS3 4b/4a, rs1799983, and rs7830 were associated with HAPE (P < 0.03). The risk allele rs3761581G was associated with a 58.6% reduction in gene expression (P = 0.017), and the risk alleles rs3761581G and rs2235312T were associated with low levels of apelin-13 and nitrite (P < 0.05). The latter two levels decreased further when both of these risk alleles were present in the patients (P < 0.05). Methylation of the apelin CpG island was significantly higher in HAPE-p at 11.92% than in HAPE-f and HLs at ≤7.1% (P < 0.05). Moreover, the methylation effect was 9% stronger in the 5′ UTR and was associated with decreased apelin expression and apelin-13 levels. The rs3761581 and rs2235312 polymorphisms and methylation of the CpG island influence the expression of apelin in HAPE. PMID:25918383

  17. Genetic differences and aberrant methylation in the apelin system predict the risk of high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aastha; Kohli, Samantha; Dua, Sanchi; Thinlas, Tashi; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2015-05-12

    Hypoxia-inducible factor stimulates the expression of apelin, a potent vasodilator, in response to reduced blood arterial oxygen saturation. However, aberrations in the apelin system impair pulmonary vascular function, potentially resulting in the development of high-altitude (HA)-related disorders. This study aimed to elucidate the genetic and epigenetic regulation of apelin, apelin receptor (APLNR), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) in HA adaptation and HA pulmonary edema (HAPE). A genome-wide association study and sequencing identified variants of apelin, APLNR, and NOS3 that were validated in a larger sample size of HAPE-patients (HAPE-p), HAPE-free controls (HAPE-f), and healthy highland natives (HLs). Apelin-13 and nitrite levels and apelin and NOS3 expression were down-regulated in HAPE-p (P < 0.001). Among the several studied polymorphisms, apelin rs3761581, rs2235312, and rs3115757; APLNR rs11544374 and rs2282623; and NOS3 4b/4a, rs1799983, and rs7830 were associated with HAPE (P < 0.03). The risk allele rs3761581G was associated with a 58.6% reduction in gene expression (P = 0.017), and the risk alleles rs3761581G and rs2235312T were associated with low levels of apelin-13 and nitrite (P < 0.05). The latter two levels decreased further when both of these risk alleles were present in the patients (P < 0.05). Methylation of the apelin CpG island was significantly higher in HAPE-p at 11.92% than in HAPE-f and HLs at ≤ 7.1% (P < 0.05). Moreover, the methylation effect was 9% stronger in the 5' UTR and was associated with decreased apelin expression and apelin-13 levels. The rs3761581 and rs2235312 polymorphisms and methylation of the CpG island influence the expression of apelin in HAPE.

  18. [Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins: a fatal cause of refractory neonatal cyanosis].

    PubMed

    Savey, B; Jeanne-Pasquier, C; Dupont-Chauvet, P; Maragnes, P; Bellot, A; Guillois, B

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare neonatal pathology that combines refractory hypoxemia with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, and leads to death every time. Histologic examination of lung tissue confirms the diagnosis and is characterized by a decreased number of pulmonary capillaries, immature lobular development, and abnormal proximity between pulmonary arteries and veins. This abnormal proximity is responsible for an arteriovenous shunt. We report five cases confirmed by postmortem histology, which occurred over 14 years in Lower Normandy (France). The cumulative incidence is therefore of 1.8 for 100,000 births. In these five cases, the first symptoms appeared during the first hour of life and death occurred before 24h in four of five cases. The patient with the longest survival had mild histological lesions and delayed emergence of the first symptoms. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal anomalies were associated with ACD/MPV in two cases, and bilateral pulmonary hypoplasia in three cases. Optimized invasive ventilation, pulmonary vasodilators, vasoactive drugs, and pulmonary surfactant did not improve survival. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was not used. We present a review of the literature on ACD/MPV, a clinical and histological entity little known to both clinicians and pathologists, whereas a premortem diagnosis is possible and genetic counseling in affected families can be suggested.

  19. Incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema in low-landers during re-exposure to high altitude after a sojourn in the plains

    PubMed Central

    Apte, C.V.; Tomar, R.K.S.; Sharma, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is uncertainty whether acclimatized low-landers who return to high altitude after a sojourn at low altitude have a higher incidence of pulmonary edema than during the first exposure to high altitude. Methods This was a prospective cohort study consisting of men ascending to 3400 m by road (N = 1003) or by air (N = 4178). The study compared the incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema during first exposure vs the incidence during re-exposure in each of these cohorts. Results Pulmonary edema occurred in 13 of the 4178 entries by air (Incidence: 0.31%, 95% CI: 0.18%–0.53%). The incidence during first exposure was 0.18% (0.05%–0.66%) and 0.36% (0.2%–0.64%) during re-exposure (Fisher Exact Test for differences in the incidence (two-tailed) p = 0.534). The relative risk for the re-exposure cohort was 1.95 (95% CI, 0.43%–8.80%). Pulmonary edema occurred in 3 of the 1003 road entrants (Incidence: 0.30%, 95% CI: 0.08%–0.95%). All three cases occurred in the re-exposure cohort. Conclusion The large overlap of confidence intervals between incidence during first exposure and re-exposure; the nature of the confidence interval of the relative risk; and the result of the Fisher exact test, all suggest that this difference in incidence could have occurred purely by chance. We did not find evidence for a significantly higher incidence of HAPE during re-entry to HA after a sojourn in the plains. PMID:26288488

  20. Fatal water intoxication of an Army trainee during urine drug testing.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Frank D; Gardner, John W

    2002-05-01

    An Army trainee developed acute water intoxication, hyponatremia, pulmonary edema, and fatal cerebral edema. This is the first report of a fatality related to urine drug testing. This resulted from supervised excessive water ingestion in an attempt to induce a sufficient urine specimen for substance abuse testing. To avoid a similar preventable death in the future, we make several recommendations. These include limiting the volume of ingested fluid to eight ounces every 30 to 45 minutes, not to exceed 40 ounces, and providing a relaxed, reassuring environment when obtaining urine specimens for substance abuse detection.

  1. Enhanced expression of Fas and FasL modulates apoptosis in the lungs of severe P. falciparum malaria patients with pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Setthapramote, Chayanee; Palipoch, Sarawoot

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis mediated by Fas/FasL has been implicated in pulmonary disorders. However, little is known about the relationship between Fas and FasL in the process of lung injury during malaria infection. Paraffin-embedded lung tissues from malaria patients were divided into two groups: those with pulmonary edema (PE) and those without pulmonary edema (non-PE). Normal lung tissues were used as the control group. Cellular expression of Fas, FasL, and the markers of apoptotic caspases, including cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-8 in the lung tissues were investigated by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. Semi-quantitative analysis of IHC staining revealed that cellular expression of Fas, FasL, cleaved caspase-8, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased in the lungs of patients with PE compared with the lungs of patients with non-PE and control groups (all P < 0.05). In addition, significant positive correlations were obtained between Fas and apoptosis (rs = 0.937, P < 0.001) and FasL and apoptosis (rs = 0.808, P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between Fas and FasL expression (rs = 0.827, P < 0.001) and between cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3 expression (rs = 0.823, P < 0.001), which suggests that Fas-dependent initiator and effector caspases, including cleaved caspase-8 and caspase-3, are necessary for inducing apoptosis in the lungs of patients with severe P. falciparum malaria. The Fas/FasL system and downstream activation of caspases are important mediators of apoptosis and may be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in severe P. falciparum malaria patients. The proper regulation of the Fas/FasL pathway can be a potential treatment for pulmonary complications in falciparum malaria patients. PMID:26617708

  2. Using a Caesalpinia echinata Lam. protease inhibitor as a tool for studying the roles of neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and proteinase 3 in pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Silva, Ilana; Neuhof, Christiane; Gozzo, Andrezza Justino; Nunes, Viviane Abreu; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia; Neuhof, Heinz; Araújo, Mariana da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by neutrophil infiltration and the release of proteases, mainly elastase (NE), cathepsin G (Cat G) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which can be controlled by specific endogenous inhibitors. However, inhibitors of these proteases have been isolated from different sources, including plants. For this study, CeEI, or Caesalpinia echinata elastase inhibitor, was purified from C. echinata (Brazil-wood) seeds after acetone fractionation, followed by ion exchange and reversed phase chromatographic steps. Characterization with SDS-PAGE, stability assays, amino acid sequencing and alignment with other protein sequences confirmed that CeEI is a member of the soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor family. Like other members of this family, CeEI is a 20 kDa monomeric protein; it is stable within a large pH and temperature range, with four cysteine residues forming two disulfide bridges, conserved amino acid residues and leucine-isoleucine residues in the reactive site. CeEI was able to inhibit NE and Cat G at a nanomolar range (with K(i)s of 1.9 and 3.6 nM, respectively) and inhibited PR3 within a micromolar range (K(i) 3.7 μM), leading to hydrolysis of specific synthetic substrates. In a lung edema model, CeEI reduced the lung weight and pulmonary artery pressure until 180 min after the injection of zymosan-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. In experiments performed in the presence of a Cat G and PR3, but not an NE inhibitor, lung edema was reduced only until 150 min and pulmonary artery pressure was similar to that of the control. These results confirm that NE action is crucial to edema establishment and progression. Additionally, CeEI appears to be a useful tool for studying the physiology of pulmonary edema and provides a template for molecular engineering and drug design for ALI therapy.

  3. The susceptibility gene screening in a Chinese high-altitude pulmonary edema family by whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yingzhong, Yang; Yaping, Wang; Jin, Xu; Rili, Ge

    2017-02-20

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is one of idiopathic mountain sicknesses that occur in healthy lowlanders when they quickly ascend to altitudes exceeding 2500 m above sea levels within 1-7 days. Growing evidence suggests that genetics plays an important role in the risk of HAPE. In this study, we recruited a Chinese HAPE family and screened genetic variations in the 7 family members (including 6 family members with a medical history of HAPE and the propositus's mother) by whole-exome sequencing. The results showed 18 genetic variations (9 SNVs and 9 Indels) were related to HAPE. Two SNV sites (CFHR4 (p.L85F) and OXER1 (p.R176C)) were predicted to be damaging and alter protein functions by SIFT, PolyPhen-2 and PROVEAN software. The biological function of OXER1 was highly related to the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway. Therefore, those two sites were identified as candidate pathological variations. Moreover, other SNVs (NMB p.S150P, APOB p.I4194T, EIF4ENIF1 p.Q763P) and Indels (KCNJ12 p.EE333-334E, ANKRD31 p.LMN251-253LN, OR2A14 p.HFFC175-178HFC) were also predicted to be damaging as well, which also might be considered as potential candidate pathological variations related to HAPE. Collectively we firstly screened the susceptibility genes in a Chinese HAPE family by whole-exome sequencing, which will provide new clues for further mechanistic studies of HAPE.

  4. Acidemia in severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Gensini, Gian F; Picariello, Claudio; Attanà, Paola; Mattesini, Alessio; Chiostri, Marco; Valente, Serafina

    2015-09-01

    In clinical practice, acidotic patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) are commonly considered more severe in comparison with nonacidotic patients, and data on the outcome of these patients treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation (NIV) are lacking.The present investigation was aimed at assessing whether acidosis on admission (pH < 7.35) was associated with adverse outcome in 65 consecutive patients with ACPE treated with NIV and admitted to our Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU).In our population, 28 patients were acidotic (28 of 65, 43.1%), whereas 41 patients were not (37 of 65, 56.9%). According to the Repeated Measures General Linear Model, pCO2 values significantly changed throughout the 2-h NIV treatment (P = 0.019) in both groups (P = 0001). In acidotic patients, pCO2 significantly decreased (51.9 ± 15.3 → 47.0 ± 12.8 → 44.8 ± 12.7), whereas they increased in the nonacidotic subgroup (36.8 ± 6.5 → 36.9 ± 7.2 → 37.6 ± 6.4). No difference was observed in intubation rate between acidotic (eight patients, 28.6%) and nonacidotic patients (12 patients, 32.4%) (P = 0.738). In-ICCU mortality rate did not differ between (13 patients, 35.1%) and nonacidotic patients (nine patients, 32.1%) (P = 0.801).Our data strongly suggest that in patients with severe ACPE treated with NIV, the presence of acidosis is not associated with adverse outcomes (early mortality and intubation rates) in these patients.

  5. Post splenectomy fatal pulmonary embolism in a patient with moderate hemophilia a.

    PubMed

    Davoodabadi, Abdolhossein; Adib, Mohammad Mahdi; Keleidari, Behrooz

    2011-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by defective production of factor VIII. The main concern associated with the disease is bleeding, especially after trauma and surgeries. Factor VIII replacement therapy is associated with substantial decrease of bleeding events during surgery. However, there have been a number of reports of thromboemblic events in this situation. The present report describes a case of moderate hemophilia A in which splenectomy did lead to pulmonary embolism and subsequent death.The patient was a 25-year-old man with hemophilia A admitted after a car accident and trauma to left lower chest and abdomen. He received factor VIII concentrates for replacement therapy. He was hemodynamically stable on the first day, but on the second day his hemoglobin declined and he showed signs of abdominal tenderness. He, therefore, was subjected to laparatomy and splenectomy. After the operation, he suddenly developed dyspnea and decline in blood pressure, and death afterwards. Autopsy of the patient revealed massive pulmonary thromboembolism. The symptoms and outcome of the present case indicate that although pulmonary thromboembolism in the early postoperative period in patients with hemophilia A undergoing splenectomy and receiving factor VIII concentrate for replacement is rare, it should not be assumed a far-fetched event, and prophylactic measures to prevent thromboemboly must be considered.

  6. Fatal bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following single digit replantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anderson S M; Fok, Margaret W M; Fung, Boris K K

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism in hand surgery is rare. There is no report in the literature on postoperative mortality from venous thromboembolism following microsurgery in upper limbs. We report the case of a 56-year-old Chinese man who died from pulmonary embolism as a result of bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis following prolonged surgery under general anaesthesia after replantation of a finger. This case raises awareness of the need for precautions against venous thromboembolism following prolonged microsurgery and identification of high-risk patients.

  7. Andes virus and first case report of Bermejo virus causing fatal pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Padula, Paula; Della Valle, Marcelo González; Alai, María Garcia; Cortada, Pedro; Villagra, Mario; Gianella, Alberto

    2002-04-01

    Two suspected hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases from Bolivia occurred in May and July 2000 and were confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-ANDES using N-Andes recombinant antigen serology. Clot RNAs from the two patients were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing. We describe two characterized cases of HPS. One was caused by infection with Bermejo virus and the other with Andes Nort viral lineage, both previously obtained from Oligoryzomys species. This is the first report of molecular identification of a human hantavirus associated with Bermejo virus.

  8. Hemorrhagic onset of hemangioblastoma located in the dorsal medulla oblongata presenting with tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and neurogenic pulmonary edema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gekka, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Kazumata, Ken; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Motegi, Hiroaki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present a case of dorsal medulla oblongata hemangioblastoma with fourth ventricular hemorrhage. A 23-year-old female developed sudden consciousness disturbance, and CT revealed hemorrhage in all cerebral ventricles and a hyperdense mass in the cisterna magna. Although the reddish tumor located in the dorsal medulla oblongata was successfully removed, she suffered from severe tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) and neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) because of baroreflex failure and damage to the solitary tract nuclei. After intensive care for 12 weeks following surgery, she was discharged without any neurological or radiological deficits. Pathogenesis of TTC/NPE is discussed in this paper.

  9. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  10. Endomyocardial fibrosis as a cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome and fatal pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Silva, Carolina M P D C; Ardito, Sabrina Q; Theodoropoulos, Tatiana A D; Cury, Patrícia M; Corbucci, Hélio A R

    2010-01-01

    A 24-year-old-man had right-sided heart failure of 3 months' duration. A Doppler echocardiogram revealed atrium and right ventricular enlargement, obliteration of the right ventricular apex, and a mass with an echolucent center measuring 20x21 mm in the right ventricular outlet. He died of pulmonary embolism. At autopsy, a huge organized thrombus obliterating the right ventricular apex passing through the tricuspid valve to the right atrium and then extending to the inferior vena cava up to the suprahepatic veins was seen. Histologically, an intense fibrotic thickening of the endomyocardium extending into the myocardium was observed. Cardiac thrombosis associated with endomyocardial fibrosis should be added to the list of causes of Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  11. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  12. Intralipid prevents and rescues fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Umar, Soban; Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Li, Jingyuan; Maltese, Federica; Partownavid, Parisa; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling leading to right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and failure. Intralipid (ILP), a source of parenteral nutrition for patients, contains γ-linolenic acid and soy-derived phytoestrogens that are protective for lungs and heart. We, therefore, investigated the therapeutic potential of ILP in preventing and rescuing monocrotaline-induced PAH and RV dysfunction. PAH was induced in male rats with monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Rats then received daily ILP (1 mL of 20% ILP per day IP) from day 1 to day 30 for prevention protocol or from day 21 to day 30 for rescue protocol. Other monocrotaline-injected rats were left untreated to develop severe PAH by day 21 or RV failure by approximately day 30. Saline or ILP-treated rats served as controls. Significant increase in RV pressure and decrease in RV ejection fraction in the RV failure group resulted in high mortality. Therapy with ILP resulted in 100% survival and prevented PAH-induced RV failure by preserving RV pressure and RV ejection fraction and preventing RV hypertrophy and lung remodeling. In preexisting severe PAH, ILP attenuated most lung and RV abnormalities. The beneficial effects of ILP in PAH seem to result from the interplay of various factors, among which preservation and/or stimulation of angiogenesis, suppression and/or reversal of inflammation, fibrosis and hypertrophy, in both lung and RV, appear to be major contributors. In conclusion, ILP not only prevents the development of PAH and RV failure but also rescues preexisting severe PAH.

  13. Successful management of severe unilateral re-expansion pulmonary edema after mitral valve repair with mini-thoracotomy using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Okamoto, Kazuma; Kudo, Mikihiko; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hayashi, Kanako; Inaba, Yu; Ai, Kimiaki; Suzuki, Takeshi; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2017-03-01

    A 60-year-old man received mitral valve repair via right mini-thoracotomy, which was followed by unilateral re-expansion pulmonary edema on the right side and severe hemoptysis just after the surgery. Despite differential lung ventilation with unilateral high positive end expiratory pressure was initiated for the affected right lung, respiratory function did not improved and hemodynamics was collapsed in the next day. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated by cannulation of the right jugular and the left femoral vein. After pulmonary function recovered gradually, veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was terminated on the fifth postoperative day. He was discharged in ambulatory condition on postoperative day 52.

  14. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and life-threatening shock due to calcium channel blocker overdose: a case report and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Tauseef Afaq; Hill, Jennifer; Huckleberry, Yvonne; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-02-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) overdose can be life-threatening when manifest as catastrophic shock and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. We describe a case of massive overdose of multiple medications, including sustained-release verapamil, which was resistant to conventional support. Initial treatment for CCB overdose is primarily supportive, and includes fluid resuscitation. The mechanism of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is not well known, and reported cases have been successfully treated with mechanical ventilation. Circulatory shock may fail to respond to atropine, glucagon, and calcium in severely poisoned patients, and vasopressors are usually required. Attempting to overcome calcium-channel antagonism with the supra-therapeutic doses of calcium salts is clinically indicated to reverse hypotension and bradycardia. There is evidence that hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia therapy is superior to other therapies for CCB poisoning, and the mechanism is thought to be the insulin-mediated active transport of glucose into the cells, which counters the CCB-induced intra-cellular carbohydrate-deficient state. Conventional decontamination measures are ineffective in accelerating clearance of CCB. Experience with intravenous lipid emulsion for lipophilic drug overdose, such as verapamil, is limited, but has been proposed as a rescue therapy and might improve cardiac inotropy through intravascular sequestration of the lipophilic CCB.

  15. [Case report of re-expansion pulmonary edema in a patient with anorexia nervosa after removal of a huge ovarian tumor].

    PubMed

    Hari, Junko; Arai, Masayasu; Kosaka, Yasuharu; Toda, Masaya; Kuroiwa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2014-04-01

    We described a case of 19-year-old female who developed re-expansion pulmonary edema (RPE) after removal of a huge ovarian tumor. Altered lung volume after the surgery was observed by chest X-ray. Preoperatively, the lung was highly compressed by the tumor. Patient was intubated under general anesthesia and was ventilated by pressure controlled mode with only 5 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). P/F ratio was changed from 163 to 444 after removal of the tumor. At the end of the surgery, P/F ratio decreased to 263 with yellow frothy sputum in the endotracheal tube and we diagnosed re-expansion pulmonary edema based on appearing yellow frothy sputum and chest X-ray. No recruitment procedure was carried out through the course except positive pressure ventilation with 5 cmH2O of PEEP in the intensive care unit after surgery. Twelve hours after the surgery, we could not confirm the recovery of lung volume on chest X-ray; however the patient was extubated because of P/F ratio increasing to 507. After 8 days of the surgery, the chest X-ray showed recovery of the lung volume to almost normal size. In this case, the compressed lung needed almost 1 week to recover the lung volume. This change in chest X-ray might indicate inadequate recovery of lung volume by recruitment maneuver and this should be avoided in order not to allow development of unfavorable clinical course of RPE.

  16. Dexmedetomidine alleviates pulmonary edema by upregulating AQP1 and AQP5 expression in rats with acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan-xu; Dai, Zhong-liang; Zhang, Xue-ping; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Qiang; Gao, Li-kun

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanisms by which dexmedetomidine alleviates pulmonary edema in rats with acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: normal saline control (NS) group, receiving intravenous 0.9% normal saline (5 mL/kg); LPS group, receiving intravenous LPS (10 mg/kg); small-dose dexmedetomidine (S) group, treated with a small dose of dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1)); medium-dose dexmedetomidine (M) group, treated with a medium dose of dexmedetomidine (2.5 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1)); high-dose dexmedetomidine (H) group, treated with a high dose of dexmedetomidine (5 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1)). The rats were sacrificed 6 h after intravenous injection of LPS or NS, and the lungs were removed for evaluating histological characteristics and determining the lung wet/dry weight ratio (W/D). The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the lung tissues were assessed by enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mRNA and protein expression levels of aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-5 (AQP5) were detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. The lung tissues from the LPS groups were significantly damaged, which were less pronounced in the H group but not in the small-dose dexmedetomidine group or medium-dose dexmedetomidine group. The W/D and the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β in the pulmonary tissues were increased in the LPS group as compared with those in NS group, which were reduced in the H group but not in S group or M group (P<0.01). The expression of AQP1 and AQP5 was lower in the LPS group than in the NS group, and significantly increased in the H group but not in the S group or M group (P<0.01). Our findings suggest that dexmedetomidine may alleviate pulmonary edema by increasing the expression of AQP-1 and AQP-5.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption and lung edema: critical role for bicarbonate stimulation of AC10

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Jordan; Obiako, Boniface; Ramila, K. C.; Putinta, Kevin; Schilling, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria-induced sepsis is a common cause of pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction and can progress toward acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in intracellular cAMP tightly regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity; however, cAMP signals are highly compartmentalized: whether cAMP is barrier-protective or -disruptive depends on the compartment (plasma membrane or cytosol, respectively) in which the signal is generated. The mammalian soluble adenylyl cyclase isoform 10 (AC10) is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate and is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Elevated extracellular bicarbonate increases cAMP in PMVECs to disrupt the endothelial barrier and increase the filtration coefficient (Kf) in the isolated lung. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis-induced endothelial barrier disruption and increased permeability are dependent on extracellular bicarbonate and activation of AC10. Our findings reveal that LPS-induced endothelial barrier disruption is dependent on extracellular bicarbonate: LPS-induced barrier failure and increased permeability are exacerbated in elevated bicarbonate compared with low extracellular bicarbonate. The AC10 inhibitor KH7 attenuated the bicarbonate-dependent LPS-induced barrier disruption. In the isolated lung, LPS failed to increase Kf in the presence of minimal perfusate bicarbonate. An increase in perfusate bicarbonate to the physiological range (24 mM) revealed the LPS-induced increase in Kf, which was attenuated by KH7. Furthermore, in PMVECs treated with LPS for 6 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in AC10 expression. Thus these findings reveal that LPS-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier failure requires bicarbonate activation of AC10. PMID:26475732

  18. What Is Macular Edema?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema Sections What Is Macular Edema? What Causes Macular ... Edema Diagnosis Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Dec. 01, 2010 Macular edema is swelling or ...

  19. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Rowe, R Grant

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology.

  20. Fatal course of pulmonary Absidia sp. infection in a 4-year-old girl undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krauze, Agnieszka; Krenke, Katarzyna; Matysiak, Michal; Kulus, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Absidia sp. is a rare etiologic agent responsible for infectious complications in immunosuppressed patients. The authors describe a 4-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with pleuropneumonia caused by an Absidia infection during the induction of remission. A review of the published reports in current literature is included for comparison. To the authors' knowledge only six cases of primary pulmonary absidiomycosis have been published. Despite its uncommon pulmonary presentation, mucormycosis should be considered in patients with an immunosuppressing illness and positive risk factors and when a pulmonary lesion is not responding to appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  1. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... mediastinitis ) Abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) Buildup of fluid between the layers of tissue ... reactions Cardiovascular Chemotherapy Interstitial lung disease Pleural effusion Pulmonary edema Respiratory Systemic lupus erythematosus Patient Instructions Interstitial lung ...

  2. Mitochondrial haplogroup D4 confers resistance and haplogroup B is a genetic risk factor for high-altitude pulmonary edema among Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y J; Gao, W X; Li, S Z; Huang, X W; Chen, Y; Liu, F Y; Huang, Q Y; Gao, Y Q

    2012-10-09

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a life-threatening condition caused by acute exposure to high altitude. Accumulating evidence suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of HAPE. However, conclusions from association studies have been hindered by limited sample size due to the rareness of this disease. It is known that mitochondria are critical for hypoxic adaptation, and mitochondrial malfunction can be an important factor in HAPE development. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and polymorphisms affect HAPE susceptibility. We recruited 204 HAPE patients and 174 healthy controls in Tibet (3658 m above sea level), all Han Chinese, constituting the largest sample size of all HAPE vulnerability studies. Among mtDNA haplogroups, we found that haplogroup D4 is associated with resistance to HAPE, while haplogroup B is a genetic risk factor for this condition. Haplogroup D4 (tagged by 3010A) may enhance the stability of 16S rRNA, resulting in reduced oxidative stress and protection against HAPE. Within haplogroup B, subhaplogroup B4c (tagged by 15436A and 1119C) was associated with increased risk for HAPE, while subhaplogroup B4b may protect against HAPE. We indicate that there are differences in HAPE susceptibility among mtDNA haplogroups. We conclude that mitochondria are involved in adverse reactions to acute hypoxic exposure; our finding of differences in susceptibility as a function of mitochondrial DNA haplotype may shed light on the pathogenesis of other disorders associated with hypoxia, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    A recent outbreak of a severe pulmonary disease in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a previously unrecognized bantavirus. The virus has been isolated from its majorreservoir, the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus,and recently named Sin Nombre virus. Clinically, the disease has become known as the bantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Since May 1993, 44 fatal cases of HPS have been identified through clinicopathological review and immunobistochemical(IHC) testing of tissues from 273 patients who died of an unexplained noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. In 158 cases for which suitable specimens were available, serologicaltesting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of extracted RNA was also performed. IHC, serological, and PCR results were concordant for virtually all HPS and non-HPS patients when more than one assay was performed. The prodromal ilness of HPS is similar to that of many other viral diseases. Consistent bematological features include thrombocytopenia, bemoconcentration, neutropbilic leukocytosis with a left shift, and reactivel lymphocytes. Pulmonary bistopatbological features were similar in most of the fatal HPS cases (40/44) and consisted of an interstitial pneumonitis with a variable mononuclear cell infiltrate, edema, and focal byaline membranes. In four cases, bowever, pulmonary features were significantly different and included diffuse alveolar damage and variable degrees of severe air space disorganization. IHC analysis showed widespread presence of bantaviral antigens in endothelial cells of the microvasculature, particularly in the lung. Hantaviral antigens were also observed within follicular dendritic cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Hantaviral inclusions were observed in endothelial cells of lungs by thinsection electron microscopy, and their identity was verified by immunogold labeling. Virus-like particles were seen in pulmonary endothelial cells and macropbages. HPS is

  4. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in ADRB2, GNB3 and GSTP1 genes and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    He, Yongjun; Liu, Lijun; Xu, Pengcheng; He, Na; Yuan, Dongya; Kang, Longli; Jin, Tianbo

    2017-02-14

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) occurs mainly under conditions such as high altitude, rapid ascent, or hypoxia. Previous studies suggest that ADRB2, GNB3, TH, and GSTP1 polymorphisms are associated with various lung diseases. We evaluated whether those polymorphisms are associated with the risk of HAPE in a Chinese Han population. ADRB2, GNB3, TH and GSTP1 polymorphisms were genotyped using a Sequenom MassARRAY. Logistic regression, adjusted for age and gender, was used to evaluate the association between the genotypes and the risk of HAPE by computing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). The results revealed that GNB3 rs4963516 allele ''G'' (G vs T: OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.55-0.90, p = 0.006) was associated with HAPE risk. The ADRB2 rs1042718 alleles had a 1.29-fold (95%CI = 1.00-1.66; p = 0.045) increased risk of HAPE, and the GSTP1 rs749174 alleles had a 0.71-fold (95%CI = 0.52-0.99; p = 0.042) decreased risk of HAPE. Co-dominant and dominant models of GNB3 rs4963516 decreased the risk of HAPE (p = 0.023 and p = 0.008, respectively). Our results indicate GNB3 and GSTP1 polymorphisms may protect against HAPE progression, while ADRB2 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of HAPE.

  5. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  6. Therapeutic implications of melatonin in cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral edema/brain edema refers to the accumulation of fluid in the brain and is one of the fatal conditions that require immediate medical attention. Cerebral edema develops as a consequence of cerebral trauma, cerebral infarction, hemorrhages, abscess, tumor, hypoxia, and other toxic or metabolic factors. Based on the causative factors cerebral edema is differentiated into cytotoxic cerebral edema, vasogenic cerebral edema, osmotic and interstitial cerebral edema. Treatment of cerebral edema depends on timely diagnosis and medical assistance. Pragmatic treatment strategies such as antihypertensive medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, steroids, glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and trometamol are used in clinical practice. Although the above mentioned treatment approaches are being used, owing to the complexity of the mechanisms involved in cerebral edema, a single therapeutic strategy which could ameliorate cerebral edema is yet to be identified. However, recent experimental studies have suggested that melatonin, a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, could be an effective alternative for treating cerebral edema. In animal models of stroke, melatonin was not only shown to reduce cerebral edema but also preserved the blood brain barrier. Melatonin's beneficial effects were attributed to its properties, such as being a potent anti-oxidant, and its ability to cross the blood brain barrier within minutes after its administration. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of melatonin when used for treating cerebral edema.

  7. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sabry; Moore, Tyler; Payne, Drew; Momeni, Parastoo; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary. PMID:25104961

  8. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macneil, Adam; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2011-12-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe disease characterized by a rapid onset of pulmonary edema followed by respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock. The HPS associated viruses are members of the genus Hantavirus, family Bunyaviridae. Hantaviruses have a worldwide distribution and are broadly split into the New World hantaviruses, which includes those causing HPS, and the Old World hantaviruses [including the prototype Hantaan virus (HTNV)], which are associated with a different disease, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) are the most common causes of HPS in North and South America, respectively. Case fatality of HPS is approximately 40%. Pathogenic New World hantaviruses infect the lung microvascular endothelium without causing any virus induced cytopathic effect. However, virus infection results in microvascular leakage, which is the hallmark of HPS. This article briefly reviews the knowledge on HPS-associated hantaviruses accumulated since their discovery, less than 20 years ago.

  9. Objective criteria for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema in acclimatized patients at altitudes between 2700 m and 3500 m

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Anuj; Tripathi, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The criteria used for diagnosing high altitude illnesses are largely based on Western literature. This study was undertaken to define objective, simple and reliable diagnostic criteria for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in Indian soldiers at altitudes between 2700 m and 3500 m. Methods Clinical data of 235 cases of HAPE that occurred between 2700 m and 3500 m were analysed. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to select simple clinical parameters suitable for the diagnosis of HAPE at peripheral medical facilities. Cut-off values and their reliability for the diagnosis of HAPE were defined. Results HAPE occurred 2.8 ± 2.2 days after arrival at altitudes between 2700 m and 3500 m. Breathlessness, cough, chest discomfort and headache were the commonest symptoms. Low pulse oximetry (SPO2) values than normal for this altitude were seen in 89% of patients. ROC analysis of clinical parameters identified a heart rate more than 95 beats per minute (bpm), respiratory rate more than 21 per minute and SPO2 less than 86% while breathing ambient air at this altitude as diagnostic of HAPE. The sensitivity and specificity of these cut-offs was 0.66, 0.83 and 0.82 and 0.94, 0.95 and 0.93 respectively. Conclusion A heart rate of more than 95 bpm, respiratory rate more than 21 per minute and SPO2 less than 86% breathing room air in individuals complaining of breathlessness, cough, chest discomfort or headache within the first 5 days of arrival at altitudes between 2700 m and 3500 m is highly suggestive of HAPE. PMID:26663962

  10. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm−2 h−1. Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na+ transport at a rate of 5 μL cm−2 h−1. Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na+ transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [3H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of 22Na+ was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5–10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na+ channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:26333829

  11. Accuracy of point-of-care lung ultrasonography for the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs and cats with acute dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica L; Lisciandro, Gregory R; Keene, Bruce W; Tou, Sandra P; DeFrancesco, Teresa C

    2017-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the accuracy of a point-of-care lung ultrasonography (LUS) protocol designed to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) in dyspneic dogs and cats. DESIGN Diagnostic test evaluation. ANIMALS 76 dogs and 24 cats evaluated for dyspnea. PROCEDURES Dogs and cats were evaluated by LUS; B lines were counted at 4 anatomic sites on each hemithorax. A site was scored as positive when > 3 B lines were identified. Animals with ≥ 2 positive sites identified on each hemithorax were considered positive for CPE. Medical records were evaluated to obtain a final diagnosis (reference standard) for calculation of the sensitivity and specificity of LUS and thoracic radiography for the diagnosis of CPE. RESULTS Dogs and cats with a final diagnosis of CPE had a higher number of positive LUS sites than did those with noncardiac causes of dyspnea. Overall sensitivity and specificity of LUS for the diagnosis of CPE were 84% and 74%, respectively, and these values were similar to those of thoracic radiography (85% and 87%, respectively). Use of LUS generally led to the misdiagnosis of CPE (ie, a false-positive result) in animals with diffuse interstitial or alveolar disease. Interobserver agreement on LUS results was high (κ > 0.85). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE LUS was useful for predicting CPE as the cause of dyspnea in dogs and cats, although this technique could not be used to differentiate CPE from other causes of diffuse interstitial or alveolar disease. Point-of-care LUS has promise as a diagnostic tool for dyspneic dogs and cats.

  12. Fulminant Laryngeal-tracheobronchial-pulmonary Aspergillosis: A Rare and Fatal Complication in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Xue, Sheng-Li; Wu, De-Pei; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    A 23-year-old man who had previously undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for severe aplastic anemia was diagnosed with invasive laryngeal-tracheobronchial-pulmonary aspergillosis after presenting with a persistent dry cough at six months post-transplantation based on the findings of laryngoscopy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy. A fiberoptic bronchoscope was used to remove the obstructive material from the patient's airway and posaconazole plus caspofungin were administered to successfully to treat the patient. Our report suggests that laryngoscopy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy should be considered as alternative approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of allo-HSCT recipients with persistent respiratory symptoms when invasive laryngeal aspergillosis and invasive tracheobronchial aspergillosis are suspected. PMID:28154281

  13. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E−06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E−07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E−06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in

  14. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E-06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E-07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E-06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in HLs (P

  15. Agents Which Mediate Pulmonary Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    varying fractions of the LD50 and the plate was incubated at 370C for 4 hours. Control wells of endothelial cells plhs medium/ diluent were established. All...measured by incubation of the targets in culture medium/ diluent without challenge. Specific cytolysis was calculated by: Experimental Counts - Spontaneous...and is an important bactericidal mechanism employed by the AM. In Figures 3 and 4, production of SOA (as measured by ferricytochrome C reduction) by

  16. Pathogenesis of Brain Edema and Investigation into Anti-Edema Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Koyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that occurs after brain injuries such as stroke and head trauma. In the edematous brain, excess accumulation of extracellular fluid results in elevation of intracranial pressure, leading to impaired nerve function. Despite the seriousness of brain edema, only symptomatic treatments to remove edema fluid are currently available. Thus, the development of novel anti-edema drugs is required. The pathogenesis of brain edema is classified as vasogenic or cytotoxic edema. Vasogenic edema is defined as extracellular accumulation of fluid resulting from disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and extravasations of serum proteins, while cytotoxic edema is characterized by cell swelling caused by intracellular accumulation of fluid. Various experimental animal models are often used to investigate mechanisms underlying brain edema. Many soluble factors and functional molecules have been confirmed to induce BBB disruption or cell swelling and drugs targeted to these factors are expected to have anti-edema effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and involvement of factors that induce brain edema formation, and the possibility of anti-edema drugs targeting them. PMID:25941935

  17. Reperfusion edema after thromboendarterectomy: radiographic patterns of disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, W T; Osiason, A W; Langlotz, C P; Palevsky, H I

    1998-07-01

    In patients with chronic pulmonary embolism, pulmonary thromboendarterectomy may result in a unique form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema termed reperfusion edema. This report reviews the authors' experience after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy with particular emphasis on the radiographic manifestations of reperfusion edema. The clinical and radiographic record of 25 patients who underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy at the University of Pennsylvania from 1985 through 1995 were reviewed. The zonal distribution of radiographic opacity, time to maximal opacity, and the time to clearance of reperfusion edema were determined. The relationship of these radiographic manifestations to clinical severity of disease and clinical outcome was examined. Reperfusion edema, characterized by patchy bilateral perihilar alveolar opacities, occurred in all but one patient. There is a lower lung zone predominance of opacities, but in individual cases, striking unilateral or haphazard arrangements of opacities may be seen. In this small sample of patients, no association between preoperative pulmonary arterial pressures and radiographic appearance or clinical outcome was found. However, severity of radiographic opacities, as measured by the extent of involved lung, correlated with disease severity, as measured by time to extubation and time to discharge. Pneumonia, defined as a radiographic opacity that evolves discordantly with the reperfusion edema opacities, occurred in 20% of cases. Reperfusion edema is a common consequence of pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. The severity of radiographic manifestations and clinical severity of disease are related. This characteristically appears as perihilar alveolar opacities.

  18. FATAL EPISTAXIS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Francis Berchmans

    1961-01-01

    The instances in which nosebleed is potentially fatal are those in which there is a history of recent head injury, severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease or an underlying vascular tumor in the nasal chambers. Fatal nasal bleeding has not been reported in children. An awareness on the part of the physician of the potentially fatal significance of his patient's nosebleed is the very best insurance against such an event. Intelligent history-taking, careful physical and x-ray examination, generous sedation, precise local cauterization and packing, estimation of hemoglobin mass and a search for bleeding and clotting disorders are the best weapons of the physician called to treat epistaxis. These procedures, coupled with adequate blood replacement and an informed attitude toward surgical interruption of the blood supply to the bleeding region should forestall death from fatal nosebleed. PMID:13738727

  19. Scintigraphy for Pulmonary Capillary Protein Leak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    det,,rmine the severity and duration of non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema (17). C. Approach to the Problem The anim-als were anesthetize,, intubated and...pulmonary lymphatics. If the leak exceeds the lymphatic capacity, which can increase flow by a factor of 20, pulmonary interstitial edema occurs. When...therefore, does not appear to cause permeability pulmonary edema in either the sheep or dog. The ARDS seen in patients following sclerotherapy of esophageal

  20. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  1. Complete Heart Block with Diastolic Heart Failure and Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Enlarging Previously Diagnosed Thrombosed Aneurysm of Sinus of Valsalva in a Patient with History of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Thomas, Maria Joana; Daniels, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with vascular aneurysms that can affect any part of the vascular tree, like ascending aorta or coronary arteries. Sinus of Valsalva is known as an anatomical dilation at the root of aorta above the aortic valve and very few cases show aneurysm at that site in patients with ADPKD. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) can present with rupture and acute heart failure and infective endocarditis or could be asymptomatic accidentally discovered during cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 76-year-old male with a unique constellation of cardiovascular anomalies associated with ADPKD. Patient was previously diagnosed with aneurysms affecting ascending aorta, sinus of Valsalva, and coronary arteries. Several years later, he came with complete heart block which was discovered later to be secondary to enlargement of his previously diagnosed thrombosed SVA. His case was complicated with acute heart failure and pulmonary edema. Conclusion. Patients with ADPKD can present with extrarenal manifestations. In our case, aneurysm at sinus of Valsalva was progressively enlarging and presented with complete heart block. PMID:25861484

  2. Histochemical analyses and quantum dot imaging of microvascular blood flow with pulmonary edema in living mouse lungs by "in vivo cryotechnique".

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yurika; Terada, Nobuo; Saitoh, Sei; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Jin, Takashi; Ohno, Shinichi

    2012-02-01

    Light microscopic imaging of blood vessels and distribution of serum proteins is essential to analyze hemodynamics in living animal lungs under normal respiration or respiratory diseases. In this study, to demonstrate dynamically changing morphology and immunohistochemical images of their living states, "in vivo cryotechnique" (IVCT) combined with freeze-substitution fixation was applied to anesthetized mouse lungs. By hematoxylin-eosin staining, morphological features, such as shapes of alveolar septum and sizes of alveolar lumen, reflected their respiratory conditions in vivo, and alveolar capillaries were filled with variously shaped erythrocytes. Albumin was usually immunolocalized in the capillaries, which was confirmed by double-immunostaining for aquaporin-1 of endothelium. To capture accurate time-courses of blood flow in peripheral pulmonary alveoli, glutathione-coated quantum dots (QDs) were injected into right ventricles, and then IVCT was performed at different time-points after the QD injection. QDs were localized in most arterioles and some alveolar capillaries at 1 s, and later in venules at 2 s, reflecting a typical blood flow direction in vivo. Three-dimensional QD images of microvascular networks were reconstructed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was also applied to lungs of acute pulmonary hypertension mouse model. Erythrocytes were crammed in blood vessels, and some serum components leaked into alveolar lumens, as confirmed by mouse albumin immunostaining. Some separated collagen fibers and connecting elastic fibers were still detected in edematous tunica adventitia near terminal bronchioles. Thus, IVCT combined with histochemical approaches enabled us to capture native images of dynamically changing structures and microvascular hemodynamics of living mouse lungs.

  3. Scintigraphy for Pulmonary Capillary Protein Leak.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    duration of non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema (17). C. Approach to the Problem The animals were anesthetized, intubated and placed beneath a Pho-ajiui: I...capacity, which can increase flow 1w a K factor of 20, pulmonary interstitial edema occurs. ien the interstitial Compartment reaches a critical volume and...of sheep is the accepted model for the study of pulmonary permeability edema (18). It is, therefore, necessary to compare our scintigraphic technique

  4. Fatal foreign-body granulomatous pulmonary embolization due to microcrystalline cellulose in a patient receiving total parenteral nutrition: all crystals are not what they seem.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sarah; Pena, Elena; Walker, Alfredo E

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary foreign-body granulomatous embolization has been described secondary to crystal precipitation in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as well as when pharmaceutical tablets are crushed and injected intravenously. Extensive granulomatous embolization may cause pulmonary hypertension and death due to acute cor pulmonale. We report the case of a 34-year old woman who had been receiving TPN post-operatively secondary to complications of a paraesophageal hernia repair. During and following receiving TPN, she experienced episodes of hypoxia, tachycardia, fever, and hypotension. Computed tomography scans of the thorax showed centrilobular nodules, tree-in-bud and ground-glass opacities, as well as findings of pulmonary hypertension. Following an episode of hypoxia she was found unresponsive and died despite resuscitative efforts. Microscopic examination of the lungs following post-mortem examination revealed occlusive granulomatous inflammation of the pulmonary arterial vasculature by crystalline material. The morphologic and histochemical patterns of the crystals were suggestive of microcrystalline cellulose, a finding that was confirmed by energy dispersive X-spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Ancillary tests did not support that the crystalline material was the result of TPN precipitation. Foreign-body granulomatous embolization leading to acute core pulmonale may occur as a complication of both intravenous injection of oral medications as well as of TPN crystallization. The source of crystalline material may be difficult to discern based solely on morphological assessment or by histochemical staining. Ancillary studies such as energy dispersive X-spectroscopy or infrared spectroscopy should be performed to definitively discern the two entities.

  5. Pulmonary blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bariola, J Ryan; Vyas, Keyur S

    2011-12-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is acquired in almost all cases via inhalation, and pulmonary disease is the most frequent clinical manifestation of blastomycosis. Pulmonary disease can range from asymptomatic infection to rapidly severe and fatal disease. Most cases will present as pneumonia, either acute or chronic, or as a lung mass. In rare cases pulmonary blastomycosis is associated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blastomycosis can present as isolated pulmonary disease or along with coexisting extrapulmonary disease that usually will involve the skin, bony structures, genitourinary tract, or central nervous system. Diagnosis is largely based on isolation of the organism via culture or visualization of the organism in clinical specimens. Detection of urinary Blastomyces antigen is a recent addition to diagnostic options. Itraconazole is the drug of choice for most forms of the disease; amphotericin B is reserved for the more severe forms. Newer azoles such as voriconazole and posaconazole have a limited role in the treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis.

  6. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  7. LUNG EDEMA FOLLOWING BILATERAL VAGOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Victor

    1939-01-01

    1. Small animals (rat and guinea pig) vagotomized in the neck die within a period of hours, the lungs showing extensive congestion and edema. 2. Tracheotomy permits appreciably longer survival with minimal lung changes approximating those seen in the control animals. 3. Intrathoracic vagotomy (sparing the recurrent laryngeal nerve) on one side, and cervical vagotomy on the other, permits almost indefinite survival (guinea pig and rabbit), unless laryngeal paralysis from the unilateral denervation produces respiratory obstruction (rat, guinea pig, and rabbit). 4. Pulmonary edema following bilateral vagotomy probably results primarily from respiratory obstruction. It is suggested that circulatory failure may also be a factor of some importance. The rôle of vagotomy itself is considered in relationship to these two phenomena. 5. The reaction of smaller animals to bilateral vagotomy, with regard to lung changes, apparently differs in no way from that of the larger animals, but is less readily demonstrated because of the smaller diameters of the air passages. PMID:19870894

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Two Novel Bacteria Afipia cberi and Mesorhizobium hominis from Blood of a Patient Afflicted with Fatal Pulmonary Illness

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shyh-Ching; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tianwei; Zhang, Jing; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Tsai, Shien; Zucker, Mark J.; Olesnicky, Ludmilla

    2013-01-01

    We recently isolated and discovered new Bradyrhizobiaceae microbes from the cryopreserved culture broth of blood samples from 3 patients with poorly defined illnesses using modified SP4 media and culture conditions coupled with genomic sequencing. Using a similar protocol, we studied a previously cryopreserved culture broth of blood sample from a patient who had succumbed to an acute onset of fulminant pulmonary illness. We report that two phases of microbial growth were observed in the re-initiated culture. Biochemical and genomic characterization revealed microbes isolated from the first phase of growth were new Afipia species of Bradyrhizobiaceae, tentatively named A. cberi with a ~ 5 MB chromosome that was different from those of all previously known Afipia microbes including the newly discovered A. septicemium. The microbes isolated from the second phase of growth were prominent sugar assimilators, novel Phyllobacteriaceae, phylogenetically most closely related to Mesorhizobium and tentatively named M. hominis with a ~ 5.5 MB chromosome. All A. cberi isolates carry a circular ~ 140 KB plasmid. Some M. hominis isolates possess a circular ~ 412 KB plasmid that can be lost in prolonged culture or passage. No antibiotics resistant genes could be identified in both of the A. cberi and M. hominis plasmids. Antibiotic susceptibility studies using broth culture systems revealed isolates of A. cberi could be sensitive to some antibiotics, but all isolates of M. hominis were resistant to essentially all tested antibiotics. However, the cell-free antibiotics susceptibility test results may not be applicable to clinical treatment against the microbes that are known to be capable of intracellular growth. It remains to be determined if the 2 previously unknown Rhizobiales were indeed pathogenic and played a role in the pulmonary disease process in this patient. Specific probes and methods will be developed to re-examine the diseased lungs from patient's autopsy. PMID

  9. Handbook of pulmonary emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Spaquolo, S.V.; Medinger, A

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: clinical assessment of the patient with pulmonary disease; interpretation of arterial blood gases in the emergency patient; life-threatening pneumonia; extrapulmonic ventilatory failure; acute inhalation lung disease; pulmonary edema; near drowning; chest trauma; upper airway emergencies; chronic lung disease with acute respiratory decompensation; acute respiratory failure in the patient with chronic airflow obstruction; asthma; hemoptysis; embolic pulmonary disease; superior vena cava syndrome; catastrophic pleural disease; ventilatory assistance and its complications; and ventilator emergencies.

  10. Scintigraphy for Pulmonary Capillary Protein Leak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    adrministration (16). The method is noninvasive and has been used clinically to determine the severity and duration of non- cardiogenic pulmonary edema ...If the leak exceeds the 1.iiiphatic capacity, which can increase flow by a factor of 20, pulmcnary interstitial edema occurs. T•hen the interstitial...of shoee is the accepted !::odel for the scudv of pulmonary permehbility - edema (18). It is, therefore, necessary to comnpare our scintigraphic

  11. [Secondary prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism: analysis of 49 fatal cases].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Hajduk, B; Vertun-Baranowska, B; Kober, J; Filipecki, S

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of 49 fatal cases of venous thromboembolism--VTE (15% of total ambulatory patients number during long observation was performed. The advanced age of patients, multiple risk factors, underlying circulatory and respiratory tract diseases, malignancies, previous episodes of VTE especially with secondary pulmonary hypertension were the most important factors determining fatal prognoses in those patients.

  12. A Fatal Case of Pentedrone and α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sykutera, Marzena; Cychowska, Magdalena; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elżbieta

    2015-05-01

    We report a fatal case of combined α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP) and 2-(methylamino)-1-phenylpentan-1-one (pentedrone) poisoning. A 28-year-old man was taken to hospital in asystole. Despite resuscitation efforts over 30 min, he died. The forensic autopsy showed pulmonary edema and moderately advanced atherosclerotic lesions of the arteries. Microscopic observation revealed chronic changes in the heart. Confirmation of the presence of pentedrone, α-PVP, and its metabolite 1-phenyl-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)pentan-1-ol (OH-α-PVP) in tissues and fluids were achieved using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis after liquid-liquid extraction. A quantitative validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was used to determine the concentrations of the above designer drugs in postmortem samples. Pentedrone, α-PVP, and OH-α-PVP concentrations were 8,794, 901 and 185 ng/mL in whole blood, respectively; 100,044, 2,610 and 2,264 ng/g in the liver, respectively; 22,102, 462 and 294 ng/g in the kidney, respectively; 13,248, 120 and 91 ng/g in the brain, respectively and 500,534, 4,190 and 47 ng/g in the stomach contents, respectively. This is the first known reported death attributed to the combined use of α-PVP and pentedrone. Additionally, this article is the first to report the distribution of pentedrone in postmortem human samples.

  13. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism.

  14. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:27833785

  15. Diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-07-01

    A variety of treatment options are available for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. They include laser photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids, and vitrectomy with or without release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of the physiological mechanisms of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and thereby decreases leakage of plasma proteins from capillaries into the tissue. In addition, vitrectomy allows faster clearance of cytokines, such as VEGF, from the retina into the vitreous cavity. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and corticosteroids reduce the effect of VEGF on capillary permeability. Starling's law explains vasogenic edema, which is controlled by osmotic and hydrostatic gradients between vessel and tissue. It explains how VEGF-induced vascular permeability causes plasma protein to leak into the tissue interstitial space, thus decreasing the osmotic pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, resulting in water accumulation, i.e. edema. This is reversed by reducing VEGF production, which is achieved with laser treatment; or by removing VEGF with antibodies or vitrectomy; or by reducing the permeability effect with steroids. At the same time, Starling's law takes into account hemodynamic changes that affect the hydrostatic gradient. High arterial blood pressure and hypoxic vasodilatation increase the hydrostatic pressure in the microcirculation, which increases water flux from vessel to tissue and induce edema. Treatment of arterial hypertension or reversal of retinal hypoxia with laser reverses this pathophysiology and reduces edema. Newton's third law explains, that vitreoretinal traction decreases hydrostatic tissue pressure in the retina, increases the pressure gradient

  16. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed.

  17. A fatal case of n-butane poisoning after inhaling anti-perspiration aerosol deodorant.

    PubMed

    Ago, Mihoko; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ogata, Mamoru

    2002-06-01

    We report a case of sudden death due to n-butane poisoning after the inhalation of anti-perspiration aerosol deodorant. The deceased was a 15-year-old boy who was found unresponsive on the road, and was pronounced dead after 1.25h. A spray can of anti-perspiration deodorant and vinyl bags were found in a thicket near the scene. An autopsy revealed pulmonary edema, cerebral edema and congestion of the organs. Using qualitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the existence of n-butane was ascertained. The concentration of n-butane (in microl/ml or microl/g) was estimated to be 15.3 in the blood, 13.3 in the brain, 26.6 in the liver, 7.5 in the lung, and 13.6 in the kidney. These n-butane levels in the blood and in the tissues were higher than those of previous reports of death associated with n-butane inhalation. We concluded that the cause of death was n-butane poisoning and presumed that n-butane in the can of anti-perspiration aerosol deodorant induced fatal cardiac arrhythmia.

  18. [Limb edema and lymphoscintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, P; Munck, D; Belgrado, J P; Leduc, O; Leduc, A

    2003-02-01

    Lymphoscintigraphic investigations represent techniques of nuclear medicine very contributive for the management and treatment of the limb edemas, either primary or secundary. Their principle is presented and methodologies proposed in the literature are reviewed. Their diagnostic contributions are detailed. The sensitivities and specificities of several protocols of investigation are reported. Some limitations of these examinations are analyzed and discussed. Clinical indications for their use are proposed and their interest with regard to the various treatments that can be applied to these limb edemas is discussed.

  19. Fatality due to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and heroin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, S D; Tedeschi, L; Frison, G; Rossi, A

    1995-05-01

    The first case of fatal intoxication due to ingestion of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and intravenous use of heroin is reported. A 42-year-old man, known to have been a heroin addict and to have taken other psychoactive substances, who had been in treatment with GHB for several months, was found dead. Anatomohistopathologic examination showed generalized visceral congestion, edema and pulmonary anthracosis, chronic bronchitis and chronic active hepatitis. Toxicological findings included fluid and tissue distributions of GHB, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine. GHB and morphine concentrations were respectively 11.5 and 0.77 micrograms/mL (blood), 84.3 and 0.3 micrograms/mL (vitreous humor), 258.3 and 1.35 micrograms/mL (urine), 57.0 and 14.3 micrograms/mL (bile), 40.0 and 0.43 micrograms/g (brain), 43.0 and 0.60 micrograms/g (liver), 47.0 and 0.68 micrograms/g (kidney). Blood and urine levels of 6-monoacetylmorphine were 28.5 and 12.1 ng/mL respectively. The presumed mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of GHB are briefly reviewed, with reference to its therapeutic use and to reports of non-fatal GHB intoxication.

  20. Latest advances in edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villavicencio, J. L.; Hargens, A. R.; Pikoulicz, E.

    1996-01-01

    Basic concepts in the physiopathology of edema are reviewed. The mechanisms of fluid exchange across the capillary endothelium are explained. Interstitial flow and lymph formation are examined. Clinical disorders of tissue and lymphatic transport, microcirculatory derangements in venous disorders, protein disorders, and lymphatic system disorders are explored. Techniques for investigational imaging of the lymphatic system are explained.

  1. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  2. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Samuel P

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto(®) (rivaroxaban).

  3. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  4. Transient Idiopathic Primary Penoscrotal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Namir, Sody A; Trattner, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a male born prematurely at 32 weeks gestation by cesarean section following overt symptoms of maternal preeclampsia. He developed severe penoscrotal edema anew one month from birth. No remarkable exposure or trauma was identified. This unexplained swelling remained uniform till 4 months of age, while the penile edema resolved spontaneously. A small benign hydrocele remained unchanged, since onset of the edema and continued after the edema subsided. This is the first report of persistent, but transient penoscrotal edema resolving in a 3 months course, without any apparent explanation, a possible pathogenetic mechanism was suggested. PMID:24082210

  5. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures.

  6. Pulmonary Aspects of Exercise and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the lungs are a critical component of exercise performance, their response to exercise and other environmental stresses is often overlooked when evaluating pulmonary performance during high workloads. Exercise can produce capillary leakage, particularly when left atrial pressure increases related to left ventricular (LV) systolic or diastolic failure. Diastolic LV dysfunction that results in elevated left atrial pressure during exercise is particularly likely to result in pulmonary edema and capillary hemorrhage. Data from race horses, endurance athletes, and triathletes support the concept that the lungs can react to exercise and immersion stress with pulmonary edema and pulmonary hemorrhage. Immersion in water by swimmers and divers can also increase stress on pulmonary capillaries and result in pulmonary edema. Swimming-induced pulmonary edema and immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers are well-documented events caused by the fluid shifts that occur with immersion, elevated pulmonary venous pressure during extreme exercise, and negative alveolar pressure due to inhalation resistance. Prevention strategies include avoiding extreme exercise, avoiding over hydration, and assuring that inspiratory resistance is minimized. PMID:27486491

  7. Fatalities in Swedish skydiving.

    PubMed

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2005-11-01

    Exact risk patterns in skydiving fatalities are not well known, but incomplete world injury data indicate that many are preventable. A comprehensive national material for Sweden of 37 skydiving fatalities 1964-2003 were reviewed to identify risk factors. In relation to jump volume, the period 1994-2003 had a fatality rate 11 times lower than 1964-1973. Student skydivers had the highest risk of fatal outcome, often caused by instability in freefall leading to unstable parachute activation with subsequent line entanglement, or parachute activation failure. Unintentional water landings also contributed to student fatality, with life jacket malfunctions, neglect to use life jackets, and automatic reserve parachute activation devices activated by water as aggravating factors. One-third of all fatalities had an inflated and operational parachute at some point prior to injury. A drastic worldwide increase in fatal landing incidents with fast wing parachutes during the 1990s did not occur in Sweden. Every fourth fatality caused by rapid deceleration against ground or water survived impact and died during transports or in hospitals. Rescue units and health care providers can improve management of skydiving incidents from knowledge about the incident and injury mechanisms we have described, and the skydiving community can target risk factors in preventive safety work.

  8. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  9. The Impact of Moderate-Altitude Staging on Pulmonary Arterial Hemodynamics after Ascent to High Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    et al., 1956; Sime et al., 1974). The magnitude of the PAP in- crease plays an important role in the development of high altitude pulmonary edema ...implications for travelers to high altitude. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an important cause of high altitude morbidity and mortality, and...P., and Oelz O. (1991). Prevention of high-altitude pulmonary edema by nifedipine. N. Engl. J. Med. 325:1284–1289. Beidleman B.A., Fulco C.S., Muza

  10. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  11. Pulmonary circulation at exercise.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Chesler, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high-flow and low-pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg/min/L in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg/min/L over four to six decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20 to 25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40 to 50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease.

  12. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  13. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

  14. [Pathopshysiological mechanisms in macular edema].

    PubMed

    Turlea, Cristian; Zolog, Ileana; Blăjan, Codruta; Roşca, C; Turlea, Magdalena; Munteanu, Mihnea; Boruga, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema has known a fast development in the last 5 years where the transition from laser monotherapy to intravitreal pharmacotherapy is becoming standard practice. Intravitreal injections therapy is in a continuous development with promising positive results. The use of intratvitreal devices in the treatment of macular edema of vascular cause has become a viable alternative also in treating diabetic macular edema. Several clinical studies have revealed the superiority of intravitreal treatment versus laser monotherapy. This article is evaluating and reviewing present and future treatments used to combat diabetic macular edema. [corrected].

  15. Aluminum phosphide fatalities at mild exertion in asymptomatic children: a clue to understand the variations of the autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Abder-Rahman, Hasan A

    2009-08-01

    Fatalities resulted from aluminium phosphide (ALP) intoxication in completely healthy children with no preceded clinical sings or symptoms were presented. Data regarding circumstances, autopsy reports, histopathological examination, toxicological investigation, and police enquiries were also collected and evaluated. The affected children were females, and 6-16 years old. They were completely healthy and died suddenly in relation to some physical activities such as running, walking, and bathing, without any prior complain. The viscera showed intense congestion with moderate to severe pulmonary edema. The cause of the sudden termination of life in the reported cases is mostly cardiac ones. Physical exertion may precipitate death due to increased cardiac stress, increased oxygen demand, and by aggravating metabolic acidosis. The absence of clinical symptoms before death may be due to the low level ALP, or due to the occurrence of death in the early stages after exposure to poison. Death due to ALP could result in cases of mild, moderate, or severe ALP intoxication. This may explain partly the differences encountered in clinical, autopsy, and histopathology findings of ALP intoxication. Fatalities are not the mere consequences of the dose of the poison, but factors such as physical activity and low oxygen level may be quite important.

  16. Fatal big cat attacks.

    PubMed

    Cohle, S D; Harlan, C W; Harlan, G

    1990-09-01

    Two cases of fatal attacks by large cats are presented. In the first case, a 30-year-old female zoo worker was attacked by a jaguar that had escaped its cage. In the second case, a 2-year-old girl was fatally injured by her father's pet leopard. The pattern of injuries in these cases is nearly identical to those of these cats' prey in the wild.

  17. Brain Edema After Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of brain edema after ischaemic stroke and its impact on the outcome of patients in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 114 patients. Ischaemic stroke and brain edema are verified by computed tomography. The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Laboratory findings were made during the first four days of hospitalization, and complications were verified by clinical examination and additional tests. Results: In 9 (7.9%) patients developed brain edema. Pneumonia was the most common complication (12.3%). Brain edema had a higher incidence in women, patients with hypertension and elevated serum creatinine values, and patients who are suffering from diabetes. There was no significant correlation between brain edema and survival in patients after acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with brain edema had a significantly higher degree of neurological deficit as at admission, and at discharge (p = 0.04, p = 0.004). Conclusion: The cerebral edema is common after acute ischaemic stroke and no effect on survival in the acute phase. The existence of brain edema in acute ischaemic stroke significantly influence the degree of neurological deficit. PMID:27994292

  18. Letter to the Editor Reply to commentary by G. Sikri and S. Dua on the article "Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema" published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (3): 11562-11572 to the letter published in Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15904-15905.

    PubMed

    Wu, L J

    2016-03-24

    The object in this study was a Han Chinese population in Lhasa, with 3658 m in altitude from Chengdu, which has 505 m in altitude by air. Within 24 to 48 h before the subjects arrived in the plateau, they completed a basic situation questionnaire, under the guidance of medical staff. Within 24 to 48 h after they reached the plateau, the subjects completed an acute plateau disease questionnaire. The diagnostic standard of HAPE and the diagnosis of acute plateau disease were adopted by the Lake Louise diagnostic standards in 1991 and the Chinese Medical Association promulgated the domestic diagnostic criteria on the Third National Plateau Medical Academic Seminar. Other diseases that cause acute symptoms of altitude sickness, such as plateau pulmonary edema, plateau cerebral edema, acute respiratory infections and neurosis, were excluded. According to the Lake Louise standard, questionnaire and symptom score values >3 points were diagnosed as HAPE. According to the national standard, the questionnaire and symptom score values >5 points were diagnosed as HAPE. At the present, morbidity of HAPE remains relatively high in China. The research shows that usually in the case of not taking preventive measures, according to the factors such as altitude, speed, and time of arrival, the incidence of HAPE is 30% to 90%. Epidemiological survey shows that HAPE happens at an altitude of 2500 m above the plateau. And an altitude of 3000 m above the plateau of China is occupied 1/6 of the total land area, the population of permanent residents is more than sixty million. We detected the 200 cases who adapted to plateau and the 106 cases of patients with HAPE susceptibility genes SNP locus, and got the key SNP loci of HAPE susceptibility genes. We maked the corresponding gene chip diagnostic kits.

  19. A fatal cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response reveals a critical role for NK cells.

    PubMed

    Carson, W E; Yu, H; Dierksheide, J; Pfeffer, K; Bouchard, P; Clark, R; Durbin, J; Baldwin, A S; Peschon, J; Johnson, P R; Ku, G; Baumann, H; Caligiuri, M A

    1999-04-15

    The mechanism of cytokine-induced shock remains poorly understood. The combination of IL-2 and IL-12 has synergistic antitumor activity in vivo, yet has been associated with significant toxicity. We examined the effects of IL-2 plus IL-12 in a murine model and found that the daily, simultaneous administration of IL-2 and IL-12 resulted in shock and 100% mortality within 4 to 12 days depending on the strain employed. Mice treated with IL-2 plus IL-12 exhibited NK cell apoptosis, pulmonary edema, degenerative lesions of the gastrointestinal tract, and elevated serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and acute phase reactants. The actions of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha, IL-1, IL-1-converting enzyme, Fas, perforin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and STAT1 did not contribute to the observed toxicity, nor did B or T cells. However, toxicity and death from treatment with IL-2 plus IL-12 could be completely abrogated by elimination of NK cells. These results suggest that the fatal systemic inflammatory response induced by this cytokine treatment is critically dependent upon NK cells, but does not appear to be mediated by the known effector molecules of this cellular compartment. These data may provide insight into the pathogenesis of cytokine-induced shock in humans.

  20. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  1. Diuretics in cardiac edema--1969.

    PubMed

    Shanoff, H M

    1969-10-04

    New and powerful diuretics have made it possible for the physician to control cardiac edema in most patients. At the same time their potentially dangerous side effects make it mandatory for the physician to be knowledgeable and judicious in their use. The appreciation of a few simplified facts about cardiac edema and renal reabsorption of sodium makes the clinical pharmacology of the diuretics much easier to understand, remember and apply.

  2. Chronic fatal pneumocystosis in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Goto, Y; Yamazaki, S; Fujiwara, K

    1977-12-01

    A chronic pulmonary disease was encountered in nude mice of a barrier sustained colony, and Pneumocystis carinii was identified as the causative agent histopathologically as well as on impression smear preparations in the affected lungs. Fatal infection was seen only in old nude mice aged more than 6 months, while focal pulmonary lesions were developed without clinical signs in young adult nudes 2 to 3 months of age. The lesions produced in aged nude mice were characterized by propagation of mononuclear cells with the presence of foamy masses of P. carinii. Heterozygous littermates were much less susceptible to the infection but pneumocystic lesions could be produced readily by multiple treatment with immunosuppressants. The infection could be transmitted without immunosuppressant to non-infected nudes but not to heterozygous littermates after intranasal inoculation of affected tissue emulsion or by cage mating with severely affected nudes.

  3. Understanding Fatal Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Ralph A.; Gaughan, Daniel C.

    1995-01-01

    Medical, social service, and coroner reports were reviewed for 14 cases of fatal child abuse and neglect identified at a children's hospital from 1988 to 1992. Median age was 6.5 months. Six families had prior protective service involvement (though four of these had involved a sibling). The cause of death in all cases was blunt impact head injury.…

  4. [Concealed and simulated trauma fatalities(II)].

    PubMed

    Klotzbach, H; Püschel, K

    2001-12-01

    A careful investigation of fatal accidents is required due to the relevant financial consequences for the insured as well as for the insurance company. An evaluation of post-mortem cases handled by our institute from 1988 to 1998 showed that 16% of all fatal accidents were not initially classified as such; it was only possible to determine the cause by post-mortem and criminal investigation. The frequency of a relevant alcoholization varied with different types of accidents. Furthermore, of all fatal accidents, 3% were revealed to be deceptive. Those 42 cases in total, presenting themselves as fatal accidents at first glance, were later determined either to be natural deaths (n = 27), homicide (n = 11) or suicide (n = 4). In addition to this, autopsies showed 83 cases of death to be sequelae to accidents. Particularly in cases of a victim plunging out of the window or into water, it can be difficult to make the distinction between natural death--e.g. as a reason for falling--and suicide or homicide. Further difficulties can result from interpretations of the findings in cases of putrefaction, mauling by animals, defects caused by burning or severely deformed corpses. In these cases, the importance of patho-morphological findings from the autopsy must be emphasized. Indirect sequelae of accidents may be pulmonary embolism or pneumonia. The cause of death has to be classified as accidental if the chain of events is of traumatic origin. Mistakes can be avoided if the medical history is taken conscientiously. If no facts are available, the cause of death should be certificated as undetermined. Our evaluation only included autopsy cases from our institute. The concealed fatal accidents which were incorrectly certified as natural deaths or the cases dismissed by the police and the public prosecutor without performing an autopsy were not evaluated.

  5. Laguna Negra Virus Infection Causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Turkish Hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti).

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, K; Scott, D; Safronetz, D; Brining, D L; Ebihara, H; Feldmann, H; LaCasse, R A

    2016-01-01

    Laguna Negra virus (LNV) is a New World hantavirus associated with severe and often fatal cardiopulmonary disease in humans, known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Five hamster species were evaluated for clinical and serologic responses following inoculation with 4 hantaviruses. Of the 5 hamster species, only Turkish hamsters infected with LNV demonstrated signs consistent with HPS and a fatality rate of 43%. Clinical manifestations in infected animals that succumbed to disease included severe and rapid onset of dyspnea, weight loss, leukopenia, and reduced thrombocyte numbers as compared to uninfected controls. Histopathologic examination revealed lung lesions that resemble the hallmarks of HPS in humans, including interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary edema, as well as generalized infection of endothelial cells and macrophages in major organ tissues. Histologic lesions corresponded to the presence of viral antigen in affected tissues. To date, there have been no small animal models available to study LNV infection and pathogenesis. The Turkish hamster model of LNV infection may be important in the study of LNV-induced HPS pathogenesis and development of disease treatment and prevention strategies.

  6. Pulmonary embolism caused by intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchida, Masayuki; Iwaki, Taku; Nagamine, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tamotsu; Kawase, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kazuhiko; Michishita, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 39-year-old woman with a pulmonary embolism caused by intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. She presented with shortness of breath and leg edema. Computed tomography showed a low density area that extended from the main pulmonary artery to the bilateral pulmonary arteries. We diagnosed her to have a pulmonary thromboembolism. The thrombosis did not decrease after the administration of anti-coagulant therapy, and she underwent resection of the thrombotic tissue. Histopathologically, the surgical specimen was not found to be thrombotic tissue but rather an intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. After undergoing surgery, she received radiation therapy and chemotherapy; however, she died 31 months after being diagnosed.

  7. Maporal viral infection in the Syrian golden hamster: a model of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Eyzaguirre, Eduardo J; Molina, Claudia P; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2002-11-15

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe and often fatal rodent-borne zoonosis. Maporal (MAP) virus is a newly discovered hantavirus that originally was isolated from an arboreal rice rat captured in central Venezuela. The results of this study indicate that MAP virus in the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) can cause a disease that is clinically and pathologically remarkably similar to HPS. The similarities include the time course of clinical disease, presence of virus-specific IgG at the onset of clinical disease, subacute pneumonitis, rapid onset of diffuse alveolar edema in the absence of necrosis, hepatic-portal triaditis, mononuclear-cellular infiltrate in lung and liver, widespread distribution of hantaviral antigen in endothelial cells of the microvasculature of lung and other tissues, and variable lethality. These similarities suggest that the MAP virus-hamster system is a useful model for studies of the pathogenesis of HPS and for the evaluation of potential therapeutic agents.

  8. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  9. Effectiveness of CT for clinical stratification of occupational lung edema.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Keisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Uwabe, Yasuhide; Takayama, Masanori; Sakai, Masao; Hayashi, Takuya; Otsuka, Masayuki; Suzuki, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    We treated two occupational lung diseases in different situations during military training. The purpose of this study is to investigate the availability of CT scanning for the evaluation of inhalation pulmonary edema. Two soldiers suffered severe lung edema after using a spray for the daily maintenance of their firearms. Four soldiers suffered severe dyspnea after undertaking drills in a narrow zone where numerous smoke bombs had been used. We evaluated these patients from several aspects. CT scans of the chest of spray-induced patients revealed bilateral infiltration predominantly in the upper lung fields. The patients received steroid pulse treatment and gradually recovered. CT scans of the chest of smoke-induced patients revealed bilateral ground-glass attenuation with peripheral lung sparing. The patients gradually recovered with steroid therapy. In accordance with previous studies, CT scans of the chest in our patients demonstrated that the periphery of the lungs remained normal, except in cases of serious injury. When differential diagnosis is required, we consider that CT scans of the chest are particularly useful; CT findings are useful in determining the severity of lung injury as well as the diagnosis of inhalation pulmonary edema.

  10. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis.

  11. A fatal mongoose bite.

    PubMed

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Bardale, Rajesh Vaijnathrao; Dixit, Pradeep Gangadhar; Deshmukh, Ashutosh Yashwant

    2012-11-19

    Animal bite is a bite wound from a pet, farm or wild animal. Dog bites make up 80-85% of all reported incidents. Cats amount for about 10% of reported bites and other animals such as rodents, rabbits, horses, raccoons, bats and monkeys amount to 5-10%. Bites by mongoose are uncommon. Here, we present a case of fatal mongoose bite to an elderly woman who died as a complication of streptococcal infection at the bite site.

  12. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  13. Hypertransaminasemia and fatal lung disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glycogenosis type II (Pompe disease) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. The classic form is characterized by severe cardiac involvement, generalized hypotonia and exitus early in life. Presenting symptoms and signs of the disease may be neglected or underestimated, thus delaying the diagnosis. Respiratory manifestations mainly occur because of respiratory muscle weakness. However, additional mechanisms can favor the development of pulmonary complications that result in fatal respiratory failure. We herein describe a case of an infant with glycogenosis type II presenting with hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia, who rapidly developed fatal lung disease. PMID:23391190

  14. Edema: a silent but important factor.

    PubMed

    Villeco, June P

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a normal response to injury. Even the smallest injury is associated with some inflammation, and initial edema is part of the normal inflammatory process. However, edema becomes a concern when it persists beyond the inflammatory phase. Once we have progressed into the rebuilding, or fibroplastic phase of healing, edema will delay healing and contribute to complications such as pain and stiffness. Early prevention and management to prevent this progression are therefore critical. This article discusses edema in relation to stages of healing and presents the research behind techniques available to the clinician to manage localized extracellular upper extremity edema in the patient with an intact lymphatic system.

  15. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treatment with thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, J; Amigo, M C; Barragan, R; Izaguirre, R; Reyes, P A; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Palomar, A; Gomez, A; Garcia-Torres, R

    1996-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension may occur in the antiphospholipid syndrome as a result of recurrent pulmonary embolism or microthrombosis of pulmonary vessels. We describe 3 cases of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and cor pulmonale that fulfilled the criteria for chronic major vessel thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy was performed in all 3 patients and it was successful in 2. One patient died in the immediate postoperative period from hemorrhagic pulmonary edema. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension should be added to the list of pulmonary vascular complications of primary APS. Despite its risk, pulmonary thromboendarterectomy represents a treatment option for this otherwise lethal condition.

  16. Pulmonary artery rupture in pregnancy complicating patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicholas J; Rollason, Terence P

    1992-01-01

    Fatal haemopericardium in a 27 year old pregnant woman was caused by rupture of a dissecting aneurysm of the pulmonary artery. She had an uncorrected patent ductus arteriosus and severe pulmonary hypertension. The wall of the pulmonary artery showed atherosclerosis and cystic medionecrosis. PMID:1467058

  17. Uveitic Macular Edema: Treatment Update

    PubMed Central

    Goldhardt, Raquel; Rosen, Bradley Simon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize recent developments in the treatment of uveitic macular edema (ME). ME represent a major cause of visual loss in uveitis and adequate management is crucial for the maintenance of useful vision in patients with chronic uveitis. PMID:27347446

  18. Case report of a patient with an intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary trunk presenting as a pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Weijmer, M C; Kummer, J A; Thijs, L G

    1999-08-01

    A fatal case of an 89-year-old woman with an intimal sarcoma obstructing the pulmonary trunk and an open foramen ovale is presented. Clinical symptoms, physical examination and further evaluation originally raised suspicion of a pulmonary embolism. Recent classification systems, specific radiological and pathological characteristics of sarcomas of the pulmonary trunk are discussed.

  19. Fatal crocodile attack.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out.

  20. Air weapon fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Clark, J C; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Rooney, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To describe characteristics of a series of people accidentally and deliberately killed by air powered weapons. METHODS: Five cases of fatal airgun injury were identified by forensic pathologists and histopathologists. The circumstances surrounding the case, radiological examination, and pathological findings are described. The weapon characteristics are also reported. RESULTS: Three of the victims were adult men, one was a 16 year old boy, and one an eight year old child. Four of the airguns were .22 air rifles, the other a .177 air rifle. Two committed suicide, one person shooting himself in the head, the other in the chest. In both cases the guns were fired at contact range. Three of the cases were classified as accidents: in two the pellet penetrated into the head and in one the chest. CONCLUSIONS: One person each year dies from an air powered weapon injury in the United Kingdom. In addition there is considerable morbidity from airgun injuries. Fatalities and injuries are most commonly accidents, but deliberately inflicted injuries occur. Airguns are dangerous weapons when inappropriately handled and should not be considered as toys. Children should not play with airguns unsupervised. Images PMID:9797730

  1. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... Main symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include chest pain that may be any of the following: Under the breastbone or on one side Sharp or stabbing ...

  2. Histopathological features and distribution of EV71 antigens and SCARB2 in human fatal cases and a mouse model of enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pin; Gao, Zifen; Zong, Yuanyuan; Bao, Linlin; Xu, Lili; Deng, Wei; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gao, Zhancheng; Xu, Yanfeng; Yao, Yanfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2014-08-30

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic pathogen that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease. While infection is usually self-limiting, a minority of patients infected with EV71 develop severe neurological complications. In humans, EV71 has been reported to utilize the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) as a receptor for infectious cellular entry. In this study, we define the pathological features of EV71-associated disease as well as the distribution of EV71 antigen and SCARB2 in human fatal cases and a mouse model. Histopathologically, human fatal cases showed severe central nervous system (CNS) changes, mainly in the brainstems, spinal cords, and thalamus. These patient further exhibited pulmonary edema and necrotic enteritis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human fatal cases demonstrated that EV71 antigen and SCARB2 were observed mainly in neurons, microglia cells and inflammatory cells in the CNS, and epithelial cells in the intestines. However, skeletal muscle tissue was negative for EV71 antigen. In a mouse model of EV71 infection, we observed massive necrotic myositis, different degrees of viral diseases in CNS, and extensive interstitial pneumonia. In mice, EV71 exhibits strong myotropism compared to the neurotropism seen in humans. EV71 antigen was detected in the spinal cord and brainstem of mice. However, there was no clear correlation between mouse SCARB2 and EV71 antigen distribution in the mouse model, consistent with previous results that SCARB2 functions as a receptor for EV71 in humans but not mice. The EV71-induced lesions seen in the mouse model resembled the pathological changes seen in human samples. These results increase our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis and will inform further work developing a mouse model for EV71 infection.

  3. A fatal leopard attack.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr

    2010-05-01

    A rare case of a big cat fatal attack is presented. A male leopard that had escaped from its unlocked cage attacked a 26-year-old male zoo worker. The man sustained penetrating injuries to the neck with consequent external bleeding. The man died while being transported to the hospital as a result of the injuries sustained. The wounds discovered on the victim's body corresponded with the known methods of leopard attacks and with findings on the carcasses of animals killed by leopards in the wild. The conclusion of the medicolegal investigation was that the underlying cause of death was a bite wound to the neck which lacerated the left internal jugular vein, the two main branches of the left external carotid artery, and the cervical spine. The cause of death was massive external bleeding. Special attention is paid to the general pattern of injuries sustained from big cat attacks.

  4. Military parachute mishap fatalities: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mellen, P F; Sohn, S S

    1990-12-01

    Military parachuting is relatively safe. Most injuries involve vertebral bodies or the lower extremity, and fatalities are rare. We studied 49 military parachute accident facilities occurring during 1964-1989. Causes of the accidents included accidental deployment of reserve parachute in aircraft, static line failures and entanglements, equipment (canopy) failures, in-air collisions, landing injuries, drowning, and dragging. Rarely, preexisting illness such as coronary artery disease caused or contributed to an accident. Pathologic findings revealed a high proportion of deceleration and blunt force injuries: cardiac, aortic and liver laceration, and skull, pelvic and extremity fractures. Isolated head injury, strangulation, and post traumatic pulmonary embolus were occasionally noted. Toxicological examination demonstrated contributing factors such as alcohol intoxication or antihistamine use in a small number of cases. Background investigations, scene inspections, autopsy and toxicology studies all yielded important data or pertinent negatives during investigations. We propose an investigation protocol.

  5. Response of pulmonary veins to increased intracranial pressure and pulmonary air embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, B.T.; Grauer, S.E.; Hyde, R.W.; Ortiz, C.; Moosavi, H.; Utell, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    To see whether air emboli to the lungs rather than brain compression caused these findings, anesthetized dogs received intravenous air infusions, subdural air infusions, or brain compression from balloons inflated in the subdural space. Subdural air and intravenous air resulted in similar vascular responses. Pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) increased 160% (P < 0.01) and pulmonary venous pressure transiently rose 13 +- 5 Torr (P < 0.05) without an increase in left atrial pressure or cardiac output (Q). The end-tidal PCP/sub 2/ fell 55% (P < 0.01) and the postmortem weight of the lungs increased 55% (P < 0.05). Brain compression with a subdural balloon instead of air only caused a 20% rise in Ppa and Q without pulmonary edema. Thus, pulmonary air emboli rather than brain compression accounts for the edema and pulmonary hypertension caused by subdural air. Catheters in pulmonary veins and the left atrium showed that air emboli cause transient pulmonary venous hypertension as well as a reproducible form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  6. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  7. Fatal diving accidents in western Norway 1983-2007.

    PubMed

    Ramnefjell, M P; Morild, I; Mørk, S J; Lilleng, P K

    2012-11-30

    Despite efforts to reduce their number, fatal diving accidents still occur. The circumstances and post-mortem findings in 40 fatal diving accidents in western Norway from 1983 through 2007 were investigated. Diving experience, medical history and toxicology reports were retrieved. The material consisted of recreational divers, professional saturation divers and professional divers without experience with saturation. In 33 cases the diving equipment was examined as part of the forensic investigation. In 27 cases defects in the diving equipment were found. For six divers such defects were responsible for the fatal accidents. Eighteen divers died on the surface or less than 10 m below surface. Five divers reached below 100 msw, and two of them died at this depth. The fatalities were not season-dependent. However, wave-height and strength of currents were influential factors in some cases. Twelve divers were diving alone. Twenty divers had one buddy, 9 of these divers were alone at the time of death. The cause of death was drowning in 31 out of 40 divers; one of them had a high blood-ethanol concentration, in two other divers ethanol was found in the urine, indicating previous ethanol consumption. Nine divers died from sudden decompression, pulmonary barotraumas, underwater trauma and natural causes. The study shows that most of the fatal diving accidents could be avoided if adequate diving safety procedures had been followed.

  8. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  9. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a vinaceous Amazon parrot (Amazona vinacea).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Carlos; Donatti, Rogerio Venâncio; Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ecco, Roselene; Preis, Ingred Sales; Shivaprasad, H L; Vilela, Daniel Ambrózio da Rocha; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2012-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a vinaceous Amazon parrot based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The bird was prostrate on the bottom of the cage and died. Necropsy revealed edema and congestion of the lungs, cloudy air sacs, and mild hepatomegaly. Histopathology revealed severe pulmonary congestion and edema and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation associated with many cysts containing bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii scattered throughout. The heart had mild multifocal lymphocytic myocarditis and free tachyzoites in the muscle fibers, and the kidneys had mild interstitial nephritis and a few cysts containing bradyzoites of T. gondii. Immunohistochemistry was negative for Sarcocystis falcatula and Neospora caninum and confirmed the protozoa as T. gondii. This is the first description of T. gondii in an endangered species ofa Brazilian psittacine.

  10. Fatal intoxication with methoxetamine.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Zuba, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a new synthetic drug of abuse structurally related to ketamine and phencyclidine. A case of a 29-year-old male with acute toxicity related to the analytically confirmed use of MXE is reported. The man was found dead at his residence. Biological material was analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The concentration of MXE in urine of the deceased was 85 μg/mL. Despite the vial containing the blood sample being destroyed during transportation and the blood leaking out into the cardboard packaging, the blood level of MXE was estimated. After determination of the cardboard grammage (approx. 400 g/m(3) ) and the mean mass of the blood obtained after drying (0.1785 ± 0.0173 g per 1 mL), the estimated blood concentration of MXE was found to be 5.8 μg/mL. The high concentration of MXE in blood and urine and the circumstances of the case indicate an unintentional, fatal intoxication with this substance.

  11. [Fatal electrocution in prison].

    PubMed

    Grellner, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The clarification of deaths from electric current can be difficult when electric skin marks are missing or overlooked. In the following, the fatal electric accident of a 21-year-old man in prison is reported with a scene which primarily seemed to be inconspicuous. The autopsy disclosed typical electric marks in the skin of the left thumb and the corresponding part of the left index finger. A second inspection of the jail room, which was large enough for three men, but occupied by the deceased alone, led to the finding of widely spread utensils (two forks with signs of corrosion and deformation of the prongs, radio cable with socket, water container) for the self-construction of a kind of "immersion heater" for the heating of water. The man must have suffered electrocution when touching the prongs of the forks. Death supposedly occurred due to disturbances of the cardiac rhythm after a longer interval of maintained ability to act. The case again proves the difficulties in the detection and examination of possible electric deaths in which unusual sources of electricity must be considered.

  12. [Fatal rat bites].

    PubMed

    Yanai, O; Goldin, L; Hiss, J

    1999-04-15

    We present a rare case of infant death due to blood loss resulting from multiple rat bites. Domestic dogs and cats cause most animal bites. Bites of a house rat usually cause bacterial infection, successfully treated with antibiotics. There is little information about death due to house rat bites. Since the wounds they cause tend to occur post-mortem, they are usually wedged, clean and without subcutaneous bleeding. An 11-week-old, malnourished infant girl was bitten to death while sleeping in her mother's bed in a rat-infested home. The infant's clothing was covered with blood, parts of her face were missing and marks of gnawing were present on her neck and extremities. There was subcutaneous bleeding around the wounds indicating that they were inflicted while the child was alive. Autopsy findings revealed profound blood loss. We conclude that a combination of low socio-economic status, severe failure to thrive, and poor hygiene in a rat-infested environment contributed to the fatal outcome in this attack.

  13. Work-related maritime fatalities.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Peter J; O'Connor, Nina

    2006-07-01

    All maritime fatalities investigated by Coroners that occurred in Australia from 1992 to 1998 inclusive have been collated, coded and recorded in the Australian Boating Injury Database: Fatal Injury (ABID:FI). This article focuses on the work-related maritime fatalities recorded in the database. Over the period 1992-1998 there were 74 fatalities involving people who were working for income at the time of the incident: 46 commercial fishermen, 12 seamen involved in the transport of cargo and 16 miscellaneous workers. The fatality rate of commercial fishermen has declined substantially in Australia over recent years. The main contributing factors were: hazardous conditions; an error of judgement; unsafe work practices; and failure to wear a personal flotation device (PFD) in circumstances where, in the opinion of the Coroners, it would have saved life. Hazardous conditions were much more of a factor in fishermen deaths than in other maritime deaths. Most vessels involved had an insufficient number of PFDs for the number of crew on board. The Australian fatal injury database should be updated with the details of recent fatalities in order to further monitor safety performance, causal factors and prevention measures in the maritime industry in Australia. Attention should be focused on reducing alcohol use and increasing PFD availability and usage. In order to continue to improve safety, it is essential that a constructive dialogue is maintained with industry sources, informed by independent research and up-to-date information.

  14. Global earthquake fatalities and population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Savage, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern global earthquake fatalities can be separated into two components: (1) fatalities from an approximately constant annual background rate that is independent of world population growth and (2) fatalities caused by earthquakes with large human death tolls, the frequency of which is dependent on world population. Earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (and 50,000) have increased with world population and obey a nonstationary Poisson distribution with rate proportional to population. We predict that the number of earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (50,000) will increase in the 21st century to 8.7±3.3 (20.5±4.3) from 4 (7) observed in the 20th century if world population reaches 10.1 billion in 2100. Combining fatalities caused by the background rate with fatalities caused by catastrophic earthquakes (>100,000 fatalities) indicates global fatalities in the 21st century will be 2.57±0.64 million if the average post-1900 death toll for catastrophic earthquakes (193,000) is assumed.

  15. Noncardiogenic Pulmonary Edema as a Result of Urosepsis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    cause could be aortic stenosis , which may require surgery to correct, or it could be coronary artery disease, which can be treated through a variety...systolic dysfunction. Left ventricular dysfunction can occur due to many processes such as aortic or mitral valve dysfunction, coronary artery disease

  16. Fatal and near-fatal animal bite injuries.

    PubMed

    Clark, M A; Sandusky, G E; Hawley, D A; Pless, J E; Fardal, P M; Tate, L R

    1991-07-01

    Fatal and near-fatal maulings of humans by pit bulls have recently become a topic of major public concern, resulting in the passage of laws in some jurisdictions that make the owner of a pit bull criminally liable for manslaughter if his or her pet causes a human death. The authors recently investigated two cases in which children were fatally injured by pet dogs. In the first case, a 17-day-old girl suffered fatal abdominal injuries when attacked by a pregnant Siberian husky. A 2-year-old girl expired from neck wounds inflicted by a pit bull or a rottweiler or both. Because no expert would testify as to which dog caused the fatal injury, the owner of the animals was not charged under a statute which specified criminality only if a pit bull caused the fatal injury. We also examined a 12-year-old boy who attempted to pet a circus tiger; the animal grabbed his arm with its claws and bit off the arm at the shoulder. The arm could not be reattached, but the child survived. These cases and the differentiation of animal bites from other injuries will be presented.

  17. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience.

  18. Progress in Drug Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y Y; Shen, F C; Xie, D; Han, Q P; Fang, M; Chen, C B; Zeng, H K

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema causes intracranial hypertension (ICH) which leads to severe outcome of patients in the clinical setting. Effective anti-edema therapy may significantly decrease the mortality in a variety of neurological conditions. At present drug treatment is a cornerstone in the management of cerebral edema. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy. Mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) are the most commonly used osmotic agents. The relative safety and efficacy of HS and mannitol in the treatment of cerebral edema and reduction of enhanced ICP have been demonstrated in the past decades. Apart from its osmotic force, HS exerts anti-edema effects partly through inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in astrocytes. Melatonin may also reduce brain edema and exert neuroprotective effect on several central nervous system diseases through inhibition of inflammatory response. The inhibitors of Na/H exchanger, NKCC and AQP4 may attenuate brain edema formation through inhibition of excessive transportation of ion and water from blood into the cerebral tissue. In this review we survey some of the most recent findings in the drug treatment of brain edema focusing on the use of osmotherapy, melatonin and inhibitors of ion cotransporters and water channels. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these agents would help to improve in the clinical management of patients with brain edema.

  19. Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    TI FLE CY N Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 SWES% Ot DNA-TR-89-45 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes A. Laupa G. H. Anno...0104 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes PE - 62715H PR - RM 6 AUTHOR(S) TA -RH A. Laupa: G. H. Anno WU - DH026130 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...vi 1 INTRODUCTION .......................................... 1I DATA SOURCES ON CHERNOBYL VICTIMS ............... 3 CHERNOBYL

  20. Fatal aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Anger, F; Paysant, F; Brousse, F; Le Normand, I; Develay, P; Gaillard, Y; Baert, A; Le Gueut, M A; Pepin, G; Anger, J P

    2000-03-01

    A 39-year-old man committed suicide by ingestion of aluminum phosphide, a potent mole pesticide, which was available at the victim's workplace. The judicial authority ordered an autopsy, which ruled out any other cause of death. The victim was discovered 10 days after the ingestion of the pesticide. When aluminum phosphide comes into contact with humidity, it releases large quantities of hydrogen phosphine (PH3), a very toxic gas. Macroscopic examination during the autopsy revealed a very important asphyxia syndrome with major visceral congestion. Blood, urine, liver, kidney, adrenal, and heart samples were analyzed. Phosphine gas was absent in the blood and urine but present in the brain (94 mL/g), the liver (24 mL/g), and the kidneys (41 mL/g). High levels of phosphorus were found in the blood (76.3 mg/L) and liver (8.22 mg/g). Aluminum concentrations were very high in the blood (1.54 mg/L), brain (36 microg/g), and liver (75 microg/g) compared to the usual published values. Microscopic examination revealed congestion of all the organs studied and obvious asphyxia lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma. All these results confirmed a diagnosis of poisoning by aluminum phosphide. This report points out that this type of poisoning is rare and that hydrogen phosphine is very toxic. The phosphorus and aluminum concentrations observed and their distribution in the different viscera are discussed in relation to data in the literature.

  1. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulmonary arteriography; Pulmonary angiogram; Angiogram of the lungs Images Pulmonary arteries References Jackson JE, Meaney JFM. Angiography. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  3. Pulmonary hypertension and chronic cor pulmonale in COPD.

    PubMed

    Shujaat, Adil; Minkin, Ruth; Eden, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia and endothelial dysfunction play a central role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. Cor pulmonale is a maladaptive response to pulmonary hypertension. The presence of peripheral edema in cor pulmonale is almost invariably associated with hypercapnia. Correction of abnormalities of gas exchange and ventilation can ameliorate pulmonary hypertension and improve survival. This review focuses on new information about the pathogenesis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in COPD including information derived from lung volume reduction surgery, the role of brain natriuretic peptide, exhaled nitric oxide for diagnosis, and the treatment of cor pulmonale with recently available specific pulmonary vasodilators.

  4. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  5. Overview of diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, Nancy M

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a rapidly growing epidemic in the United States, and it is expected to affect 592 million individuals within the next 20 years. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are the 2 most common ophthalmic complications of DM. DR is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults around the world, and development of DR is tied to DM disease duration. With the only identifier of early markers of DR being a complete ophthalmic exam, early signs of the disease are asymptomatic. Yearly, or at least every other year, ophthalmic exams are recommended for all patients with DM; but often, individuals with DM have not undergone screening exams and do not have regular eye exams until vision loss has occurred. With spending estimates of $490 million to treat the vision complications of DM, it is clear that DR and DME impose a substantial burden for patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems.

  6. Macular edema: definition and basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Coscas, Gabriel; Cunha-Vaz, José; Soubrane, Gisèle

    2010-01-01

    Macular edema is the result of an accumulation of fluid in the retinal layers around the fovea. It contributes to vision loss by altering the functional cell relationship in the retina and promoting an inflammatory reparative response. Macular edema may be intracellular or extracellular. Intracellular accumulation of fluid, also called cytotoxic edema, is an alteration of the cellular ionic distribution. Extracellular accumulation of fluid, which is more frequent and clinically more relevant, is directly associated with an alteration of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). The following parameters are relevant for clinical evaluation of macular edema: extent of the macular edema (i.e., the area that shows increased retinal thickness); distribution of the edema in the macular area (i.e., focal versus diffuse macular edema); central foveal involvement (central area 500 microm); fluorescein leakage (evidence of alteration of the BRB or 'open barrier') and intraretinal cysts; signs of ischemia (broken perifoveolar capillary arcade and/or areas of capillary closure); presence or absence of vitreous traction; increase in retinal thickness and cysts in the retina (inner or outer), and chronicity of the edema (i.e., time elapsed since initial diagnosis and response to therapy). It is essential to establish associations and correlations of all the different images obtained, regardless of whether the same or different modalities are used.

  7. Conservative management of acute scrotal edema.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Karen D

    2014-01-01

    Scrotal edema is a prevalent issue. It is difficult to treat and has a myriad of causes. Historical treatments for scrotal edema have lacked efficacy. If treated before fibrosis occurs, surgery can be avoided. A method for conservative management is outlined.

  8. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. )

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  9. Cytotoxic edema: mechanisms of pathological cell swelling

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Danny; Bhatta, Sergei; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral edema is caused by a variety of pathological conditions that affect the brain. It is associated with two separate pathophysiological processes with distinct molecular and physiological antecedents: those related to cytotoxic (cellular) edema of neurons and astrocytes, and those related to transcapillary flux of Na+ and other ions, water, and serum macromolecules. In this review, the authors focus exclusively on the first of these two processes. Cytotoxic edema results from unchecked or uncompensated influx of cations, mainly Na+, through cation channels. The authors review the different cation channels that have been implicated in the formation of cytotoxic edema of astrocytes and neurons in different pathological states. A better understanding of these molecular mechanisms holds the promise of improved treatments of cerebral edema and of the secondary injury produced by this pathological process. PMID:17613233

  10. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  11. Esophageal foreign bodies as child abuse. Potential fatal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B

    1993-12-01

    Foreign bodies being forced into the esophagus as a form of fatal child abuse is rare. A 4.5-month-old female infant presented to clinicians with respiratory distress. Several coins were recovered from the esophagus. One month later, she was found dead in her crib. At autopsy, there were three coins in the esophagus. In addition, there were cutaneous contusions of various ages, acute and partially healed fractures of the extremities, old aspirated foreign material in the lungs, and pulmonary fat emboli. Although the fat emboli may have contributed to the death, several potentially fatal mechanisms from the esophageal foreign bodies deserve consideration. These include vagal stimulation from esophageal distention, aspiration of swallowed fluids after esophageal obstruction, compression of the trachea or the heart by the coins, and cardiac compression or airway occlusion by the introducing finger.

  12. Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis: A Recent Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vishnubhotla, Priya

    2017-01-01

    The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most proximal source of arterial thromboembolism. Pulmonary vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but potentially lethal disease; its incidence is unclear, as most of the literature includes case reports. It most commonly occurs as a complica­tion of malignancy, post lung surgery, or atrial fibrillation and can be idiopathic in some cases. Most patients with PVT are commonly asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea from pulmonary edema or infarction. The thrombi are typically detected using a variety of imaging modalities including transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or pulmonary angiog­raphy. Treatment should be determined by the obstructing pathological finding and can include antibiotic therapy, anticoagulation, thrombectomy, and/or pulmonary resection. The delay in diagnosing this medical entity can lead to complications including pulmonary infarction, pulmonary edema, right ventricular failure, allograft failure, and peripheral embolism resulting in limb ischemia, stroke, and renal infarction (RI). PMID:28265529

  13. Pulmonary Thromboembolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Inho; Cho, Kyu Seok; Kim, Bum Shik; Kim, Soo-Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Jung-Heon; Youn, Hyo Chul

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary thromboembolism is fatal because of abruptly occurring hypoxemia and right ventricular failure. There are several treatment modalities, including anticoagulation, thrombolytics, ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenator), and thromboembolectomy, for managing acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Materials and Methods Medical records from January 1999 to December 2004 at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for pulmonary thromboembolectomy. There were 7 patients (4 men and 3 women), who underwent a total of 8 operations because one patient had post-operative recurrent emboli and underwent reoperation. Surgery was indicatedfor mild hypoxemia and performed with CPB (cardiopulmonary bypass) in a beating heart state. Results The patients had several symptoms, such as dyspnea, chest discomfort, and palpitation. Four patients had deep vein thromboembolisms and 3 had psychotic problems, specifically schizophrenia. Post-operative complications included hemothorax, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion. There were two hospital deaths, one each by brain death and right heart failure. Conclusion Emergency operation should be performed when medical treatments are no longer effective. PMID:22263185

  14. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  15. Diving fatality investigations: recent changes.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-06-01

    Modifications to the investigation procedures in diving fatalities have been incorporated into the data acquisition by diving accident investigators. The most germane proposal for investigators assessing diving fatalities is to delay the drawing of conclusions until all relevant diving information is known. This includes: the accumulation and integration of the pathological data; the access to dive computer information; re-enactments of diving incidents; post-mortem CT scans and the interpretation of intravascular and tissue gas detected. These are all discussed, with reference to the established literature and recent publications.

  16. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids.

  17. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kahle, Kristopher T; Simard, J Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common finding in a variety of neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, ruptured cerebral aneurysm, and neoplasia. With the possible exception of neoplasia, most pathological processes leading to edema seem to share similar molecular mechanisms of edema formation. Challenges to brain-cell volume homeostasis can have dramatic consequences, given the fixed volume of the rigid skull and the effect of swelling on secondary neuronal injury. With even small changes in cellular and extracellular volume, cerebral edema can compromise regional or global cerebral blood flow and metabolism or result in compression of vital brain structures. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy and is typically administered as part of an escalating medical treatment algorithm that can include corticosteroids, diuretics, and pharmacological cerebral metabolic suppression. Novel treatment targets for cerebral edema include the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) and the SUR1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) (SUR1/TRPM4) channel. These two ion channels have been demonstrated to be critical mediators of edema formation in brain-injured states. Their specific inhibitors, bumetanide and glibenclamide, respectively, are well-characterized Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with excellent safety profiles. Directed inhibition of these ion transporters has the potential to reduce the development of cerebral edema and is currently being investigated in human clinical trials. Another class of treatment agents for cerebral edema is vasopressin receptor antagonists. Euvolemic hyponatremia is present in a myriad of neurological conditions resulting in cerebral edema. A specific antagonist of the vasopressin V1A- and V2-receptor, conivaptan, promotes water excretion while sparing electrolytes through a process known as aquaresis.

  18. Fatal bilateral pneumothoraces complicating dyskeratosis congenita: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare genodermatosis, characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and leukoplakia of mucous membranes. It is also associated with a variety of non-cutaneous abnormalities such as bone marrow failure, malignancy and pulmonary complications. Among its wide range of clinical manifestations, fatal pneumothorax has rarely been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old Lebanese woman with dyskeratosis congenita who succumbed to devastating bilateral pneumothoraces. Conclusion Careful surveillance of patients with dyskeratosis congenita is required as incipient respiratory failure due to pneumothorax may be successfully treated if detected at an early stage. PMID:19830116

  19. Invasive pulmonary mucormycosis with concomitant lung cancer presented with massive hemoptysis by huge pseudoaneurysm of pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Il; Kang, Hyo Cheol; Lee, Ho Sung; Choi, Jae Sung; Seo, Ki Hyun; Kim, Yong Hoon; Na, Juock

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic invasive fungal infection involving the pulmonary vasculature in immunocompromised patients. Pseudoaneurysm of pulmonary artery in mucormycosis is a rare fatal complication after invasion and rupture of a pulmonary artery. We report a patient with diabetes mellitus and incidental lung cancer who developed massive hemoptysis because of a huge pseudoaneurysm of the left pulmonary artery by mucormycosis. Although the patient had been managed by amphotericin B followed by left pneumonectomy for persistent hemoptysis, he died from septic shock and multiorgan failure after surgery. Histologic analysis of a surgical specimen revealed concomitant squamous cell lung cancer.

  20. Edema - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/edema.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Edema - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  1. Left pulmonary artery hypoplasia presenting with unilateral hyperluscent lung.

    PubMed

    Sunavala, A J; Thacker, H P; Khann, J N

    2011-03-01

    Agenesis or hypoplasia of the right or left pulmonary arteries are among the rarest pulmonary artery anomalies with left sided anomalies being reported even less frequently. Pulmonary artery agenesis should be suspected in asymptomatic patients if a plain chest X-ray shows asymmetric lung fields, lung hypoplasia, or hyperinflation of the contralateral lung. It must be considered as a rare cause of recurrent lower respiratory tract infections in childhood and in subjects with a low threshold for or recurrent "High Altitude Pulmonary Edema".

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  3. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  4. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  5. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  6. Mitragynine concentrations in two fatalities.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Olwen; Roider, Gabriele; Stöver, Andreas; Graw, Matthias; Musshoff, Frank; Sachs, Hans; Bicker, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of fatalities are reported of which the recreational use of Mitragyna speciosa ("kratom") could be confirmed. One of these cases presents with one of the highest postmortem mitragynine concentrations published to date. Our results show that even extremely high mitragynine blood concentrations following the consumption of kratom do not necessarily have to be the direct cause of death in such fatalities as a result of an acute overdose. The two cases are compared with regard to the differences in mitragynine concentrations detected and the role of mitragynine in the death of the subjects. Irrespective of the big differences in mitragynine concentrations in the postmortem blood samples, mitragynine was not the primary cause of death in either of the two cases reported here. Additionally, by rough estimation, a significant difference in ratio of mitragynine to its diastereomers in the blood and urine samples between the two cases could be seen.

  7. Fire fatalities in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Elder, A T; Squires, T; Busuttil, A

    1996-05-01

    Fatal dwelling-house fires account for 10% of all accidental deaths in the United Kingdom with one-quarter of the deaths being of elderly people. No study had described the characteristics of elderly individuals who die in fires. We report results from a retrospective review of all fatal dwelling-house fires in Scotland from 1980 to 1990. Of 1096 people dying in fires, 243 (23%) were aged over 75. When compared with patients under the age of 75, older patients were significantly less likely to be smokers. Significantly more fires killing elderly people were caused by faulty or misused electrical items in the house, particularly electric blankets. These differences between elderly and younger individuals dying in dwelling-house fires may suggest that preventive strategies for the elderly population require a different emphasis from those for younger people.

  8. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  9. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), or PH, is increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries. These arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs to pick up oxygen. PH causes symptoms such as shortness of ...

  11. Cerebral edema in children with diabetic ketoacidosis: vasogenic rather than cellular?

    PubMed

    Tasker, Robert C; Acerini, Carlo L

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral edema (CE) is accumulation of water in the intracellular or extracellular spaces of the brain. Vasogenic edema occurs when there is breakdown of the tight endothelial junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leading to extravasation of intravascular protein and fluid into the interstitial space of the brain. In cellular edema the BBB remains intact and there is swelling of astrocytes with corresponding reduction in extracellular space. In this review we bring together clinical evidence from neuropathology and cerebral magnetic resonance (MR) studies in pediatric patients presenting in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and use applied physiology to understand whether CE complicating DKA is vasogenic, rather than cellular in origin. Because the first-line of defense against CE is the interface between the intravascular compartment and the extracellular space in the brain much of the focus in this review is the BBB. The principal pathologic finding in fatal cases is perivascular with BBB disruption and albumin extravasation, suggesting increased vascular permeability. DKA induces an inflammatory response and the mechanism of BBB transcellular permeability may be an immunologic cascade that disrupts tight junctions. The principal MR finding in subclinical cases of CE is vasogenic rather than cellular edema. We propose that the following physiology be considered when treating cases: bolus dose of intravenous mannitol may result in fall in serum sodium concentration, and therefore clinical worsening. Failure to respond to mannitol should prompt the use of 3% hypertonic saline (HS). Bolus dose of intravenous 3% HS is expected to effect vasogenic edema provided that the reflection coefficient is close to 1. Failure to respond to 3% HS should prompt the use of mannitol.

  12. Riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Nathan; Granton, John

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule in the pulmonary vasculature. NO activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) resulting in the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) - a key mediator of pulmonary artery vasodilatation that may also inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Pulmonary hypertension, a serious, progressive and often fatal disease is characterized by NO-sGC-sGMP pathway dysregulation. Riociguat is a member of a novel therapeutic class known as soluble guanylate stimulators. Riociguat has a dual mode of action, acting in synergy with endogenous NO and also directly stimulating sGC independently of NO availability. Phase 3 randomized control trials have demonstrated that riociguat improves clinical, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. In this review we will discuss the pharmacologic properties of riociguat and its appropriate implementation into clinical practice.

  13. Fatal bronchopneumonia in a Metastrongylus elongatus and Porcine circovirus type 2 co-infected pig.

    PubMed

    Marruchella, G; Paoletti, B; Speranza, R; Di Guardo, G

    2012-08-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection is distributed worldwide and PCV2-associated disease (PCVAD) is considered among the most economically relevant ones to the global swine industry. PCV2 is known to play a causal role in the porcine respiratory disease complex, usually in close association with a large plethora of other biologic agents. We describe herein a case of fatal parasitic bronchopneumonia by Metastrongylus elongatus in a PCV2-infected pig. Metastrongylosis may still represent a major concern for outdoor herds. Our recent experience suggests that a concurrent PCVAD condition may trigger metastrongylosis, which may subsequently result, at its turn, in severe, sometimes fatal, pulmonary disease.

  14. Dengue virus identification by transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Limonta, D; Falcón, V; Torres, G; Capó, V; Menéndez, I; Rosario, D; Castellanos, Y; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Roche, R; de la Rosa, M C; Pavón, A; López, L; González, K; Guillén, G; Diaz, J; Guzmán, M G

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is the most significant virus transmitted by arthropods worldwide and may cause a potentially fatal systemic disease named dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this work, dengue virus serotype 4 was detected in the tissues of one fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever case using electron immunomicroscopy and molecular methods. This is the first report of dengue virus polypeptides findings by electron immunomicroscopy in human samples. In addition, not-previously-documented virus-like particles visualized in spleen, hepatic, brain, and pulmonary tissues from a dengue case are discussed.

  15. Leg edema from intrathecal opiate infusions.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Couto da Silva JM

    2000-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of intrathecal infusions to treat patients with long-term non-cancer-related pain, this therapy is not without serious side-effects. Five out of 23 patients who had intrathecal infusions of opiates for longer than 24 months developed leg and feet edema. As predisposing factors, cardiovascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, peripheral vascular disease, and venous stasis of the lower extremities were considered. Every patient who developed pedal and leg edema after the implantation of an infusion pump was also found to have leg edema and venous stasis prior to the time when the pump was inserted. This complication was severe enough to limit their physical activity, and to produce lymphedema, ulcerations and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Reduction of the edema occurred when the dose of the opiate was decreased, and in two cases in which the infusion was discontinued, there was almost complete resolution of the syndrome. It appears that the pre-existence of pedal edema and of venous stasis is a relative contraindication to the long-term intrathecal infusion of opiates in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

  16. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  17. Massive ovarian edema, due to adjacent appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Callen, Andrew L; Illangasekare, Tushani; Poder, Liina

    2017-04-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a benign clinical entity, the imaging findings of which can mimic an adnexal mass or ovarian torsion. In the setting of acute abdominal pain, identifying massive ovarian edema is a key in avoiding potential fertility-threatening surgery in young women. In addition, it is important to consider other contributing pathology when ovarian edema is secondary to another process. We present a case of a young woman presenting with subacute abdominal pain, whose initial workup revealed marked enlarged right ovary. Further imaging, diagnostic tests, and eventually diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that the ovarian enlargement was secondary to subacute appendicitis, rather than a primary adnexal process. We review the classic ultrasound and MRI imaging findings and pitfalls that relate to this diagnosis.

  18. Bilateral ankle edema with bilateral iritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil

    2007-07-01

    I report two patient presented to me with bilateral symmetrical ankle edema and bilateral acute iritis. A 42-year-old female of Indian origin and 30-year-old female from Somalia both presented with bilateral acute iritis. In the first patient, bilateral ankle edema preceded the onset of bilateral acute iritis. Bilateral ankle edema developed during the course of disease after onset of ocular symptoms in the second patient. Both patients did not suffer any significant ocular problem in the past, and on systemic examination, all clinical parameters were within normal limit. Lacrimal gland and conjunctival nodule biopsy established the final diagnosis of sarcoidosis in both cases, although the chest x-rays were normal.

  19. Edema, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and acrodermatitis enteropathica: an uncommon initial presentation of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Antonio E; Bartle, Sam; Foster, Robin

    2004-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder characterized by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine deficiency, and abnormally high sweat electrolyte concentrations. Less frequently, the presenting features in infants may include edema, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. Liver involvement may produce hepatomegaly and mild elevation of transaminases. This clinical symptom usually presents within the first 6 months of life and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and institution of appropriate nutritional supplementation and pancreatic enzymes is essential to improve outcome. Since the sweat test may be falsely negative, emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in an infant who presents with edema, anemia, hypoproteinemia, and acrodermatitis enteropathica.

  20. [Fatal exposure to Aconitum napellus].

    PubMed

    German Jørgensen, Jørgen Rahr; Andersen, Anne Elsborg

    2013-06-10

    Fatal exposure to poisonous plants in northern Europe is a rare condition. In this case report we describe an intended poisoning with Aconitum napellus (monkshood), which contains the toxin aconitine. The lethal dose in adults is 3-6 mg. The toxin affects excitable cells such as neurons and myocytes causing degrees of unconsciousness, hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. There is no antidote and treatment is symptomatic. We describe a patient who had eaten monkshood. She was treated with infusion of lidocaine and survived. After 24 hours of treatment and monitoring she was discharged from the intensive care unit.

  1. [Fatal poisoning due to Indigofera].

    PubMed

    Labib, S; Berdai, M-A; Bendadi, A; Achour, S; Harandou, M

    2012-01-01

    Indigo, also known in Morocco as Nila, is a dye widely used in the coloring of Moroccan handicrafts. It is obtained from fermentation reactions on the leaves and branches of true indigo, Indigofera tinctoria, which is a widespread plant in tropical Africa and Asia. We report a case of fatal poisoning in a 3-year-old child after administration of indigo for therapeutic purposes. Death resulted from multiple organ failure. The toxicity of this compound is little known in the literature and deserves to be explored through toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies, in order to better determine the toxic constituents of the dye.

  2. Imaging experimental cerebral malaria in vivo: significant role of ischemic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Penet, Marie-France; Viola, Angèle; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Duhamel, Guillaume; Kober, Frank; Ibarrola, Danielle; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Coltel, Nicolas; Gharib, Bouchra; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2005-08-10

    The first in vivo magnetic resonance study of experimental cerebral malaria is presented. Cerebral involvement is a lethal complication of malaria. To explore the brain of susceptible mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, multimodal magnetic resonance techniques were applied (imaging, diffusion, perfusion, angiography, spectroscopy). They reveal vascular damage including blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhages attributable to inflammatory processes. We provide the first in vivo demonstration for blood-brain barrier breakdown in cerebral malaria. Major edema formation as well as reduced brain perfusion was detected and is accompanied by an ischemic metabolic profile with reduction of high-energy phosphates and elevated brain lactate. In addition, angiography supplies compelling evidence for major hemodynamics dysfunction. Actually, edema further worsens ischemia by compressing cerebral arteries, which subsequently leads to a collapse of the blood flow that ultimately represents the cause of death. These findings demonstrate the coexistence of inflammatory and ischemic lesions and prove the preponderant role of edema in the fatal outcome of experimental cerebral malaria. They improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria and may provide the necessary noninvasive surrogate markers for quantitative monitoring of treatment.

  3. Fatal neglect of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, C; Fechner, G; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    Maltreatment of the elderly is a common problem that affects more than 3% of the elderly. We report on two cases of fatal neglect. Risk factors of victims and caregivers were analysed in the context of the social history. In both cases, the victims had a dominant personality and the abusers (the sons) had been strictly controlled and formed by the parent. The victims showed typical risk factors such as living together with the abuser, isolation, dependence on care, income and money administration. Initially, the victims declined help from outside and self-neglect occurred. The unemployed perpetrators lived in social isolation and depended financially and mentally on the victims. In both cases no mental illness was present but there was a decrease of social competence. Legal medicine is predominantly involved in fatal cases in connection with external post-mortem examinations and autopsies. Also in the living, the medico-legal expert can assist in the identification of findings in elderly persons in cases of suspected abuse.

  4. Dysphagia Caused by Chronic Laryngeal Edema.

    PubMed

    Delides, Alexander; Sakagiannis, George; Maragoudakis, Pavlos; Gouloumi, Αlina-Roxani; Katsimbri, Pelagia; Giotakis, Ioannis; Panayiotides, John G

    2015-10-01

    A rare case of a young female with chronic diffuse laryngeal edema causing severe swallowing difficulty is presented. The patient was previously treated with antibiotics and steroids with no improvement. Diagnosis was made with biopsy of the epiglottis under local anesthesia in the office.

  5. INTRAVITREAL CORTICOSTEROIDS IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Clare; Loewenstein, Anat; Massin, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the relationship between kinetics, efficacy, and safety of several corticosteroid formulations for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Methods: Reports of corticosteroid use for the treatment of diabetic macular edema were identified by a literature search, which focused on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of these agents in preclinical animal models and clinical trials. Results: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema treatment include intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide. Because of differences in solubility and bioavailability, various delivery mechanisms are used. Bioerodible delivery systems achieve higher maximum concentrations than nonbioerodible formulations. There is a relationship between visual gains and drug persistence in the intravitreal compartment. Safety effects were more complex; level of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide exposure is related to development of elevated intraocular pressure and cataract; this does not seem to be the case for dexamethasone, where two different doses showed similar mean intraocular pressure and incidence of cataract surgery. With fluocinolone acetonide, rates of intraocular pressure elevations requiring surgery seem to be dose related; rates of cataract extraction were similar regardless of dose. Conclusion: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema exhibit different pharmacokinetic profiles that impact efficacy and adverse events and should be taken into account when developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:26352555

  6. [Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication].

    PubMed

    Papyshev, I P; Astashkina, O G; Tuchik, E S; Nikolaev, B S; Cherniaev, A L

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication remains a topical problem in forensic medical science and practice. We investigated materials obtained in the course of forensic medical expertise of the cases of fatal opium intoxication. The study revealed significant differences between myoglobin levels in blood, urine, myocardium, and skeletal muscles. The proposed approach to biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication enhances the accuracy and the level of evidence of expert conclusions.

  7. Fatal Events in Cancer Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Farge, Dominique; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Debourdeau, Philippe; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Rodriguez-Beltrán, Eva Maria; Nieto, Jose Antonio; Peris, Maria Luisa; Zeltser, David; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hij, Adrian; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In cancer patients treated for venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), analyzing mortality associated with recurrent VTE or major bleeding is needed to determine the optimal duration of anticoagulation. This was a cohort study using the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) Registry database to compare rates of fatal recurrent PE and fatal bleeding in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation for VTE. As of January 2013, 44,794 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 7911 (18%) had active cancer. During the course of anticoagulant therapy (mean, 181 ± 210 days), 178 cancer patients (4.3%) developed recurrent PE (5.5 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 4.8–6.4), 194 (4.7%) had recurrent DVT (6.2 per 100 patient-years; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3–7.1), and 367 (8.9%) bled (11.3 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 10.2–12.5). Of 4125 patients initially presenting with PE, 43 (1.0%) died of recurrent PE and 45 (1.1%) of bleeding; of 3786 patients with DVT, 19 (0.5%) died of PE, and 55 (1.3%) of bleeding. During the first 3 months of anticoagulation, there were 59 (1.4%) fatal PE recurrences and 77 (1.9%) fatal bleeds. Beyond the third month, there were 3 fatal PE recurrences and 23 fatal bleeds. In RIETE cancer patients, the rate of fatal recurrent PE or fatal bleeding was much higher within the first 3 months of anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26266353

  8. Heat fatalities in Pima County, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Keim, Samuel M; Mays, Mary Z; Parks, Bruce; Pytlak, Erik; Harris, Robin M; Kent, Michael A

    2007-03-01

    The most common cause of heat fatalities is environmental exposure during heat waves. Deserts of the southwestern USA are known for temperatures that exceed 32 degrees C for 30 days or more; yet, heat-related fatalities are rare among residents of the region. We compiled data from the National Weather Service and the Office of the Medical Examiner in order to determine the relationship between temperature and occurrence of heat fatalities in Pima County, AZ. Logistic regression indicated that for each degree of increase in temperature (degrees C), there was a 35% increase in the odds of a heat fatality occurring (p<0.001).

  9. Fatality estimator user’s guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.; Som, Nicholas; Ladd, Lew

    2012-12-11

    Only carcasses judged to have been killed after the previous search should be included in the fatality data set submitted to this estimator software. This estimator already corrects for carcasses missed in previous searches, so carcasses judged to have been missed at least once should be considered “incidental” and not included in the fatality data set used to estimate fatality. Note: When observed carcass count is <5 (including 0 for species known to be at risk, but not observed), USGS Data Series 881 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/0881/) is recommended for fatality estimation.

  10. Improvement of cold injury-induced mouse brain edema by endothelin ETB antagonists is accompanied by decreases in matrixmetalloproteinase 9 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Minami, Shizuho; Kimura, Akimasa; Hatanaka, Shunichi; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Koyama, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that often occurs after brain injuries such as ischemia and trauma. However, therapeutic agents that fundamentally treat brain edema have not yet been established. We previously found that endothelin ETB receptor antagonists attenuate the formation and maintenance of vasogenic brain edema after cold injury in mice. In this study, the effects of ETB antagonists on matrixmetalloproteinase (MMP)9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A expression were examined in the cold injury model. Cold injury was performed in the left brain of male ddY mice (5-6 weeks old) for the induction of vasogenic edema. Expression of MMP9 and VEGF-A mRNA in the mouse cerebrum was increased by cold injury. Immunohistochemical observations showed that the MMP9 and VEGF-A were mainly produced in reactive astrocytes in the damaged cerebrum. Intracerebroventricular administration of BQ788 (10 μg) or IRL-2500 (10 μg) (selective ETB antagonists) attenuated brain edema and disruption of the blood-brain barrier after cold injury. BQ788 and IRL-2500 reversed the cold injury-induced increases in MMP9 and VEGF-A expression. The induction of reactive astrocytes producing MMP9 and VEGF-A in the damaged cerebrum was attenuated by BQ788 and IRL-2500. These results suggest that attenuations of astrocytic MMP9 and VEGF-A expression by ETB antagonists may be involved in the amelioration of vasogenic brain edema.

  11. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  12. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  13. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  14. [Autoerotic fatalities in Greater Dusseldorf].

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Hellen, Florence; Borchard, Nora; Huckenbeck, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Autoerotic fatalities in the Greater Dusseldorf area correspond to the relevant medicolegal literature. Our results included exclusively young to middle-aged, usually single men who were found dead in their city apartments. Clothing and devices used showed a great variety. Women's or fetish clothing and complex shackling or hanging devices were disproportionately frequent. In most cases, death occurred due to hanging or ligature strangulation. There was no increased incidence of underlying psychiatric disorders. In most of the deceased no or at least no remarkable alcohol intoxication was found. Occasionally, it may be difficult to reliably differentiate autoerotic accidents, accidents occurring in connection with practices of bondage & discipline, dominance & submission (BDSM) from natural death, suicide or homicide.

  15. Massive edema of the ovary associated with androgenic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Siller, B S; Gelder, M S; Alvarez, R D; Partridge, E E

    1995-11-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a rare tumor-like condition of the ovary characterized by marked enlargement of one or both ovaries due to marked accumulation of edema fluid in the ovarian stroma. This paper reviews the literature on massive ovarian edema and presents a case associated with androgenic manifestations.

  16. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Pulmonary Embolism Explore Pulmonary Embolism What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung VQ Scan Overweight and Obesity Send a ...

  17. Predictors of malignant brain edema in middle cerebral artery infarction observed on CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Jin, Seon Tak; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Rim; Park, Ik Seong; Jo, Kwang Wook

    2015-03-01

    Patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction accompanied by MCA occlusion with or without internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion have a poor prognosis, as a result of brain cell damage caused by both the infarction and by space-occupying and life-threatening edema formation. Multiple treatments can reduce the likelihood of edema formation, but tend to show limited efficacy. Decompressive hemicraniectomy with duroplasty has been promising for improving functional outcomes and reducing mortality, particularly improved functional outcomes can be achieved with early decompressive surgery. Therefore, identifying patients at risk for developing fatal edema is important and should be performed as early as possible. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with major MCA infarction with MCA occlusion within 8 hours of symptom onset were retrospectively reviewed. Early clinical, laboratory, and computed tomography angiography (CTA) parameters were analyzed for malignant brain edema (MBE). Twenty of the 64 patients (31%) had MBE, and the clinical outcome was poor (3month modified Rankin Scale >2) in 95% of them. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, Clot Burden Score, and Collateral Score (CS) showed statically significant differences in both groups. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age and sex identified the independent predictors of MBE: NIHSS score >18 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-16.0, p=0.023) and CS on CTA <2 (OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 1.7-30.3,p=0.006). Our results provide useful information for selecting patients in need of aggressive treatment such as decompressive surgery.

  18. MicroRNAs in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guofei; Chen, Tianji

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease without effective treatment. Despite decades of research and the development of novel treatments, PAH remains a fatal disease, suggesting an urgent need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAH. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in patients with PAH and in experimental pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, normalization of a few miRNAs is reported to inhibit experimental pulmonary hypertension. We have reviewed the current knowledge about miRNA biogenesis, miRNA expression pattern, and their roles in regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. We have also identified emerging trends in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PAH and propose future studies that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25192340

  19. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty in carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Fudge, James C

    2016-12-28

    A 26-year-old female with carcinoid heart disease consisting of severe pulmonary and tricuspid valve stenosis was admitted with line associated sepsis. She recovered from sepsis with antibiotics and aggressive fluid resuscitation but became grossly volume overloaded with evidence of tense ascites and lower extremity edema. She developed worsening renal and hepatic function due to congestive nephropathy and hepatopathy, which did not respond to intravenous diuretics, and she was deemed too sick for surgical pulmonary and tricuspid valve replacement. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty was performed as a rescue measure to alleviate her congestive symptoms and improve her candidacy for valve replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pulmonary manifestations of malaria : recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Walter R J; Cañon, Viviam; White, Nicholas J

    2006-01-01

    Lung involvement in malaria has been recognized for more than 200 hundred years, yet our knowledge of its pathogenesis and management is limited. Pulmonary edema is the most severe form of lung involvement. Increased alveolar capillary permeability leading to intravascular fluid loss into the lungs is the main pathophysiologic mechanism. This defines malaria as another cause of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Pulmonary edema has been described most often in non-immune individuals with Plasmodium falciparum infections as part of a severe systemic illness or as the main feature of acute malaria. P.vivax and P.ovale have also rarely caused pulmonary edema.Clinically, patients usually present with acute breathlessness that can rapidly progress to respiratory failure either at disease presentation or, interestingly, after treatment when clinical improvement is taking place and the parasitemia is falling. Pregnant women are particularly prone to developing pulmonary edema. Optimal management of malaria-induced ALI/ARDS includes early recognition and diagnosis. Malaria must always be suspected in a returning traveler or a visitor from a malaria-endemic country with an acute febrile illness. Slide microscopy and/or the use of rapid antigen tests are standard diagnostic tools. Malaria must be treated with effective drugs, but current choices are few: e.g. parenteral artemisinins, intravenous quinine or quinidine (in the US only). A recent trial in adults has shown that intravenous artesunate reduces severe malaria mortality by a third compared with adults treated with intravenous quinine. Respiratory compromise should be managed on its merits and may require mechanical ventilation.Patients should be managed in an intensive care unit and particular attention should be paid to the energetic management of other severe malaria complications, notably coma and acute renal failure. ALI/ARDS may also be related to a coincidental bacterial

  1. Gasoline Prices and Motor Vehicle Fatalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, David C.; Morrisey, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Fatal motor vehicle crashes per capita remained relatively stable over the 1990s, in spite of new traffic safety laws and vehicle innovations. One explanation for this stability is that the price of gasoline declined, which resulted in more vehicle miles traveled and potentially more fatalities. By using 1983-2000 monthly gasoline price and…

  2. Fatal diphenhydramine poisoning in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Buchweitz, John P.; Raverty, Stephen A.; Johnson, Margaret B.; Lehner, Andreas F.

    2014-01-01

    We report a fatal diphenhydramine poisoning of a 10-year-old, male poodle-cross dog with pre-existing conditions and suspected co-ingestion of ethanol. This case illustrates that diphenhydramine overdose can be fatal in certain circumstances and that analytical toxicology may play an important role in animal death investigations. PMID:25392554

  3. Fatal haemorrhage following male ritual circumcision.

    PubMed

    Hiss, J; Horowitz, A; Kahana, T

    2000-03-01

    Lethal complications following ritual circumcision are extremely rare, the most common being sepsis. We present here a case of fatal haemorrhage from a tiny incision of the glans, following a 'home' circumcision of a 6-week-old baby. The post-mortem examination disclosed idiopathic neonatal hepatitis. It is suggested that the previously undiagnosed hepatic condition was responsible for the fatal haemorrhage.

  4. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  5. [Massive pulmonary artery thromboembolism after removal of sphenoid wing meningioma (clinical case with good outcome)].

    PubMed

    Lubnin, A Iu; Konovalov, A N; Markina, M S; Goriachev, A S

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of the severe potentially fatal postoperative complication--massive pulmonary thromboembolism--in a patient after uncomplicated removal of meningioma of the wing of os basilare. It also describes the problems in the diagnosis, treatment, prevention of perioperative deep venous thrombosis of the shin and subsequent pulmonary thromboembolism in neurosurgery patients.

  6. A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Complicated by Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kwak, Mi Hyang; Kong, Sun-Young; Seong, Moon-Woo; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Keun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rare, malignancy-related complication that causes marked pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and death. We report on a patient with locally advanced breast cancer whose course was complicated by fatal PTTM based on clinical and laboratory findings. PMID:23341791

  7. [Epidemiology and development of macular edema in the diabetic].

    PubMed

    Zghal-Mokni, I; Jeddi, A; Boujemaa, C; Ben Hadj Alouane, W; Gaigi, S; Ayed, S

    2001-12-01

    Macular edema is the first cause of blindness in diabetics. Macular edema is defined by macular thickening or deposits of hard exudates. On 1000 diabetics examined over 2 years, 60 patients had a macular edema of which we retained 38 cases(54 eyes). All the patients had an ophthalmologic examination with a retinal angiography. Laser photocoagulation with green Argon laser was instituted in 50 eyes. 63% had background rethinopathy. Total or partial regression of the edema happened in 84.4%. Laser photocoagulation decrease by the half vision loss risk. Interest of early detection and treatment to decrease blindness incidence of macular edema in diabetics.

  8. Brain Abscesses Associated with Asymptomatic Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-sook; Kwon, Jeong-taik

    2017-01-01

    Brain abscess commonly occurs secondary to an adjacent infection (mostly in the middle ear or paranasal sinuses) or due to hematogenous spread from a distant infection or trauma. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are abnormal direct communications between the pulmonary artery and vein. We present two cases of brain abscess associated with asymptomatic pulmonary AVF. A 65-year-old woman was admitted with a headache and cognitive impairment that aggravated 10 days prior. An magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a brain abscess with severe edema in the right frontal lobe. We performed a craniotomy and abscess removal. Bacteriological culture proved negative. Her chest computed tomography (CT) showed multiple AVFs. Therapeutic embolization of multiple pulmonary AVFs was performed and antibiotics were administered for 8 weeks. A 45-year-old woman presented with a 7-day history of progressive left hemiparesis. She had no remarkable past medical history or family history. On admission, blood examination showed a white blood cell count of 6290 cells/uL and a high sensitive C-reactive protein of 2.62 mg/L. CT and MR imaging with MR spectroscopy revealed an enhancing lesion involving the right motor and sensory cortex with marked perilesional edema that suggested a brain abscess. A chest CT revealed a pulmonary AVF in the right upper lung. The pulmonary AVF was obliterated with embolization. There needs to consider pulmonary AVF as an etiology of cerebral abscess when routine investigations fail to detect a source. PMID:28061502

  9. Fatal thrombocytopenia: A rare case with possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A 22 year old male presented with breathlessness on exertion, ecchymosis, jaundice and features of worsening right heart failure for the last fifteen days. On physical examination, he had a mid diastolic murmur in the tricuspid area and an ejection systolic murmur in the pulmonary area. Bone marrow histopathology report showed an increased in megakaryocytes count. Routine investigations reports were normal. Echocardiography and computerized tomography (CT) revealed a single mobile large intra cardiac mass originating from the right atrium and causing dynamic obstruction of the right ventricular inflow and outflow tract. Associated fatal thrombocytopenia did not respond to intravenous steroids or platelet transfusion. Patient could not be operated because of very low platelet count, and died during hospital stay before excision biopsy could be done. Pathological autopsy was not done. This is a rare case, as the fatal thrombocytopenia observed here was the result of mechanical effects like frictional and shear force, which can be attributed to the physical presence of a large intra cardiac mass resulting in obstruction to flow. PMID:22629036

  10. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    PubMed

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials.

  11. Laparoscopic Surgery Can Reduce Postoperative Edema Compared with Open Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Cao, Lei; Wei, Yao; Guo, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The study aimed to investigate the impact of laparoscopic surgery and open surgery on postoperative edema in Crohn's disease. Methods. Patients who required enterectomy were divided into open group (Group O) and laparoscopic group (Group L). Edema was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis preoperatively (PRE) and on postoperative day 3 (POD3) and postoperative day 5 (POD5). The postoperative edema was divided into slight edema and edema by an edema index, defined as the ratio of total extracellular water to total body water. Results. Patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery had better clinical outcomes and lower levels of inflammatory and stress markers. A total of 31 patients (26.05%) developed slight edema and 53 patients (44.54%) developed edema on POD3. More patients developed postoperative edema in Group O than in Group L on POD3 (p = 0.006). The value of the edema index of Group O was higher than that of Group L on POD3 and POD5 (0.402 ± 0.010 versus 0.397 ± 0.008, p = 0.001; 0.401 ± 0.009 versus 0.395 ± 0.007, p = 0.039, resp.). Conclusions. Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery can reduce postoperative edema, which may contribute to the better outcomes of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. PMID:27777583

  12. HEPES prevents edema in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D G; Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    2001-05-11

    Brain slices gain water when maintained in bicarbonate-buffered artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (ACSF) at 35 degrees C. We previously showed that this edema is linked to glutamate receptor activation and oxidative stress. An additional factor that may contribute to swelling is acidosis, which arises from high CO2 tension in brain slices. To examine the role of acidosis in slice edema, we added N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) to osmotically balanced ACSF (HEPES-ACSF), thereby increasing buffering capacity beyond that provided by bicarbonate/CO2. Water gain was markedly inhibited in HEPES-ACSF. After 3 h incubation in HEPES-ACSF at 35 degrees C, water gain was limited to that of fresh slices after 1 h recovery in ACSF at room temperature. The effect of HEPES in decreasing slice water gain was concentration dependent from 0.3 to 20 mM. The inhibition of water gain by HEPES suggests that tissue acidosis is a contributing factor in brain slice edema.

  13. Assessing local tissue edema in postmastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N

    2007-06-01

    Overall limb lymphedema can be assessed by several methods but none are suitable to determine local edema. Quantifying local edema could provide important information not previously available. Our goal was to determine the suitability of using the tissue dielectric constant (TDC) as and index of local tissue water to detect and quantify edema in postmastectomy patients with unilateral arm lymphedema. Segmental arm volume and TDC were measured in both arms of 18 women with unilateral lymphedema, and in 15 premenopausal and 15 postmenopausal controls. TDC was measured at a frequency of 300 MHz using open-ended coaxial probes with effective measuring depths of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5 and 5.0 mm. For patients and controls, absolute TDC depended on measurement depth but for any depth the TDC of lymphedematous segments was significantly greater than for non-affected contralateral arms (p<0.001). At a depth of 2.5 mm, the TDC ratio between arms for patients was 1.64+/-0.30 vs.1.04+/-0.04 for both control groups (p<0.001). No patient's TDC ratio was as low as 1.2 and no control subject's TDC ratio was as great as 1.2. Results suggest that this method is a good quantitative discriminator of the presence of lymphedema in patients with unilateral limb lymphedema.

  14. Primary intimal sarcoma of pulmonary valve and trunk with osteogenic sarcomatous elements. Report of a case considered to be pulmonary embolus.

    PubMed

    Murthy, M S; Meckstroth, C V; Merkle, B H; Huston, J T; Cattaneo, S M

    1976-12-01

    A 49-year-old woman had a six-week history of increasing shortness of breath and fatigue. X-ray films and pulmonary scans showed multiple areas of emboli, especially in the right lung. Treatment with heparin was unsuccessful, and although a repeat scan showed only slight changes, the patient's condition deteriorated. Acute pulmonary edema and ventricular tachycardia preceded her death. Autopsy revealed a primary intimal sarcoma with osteogenic elements arising in the posterior leaflet of the pulmonary valve and obstructing the main pulmonary artery and its right branch.

  15. Fatal intoxication with tianeptine (Stablon).

    PubMed

    Proença, Paula; Teixeira, Helena; Pinheiro, João; Monsanto, Paula V; Vieira, Duarte Nuno

    2007-08-06

    Tianeptine (Stablon), although structurally similar to tricyclic antidepressants, acts by enhancing the reuptake of serotonin. A fatal case is presented involving a 26-year-old man, found lying in bed with a "mushroom of foam" around his mouth. Empty blister packs of Stablon and a suicide note were found next to the body. A liquid-liquid extraction procedure with n-hexane: ethyl acetate and n-hexane: 2-propanol, followed by LC-DAD-MS analysis, using positive mode electrospray ionization was performed. The detection limit was 0.001 microg/mL. The toxicological results revealed the following tianeptine concentrations in the post-mortem samples: blood 5.1 microg/mL; urine 2.0 microg/mL; liver 23 microg/g; stomach contents 22 mg. Femoral blood analyses also revealed an ethanol concentration of 0.53 g/L. The present method was also developed and validated for the other post-mortem specimens, since no previous published data had confirmed the post-mortem distribution of tianeptine. The absence of other suitable direct causes of death (macroscopic or histological) and the positive results achieved with the toxicological analysis led the pathologist to rule that death was due to an intoxication caused by the suicidal ingestion of tianeptine in combination with alcohol.

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    McGoon, Michael D.; Kane, Garvan C.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive, symptomatic, and ultimately fatal disorder for which substantial advances in treatment have been made during the past decade. Effective management requires timely recognition and accurate diagnosis of the disorder and appropriate selection among therapeutic alternatives. Despite progress in treatment, obstacles remain that impede the achievement of optimal outcomes. The current article provides an overview of the pathobiologic mechanisms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, including genetic substrates and molecular and cellular mechanisms, and describes the clinical manifestations and classification of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The article also reviews established approaches to evaluation and treatment, with emphasis on the appropriate application of calcium channel blockers, prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. In addition, the authors discuss unresolved issues that may complicate patient management, such as the clinical importance of mild or exercise-related pulmonary arterial hypertension, and they identify avenues by which treatment may advance in the future through the use of combination treatment, outcomes assessment, and exploration of alternative pharmacologic strategies. PMID:19181654

  17. Lightning fatalities and injuries in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilev-Tanriover, Ş.; Kahraman, A.; Kadioğlu, M.; Schultz, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    A database of lightning-related fatalities and injuries in Turkey was constructed by collecting data from the Turkish State Meteorological Service, newspaper archives, European Severe Weather Database, and the internet. The database covers January 1930 to June 2014. In total, 742 lightning incidents causing human fatalities and injuries were found. Within these 742 incidents, there were 895 fatalities, 149 serious injuries, and 535 other injuries. Most of the incidents (89 %) occurred during April through September, with a peak in May and June (26 and 28 %) followed by July (14 %). Lightning-related fatalities and injuries were most frequent in the afternoon. Most of the incidents (86 %) occurred in rural areas, with only 14 % in the urban areas. Approximately, two thirds of the victims with known gender were male. Because of the unrepresentativeness of the historical data, determining an average mortality rate over a long period is not possible. Nevertheless, there were 31 fatalities (0.42 per million) in 2012, 26 fatalities (0.35 per million) in 2013, and 25 fatalities (0.34 per million) in 2014 (as of June). There were 36 injuries (0.49 per million) in each of 2012 and 2013, and 62 injuries (0.84 per million) in 2014 (as of June).

  18. Lightning fatalities and injuries in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilev-Tanriover, Ş.; Kahraman, A.; Kadioğlu, M.; Schultz, D. M.

    2015-03-01

    A database of lightning-related fatalities and injuries in Turkey was constructed by collecting data from the Turkish State Meteorological Service, newspaper archives, European Severe Weather Database, and the internet. The database covers January 1930 to June 2014. In total, 742 lightning incidents causing human fatalities and injuries were found. Within these 742 incidents, there were 895 fatalities, 149 serious injuries, and 535 other injuries. Most of the incidents (89%) occurred during April through September, with a peak in May and June (26 and 28 %) followed by July (14%). Lightning-related fatalities and injuries were most frequent in the afternoon. Most of the incidents (86%) occurred in the rural areas, with only 14% in the urban areas. Approximately, two thirds of the victims with known gender were male. Because of the unrepresentativeness of the historical data, determining an average mortality rate over a long period is not possible. Nevertheless, there were 31 fatalities (0.42 per million) in 2012, 26 fatalities (0.35 per million) in 2013, and 25 fatalities (0.34 per million) in 2014 (as of June). There were 36 injuries (0.49 per million) in each of 2012 and 2013, and 62 injuries (0.84 per million) in 2014 (as of June).

  19. Fatal falls among Hispanic construction workers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Fujimoto, Alissa; Ringen, Knut; Men, Yurong

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated occupational deaths resulting from fall injuries among Hispanic construction workers using data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and the Current Population Survey. The demographics and characteristics of fatal falls among Hispanic workers were examined and compared with that of their white, non-Hispanic counterparts. The results show that fatal injuries among Hispanic construction workers were more likely to be caused by a fall than their white, non-Hispanic counterparts (OR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.05-2.10) after controlling for possible confounders. The rate of fatal falls for foreign-born Hispanic construction workers was 5.5 per 100,000 FTE, which is significantly higher than 4.1 per 100,000 FTE for Hispanic workers who were born in the U.S. (OR=1.36, 95% CI: 1.08-1.67). The disparities in fatal injuries from falls were found in age groups, job tenure, occupations, and types of construction projects. This study also found that about every two of three fatal falls in construction occurred in establishments with 10 or fewer employees. More prevention, intervention, and training measures must be applied to Hispanic workers, especially those who are new immigrants. OSHA enforcements should target small construction establishments in order to lower overall fatality rates, costs, and unnecessary losses of life.

  20. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis The most common species of fungus that causes ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 7/31/2016 Updated by: Jatin ...

  1. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant Outlook (Prognosis) ...

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  3. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Behcet's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Akhan, Hulya; Cuhadaroglu, Caglar; Erkan, Feyza

    2004-05-01

    The pulmonary artery is the second most common site of arterial involvement in Behcet's disease. A 32-year-old man presented with bilateral ankle edema, abdominal discomfort, and hemoptysis. He had a history of recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcerations for 1 year. The diagnosis of Behcet's disease was made on the basis of the criteria published by the International Study Group for Behcet's Disease. His chest X-ray revealed left hilar enlargement. A helical computed tomography (CT) scan showed a pulmonary aneurysm with intramural thrombosis in the left pulmonary artery and enlarged hepatic veins. Treatment with colchicine and cyclophosphamide was given for 24 months, and helical thoracic CT was performed again. Helical CT showed that the pulmonary aneurysm was reduced by treatment. Helical CT could be used in Behcet's disease for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary involvement.

  4. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  5. Adrenal gland hemorrhage in patients with fatal bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Paddock, Christopher D; Bartlett, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R

    2008-09-01

    A wide spectrum of adrenal gland pathology is seen during bacterial infections. Hemorrhage is particularly associated with meningococcemia, while abscesses have been described with several neonatal infections. We studied adrenal gland histopathology of 65 patients with bacterial infections documented in a variety of tissues by using immunohistochemistry. The infections diagnosed included Neisseria meningitidies, group A streptococcus, Rickettsia rickettsii, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Ehrlichia sp., Bacillus anthracis, Leptospira sp., Clostridium sp., Klebsiella sp., Legionella sp., Yersinia pestis, and Treponema pallidum. Bacteria were detected in the adrenal of 40 (61%) cases. Adrenal hemorrhage was present in 39 (60%) cases. Bacteria or bacterial antigens were observed in 31 (79%) of the cases with adrenal hemorrhage including 14 with N. meningitidis, four with R. rickettsii, four with S. pneumoniae, three with group A streptococcus, two with S. aureus, two with B. anthracis, one with T. pallidum, and one with Legionella sp. Bacterial antigens were observed in nine of 26 non-hemorrhagic adrenal glands that showed inflammatory foci (four cases), edema (two cases), congestion (two cases), or necrosis (one case). Hemorrhage is the most frequent adrenal gland pathology observed in fatal bacterial infections. Bacteria and bacterial antigens are frequently seen in adrenal glands with hemorrhage and may play a pathogenic role. Although N. meningitidis is the most frequent bacteria associated with adrenal gland pathology, a broad collection of bacteria can also cause adrenal lesions.

  6. Hiker Fatality From Severe Hyponatremia in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later. We believe this is the first report of a fatality due to acute hyponatremia associated with hiking in a wilderness setting. This case demonstrates the typical pathophysiology, which includes overconsumption of fluids, and demonstrates the challenges of diagnosis and the importance of appropriate acute management. Current treatment guidelines indicate that symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia should be acutely managed with hypertonic saline and can be done so without concern over central pontine myelinolysis, whereas treatment with high volumes of isotonic fluids may delay recovery and has even resulted in deaths.

  7. Rise in landing-related skydiving fatalities.

    PubMed

    Hart, Christian L; Griffith, James D

    2003-10-01

    The purpose was to assess whether adoption of potentially dangerous skydiving gear and skydiving practices has led to an increase in fatalities. Beginning in the early 1990s, civilian skydivers began to utilize high performance parachutes that fly much faster and are much more responsive than older style parachutes. Also, skydivers began to fly these parachutes in a more aggressive manner. An analysis of data from the 507 skydiving fatalities in the USA between 1986 and 2001 indicated that this shift toward high performance parachutes and aggressive flying techniques was temporally associated with an increase in parachute-landing deaths. During the same time period, the total number of fatalities remained fairly stable.

  8. Diagnostic Evaluation of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Deepa; Blanchard, Daniel; Auger, William R

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 25 mm Hg. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is defined as pulmonary hypertension in the presence of an organized thrombus within the pulmonary vascular bed that persists at least 3 months after the onset of anticoagulant therapy. Because CTEPH is potentially curable by surgical endarterectomy, correct identification of patients with this form of pulmonary hypertension and an accurate assessment of surgical candidacy are essential to provide optimal care. Patients most commonly present with symptoms of exertional dyspnea and otherwise unexplained decline in exercise capacity. Atypical chest pain, a nonproductive cough, and episodic hemoptysis are observed less frequently. With more advanced disease, patients often develop symptoms suggestive of right ventricular compromise. Physical examination findings are minimal early in the course of this disease, but as pulmonary hypertension progresses, may include nonspecific finding of right ventricular failure, such as a tricuspid regurgitation murmur, pedal edema, and jugular venous distention. Chest radiographs may suggest pulmonary hypertension, but are neither sensitive nor specific for the diagnosis. Radioisotopic ventilation-perfusion scanning is sensitive for detecting CTEPH, making it a valuable screening study. Conventional catheter-based pulmonary angiography retains an important role in establishing the presence and extent of chronic thromboembolic disease. However, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging are playing a growing diagnostic role. Innovative technologies such as dual-energy computed tomography, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and optical coherence tomography show promise for contributing diagnostic information and assisting in the preoperative characterization of patients with CTEPH.

  9. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  10. Ippolito Albertini and Michael Albertus: disparate old and innovative theories on dropsy and edema.

    PubMed

    Timio, Mario; Capodicasa, Enrico

    2002-07-01

    The concept of edema and dropsy as a part of heart and renal failure developed in the 17th and 18th centuries with the observations of Albertini, who realized that two clinical entities were derived from the blood rather than the tissues. Albertus, who lived in the same period, was the last physician to interpret fluid accumulation according to the old, scholastic and dogmatic procedures of medicine. The fundamental concepts of Albertus held little in addition to the classification and categories of the physicians of the Middle Ages. Bloody congestions were distinguished from stagnation: the former have the purpose of reducing superfluites of blood and occurred in plethoric patients. Plethora in turn is caused by the ancient villain, inculpated since Hippocrates and Galen: suppressed hemorrhoids, suppressed menstrual evacuation and cutaneous eruption driven inward. Because of its suppression, transfer of blood occurs toward the chest, which impedes thoracic expansion and contraction, then asthma and dyspnea occur. On the contrary, Albertini with his clinical and autoptic observations and pronouncements filled in the anatomical and clinical picture of fluid accumulation and created the rudiments of diagnostic criteria. Edema, dropsy, asthma, dyspnea were, according to Albertini, the signs and symptoms of heart and renal failure. Albertini was the first to point out that dyspnea is apt to arise with special rapidity when a lesion occurs in the left atrial chamber and ventricle and by implication the mitral valve. In modern physiopathological terms, he discovered the picture of pulmonary edema. To this important discovery, he added a number of extremely important comments: changes in the respiratory organs are secondary to changes in the cardiovascular system; edema that is accompanied by dyspnea also affects the viscera, most especially the lungs, and finally dropsy of the lungs must be differentiated anatomically and clinically from dropsy of the chest (hydrothorax

  11. Pitting type of pretibial edema in a patient with silent thyroiditis successfully treated by angiotensin ii receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Itsuro; Mori, Yoko; Baba, Asuka; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 56 Final Diagnosis: Thyroiditis – silent Symptoms: Palpitations • pretibial pitting edema • short of breath • sweating Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Hyper- or hypothyroidism sometimes causes pretibial myxedema characterized by non-pitting infiltration of a proteinaceous ground substance. However, in those patients, the “pitting” type of pretibial edema as a result of increased sodium and fluid retention or vascular hyper-permeability rarely occurs, except in cases complicated by heart failures due to severe cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension. Case Report: A 56-year-old woman developed bilateral pretibial pitting edema, followed by occasional sweating, palpitations, and shortness of breath, which persisted for more than 2 months. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism due to silent thyroiditis was supported by elevated levels of free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), with a marked decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and the negative results for TSH receptor antibodies with typical findings of destructive thyrotoxicosis. Despite her “pitting” type of pretibial edema, a chest radio-graph demonstrated the absence of cardiomyopathy or congestive heart failure. Oral administration of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) was initiated for her systolic hypertension, with a relatively higher elevation of plasma renin activity compared to that of the aldosterone level. Although the symptoms characteristic to hyperthyroidism, such as increased sweating, palpitations and shortness of breath, slowly improved with a spontaneous resolution of the disease, ARB quickly resolved the pretibial pitting edema shortly after the administration.. Conclusions: In this case, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system stimulated by thyroid hormone was likely responsible for the patient’s pitting type of edema. The pharmacological

  12. Fatal lightning strikes in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Murty, O P; Kian, Chong Kah; Ari Husin, Mohammed Husrul; Nanta Kumar, Ranjeev Kumar; Mohammed Yusuf, Wan Yuhana W

    2009-09-01

    Lightning strike is a natural phenomenon with potentially devastating effects and represents one of the important causes of deaths from environmental phenomena. Almost every organ system may be affected as lightning current passes through the human body taking the shortest pathways between the contact points. A 10 years retrospective study (1996-2005) was conducted at University Hospital Kuala Lumpur (20 cases) also including cases during last 3 years from Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah, Klang (7 cases) from the autopsy reports at Forensic Pathology Units of these 2 hospitals. Both these hospitals are attached to University of Malaya. There were 27 fatal cases of lightning strike with male preponderance(92.59%) and male to female ratio of 12.5:1. Majority of victims of lightning strike were from the age group between 30 and 39 years old. Most of the victims were foreign workers. Indonesians workers contributed to 59.26% of overall cases. Majority of them were construction workers who attributed i.e.11 of 27 cases (40.74%). Most of the victims were brought in dead (37.04%). In majority of the cases the lightning incidence occurred in the evenings, with the frequency of 15 of 27 cases (62.5%). The month of December represented with the highest number of cases (5 cases of 23 cases); 2004 had the highest incidence of lightning strike which was 5 (19.23%). Lightning strike incidence occurred when victims had taken shelter (25.9%) under trees or shades. Lightning strike in open areas occurred in 10 of 27 cases (37.0%). Head and neck were the most commonly affected sites with the incidence of 77.78% and 74% respectively in all the victims. Only 29.63% of the cases presented with ear bleeding.

  13. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  14. State Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... York City) - Archived CFOI State Tables New York City CFOI Darlene Kelley Phone: 646-632-6729 Fax: ... Research Unit 3017 North Stiles, Suite 100 Oklahoma City, OK 73105 Fatal occupational injuries (CFOI) data (Please ...

  15. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma. PMID:27635254

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven R; Gardner, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema result from chronic damage to the neurovascular structures of the retina. The pathophysiology of retinal damage remains uncertain but includes metabolic and neuroinflammatory insults. These mechanisms are addressed by intensive metabolic control of the systemic disease and by the use of ocular anti-inflammatory agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and corticosteroids. Improved understanding of the ocular and systemic mechanisms that underlie diabetic retinopathy will lead to improved means to diagnose and treat retinopathy and better maintain vision.

  17. Dramatic response of a patient with pregnancy induced idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension to sildenafil treatment.

    PubMed

    Taçoy, Gülten; Ekim, Numan Nadir; Cengel, Atiye

    2010-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, which may lead to right ventricular failure and death. Major cardiovascular and pulmonary alterations occur during pregnancy and therefore worsen or increase the complications of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). A patient diagnosed with IPAH after a successful full-term pregnancy and cesarean section with epidural anesthesia is presented. The postoperative course was complicated by progressive dyspnea, and lower limb edema. The outcome of treatment with sildenafil during puerperium was favorable in this patient. The clinical course was complicated by an unexpected spontaneous pregnancy after primary infertility.

  18. Fatal acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Fatal Acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee Yugendar R. Bommineni1, Edward J. Dick Jr.1, J. Scot Estep2, John L. Van de Berg1, and Gene B. Hubbard1...species and several insect vectors demonstrating a wide host distribution and low host specificity. Methods—A 23 year old male chimpanzee died acutely and... chimpanzee . Keywords Ape; nonhuman primate; protozoa; fatal case; Trypanosoma cruzi Introduction CD or American trypanosomiasis is caused by TC, a

  19. Fatal outcome in hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Himali; Joshi, Charuta

    2014-03-01

    Hemiplegia-hemiconvulsion-epilepsy syndrome is characterized by prolonged unilateral clonic seizures in a child followed by the development of hemiplegia. Focal status epilepticus results in unilateral cerebral edema of the epileptic hemisphere in the acute phase followed by cerebral hemiatrophy. Literature in the last 5 years does not describe malignant cerebral edema or resultant death. We report a case of a 3-year-old girl with hemiplegia-hemiconvulsion-epilepsy syndrome who died due to malignant cerebral edema and temporal lobe herniation. The first indication of worsening of clinical status after being seizure free was voltage suppression on continuous electroencephalography (EEG). We describe neuroimaging, EEG findings, and neuropathologic findings at autopsy and review pertinent literature. We also evaluate the evolving role of continuous EEG monitoring in the pediatric intensive care unit.

  20. Fecal Impaction Causing Pelvic Venous Compression and Edema

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Aziz, Faisal; Alexander, Chandran Paul; Methratta, Sosamma; Cilley, Robert; Rocourt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema. PMID:26500749

  1. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  2. [Brain edema--historical aspects and contemporary suggestions].

    PubMed

    Meskheli, M K; Gereshidze, M M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article was to show the historical aspects of elaboration of the brain edema study. To draft the main stages of study development from naive medievals suggestions till the creation of modern technologies and the possibility of the brain edema neurovisualization. The possibility to watch and control these processes grants the real perspective to enhance the effectiveness of the brain edema therapy.

  3. Acute edema blisters in a hereditary angioedema cutaneous attack.

    PubMed

    Fernández Romero, D; Di Marco, P; Malbrán, A

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of acute edema affecting the skin and the respiratory and digestive tracts. Acute edema blisters or hydro-static bullae develop after rapid accumulation of interstitial fluid usually associated to cardiac insufficiency. Lesions contain sterile fluid and break up easily resolving without scars. Blisters disappear when fluid accumulation resolves. We describe a patient developing recurrent acute edema blisters as a consequence of cutaneous hereditary angioedema attacks.

  4. Objectification of the severity of Reinke's edema.

    PubMed

    Szkiełkowska, Agata; Miaśkiewicz, Beata; Krasnodębska, Paulina; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    According to the severity, Reinke's edema (RE) of the vocal folds can be divided into three stages as classified by Yonekawa. We evaluated open and closed quotients of vocal folds vibratory cycles using Videostrobokymography (VSK) in a cohort of patients with RE. Parameters were measured from the anterior, medial and posterior third of the vocal folds. Mean values from RE group were OQ (0.44; 0.46; 0.52); CQ (0.56; 0.54; 0.48). Results from the whole glottis OQ and CQ in RE were: OQ=0.48 and CQ=0.52. Significant differences were found for OQ and CQ mean values as well as values measured from each third of the glottis between the control group and patients with RE. In the first Yonekawa group no statistically significant differences were found compared to the control group, but there were significant differences in the remaining two groups. The correlation between the stage of edema on the Yonekawa classification and the mean values of OQ and CQ was 70%.

  5. Hantavirus Fever without Pulmonary Syndrome in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Armien, Blas; Pascale, Juan M.; Muñoz, Carlos; Mariñas, Jamileth; Núñez, Heydy; Herrera, Milagro; Trujillo, José; Sánchez, Deyanira; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Hjelle, Brian; Koster, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    In Panama, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is caused by Choclo virus, a species phylogenetically related to Andes and Maporal viruses. Up to 60% of the population has been positive for specific serum antibody in community-based surveys, but mortality is very uncommon. In four western Panama clinics, we tested individuals presenting with a severe febrile prodrome for acute hantavirus (HV) infection by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as well as clinically similar infections, such as dengue and leptospirosis. From 2006 to 2009, at least 21% of 117 patients diagnosed with HV infection had HV Fever (HF) with no evidence of pulmonary edema (no respiratory distress or radiographic lung infiltrates), and 44% of patients had very mild HPS (radiographic pulmonary edema but no respiratory insufficiency). HV infection caused by Choclo virus in Panama presents often as HF, which contrasts with HV in the Americas but is consistent with the high seroprevalence in endemic regions. PMID:23836565

  6. Magnetic Resonance investigation into the mechanisms involved in the development of high-altitude cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Ravjit S; Hutchinson, Charles E; Wright, Alex; Handford, Charles; Parsons, Helen; Sherwood, Victoria; Wayte, Sarah; Nagaraja, Sanjoy; Ng’Andwe, Eddie; Wilson, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Rapid ascent to high altitude commonly results in acute mountain sickness, and on occasion potentially fatal high-altitude cerebral edema. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms behind these syndromes remain to be determined. We report a study in which 12 subjects were exposed to a FiO2 = 0.12 for 22 h and underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging sequences to enable measurement of middle cerebral artery velocity, flow and diameter, and brain parenchymal, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral venous volumes. Ten subjects completed 22 h and most developed symptoms of acute mountain sickness (mean Lake Louise Score 5.4; p < 0.001 vs. baseline). Cerebral oxygen delivery was maintained by an increase in middle cerebral artery velocity and diameter (first 6 h). There appeared to be venocompression at the level of the small, deep cerebral veins (116 cm3 at 2 h to 97 cm3 at 22 h; p < 0.05). Brain white matter volume increased over the 22-h period (574 ml to 587 ml; p < 0.001) and correlated with cumulative Lake Louise scores at 22 h (p < 0.05). We conclude that cerebral oxygen delivery was maintained by increased arterial inflow and this preceded the development of cerebral edema. Venous outflow restriction appeared to play a contributory role in the formation of cerebral edema, a novel feature that has not been observed previously. PMID:26746867

  7. Cellular senescence mediates fibrotic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Iijima, Koji; Haak, Andrew J.; Ligresti, Giovanni; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Birch, Jodie; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Zhu, Yi; Mazula, Daniel L.; Brooks, Robert W.; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Prakash, Y. S.; Tchkonia, Tamara; Robbins, Paul D.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Passos, João F.; Kirkland, James L.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Kita, Hirohito; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by interstitial remodelling, leading to compromised lung function. Cellular senescence markers are detectable within IPF lung tissue and senescent cell deletion rejuvenates pulmonary health in aged mice. Whether and how senescent cells regulate IPF or if their removal may be an efficacious intervention strategy is unknown. Here we demonstrate elevated abundance of senescence biomarkers in IPF lung, with p16 expression increasing with disease severity. We show that the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, which are selectively killed by a senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin (DQ), is fibrogenic. Leveraging the bleomycin-injury IPF model, we demonstrate that early-intervention suicide-gene-mediated senescent cell ablation improves pulmonary function and physical health, although lung fibrosis is visibly unaltered. DQ treatment replicates benefits of transgenic clearance. Thus, our findings establish that fibrotic lung disease is mediated, in part, by senescent cells, which can be targeted to improve health and function. PMID:28230051

  8. Cellular senescence mediates fibrotic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Iijima, Koji; Haak, Andrew J; Ligresti, Giovanni; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Oberg, Ann L; Birch, Jodie; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Zhu, Yi; Mazula, Daniel L; Brooks, Robert W; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Prakash, Y S; Tchkonia, Tamara; Robbins, Paul D; Aubry, Marie Christine; Passos, João F; Kirkland, James L; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Kita, Hirohito; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by interstitial remodelling, leading to compromised lung function. Cellular senescence markers are detectable within IPF lung tissue and senescent cell deletion rejuvenates pulmonary health in aged mice. Whether and how senescent cells regulate IPF or if their removal may be an efficacious intervention strategy is unknown. Here we demonstrate elevated abundance of senescence biomarkers in IPF lung, with p16 expression increasing with disease severity. We show that the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, which are selectively killed by a senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin (DQ), is fibrogenic. Leveraging the bleomycin-injury IPF model, we demonstrate that early-intervention suicide-gene-mediated senescent cell ablation improves pulmonary function and physical health, although lung fibrosis is visibly unaltered. DQ treatment replicates benefits of transgenic clearance. Thus, our findings establish that fibrotic lung disease is mediated, in part, by senescent cells, which can be targeted to improve health and function.

  9. Highway Safety: Trends in Highway Fatalities 1975-1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    pattern of fatalities as the overall trend. This pattern applies to many of the general fatality statis- tics we present, and, in all cases, it serves as a...Fatalities 1975-87 Appemfx IV Vehicle-Related Statistics Figure IV.17: Vehicle Fatalities by Direction of Principal Impacto NNNumber of PddUlsils lwam 0 1975

  10. Multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules masquerading as pulmonary metastasis; a case of nodular sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mostafa; Farrokh, Donya; Mohammadpanah, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology that is manifested by the presence of non-caseating granulomas. Multiple pulmonary nodules are rare presentations of sarcoidosis. We report a case of nodular sarcoidosis in a young male of Middle-East origin who had initially presented with bilateral painful ankle edema. His chest X-ray showed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. A high resolution computed tomography scan of the chest demonstrated multiple pulmonary nodular lesions and also mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. Subsequent biopsies revealed non-necrotizing granuloma with multi-nucleated giant cells indicative of sarcoidosis. An appropriate work-up was done to confirm the true nature of the nodules and facilitate treatment. PMID:27757192

  11. Role of prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jane A.; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Wright, William R.; Mackenzie, Louise S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Mohamed, Nura

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin is a powerful cardioprotective hormone released by the endothelium of all blood vessels. Prostacyclin exists in equilibrium with other vasoactive hormones and a disturbance in the balance of these factors leads to cardiovascular disease including pulmonary arterial hypertension. Since it's discovery in the 1970s concerted efforts have been made to make the best therapeutic utility of prostacyclin, particularly in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This has centred on working out the detailed pharmacology of prostacyclin and then synthesising new molecules based on its structure that are more stable or more easily tolerated. In addition, newer molecules have been developed that are not analogues of prostacyclin but that target the receptors that prostacyclin activates. Prostacyclin and related drugs have without doubt revolutionised the treatment and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension but are seriously limited by side effects within the systemic circulation. With the dawn of nanomedicine and targeted drug or stem cell delivery systems it will, in the very near future, be possible to make new formulations of prostacyclin that can evade the systemic circulation allowing for safe delivery to the pulmonary vessels. In this way, the full therapeutic potential of prostacyclin can be realised opening the possibility that pulmonary arterial hypertension will become, if not curable, a chronic manageable disease that is no longer fatal. This review discusses these and other issues relating to prostacyclin and its use in pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:25780793

  12. Massive Pulmonary Calculi Embolism: A Novel Complication of Pneumatic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pneumatic lithotripsy is a minimally invasive technique mainly for the treatment of urinary staghorn stones. Previous literatures have reported some therapeutic complications during or after this procedure, but calculi embolism has not been mentioned before. We report here a fatal case of calculi-induced pulmonary embolism in an adult woman who underwent pneumatic lithotripsy. An autopsy did not reveal any evidence of pulmonary embolism. However, light microscopy revealed noticeable presence of calculi in pulmonary arterioles and capillaries, as evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The primary determinants of calculi embolism include intrarenal pressure, and volume and viscosity of the calculi fragments formation. Vascular intravasation of smashed calculi might increase pulmonary vascular resistance and hypoxemia and decrease cardiac output. This case report intends to provide information for clinicians to consider the probability of intraoperative calculi embolism during lithotripsies when patients develop typical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:26222867

  13. Case fatality of COPD exacerbations: a meta-analysis and statistical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, M; Hoogenveen, R T; Rutten-van Mölken, M P; Vestbo, J; Feenstra, T L

    2011-03-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the case fatality of a severe exacerbation from long-term survival data presented in the literature. A literature search identified studies reporting ≥1.5 yr survival after a severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation resulting in hospitalisation. The survival curve of each study was divided into a critical and a stable period. Mortality during the stable period was then estimated by extrapolating the survival curve during the stable period back to the time of exacerbation onset. Case fatality was defined as the excess mortality that results from an exacerbation and was calculated as 1 minus the (backwardly) extrapolated survival during the stable period at the time of exacerbation onset. The 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the estimated case fatalities were obtained by bootstrapping. A random effect model was used to combine all estimates into a weighted average with 95% CI. The meta-analysis based on six studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria resulted in a weighted average case-fatality rate of 15.6% (95% CI 10.9-20.3), ranging from 11.4% to 19.0% for the individual studies. A severe COPD exacerbation requiring hospitalisation not only results in higher mortality risks during hospitalisation, but also in the time-period after discharge and contributes substantially to total COPD mortality.

  14. Fire fighter fatalities 1998–2001: overview with an emphasis on structure related traumatic fatalities

    PubMed Central

    Hodous, T; Pizatella, T; Braddee, R; Castillo, D

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the causes of all fire fighter line-of-duty-deaths from 1998 through 2001, and present recommendations for preventing fatalities within the specific subgroup of structure related events. Methods: Fire fighter fatality data from the United States Fire Administration were reviewed and classified into three main categories of injury. Investigations conducted through the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program provided the basis for the recommendations presented in this paper. Results: During the time period from 1998–2001, there were 410 line-of-duty deaths among fire fighters in the United States, excluding the 343 fire fighters who died at the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001. The 410 fatalities included 191 medical (non-traumatic) deaths (47%), 75 motor vehicle related fatalities (18%), and 144 other traumatic fatalities (35%). The latter group included 68 fatalities that were associated with structures which commonly involved structural collapse, rapid fire progression, and trapped fire fighters. Conclusions: Structural fires pose particular hazards to fire fighters. Additional efforts must be directed to more effectively use what we have learned through the NIOSH investigations and recommendations from published experts in the safety community, consensus standards, and national fire safety organizations to reduce fire fighter fatalities during structural fire fighting. PMID:15314049

  15. ABCA3 mutations led to pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema with pulmonary hypertension in an 8-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Ota, Chiharu; Kimura, Masato; Kure, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    ABCA3 is highly expressed in alveolar epithelial type 2 cells and is associated with surfactant homeostasis. Patients with ABCA3 mutations develop various respiratory complications, such as fatal respiratory distress syndrome or interstitial lung disease. We describe a patient with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema with pulmonary hypertension, associated with compound heterozygous mutations of the ABCA3 gene. This is the first report showing that mutations in the ABCA3 gene lead to pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, including combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, in childhood. Treatment with prostacyclin analogue, warfarin, and inhaled oxygen was effective to improve patient's hemodynamic condition as well as pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E21-E23. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  17. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  18. Fire fatality study: demographics of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Barillo, D J; Goode, R

    1996-03-01

    Injury or death caused by fire is frequent and largely preventable. This study was undertaken to define the populations, locations, times and behaviours associated with fatal fires. Seven hundred and twenty-seven fatalities occurring within the State of New Jersey, between the years 1985 and 1991, were examined retrospectively. Most deaths were attributed to a combination of smoke inhalation and burn injury. Five hundred and seventy-four fatalities occurred in residential fires. Smoking materials were the most common source of ignition for residential fires. More than half of the fatal residential fires started between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Children and the elderly represented a disproportionate percentage of fire victims. Victims under the age of 11 years or over the age of 70 years constituted 22.1 per cent of the state population but 39.5 per cent of all fire fatalities. Fire-prevention efforts should target home fire safety, and should concentrate on children and the elderly. The development of fire-safe smoking materials should be encouraged.

  19. Clinical and Molecular Observations of Two Fatal Cases of Rotavirus-Associated Enteritis in Children in Italy▿

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Abelli, Laura Anna; Martinelli, Monica; Corradi, Domenico; Dodi, Icilio; Tummolo, Fabio; Albonetti, Valeria; Martella, Vito; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Two fatal cases of infantile rotavirus enteritis occurred in northern Italy in 2005. Both children were severely dehydrated, and death was related to severe cerebral edema. Histological examination demonstrated extensive damage of the intestinal epithelium, villous atrophy or blunting, and macrophage infiltration. The two rotavirus strains were of the G1P[8] type and the long electropherotype. The 2005 G1P[8] rotaviruses differed in the NSP4, VP3, VP4, and VP7 genes from G1P[8] rotaviruses circulating in 2004, suggesting the onset of a new G1P[8] strain in the local population. PMID:21525221

  20. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up.

  1. Cardio-pulmonary interactions at high altitude. Pulmonary hypertension as a common denominator.

    PubMed

    Maggiorini, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to find the evidence that a disproportionate pulmonary vasoconstriction persisting for days, weeks and years during residence at high altitude is the common pathophysiologic mechanism of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness. A recent finding in early HAPE suggests that transmission of excessively elevated pulmonary artery pressure to the pulmonary capillaries leading to alveolar hemorrhage as the pathophysiologic mechanism of HAPE. The elevated incidence of HAPE in Indian soldiers led the Indian Army to extend the acclimatization period from a few days to 5 weeks. Using this protocol, HAPE was prevented, but after several weeks of residence at an altitude of 6000m dyspnea, anasarca and pleuro-pericardial effusion developed. Clinical examination revealed severe congestive right heart failure. This condition has been previously described in long-term high altitude residents of the Himalaya and the Andes. In rats, smooth muscle cells appear in normally non-muscular arterioles within days of simulated altitude. Rapid remodeling of the small precapillary arteries may prevent HAPE but increase pulmonary vascular resistance leading to pulmonary hypertension in long-term high altitude residents. Symptoms and signs of HAPE, subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness reverse completely after residents are transfered to low altitude. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that pulmonary hypertension at high altitude, which could be named "high altitude pulmonary hypertension", is the principal and common pathogenic factor of all three cardio-pulmonary manifestations of high altitude illness. Accordingly, subacute mountain sickness and chronic mountain sickness could be renamed in "acute-" and "chronic right heart failure of high altitude", respectively.

  2. Update on corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, Ingrid U; Stewart, Michael W; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important cause of visual loss. Although anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents are generally used as first-line treatments for patients with center-involving DME, there is an important role for corticosteroids as well. Corticosteroids may be especially useful in pseudophakic patients poorly responsive to anti-VEGF therapies, in patients wishing to reduce the number of required injections, and in pregnant patients. Intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide has been used for many years but is not approved for this indication. An extended-release bioerodable dexamethasone delivery system and an extended-release nonbioerodable fluocinolone acetonide insert have both achieved regulatory approval for the treatment of DME. All intravitreal corticosteroids are associated with risks of cataract progression, elevation of intraocular pressure, and endophthalmitis. There is no current consensus regarding the use of corticosteroids, but they are valuable for selected patients with center-involving DME. PMID:27660409

  3. Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema: update 2016

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sikorski, Bartosz L; Ascaso, Francisco J; Huerva, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is the most common complication of cataract surgery, leading in some cases to a decrease in vision. Although the pathogenesis of PCME is not completely understood, the contribution of postsurgical inflammation is generally accepted. Consequently, anti-inflammatory medicines, including steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have been postulated as having a role in both the prophylaxis and treatment of PCME. However, the lack of a uniformly accepted PCME definition, conflicting data on some risk factors, and the scarcity of studies comparing the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to steroids in PCME prevention make the problem of PCME one of the puzzles of ophthalmology. This paper presents an updated review on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and use of anti-inflammatory drugs in PCME that reflect current research and practice. PMID:27672316

  4. [Papillary edema in Muckle-Wells syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wirths, G; Grenzebach, U; Eter, N

    2015-09-01

    Papillary edema may occur isolated without functional impairment or secondary related to various syndromes, increased intracerebral pressure or associated with medicinal treatment. The Muckle-Wells syndrome is a rare disease, which among many other symptoms can lead to optic disc swelling and recurrent increase in intracerebral pressure. Besides familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS) and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), the Muckle-Wells syndrome also belongs to the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). In most cases of CAP syndromes there is an underlying genetic disorder that leads to overproduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β); therefore, typical symptoms include inflammation reactions, such as repeated skin rash, fatigue, fever, joint pain and conjunctivitis.

  5. Anthrax edema toxin impairs clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Sastalla, Inka; Tang, Shixing; Crown, Devorah; Liu, Shihui; Eckhaus, Michael A; Hewlett, Indira K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2012-02-01

    The anthrax edema toxin (ET) of Bacillus anthracis is composed of the receptor-binding component protective antigen (PA) and of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic moiety, edema factor (EF). Uptake of ET into cells raises intracellular concentrations of the secondary messenger cyclic AMP, thereby impairing or activating host cell functions. We report here on a new consequence of ET action in vivo. We show that in mouse models of toxemia and infection, serum PA concentrations were significantly higher in the presence of enzymatically active EF. These higher concentrations were not caused by ET-induced inhibition of PA endocytosis; on the contrary, ET induced increased PA binding and uptake of the PA oligomer in vitro and in vivo through upregulation of the PA receptors TEM8 and CMG2 in both myeloid and nonmyeloid cells. ET effects on protein clearance from circulation appeared to be global and were not limited to PA. ET also impaired the clearance of ovalbumin, green fluorescent protein, and EF itself, as well as the small molecule biotin when these molecules were coinjected with the toxin. Effects on injected protein levels were not a result of general increase in protein concentrations due to fluid loss. Functional markers for liver and kidney were altered in response to ET. Concomitantly, ET caused phosphorylation and activation of the aquaporin-2 water channel present in the principal cells of the collecting ducts of the kidneys that are responsible for fluid homeostasis. Our data suggest that in vivo, ET alters circulatory protein and small molecule pharmacokinetics by an as-yet-undefined mechanism, thereby potentially allowing a prolonged circulation of anthrax virulence factors such as EF during infection.

  6. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema.

    PubMed

    Leung, B K; Bonanno, J A; Radke, C J

    2011-11-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem-Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema.

  7. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema

    PubMed Central

    Leung, B.K.; Bonanno, J.A.; Radke, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem–Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema. PMID:21820076

  8. Fatal Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Mafra, Cláudio Lísias; Calic, Simone Berger; Chamone, Chequer Buffe; Filho, Gracco Cesarino; Olano, Juan Pablo; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence and reemergence of a serious infectious disease are often associated with a high case-fatality rate because of misdiagnosis and inappropriate or delayed treatment. The current reemergence of spotted fever rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in Brazil has resulted in a high proportion of fatal cases. We describe two familial clusters of Brazilian spotted fever in the state of Minas Gerais, involving six children 9 months to 15 years of age; five died. Immunohistochemical investigation of tissues obtained at necropsy of a child in each location, Novo Cruzeiro and Coronel Fabriciano municipalities, established the diagnosis by demonstration of disseminated endothelial infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae. The diagnosis in the two fatal cases from Coronel Fabriciano and the surviving patient from Novo Cruzeiro was further supported by immunofluorescence serologic tests. PMID:14718082

  9. Edema and pain reduction using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on the edema and pain when applying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven patients who were diagnosed with lymphedema were selected as the subjects of the study. The experimental group received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment on edema regions three times per week for four weeks. Surface tape measurement was used to measure changes in lower extremity edema. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale. [Results] The edema decrements in the experimental group were significantly larger than those in the control group. The pain decrements in the experimental group were significantly larger than those in the control group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was confirmed to be effective in reducing edema and pain. PMID:27942125

  10. A fatal case of potential chronic overdoses of prescribed and proprietary remedies.

    PubMed

    Takase, Izumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Tokiko; Nishi, Katsuji

    2010-08-01

    A 33-year-old man was found in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest. He was transported to an emergency hospital but was pronounced dead. He had suffered from depression for about 8 years and had attempted suicide repeatedly. A search by the police found 645 empty Press Through Package (PTP) sheets. They had included neuroleptics, antidepressants, hypnotics, proprietary antitussives containing caffeine, proprietary cold remedies containing caffeine, and other unidentified drugs. An autopsy showed higher rectal temperature (38 degrees C), severe pulmonary edema (left: 681 g, right: 821 g), and a large amount of urine in the bladder (about 760 mL). Toxicological analyses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrated that doses of clomipramine hydrochloride (a tricyclic antidepressant), chlorpromazine (a phenothiazine), and caffeine (a methylxanthine derivative) were within the toxic range (0.68, 0.64, and 34.24 [microg/mL], respectively). Histological examination showed centrilobular necrosis of the liver with small fat droplets. We concluded that he had died of pulmonary edema due to combined drug intoxication including proprietary antitussives and cold remedies. Furthermore, there was a strong possibility that he had habitually taken overdoses of those drugs. Herein, the risk of misuse of prescribed and proprietary drugs, especially for people with psychological problems, should be reemphasized.

  11. Fatal chemical pneumonia from 1,1,2,3,3-pentafluoro-3-chloropropene in an unmarked gas tank

    SciTech Connect

    Thun, M.; Kimbrough, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Fatal chemical pneumonia occurred in a worker following exposure to an unidentified gas in a salvaged cylinder. Inspection of the tank revealed a scrawled chemical formula for 1,1,2,3,3-pentafluoro-3-chloropropene, a suspected pulmonary irritant. The report underscores the potential hazards which salvaged cylinders pose to individuals who use or refill them. The population at risk includes scuba divers, emergency rescue personnel, and workers in the compressed gas industry.

  12. Pulmonary Aspiration of Gastric Acid—Mendelson's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Berris, Barnet; Kasler, David

    1965-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary aspiration of gastric acid as a complication of obstetrical anesthesia are described. The clinical picture consists of dyspnea, cyanosis, tachycardia and shock appearing several hours after the aspiration has occurred. On examination, the chest may be quite clear, but the chest radiograph shows a picture indistinguishable from that of pulmonary edema. The most important therapeutic measure is the intravenous administration of corticosteroids in large doses for several days. Bronchoscopy is contraindicated. With routine use of epidural anesthesia, this obstetrical complication can be avoided. PMID:14289137

  13. ECONOMIC LOSSES AND FATALITIES DUE TO LANDSLIDES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Robert L.; Fleming, Robert W.

    1986-01-01

    Annual losses in the United States, Japan, Italy, and India have been estimated at 1 billion or more each. During the period 1971-74, nearly 600 people per year were killed by landslides worldwide; about 90 percent of these deaths occurred in the Circum-Pacific region. From 1967-82, 150 people per year died in Japan as a result of slope failures. In the United States, the number of landslide-related fatalities per year exceeds 25. Japan leads other nations in development of comprehensive programs to reduce economic losses and fatalities due to landslides. The United States recently has proposed a national landslide hazard reduction program.

  14. Forensic Nursing Provides Closure in Workplace Fatality.

    PubMed

    Harris, Colin

    The Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia in Canada is the provincial agency mandated to investigate workplace injuries and fatalities. In 2012, the Fatal and Serious Injuries Investigation section of this organization initiated the integration of forensic nursing expertise into the investigation of workplace incidents. The goals were to improve investigative outcomes and aid in prevention initiatives by achieving a more accurate understanding of incident causation through the application of forensic nursing science. An unexpected outcome of the use of forensic nursing expertise was providing closure for families through a deeper understanding of their loved one's tragic workplace incident.

  15. Androctonus australis hector venom contributes to the interaction between neuropeptides and mast cells in pulmonary hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chaïr-Yousfi, Imène; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima; Hammoudi-Triki, Djelila

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome are frequent symptoms observed in the most severe cases of scorpion envenomation. The uncontrolled transmigration of leukocyte cells into the lung interstitium and alveolar space and pulmonary edema may be the cause of death. Mast cells can release various inflammatory mediators known to be involved in the development of lung edema following scorpion venom injection. The present study was designed to determine the evidence of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and the involvement of mast cell activation to induce pulmonary edema and to increase vascular permeability after Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom administration. To this end, mast cells were depleted using compound 48/80 (C48/80). Furthermore, the involvement of tachykinin NK1 receptors expressed on mast cell membranes was elucidated by their blocking with an antagonist. On the other hand, the ability of Aah venom to increase vascular permeability and to induce edema was also assessed by measuring the amount of Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in the lungs of mice. Pulmonary edema, as assessed by the levels of EBD extravasation, was completely inhibited in compound 48/80-treated animals. Depletion by stimuli non-immunological C48/80 component markedly reduced induced inflammatory response following the venom administration. The mast cells seem to play an important role in the development of lung injury and the increase of vascular permeability in mice following the subcutaneous administration of Aah scorpion venom through the NK1 receptor.

  16. Relapse of Yellow Nail Syndrome with Pulmonary Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Yano, Ryozo; Sasaki, Yuka; Osawa, Takeshi; Kudoh, Shoji; Goto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare disorder characterized by the triad of yellow, thickened nails, lymphedema, and respiratory manifestations such as pleural effusions, bronchiectasis, and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. We report a case of YNS showing pulmonary interlobular septal thickening on thoracic computed tomography, implying the presence of lymphatic edema. The patient showed both the remission and relapse of yellow nail with different lung treatments over a long clinical course.

  17. [Pulmonary hypertension in pediatric heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Falcone, N

    2001-12-01

    Congenital heart disease can increase or decrease pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) or pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). PAP is the product of PVR and pulmonary minute volume (Qp), such that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) may develop as a result of an increase in either PVR or Qp or both. Given that the pulmonary vascular bed is a low pressure system with high flow, any increase in resistance would generate PHT. The normal value of PVR is 2 Woods units (mm Hg/l/min). Increased PAP is due to hypoxic lesions of the endothelium, which release proteolytic enzymes that alter the balance of metabolites of arachidonic acid, regulators of pulmonary vasomotor tone. Hypoxia and acidosis cause intense pulmonary vasoconstriction (hypoxic vasoconstrictor reflex). An increase of PVR is due to a combination of vasoconstrictive processes and remodeling, with hypertrophy of the pulmonary artery. Structural lesions are related to hypertrophy of the endothelium, the transformation of fibroblasts to myocytes and the decrease of the alveolar/arteriolar ratio with the formation of new vessels.PHT may be primary or secondary to another disease. Primary PHT is a rare genetic disease. The most common secondary forms of PHT in pediatrics are due to persistence of neonatal anatomy (neonatal PHT), to heart diseases with left-right shunt (CIV, DAP, etc.), to diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma (interstitial viral infection, mucoviscidosis), and complications of heart surgery. All congenital heart diseases can lead to PHT if not treated promptly. Clinical signs of PHT are highly non-specific: dyspnea, fatigue, syncopes, exercise intolerance, precordialgia, cyanosis and edema. The best approaches to diagnosis and prognosis are echocardiography and cardiac catheterization with vasodilators. Anesthetics that do not alter PVR should be used in such patients, who are sensitive to changes in pulmonary ventilation, to changes in cardiac output and to anesthetics. The treatment of

  18. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  19. Fatal fat embolism following femoral head resection in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Walker, N M; Bateson, T; Reavley, P; Prakash, D

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare complication during primary total hip arthroplasty. A fatal fat pulmonary embolism immediately followed removal of the femoral head, prior to further preparation of the acetabulum or femoral shaft. Fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication during total joint arthroplasty, usually attributed to preparation of the femoral shaft, particularly intramedullary reaming and insertion of the prosthesis. These risk factors have previously been identified in the literature. We believe that this case highlights the need for further research to establish the intramedullary pressures during the processes of dislocation and resection of the femoral neck and the attendant risk.

  20. Paraneoplastic pemphigus caused by an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma and associated with fatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    van der Waal, R I; Pas, H H; Nousari, H C; Schulten, E A; Jonkman, M F; Nieboer, C; Stoof, T J; Starink, T M; Anhalt, G J

    2000-07-01

    A patient is described who initially presented with pemphigus vulgaris, limited to the oral cavity, and weight loss. Although the various laboratory studies pointed to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP), the underlying neoplasm was not detected until 6 months later, when the patient developed shortness of breath and routine physical examination on admission revealed an abdominal mass, which eventually was proven to be an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma. In spite of radical excision of the tumour and intensive treatment of the dyspnoea, the patient died of respiratory failure 19 months after the PNP had been diagnosed. Early diagnosis of PNP is stressed to possibly prevent fatal pulmonary involvement.