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Sample records for fatigue immune dysfunction

  1. Retroviral sequences related to human T-lymphotropic virus type II in patients with chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    DeFreitas, E.; Hilliard, B.; Cheney, P.R.; Bell, D.S.; Kiggundu, E.; Sankey, D.; Wroblewska, Z.; Palladino, M.; Woodward, J.P.; Koprowski, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) is a recently recognized illness characterized by debilitating fatigue as well as immunological and neurological abnormalities. Once thought to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, it is now thought to have a different but unknown etiology. The authors evaluted 30 adult and pediatric CFIDS patients from six eastern states for the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I and II by Western immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization of blood samples. The majority of patients were positive for HTLV antibodies by Western blotting and for HTLV-II gag sequences by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Twenty nonexposure healthy controls were negative in all assays. These data support an association between an HTLV-II-like virus and CFIDS.

  2. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: immune dysfunction, role of pathogens and toxic agents and neurological and cardial changes].

    PubMed

    Hilgers, A; Frank, J

    1994-01-01

    375 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) were examined using a standardized questionnaire and subsequent interview on 11 risk factors and 45 symptoms. Additionally immunologic, serologic, toxicologic, neuroradiologic, neurophysiologic and cardiologic investigations were performed. Immunologic tests showed cellular immunodeficiences particularly in functional regard (pathological lymphocyte stimulation in 50% of the patients, disorders of granulocyte function in 44%). Furthermore variable deviations were found in the lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, DR, Leu 11 + 19). In the humoral part tendencies to low IgG-3- and IgG-1-subclass-levels occurred (59% respectively 11% of the patients) also as decreases in complement system (CH50, C3, C4, C1-esterase-inhibitor). In the group of activation markers and cytokines 42% of the investigated patients had circulating immune complexes (CIC), 47% increases of tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF-a) and 21% increases of soluble interleukin-2-receptor (IL-2-R). The increased occurrence of autoantibodies in the CFS-patients (specially antinuclear anti-bodies [ANA], microsomal thyroid antibodies) suggest, that CFS is associated with or the beginning of manifest autoimmune disease. Under the pathogens 78% of the patients had a striking serological constellation of Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV-EA positive, low EBNA-titers), in the HHV-6-Virus 47% showed increased antibody-titers. Tests on further herpes viruses and on Borreliae, Chlamydiae, Candida and Amoebae were positive in 8 to 36% of the examined patients. Furthermore there were found variable deficits of vitamins and trace elements also as hormonal disturbances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Association of mitochondrial dysfunction and fatigue: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Filler, Kristin; Lyon, Debra; Bennett, James; McCain, Nancy; Elswick, Ronald; Lukkahatai, Nada; Saligan, Leorey N.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is often described by patients as a lack of energy, mental or physical tiredness, diminished endurance, and prolonged recovery after physical activity. Etiologic mechanisms underlying fatigue are not well understood; however, fatigue is a hallmark symptom of mitochondrial disease, making mitochondrial dysfunction a putative biological mechanism for fatigue. Therefore, this review examined studies that investigated the association of markers of mitochondrial dysfunction with fatigue and proposes possible research directions to enhance understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in fatigue. A thorough search using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase databases returned 1220 articles. After the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 25 articles meeting eligibility criteria were selected for full review. Dysfunctions in the mitochondrial structure, mitochondrial function (mitochondrial enzymes and oxidative/nitrosative stress), mitochondrial energy metabolism (ATP production and fatty acid metabolism), immune response, and genetics were investigated as potential contributors to fatigue. Carnitine was the most investigated mitochondrial function marker. Dysfunctional levels were reported in all the studies investigating carnitine; however, the specific type of carnitine that was dysfunctional varied. Genetic profiles were the second most studied mitochondrial parameter. Six common pathways were proposed: metabolism, energy production, protein transport, mitochondrial morphology, central nervous system dysfunction and post-viral infection. Coenzyme Q10 was the most commonly investigated mitochondrial enzyme. Low levels of Coenzyme Q10 were consistently associated with fatigue. Potential targets for further investigation were identified as well as gaps in the current literature. PMID:25147756

  4. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease.

  5. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Ward, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after “recovery” from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical “recovery,” with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  6. Immune Dysfunction in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Ishraga; Edwards, Mark J.; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    The association between immunity and neurodevelopmental disorders has been extensively investigated in autism, suggesting a potential involvement of both cellular and humoral immunity in the establishment of synaptic connectivity modulation during development. A similar link has been proposed also for Tourette syndrome (TS), a complex, multifactorial disorder, in which the interplay between genetic, environmental, hormonal and immunological factors might be relevant. Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis in TS suggests a possible systemic activation of several T- and B-cell subtypes, whereas the observed decreased numbers of T regulatory lymphocytes might predispose to autoimmunity. Genes related to both cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses may be over-expressed at specific ages in youngsters with TS. Data from cytokine measurements and transcriptomics profiles in TS patients are coherent with the systemic immune activation detected by studies on lymphocyte subpopulations. Moreover, TS patients have exhibited IgG3 and IgA dysgammaglobulinemia, which might predispose to recurrent infections and autoimmunity. To date, the association between TS and autoantibodies has not been demonstrated. Interestingly, however, there is a higher degree of maternal family history of autoimmune diseases among TS patients. Finally, TS patients could be prone to allergic illnesses (asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, conjunctivitis), but more work is needed in this area. PMID:23187145

  7. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0388 TITLE: Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling 5b. GRANT...at the HLA level that makes you more susceptible to have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) or any differences between the cases and controls. In order

  8. Immune dysfunction in uremia—an update.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gerald; Hörl, Walter H

    2012-10-24

    Kidney dysfunction leads to disturbed renal metabolic activities and to impaired glomerular filtration, resulting in the retention of toxic solutes affecting all organs of the body. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections are the main causes for the increased occurrence of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both complications are directly or indirectly linked to a compromised immune defense. The specific coordinated roles of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in maintaining an efficient immune response are affected. Their normal response can be impaired, giving rise to infectious diseases or pre-activated/primed, leading to inflammation and consequently to CVD. Whereas the coordinated removal via apoptosis of activated immune cells is crucial for the resolution of inflammation, inappropriately high apoptotic rates lead to a diminished immune response. In uremia, the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory and between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors is disturbed. This review summarizes the interrelated parameters interfering with the immune response in uremia, with a special focus on the non-specific immune response and the role of uremic toxins.

  9. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0388 TITLE: Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...SUBTITLE Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0388 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...tested by two novel methods (CyTOF-phosphoflow and HLA Typing, respectively) to help us better understand the roles of immune responses and genetics

  10. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  11. Serotonergic dysfunctions and abnormal iron metabolism: Relevant to mental fatigue of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li-Jun; Yu, Shu-Yang; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Piao, Ying-Shan; Lian, Teng-Hong; Yu, Qiu-Jin; Wang, Rui-Dan; Li, Li-Xia; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Zhu, Rong-Yan; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Ya-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chan, Piu; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue is a very common non-motor symptom in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. It included physical fatigue and mental fatigue. The potential mechanisms of mental fatigue involving serotonergic dysfunction and abnormal iron metabolism are still unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the fatigue symptoms, classified PD patients into fatigue group and non-fatigue group, and detected the levels of serotonin, iron and related proteins in CSF and serum. In CSF, 5-HT level is significantly decreased and the levels of iron and transferrin are dramatically increased in fatigue group. In fatigue group, mental fatigue score is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF, and positively correlated with the scores of depression and excessive daytime sleepiness, and disease duration, also, mental fatigue is positively correlated with the levels of iron and transferrin in CSF. Transferrin level is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF. In serum, the levels of 5-HT and transferrin are markedly decreased in fatigue group; mental fatigue score exhibits a negative correlation with 5-HT level. Thus serotonin dysfunction in both central and peripheral systems may be correlated with mental fatigue through abnormal iron metabolism. Depression, excessive daytime sleepiness and disease duration were the risk factors for mental fatigue of PD.

  12. Monitoring of the Immune Dysfunction in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2016-09-02

    Immunotherapy shows promising clinical results in patients with different types of cancer, but its full potential is not reached due to immune dysfunction as a result of several suppressive mechanisms that play a role in cancer development and progression. Monitoring of immune dysfunction is a prerequisite for the development of strategies aiming to alleviate cancer-induced immune suppression. At this point, the level at which immune dysfunction occurs has to be established, the underlying mechanism(s) need to be known, as well as the techniques to assess this. While it is relatively easy to measure general signs of immune suppression, it turns out that accurate monitoring of the frequency and function of immune-suppressive cells is still difficult. A lack of truly specific markers, the phenotypic complexity among suppressive cells of the same lineage, but potentially with different functions and functional assays that may not cover every mechanistic aspect of immune suppression are among the reasons complicating proper assessments. Technical innovations in flow and mass cytometry will allow for more complete sets of markers to precisely determine phenotype and associated function. There is, however, a clear need for functional assays that recapitulate more of the mechanisms employed to suppress the immune system.

  13. Monitoring of the Immune Dysfunction in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Welters, Marij J. P.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy shows promising clinical results in patients with different types of cancer, but its full potential is not reached due to immune dysfunction as a result of several suppressive mechanisms that play a role in cancer development and progression. Monitoring of immune dysfunction is a prerequisite for the development of strategies aiming to alleviate cancer-induced immune suppression. At this point, the level at which immune dysfunction occurs has to be established, the underlying mechanism(s) need to be known, as well as the techniques to assess this. While it is relatively easy to measure general signs of immune suppression, it turns out that accurate monitoring of the frequency and function of immune-suppressive cells is still difficult. A lack of truly specific markers, the phenotypic complexity among suppressive cells of the same lineage, but potentially with different functions and functional assays that may not cover every mechanistic aspect of immune suppression are among the reasons complicating proper assessments. Technical innovations in flow and mass cytometry will allow for more complete sets of markers to precisely determine phenotype and associated function. There is, however, a clear need for functional assays that recapitulate more of the mechanisms employed to suppress the immune system. PMID:27598210

  14. Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), postnatal immune dysfunction and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2009-01-01

    The developing immune system is a sensitive target for environmentally-induced disruption producing postnatal immune dysfunction. Unique immune maturational events occur during critical windows of prenatal/perinatal development and environmentally-induced disruption of one-time events can have serious health consequences. Additionally, the specialized immunological conditions necessary to bring a semi-allogeneic fetus to term place restrictions on both the maternal and offspring immune systems. These features combine not only to increase the risk of early-life immune insult (ELII), which includes xenobiotically-induced developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), but also to influence the nature of DIT-associated diseases for the child. Exposure to certain toxicants as well as maternal infections and other pregnancy stressors is known to induce postnatal immune dysfunction. Because dysfunctional immune responses to childhood infections have been proposed to play a role in childhood leukemia, DIT is a potential risk factor for this disease. This review details the range of disease susceptibilities impacted by DIT and discusses the importance of effective DIT safety testing for drugs and chemicals as a preventative measure.

  15. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Miller, Caragh; Singh, Sukhbir S; Thomas, Richard; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis.

  16. Radiation-Induced Hemopoietic and Immune Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    with a povidone -iodine scrub and an alcohol rinse. Marrow cells obtained six days, after TBI were used as antigen for the immunization of mice. At this...detected by FACS analysis after treatment with antibody and complement. Recovery of white blood cells an1 platelet counts was comparable to the recovery...in triplicate in CFU-GM assay. Each point represents the cumulative number of weekly CFU-GM. need to be autologous compared to the cells of the

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  18. Innate immune dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gersemann, M; Wehkamp, J; Stange, E F

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms that cause the two types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are still under investigation. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that luminal microbes are of particular relevance in the development of these conditions. In recent years, increasing evidence has shown that defects in the innate immunity are at the centre of both types of IBD. The innate intestinal barrier is provided by the epithelium which secretes antimicrobial peptides (so-called defensins) that are retained in the mucus layer. In ileal CD, the alpha-defensins are lacking owing to several Paneth cell defects. In colonic CD, the expression of beta-defensins is inadequate. This may be related to downregulation of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and in some cohorts is associated with a reduced HBD2 gene copy number. In UC, the mucus layer, which protects the host from the enormous amounts of luminal microbes, is defective. This is accompanied by an insufficient differentiation from intestinal stem cells towards goblet cells. All these disturbances in the gut barrier shift the balance from epithelial defence towards bacterial offence. The current treatment for CD and UC is based on suppression of this secondary inflammatory process. In future, patients may benefit from new therapeutic approaches stimulating the protective innate immune system.

  19. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  20. Muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  1. Muscle Fatigue in the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:25883949

  2. The effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Guang

    2003-12-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue has long been an important field in sports medicine. The electron leak of mitochondrial respiratory chain during the ATP synthesis integrated with proton leak and O-.2 can decrease the efficiency of ATP synthesis in mitochondria. And the exercise-induced fatigue occur followed by the decrease of performance. If the dysfunction of mitochondria can be avoided, the fatigue during the exercise may be delayed and the performance may be enhanced. Indeed there are some kind of materials can partially prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency in mitochondria. But the side effects and safety of these materials is still needed to be studied. Low intensity laser can improve the mitochondria function. It is reasonable to consider that low intensity laser therapy may become the new and more effective way to delay or elimination the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria. Because the effect of laser irradiation may not be controlled exactly when study in vivo, we use electrical stimulation of C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define the effect of low intensity laser on the dysfunction of mitochondria, and to define the optimal laser intensity to prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency. Our study use the C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define some of the mechanisms involved in the contractile-induced changes of mitochondrial function firstly in sports medicine and may suggest a useful study way to other researchers. We also give a new way to delay or eliminating the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria without side effect.

  3. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Immune-Inflammatory Pathways in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been classified as a disease of the central nervous system by the WHO since 1969. Many patients carrying this diagnosis do demonstrate an almost bewildering array of biological abnormalities particularly the presence of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and a chronically activated innate immune system. The proposal made herein is that once generated chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways conspire to generate a multitude of self-sustaining and self-amplifying pathological processes which are associated with the onset of ME/CFS. Sources of continuous activation of O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are chronic, intermittent and opportunistic infections, bacterial translocation, autoimmune responses, mitochondrial dysfunctions, activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle, and decreased antioxidant levels. Consequences of chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are brain disorders, including neuroinflammation and brain hypometabolism / hypoperfusion, toxic effects of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, secondary autoimmune responses directed against disrupted lipid membrane components and proteins, mitochondrial dysfunctions with a disruption of energy metabolism (e.g. compromised ATP production) and dysfunctional intracellular signaling pathways. The interplay between all of these factors leads to self-amplifying feed forward loops causing a chronic state of activated O&NS, immune-inflammatory and autoimmune pathways which may sustain the disease. PMID:24669210

  4. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  5. [Immune dysfunction in highly skilled athletes and nutritional rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Trushina, E N; Mustafina, O K; Nikitiuk, D B; Kuznetsov, V D

    2012-01-01

    The present review examines the effects of strenuous and moderate exercise on various components of the immune system including humoral and cell immunity. Acute exercise have been found to affect lymphocyte subsets, immunoglobulin levels, the activity of mononuclear phagocytic system, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cytokine levels, especially IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF. The extreme type of immune deficiency in sportsmen, in which there are not determine different isotypes of immunoglobulins, there are described as phenomenon of Ig disappearance. The immune suppression is associated with an increased risk of subclinical and clinical infection in athletes. The mechanisms immunodeficiency are multifactorial and include neuroendocrinologocal and metabolic disorders. The immunosuppression in sportsmen may be prevented by use of special diets. Although athletes need to eat a well-balanced basic diet, there are several nutritional factors that are difficult to obtain at a sufficient level from a normal diet since athletes require more nutrients than the recommended daily allowances. Thus, appropriate nutrition enrichment of special products and food supplements containing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, probiotics is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, recovery from fatigue after exercise and ward off immunodeficiency.

  6. A neuro-immune model of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a neuro-immune model for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). A wide range of immunological and neurological abnormalities have been reported in people suffering from ME/CFS. They include abnormalities in proinflammatory cytokines, raised production of nuclear factor-κB, mitochondrial dysfunctions, autoimmune responses, autonomic disturbances and brain pathology. Raised levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), together with reduced levels of antioxidants are indicative of an immuno-inflammatory pathology. A number of different pathogens have been reported either as triggering or maintaining factors. Our model proposes that initial infection and immune activation caused by a number of possible pathogens leads to a state of chronic peripheral immune activation driven by activated O&NS pathways that lead to progressive damage of self epitopes even when the initial infection has been cleared. Subsequent activation of autoreactive T cells conspiring with O&NS pathways cause further damage and provoke chronic activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways. The subsequent upregulation of proinflammatory compounds may activate microglia via the vagus nerve. Elevated proinflammatory cytokines together with raised O&NS conspire to produce mitochondrial damage. The subsequent ATP deficit together with inflammation and O&NS are responsible for the landmark symptoms of ME/CFS, including post-exertional malaise. Raised levels of O&NS subsequently cause progressive elevation of autoimmune activity facilitated by molecular mimicry, bystander activation or epitope spreading. These processes provoke central nervous system (CNS) activation in an attempt to restore immune homeostatsis. This model proposes that the antagonistic activities of the CNS response to peripheral inflammation, O&NS and chronic immune activation are responsible for the remitting-relapsing nature of ME/CFS. Leads for future research are suggested based on this

  7. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  8. Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Fatigue and Weight Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Yadav, Vijayshree; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-11-01

    Signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis are usually attributed to demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord or cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is a region that is often overlooked yet controls many important homeostatic functions, including those that are perturbed in multiple sclerosis. In this review we discuss how hypothalamic dysfunction may contribute to signs and symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis. While dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is common in multiple sclerosis, the effects and mechanisms of this dysfunction are not well understood. We discuss three hypothalamic mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: (1) general hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, (2) disordered orexin neurotransmission, (3) abnormal cortisol secretion. We then review potential mechanisms of weight dysregulation caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Lastly, we propose future studies and therapeutics to better understand and treat hypothalamic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Hypothalamic dysfunction appears to be common in multiple sclerosis, yet current studies are underpowered and contradictory. Future studies should contain larger sample sizes and standardize hormone and neuropeptide measurements.

  9. Multiple sclerosis and fatigue: A review on the contribution of inflammation and immune-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Patejdl, Robert; Penner, Iris K; Noack, Thomas K; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among young and middle-aged adults in the western world. One of its most prevalent and debilitating symptoms is fatigue. Despite the general acceptance of the idea of an immune pathogenesis of MS itself, the role of autoimmunity in the course of MS-fatigue is a matter of debate. Both immune-related processes (acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, immune-mediated neurodegeneration, immune-mediated alterations of endocrine functions related to fatigue) and presumably non-immune-mediated disturbances and factors (sleep disturbances, depression, cognitive alterations, chronic infections, adverse effects of medications) contribute to the clinical picture. Data from in vitro and animal experiments has provided evidence for a role of cytokines as IL-1 and TNF-alpha. This association could not be verified directly in blood samples from humans whereas whole blood stimulation protocols gave some indirect evidence for a role of cytokines in MS-fatigue. MRI being able to detect acute and chronic immune mediated damage to the CNS could depict that global atrophy of gray or white matter does not correlate with fatigue. Rather, distinctive clusters of lesions and atrophy at different locations, mostly bifrontal or in subcortical structures, correlate specifically with fatigue. Regardless of the difficulties in pinpointing the immunogenesis of MS-fatigue, an important role of autoimmunity is strongly supported by an indirect route: A growing amount of data shows that the highly effective immunotherapeutics which have been introduced to MS-treatment over the last years effectively and sustainably stabilize and ameliorate fatigue in parallel to their dampening effects on the neuroinflammatory process. This review summarizes the existing data on the relation between inflammation, patterns of CNS-lesions and the effects of immunotherapeutics

  10. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  11. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica E.; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure. PMID:27740937

  12. Is DNA methylation responsible for immune system dysfunction in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Khojasteh-Fard, Maryam; Tabrizi, Mina; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2011-10-01

    Association of both environmental and hereditary factors in susceptibility to schizophrenia is well established. Initial diagnosis of schizophrenia in a genetically susceptible individual usually occurs the first time that individual faces a great life-time stressful event. Immune system dysfunction is one of the major factors implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia because it can render an individual more vulnerable to stress. Imbalance between type-1 and type-2 immunity and subsequent alterations in cytokine levels have been reported in schizophrenia patients. Cytokines seem to have neurotropic activities associated with neurologic disorders, suggesting their complex role in the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, it is well known that CpG methylation strongly associates with silencing of genes in differentiated cells at the transcriptional level and variation in genomic DNA methylation of cytokine genes and T cells is an important factor modulating cytokine gene expression in various conditions. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that alterations in methylation pattern of selective cytokine gene promoters be regarded as an underlying mechanism of Th1/Th2 imbalance observed in schizophrenia. Environmental triggers including feto-maternal transmission of viral or bacterial micro-organisms, change in enzymatic activities, or interaction of environmental and genetic factors in individuals with a higher risk of schizophrenia might orchestrate this mechanism.

  13. A brain MRI study of chronic fatigue syndrome: evidence of brainstem dysfunction and altered homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barnden, Leighton R; Crouch, Benjamin; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Mernone, Anacleto; Chryssidis, Steve; Scroop, Garry; Del Fante, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To explore brain involvement in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), the statistical parametric mapping of brain MR images has been extended to voxel-based regressions against clinical scores. Using SPM5 we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and analysed T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo MR signal levels in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Clinical scores included CFS fatigue duration, a score based on the 10 most common CFS symptoms, the Bell score, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) anxiety and depression, and hemodynamic parameters from 24-h blood pressure monitoring. We also performed group × hemodynamic score interaction regressions to detect locations where MR regressions were opposite for CFS and NC, thereby indicating abnormality in the CFS group. In the midbrain, white matter volume was observed to decrease with increasing fatigue duration. For T1-weighted MR and white matter volume, group × hemodynamic score interactions were detected in the brainstem [strongest in midbrain grey matter (GM)], deep prefrontal white matter (WM), the caudal basal pons and hypothalamus. A strong correlation in CFS between brainstem GM volume and pulse pressure suggested impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation. It can be argued that at least some of these changes could arise from astrocyte dysfunction. These results are consistent with an insult to the midbrain at fatigue onset that affects multiple feedback control loops to suppress cerebral motor and cognitive activity and disrupt local CNS homeostasis, including resetting of some elements of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). © 2011 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21560176

  14. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, ...

  15. Humoral and cellular immune responses after influenza vaccination in patients with postcancer fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Hetty; van Laarhoven, Hanneke WM; Pots, Jeanette M; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Mulder, Sasja F; van Herpen, Carla ML; Jacobs, Joannes FM; Leer, Jan Willem H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Stelma, Foekje F; Torensma, Ruurd; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in cancer survivors with and without severe symptoms of fatigue. Severely fatigued (n = 15) and non-fatigued (n = 12) disease-free cancer survivors were vaccinated against seasonal influenza. Humoral immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Cellular immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by lymphocyte proliferation and activation assays. Regulatory T cells were measured at baseline by flow cytometry and heat-shock protein 90 alpha levels by ELISA. Comparable humoral immune responses were observed in fatigued and non-fatigued patients, both pre- and post-vaccination. At baseline, fatigued patients showed a significantly diminished cellular proliferation upon virus stimulation with strain H3N2 (1414 ± 1201 counts), and a trend in a similar direction with strain H1N1 (3025 ± 2339 counts), compared to non-fatigued patients (3099 ± 2401 and 5877 ± 4604 counts, respectively). The percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes was significantly increased (4.4 ± 2.1% versus 2.4 ± 0.8%) and significantly lower amounts of interleukin 2 were detected prior to vaccination in fatigued compared to non-fatigued patients (36.3 ± 44.3 pg/ml vs. 94.0 ± 45.4 pg/ml with strain H3N2 and 28.4 ± 44.0 pg/ml versus 74.5 ± 56.1 pg/ml with strain H1N1). Pre-vaccination heat-shock protein 90 alpha concentrations, post-vaccination cellular proliferation, and post-vaccination cytokine concentrations did not differ between both groups. In conclusion, influenza vaccination is favorable for severely fatigued cancer survivors and should be recommended when indicated. However, compared to non-fatigued cancer survivors, fatigued cancer survivors showed several significant differences in immunological reactivity at baseline, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25996472

  16. Humoral and cellular immune responses after influenza vaccination in patients with postcancer fatigue.

    PubMed

    Prinsen, Hetty; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Pots, Jeanette M; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Mulder, Sasja F; van Herpen, Carla M L; Jacobs, Joannes F M; Leer, Jan Willem H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Stelma, Foekje F; Torensma, Ruurd; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in cancer survivors with and without severe symptoms of fatigue. Severely fatigued (n = 15) and non-fatigued (n = 12) disease-free cancer survivors were vaccinated against seasonal influenza. Humoral immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Cellular immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by lymphocyte proliferation and activation assays. Regulatory T cells were measured at baseline by flow cytometry and heat-shock protein 90 alpha levels by ELISA. Comparable humoral immune responses were observed in fatigued and non-fatigued patients, both pre- and post-vaccination. At baseline, fatigued patients showed a significantly diminished cellular proliferation upon virus stimulation with strain H3N2 (1414 ± 1201 counts), and a trend in a similar direction with strain H1N1 (3025 ± 2339 counts), compared to non-fatigued patients (3099 ± 2401 and 5877 ± 4604 counts, respectively). The percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes was significantly increased (4.4 ± 2.1% versus 2.4 ± 0.8%) and significantly lower amounts of interleukin 2 were detected prior to vaccination in fatigued compared to non-fatigued patients (36.3 ± 44.3 pg/ml vs. 94.0 ± 45.4 pg/ml with strain H3N2 and 28.4 ± 44.0 pg/ml versus 74.5 ± 56.1 pg/ml with strain H1N1). Pre-vaccination heat-shock protein 90 alpha concentrations, post-vaccination cellular proliferation, and post-vaccination cytokine concentrations did not differ between both groups. In conclusion, influenza vaccination is favorable for severely fatigued cancer survivors and should be recommended when indicated. However, compared to non-fatigued cancer survivors, fatigued cancer survivors showed several significant differences in immunological reactivity at baseline, which warrants further investigation.

  17. Loneliness Predicts Pain, Depression, and Fatigue: Understanding the Role of Immune Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Glaser, Ronald; Bennett, Jeanette M.; Malarkey, William B.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster is an important health concern. Loneliness is a common risk factor for these symptoms. Little is known about the physiological mechanisms linking loneliness to the symptom cluster; immune dysregulation is a promising candidate. Latent herpesvirus reactivation, which is reflected by elevated herpesvirus antibody titers, provides a window into immune dysregulation. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are two common herpesviruses. Methods Participants were 200 breast cancer survivors who were 2 months to 3 years post-treatment at the time of the study. They completed questionnaires and provided a blood sample that was assayed for CMV and EBV antibody titers. Results Lonelier participants experienced more pain, depression, and fatigue than those who felt more socially connected. Lonelier participants also had higher CMV antibody titers which, in turn, were associated with higher levels of the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. Contrary to expectations, EBV antibody titers were not associated with either loneliness or the symptom cluster. Conclusions The pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster is a notable clinical problem, especially among cancer survivors. Accordingly, understanding the risk factors for these symptoms is important. The current study suggests that loneliness enhances risk for immune dysregulation and the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. The present data also provide a glimpse into the pathways through which loneliness may impact health. PMID:23273678

  18. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatigue may be worsened with physical activity or mental stress. It is diagnosed based on the presence of a specific group of symptoms and after all other possible causes of fatigue are ruled out.

  19. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Jose Montoya ...W81XWH-12-1-0388 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dr. Jose Montoya , Ian Valencia, Holden Maecker, Michael Mindrinos

  20. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  1. Role of developmental immunotoxicity and immune dysfunction in chronic disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2011-04-01

    The developing immune system is among the most sensitive targets for environmental insult and risk of chronic disease including cancer. Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT)-associated health risks include not only pediatric diseases like childhood asthma and type 1 diabetes, but also multi-disease "patterns" of conditions linked to the initial immune dysfunction. DIT contributes to ever-increasing health care costs, increasing reliance on drugs and reduced quality of life. Drug discovery efforts using cutting-edge immunology produce effective tools for management of allergic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases; in stark contrast, required immunotoxicity testing clings to an outdated understanding of the immune system and its relationship to disease. As currently required, immune safety evaluation of drugs and chemicals lacks the capability of protecting against the most prevalent pediatric immune dysfunction-based diseases. For this reason, mandatory and relevant DIT testing is needed for all drugs and chemicals where pregnant women and children are at risk.

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  3. Preliminary differences in peripheral immune markers and brain metabolites between fatigued and non-fatigued breast cancer survivors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna Maria; Zwickey, Heather; Wood, Lisa; Foerster, Bradley; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin; Ichesco, Eric; Sen, Ananda; Harris, Richard Edmund

    2014-12-01

    Persistent cancer-related fatigue (PCRF) is one of the most troubling side-effects of breast cancer (BC) treatment. One explanatory model for PCRF is sickness behavior, which is a set of adaptive responses including sleepiness and depressed mood in reaction to an inflammatory trigger. Prior research has investigated differences in inflammatory cytokines between fatigued and non-fatigued BC survivors, but no study has examined differences in brain metabolites. Differences in inflammatory markers, and brain metabolites using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were evaluated within 16 fatigued and 13 non-fatigued BC survivors. Fatigued BC survivors had significantly higher ratios of two markers derived from brain metabolites; namely (a) creatine, normalized to total creatine (creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr/tCr)) ratio (P = 0.03) and (b) glutamate + glutamine (Glx) to N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (P = 0.01) in the posterior insula compared to non-fatigued breast cancer survivor. Further, serum IL-6 was increased in fatigued women compared to non-fatigued women (P = 0.03), Using receiver operator curves (ROC) we determined that the posterior insula Glx/NAA ratio was the best predictor of fatigue with an overall area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 79%, with a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 69%. However, posterior insula Glx/NAA, Cr/tCr and serum IL-6 were not significantly correlated with one another implying the possibility of independent biological mechanisms for PCRF rather than an interrelated mechanism as represented by the sickness behavior model. This study provides novel preliminary evidence of several distinct neurobiological changes in the posterior insula associated with PCRF in BC survivors. Future, longitudinal studies are needed to explore these distinct biological phenomena where changes through time in peripheral immune markers and brain metabolites are examined to determine if they correlate with

  4. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  5. BIOMARKERS for CHRONIC FATIGUE

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Gordon; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue that persists for 6 months or more is termed chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue (CF) in combination with a minimum of 4 of 8 symptoms and the absence of diseases that could explain these symptoms, constitute the case definition for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). Inflammation, immune system activation, autonomic dysfunction, impaired functioning in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and neuroendocrine dysregulation have all been suggested as root causes of fatigue. The identification of objective markers consistently associated with CFS/ME is an important goal in relation to diagnosis and treatment, as the current case definitions are based entirely on physical signs and symptoms. This review is focused on the recent literature related to biomarkers for fatigue associated with CFS/ME and, for comparison, those associated with other diseases. These markers are distributed across several of the body’s core regulatory systems. A complex construct of symptoms emerges from alterations and/or dysfunctions in the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. We propose that new insight will depend on our ability to develop and deploy an integrative profiling of CFS/ME pathogenesis at the molecular level. Until such a molecular signature is obtained efforts to develop effective treatments will continue to be severely limited. PMID:22732129

  6. Ebola VP40 in Exosomes Can Cause Immune Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pleet, Michelle L.; Mathiesen, Allison; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao A.; Barclay, Robert A.; Schwab, Angela; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C.; Lepene, Benjamin; Nekhai, Sergei; Aman, M. J.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is an enveloped, ssRNA virus from the family Filoviridae capable of causing severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 80–90% mortality rates. The most recent outbreak of EBOV in West Africa starting in 2014 resulted in over 11,300 deaths; however, long-lasting persistence and recurrence in survivors has been documented, potentially leading to further transmission of the virus. We have previously shown that exosomes from cells infected with HIV-1, HTLV-1 and Rift Valley Fever virus are able to transfer viral proteins and non-coding RNAs to naïve recipient cells, resulting in an altered cellular activity. In the current manuscript, we examined the effect of Ebola structural proteins VP40, GP, NP and VLPs on recipient immune cells, as well as the effect of exosomes containing these proteins on naïve immune cells. We found that VP40-transfected cells packaged VP40 into exosomes, and that these exosomes were capable of inducing apoptosis in recipient immune cells. Additionally, we show that presence of VP40 within parental cells or in exosomes delivered to naïve cells could result in the regulation of RNAi machinery including Dicer, Drosha, and Ago 1, which may play a role in the induction of cell death in recipient immune cells. Exosome biogenesis was regulated by VP40 in transfected cells by increasing levels of ESCRT-II proteins EAP20 and EAP45, and exosomal marker proteins CD63 and Alix. VP40 was phosphorylated by Cdk2/Cyclin complexes at Serine 233 which could be reversed with r-Roscovitine treatment. The level of VP40-containing exosomes could also be regulated by treated cells with FDA-approved Oxytetracycline. Additionally, we utilized novel nanoparticles to safely capture VP40 and other viral proteins from Ebola VLPs spiked into human samples using SDS/reducing agents, thus minimizing the need for BSL-4 conditions for most downstream assays. Collectively, our data indicates that VP40 packaged into exosomes may be responsible for the

  7. Immune dysfunction in HIV-seronegative, Cryptococcus gattii meningitis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Annemarie E; Siddiqui, Asna A; Kester, Maartje I; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Rajanuwong, Adul; Wannapasni, Saran; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Harrison, Thomas S

    2007-03-01

    The pathophysiology of meningitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii in apparently immunocompetent individuals remains unclear. We measured multiple cytokines in CSF from a HIV-seronegative, apparently immunocompetent, Thai patient with C. gattii meningitis, over the first 2 weeks of antifungal therapy. Levels of proinflammatory IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were very low compared to patients with HIV-related Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis and of IL-10 very high. While patients with C. gattii meningitis may be a heterogeneous group, these data suggest in this case a maladapted immune response to cryptococcal exposure had allowed progression to clinical cryptococcal disease.

  8. Neuro-immune Dysfunction During Brain Aging: New Insights in Microglial Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Stephanie M.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are at the center of communication between the central nervous system and immune system. While these brain-immune interactions are balanced in healthy adulthood, the ability to maintain homeostasis during aging is impaired. Microglia develop a loss of integrated regulatory networks including aberrant signaling from other brain cells, immune sensors, and epigenetic modifiers. The low-grade chronic neuroinflammation associated with this dysfunctional activity likely contributes to cognitive deficits and susceptibility to age-related pathologies. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for neuro-immune dysregulation with age is crucial for providing targeted therapeutic strategies to support brain repair and healthy aging. PMID:26595306

  9. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  10. Increased risk of organic erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chao, C-H; Chen, H-J; Wang, H-Y; Li, T-C; Kao, C-H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex disorder characterized by profound and persistent fatigue and several comorbidities. CFS was previously reported to be associated with female sexual dysfunction. We propose that CFS might also be associated with organic erectile dysfunction (organic ED). We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database. We identified 2156 male patients who were newly diagnosed with CFS between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006. After excluding those younger than 20 years and prevalent cases, 1976 patients were subjected to analysis, and 7904 people served as healthy controls. All study subjects were followed up from the index date to the date of organic ED diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of 2011. Compared with the non-CFS cohort, the incidence density rate of organic ED was 1.88-fold higher than that in the CFS cohort (3.23 vs. 1.73 per 1000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.88 (95% CI = 1.26-2.81) when adjusting for sex and comorbidities. The combined impacts of patients with CFS and cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD), depression, and anxiety showed a significant by joint association with organic ED risk compared with patients with no CFS and no counterpart comorbidity. The greatest magnitude of adjusted HR of ED for CFS was observed in individuals without any comorbidity (3.87, 1.95-7.66). The incidence of organic ED is higher among males aged 40 years and over for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts. As the number of comorbidity increases, the incidence of organic ED increases in males without CFS. Higher incidence of organic ED was observed in males with CVD, DM, CKD, depression, or anxiety for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts.

  11. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  12. Prevention effects of Schisandra polysaccharide on radiation-induced immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Jia, Yun-Long; Ma, Ming; Duan, Yu-Qing; Liu, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficacy of SP (Schisandra polysaccharide) in prevention of radiation-induced immune dysfunction and discussed the underlying mechanisms with a Bal/bc mouse model. The data demonstrated that SP could reverse the decreases in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement C3 in blood serum were all decreased after radiation and SP could restore this radiation disorder. Furthermore, SP could reverse the deregulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood and thymus of mice after radiotherapy. We also performed terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the apoptosis and underlying mechanisms of SP in thymus. Data showed that radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes could be reversed by SP through inducing upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and downregulation of Fas and Bax levels. Furthermore, SP has no any side-effects on immunity of normal mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that SP could effectively prevent immune injury during radiotherapy by protecting the immune system. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for therapeutic interventions of prevention immune system damage in the radiation treatment.

  13. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  14. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; Del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-15

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases.

  15. Index markers of chronic fatigue syndrome with dysfunction of TCA and urea cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Emi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Jin, Guanghua; Tajima, Seiki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Sanae; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a persistent and unexplained pathological state characterized by exertional and severely debilitating fatigue, with/without infectious or neuropsychiatric symptoms, lasting at least 6 consecutive months. Its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses of 133 plasma samples obtained from CFS patients and healthy controls to establish an objective diagnosis of CFS. CFS patients exhibited significant differences in intermediate metabolite concentrations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles. The combination of ornithine/citrulline and pyruvate/isocitrate ratios discriminated CFS patients from healthy controls, yielding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.801 (95% confidential interval [CI]: 0.711–0.890, P < 0.0001) and 0.750 (95% CI: 0.584–0.916, P = 0.0069) for training (n = 93) and validation (n = 40) datasets, respectively. These findings provide compelling evidence that a clinical diagnostic tool could be developed for CFS based on the ratios of metabolites in plasma. PMID:27725700

  16. Colonic Immune Suppression, Barrier Dysfunction, and Dysbiosis by Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Cheng, Sam X.; Wang, Gary P.; Owen, Jennifer L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax results from the ingestion of Bacillus anthracis. Herein, we investigated the pathogenesis of GI anthrax in animals orally infected with toxigenic non-encapsulated B. anthracis Sterne strain (pXO1+ pXO2−) spores that resulted in rapid animal death. B. anthracis Sterne induced significant breakdown of intestinal barrier function and led to gut dysbiosis, resulting in systemic dissemination of not only B. anthracis, but also of commensals. Disease progression significantly correlated with the deterioration of innate and T cell functions. Our studies provide critical immunologic and physiologic insights into the pathogenesis of GI anthrax infection, whereupon cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in immune cells may play a central role in promoting dysfunctional immune responses against this deadly pathogen. PMID:24945934

  17. Colonic immune suppression, barrier dysfunction, and dysbiosis by gastrointestinal bacillus anthracis Infection.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L; Yang, Tao; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Cheng, Sam X; Wang, Gary P; Owen, Jennifer L; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax results from the ingestion of Bacillus anthracis. Herein, we investigated the pathogenesis of GI anthrax in animals orally infected with toxigenic non-encapsulated B. anthracis Sterne strain (pXO1+ pXO2-) spores that resulted in rapid animal death. B. anthracis Sterne induced significant breakdown of intestinal barrier function and led to gut dysbiosis, resulting in systemic dissemination of not only B. anthracis, but also of commensals. Disease progression significantly correlated with the deterioration of innate and T cell functions. Our studies provide critical immunologic and physiologic insights into the pathogenesis of GI anthrax infection, whereupon cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in immune cells may play a central role in promoting dysfunctional immune responses against this deadly pathogen.

  18. The Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle Pathway: A New Drug Target in Immune-Related Chronic Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Morris, Gerwyn; Anderson, George; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss that peripheral and central activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) Radical Cycle may underpin the pathophysiology of immune-related chronic fatigue secondary to other medical diseases and conditions. The TLR Radical Cycle plays a role in illnesses and conditions that are disproportionately commonly comorbid with secondary chronic fatigue, including a) neuroinflammatory disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease, stroke, depression, psychological stressors, and b) systemic disorders, e.g. (auto)immune disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, incl. myocardial infarction, cancer and its treatments. Increased TLR signaling is driven by activated immuneinflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, pathogen derived molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharides, and damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Newly formed redox-derived DAMPs, secondary to oxidative processes, may further activate the TLR complex leading to an auto-amplifying TLR Radical feedback loop. Increased gut permeability with translocation of gram negative bacteria and LPS, which activates the TLR Radical Cycle, is another pathway that may play a role in most of the abovementioned diseases and the secondary fatigue accompanying them. It is concluded that secondary fatigue may be associated with activation of the TLR Radical Cycle pathway due to activated immune-inflammatory pathways, classical and redox-derived DAMPs and PAMPs plays a role in its pathophysiology. Such an activation of the TLR Radical Cycle pathway may also explain why the abovementioned conditions are primed for an increased expression of secondary chronic fatigue. Targeting the TLR Radical Cycle pathway may be an effective method to treat TLR-Radical Cycle-related diseases such as secondary chronic fatigue.

  19. [Immune dysfunction and cognitive deficit in stress and physiological aging (Part I): Pathogenesis and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Pukhal'skiĭ, A L; Shmarina, G V; Aleshkin, V A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of stressful cognitive dysfunction, which is under consideration in this review, allows picking out several therapeutic targets. The brain, immune and endocrine systems being the principal adaptive systems in the body permanently share information both in the form of neural impulses and soluble mediators. The CNS differs from other organs due to several peculiarities that affect local immune surveillance. The brain cells secluded from the blood flow by a specialized blood-brain-barrier (BBB) can endogenously express pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines without the intervention of the immune system. In normal brain the cytokine signaling rather contributes to exclusive brain function (e.g. long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis) than serves as immune communicator. The stress of different origin increases the serum cytokine levels and disrupts BBB. As a result peripheral cytokines penetrate into the brain where they begin to perform new functions. Mass intrusion of biologically active peptides having a lot of specific targets alters the brain work that we can observe both in humans and in animal experiments. In addition owing to BBB disruption dendritic cells and T cells also penetrate into the brain where they take up a perivascular position. The changes observed in stressed subject may accumulate during repeated episodes of stress forming a picture typical of the aging brain. Moreover long-term stress as well as physiological aging result in hormonal and immunological disturbances including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis depletion, regulatory T-cell accumulation and dehydroepiandrosterone decrease.

  20. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity.

  1. An approach to symptoms at the interface of medicine and psychiatry: pain, insomnia, weight loss and anorexia, fatigue and forgetfulness, and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Kontos, Nicholas; Nejad, Shamim H; Gross, Anne F

    2010-11-01

    Primary care physicians commonly deal with patients who present with a somatic complaint for which no clear organic etiology can be found. This article discusses how a psychiatrist thinks about somatic symptoms (eg, pain, insomnia, weight loss and loss of appetite, fatigue and forgetfulness, sexual dysfunction) in a patient who might have depression. The management of a patient in whom no satisfactory medical or psychiatric diagnosis can be made is also reviewed briefly.

  2. [ANCA(antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies)-associated vasculitis in a man with extreme fatigue, fever and progressive renal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Bakashvili, N; Swaak, A J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Dees, A

    2008-04-26

    A 55-year-old man, with no previous history, presented with extreme fatigue and fever and was admitted to hospital. He had progressive renal dysfunction and his serum anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were markedly elevated. Renal histology was consistent with ANCA-associated vasculitis. The patient was successfully treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The classification and management of the ANCA-associated vasculitides are described. The classification was guided by the clinical presentation, serology and results of tissue biopsies. The ANCA inflammation had affected the middle sized and small vessels of especially the upper and lower airways, and the kidneys. The antibodies were directed at proteinase-3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). PR3-ANCA is predominantly found in Wegener's granulomatosis, while MPO-ANCA is related to microscopic polyangiitis. Tissue studies showed granulomatous inflammation of the airways which is typical of Wegener's disease. This type of inflammation is absent in microscopic polyangiitis. The initial treatment schedule consists of prednisone 1 mg/kg daily and oral cyclophosphamide 2 mg/kg daily. In the remission phase, the cyclophosphamide is replaced by azathioprine. It is not yet known how long maintenance treatment should be continued and which parameters have prognostic value.

  3. Immune Dysfunction in Children with CHARGE Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Burg, Mirjam; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Hogendorf, Lianne A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a variable, multiple congenital malformation syndrome. Patients with CHARGE syndrome have frequent infections that are presumed to be due to anatomical anomalies of the craniofacial region and upper airway, and cranial nerve problems resulting in swallowing difficulties and aspiration. The possible contribution of immunological abnormalities to these infections has not been systematically studied even though immune deficiencies have been described in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a condition which shares remarkable clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome. We assessed the frequency and nature of immune dysfunction in 24 children with genetically proven CHARGE syndrome. All patients, or their parents, completed a questionnaire on infectious history. Their immune system was extensively assessed through full blood counts, immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subpopulations, peripheral B- and T-cell differentiation, T-receptor excision circle (TREC) analysis, T-cell function, and vaccination responses. All CHARGE patients had a history of infections (often frequent), mainly otitis media and pneumonia, leading to frequent use of antibiotics and to hospital admissions. Decreased T-cell numbers were found in 12 (50%) patients, presumably caused by insufficient thymic output since TREC amounts were also diminished in CHARGE patients. Despite normal peripheral B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production in all patients, 83% of patients had insufficient antibody titers to one or more early childhood vaccinations. Based on our results, we recommend immunological evaluation of CHARGE patients with recurrent infections. PMID:26544072

  4. Variable Neuroendocrine-Immune Dysfunction in Individuals with Unfavorable Outcome after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Kumar, Raj G.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Berga, Sarah L.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems is not well understood in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol and inflammation after TBI, and to determine how these relationships differ by outcome. CSF samples were collected from 91 subjects with severe TBI during days 0–6 post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and inflammatory markers, and compared to healthy controls (n=13 cortisol, n=11 inflammatory markers). Group-based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) delineated subpopulations with similar longitudinal CSF cortisol profiles (high vs. low cortisol). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months served as the primary outcome measure reflecting global outcome. Inflammatory markers that displayed significant bivariate associations with both GOS and cortisol TRAJ (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, soluble Fas [sFas], soluble intracellular adhesion molecule [sICAM]-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]-α) were used to generate a cumulative inflammatory load score (ILS). Subsequent analysis revealed that cortisol TRAJ group membership mediated ILS effects on outcome (indirect effect estimate= −0.253, 95% CI (−0.481, −0.025), p=0.03). Correlational analysis between mean cortisol levels and ILS were examined separately within each cortisol TRAJ group and by outcome. Within the low cortisol TRAJ group, subjects with unfavorable 6-month outcome displayed a negative correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=−0.562, p=0.045). Conversely, subjects with unfavorable outcome in the high cortisol TRAJ group displayed a positive correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=0.391, p=0.006). Our results suggest that unfavorable outcome after TBI may result from dysfunctional neuroendocrine-immune communication wherein an adequate immune response is not mounted or, alternatively, neuroinflammation is prolonged. Importantly, the nature of

  5. Radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction. Technical report, 16 Aug 86-31 Mar 90

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Schuening, F.

    1991-06-01

    This work was aimed at investigating radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction in the dog model. One project was to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against canine hemopoietic precursor cells and specific for pluripotent stem cells. Antibodies obtained reacted with different myeloid and erythroid precursor cells; unfortunately, none of the antibodies were specific for pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells. Positive selections for these cells were performed using magnetic beads and an antibody against class 2-antigen. Transplantation of class 2 positive marrow cells into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs led to sustained recovery in only 1 of 5 dogs. A second project established and investigated long-term marrow cultures in the dog. Culture conditions were studied and optimized, and marrow cells were transplanted into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs to investigate stem cell survival in long-term cultures. Engraftment was observed only with short-term marrow cultures.

  6. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  7. Atopic dermatitis: immune deviation, barrier dysfunction, IgE autoreactivity and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Tsuji, Gaku; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kadono, Takafumi

    2017-01-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic or chronically relapsing, eczematous, severely pruritic skin disorder mostly associated with IgE elevation and skin barrier dysfunction due to decreased filaggrin expression. The lesional skin of AD exhibits Th2- and Th22-deviated immune reactions that are progressive during disease chronicity. Th2 and Th22 cytokines further deteriorate the skin barrier by inhibiting filaggrin expression. Some IgEs are reactive to self-antigens. The IgE autoreactivity may precipitate the chronicity of AD. Upon activation of the ORAI1 calcium channel, atopic epidermis releases large amounts of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which initiates the Th2 and Th22 immune response. Th2-derived interleukin-31 and TSLP induce an itch sensation. Taken together, TSLP/Th2/Th22 pathway is a promising target for developing new therapeutics for AD. Enhancing filaggrin expression using ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor may also be an adjunctive measure to restore the disrupted barrier function specifically for AD.

  8. Form follows function: astrocyte morphology and immune dysfunction in SIV neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Renner, Nicole A; Sansing, Hope A; Didier, Peter J; MacLean, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Cortical function is disrupted in neuroinflammatory disorders, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Astrocyte dysfunction includes retraction of foot processes from the blood-brain barrier and decreased removal of neurotransmitters from synaptic clefts. Mechanisms of astrocyte activation, including innate immune function and the fine neuroanatomy of astrocytes, however, remain to be investigated. We quantified the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-labeled astrocytes per square millimeter and the proportion of astrocytes immunopositive for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to examine innate immune activation in astrocytes. We also performed detailed morphometric analyses of gray and white matter astrocytes in the frontal and parietal lobes of rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), both with and without encephalitis, an established model of AIDS neuropathogenesis. Protoplasmic astrocytes (gray matter) and fibrous astrocytes (deep white matter) were imaged, and morphometric features were analyzed using Neurolucida. Gray matter and white matter astrocytes showed no change in cell body size in animals infected with SIV regardless of encephalitic status. In SIV-infected macaques, both gray and white matter astrocytes had shorter, less ramified processes, resulting in decreased cell arbor compared with controls. SIV-infected macaques with encephalitis showed decreases in arbor length in white matter astrocytes and reduced complexity in gray matter astrocytes compared to controls. These results provide the first evidence that innate immune activation of astrocytes is linked to altered cortical astrocyte morphology in SIV/HIV infection. Here, we demonstrate that astrocyte remodeling is correlated with infection. Perturbed neuron-glia signaling may be a driving factor in the development of HAND.

  9. Drosophila type IV collagen mutation associates with immune system activation and intestinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Márton; Kiss, András A; Radics, Monika; Popovics, Nikoletta; Hermesz, Edit; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-01-01

    The basal lamina (BM) contains numerous components with a predominance of type IV collagens. Clinical manifestations associated with mutations of the human COL4A1 gene include perinatal cerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly, hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps (HANAC), ocular dysgenesis, myopathy, Walker–Warburg syndrome and systemic tissue degeneration. In Drosophila, the phenotype associated with dominant temperature sensitive mutations of col4a1 include severe myopathy resulting from massive degradation of striated muscle fibers, and in the gut, degeneration of circular visceral muscle cells and epithelial cells following detachment from the BM. In order to determine the consequences of altered BMfunctions due to aberrant COL4A1 protein, we have carried out a series of tests using Drosophila DTS-L3 mutants from our allelic series of col4a1 mutations with confirmed degeneration of various cell types and lowest survival rate among the col4a1 mutant lines at restrictive temperature. Results demonstrated epithelial cell degeneration in the gut, shortened gut, enlarged midgut with multiple diverticulae, intestinal dysfunction and shortened life span. Midgut immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed altered expression and distribution of BM components integrin PSI and PSII alpha subunits, laminin gamma 1, and COL4A1 both in larvae and adults. Global gene expression analysis revealed activation of the effector AMP genes of the primary innate immune system including Metchnikowin, Diptericin, Diptericin B, and edin that preceded morphological changes. Attacin::GFP midgut expression pattern further supported these changes. An increase in ROS production and changes in gut bacterial flora were also noted and may have further enhanced an immune response. The phenotypic features of Drosophila col4a1 mutants confirmed an essential role for type IV collagen in maintaining epithelial integrity, gut morphology and intestinal function and suggest that

  10. A comparison of sex-specific immune signatures in Gulf War illness and chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though potentially linked to the basic physiology of stress response we still have no clear understanding of Gulf War Illness (GWI), a debilitating condition presenting complex immune, endocrine and neurological symptoms. Here we compared male (n = 20) and female (n = 10) veterans with GWI separately against their healthy counterparts (n = 21 male, n = 9 female) as well as subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome/ myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) (n = 12 male, n = 10 female). Methods Subjects were assessed using a Graded eXercise Test (GXT) with blood drawn prior to exercise, at peak effort (VO2 max) and 4-hours post exercise. Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70), 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFNγ, TNFα and TNFβ in plasma samples from each phase of exercise. Linear classification models were constructed using stepwise variable selection to identify cytokine co-expression patterns characteristic of each subject group. Results Classification accuracies in excess of 80% were obtained using between 2 and 5 cytokine markers. Common to both GWI and CFS, IL-10 and IL-23 expression contributed in an illness and time-dependent manner, accompanied in male subjects by NK and Th1 markers IL-12, IL-15, IL-2 and IFNγ. In female GWI and CFS subjects IL-10 was again identified as a delineator but this time in the context of IL-17 and Th2 markers IL-4 and IL-5. Exercise response also differed between sexes: male GWI subjects presented characteristic cytokine signatures at rest but not at peak effort whereas the opposite was true for female subjects. Conclusions Though individual markers varied, results collectively supported involvement of the IL-23/Th17/IL-17 axis in the delineation of GWI and CFS in a sex-specific way. PMID:23800166

  11. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  12. Effects of acupuncturing Pishu combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 on the immune function of rats with chronic fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Yue; Ma, Xiande; Chen, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of acupuncturing Pishu combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 on the immune function of rats with chronic fatigue. Methods: Forty male SD rats were equally randomized into control group, chronic fatigue system group (CFS), Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) group, acupuncture group and acupuncture combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 (A+Rg3) group. Rats with chronic fatigue were established by bounding and forced swimming in cold water once daily for 21 days except control group, then the rats in the acupuncture and A+Rg3 group were treated by manual acupuncture stimulation of bilateral “Pishu” once daily for 7 days. Ginsenoside Rg3 was administered by intravenous to the rats of the A+Rg3 and Rg3 group for 7 days in dosages of 2 mg/kg body weight, and two markers of physical fatigue were evaluated: body weight and blood lactic acid (LA). The percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes, CD4+ lymphocytes, and CD8+ lymphocytes in the spleens of the rats were evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Serum IFN-gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-4 contents were detected by ELISA. Results: Increased body weight and reduced blood LA concentrations were found in the rat of Rg3 group and A+Rg3 group than that in CFS group. The rat of Rg3 group and A+Rg3 group also showed a significant increase in the percentage of CD4+ lymphocytes and a significant decrease in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes and correct CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Compared with the CFS group, the level of IFN-γ in the Rg3, acupuncture and A+Rg3 groups was reduced and IL-4 was increased. Conclusions: Acupuncture and Rg3 can improve the immune system activity of CFS rats and acupuncturing Pishu combined with Rg3 was significantly superior compared with Rg3 and acupuncture, respectively. PMID:26770528

  13. microRNA Expression in Sentinel Nodes from Progressing Melanoma Patients Identifies Networks Associated with Dysfunctional Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Vallacchi, Viviana; Camisaschi, Chiara; Dugo, Matteo; Vergani, Elisabetta; Deho, Paola; Gualeni, Ambra; Huber, Veronica; Gloghini, Annunziata; Maurichi, Andrea; Santinami, Mario; Sensi, Marialuisa; Castelli, Chiara; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence. PMID:27983661

  14. Dendritic cells modulate lung response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a murine model of sepsis-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pène, Frédéric; Zuber, Benjamin; Courtine, Emilie; Rousseau, Christophe; Ouaaz, Fatah; Toubiana, Julie; Tazi, Asmaa; Mira, Jean-Paul; Chiche, Jean-Daniel

    2008-12-15

    Host infection by pathogens triggers an innate immune response leading to a systemic inflammatory response, often followed by an immune dysfunction which can favor the emergence of secondary infections. Dendritic cells (DCs) link innate and adaptive immunity and may be centrally involved in the regulation of sepsis-induced immune dysfunction. We assessed the contribution of DCs to lung defense in a murine model of sublethal polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligature and puncture, CLP). In this model, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) retained an immature phenotype, associated with decreased capacity of IL-12p70 release and impaired priming of T cell lymphocytes. Eight days after CLP surgery, we induced a secondary pulmonary infection through intratracheal instillation of 5 x 10(6) CFUs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whereas all sham-operated mice survived, 80% of post-CLP mice died after secondary pneumonia. Post-CLP mice exhibited marked lung damage with early recruitment of neutrophils, cytokine imbalance with decreased IL-12p70 production, and increased IL-10 release, but no defective bacterial lung clearance, while systemic bacterial dissemination was almost constant. Concomitant intrapulmonary administration of exogenous BMDCs into post-CLP mice challenged with P. aeruginosa dramatically improved survival. BMDCs did not improve bacterial lung clearance, but delayed neutrophil recruitment, strongly attenuated the early peak of TNF-alpha and restored an adequate Il-12p70/IL-10 balance in post-CLP mice. Thus, adoptive transfer of BMDCs reversed sepsis-induced immune dysfunction in a relevant model of secondary P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Unexpectedly, the mechanism of action of BMDCs did not involve enhanced antibacterial activity, but occurred by dampening the pulmonary inflammatory response.

  15. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  16. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-28

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed.

  17. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: biochemical examination of blood].

    PubMed

    Hakariya, Yukiko; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2007-06-01

    Though patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have lots of complaints, abnormal findings cannot be detected by biochemical screening tests. However, some specialized blood tests have revealed neuroendocrine immune axis abnormalities, which is closely associated with each other. Recent studies indicate that CFS can be understood as a special condition based on abnormality of the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immunological system, with the distinguishing feature of CFS seeming to be the secondary brain dysfunction caused by several cytokines and/or autoantibodies. In this paper, we summarize these abnormalities found in CFS and show the neuro-molecular mechanism leading to chronic fatigue.

  18. Exacerbated fatigue and motor deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral immune stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Krzyszton, C. P.; Sparkman, N. L.; Grant, R. W.; Buchanan, J. B.; Broussard, S. R.; Woods, J.; Johnson, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation in the periphery and brain, but whether it protects against infection- or age-related psychomotor disturbances and fatigue is unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated motor coordination, time to fatigue, and several central and peripheral proinflammatory cytokines in male young adult (3-mo-old) and middle-aged (12-mo-old) wild-type (IL-10+/+) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. No age-related differences were observed; therefore, data from the two ages were pooled and analyzed to determine effects of genotype and treatment. LPS treatment increased IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα mRNA in all brain areas examined in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, but to a greater extent and for a longer time in IL-10−/− mice. Plasma IL-1β and IL-6 were increased similarly in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice 4 h after LPS but remained elevated longer in IL-10−/− mice, whereas TNFα was higher in IL-10−/− mice throughout after LPS treatment. Motor performance and motor learning in IL-10+/+ mice were not affected by LPS treatment; however, both were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with LPS compared with those treated with saline. Furthermore, although LPS reduced the time to fatigue in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, the effects were exacerbated in IL-10−/− mice. Thus the increased brain and peripheral inflammation induced by LPS in IL-10−/− mice was associated with increased coordination deficits and fatigue. These data suggest that IL-10 may inhibit motor deficits and fatigue associated with peripheral infections via its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:18650318

  19. Exacerbated fatigue and motor deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Krzyszton, C P; Sparkman, N L; Grant, R W; Buchanan, J B; Broussard, S R; Woods, J; Johnson, R W

    2008-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation in the periphery and brain, but whether it protects against infection- or age-related psychomotor disturbances and fatigue is unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated motor coordination, time to fatigue, and several central and peripheral proinflammatory cytokines in male young adult (3-mo-old) and middle-aged (12-mo-old) wild-type (IL-10(+/+)) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. No age-related differences were observed; therefore, data from the two ages were pooled and analyzed to determine effects of genotype and treatment. LPS treatment increased IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha mRNA in all brain areas examined in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice, but to a greater extent and for a longer time in IL-10(-/-) mice. Plasma IL-1beta and IL-6 were increased similarly in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice 4 h after LPS but remained elevated longer in IL-10(-/-) mice, whereas TNFalpha was higher in IL-10(-/-) mice throughout after LPS treatment. Motor performance and motor learning in IL-10(+/+) mice were not affected by LPS treatment; however, both were reduced in IL-10(-/-) mice treated with LPS compared with those treated with saline. Furthermore, although LPS reduced the time to fatigue in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice, the effects were exacerbated in IL-10(-/-) mice. Thus the increased brain and peripheral inflammation induced by LPS in IL-10(-/-) mice was associated with increased coordination deficits and fatigue. These data suggest that IL-10 may inhibit motor deficits and fatigue associated with peripheral infections via its anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Chronic fatigue is prevalent and associated with hormonal dysfunction in long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors treated with radiotherapy to the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Seland, Mette; Holte, Harald; Bjøro, Trine; Schreiner, Thomas; Bollerslev, Jens; Loge, Jon Håvard; Fosså, Sophie D; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of chronic fatigue (CF) in irradiated survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, analyze for associations between hormonal dysfunction and CF, and to investigate the associations between CF and functioning. Invited survivors were all treated with radiation to the head and neck region, with or without additional chemotherapy. The participants (n=98) responded to questionnaires measuring CF, mental distress (HADS), and functioning (SF-36), and had blood drawn for analyses of four hormonal axes. Hormonal status was categorized as normal, hormone dysfunction in one or more axes, or hormone replacement therapy. A total of 29% of the survivors had CF. In multivariate analyses there was an increased risk of CF among survivors with untreated hormone dysfunction (OR 3.87, 95% CI: 1.20-12.51, p=0.02). Survivors on hormone substitution did not have increased risk for CF compared to survivors with normal hormonal status. CF was significantly associated with reduced functioning.

  1. Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression following moderate exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea T.; Light, Alan R.; Hughen, Ronald W.; VanHaitsma, Timothy A.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are characterized by debilitating fatigue, yet evaluation of this symptom is subjective. We examined metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression (mRNA) in patients with CFS (n=22) vs. MS (n=20) vs. healthy controls (n=23) and determined their relationship to fatigue and pain before and after exercise. Methods Blood samples and fatigue and pain ratings were obtained at baseline and 0.5, 8, 24, and 48 hours following sustained moderate exercise. Leukocyte mRNA of 4 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3, P2X4, P2X5, TRPV1), 4 adrenergic (α-2a, β-1, β-2 receptors, COMT) and 5 immune markers (CD14, TLR4, IL-6, IL-10, LTa) was examined using quantitative PCR. Results CFS patients had greater post-exercise increases in fatigue and pain (10–29 pts above baseline, p<.001) and greater mRNA increases in P2X4, TRPV1, CD14 and all adrenergic receptors than controls (1.3 ± .14 to 3.4 ± .90 fold increase above baseline, p=.04 – .005). CFS patients with co-morbid fibromyalgia (n=18) also showed greater increases in ASIC3 and P2X5 (p<.05). MS patients had greater post-exercise increases than controls in β-1 and β-2 adrenergic receptor expression (1.4 ± .27 and 1.3 ± .06 fold increase, respectively, p=.02 and <.001) and greater decreases in TLR4 (p=.02). In MS, IL-10 and TLR4 decreases correlated with higher fatigue scores. Conclusion Post-exercise mRNA increases in metabolite-detecting receptors were unique to CFS patients while both MS and CFS showed abnormal increases in adrenergic receptors. Among MS patients, greater fatigue was correlated with blunted immune marker expression. PMID:22210239

  2. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  3. Immune Dysfunctions and Abrogation of the Inflammatory Response by Environmental Chemicals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-31

    or strain (syngeneic). Autoimmune strains of mice and humans with autoimmune diseases have a markedly sup- pressed autologous MLR. The inciting...rHD-Ai3? 7168 IMIMUNE DYSFUNCTIONS AND ABROGATION OF THE INFLARMMARTORY illi I RESPONSE BY ENVIRO ..(U) OHIO STATE UNIV RESEARCH 1FOUNDAT ION COLUMBUS

  4. Immune cell dysfunctions in breast cancer patients detected through whole blood multi-parametric flow cytometry assay

    PubMed Central

    Verronèse, E.; Delgado, A.; Valladeau-Guilemond, J.; Garin, G.; Guillemaut, S.; Tredan, O.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Bachelot, T.; N'Kodia, A.; Bardin-Dit-Courageot, C.; Rigal, C.; Pérol, D.; Caux, C.; Ménétrier-Caux, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monitoring functional competence of immune cell populations in clinical routine represents a major challenge. We developed a whole-blood assay to monitor functional competence of peripheral innate immune cells including NK cells, dendritic and monocyte cell subsets through their ability to produce specific cytokines after short-term stimulation, detected through intra-cytoplasmic staining and multi-parametric flow-cytometry. A PMA/ionomycin T cell activation assay complemented this analysis. Comparing cohorts of healthy women and breast cancer (BC) patients at different stages, we identified significant functional alteration of circulating immune cells during BC progression prior to initiation of treatment. Of upmost importance, as early as the localized primary tumor (PT) stage, we observed functional alterations in several innate immune populations and T cells i.e. (i) reduced TNFα production by BDCA-1+ DC and non-classical monocytes in response to Type-I IFN, (ii) a strong drop in IFNγ production by NK cells in response to either Type-I IFN or TLR7/8 ligand, and (iii) a coordinated impairment of cytokine (IL-2, IFNγ, IL-21) production by T cell subpopulations. Overall, these alterations are further accentuated according to the stage of the disease in first-line metastatic patients. Finally, whereas we did not detect functional modification of DC subsets in response to TLR7/8 ligand, we highlighted increased IL-12p40 production by monocytes specifically at first relapse (FR). Our results reinforce the importance of monitoring both innate and adaptive immunity to better evaluate dysfunctions in cancer patients and suggest that our whole-blood assay will be useful to monitor response to treatment, particularly for immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27141361

  5. Severe immune dysfunction after lethal neutron irradiation in a JCO nuclear facility accident victim.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Hitomi; Ooi, Jun; Tomonari, Akira; Iseki, Tohru; Tojo, Arinobu; Tani, Kenzaburo; Takahashi, Tsuneo A; Yamashita, Naohide; Shigetaka, Asano

    2002-08-01

    The optimal treatment for the hematological toxicity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is not fully established, especially in cases of high-dose nonuniform irradiation by mixed neutrons and gamma-rays, because estimation of the irradiation dose (dosimetry) and prediction of autologous hematological recovery are complicated. For the treatment of ARS, we performed HLA-DRB1-mismatched unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) for a nuclear accident victim who received 8 to 10 GyEq mixed neutron and gamma-ray irradiation at the JCO Co. Ltd. nuclear processing facility in Tokaimura, Japan. Donor/ recipient mixed chimerism was attained; thereafter rapid autologous hematopoietic recovery was achieved in concordance with the termination of immunosuppressants. Immune function examined in vitro showed recovery of the autologous immune system was severely impaired. Although the naive T-cell fraction and the helper T-cell subtype 1 fraction were increased, the mitogenic responses of T-cells and the allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction were severely suppressed. Endogenous immunoglobulin production was also suppressed until 120 days after the accident. Although skin transplantation for ARS was successful, the patient died of infectious complications and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome 210 days after the accident. These results suggest that fast neutrons in doses higher than 8 to 10 Gy cause complete abrogation of the human immune system, which may lead to fatal outcome even if autologous hematopoiesis recovers. The roles of transplantation, autologous hematopoietic recovery, chimerism, immune suppression, and immune function are discussed.

  6. HTT-lowering reverses Huntington's disease immune dysfunction caused by NFκB pathway dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Lahiri, Nayana; Magnusson-Lind, Anna; Weiss, Andreas; Grueninger, Stephan; McKinnon, Chris; Sirinathsinghji, Eva; Kahlon, Shira; Pfister, Edith L; Moser, Roger; Hummerich, Holger; Antoniou, Michael; Bates, Gillian P; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Lowdell, Mark W; Björkqvist, Maria; Ostroff, Gary R; Aronin, Neil; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2014-03-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system contributes to Huntington's disease pathogenesis and has been targeted successfully to modulate disease progression, but mechanistic understanding relating this to mutant huntingtin expression in immune cells has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that human Huntington's disease myeloid cells produce excessive inflammatory cytokines as a result of the cell-intrinsic effects of mutant huntingtin expression. A direct effect of mutant huntingtin on the NFκB pathway, whereby it interacts with IKKγ, leads to increased degradation of IκB and subsequent nuclear translocation of RelA. Transcriptional alterations in intracellular immune signalling pathways are also observed. Using a novel method of small interfering RNA delivery to lower huntingtin expression, we show reversal of disease-associated alterations in cellular function-the first time this has been demonstrated in primary human cells. Glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles were used to lower huntingtin levels in human Huntington's disease monocytes/macrophages, resulting in a reversal of huntingtin-induced elevated cytokine production and transcriptional changes. These findings improve our understanding of the role of innate immunity in neurodegeneration, introduce glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles as tool for studying cellular pathogenesis ex vivo in human cells and raise the prospect of immune cell-directed HTT-lowering as a therapeutic in Huntington's disease.

  7. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  8. Stress and depression-induced immune dysfunction: implications for the development and progression of cancer.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Nunes, Sandra Morimoto Vargas

    2005-12-01

    The persistent activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary axes in chronic stress response and in depression impairs the immune response and contributes to the development and progression of some types of cancer. This overview presents results from experimental animal models, human studies, and clinical evidence that various cellular and molecular immunological parameters are compromised in chronic stress and depression. At the cellular level, stressed and depressed patients had overall leukocytosis, high concentrations of circulating neutrophils, reduced mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and neutrophil phagocytosis. At the molecular level, high levels of serum basal cortisol, acute phase proteins, specific antibodies against herpes simplex virus type 1 and Epstein Barr virus, plasma concentration of interleukins IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, and a shift in the balance of Th1 and Th2 immune response were observed. Both stress and depression were associated with the decreased cytotoxic T-cell and natural killer cell activities affecting the processes of the immune surveillance of tumours, and the events that modulate the development and the accumulation of somatic mutations and genomic instability. DNA damage, growth and angiogenic factors, proteases, matrix metalloproteinases, and reactive oxygen species were also related to the chronic stress response and depression. Behavioural strategies, psychological, and psychopharmacotherapeutic interventions that enhance effective coping and reduce affective distress showed beneficial effects in cancer patients. A better understanding of the bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems could contribute to novel clinical and treatment strategies in oncology.

  9. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  10. Dichloroacetate improves immune dysfunction caused by tumor-secreted lactic acid and increases antitumor immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Akazawa, Takashi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya; Mizuta, Keisuke; Ito, Yatsuji; Inoue, Norimitsu

    2013-09-01

    The activation of oncogenic signaling pathways induces the reprogramming of glucose metabolism in tumor cells and increases lactic acid secretion into the tumor microenvironment. This is a well-known characteristic of tumor cells, termed the Warburg effect, and is a candidate target for antitumor therapy. Previous reports show that lactic acid secreted by tumor cells is a proinflammatory mediator that activates the IL-23/IL-17 pathway, thereby inducing inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Here, we show that lactic acid, or more specifically the acidification it causes, increases arginase I (ARG1) expression in macrophages to inhibit T-cell proliferation and activation. Accordingly, we hypothesized that counteraction of the immune effects by lactic acid might suppress tumor development. We show that dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases, targets macrophages to suppress activation of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and the expression of ARG1 by lactic acid. Furthermore, lactic acid-pretreated macrophages inhibited CD8+ T-cell proliferation, but CD8+ T-cell proliferation was restored when macrophages were pretreated with lactic acid and DCA. DCA treatment decreased ARG1 expression in tumor-infiltrating immune cells and increased the number of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and NK cells in tumor-bearing mouse spleen. Although DCA treatment alone did not suppress tumor growth, it increased antitumor immunotherapeutic activity of Poly(IC) in both CD8+ T cell- and NK cell-sensitive tumor models. Therefore, DCA acts not only on tumor cells to suppress glycolysis but also on immune cells to improve the immune status modulated by lactic acid and to increase the effectiveness of antitumor immunotherapy.

  11. Chronic Systemic Immune Dysfunction in African-Americans with Small Vessel-Type Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Brown, Candice M; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Samsa, Gregory P; Goldstein, Larry B; Colton, Carol A

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of small vessel-type (lacunar) ischemic strokes is greater in African-Americans compared to whites. The chronic inflammatory changes that result from lacunar stroke are poorly understood. To elucidate these changes, we measured serum inflammatory and thrombotic biomarkers in African-Americans at least 6 weeks post-stroke compared to control individuals. Cases were African-Americans with lacunar stroke (n = 30), and controls were age-matched African-Americans with no history of stroke or other major neurologic disease (n = 37). Blood was obtained >6 weeks post-stroke and was analyzed for inflammatory biomarkers. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to assess immune responsiveness in a subset of cases (n = 5) and controls (n = 4). After adjustment for covariates, the pro-inflammatory biomarkers, soluble vascular cadherin adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and thrombin anti-thrombin (TAT), were independently associated with lacunar stroke. Immune responsiveness to LPS challenge was abnormal in cases compared to controls. African-Americans with lacunar stroke had elevated blood levels of VCAM-1 and TAT and an abnormal response to acute immune challenge >6 weeks post-stroke, suggesting a chronically compromised systemic inflammatory response.

  12. Urine proteomes of healthy aging humans reveal extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations and immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bakun, M; Senatorski, G; Rubel, T; Lukasik, A; Zielenkiewicz, P; Dadlez, M; Paczek, L

    2014-02-01

    Aging is a complex physiological process that poses considerable conundrums to rapidly aging societies. For example, the risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases and/or cancer steadily declines for people after their 60s, and other causes of death predominate for seniors older than 80 years of age. Thus, physiological aging presents numerous unanswered questions, particularly with regard to changing metabolic patterns. Urine proteomics analysis is becoming a non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic method. We investigated the urine proteomes in healthy elderly people to determine which metabolic processes were weakened or strengthened in aging humans. Urine samples from 37 healthy volunteers aged 19-90 years (19 men, 18 women) were analyzed for protein expression by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This generated a list of 19 proteins that were differentially expressed in different age groups (young, intermediate, and old age). In particular, the oldest group showed protein changes reflective of altered extracellular matrix turnover and declining immune function, in which changes corresponded to reported changes in cardiovascular tissue remodeling and immune disorders in the elderly. Thus, urinary proteome changes in the elderly appear to reflect the physiological processes of aging and are particularly clearly represented in the circulatory and immune systems. Detailed identification of "protein trails" creates a more global picture of metabolic changes that occur in the elderly.

  13. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer. Herewith we report that oncolytic HSV-1716 generates vaccination effects in the same model. Upon HSV-1716 infection, mouse ovarian tumor cells showed high levels of expression viral glycoproteins B and D and were highly phagocyted by dendritic cells (DCs). Interestingly, increased phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells by DCs was impaired by heparin, and anti-HSV glycoproteins B and D, indicating that viral infection enhances adhesive interactions between DCs and tumor apoptotic bodies. Moreover, HSV-1716 infected cells expressed high levels of heat shock proteins 70 and GRP94, molecules that have been reported to induce maturation of DCs, increase cross-presentation of antigens and promote antitumor immune response. After phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells, DCs acquired a mature status in vitro and in vivo, upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecule and increased migration towards MIP-3beta. Furthermore, HSV-1716 oncolytic treatment markedly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tumor-bearing animals thus abrogating tumor immunosuppressive milieu. These mechanisms may account for the highly enhanced antitumoral immune responses observed in HSV-1716 treated animals. Oncolytic treatment induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFNgamma producing cells, and induced a robust tumor infiltration by T cells. These results indicate that oncolytic therapy with HSV-1716 facilitates antitumor immune responses.

  14. Influenza A induces dysfunctional immunity and death in MeCP2-overexpressing mice

    PubMed Central

    Cronk, James C.; Herz, Jasmin; Kim, Taeg S.; Louveau, Antoine; Moser, Emily K.; Smirnov, Igor; Tung, Kenneth S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function or overexpression of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) results in the severe neurodevelopmental disorders Rett syndrome and MeCP2 duplication syndrome, respectively. MeCP2 plays a critical role in neuronal function and the function of cells throughout the body. It has been previously demonstrated that MeCP2 regulates T cell function and macrophage response to multiple stimuli, and that immune-mediated rescue imparts significant benefit in Mecp2-null mice. Unlike Rett syndrome, MeCP2 duplication syndrome results in chronic, severe respiratory infections, which represent a significant cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Here, we demonstrate that MeCP2Tg3 mice, which overexpress MeCP2 at levels 3- to 5-fold higher than normal, are hypersensitive to influenza A/PR/8/34 infection. Prior to death, MeCP2Tg3 mice experienced a host of complications during infection, including neutrophilia, increased cytokine production, excessive corticosterone levels, defective adaptive immunity, and vascular pathology characterized by impaired perfusion and pulmonary hemorrhage. Importantly, we found that radioresistant cells are essential to infection-related death after bone marrow transplantation. In all, these results demonstrate that influenza A infection in MeCP2Tg3 mice results in pathology affecting both immune and nonhematopoietic cells, suggesting that failure to effectively respond and clear viral respiratory infection has a complex, multicompartment etiology in the context of MeCP2 overexpression. PMID:28138553

  15. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Puchta, Alicja; Naidoo, Avee; Verschoor, Chris P; Loukov, Dessi; Thevaranjan, Netusha; Mandur, Talveer S; Nguyen, Phuong-Son; Jordana, Manel; Loeb, Mark; Xing, Zhou; Kobzik, Lester; Larché, Maggie J; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo) mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  16. Immunotoxicology: environmental contamination by polybrominated biphenyls and immune dysfunction among residents of the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Bekesi, J.G.; Roboz, J.P.; Fischbein, A.; Mason, P.

    1987-01-01

    In 1973, inadvertent contamination occurred in a special farm feed supplement for lactating cows. Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) were used in place of magnesium oxide resulting in serious harm to farm animals, including cattle, chickens, geese, ducks. Farm families, accustomed to eating their own products, were most heavily exposed. To study the impact of PBBs, 336 adult Michigan farm residents, 117 general consumers for comparison, 75 dairy farm residents in Wisconsin, who had not eaten PBB-contaminated food, were examined, as were 79 healthy subjects in New York City. Abnormalities in the Michigan groups included hypergammaglobulinemia, exaggerated hypersensitive response to streptococci, significant decrease in absolute numbers and percentage of T and B-lymphocytes, and increased number of lymphocytes with no detectable surface markers (''null cells''). Significant reduction of in vitro immune function was noted in 20-25% of the Michigan farm residents who had eaten food containing PBB. The decreased immune function detected among the PBB-exposed farm residents tended to affect families as a unit and was independent of exposed individuals' age or sex, pointing against the possibility of genetic predisposition.

  17. Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in the treatment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) - a clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Myhill, Sarah; Booth, Norman E; McLaren-Howard, John

    2013-01-01

    We report on an audit of 138 ME/CFS patients who attended a private practice and took the ATP Profile biomedical test. The results revealed that all of these patients had measureable mitochondrial dysfunction. A basic treatment regime, based on 1) eating the evolutionary correct stone-age diet, 2) ensuring optimum hours of good quality sleep, 3) taking a standard package of nutritional supplements, and 4) getting the right balance between work and rest, was recommended for all patients. Additions to the basic regime were tailored for each patient according to the results of the ATP Profile and additional nutritional tests and clues from the clinical history. Mitochondrial function is typically impaired in two ways: substrate or co-factor deficiency, and inhibition by chemicals, exogenous or endogenous. For the former, additional nutrients are recommended where there is a deficiency, and for the latter, improvement of anti-oxidant status and selective chelation therapy or far-infrared saunas are appropriate. We show case histories of nine patients who have taken the ATP Profile on three or four occasions, and a before-and-after treatment summary of the 34 patients who have had at least two ATP Profile tests separated by some months. Finally, we summarize the results for the 30 patients who followed all aspects of the treatment regime and compare them with the 4 patients who were lax on two or more aspects of the treatment regime. All patients who followed the treatment regime improved in mitochondrial function by on average a factor of 4. PMID:23236553

  18. Cognitive dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a possible role for neuromodulatory immune molecules.

    PubMed

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X chromosome-linked disease characterized by progressive physical disability, immobility, and premature death in affected boys. Underlying the devastating symptoms of DMD is the loss of dystrophin, a structural protein that connects the extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton and provides protection against contraction-induced damage in muscle cells, leading to chronic peripheral inflammation. However, dystrophin is also expressed in neurons within specific brain regions, including the hippocampus, a structure associated with learning and memory formation. Linked to this, a subset of boys with DMD exhibit nonprogressing cognitive dysfunction, with deficits in verbal, short-term, and working memory. Furthermore, in the genetically comparable dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model of DMD, some, but not all, types of learning and memory are deficient, and specific deficits in synaptogenesis and channel clustering at synapses has been noted. Little consideration has been devoted to the cognitive deficits associated with DMD compared with the research conducted into the peripheral effects of dystrophin deficiency. Therefore, this review focuses on what is known about the role of full-length dystrophin (Dp427) in hippocampal neurons. The importance of dystrophin in learning and memory is assessed, and the potential importance that inflammatory mediators, which are chronically elevated in dystrophinopathies, may have on hippocampal function is also evaluated.

  19. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Didier, Peter J; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors.

  20. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H(2) was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H(2) could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H(2) treatment. H(2) also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H(2). Finally, we found that H(2) could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H(2) as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species.

  1. Genetic, Immune, and Vasoactive Factors in the Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajjadh M. J.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy that could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of PE are not completely understood, but recent research has begun to unravel some of the potential mechanisms. Areas covered Genetic polymorphisms and altered maternal immune response may cause impaired remodeling of the spiral arteries; a potential early defect in PE. Inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the decidua leads to reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia. Placental ischemia causes the release of biologically active factors such as anti-angiogenic factors, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and angiotensin II receptor autoantibodies. These vasoactive factors could cause systemic vascular endotheliosis and consequent increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure, glomerular endotheliosis causing proteinuria, cerebrovascular endotheliosis causing cerebral edema, seizures and visual disturbances, and hepatic endotheliosis which may contribute to the manifestations of HELLP syndrome. PE-associated vascular endotheliosis causes a decrease in vasodilator mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, an increase in vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2, and enhanced mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction such as intracellular Ca2+, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity and extracellular matrix cause vascular remodeling and further vasoconstriction. Expert opinion Some of the genetic, immune and vasoactive factors involved in vascular endotheliosis could be used as biomarkers for early detection, and as potential targets for prevention and treatment of PE. PMID:26294111

  2. A new hypothesis of chronic fatigue syndrome: co-conditioning theory.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-08-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is an illness characterized by a profound, disabling, and unexplained sensation of fatigue lasting at least 6 months, which severely impairs daily functioning and is accompanied by a combination of non-specific symptoms. Many potential causes of chronic fatigue syndrome have been investigated, including viral infections, immune dysfunctions, abnormal neuroendocrine responses, central nervous system abnormalities, autonomic dysfunctions, impaired exercise capacities, sleep disruptions, genetic backgrounds, psychiatric abnormalities, personality, and abnormal psychological processes. However, no etiology, specific physical signs or laboratory test abnormalities have been found. It is essential to establish a conceptual theory of chronic fatigue syndrome that can explain its pathophysiology in order to identify the clinical entity and to develop effective treatment methods. In this article, a new conceptual hypothesis about the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome, the co-conditioning theory, is presented: after repetitive overwork and/or stress, alarm signal to rest and fatigue sensation may cause in response to an unconditioned stimulus (impaired homeostasis and function) that has been paired with a conditioned stimulus (overwork and/or stress). In the future, a new treatment strategy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, re-co-conditioning therapy, may be developed on the basis of the co-conditioning theory. In addition, this theory will likely contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome.

  3. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  4. [Endothelial dysfunction and nonspecific immune reactions in development and progression of osteoarthrosis in women engaged into manual work].

    PubMed

    Maliutina, N N; Nevzorova, M S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers mechanisms of development and progression of osteoarthrosis as an occupationally conditioned disease in women of manual work. Women working in physical overstrain conditions are under occupational risk with dysfunction of many body systems. The authors set a hypothesis on association of endothelial dysfunction markers dysbalance and structural remodelling of cartilage matrix as a proof of degenerative changes.

  5. Green tea and its major components ameliorate immune dysfunction in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma and treated with the carcinogen NNK.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Gong, Y; Yang, Z; Ge, G; Han, C; Chen, J

    1999-01-01

    The protective effects of tea and/or its components on dysfunction of immune functions during tumor growth and carcinogenesis in mice were studied using two experimental models: C57/BL6J mice transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and Kunming mice treated with a single dose of 4-(methylnitrosamino-)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). In C57/BL6J mice bearing LLC, the weight of the thymus decreased, the proportion of CD4(+)-positive T lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ decreased, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of white blood cells in peripheral blood stimulated by zymosan increased, and plaque-forming cells (PFC) decreased. However, in LLC-bearing mice given green tea as drinking water, all immune functions were improved, along with inhibition of tumor growth. In Kunming mice treated with NNK, during the four weeks of observation, their immunologic indicators, such as phagocytosis of macrophages in the abdominal cavity, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of white blood cells, plaque-forming cells, and delayed-type hypersensitivity, increased or decreased to various extents compared with normal controls. However, these changes were significantly prevented in the mice given green tea, mixed tea, or tea polyphenol as drinking water. In conclusion, tea and its components ameliorated immune dysfunction in mice bearing LLC or treated with the carcinogen NNK.

  6. Chemotherapy Necessitates Increased Immune Control of HHVs: A Cause of Persistent Inflammation Enabling Protracted Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    survivors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS breast cancer, chemotherapy, immunology, human herpes viruses, survivor fatigue 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...collected prior to, during, and post chemotherapy from BC patients. Our initial hypotheses focused on the role of HHVs, specifically CMV and EBV , and...study 3, respectively. We have performed CMV, EBV , neopterin, and IFN-γ analysis on the analyzed samples listed in Table 1. We will assess VZV and

  7. Chemotherapy Necessitates Increased Immune Control of HHVs: A Cause of Persistent Inflammation Enabling Protracted Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    found a significant increase in CRP levels between EBV + and EBV /CMV double positive subjects. Moreover, EBV /CMV double positive individuals showed...higher levels of hs-CRP. Similarly, CMV/ EBV double positive breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy showed higher hs-CRP levels than CMV-/ EBV ...TERMS breast cancer, chemotherapy, immunology, human herpes viruses, survivor fatigue 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  8. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? Why Are Vaccinations Important? Why Do I Need Shots? Which Vaccinations Do ...

  9. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  10. Chemotherapy Necessitates Increased Immune Control of HHVs: A Cause of Persistent Inflammation Enabling Protracted Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that chemotherapy would iuduce a shift iu control of chronic luunan he1pes viruses (HHVs) iu breast cancer patients and that this... Virus -Specific T Serum Fatigue Sta tus Sta tus ceU responses Cvtokines Score Cohort 1 14 Active Active X X X NIA Cohort 2 20 Active Previously r...herpes viruses and CMV/EBV status is shown in Table 2. We assessed serum for inflammatory cytokines IL-10, neopterin, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and CRP and the

  11. Unstimulated cortisol secretory activity in everyday life and its relationship with fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review and subset meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Daniel J H; Liossi, Christina; Moss-Morris, Rona; Schlotz, Wolff

    2013-11-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a psychoneuroendocrine regulator of the stress response and immune system, and dysfunctions have been associated with outcomes in several physical health conditions. Its end product, cortisol, is relevant to fatigue due to its role in energy metabolism. The systematic review examined the relationship between different markers of unstimulated salivary cortisol activity in everyday life in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fatigue assessed in other clinical and general populations. Search terms for the review related to salivary cortisol assessments, everyday life contexts, and fatigue. All eligible studies (n=19) were reviewed narratively in terms of associations between fatigue and assessed cortisol markers, including the cortisol awakening response (CAR), circadian profile (CP) output, and diurnal cortisol slope (DCS). Subset meta-analyses were conducted of case-control CFS studies examining group differences in three cortisol outcomes: CAR output; CAR increase; and CP output. Meta-analyses revealed an attenuation of the CAR increase within CFS compared to controls (d=-.34) but no statistically significant differences between groups for other markers. In the narrative review, total cortisol output (CAR or CP) was rarely associated with fatigue in any population; CAR increase and DCS were most relevant. Outcomes reflecting within-day change in cortisol levels (CAR increase; DCS) may be the most relevant to fatigue experience, and future research in this area should report at least one such marker. Results should be considered with caution due to heterogeneity in one meta-analysis and the small number of studies.

  12. Individual Differences in Self-Regulatory Failure and Menstrual Dysfunction Predict Upper Respiratory Infection Symptoms and Antibody Response to Flu Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Strauman, Timothy J.; Coe, Christopher L.; McCrudden, Megan C.; Vieth, Angela Z.; Kwapil, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Prior research indicates that cognitive priming manipulations that activate personal goals acutely increase or decrease natural killer cell cytotoxicity depending on whether individuals see themselves as making or failing to make progress toward their goals. Those findings in a laboratory setting revealed a psychobiological pathway whereby experiences of failure can influence health, but did not assess the impact of chronic perceived success/failure in goal pursuit on actual health outcomes. Three new studies investigated whether individual differences in perceived failure to attain personal goals influenced the self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory infections (URIs) as well as antibody response to flu immunization. Based on pilot data in young women, it also was hypothesized that the occurrence of menstrual dysfunction might interact with goal pursuit failure to more specifically predict cold and flu symptoms and optimal responses to vaccination. Perceived failure to attain goals did predict the reporting of URI symptoms as well as antibody levels post-immunization, both alone and in combination with menstrual dysfunction. PMID:18294813

  13. Chronic fatigue syndrome: an approach combining self-management with graded exercise to avoid exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Jo; Paul, Lorna; Wallman, Karen

    2008-04-01

    Controversy regarding the aetiology and treatment of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome continues among the medical professions. The Cochrane Collaboration advises practitioners to implement graded exercise therapy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome using cognitive behavioural principles. Conversely, there is evidence that exercise can exacerbate symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome, if too-vigorous exercise/activity promotes immune dysfunction, which in turn increases symptoms. When designing and implementing an exercise programme for chronic fatigue syndrome it is important to be aware of both of these seemingly opposing viewpoints in order to deliver a programme with no detrimental effects on the pathophysiology of the condition. Using evidence from both the biological and clinical sciences, this paper explains that graded exercise therapy for people with chronic fatigue syndrome can be undertaken safely with no detrimental effects on the immune system. Exercise programmes should be designed to cater for individual physical capabilities and should take into account the fluctuating nature of symptoms. In line with cognitive behaviourally and graded exercise-based strategies, self-management for people with chronic fatigue syndrome involves encouraging patients to pace their activities and respect their physical and mental limitations, with the ultimate aim of improving their everyday functioning.

  14. Modified Mediterranean Diet for Enrichment of Short Chain Fatty Acids: Potential Adjunctive Therapeutic to Target Immune and Metabolic Dysfunction in Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Shih, Pei-an B.; Cadenhead, Kristen S.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Growing interest in gut and digestive processes and their potential link to brain and peripheral based inflammation or biobehavioral phenotypes has led to an increasing number of basic and translational scientific reports focused on the role of gut microbiota within the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of dietary modification on specific gut metabolites, in association with immune, metabolic, and psychopathological functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders has not been well characterized. The short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, butyrate, and propionate, major metabolites derived from fermentation of dietary fibers by gut microbes, interact with multiple immune and metabolic pathways. The specific pathways that SCFA are thought to target, are dysregulated in cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and systemic inflammation. Most notably, these disorders are consistently linked to an attenuated lifespan in schizophrenia. Although, unhealthy dietary intake patterns and increased prevalence of immune and metabolic dysfunction has been observed in people with schizophrenia; dietary interventions have not been well utilized to target immune or metabolic illness. Prior schizophrenia patient trials primarily focused on the effects of gluten free diets. Findings from these studies indicate that a diet avoiding gluten benefits a limited subset of patients, individuals with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Therefore, alternative dietary and nutritional modifications such as high-fiber, Mediterranean style, diets that enrich the production of SCFA, while being associated with a minimal likelihood of adverse events, may improve immune and cardiovascular outcomes linked to premature mortality in schizophrenia. With a growing literature demonstrating that SCFA can cross the blood brain barrier and target key inflammatory and metabolic pathways, this article highlights enriching dietary intake for SCFA as a potential adjunctive

  15. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  16. Fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Grace E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease often characterized by fatigue, with significant effects on physical functioning and wellbeing. The definition, prevalence and factors associated with fatigue, including physical activity, obesity, sleep, depression, anxiety, mood, cognitive dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, pain, effects of medications and comorbidities, as well as potential therapeutic options of fatigue in the systemic lupus erythematosus population are reviewed. Due to variability in the reliability and validity of various fatigue measures used in clinical studies, clinical trial data have been challenging to interpret. Further investigation into the relationships between these risk factors and fatigue, and improved measures of fatigue, may lead to an improvement in the management of this chronic inflammatory disease.

  17. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus ...

  18. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  19. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity.

    PubMed

    Shanely, R Andrew; Nieman, David C; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A; Meaney, Mary P; Knab, Amy M; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-08-22

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  20. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  1. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shanely, R. Andrew; Nieman, David C.; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A.; Meaney, Mary P.; Knab, Amy M.; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function. PMID:27556488

  2. CDC Grand Rounds: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Advancing Research and Clinical Education.

    PubMed

    Unger, Elizabeth R; Lin, Jin-Mann Sally; Brimmer, Dana J; Lapp, Charles W; Komaroff, Anthony L; Nath, Avindra; Laird, Susan; Iskander, John

    2016-12-30

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex and serious illness that is often misunderstood. Experts have noted that the terminology "chronic fatigue syndrome" can trivialize this illness and stigmatize persons who experience its symptoms (1). The name was coined by a group of clinicians convened by CDC in the late 1980s to develop a research case definition for the illness, which, at the time, was called chronic Epstein-Barr virus syndrome. The name CFS was suggested because of the characteristic persistent fatigue experienced by all those affected and the evidence that acute or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus infection was not associated with many cases (2). However, the fatigue in this illness is striking and quite distinct from the common fatigue everyone experiences. A variety of other names have been used, including myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), ME/CFS, chronic fatigue immune dysfunction, and most recently, systemic exertion intolerance disease (3). The lack of agreement about nomenclature need not be an impediment for advancing critically needed research and education. The term ME/CFS will be used in this article.

  3. Gene Expression of Mesothelioma in Vinylidene Chloride-Exposed F344/N Rats Reveals Immune Dysfunction, Tissue Damage, and Inflammation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blackshear, Pamela E.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Nagai, Hiroaki; Bhusari, Sachin; Hong, Lily; Ton, Thai-Vu T.; Clayton, Natasha P.; Wyde, Michael; Shockley, Keith R.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Gerrish, Kevin E.; Sills, Robert C.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    A majority (~80%) of human malignant mesotheliomas are asbestos-related. However, non-asbestos risk factors (radiation, chemicals, genetic factors) account for up to 30% of cases. A recent two-year National Toxicology Program carcinogenicity bioassay showed that male F344/N rats exposed to the industrial toxicant vinylidene chloride (VDC) resulted in a marked increase in malignant mesothelioma. Global gene expression profiles of these tumors were compared to spontaneous mesotheliomas and the F344/N rat mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE) in order to characterize the molecular features and chemical-specific profiles of mesothelioma in VDC-exposed rats. As expected, mesotheliomas from control and vinylidene chloride-exposed rats shared pathways associated with tumorigenesis, including cellular and tissue development, organismal injury, embryonic development, inflammatory response, cell cycle regulation, and cellular growth and proliferation, while mesotheliomas from vinylidene chloride-exposed rats alone showed overrepresentation of pathways associated with pro-inflammatory pathways and immune dysfunction such as the NF-kB signaling pathway, IL-8 and IL-12 signaling, interleukin responses, Fc receptor signaling, and NK and DC signaling, as well as overrepresentation of DNA damage and repair. These data suggest that a chronic, proinflammatory environment associated with VDC exposure may exacerbate disturbances in oncogene, growth factor and cell cycle regulation, resulting in an increased incidence of mesothelioma. PMID:24958746

  4. Postdialysis fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sklar, A H; Riesenberg, L A; Silber, A K; Ahmed, W; Ali, A

    1996-11-01

    To clarify the demographic and clinicolaboratory features of postdialysis fatigue (PDF), we enrolled 85 patients on maintenance hemodialysis in a cross-sectional study using validated questionnaires and chart review. Forty-three patients complained of fatigue after dialysis. On formal testing using the Kidney Disease Questionnaire, the PDF group had statistically greater severity of fatigue and somatic complaints than the group of patients without subjective fatigue (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). On a scale measuring intensity of fatigue (1 = least to 5 = worst), the PDF group average was 3.4 +/- 1.2. PDF subjects reported that 80% +/- 25% of dialysis treatments were followed by fatigue symptoms. In 28 (65%) of patients, the symptoms started with the first dialysis treatment. They reported needing an average of 4.8 hours of rest or sleep to overcome the fatigue symptoms (range, 0 to 24 hours). There were no significant differences between patients with and without PDF in the following parameters: age; sex; type of renal disease; presence of diabetes mellitus, heart disease (congestive, ischemic), or chronic obstructive lung disease; blood pressure response to dialysis; type or adequacy of dialysis regimen; hematocrit; electrolytes; blood urea nitrogen; creatinine; cholesterol; albumin; parathyroid hormone; ejection fraction; and use of antihistamines, benzodiazepines, and narcotics. In the fatigue group, there was significantly greater use of antihypertensive medications known to have fatigue as a side effect (P = 0.007). Depression was more common in the fatigue group by Beck Depression score (11.6 +/- 8.0 v 7.8 +/- 6.3; P = 0.02). We conclude that (1) postdialysis fatigue is a common, often incapacitating symptom in patients on chronic extracorporeal dialysis; (2) no routinely measured parameter of clinical or dialytic function appears to predict postdialysis fatigue; and (3) depression is highly associated with postdialysis fatigue, but the cause

  5. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  6. Chronic pain and fatigue syndromes: overlapping clinical and neuroendocrine features and potential pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Clauw, D J; Chrousos, G P

    1997-01-01

    Patients with unexplained chronic pain and/or fatigue have been described for centuries in the medical literature, although the terms used to describe these symptom complexes have changed frequently. The currently preferred terms for these syndromes are fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, names which describe the prominent clinical features of the illness without any attempt to identify the cause. This review delineates the definitions of these syndromes, and the overlapping clinical features. A hypothesis is presented to demonstrate how genetic and environmental factors may interact to cause the development of these syndromes, which we postulate are caused by central nervous system dysfunction. Various components of the central nervous system appear to be involved, including the hypothalamic pituitary axes, pain-processing pathways, and autonomic nervous system. These central nervous system changes lead to corresponding changes in immune function, which we postulate are epiphenomena rather than the cause of the illnesses.

  7. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: more than fatigue].

    PubMed

    Royes, Badía; Alvarez, Carballo; Lalinde, Sevillano; Vidal, Llinas; Martín, Alegre

    2010-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease recognized by all international medical organizations and WHO, and is classified under the code G93.3 of the International Classification of Diseases. Its prevalence is estimated around 2.54% being more common in women than in men (8/2) aged between 20 and 40 Is defined as a chronic new description characterized by the presence of subjective feeling of fatigue and exhaustion long disabling of more than 6 months duration that is not relieved by rest. It is a multisystem disorder that often presents a significant number of comorbid phenomena. Not known until specific tests to confirm the diagnosis, nor is there a cure to solve this health problem definitively The strongest evidence is based on the multidisciplinary approach for the symptomatic treatment of pain, sleep disorders, neurocognitive dysfunction, autonomic and control of depression and anxiety. The specific contribution of nursing to care for the person who lives and live with the SFC should be developed primarily in the field of health education and supportive care, support and assistance to help the patient and their relatives are an adaptive response to changes in health.

  8. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Inhibited sexual excitement; Sex - orgasmic dysfunction; Anorgasmia; Sexual dysfunction - orgasmic; Sexual problem - orgasmic ... of knowledge about sexual function Negative feelings about sex (often learned in childhood or teen years) Shyness ...

  9. Managing fatigue in the syncope unit.

    PubMed

    Newton, Julia L

    2012-12-01

    The symptom of fatigue is frequently described by patients attending the syncope unit with a wide range of conditions including vasovagal syncope and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. It is possible that the presence of autonomic dysfunction provides the common pathogenetic mechanism linking neurally mediated hypotension and fatigue. Managing this debilitating symptom can often be challenging but, with a structured approach, immensely rewarding, and as a result improve how patients cope with their disease.

  10. Mouse social stress induces increased fear conditioning, helplessness and fatigue to physical challenge together with markers of altered immune and dopamine function.

    PubMed

    Azzinnari, Damiano; Sigrist, Hannes; Staehli, Simon; Palme, Rupert; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Leparc, German; Hengerer, Bastian; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2014-10-01

    In neuropsychiatry, animal studies demonstrating causal effects of environmental manipulations relevant to human aetiology on behaviours relevant to human psychopathologies are valuable. Such valid models can improve understanding of aetio-pathophysiology and preclinical discovery and development of new treatments. In depression, specific uncontrollable stressful life events are major aetiological factors, and subsequent generalized increases in fearfulness, helplessness and fatigue are core symptoms or features. Here we exposed adult male C57BL/6 mice to 15-day psychosocial stress with loss of social control but minimal physical wounding. One cohort was assessed in a 3-day test paradigm of motor activity, fear conditioning and 2-way avoid-escape behaviour on days 16-18, and a second cohort was assessed in a treadmill fatigue paradigm on days 19 and 29, followed by the 3-day paradigm on days 30-32. All tests used a physical aversive stimulus, namely mild, brief electroshocks. Socially stressed mice displayed decreased motor activity, increased fear acquisition, decreased 2-way avoid-escape responding (increased helplessness) and increased fatigue. They also displayed increased plasma TNF and spleen hypertrophy, and adrenal hypertrophy without hyper-corticoidism. In a third cohort, psychosocial stress effects on brain gene expression were assessed using next generation sequencing. Gene expression was altered in pathways of inflammation and G-protein coupled receptors in prefrontal cortex and amygdala; in the latter, expression of genes important in dopamine function were de-regulated including down-regulated Drd2, Adora2a and Darpp-32. This model can be applied to identify targets for treating psychopathologies such as helplessness or fatigue, and to screen compounds/biologics developed to act at these targets.

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  12. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  13. Understanding and Treating Fatigue in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jopson, Laura; Dyson, Jessica K; Jones, David E J

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and although experienced less by patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a minority still report significant fatigue. Fatigue is the symptom with the greatest impact on quality of life, particularly when associated with social dysfunction. The pathogenesis of fatigue in cholestatic liver disease is complex, poorly understood, and probably has central and peripheral components. Managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease presents a challenge for clinicians given the complexity and its numerous associations. This article presents a structured approach to managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease to improve fatigue severity and quality of life.

  14. Lymphocyte subset differences in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, M J; Schacterle, R S; Mackin, G A; Wilson, S N; Bloomingdale, K L; Ritz, J; Komaroff, A L

    2005-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a heterogeneous disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by debilitating fatigue, along with other symptoms, for at least 6 months. Many studies demonstrate probable involvement of the central and autonomic nervous system, as well as a state of generalized immune activation and selective immune dysfunction in patients with CFS. The aim of this study was to compare the lymphocyte subsets of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome to those of patients with major depression and multiple sclerosis as well as those of healthy control subjects. No differences were found in total numbers of T cells, B cells or natural killer (NK) cells. However, differences were found in T, B and NK cell subsets. Patients with major depression had significantly fewer resting T (CD3+/CD25–) cells than the other groups. Patients with major depression also had significantly more CD20+/CD5+ B cells, a subset associated with the production of autoantibodies. Compared to patients with multiple sclerosis, patients with CFS had greater numbers of CD16+/CD3– NK cells. Further study will be required to determine whether these alterations in lymphocyte subsets are directly involved in the pathophysiology of these disorders, or are secondary effects of the causal agent(s). PMID:15996197

  15. Fatigue and fluid hydration status in multiple sclerosis: A hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cincotta, Molly C; Engelhard, Matthew M; Stankey, Makela; Goldman, Myla D

    2016-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prevalent and functionally disabling symptom for individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) which is poorly understood and multifactorial in etiology. Bladder dysfunction is another common MS symptom which limits social engagement and quality of life. To manage bladder issues, individuals with MS tend to limit their fluid intake, which may contribute to a low-hydration (LoH) state and fatigue. Objective To evaluate the relationship between patient-reported MS fatigue, bladder dysfunction, and hydration status. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional study in 50 women with MS. Participants submitted a random urine sample and completed several fatigue-related surveys. Using a urine specific gravity (USG) threshold of 1.015, we classified MS subjects into two groups: high-hydration (HiH) and LoH states. Results LoH status was more common in MS subjects with bladder dysfunction. Statistically significant differences in self-reported Fatigue Performance Scale were observed between HiH and LoH subjects (p = 0.022). USG was significantly correlated with fatigue as measured by the MS Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) score (r = 0.328, p = 0.020). Conclusion Hydration status correlates with self-reported fatigue, with lower fatigue scores found in those with HiH status (USG < 1.015). PMID:27542703

  16. A multi-ingredient containing carbohydrate, proteins L-glutamine and L-carnitine attenuates fatigue perception with no effect on performance, muscle damage or immunity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53 g carbohydrate, 14.5 g whey protein, 5 g glutamine, 1.5 g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1 h and 24 h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24 h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1 h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1 h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml(-1)) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml(-1)) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml(-1)). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 10(9)/L vs. 4.9±1.8 10(9)/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 10(9)/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 10(9)/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 10(9)/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis.

  17. A Multi-Ingredient Containing Carbohydrate, Proteins L-Glutamine and L-Carnitine Attenuates Fatigue Perception with No Effect on Performance, Muscle Damage or Immunity in Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53g carbohydrate, 14.5g whey protein, 5g glutamine, 1.5g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1h and 24h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml-1) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml-1) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml-1). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 109/L vs. 4.9±1.8 109/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 109/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 109/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 109/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis. PMID:25915424

  18. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  19. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  20. Mechanisms of PD-L1/PD-1-mediated CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the context of aging-related immune defects in the Eµ-TCL1 CLL mouse model.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Riches, John C; Miller, Shaun; Day, William P; Kotsiou, Eleni; Neuberg, Donna; Croce, Carlo M; Capasso, Melania; Gribben, John G

    2015-07-09

    T-cell defects, immune suppression, and poor antitumor immune responses are hallmarks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signaling has emerged as a major immunosuppressive mechanism. However, the effect of different microenvironments and the confounding influence of aging are poorly understood. The current study uses the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model, which replicates human T-cell defects, as a preclinical platform to longitudinally examine patterns of T-cell dysfunction alongside developing CLL and in different microenvironments, with a focus on PD-1/PD-L1 interactions. The development of CLL was significantly associated with changes in T-cell phenotype across all organs and function. Although partly mirrored in aging wild-type mice, CLL-specific T-cell changes were identified. Murine CLL cells highly expressed PD-L1 and PD-L2 in all organs, with high PD-L1 expression in the spleen. CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells from leukemic and aging healthy mice highly expressed PD-1, identifying aging as a confounder, but adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated CLL-specific PD-1 induction. Direct comparisons of PD-1 expression and function between aging CLL mice and controls identified PD-1(+) T cells in CLL as a heterogeneous population with variable effector function. This is highly relevant for therapeutic targeting of CD8(+) T cells, showing the potential of reprogramming and selective subset expansion to restore antitumor immunity.

  1. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  2. Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W.; Chen, Horng H

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as subjects with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF), and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity which remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic heart failure including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared to patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients’ morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning preclinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

  3. Immunologic aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome. Report on a Research Symposium convened by The CFIDS Association of America and co-sponsored by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Timothy R; Papanicolaou, Dimitris A; Amsterdam, Jay D; Bingham, Stephen; Grossman, Ashley; Hedrick, Terry; Herberman, Ronald B; Krueger, Gerhard; Levine, Susan; Mohagheghpour, Nahid; Moore, Rebecca C; Oleske, James; Snell, Christopher R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious health concern affecting over 800,000 Americans of all ages, races, socioeconomic groups and genders. The etiology and pathophysiology of CFS are unknown, yet studies have suggested an involvement of the immune system. A symposium was organized in October 2001 to explore the possibility of an association between immune dysfunction and CFS, with special emphasis on the interactions between immune dysfunction and other abnormalities noted in the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems of individuals with CFS. This paper represents the consensus of the panel of experts who participated in this meeting. Data suggest that persons with CFS manifest changes in immune responses that fall outside normative ranges, but current research does not provide definitive evidence on whether these immune abnormalities are a cause or result of the illness. It has become clear that CFS cannot be understood based on single measurements of immune, endocrine, cardiovascular, or autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This panel encourages a new emphasis on multidisciplinary research into CFS.

  4. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other heart problems take medications that contain nitrates to help the blood flow better to the ... erectile dysfunction can affect the way that the nitrates work—and cause blood pressure to drop to ...

  5. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yafi, Faysal A.; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J.; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man’s quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner’s sexual experience and the couple’s quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  6. Evidence for inflammation-mediated memory dysfunction in gastropods: putative PLA2 and COX inhibitors abolish long-term memory failure induced by systemic immune challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies associate lipid peroxidation with long-term memory (LTM) failure in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis) of associative learning and memory. This process involves activation of Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), an enzyme mediating the release of fatty acids such as arachidonic acid that form the precursor for a variety of pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites. This study investigated the effect of biologically realistic challenges of L. stagnalis host defense response system on LTM function and potential involvement of PLA2, COX and LOX therein. Results Systemic immune challenges by means of β-glucan laminarin injections induced elevated H2O2 release from L. stagnalis circulatory immune cells within 3 hrs of treatment. This effect dissipated within 24 hrs after treatment. Laminarin exposure has no direct effect on neuronal activity. Laminarin injections disrupted LTM formation if training followed within 1 hr after injection but had no behavioural impact if training started 24 hrs after treatment. Intermediate term memory was not affected by laminarin injection. Chemosensory and motor functions underpinning the feeding response involved in this learning model were not affected by laminarin injection. Laminarin’s suppression of LTM induction was reversed by treatment with aristolochic acid, a PLA2 inhibitor, or indomethacin, a putative COX inhibitor, but not by treatment with nordihydro-guaiaretic acid, a putative LOX inhibitor. Conclusions A systemic immune challenge administered shortly before behavioural training impairs associative LTM function in our model that can be countered with putative inhibitors of PLA2 and COX, but not LOX. As such, this study establishes a mechanistic link between the state of activity of this gastropod’s innate immune system and higher order nervous system function. Our findings underwrite the rapidly expanding view of neuroinflammatory processes as a fundamental, evolutionary conserved cause of cognitive and

  7. Long-term follow-up of cognitive dysfunction in patients with aluminum hydroxide-induced macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF).

    PubMed

    Passeri, Elodie; Villa, Chiara; Couette, Maryline; Itti, Emmanuel; Brugieres, Pierre; Cesaro, Pierre; Gherardi, Romain K; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2011-11-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is characterized by specific muscle lesions assessing long-term persistence of aluminum hydroxide within macrophages at the site of previous immunization. Affected patients are middle-aged adults, mainly presenting with diffuse arthromyalgias, chronic fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. Representative features of MMF-associated cognitive dysfunction (MACD) include (i) dysexecutive syndrome; (i) visual memory; (iii) left ear extinction at dichotic listening test. In present study we retrospectively evaluated the progression of MACD in 30 MMF patients. Most patients fulfilled criteria for non-amnestic/dysexecutive mild cognitive impairment, even if some cognitive deficits seemed unusually severe. MACD remained stable over time, although dysexecutive syndrome tended to worsen. Long-term follow-up of a subset of patients with 3 or 4 consecutive neuropsychological evaluations confirmed the stability of MACD with time, despite marked fluctuations.

  8. Fatigue, Inflammation, and Projected Mortality in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Anne M.; Gonzalez, Rosalia C.; Lisowski, Tadeusz; Pini, Maria; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Levy, Wayne C.; Piano, Mariann R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prominent and poorly understood symptom of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue correlated with immune biomarkers and prognosis. Methods/Results In patients with HFrEF (N = 59) and healthy controls (N = 25), we prospectively measured fatigue (Profile of Mood States), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and immune biomarkers (plasma C-reactive protein [CRP], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNFα], and interleukins [IL-6 and IL-10]). Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) mortality risk scores were determined. Patients with HFrEF had significantly greater fatigue and depressive symptoms and poorer sleep quality compared to control subjects. When controlling for depressive symptoms, however, fatigue did not differ significantly between patients with HFrEF and controls. Patients with HFrEF had significantly lower levels of IL-10 compared to controls. Cytokines did not correlate significantly with fatigue, but fatigue was significantly associated with higher SHFM scores. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were an important covariate of fatigue in patients with HFrEF. Our study findings were the first to show a positive association between fatigue and the SHFM score, indicating that fatigue was associated with poorer prognosis. PMID:22939040

  9. Longitudinal Intravital Imaging of the Retina Reveals Long-term Dynamics of Immune Infiltration and Its Effects on the Glial Network in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis, without Evident Signs of Neuronal Dysfunction in the Ganglion Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Daniel; Pache, Florence; Günther, Robert; Hornow, Jürgen; Andresen, Volker; Leben, Ruth; Mothes, Ronja; Zimmermann, Hanna; Brandt, Alexander U.; Paul, Friedemann; Hauser, Anja E.; Radbruch, Helena; Niesner, Raluca

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of autoimmune retinal inflammation is the infiltration of the retina with cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to detachment of the retinal layers and even to complete loss of the retinal photoreceptor layer. As the only optical system in the organism, the eye enables non-invasive longitudinal imaging studies of these local autoimmune processes and of their effects on the target tissue. Moreover, as a window to the central nervous system (CNS), the eye also reflects general neuroinflammatory processes taking place at various sites within the CNS. Histological studies in murine neuroinflammatory models, such as experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicate that immune infiltration is initialized by effector CD4+ T cells, with the innate compartment (neutrophils, macrophages, and monocytes) contributing crucially to tissue degeneration that occurs at later phases of the disease. However, how the immune attack is orchestrated by various immune cell subsets in the retina and how the latter interact with the target tissue under in vivo conditions is still poorly understood. Our study addresses this gap with a novel approach for intravital two-photon microscopy, which enabled us to repeatedly track CD4+ T cells and LysM phagocytes during the entire course of EAU and to identify a specific radial infiltration pattern of these cells within the inflamed retina, starting from the optic nerve head. In contrast, highly motile CX3CR1+ cells display an opposite radial motility pattern, toward the optic nerve head. These inflammatory processes induce modifications of the microglial network toward an activated morphology, especially around the optic nerve head and main retinal blood vessels, but do not affect the neurons within the ganglion cell layer. Thanks to the new technology, non-invasive correlation of clinical scores of CNS-related pathologies with immune infiltrate behavior and subsequent

  10. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  11. Fatigue life extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczyk, D. E.; Lin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Potential fatigue rejuvenation processes were carried out on fatigue-damaged material both with and without observable surface-connected fatigue cracks. The fatigue life of fatigue-damaged MAR-M246(Hf)(DS), a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy used in turbine airfoils, was extended by reheat treatment. The fatigue life of fatigue-cracked Inconel 718, a wrought nickel-base superalloy used in a wide variety of advanced rocket engine components, was extended by electron-beam welding to close off the surface-connected crack, followed by hot isostatic pressing and reheat treatment.

  12. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  13. Immune dysfunction in Rett syndrome patients revealed by high levels of serum anti-N(Glc) IgM antibody fraction.

    PubMed

    Papini, Anna Maria; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Guerranti, Roberto; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Rovero, Paolo; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology.

  14. Immune Dysfunction in Rett Syndrome Patients Revealed by High Levels of Serum Anti-N(Glc) IgM Antibody Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Anna Maria; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  15. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  16. Transcriptomics: A Step behind the Comprehension of the Polygenic Influence on Oxidative Stress, Immune Deregulation, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing and global health problem with a great economic burden for healthcare system. Therefore to slow down the progression of this condition is a main objective in nephrology. It has been extensively reported that microinflammation, immune system deregulation, and oxidative stress contribute to CKD progression. Additionally, dialysis worsens this clinical condition because of the contact of blood with bioincompatible dialytic devices. Numerous studies have shown the close link between immune system impairment and CKD but most have been performed using classical biomolecular strategies. These methodologies are limited in their ability to discover new elements and enable measuring the simultaneous influence of multiple factors. The “omics” techniques could overcome these gaps. For example, transcriptomics has revealed that mitochondria and inflammasome have a role in pathogenesis of CKD and are pivotal elements in the cellular alterations leading to systemic complications. We believe that a larger employment of this technique, together with other “omics” methodologies, could help clinicians to obtain new pathogenetic insights, novel diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets. Finally, transcriptomics could allow clinicians to personalize therapeutic strategies according to individual genetic background (nutrigenomic and pharmacogenomic). In this review, we analyzed the available transcriptomic studies involving CKD patients. PMID:27419142

  17. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  18. Exercise, inflammation, and fatigue in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    LaVoy, Emily C.P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue significantly disrupts normal functioning and quality of life for a substantial portion of cancer survivors, and may persist for years following cancer treatment. While the causes of persistent fatigue among cancer survivors are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that several pathways, including chronic inflammation, autonomic imbalance, HPA-axis dysfunction, and/or mitochondrial damage, could contribute towards the disruption of normal neuronal function and result in the symptom of cancer-related fatigue. Exercise training interventions have been shown to be some of the more successful treatment options to address cancer-related fatigue. In this review, we discuss the literature regarding the causes of persistent fatigue in cancer survivors and the mechanisms by which exercise may relieve this symptom. There is still much work to be done until the prescription of exercise becomes standard practice for cancer survivors. With improvements in the quality of studies, evidenced-based exercise interventions will allow exercise scientists and oncologists to work together to treat cancer-related fatigue. PMID:26853557

  19. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction may affect 30% to 50% of men aged 40 to 70 years, with age, smoking, and obesity being the main risk factors, although 20% of cases have psychological causes. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? What are the effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes, with cardiovascular disease, with spinal cord injury, and with prostate cancer or undergoing prostatectomy? What are the effects of drug treatments other than phosphodiesterase inhibitors in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? What are the effects of devices, psychological/behavioural treatments, and alternative treatments in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 81 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: alprostadil (intracavernosal, intraurethral, topical), cognitive behavioural therapy, ginseng, papaverine, papaverine plus phentolamine (bimix), papaverine plus phentolamine plus alprostadil (trimix), penile prostheses, phosphodiesterase inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil), psychosexual counselling, vacuum devices, and yohimbine. PMID:21711956

  20. Expression of IL-22 in the Skin Causes Th2-Biased Immunity, Epidermal Barrier Dysfunction, and Pruritus via Stimulating Epithelial Th2 Cytokines and the GRP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hongfei; Lu, Jingning; Choi, Eun Byul; Oh, Min Hee; Jeong, Mingeum; Barmettler, Sara; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Increased expression of Th22 cytokine IL-22 is a characteristic finding in atopic dermatitis (AD). However, the specific role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of AD in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Consistent with observations in human AD, IL-22 was significantly increased in the AD skin of mice after epicutaneous sensitization to house dust mite allergen. Utilizing a skin-specific inducible transgenic system, we show in the present study that expression of IL-22 in the skin of mice caused an AD-like phenotype characterized by chronic pruritic dermatitis associated with Th2-biased local and systemic immune responses, downregulation of epidermal differentiation complex genes, and enhanced dermatitis upon epicutaneous allergen exposure. IL-22 potently induced the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide pruritogen, in dermal immune cells and sensory afferents and in their skin-innervating sensory neurons. IL-22 also differentially upregulated the expression of GRP receptor (GRPR) on keratinocytes of AD skin. The number of GRP(+) cells in the skin correlated with the AD severity and the intensity of pruritus. IL-22 directly upregulated the expression of epithelial-derived type 2 cytokines (thymic stromal lymphopoietin and IL-33) and GRP in primary keratinocytes. Furthermore, GRP not only strongly induced thymic stromal lymphopoietin but it also increased the expression of IL-33 and GRPR synergistically with IL-22. Importantly, we found that the expression of GRP was strikingly increased in the skin of patients with AD. These results indicate that IL-22 plays important pathogenic roles in the initiation and development of AD, in part through inducing keratinocyte production of type 2 cytokines and activation of the GRP/GRPR pathway.

  1. Kindling and Oxidative Stress as Contributors to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jason, L. A.; Porter, N.; Herrington, J.; Sorenson, M.; Kubow, S.

    2010-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is one of the more complex illnesses involving multiple systems within the body. Onset of ME/CFS frequently occurs quickly, and many patients report a prior exposure to a viral infection. This debilitating illness can affect the immune, neuroendocrine, autonomic, and neurologic systems. Abnormal biological findings among some patients have included aberrant ion transport and ion channel activity, cortisol deficiency, sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity, EEG spike waves, left ventricular dysfunction in the heart, low natural killer cell cytotoxicity, and a shift from Th1 to Th2 cytokines. We propose that the kindling and oxidative stress theories provide a heuristic template for better understanding the at times conflicting findings regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of this illness. PMID:21253446

  2. Manganese deficiency or excess caused the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier, as regulated by NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling, in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Tang, Ren-Jun; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal mucosal immune components and mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) under dietary manganese (Mn) deficiency or excess were investigated. Fish were fed the diets containing graded levels of Mn [3.65-27.86 mg Mn kg(-1) diet] for 8 weeks. The results demonstrated that Mn deficiency significantly decreased the lysozyme and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, up-regulated tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 8 and the signalling factor nuclear factor-κB p65, and down-regulated interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1, inhibitor of signalling factors κB-α and target of rapamycin mRNA levels in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI). However, Mn deficiency did not change the C3 content in the PI, whereas it decreased the C3 contents in the MI and DI. Additionally, Mn depletion also resulted in significantly low mRNA levels for tight junction proteins (claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-15, occludin and zonula occludens-1), antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, GPx and CAT) and NF-E2-related factor-2 in the intestines of fish. Excessive Mn exhibited toxic effects similar to Mn deficiency, where optimal Mn contents reversed those indicators. In conclusion, Mn deficiency or excess causes the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier relating to NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling in grass carp. Furthermore, quadratic regression analysis at 95% maximum response of lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities in the distal intestine of young grass carp revealed the optimum dietary Mn levels to be 8.90 and 8.99 mg kg(-1) diet, respectively.

  3. The Neuroinflammatory Etiopathology of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Glassford, Julian A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating multi-systemic chronic illness of unknown etiology, classified as a neurological disorder by the World Health Organization (WHO). The symptomatology of the condition appears to emanate from a variety of sources of chronic neurological disturbance and associated distortions, and chronicity, in noxious sensory signaling and neuroimmune activation. This article incorporates a summary review and discussion of biomedical research considered relevant to this essential conception perspective. It is intended to provide stakeholders with a concise, integrated outline disease model in order to help demystify this major public health problem. The primary etiopathological factors presented are: (A) Postural/biomechanical pain signaling, affecting adverse neuroexcitation, in the context of compression, constriction, strain, or damage of vertebral-regional bone and neuromuscular tissues; (B) Immune mediated inflammatory sequelae, in the context of prolonged immunotropic neurotrophic infection—with lymphotropic/gliotropic/glio-toxic varieties implicated in particular; (C) A combination of factors A and B. Sustained glial activation under such conditions is associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, and neural sensitivity. These processes collectively enhance the potential for multi-systemic disarray involving endocrine pathway aberration, immune and mitochondrial dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, and tend toward still more intractable synergistic neuro-glial dysfunction (gliopathy), autoimmunity, and central neuronal sensitization. PMID:28261110

  4. A Role for Homeostatic Drive in the Perpetuation of Complex Chronic Illness: Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Fritsch, Paul; Rice, Mark A.; del Rosario, Ryan M.; Miller, Diane B.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy G.; Broderick, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    A key component in the body's stress response, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis orchestrates changes across a broad range of major biological systems. Its dysfunction has been associated with numerous chronic diseases including Gulf War Illness (GWI) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Though tightly coupled with other components of endocrine and immune function, few models of HPA function account for these interactions. Here we extend conventional models of HPA function by including feed-forward and feedback interaction with sex hormone regulation and immune response. We use this multi-axis model to explore the role of homeostatic regulation in perpetuating chronic conditions, specifically GWI and CFS. An important obstacle in building these models across regulatory systems remains the scarcity of detailed human in vivo kinetic data as its collection can present significant health risks to subjects. We circumvented this using a discrete logic representation based solely on literature of physiological and biochemical connectivity to provide a qualitative description of system behavior. This connectivity model linked molecular variables across the HPA axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in men and women, as well as a simple immune network. Inclusion of these interactions produced multiple alternate homeostatic states and sexually dimorphic responses. Experimental data for endocrine-immune markers measured in male GWI subjects showed the greatest alignment with predictions of a naturally occurring alternate steady state presenting with hypercortisolism, low testosterone and a shift towards a Th1 immune response. In female CFS subjects, expression of these markers aligned with an alternate homeostatic state displaying hypocortisolism, high estradiol, and a shift towards an anti-inflammatory Th2 activation. These results support a role for homeostatic drive in perpetuating dysfunctional cortisol levels through persistent interaction with the

  5. Fatigue of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salkind, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mechanisms in the fatigue of composite materials are analyzed in terms of the requirements for designing fatigue-critical composite structures. Fiber reinforced polymers, fiber reinforced metals, fatigue of composite structures, and composite design considerations are discussed. It is concluded that composite materials offer the engineer the opportunity for tailoring stiffness in different directions for designing dynamic components.

  6. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  7. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  8. Attention in Parkinson's disease with fatigue: evidence from the attention network test.

    PubMed

    Pauletti, Caterina; Mannarelli, Daniela; Locuratolo, Nicoletta; Pollini, Luca; Currà, Antonio; Marinelli, Lucio; Rinalduzzi, Steno; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Fatigue is a non-specific symptom that is common in chronic diseases and represents one of the most disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PD patients often experience cognitive deficits related above all to executive functions. The relationship between cognitive changes and fatigue in PD patients has not been explored in depth. The Attention Network Test (ANT) is a rapid, widely used test to measure the efficiency of three attentional networks, i.e., alerting, orienting, and executive, by evaluating reaction times (RTs) in response to visual stimuli. To assess the association between fatigue and the efficiency of the attentional networks, according to the Posnerian view, ANT was administered to 15 parkinsonian patients with fatigue (PFS-16 > 2.95), 17 parkinsonian patients without fatigue, and 37 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Anxiety, depression, quality of sleep, and quality of life were also assessed. Parkinsonian patients displayed significantly longer RTs and lower executive network efficiency than controls. Patients with fatigue displayed significantly lower executive network efficiency than patients without fatigue. Moreover, patients with fatigue exhibited a lower accuracy than either patients without fatigue or controls. Finally, patients without fatigue displayed a more efficient alerting network than either patients with fatigue or controls. Although the pathogenesis of fatigue is multifactorial, our results indicate that fatigue may be closely related to an alteration of the striato-thalamo-cortical loop connecting the neostriatum to the prefrontal cortex, which is also responsible for the executive dysfunction that is typical of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Special feature for the Olympics: effects of exercise on the immune system: overtraining effects on immunity and performance in athletes.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, L T

    2000-10-01

    Overtraining is a process of excessive exercise training in high-performance athletes that may lead to overtraining syndrome. Overtraining syndrome is a neuroendocrine disorder characterized by poor performance in competition, inability to maintain training loads, persistent fatigue, reduced catecholamine excretion, frequent illness, disturbed sleep and alterations in mood state. Although high-performance athletes are generally not clinically immune deficient, there is evidence that several immune parameters are suppressed during prolonged periods of intense exercise training. These include decreases in neutrophil function, serum and salivary immunoglobulin concentrations and natural killer cell number and possibly cytotoxic activity in peripheral blood. Moreover, the incidence of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection increases during periods of endurance training. However, all of these changes appear to result from prolonged periods of intense exercise training, rather than from the effects of overtraining syndrome itself. At present, there is no single objective marker to identify overtraining syndrome. It is best identified by a combination of markers, such as decreases in urinary norepinephrine output, maximal heart rate and blood lactate levels, impaired sport performance and work output at 110% of individual anaerobic threshold, and daily self-analysis by the athlete (e.g. high fatigue and stress ratings). The mechanisms underlying overtraining syndrome have not been clearly identified, but are likely to involve autonomic dysfunction and possibly increased cytokine production resulting from the physical stress of intense daily training with inadequate recovery.

  10. Myalgic encephalomyelitis, chronic fatigue syndrome: An infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Underhill, R A

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis also known as chronic fatigue syndrome or ME/CFS has not been established. Controversies exist over whether it is an organic disease or a psychological disorder and even the existence of ME/CFS as a disease entity is sometimes denied. Suggested causal hypotheses have included psychosomatic disorders, infectious agents, immune dysfunctions, autoimmunity, metabolic disturbances, toxins and inherited genetic factors. Clinical, immunological and epidemiological evidence supports the hypothesis that: ME/CFS is an infectious disease; the causal pathogen persists in patients; the pathogen can be transmitted by casual contact; host factors determine susceptibility to the illness; and there is a population of healthy carriers, who may be able to shed the pathogen. ME/CFS is endemic globally as sporadic cases and occasional cluster outbreaks (epidemics). Cluster outbreaks imply an infectious agent. An abrupt flu-like onset resembling an infectious illness occurs in outbreak patients and many sporadic patients. Immune responses in sporadic patients resemble immune responses in other infectious diseases. Contagion is shown by finding secondary cases in outbreaks, and suggested by a higher prevalence of ME/CFS in sporadic patients' genetically unrelated close contacts (spouses/partners) than the community. Abortive cases, sub-clinical cases, and carrier state individuals were found in outbreaks. The chronic phase of ME/CFS does not appear to be particularly infective. Some healthy patient-contacts show immune responses similar to patients' immune responses, suggesting exposure to the same antigen (a pathogen). The chronicity of symptoms and of immune system changes and the occurrence of secondary cases suggest persistence of a causal pathogen. Risk factors which predispose to developing ME/CFS are: a close family member with ME/CFS; inherited genetic factors; female gender; age; rest/activity; previous exposure to stress or toxins

  11. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  12. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms.

  13. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  14. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  15. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Johnson P; Zick, Suzanna M; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D; Harris, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = -0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  16. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Johnson P.; Zick, Suzanna M.; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D.; Harris, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = −0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  17. Adolescent fatigue, POTS, and recovery: a guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah J; Ahrens, Shelley P; Bruce, Barbara K; Chelimsky, Gisela; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia; Lloyd, Robin M; Mack, Kenneth J; Nelson, Dawn E; Ninis, Nelly; Pianosi, Paolo T; Stewart, Julian M; Weiss, Karen E; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Many teenagers who struggle with chronic fatigue have symptoms suggestive of autonomic dysfunction that may include lightheadedness, headaches, palpitations, nausea, and abdominal pain. Inadequate sleep habits and psychological conditions can contribute to fatigue, as can concurrent medical conditions. One type of autonomic dysfunction, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, is increasingly being identified in adolescents with its constellation of fatigue, orthostatic intolerance, and excessive postural tachycardia (more than 40 beats/min). A family-based approach to care with support from a multidisciplinary team can diagnose, treat, educate, and encourage patients. Full recovery is possible with multi-faceted treatment. The daily treatment plan should consist of increased fluid and salt intake, aerobic exercise, and regular sleep and meal schedules; some medications can be helpful. Psychological support is critical and often includes biobehavioral strategies and cognitive-behavioral therapy to help with symptom management. More intensive recovery plans can be implemented when necessary.

  18. Clinical neurophysiology of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Zwarts, M J; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G M

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional concept covering both physiological and psychological aspects. Chronic fatigue is a typical symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disorders but is also presented by people in whom no defined somatic disease has been established. If certain criteria are met, chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed. The 4-item Abbreviated Fatigue Questionnaire allows the extent of the experienced fatigue to be assessed with a high degree of reliability and validity. Physiological fatigue has been well defined and originates in both the peripheral and central nervous system. The condition can be assessed by combining force and surface-EMG measurements (including frequency analyses and muscle-fibre conduction estimations), twitch interpolation, magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and analysis of changes in the readiness potential. Fatigue is a well-known phenomenon in both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Examples of the former conditions are multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Although it seems to be a universal symptom of many brain disorders, the unique characteristics of the concomitant fatigue also point to a specific relationship with several of these syndromes. As regards neuromuscular disorders, fatigue has been reported in patients with post-polio syndrome, myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type-I. More than 60% of all neuromuscular patients suffer from severe fatigue, a prevalence resembling that of patients with MS. Except for several rare myopathies with specific metabolic derangements leading to exercise-induced muscle fatigue, most studies have not identified a prominent peripheral cause for the fatigue in this population. In contrast, the central activation of the diseased neuromuscular system is generally found to be suboptimal. The

  19. A biopsychosocial model of fatigue and depression following stroke.

    PubMed

    Ormstad, Heidi; Eilertsen, Grethe

    2015-12-01

    Poststroke fatigue (PSF) and poststroke depression (PSD) are both common and difficult sequelae following acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Two main perspectives to explain these sequelae are the biomedical perspective and the psychosocial perspective. Research has shown that PSF and PSD are undoubtedly associated with each other, although each can occur in the absence of the other. However, the nature of the relationship is unclear. For example, do stroke patients become fatigued because of being depressed, or do they become depressed because they are fatigued? Alternatively, is there a bidirectional relationship between these two sequelae, with each influencing the other? We propose a biopsychosocial model of PSF and PSD that supports the AIS-induced immune response and kynurenine pathway activation being related to fatigue but not (directly) to depression. We hypothesize that the risk of developing depression may be reduced if the experience of fatigue is acknowledged, and then addressed accordingly.

  20. Cancer-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Schneider, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 1.3 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2003 and millions of other individuals are already living with the disease. Fatigue continues to be the most prevalent and disruptive symptom of cancer and its treatment regimens. Fatigue was the most frequent and distressing cancer-related symptom occurring in women with lung cancer, two times greater than the next symptom, pain, and remains one of the most common symptoms in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients at any stage of the disease. There are many causes of cancer-related fatigue including preexisting conditions, physical and psychological symptoms caused by cancer, and the consequences of cancer treatment. High levels of fatigue decrease quality of life, physical functional status, and symptom management. This article presents an evidenced-base review of cancer-related fatigue, strategies for the management of cancer-related fatigue, and recommendations for clinical practice.

  1. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  2. Accelerated Fatigue Test Rationale,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    stress cycles. The high cycle fatigue (i.e. elastic stress-strain) typically extends beyond 104 cycles. The Coffin - Manson low cycle fatigue expression...g "Engineering strain is usually more convenient to use than "true" strain. The Coffin - Manson can be modified 12J to give -1/B .- Cu (2 Nf) (21...Mowbray Ci03 has shown that this relationship also reduces to the Coffin - Manson low cycle fatigue expression. An important aspect of the Dowling and

  3. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  4. Fatigue behaviour of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, G.; Hübner, R.; Knaak, S.; Pannkoke, C.

    An important design parameter for cyclically loaded structures (e.g. transport vessels) is the fatigue endurance limit. The cryogenic fatigue behaviour with different types of fibres and matrices has been investigated. The main emphasis it put on the behaviour of fibre dominated properties. It is surprising that the fatigue strength even of unidirectional fibre composites is strongly influenced by the matrix type. This will be discussed for carbon fibre composites with thermoplastic and duroplastic matrices under tensile and shear loading. For crossplies (with non-woven fabrics) the interaction between laminates controls the fatigue behaviour. The interaction depends on the matrix type and is different for tensile and shear loading.

  5. The protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing intermittent and graded exercise to usual care for chronic fatigue syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a debilitating disorder with an unknown aetiology but suspected multifactorial origins. Common “triggers” include severe viral infections and emotional stress. Recent studies have also found evidence of immune dysfunction and elevated inflammatory cytokines in CFS patients, but there has been considerable variation in the outcome measures and magnitude of these studies. Currently, there is no cure for CFS but treatments include rest, specialist medical care, cognitive behavioural therapy, and graded (self-paced) exercise. To date, several studies have examined the efficacy of graded exercise with or without Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, with some success for patients. However, improvements in functional capacity have not necessarily correlated with improvements in immune function, fatigue or other symptoms. This 12-week pilot trial compares graded and intermittent exercise to normal care, measuring physiological outcomes, fatigue levels, immune function and wellness. Methods/design 90 patients aged between 16 to 60 years, who meet the diagnostic criteria for CFS and have been diagnosed by their medical practitioner, will be randomly recruited into groups consisting of Intermittent exercise, Graded exercise and usual care (Control). The outcomes will be measured pre-study (Week 0) and post-study (Week 13). Primary outcomes are VO2peak, anaerobic threshold, peak power, levels of fatigue, immune cell (CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, CD 16+CD56+) concentrations and activation. Secondary outcomes include onset of secondary CFS symptoms (e.g. fever, swollen lymph nodes), wellness, mood and sleep patterns. Primary analysis will be based on intention to treat using logistic regression models to compare treatments. Quantitative data will be analysed using repeated measures ANOVA with a linear model, and Cohen’s effect size. Qualitative data such as participants’ responses (e.g. changes in mood and other reactions) following the

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    PubMed

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  7. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  8. The status of and future research into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: the need of accurate diagnosis, objective assessment, and acknowledging biological and clinical subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are used interchangeably, the diagnostic criteria define two distinct clinical entities. Cognitive impairment, (muscle) weakness, circulatory disturbances, marked variability of symptoms, and, above all, post-exertional malaise: a long-lasting increase of symptoms after a minor exertion, are distinctive symptoms of ME. This latter phenomenon separates ME, a neuro-immune illness, from chronic fatigue (syndrome), other disorders and deconditioning. The introduction of the label, but more importantly the diagnostic criteria for CFS have generated much confusion, mostly because chronic fatigue is a subjective and ambiguous notion. CFS was redefined in 1994 into unexplained (persistent or relapsing) chronic fatigue, accompanied by at least four out of eight symptoms, e.g., headaches and unrefreshing sleep. Most of the research into ME and/or CFS in the last decades was based upon the multivalent CFS criteria, which define a heterogeneous patient group. Due to the fact that fatigue and other symptoms are non-discriminative, subjective experiences, research has been hampered. Various authors have questioned the physiological nature of the symptoms and qualified ME/CFS as somatization. However, various typical symptoms can be assessed objectively using standardized methods. Despite subjective and unclear criteria and measures, research has observed specific abnormalities in ME/CFS repetitively, e.g., immunological abnormalities, oxidative and nitrosative stress, neurological anomalies, circulatory deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, to improve future research standards and patient care, it is crucial that patients with post-exertional malaise (ME) and patients without this odd phenomenon are acknowledged as separate clinical entities that the diagnosis of ME and CFS in research and clinical practice is based upon accurate criteria and an objective assessment of characteristic symptoms

  9. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment.

  10. Aerodynamic Heating and Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Wilhelmina D.

    1959-01-01

    A review of the physical condition's under which future airplanes will operate has been made and the necessity for considering fatigue in the design has been established. A survey of the literature shows what phases of elevated-temperature fatigue have been investigated. Other studies that would yield data of particular interest to the designer of aircraft structures are indicated.

  11. Psychologic and Biologic Factors Associated with Fatigue in Patients with Persistent Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom associated with neuropathic pain (NP) and can have negative consequences on psychosocial functioning, physical endurance, and quality of life. Recent evidence indicates that immune activation modulated through the increased release of proinflammatory cytokines can predict fatigue in some patient populations. Although earlier studies have shown that immune activation is a pathophysiologic feature of NP, there have been no studies to examine the relationship between immune activation and fatigue in persons with NP. Therefore, the purpose of this exploratory study was to: 1) determine the relationships among fatigue, pain, psychosocial factors, and selected biologic markers of immune activation (interleukin [IL] 6 and soluble IL-6 receptor [sIL-6R]) in participants with persistent radiculopathy; and 2) determine the differences in these variables based on fatigue severity. Participants (n = 80) were classified according to their level of fatigue as low (27.5%), moderate (32.5%), or high (40%), and significant differences were found between fatigue categories (p =.001). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that individuals with moderate to high levels of fatigue differed from those with the lowest levels of fatigue in psychologic distress, depressive symptoms, IL-6, and sIL-6R, whereas the differences between moderate and high levels of fatigue were significant for psychologic distress and sIL-6R only. The findings suggest that immune activation affects fatigue severity and possibly other behavioral responses, offering important information when providing care to patients with persistent radiculopathy. The integration of biobehavioral nursing interventions in pain management may have a greater impact on quality of life than treatment focused only on pain. PMID:23452526

  12. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  13. Fatigue countermeasures in aviation.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, John A; Mallis, Melissa M; Caldwell, J Lynn; Paul, Michel A; Miller, James C; Neri, David F

    2009-01-01

    Pilot fatigue is a significant problem in modern aviation operations, largely because of the unpredictable work hours, long duty periods, circadian disruptions, and insufficient sleep that are commonplace in both civilian and military flight operations. The full impact of fatigue is often underappreciated, but many of its deleterious effects have long been known. Compared to people who are well-rested, people who are sleep deprived think and move more slowly, make more mistakes, and have memory difficulties. These negative effects may and do lead to aviation errors and accidents. In the 1930s, flight time limitations, suggested layover durations, and aircrew sleep recommendations were developed in an attempt to mitigate aircrew fatigue. Unfortunately, there have been few changes to aircrew scheduling provisions and flight time limitations since the time they were first introduced, despite evidence that updates are needed. Although the scientific understanding of fatigue, sleep, shift work, and circadian physiology has advanced significantly over the past several decades, current regulations and industry practices have in large part failed to adequately incorporate the new knowledge. Thus, the problem of pilot fatigue has steadily increased along with fatigue-related concerns over air safety. Accident statistics, reports from pilots themselves, and operational flight studies all show that fatigue is a growing concern within aviation operations. This position paper reviews the relevant scientific literature, summarizes applicable U.S. civilian and military flight regulations, evaluates various in-flight and pre-/postflight fatigue countermeasures, and describes emerging technologies for detecting and countering fatigue. Following the discussion of each major issue, position statements address ways to deal with fatigue in specific contexts with the goal of using current scientific knowledge to update policy and provide tools and techniques for improving air safety.

  14. Nucleic Acid Delivery for Endothelial Dysfunction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Dipti; Janero, David R.; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Blanco, Elvin; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple cardiovascular diseases and involves components of both innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Identifying signature patterns and targets associated with endothelial dysfunction can help in the development of novel nanotherapeutic platforms for treatment of vascular diseases. This review discusses nucleic acid-based regulation of endothelial function and the different nucleic acid-based nanotherapeutic approaches designed to target endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27826366

  15. Mechanisms of peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T

    1990-08-01

    Fatigue can be defined as the failure to maintain an expected power output. This is often an antecedent to some sports-related injury. It is important for those involved in physical performance to be familiar with the variety of mechanisms which can lead to fatigue. All too often, a single factor is described as the cause of fatigue when actually fatigue may be a combination of factors that contribute to the sequence of events that results in decreased performance. It may be suggested that every step in the chain of events that leads to voluntary contraction of skeletal muscle could be a culprit in fatigue. Peripheral sites and processes include the motor neuron, neuromuscular junction, sarcolemmal membrane, excitation-contraction coupling, accumulation of metabolites, or depletion of fuels. Physical training is frequently designed to delay the onset of fatigue. The actual mechanism(s) add to the specificity concept, that is, a "specificity of fatigue". To the performer, the end result is the same, the inability to maintain his or her expected level of performance or power output.

  16. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  17. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract.

  18. Multiple sclerosis and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen-Ni; He, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by episodic and progressive neurologic dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. The underlying pathogenesis of MS remains largely unclear. However, it is currently accepted as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Among other clinical manifestations, sexual dysfunction (SD) is a painful but still underreported and underdiagnosed symptom of the disorder. SD in MS patients may result from a complex set of conditions and may be associated with multiple anatomic, physiologic, biologic, medical and psychological factors. SD arises primarily from lesions affecting the neural pathways involved in physiologic function. In addition, psychological factors, the side effects of medications and physical symptoms such as fatigue, muscular weakness, menstrual changes, pain and concerns about bladder and bowel incontinence may also be involved. Since MS primarily affects young people, SD secondary to MS may have a great impact on quality of life. Thus, maintaining a healthy sexual life with MS is an important priority. The treatment of SD requires multidisciplinary teamwork and cooperation among specialists, individual patients, partners and the society. PMID:22447199

  19. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    fatigue cracks grown in a nominally elastic field. EXPERIMENTAL DETAILS A low alloy steel (QIN) with a composition closely similar to HY80 , i.e. 2.5...Prediction of Steel Cords - A. PRAKASH, 645 G.A. COSTELLO, R.M. SHEMENSKI AND D.K. KIM Effect of Hold Time on Fatigue of Lead Rich 655 PbSn Solder...S. VAYNMAN, M.E. FINE AND D.A. JEANNOTTE On Cleavage in Fatigue for Rail Steels - 667 ZHU DONG, CAI QIGONG and YAO HENG Influence of Cleavage on

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    Magnetic perturbation signatures and Barkhausen noise results have been obtained from an AISI 4340 steel fatigue specimen stress-cycled at 180ksi...vicinity of the fatigue crack. Barkhausen noise signals were obtained on a grid pattern in the vicinity of several fatigue cracks with a Barkhausen ...fatigue specimens are being fabricated for magnetic perturbation and Barkhausen noise analysis measurements. Fatigue cracks in Ti-6Al-4V specimens were investigated with the electric current injection technique.

  1. The Environment-Immune Route to Chronic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific environmental factors including chemicals, drugs, microbes and both physical and psychological factors can affect the immune system producing dysfunction and, ultimately, an increased risk ofchronic disease. Several different types of immune alterations can result from e...

  2. Silent Burdens in Disease: Fatigue and Depression in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, R.; Bernardes, M.; Terroso, G.; de Sousa, M.; Figueiredo-Braga, M.

    2014-01-01

    At a time when health is being recognized as more than just avoiding death, age and comorbidity are becoming increasingly important aspects of chronic disease. Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) is probably one of the best paradigms of modern chronic disease, sitting at the crossroads of numerous somatic health problems, immune activation, depression, pain, and fatigue. One hundred forty-eight female participants were enrolled in the present study: 50 diagnosed with SLE, 45 with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 53 age-matched controls. Statistically significant lower scores in quality-of-life dimensions related to physical impairment were found in SLE. Patients with MDD presented significant levels of pain, reduced physical summary component (PSC), and general health scores different from healthy controls. Fatigue was reported in 90% of women with SLE and 77.8% of the MDD patients in contrast with 39.6% in the control group. Significant correlations were seen among fatigue severity, age, and educational level in SLE. From our own previous work and more recent work on the association of immune activation and depression, unexplained fatigue in SLE may signify an early sign of immune activation flare-up. The search for cytokine markers should perhaps be extended to fatigue in SLE. PMID:24592329

  3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do you recommend that I also see a mental health provider? Don't hesitate to ask other questions ... for evidence of some of the top suspects. Mental health issues. Fatigue is also a symptom of a ...

  4. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatigue. Think "alternative." Acupuncture, reiki, massage, stretching, yoga, and t'ai chi seem to help many ... not beginning therapy — and therapies like the stress-management techniques and graded exercise previously mentioned have been ...

  5. Micromechanics of Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    recalled. Application of the derived tools to Apha-Two- Titanium Aluminide Aliov is made with a first series of strain controlled fatigue tests the locally...accumulation, and, multiaxial fatigue. In section 6, application is performed on the Alpha-Two- Titanium Alum:Aide Alloy.With a first serie of strain controlled ...tests needed for the identification of the model are described in the following figures. Test n’l is a classical tensile test strain controlled 1 = 0

  6. Fracture and Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    fracture. The main additional categories of crack growth are elastic-plastic crack growth, fatigue crack growth, and crack growth as affected by...FRACTURE AND FATIGUE R. 0. RITCHIE W. W. GERBERICH J. H. UNDERWOOD DTIC AM ELECTE JUL 1 11988 APRIL 1988 FH US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND...other authorized documents. N The use of trade name(s) and/or manufacturer (s) does not constitute an official indorsement or approval. DESTRUCTION NOTICE

  7. Fatigue and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Béthoux, F

    2006-07-01

    Even if the definition and pathophysiology of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still debated, and despite the scarcity of objective markers correlated with the subjective sensation of fatigue, a review of the literature shows the importance of its detection and management, and allows one to propose therapeutic strategies. Fatigue is not only the most frequently reported symptom in MS, but also a frequent source of activity and participation limitations, psychological distress, and impairment of quality of life. Its management, which must be initiated early, is based on a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics and consequences (sometimes with the use of scales such as the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale), and on the identification of many potential contributing factors (psychological disorders, sleep disturbances, pain, infections and other comorbidities, medications, and deconditioning). Rehabilitative interventions are essential to the treatment of fatigue. Beyond the traditional energy conservation strategies and cooling techniques, several randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the positive impact of aerobic exercise. Medications are partially beneficial, and with the exception of amantadine, their efficacy has not been confirmed by randomized double-blind trials.

  8. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  9. Probabilistic Fatigue: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is a primary consideration in the design of aerospace structures for long term durability and reliability. There are several types of fatigue that must be considered in the design. These include low cycle, high cycle, combined for different cyclic loading conditions - for example, mechanical, thermal, erosion, etc. The traditional approach to evaluate fatigue has been to conduct many tests in the various service-environment conditions that the component will be subjected to in a specific design. This approach is reasonable and robust for that specific design. However, it is time consuming, costly and needs to be repeated for designs in different operating conditions in general. Recent research has demonstrated that fatigue of structural components/structures can be evaluated by computational simulation based on a novel paradigm. Main features in this novel paradigm are progressive telescoping scale mechanics, progressive scale substructuring and progressive structural fracture, encompassed with probabilistic simulation. These generic features of this approach are to probabilistically telescope scale local material point damage all the way up to the structural component and to probabilistically scale decompose structural loads and boundary conditions all the way down to material point. Additional features include a multifactor interaction model that probabilistically describes material properties evolution, any changes due to various cyclic load and other mutually interacting effects. The objective of the proposed paper is to describe this novel paradigm of computational simulation and present typical fatigue results for structural components. Additionally, advantages, versatility and inclusiveness of computational simulation versus testing are discussed. Guidelines for complementing simulated results with strategic testing are outlined. Typical results are shown for computational simulation of fatigue in metallic composite structures to demonstrate the

  10. Review of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an evidence-based approach to diagnosis and management by clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bested, Alison C; Marshall, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    This review was written from the viewpoint of the treating clinician to educate health care professionals and the public about Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). It includes: the clinical definition of ME/CFS with emphasis on how to diagnose ME/CFS; the etiology, pathophysiology, management approach, long-term prognosis and economic cost of ME/CFS. After reading this review, you will be better able to diagnose and treat your patients with ME/CFS using the tools and information provided. Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, chronic medical condition characterized by symptom clusters that include: pathological fatigue and malaise that is worse after exertion, cognitive dysfunction, immune dysfunction, unrefreshing sleep, pain, autonomic dysfunction, neuroendocrine and immune symptoms. ME/CFS is common, often severely disabling and costly. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) reviewed the ME/CFS literature and estimates that between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans have ME/CFS at a cost of between 17 and 24 billion dollars annually in the US. The IOM suggested a new name for ME/CFS and called it Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). SEID's diagnostic criteria are less specific and do not exclude psychiatric disorders in the criteria. The 2010 Canadian Community Health Survey discovered that 29% of patients with ME/CFS had unmet health care needs and 20% had food insecurity--lack of access to sufficient healthy foods. ME/CFS can be severely disabling and cause patients to be bedridden. Yet most patients (80%) struggle to get a diagnosis because doctors have not been taught how to diagnose or treat ME/CFS in medical schools or in their post-graduate educational training. Consequently, the patients with ME/CFS suffer. They are not diagnosed with ME/CFS and are not treated accordingly. Instead of compassionate care from their doctors, they are often ridiculed by the very people from whom they seek help

  11. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  12. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  13. An indentation fatigue strength law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Yonezu, Akio; Chen, Xi

    2010-05-01

    Indentation fatigue, where a cyclic load is applied on the sample via an indenter, emerges as an alternative approach for measuring the fatigue properties of materials. We have carried out indentation fatigue tests on a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) bulk material, as well as on TiN and NiP films/coatings deposited on SUS304 steel substrates, and demonstrate that a simple power-law relationship can be established between the indentation load amplitude and number of cycles to failure. Such a law is very similar to the conventional fatigue strength law obtained from uniaxial tests. The agreement between the fatigue stress exponents obtained by uniaxial and indentation fatigue tests suggests the potential applicability of the indentation fatigue technique for extracting the fatigue properties of materials.

  14. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  15. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  16. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  17. Fatigue and fracture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    The accomplishments achieved under the isotropic creep-fatigue crack initiation life prediction program are summarized. A sizeable creep-fatigue crack initiation data base was generated on the nickel-base superalloy, B-1900. Companion constitutive modeling programs have also generated extensive data bases on the same heat of material. The crack initiation results have formed the basis of a new approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. The term Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) was coined for the method, which was evaluated under isothermal, uniaxial conditions. Stringent laboratory verification experiments were used to test the accuracy of the method. Considering the quite limited material property data needed to evaluate the constants in the approach, the prediction accuracy is acceptable. At the expense of the larger data base required, Lewis developed total strain- strainrange partitioning method (TS-SRP) is capable of a higher degree of accuracy.

  18. Fatigue and Barkhausen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wei

    Piezomagnetism designates a change in the magnetization of materials induced by mechanical actions such as tension or compression. The type of Barkhausen effect that occurs in this work consists of sudden, discontinuous jumps in a material's magnetization that appear in response to smooth (continuous) stress variations. A series of strain controlled fatigue tests with an alternating sinusoidal waveform were carried out to study the relationship between the endurance limit and the Barkhausen effect. Results of fatigue tests on steel specimens exhibiting Barkhausen pulses at various stages are reported and a threshold-crossing analysis is applied to the test results. These studies show that when the fatigue limit is approached, the Barkhausen pulses become, in general, more intense in amplitude and quantity than at other stress levels. A hypothetical mechanism is proposed that relates the intensity of the Barkhausen response to the inception of micro-cracking and rearrangements of the mechanical lattice at the microscopic level.

  19. Increased Incidence of Fatigue in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders: Prevalence and Associations Within the US Immunodeficiency Network Registry

    PubMed Central

    Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) often report fatigue, yet this symptom has not been studied in PID. Fatigue affects 6–7.5% of healthy adults. The goal of this study is to estimate the prevalence of fatigue in patients with PID and investigate its associated factors. Methods We analyzed 2537 PID patients registered in USIDNET to determine responses to the field “fatigue” in the core registry form. Demographics, immune phenotypes, and comorbid conditions were compared between fatigued and non-fatigued patients to identify relevant associations and potential drivers. A focused analysis was performed for patients with predominantly antibody deficiency disorders (PADs). Results Fatigue was reported in 25.9%(95% CI 23.7–28.3) of PAD patients, compared to 6.4% (95% CI 4.9–8.2) of non-PAD. Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) had the highest prevalence of fatigue (p < 0.001) among all PID diagnoses. Other factors that were associated with a higher rate of fatigue among PAD patients included female sex, higher BMI, depression, bronchiectasis, and autoimmunity. Additionally, fatigued PAD patients had lower absolute lymphocyte, CD3, CD4, and CD8 counts compared to non-fatigued patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that fatigue is overrepresented in PAD patients. Prospective studies to estimate prevalence, risk factors, and fatigue etiology in PID are warranted, so therapeutic interventions can be considered. PMID:28124237

  20. The Nature of Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Karin; Zimka, Oksana; Stein, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we report the findings of our study on the nature of fatigue in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. Using ethnoscience as a design, we conducted a series of unstructured interviews and card sorts to learn more about how people with chronic fatigue syndrome describe fatigue. Participants (N = 14) described three distinct domains: tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion. Most participants experienced tiredness prior to diagnosis, fatigue during daily life, and exhaustion after overexertion. We also discuss participants' ability to adapt to a variety of stressors and prevent shifts to exhaustion, and relate our findings to stress theory and other current research. Primary strategies that promoted adaptation to stressors included pacing and extended rest periods. These findings can aid health care professionals in detecting impending shifts between tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion and in improving adaptive strategies, thereby improving quality of life.

  1. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  2. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  3. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  4. Hysteresis and Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erber, T.; Guralnick, S. A.; Michels, S. C.

    1993-06-01

    Fatigue in materials is the result of cumulative damage processes that are usually induced be repeated loading cycles. Since the energy dissipation associated with damage is irreversible, and the loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat, the corresponding relation between stress and strain is not single-valued; but rather exhibits a memory dependence, or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Engineering design and safety standards for estimating fatigue life are based in part on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress-strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. Experimental and theoretical results show that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Detailed features of the hysteresis can be understood with the help of analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials. In particular, scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns may be used to check on the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level.

  5. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  6. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  7. Adaptive Immunity Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-02-27

    A complex interplay between host and bacterial factors allows Staphylococcus aureus to occupy its niche as a human commensal and a major human pathogen. The role of neutrophils as a critical component of the innate immune response against S. aureus, particularly for control of systemic infection, has been established in both animal models and in humans with acquired and congenital neutrophil dysfunction. The role of the adaptive immune system is less clear. Although deficiencies in adaptive immunity do not result in the marked susceptibility to S. aureus infection that neutrophil dysfunction imparts, emerging evidence suggests both T cell- and B cell-mediated adaptive immunity can influence host susceptibility and control of S. aureus. The contribution of adaptive immunity depends on the context and site of infection and can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Furthermore, S. aureus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate adaptive immune responses to its advantage. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for the role of adaptive immunity during S. aureus infections. Further elucidation of this role will be important to understand how it influences susceptibility to infection and to appropriately design vaccines that elicit adaptive immune responses to protect against subsequent infections.

  8. Quantifying fatigue risk in model-based fatigue risk management.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Suresh; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2013-02-01

    The question of what is a maximally acceptable level of fatigue risk is hotly debated in model-based fatigue risk management in commercial aviation and other transportation modes. A quantitative approach to addressing this issue, referred to by the Federal Aviation Administration with regard to its final rule for commercial aviation "Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements," is to compare predictions from a mathematical fatigue model against a fatigue threshold. While this accounts for duty time spent at elevated fatigue risk, it does not account for the degree of fatigue risk and may, therefore, result in misleading schedule assessments. We propose an alternative approach based on the first-order approximation that fatigue risk is proportional to both the duty time spent below the fatigue threshold and the distance of the fatigue predictions to the threshold--that is, the area under the curve (AUC). The AUC approach is straightforward to implement for schedule assessments in commercial aviation and also provides a useful fatigue metric for evaluating thousands of scheduling options in industrial schedule optimization tools.

  9. Immunizations, immunology, and autism.

    PubMed

    Chez, Michael G; Chin, Kathleen; Hung, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Public fears of rising rates of children being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders has led to a fear that immunizations, specifically the measles-mumps-varicella vaccine (MMR), may trigger autism. This article reviews theories of immunization as a risk factor for autism, including thimerosal exposure. We also review theories of autoimmunity as a predisposing genetic risk in autistic patients. We summarize from multiple population-based studies and extensive review committee reports that neither immunization nor thimerosal exposure has been conclusively linked to autism. Current treatments for autoimmunity in autism are reviewed and summarized as being only anecdotally effective, with no controlled studies to conclusively determine effectiveness. The goal of this article is to allow child neurologists to effectively counsel parents of autistic patients about vaccination risks and treatment options in presumed cases of autoimmune dysfunction.

  10. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  11. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  12. Chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: shifting boundaries and attributions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A R

    1998-09-28

    The subjective symptom of "fatigue" is one of the most widespread in the general population and is a major source of healthcare utilization. Prolonged fatigue is often associated with neuropsychological and musculoskeletal symptoms that form the basis of several syndromal diagnoses including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and neurasthenia, and is clearly not simply the result of a lack of force generation from the muscle. Current epidemiologic research in this area relies predominantly on self-report data to document the prevalence and associations of chronic fatigue. Of necessity, this subjective data source gives rise to uncertain diagnostic boundaries and consequent divergent epidemiologic, clinical, and pathophysiologic research findings. This review will highlight the impact of the case definition and ascertainment methods on the varying prevalence estimates of chronic fatigue syndrome and patterns of reported psychological comorbidty. It will also evaluate the evidence for a true postinfective fatigue syndrome.

  13. Fatigue Assessment: Subjective Peer-to-Peer Fatigue Scoring (Reprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    basis for sleepiness and fatigue, as well as potential performance defi cits associ- ated with fatigued states. There are many biomathematical models ...in current use with most fundamentally infl uenced by the two or three-process model ( 7 , 9 , 12 ). Yet models are subject to many limitations...7 ). Thus, models have potential to be of great value, but also lack many independent variables that may be im- portant in fatigue and related

  14. [Childhood chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miike, Teruhisa

    2007-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome in childhood and adolescents(CCFS) is a complex and debilitation with severe morbidity and confusion. It is common condition with up to 3-5% of children and adolescents showing strange fatigue and confusion for more than 30 days. In this condition, four major symptoms are important: sleep disorders, easy fatigability, disturbed learning and memorization and immunological problems. Routine laboratory studies are similar to adult CFS, although abnormalities can be seen on serum pyruvic acid level, OGTT pattern, deep body temperature rhythm, hormonal secretion rhythm, and cerebral blood flow. For a diagnosis of CCFS, a research group supported by Japanese ministry of health, labor and welfare developed CCFS case definition on 2004. Treatment focused to correct disrupted circadian rhythms and supply of energy.

  15. Probabilistic Mesomechanical Fatigue Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic mesomechanical fatigue life model is proposed to link the microstructural material heterogeneities to the statistical scatter in the macrostructural response. The macrostructure is modeled as an ensemble of microelements. Cracks nucleation within the microelements and grow from the microelements to final fracture. Variations of the microelement properties are defined using statistical parameters. A micromechanical slip band decohesion model is used to determine the crack nucleation life and size. A crack tip opening displacement model is used to determine the small crack growth life and size. Paris law is used to determine the long crack growth life. The models are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical distribution of total fatigue life for the macrostructure. The modeled response is compared to trends in experimental observations from the literature.

  16. Helicopter Fatigue Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    de nouveaux materiaux ou technologies accentue I’importance que presente pour les forces de I’O.T.A.N. ce probleme de la maitrise des phenomenes de...fatigue interessant les helicopteres. La commission Structures et Materiaux de I’AGARD a ete conduite a proposer et developper une serie de reflexions...service life for the suspension components due to their vulnerabihty to darnage at high speeds. Spectrum No. 2 led to limitations being applied to

  17. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  18. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  19. Chronic fatigue syndrome and the treatment process.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue is a common complaint in general practice and is often associated with psychiatric and psychosocial problems and demoralization. Although the Centers for Disease Control definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) excludes pre-existing psychiatric illness, common psychosocial problems short of a clinical disorder (such as irritability, difficulty in thinking, inability to concentrate, depression and sleep disturbance) overlap with the criteria for CFS. Psychological states can affect the course of CFS or become confused in the patient's and doctor's mind with the course of infection. The core dilemma in practice is how aggressively to pursue a possible basis for CFS when it persists in the absence of an identifiable external cause. Possibilities for exploration are numerous and potentially expensive. In practice, the persistence of doctors depends on the patient's illness behaviour, on financial and organizational factors, and on the culture of medical care and practice styles. It is essential to differentiate the appropriate management of CFS from scientific study where intensive investigation may be warranted. In practice doctors should proceed in a manner that conveys concern, supports function, and avoids dysfunctional illness behaviour and inadvertent legitimization and reinforcement of disability.

  20. Hysteresis and fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Erber, T. ); Guralnick, S.A.; Michels, S.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Energy dissipation associated with damage of materials is irreversible and loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat. The relation between energy dissipation and loading therefore exhibits a memory dependence or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Standards for estimating fatigue life are partially based on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. In the present study, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials are used to aid understanding of the detailed features of hysteresis. Scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns are used to detect the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level. 61 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Górski, Witold; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Most commonly it results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas in intrathoracic lymph nodes and lung parenchyma, but the clinical course and picture may be complicated by extrapulmonary involvement and many non-respiratory signs and symptoms which are directly related to the disease. In addition, sarcoidosis patients may suffer from a plethora of symptoms of uncertain or unknown origin. Fatigue is one of these symptoms, and according to some authors it is reported by the majority of patients with active sarcoidosis, but also by a smaller proportion of patients with inactive sarcoidosis, or even with complete clinical and radiological remission. Therefore the term fatigue syndrome is frequently used to name this clinical problem. The definition of fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis is imprecise and the syndrome is usually recognized by use of validated questionnaires. In this review the uptodate knowledge in this field was presented and different challenges connected with this syndrome were described.

  2. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  3. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  4. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  5. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking.

  6. Gear Fatigue Diagnostics and Prognostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    one for single gear tooth fatigue, and one for gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ) we have been collecting crack initiation and crack propagation...fatigue tester ); and torque, angular speed, vibration, temperature, and crack-propagation (gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ). The main outcome...Description The test consists of two set of tests on a dynamometer and one set of test on the fatigue tester and some additional activities. Fig

  7. Determinants of fatigue and stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatigue can be triggered by previous perceived stress which may lead to impairment of performance and function. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and perceived stress. Method Health determinants including sociodemographic factors for associations between fatigue and perceived stress in the general population (N = 2,483) are outlined. Fatigue and stress were assessed with the Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). Results Within the general population, 25.9% of male and 34.5% of female respondents reported moderate fatigue during the last six months; 9.7% of subjects reported substantial fatigue lasting six months or longer. An adjusted regression analysis (R2corr = .28, p < .001) showed that fatigue is highest associated with perceived stress and self-perceived health status. The following factors were correlated with increased rates of fatigue and perceived stress: female gender, divorce/separation, low social class and poor health status. Conclusion We conclude that the two conditions overlap most in terms of socio-economic status and self-perceived health status. PMID:21774803

  8. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  9. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Fatigue Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Singher, L.; Notea, A.

    2004-02-01

    Despite the fact that most engineers and designers are aware of fatigue, many severe breakdowns of industrial plant and machinery still occur due to fatigue. In effect, it's been estimated that fatigue causes at least 80% of the failures in modern engineering components. From an operational point of view, the detection of fatigue damage, preferably at a very early stage, is a critically important consideration in order to prevent possible catastrophic equipment failure and associated losses. This paper describes the investigation involving the use of ultrasonic waves as a potential tool for early detection of fatigue damage. The parameters investigated were the ultrasonic wave velocities (longitudinal and transverse waves) and attenuation coefficient before fatigue damage and after progressive stages of fatigue. Although comparatively small uncertainties were observed, the feasibility of utilizing the velocity of ultrasonic waves as a fatigue monitor was barely substantiated within actual research conditions. However, careful measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation parameter had demonstrated its potential to provide an early assessment of damage during fatigue.

  10. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Axillary nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... Multiple mononeuropathy Muscle function loss Numbness and tingling Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Review Date 2/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  11. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 76. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  12. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  13. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure), excessive alcohol use or vaginal infections can cause sexual problems. Depression, relationship problems or abuse (current or past abuse) can also cause sexual dysfunction.You may have less sexual desire ...

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  15. Cryogenic fatigue data developed for Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Data were obtained on the cryogenic fatigue properties of Inconel 718 bar using axial loading and rotating beam fatigue tests. Results also disclosed the fatigue properties of Inconel 718 sheet materials.

  16. Gene Expression in Response to Exercise in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Keech, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Barry, Benjamin K.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signaling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterized sample of patients with CFS (N = 10) and healthy matched control participants (N = 12) were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 h after 25 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise. Leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune, and neurotransmission genes was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS reported substantial fatigue, functional impairment, and poor sleep at baseline (all p < 0.02), and exercise immediately induced worsened patients' fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.17). There were no significant changes in gene expression after exercise and patients did not differ from control participants at any time point. Higher levels of expression of ficolin (FCN1) and a purinergic receptor (P2RX4) in patients with CFS were found when all time points were combined. Patients with CFS did not show significant exercise-induced changes in leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes despite a prominent exacerbation of fatigue. PMID:27713703

  17. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  18. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Yashika; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Depression is the most debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with significant impact on socio-occupational and well being of individual. The exact pathophysiology of depression is still enigmatic though various theories have been put forwarded. There are evidences showing that mitochondrial dysfunction in various brain regions is associated with depression. Recent findings have sparked renewed appreciation for the role of mitochondria in many intracellular processes coupled to synaptic plasticity and cellular resilience. New insights in depression pathophysiology are revolving around the impairment of neuroplasticity. Mitochondria have potential role in ATP production, intracellular Ca2+ signalling to establish membrane stability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and to execute the complex processes of neurotransmission and plasticity. So understanding the various concepts of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of depression indubitably helps to generate novel and more targeted therapeutic approaches for depression treatment. Objective The review was aimed to give a comprehensive insight on role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. Result Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the mitochondrial functions might act as potential target for the treatment of depression. Conclusion Literature cited in this review highly supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. As impairment in the mitochondrial functions lead to the generation of various insults that exaggerate the pathogenesis of depression. So, it is useful to study mitochondrial dysfunction in relation to mood disorders, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and enhancing the functions of mitochondria might show promiscuous effects in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26923778

  19. Effect of supplement with lactic-acid producing bacteria on fatigue and physical activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Asa; Nord, Carl E; Evengård, Birgitta

    2009-01-26

    Disturbances in intestinal microbial ecology and in the immune system of the host have been implicated as a part of the pathogenesis in chronic fatigue syndrome. Probiotic lactic acid producing bacteria have been shown to prevent and alleviate gastrointestinal disturbances and to normalize the cytokine profile which might be of an advantage for patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFB 1748 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 on fatigue and physical activity in CFS patients. Fifteen patients fulfilling the criteria set by international researchers in the field at the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in 1994 for chronic fatigue syndrome, were included in the study. The patients had high fatigue severity scores and high disability scores. During the first two weeks baseline observations without treatment were assessed, succeeded by four weeks of intake of a probiotic product and a four-week follow-up period. The fatigue, health and physical activity was assessed by the use of the Visual Analogue Scales and the SF-12 Health Survey. Faecal samples were collected and the normal microflora was analysed. Neurocognitive functions improved during the study period while there were no significant changes in fatigue and physical activity scores. No major changes occurred in the gastrointestinal microflora. At the end of the study 6 of 15 patients reported that they had improved according to the assessment described. The findings in this study that improvement of health is possible to achieve should encourage further studies with interventions with probiotics in patients with CFS.

  20. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: A new disorder?

    PubMed

    de Korwin, J-D; Chiche, L; Banovic, I; Ghali, A; Delliaux, S; Authier, F-J; Cozon, G; Hatron, P-Y; Fornasieri, I; Morinet, F

    2016-12-01

    More than 30 years after its individualization, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains a debilitating condition for the patient and a confusing one to the physicians, both because of diagnostic difficulties and poorly codified management. Despite the numerous work carried out, its pathophysiology remains unclear, but a multifactorial origin is suggested with triggering (infections) and maintenance (psychological) factors as well as the persistence of inflammatory (low grade inflammation, microglial activation…), immunologic (decrease of NK cells, abnormal cytokine production, reactivity to a variety of allergens, role of estrogens…) and muscular (mitochondrial dysfunction and failure of bioenergetic performance) abnormalities at the origin of multiple dysfunctions (endocrine, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, digestive…). The complexity of the problem and the sometimes contradictory results of available studies performed so far are at the origin of different pathophysiological and diagnostic concepts. Based on a rigorous analysis of scientific data, the new American concept of Systemic Disease Exertion Intolerance proposed in 2015 simplifies the diagnostic approach and breaks with the past and terminologies (CFS and myalgic encephalomyelitis). It is still too early to distinguish a new disease, but this initiative is a strong signal to intensify the recognition and management of patients with CFS and stimulate research.

  1. Fatigue and fracture: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview of the status of the fatigue and fracture programs is given. The programs involve the development of appropriate analytic material behavior models for cyclic stress-strain-temperature-time/cyclic crack initiation, and cyclic crack propagation. The underlying thrust of these programs is the development and verification of workable engineering methods for the calculation, in advance of service, of the local cyclic stress-strain response at the critical life governing location in hot section compounds, and the resultant crack initiation and crack growth lifetimes.

  2. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Figure 5 appears to be composed of fibrils or crazes which have been torn in the fracture process. There is little of this rough fibrous material on the...their work on the role of crazes in the fatigue of polycarbonate. They suggested that the smooth area evident at the edge of an untreated sample is a...remnant of a single craze which first formed during cyclic loading at a point of high local surface stress. Under cyclic loading, this craze grew, as

  3. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  4. Fatigue failure in polysilicon not due to simple stress corrosion cracking.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H; Ballarini, R; Bellante, J J; Heuer, A H

    2002-11-08

    In the absence of a corrosive environment, brittle materials such as silicon should be immune to cyclic fatigue. However, fatigue effects are well known in micrometer-sized polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) samples tested in air. To investigate the origins of this phenomenon in polysilicon, we developed a fixed-grip fracture mechanics microspecimen but could find no evidence of static stress corrosion cracking. The environmental sensitivity of the fatigue resistance was also investigated under cyclic loading. For low-cycle fatigue, the behavior is independent of the ambient conditions, whether air or vacuum, but is strongly influenced by the ratio of compressive to tensile stresses experienced during each cycle. The fatigue damage most likely originates from contact stresses at processing-related surface asperities; subcritical crack growth then ensues during further cyclic loading. The lower far-field stresses involved in high-cycle fatigue induce reduced levels of fatigue damage. Under these conditions, a corrosive ambient such as laboratory air exacerbates the fatigue process. Without cyclic loading, polysilicon does not undergo stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Improving turbine blade fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buddenbohm, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Turbine airfoil design, materials, and cooling system management are variables which, when optimized, can contribute to longer turbine component lives. These advancements have been identified as redesign techniques to improve the turbine fatigue life of the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. This paper discusses the general program approach toward improving turbine fatigue life.

  6. Caffeine to Sustain Operational Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    It Caffeine is the most widely used psychostimulant and provided data about the most commonly used may be useful in operational fatigue-coping...palpitation, psychomotor agitation. Caffeine candy 05 withdrawal may cause headache, fatigue, anxiety, soda 04 insomnia, nausea, performance impainnents. snuff

  7. Fatigue monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1995-04-01

    This paper summarizes fatigue monitoring methods and surveys their application in the nuclear power industry. The paper is based on a review of the technical literature. Two main reasons for fatigue monitoring are more frequent occurrence of some transients than that assumed in the fatigue design analysis and the discovery of stressors that were not included in the fatigue design analysis but may cause significant fatigue damage at some locations. One fatigue monitoring method involves use of plant operating data and procedures to update the fatigue usage. Another method involves monitoring of plant operating parameters using existing, or if needed, supplementary plant instrumentation for online computation of fatigue usage. Use of fatigue monitoring has better defined the operational transients. Most operational transients have been found less severe and fewer in numbers than anticipated in the design fatigue analysis. Use of fatigue monitoring has assisted in quantifying newly discovered stressors and has helped in detecting the presence of thermal stratification of unsuspected locations.

  8. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  9. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  10. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... and afford to pay for them. World Immunization Week The last week of April each year is marked by WHO and partners as World Immunization Week. It aims to accelerate action to increase awareness ...

  11. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue of beryllium-copper spring materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, R.; Miller, G.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Fine gage, 0.006-in. d(0.15-mm) thick, beryllium-copper (Be-Cu) spring materials with tensile strength in the range of 70 to 145 ksi were subjected to cyclic loading in air and salt water environments. Plain and notched (center hole) hour glass specimens were subjected to sinusoidal loading with R = (minimum/maximum) stress = 0.1 at cyclic frequencies of 50 Hz in air and 1 Hz in salt water. Fatigue life was typically from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles with crack initiation as the dominant fatigue process. The excellence fatigue performance of Be-Cu alloys in salt water is well-known, however, current findings demonstrate 10 to 37% reduction in fatigue strength of unnotched specimens in this environment for a life of 3 x 10[sup 5] cycles. This strength degradation is attributed to the use of a lower cyclic frequency for present than for previous tests, i.e., 1 versus about 20 Hz. There was no effect of salt water on crack initiation in notched specimens. The ratios of the fatigue strengths, namely (cold-rolled/annealed) and (aged/annealed), for plain and notched specimens tested in air, decreased from 2 to about 1.4 as fatigue life increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles. This effect is attributed to cyclic hardening of the annealed material. The fatigue stress concentration factor, K[sub f] = (plain/notched) fatigue strength, increased by about 30% as fatigue cycles increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6]. The ranking of K[sub f] values of the various material conditions from highest to lowest was: cold-rolled, aged, and annealed.

  12. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  13. Development of the electrochemical fatigue sensor for evaluating fatigue damage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.F.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.Z.; DeLuccia, J.; Laird, C.

    1999-07-01

    The Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (EFS) is a device which operates by an electrochemical-mechanical interaction and which can sense the type and extent of fatigue damage both before and after crack initiation. It was initially explored through studies on soft metals. Here the authors report efforts to determine the ability of the device to read damage in hardened commercial alloys: 7075 aluminum alloy, 4130 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. They also demonstrate that the device, which uses an electrolytic medium, does not degrade the fatigue properties if care is used in electrolyte selection.

  14. Gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psycho social factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected prior to the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men while the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed towards optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure.

  15. Fatigue management in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers’ fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management. PMID:26257477

  16. Fatigue management in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers' fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management.

  17. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome.

  18. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Voznesensky, Maria; Annam, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  19. Fatigue, Creep-Fatigue, and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Testing of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; McGaw, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation resistance of an alloy is determined by conducting a series of tests over a range of values of stress amplitude or strain range. The observed number of cycles to failure is plotted against the stress amplitude or strain range to obtain a fatigue curve. The fatigue properties quoted for an alloy are typically the constants used in the equation(s) that describe the fatigue curve. Fatigue lives of interest may be as low as 10(exp 2) or higher than 10(exp 9) cycles. Because of the enormous scatter associated with fatigue, dozens of tests may be needed to confidently establish a fatigue curve, and the cost may run into several thousands of dollars. To further establish the effects on fatigue life of the test temperature, environment, alloy condition, mean stress effects, creep-fatigue effects, thermomechanical cycling, etc. requires an extraordinarily large and usually very costly test matrix. The total effort required to establish the fatigue resistance of an alloy should not be taken lightly. Fatigue crack initiation tests are conducted on relatively small and presumed to be initially crack-free, samples of an alloy that are intended to be representative of the alloy's metallurgical and physical condition. Generally, samples are smooth and have uniformly polished surfaces within the test section. Some may have intentionally machined notches of well-controlled geometry, but the surface at the root of the notch is usually not polished. The purpose of polishing is to attain a reproducible surface finish. This is to eliminate surface finish as an uncontrolled variable. Representative test specimen geometries will be discussed later. Test specimens are cyclically loaded until macroscopically observable cracks initiate and eventually grow to failure. Normally, the fatigue failure life of a specimen is defined as the number of cycles to separation of the specimen into two pieces. Alternative definitions are becoming more common, particularly for

  20. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  1. Adipocytokines in Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Berna İmge; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines are important mediators of interorgan crosstalk in metabolic regulation. Thyroid diseases have effects on metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of these effects is not clear. Recently, there are several reports suggesting this interrelation between adipocytokines and thyroid dysfunction. In this review, we summarize this relation according to the literature. PMID:24049662

  2. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  3. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  4. Female sexual dysfunction: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J B; Kalra, Bharti

    2016-05-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a common complex clinical condition, with multiple etiologies, association and pathophysiologic correlations. This review includes the definition, etiology, and diagnosis of FSD. It calls for a bio psychosocial approach to FSD management, which incorporates, but is not limited to, only the psychological aspects of FSD.

  5. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... on women with certain sexual dysfunctions, but more study is needed. Yoga. During yoga, you perform a series of postures and controlled breathing exercises to promote a flexible body and a calm mind. Certain subsets of yoga aim to channel the ...

  6. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  7. Immune reconstitution post allogeneic transplant and the impact of immune recovery on the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-11-16

    Infection is the leading cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This occurs as a result of dysfunction to the host immune system from the preparative regimen used prior to HCT, combined with a delay in reconstitution of the donor-derived immune system after HCT. In this article, we elaborate on the process of immune reconstitution post-HCT that begins with the innate system and is followed by recovery of adaptive immunity. Simultaneously, we describe how the tempo of immune reconstitution influences the risk of various infections. We explain some of the key differences in immune reconstitution and the consequent risk of infections in recipients of peripheral blood stem cell, bone marrow or umbilical cord blood grafts. Other factors that impact on immune recovery are also highlighted. Finally, we allude to various strategies that are being tested to enhance immune reconstitution post-HCT.

  8. Coping with cancer - managing fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause fatigue. Simply having cancer can drain your energy: Some cancers release proteins called cytokines that can ... tumors can change the way your body uses energy and leave you feeling tired. Many cancer treatments ...

  9. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  10. Fatigue of internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumanois, P

    1924-01-01

    The above conditions enable the employment of a criterion of general fatigue which simultaneously takes account of both mechanical and thermal conditions, for the sake of comparing any projected engine with engines of the same type already in use.

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help reduce symptoms of fatigue. acupuncture, massage, stretching, yoga, and tai chi, which have been helpful for ... that antidepressant medications can help ease the symptoms. Pain medications and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, ...

  12. Resolving the frustration of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Harpham, W S

    1999-01-01

    Fatigue is a ubiquitous side effect of many cancer therapies. Nevertheless, after treatment is complete, many survivors continue to feel a profound tiredness that affects almost all aspects of life. Even after recovery, patients are often frustrated by their continuing need for extra rest. In this deeply personal, first-person account, a physician relates the various ways that cancer-related fatigue can affect family dynamics, job responsibilities, social interactions, finances, and intimacy. Clinicians can help by searching for treatable medical conditions, but also by taking cancer-related fatigue, and the frustrations it causes, seriously. Patients should be reassured that the fatigue they feel is real, and that by learning personal energy conservation, they should be able to improve their abilities to function, to socialize, to interact with others, and ultimately to adjust to a "new normal" baseline.

  13. Leriche Syndrome Presenting as Depression with Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M S; Gautam, Priyanka; Saha, Rashmita

    2016-03-01

    Leriche syndrome results from thrombotic occlusion of the abdominal aorta immediately above the site of its bifurcation. Impotence in leriche syndrome is caused due to proximal obstruction, commonly involving isolated common iliac, internal iliac, internal pudendal or dorsalis penis artery. The symptoms of Leriche syndrome include intermittent and bilateral claudication, pallor, coldness and fatigue in lower extremities. Data regarding psychiatric morbidity in Leriche syndrome is unavailable. We hereby report the case of Leriche syndrome, presenting to psychiatry outpatient department with depressive disorder and erectile dysfunction (ED) with focus on dilemmas faced in the diagnosis and management in psychiatry.

  14. Fatigue and the criminal law.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher B; Dorrian, Jillian; Rajaratnam, Shanthakumar M W

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue is an increasingly recognised risk factor for transportation accidents. In light of this, there is the question of whether driving whilst fatigued should be a criminal offence. This paper discusses the current legal position, including the problems of voluntary conduct and self awareness. Three models for reform are proposed. The manner in which scientific research can inform legal consideration and future directions for research are discussed.

  15. Methods for the assessment of peripheral muscle fatigue and its energy and metabolic determinants in COPD.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Rafaella Rezende; Dal Corso, Simone; Simões, Alexandre; Malaguti, Carla

    2009-11-01

    It has been well established that, in addition to the pulmonary involvement, COPD has systemic consequences that can lead to peripheral muscle dysfunction, with greater muscle fatigue, lower exercise tolerance and lower survival in these patients. In view of the negative repercussions of early muscle fatigue in COPD, the objective of this review was to discuss the principal findings in the literature on the metabolic and bioenergy determinants of muscle fatigue, its functional repercussions, as well as the methods for its identification and quantification. The anatomical and functional substrate of higher muscle fatigue in COPD appears to include lower levels of high-energy phosphates, lower mitochondrial density, early lactacidemia, higher serum ammonia and reduced muscle perfusion. These alterations can be revealed by contraction failure, decreased firing rates of motor units and increased recruitment of motor units in a given activity, which can be functionally detected by a reduction in muscle strength, power and endurance. This review article also shows that various types of muscle contraction regimens and protocols have been used in order to detect muscle fatigue in this population. With this understanding, rehabilitation strategies can be developed in order to improve the resistance to muscle fatigue in this population.

  16. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  17. Current treatments to counter sleep dysfunction as a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. Polysomnography showed reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal alpha rhythms during nonrapid eye movement sleep in patients with fibromyalgia. However, sleep dysfunction might be pathogenic in fibromyalgia since myalgia and fatigue could be induced in healthy individuals by disrupting sleep. Poor sleep quality was a major risk factor for the subsequent development of chronic widespread pain in healthy pain-free individuals. Sleep disruption leads to impairment of the descending pain inhibition pathways. Aside from good sleep, hygiene, exercise can promote sleep. Among currently available pharmacological treatments, evidence suggests amitriptyline and pregabalin can improve sleep in fibromyalgia.

  18. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  19. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  20. Fatigue after Stroke: The Patient's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Victoria Louise; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background. Fatigue after stroke is common and distressing to patients. Aims. Our aims were to explore patients' perceptions of post-stroke fatigue, including the causes of fatigue and the factors that alleviate fatigue, in a mixed methods study. Results. We interviewed 15 patients who had had a stroke and were inpatients on stroke rehabilitation wards. A substantial proportion of patients reported that their fatigue started at the time of their stroke. Various different factors were reported to improve fatigue, including exercise, good sleep, rehabilitation and rest. Fatigue influences patients' sense of "control" after their stroke. Conclusion. Our results are consistent with the possibility that poststroke fatigue might be triggered by factors that occur at the time of the stroke (e.g., the stroke lesion itself, or admission to hospital) and then exacerbated by poor sleep and boredom. These factors should be considered when developing complex interventions to improve post-stroke fatigue.

  1. Fatigue in advanced cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Katherine; Walsh, Declan; Rybicki, Lisa A; Davis, Mellar P; Seyidova-Khoshknabi, Dilara

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a common advanced cancer symptom. Clinical features are not well known. The authors surveyed consecutive patients admitted to a palliative medicine program to identify clinical correlates of fatigue. Data collected included age, sex, performance status, primary site, prior chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. Visual analogue scales assessed fatigue, quality of life, and ability to perform daily activities. Weight change was estimated. Laboratory results including lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin were recorded. Fatigue severity was associated with brain metastases, poor performance status, poor quality of life, and reduced ability to perform activities. Prior radiation therapy was associated with less severe fatigue. Age, sex, and hemoglobin level were not associated with fatigue. Fatigue was universal on referral. Brain metastases and poor quality of life independently predicted severity. Hemoglobin level did not predict fatigue. Further studies are necessary to define the clinical features and relationships of fatigue.

  2. Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Ten years of research that has provided data regarding the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions is reviewed. A thorough review of the literature identified 52 studies that have been published in the 10 years since an earlier review by Spector and Carey (1990). Community samples indicate a current prevalence of 0 - 3% for male orgasmic disorder, 0 - 5% for erectile disorder, and 0 - 3% for male hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Pooling current and 1-year figures provides community prevalence estimates of 7 - 10% for female orgasmic disorder and 4 - 5% for premature ejaculation. Stable community estimates of the current prevalence for the other sexual dysfunctions remain unavailable. Prevalence estimates obtained from primary care and sexuality clinic samples are characteristically higher. Although a relatively large number of studies have been conducted since Spector and Carey’s (1990) review, the lack of methodological rigor of many studies limits the confidence that can be placed in these findings. PMID:11329727

  3. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  4. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Increased recognition of the problem of fatigue in cancer patients can be attributed, in part, to the development of measures that have provided researchers with the tools necessary for quantifying and characterizing fatigue and exploring its etiology and treatment. Although a consensus regarding the definition of fatigue is lacking, there is general agreement that it is a subjective and multidimensional phenomenon whose assessment requires the use of self-report methods. Consistent with this view, several multidimensional measures of fatigue have been developed and validated for use with cancer patients. These measures differ considerably in their format and content and, as with the definition of fatigue, there is no consensus at the present time regarding the dimensional structure of fatigue. In addition to measuring fatigue on a continuum along one or more dimensions, it may also be possible to assess a clinical syndrome of cancer-related fatigue. Criteria for assessing fatigue in this manner have been proposed and are currently undergoing evaluation. Despite the progress that has been made, there are several important unresolved issues in the assessment of fatigue in cancer patients. These include how to distinguish fatigue from depression, how to use self-reports of fatigue in clinical decision-making, how to capture temporal changes in fatigue, and how best to address the continuing lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of fatigue.

  5. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization.

  6. Sexual Dysfunction After Urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Prem Nath; Singh, Prabhjot; Nayyar, Rishi; Yadav, Siddharth

    2017-02-01

    Posturethroplasty sexual dysfunction (SD) is multifactorial and its true incidence is unknown. Even with the current evidence suggesting that it is uncommon, de novo SD causes dissatisfaction even after a successful surgery. Posterior urethroplasty carries the highest chance of SD, mostly attributable to the pelvic fracture itself rather than the urethroplasty. With anterior urethroplasty, transecting bulbar urethroplasty leads to greater SD compared with penile or nontransecting bulbar urethroplasty. Most patients with posturethroplasty SD recover within 6 months after surgery.

  7. An Exposome Perspective on Environmental Enteric Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mapesa, Job O.; Maxwell, Amy L.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposures to chemicals have been shown to influence gastrointestinal function, yet little is known regarding whether chemical mixtures may be involved in the development of a subclinical enteric dysfunction found in infants and children born into poor hygiene and sanitation. Advances in gastrointestinal and immunotoxicology fields merit inclusion in complex discussions of environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) that severely affects children in developing countries. Objective: We aimed to highlight exposome approaches for investigating the potential influence of environmental chemical exposures on EED development, including a role for toxicant modulation of gut immune system and microbiome function. Discussion: A major focus on fecal–oral contamination in impoverished living conditions already exists for EED, and should now expand to include environmental chemicals such as pesticides and heavy metals that may be anthropogenic or dietary or from microbial sources. A comprehensive characterization of environmental chemical exposures prenatally and occurring in infants and young children will enhance our knowledge of any associated risks for EED and stunting. Conclusions: Integrating EED, chemical exposure, and stunting at various ages during childhood will enhance our apparent limited view when evaluating EED. Etiology and intervention studies should evaluate the suite of environmental chemical exposures as candidates in the composite of EED biomarkers. Citation: Mapesa JO, Maxwell AL, Ryan EP. 2016. An exposome perspective on environmental enteric dysfunction. Environ Health Perspect 124:1121–1126; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510459 PMID:26713888

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Mollen, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of disease is unknown, IBD is recognized to be a complex, multifactorial disease that results from an intricate interplay of genetic predisposition, an altered immune response, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and environmental factors. Together, these contribute to a destruction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, increased gut permeability, and an influx of immune cells. Given that most cellular functions as well as maintenance of the epithelial barrier is energy-dependent, it is logical to assume that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in both the onset and recurrence of disease. Indeed several studies have demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial stress and alterations in mitochondrial function within the intestinal epithelium of patients with IBD and mice undergoing experimental colitis. Although the hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress and impaired ATP production are known to be evident in the intestines of patients with IBD, it is as yet unclear whether these processes occur as a cause of consequence of disease. We provide a current review of mitochondrial function in the setting of intestinal inflammation during IBD. PMID:26484345

  9. Association of a deficit of arousal with fatigue in multiple sclerosis: effect of modafinil.

    PubMed

    Niepel, Graham; Bibani, Rashid H; Vilisaar, Janek; Langley, Robert W; Bradshaw, Christopher M; Szabadi, Elemer; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, leading to chronic disability. Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom of MS which is unrelated to its clinical form, stage of development, the degree of disability, or the lesion load on magnetic resonance imaging. Fatigue in MS is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and autonomic dysfunction. Recently it has been reported that the wakefulness-promoting drug modafinil may relieve fatigue in MS patients and ameliorate the associated cognitive difficulties. However, it is not clear to what extent the anti-fatigue effect of modafinil may be related to its alerting and sympathetic activating effects. We addressed this question by comparing three groups of subjects, MS patients with fatigue, MS patients without fatigue and healthy controls, matched for age and sex, on measures of alertness (self-ratings on the Epworth and Stanford Sleepiness Scales and on a battery of visual analogue scales; critical flicker fusion frequency; Pupillographic Sleepiness Test; choice reaction time) and autonomic function (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pupil diameter), and by examining the effect of a single dose (200 mg) of modafinil on these measures. MS patients with fatigue, compared with healthy controls, had reduced level of alertness on all the tests used; MS patients without fatigue did not differ from healthy controls. MS patients with fatigue had a reduced level of cardiovascular sympathetic activation compared to the other two groups. Modafinil displayed alerting and sympathomimetic effects in all three groups of subjects. As fatigue in MS is associated with reduced levels of alertness and sympathetic activity, modafinil may exert its anti-fatigue effect in MS by correcting these deficiencies. The anti-fatigue effect of modafinil may reflect the activation of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), since there is evidence that this wakefulness

  10. Sexual dysfunction with antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Prisant, L M; Carr, A A; Bottini, P B; Solursh, D S; Solursh, L P

    1994-04-11

    The relationship of antihypertensive drugs have a long history of association with sexual dysfunction; however, this relationship is poorly documented. There appears to be a higher rate of sexual dysfunction in untreated hypertensive men compared with normotensive men. Sexual dysfunction increases with age and is associated with physical and emotional symptoms. There are few studies assessing sexual dysfunction with female and African-American hypertensive patients. Sexual dysfunction is associated with impairment of quality of life and noncompliance. Since group data may hide individual drug effects, baseline data should be collected on all patients before initiating therapy with any antihypertensive agent. Although questionnaires may not provide objective information on sexual dysfunction, the response rate to direct questioning may be less than the response rate on a questionnaire and may be affected by the gender or race of the interviewer. Research protocols using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design should assess sexual dysfunction in men and women in a standardized fashion.

  11. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  12. Exercise therapy for sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Galvão, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the most common, distressing and persistent adverse effects of prostate cancer treatment, and has a profound effect on quality of life for the patient and his partner. Current health-care provisions are inadequate to address the demand for the management of sexual dysfunction, with approximately half of prostate cancer survivors reporting unmet sexual health-care needs. Management strategies predominately involve pharmacological interventions to address the direct physiological effects of prostate cancer treatment on erectile function. However, the aetiology of sexual dysfunction is multifaceted and considerable physiological and psychological adverse effects of prostate cancer treatments, which are not addressed by pharmacological intervention, contribute to sexual dysfunction. Exercise has established efficacy for improving many of these factors in men with prostate cancer, including changes in body composition (especially to counteract body feminization), fatigue, physical function, risk of comorbid conditions, depression, anxiety and quality of life. Emerging evidence indicates that exercise also has a positive effect on sexual desire and sexual activity in men with prostate cancer.

  13. [Somatic comorbidities in irritable bowel syndrome: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and interstitial cystitis].

    PubMed

    Mathieu, N

    2009-02-01

    Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and interstitial cystitis frequently overlap with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There is a positive correlation between the incidence of these comorbidities and increased health care seeking, reduction in quality of life, and higher levels of mood disorders, which raises the question of a common underlying pathophysiology. A possible central hypersensitization disorder seems to be particularly involved in the dysfunction of bidirectional neural pathways and viscerovisceral cross-interactions within the CNS, thus explaining these many extraintestinal manifestations in IBS.

  14. Fatigue as it Affects Nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.In this month's article from the January 1935 issue, Lillian M. Gilbreth, a highly respected psychologist and industrial engineer, examines the problem of fatigue in nursing. A nonnurse expert, Gilbreth notes the negative effects of fatigue on skills, a problem "enormously more serious when the product of the work is human comfort and sometimes even human life, as it often is with the work of the nurse." In their article in this issue, "Health Care Worker Fatigue," Lea Anne Gardner and Deborah Dubeck of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority share examples of fatigue-related adverse events and discuss the need for both personal and institutional fatigue risk management strategies.

  15. Apoptosis in immune-mediated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sankari, S. Leena; Babu, N. Aravindha; Rajesh, E.; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a significant role in both the physiological and pathological process. A dysfunctional apoptotic system can lead to either excessive removal or prolonged survival of cells. Therefore, dysregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of immunological diseases. The present review aims to provide an overview regarding role of apoptosis in immune-mediated disease. PMID:26015710

  16. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  17. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes.

  18. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature.

  19. Fatigue life of laser cut metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted to determine the actual reduction in fatigue life due to weight removal for balancing by: hand grinding, low power (20 watt) Nd:glass laser, and high power (400 watt) Nd:YAG laser.

  20. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  1. Exercise Helps Counter Cancer-Linked Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... and physical activity for the ACS. She said exercise has many benefits, not just helping to ease fatigue. "But because ... fatigue and gain some of the many other benefits of exercise [both during and after treatment]: reduced stress, less ...

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Who's at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Who's at Risk? More ... explore this possibility Related Links Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Print page View page in: Español (Spanish) ...

  3. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  4. Dysfunctional voiding in adults.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Stav, Kobi

    2013-05-01

    Dysfunctional voiding is characterized by an intermittent and/or fluctuating flow rate due to involuntary intermittent contractions of the periurethral striated or levator muscles during voiding in neurologically normal women (International Continence Society definition). Due to the variable etiology, the diagnosis and treatment of DV is problematic. Frequently, the diagnosis is done at a late stage mainly due to non-specific symptoms and lack of awareness. The objectives of treatment are to normalize micturition patterns and prevent complications such as renal failure and recurrent infections. Treatment should be started as early as possible and a multidisciplinary approach is beneficial.

  5. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population.

  6. Depression and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Makhlouf, Antoine; Kparker, Ashay; Niederberger, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) clearly are associated. Although urologists and psychiatrists have long recognized that antidepressant medications affect erectile function negatively, the interplay between the two conditions remains underappreciated. Psychiatrists may be reluctant to question a patient in detail about ED, and urologists seldom perform a formal assessment of the presence of depression in patients who have ED. This article gives a quick overview of the relationship between these two conditions and provides the clinician with the knowledge required to effectively manage ED with comorbid depression.

  7. Peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD: lower limbs versus upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Malaguti, Carla; Corso, Simone Dal

    2011-01-01

    In patients with COPD, the degree of functional impairment appears to differ between the upper and lower limbs. Significant dyspnea and fatigue have been reported by these patients when performing tasks with unsupported upper limbs and two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this fact: neuromechanical dysfunction of respiratory muscles; and changes in lung volume during such activities. The neuromechanical dysfunction seen in COPD patients during this type of exercise is related to changes in the breathing pattern, as well as to the simultaneity of afferent and efferent muscle stimuli, resulting in respiratory muscle asynchrony. In addition, the increased ventilation during upper limb exercise in patients with COPD leads to dynamic hyperinflation at different workloads. During lower limb exercises, the strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle is lower in COPD patients than in healthy subjects. This could by explained by abnormal muscle metabolism (decreased aerobic capacity), dependence on glycolytic metabolism, and rapid accumulation of lactate during exercise. In comparison with lower limb exercises, upper limb exercises result in higher metabolic and ventilatory demands, as well as in a more intense sensation of dyspnea and greater fatigue. Because there are differences between the upper and lower limb muscles in terms of the morphological and functional adaptations in COPD patients, specific protocols for strength training and endurance should be developed and tested for the corresponding muscle groups.

  8. Investigations Concerning Cavitation and Frost Fatigue in Clonal 84K Poplar Using High-Resolution Cavitron Measurements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Feng; Ding, Fei; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Both drought and freezing-thawing of stems induce a loss of hydraulic conductivity (percentage loss of conductivity [PLC]) in woody plants. Drought-induced PLC is often accompanied by physical damage to pit membranes, causing a shift in vulnerability curves (cavitation fatigue). Hence, if cavitated stems are flushed to remove embolisms, the next vulnerability curve is different (shifted to lower tensions). The 84K poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) clone has small vessels that should be immune from frost-induced PLC, but results demonstrated that freezing-thawing in combination with tension synergistically increased PLC. Frost fatigue has already been defined, which is similar to cavitation fatigue but induced by freezing. Frost fatigue caused a transition from a single to a dual Weibull curve, but drought-fatigued stems had single Weibull curves shifted to lower tensions. Studying the combined impact of tension plus freezing on fatigue provided evidence that the mechanism of frost fatigue may be the extra water tension induced by freezing or thawing while spinning stems in a centrifuge rather than direct ice damage. A hypothesis is advanced that tension is enhanced as ice crystals grow or melt during the freeze or thaw event, respectively, causing a nearly identical fatigue event to that induced by drought. PMID:25786827

  9. Investigations concerning cavitation and frost fatigue in clonal 84K poplar using high-resolution cavitron measurements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Ding, Fei; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-05-01

    Both drought and freezing-thawing of stems induce a loss of hydraulic conductivity (percentage loss of conductivity [PLC]) in woody plants. Drought-induced PLC is often accompanied by physical damage to pit membranes, causing a shift in vulnerability curves (cavitation fatigue). Hence, if cavitated stems are flushed to remove embolisms, the next vulnerability curve is different (shifted to lower tensions). The 84K poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) clone has small vessels that should be immune from frost-induced PLC, but results demonstrated that freezing-thawing in combination with tension synergistically increased PLC. Frost fatigue has already been defined, which is similar to cavitation fatigue but induced by freezing. Frost fatigue caused a transition from a single to a dual Weibull curve, but drought-fatigued stems had single Weibull curves shifted to lower tensions. Studying the combined impact of tension plus freezing on fatigue provided evidence that the mechanism of frost fatigue may be the extra water tension induced by freezing or thawing while spinning stems in a centrifuge rather than direct ice damage. A hypothesis is advanced that tension is enhanced as ice crystals grow or melt during the freeze or thaw event, respectively, causing a nearly identical fatigue event to that induced by drought.

  10. Innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Revillard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    For more than half a century immunological research has been almost exclusively orientated towards the acquired immune response and the mechanisms of immune tolerance. Major discoveries have enabled us to better understand the functioning of the specific immune system: the structure of antibody molecules, the genetic mechanisms leading to the molecular diversity of B (BCR) and T (TCR) lymphocyte antigen receptors, the biological function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the presentation of peptides to alpha/beta receptor bearing T lymphocytes, the processes of positive and negative selection of lymphocytes during the course of their differentiation. The major role of specific or acquired immunity has been shown by the rapidly lethal character of severe combined immune deficiency diseases and various alterations in the mechanisms of tolerance have been proposed to explain the chronic inflammatory illnesses which are considered to be auto-immune. Natural or innate immunity has been known since the first description of an inflammatory reaction attributed to Cornelius Celsus. It entered into the scientific era at the end of the 19th century with the discovery of phagocytes by Metchnikoff and of the properties of the complement system by Bordet [1] but due to the vastness of the field and its lack of clear definition, it failed to excite the interest of researchers. The discovery of cytokines and progress in knowledge of the mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction have certainly helped to banish preconceived ideas about natural immunity, which was wrongly labelled as non-specific. This has led to the proposition of a wider role for immune functions beyond the level of the cell or the organism [2] and to a better understanding of the importance of the immediate defence mechanisms and their role in the later orientation of the acquired response.

  11. Fatigue Damage in Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelta, D.; Miravete, A.

    2002-02-01

    The phenomenon of fatigue is critical for designing structures including elements made of composite materials. The accurate prediction of the life and fatigue resistance of laminated composites is one of the subjects of inquiry in materials science. The ability of predicting the life of laminates is important for designing, operation, and safety analysis of a composite structure under specific conditions. To predict reliably the life of structures, it is necessary to know the mechanisms of cyclic deformation and damage. It is also necessary to develop a qualitative theory of fatigue failure that should be based on the concepts of solids mechanics. Developing such a theory requires to evaluate the microscopic parameters and the macroscopic variables of the material at the level of a laminate and the structure and to determine exactly the load modes acting on the system.

  12. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  13. Activation and Exhaustion of Adaptive Immune Cells in Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dimpu; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti; Biswas, Dipankar; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-09-01

    In hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the immune reaction is responsible for viral clearance and preventing their spread within the host. However, the immune system is dysfunctional in patients with chronic HBV infection, leading to an inadequate immune response against the virus. A major factor contributing to inefficient immune function is the phenomenon of immune exhaustion. Hence, understanding immune activation and exhaustion during HBV infection is important, as it would provide insight in developing immunotherapy to control chronic HBV infection. The aim of this review is to highlight the existing information on immune effector functions and immune exhaustion in response to HBV infection.

  14. Fatigue and Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiest, Kirsten M.; Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; McKay, Kyla A.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fatigue is commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comorbidity is also common in MS, but its association with the presence of fatigue or fatigue changes over time is poorly understood. Methods: Nine hundred forty-nine people with definite MS were recruited from four Canadian centers. The Fatigue Impact Scale for Daily Use and a validated comorbidity questionnaire were completed at three visits over 2 years. Participants were classified into groups with no fatigue versus any fatigue. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between fatigue and each comorbidity at baseline, year 1, year 2, and overall. Results: The incidence of fatigue during the study was 38.8%. The prevalence of fatigue was greater in those who were older (P = .0004), had a longer time since symptom onset (P = .005), and had greater disability (P < .0001). After adjustment, depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–3.27), irritable bowel syndrome (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.18–2.48), migraine (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.27–2.27), and anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.15–2.16) were independently associated with fatigue that persisted during the study. There was also an individual-level effect of depression on worsening fatigue (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08–2.07). Conclusions: Comorbidity is associated with fatigue in MS. Depression is associated with fatigue and with increased risk of worsening fatigue over 2 years. However, other comorbid conditions commonly associated with MS are also associated with persistent fatigue, even after accounting for depression. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms by which comorbidities influence fatigue. PMID:27134583

  15. Fatigue Lives Of Laser-Cut Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue lives made to approach those attainable by traditional grinding methods. Fatigue-test specimens prepared from four metallic alloys, and material removed from specimens by manual grinding, by Nd:glass laser, and by Nd:YAG laser. Results of fatigue tests of all specimens indicated reduction of fatigue strengths of laser-fired specimens. Laser machining holds promise for improved balancing of components of gas turbines.

  16. Effect of Load History on Fatigue Life.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    A number of different loading histories will be investigated to determine their effects on constant amplitude fatigue properties of the selected...previous test results, and at each of the two R ratios. The effect of overloads on constant ampli- tude fatigue life and damage will be investigated ...be investigated . 5.1 FATIGUE TEST RESULTS Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at four R ratios (+0.5, 0.0, -0.5, -1.0) using the

  17. Study of the Neurophysiology of Central Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-05

    objective cognitive fatigue using event related potentials (ERPs). 2) To determine the neurophysiologic mechanisms underlying objective cognitive fatigue ...Study of the Neurophysiology of Central Fatigue The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 cognitive, fatigue , fatigability

  18. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  19. [Clinical reasoning and decision making in clinical practice: a boy with fatigue and abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    van Os, Erim; Noordam, Cees; Hart, W Peter; Draaisma, Jos M T

    2009-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with fatigue and abdominal pain. Laboratory tests revealed a primary hypothyroidism with circulating auto-antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO), anaemia and an elevated level of creatine kinase (CK). A diagnosis of auto-immune hypothyroidism with associated anaemia and myopathy was made. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy was started. However, six months later, he still complained of fatigue. He had unexpectedly varying thyroid function tests and the anaemia and the elevated level of CK persisted. Analysis of the other hormonal axes demonstrated a secondary adrenal insufficiency which was treated with hydrocortisone suppletion therapy. If a patient suffering from hypothyroidism does not respond appropriately to therapy or even deteriorates, adrenal insufficiency should always be considered. Patients with one type of auto-immune endocrinopathy have a greater risk at developing other types of auto-immune endocrinopathies.

  20. Fatigue-Resistant Photochromic Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Nori Y. C.

    1989-03-01

    The optical switching properties of a photochromic spirooxazine compound in retrofit polyester film and in poly (vinyl butyral) have been measured. The light fatigue resistance of these two optical switching elements were tested by an accelerated method. The length of photochromic activity of the optical switching elements can be improved by various organonickel and hindered amine light stabilizers. The effectiveness and optimal concentration for each light stabilizer in these host materials has been determined. These two types of light stabilizers act synergistically in improving the light fatigue resistance of the optical switching elements significantly.

  1. The problem of alarm fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Up to 99 percent of alarms sounding on hospital units are false alarms signaling no real danger to patients. These false alarms can lead to alarm fatigue and alarm burden, and may divert health care providers' attention away from significant alarms heralding actual or impending harm. As the health care environment continues to become more dependent upon technological monitoring devices used for patient care, nurses must become aware of the possibility and consequences of alarm fatigue and ways to prevent it from negatively affecting their practice, as well as the possible consequences for patient care.

  2. Capturing Uncertainty in Fatigue Life Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    Several parameters can be investigated in fatigue testing . Factors such as loading, specimen geometry, material behavior, and thermal or chemical...of time they have spent with me discussing material sciences, fatigue testing , and their modeling efforts. Finally, a considerable amount of thanks...pricing structures for insurance policies. In fatigue , engineers can characterize metal alloys, quantify material responses to testing conditions, and

  3. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  4. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  5. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  6. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  7. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fatigue strength. 23.627 Section 23.627... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  9. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue strength. 23.627 Section 23.627... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  10. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fatigue strength. 23.627 Section 23.627... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  11. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue strength. 23.627 Section 23.627... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  12. Managing female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Buster, John E

    2013-10-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) range from short-term aggravations to major emotional disturbances adversely affecting family and workplace. This review highlights diagnosis and management of the four most widely diagnosed FSDs. It initially focuses on hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) as a driving force at the heart of all other FSDs; nothing happens without sexual desire. Successful resolution of HSDD frequently facilitates resolution of other disorders. Central to understanding HSDD is the impact of aging female sexual endocrinology and its effect on both prevalence and expression patterns of FSD. Advances in this field have enabled introduction of some the most effective treatments yet described for HSDD. Sexual arousal disorder, though commonly affected by the same factors as HSDD, is heavily associated with psychotropic drugs and mood elevators. Orgasmic disorder is frequently the downstream result of other sexual dysfunctions, particularly HSDD, or the result of a major psychosexual trauma. Successful management of the underlying disorder often resolves orgasmic disorder. Sexual pain disorder is frequently the result of a gynecologic disorder, such as endometriosis, that can be substantially managed through successful treatment of that disorder. This article ends with the article's most important note: how to initiate the conversation.

  13. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M. J.; Coursin, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), though newly described, has manifested itself in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for several decades. As the name implies, it is a syndrome in which more than one organ system fails. Failure of these multiple organ systems may or may not be related to the initial injury or disease process for which the patient was admitted to the ICU. MODS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in current ICU practice. While the pathophysiology of MODS is not completely known, much evidence indicates that, during the initial injury which precipitates ICU admission, a chain of events is initiated which results in activation of several endogenous metabolic pathways. These pathways release compounds which, in and of themselves, are usually cytoprotective. However, an over exuberant activation of these endogenous systems results in an inflammatory response which can lead to development of failure in distant organs. As these organs fail, they activate and propagate the systemic inflammatory response. No therapy has proven entirely efficacious at modulating this inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of MODS. In current ICU practice, treatment is focused on prevention and treating individual organ dysfunction as it develops. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of MODS therapy will come newer modalities which inhibit or interfere with the propagation of the endogenous systemic inflammatory response. These newer therapies hold great promise and already some are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:7825351

  14. [Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Solanas, M

    1999-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a clinical situation that has been described as a result of the rapid progress and advances that have been made in recent decades in the physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic support of critically ill patients. In 1991, in view of the confusing terminology used to characterize processes coursing with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a consensus conference was held. A series of basic definitions were established and the term "multiple organ failure" was replace by MODS. In response to outside aggression, the organism tries to defend itself with two mechanisms: a non-specific humoral and cellular response called inflammation, and a specific antigenic response that modifies the genetic codes of cells of the defense system and constitutes an immunological response. At present it is thought that the inflammatory response is activated (SIRS) in response to an uncontrolled aggression, but an antiinflammatory response syndrome (ARS) exists as well. An exaggerated SIRS can lead to MODS. MODS usually debuts with pulmonary dysfunction. If the aggression persists, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, coagulation, central nervous system, gastrointestinal metabolism, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal failure follow. A series of causes often trigger this syndrome and certain factors favor it. Prevention of these causes and factors in fundamental for controlling the occurrence of MODS. At present, there is no clear treatment for MODS, although numerous studies designed to block the release of certain proinflammatory mediators or to neutralize antiinflammatory responses are being carried out.

  15. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED.

  16. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  17. The Clinical Spectrum of Isolated Peripheral Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Alan B.; Arnold, W. David; Elsheikh, Bakri; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated peripheral motor dysfunction due to lower motor neuron or peripheral nerve disorders presents an interesting challenge to clinicians because of the diverse differential diagnosis with a broad range of prognoses. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of adults who presented over 12 years with muscle weakness, atrophy, or fasciculations, but without hyperreflexia or sensory involvement. Results In 119 patients, 52% had a motor neuron disease (MND), 13% had immune neuropathies, 11% had genetic neuronopathies, 10% had residual or post-polio syndrome, 5% had benign fasciculation, 1% had an infectious etiology, and 8% were not given a final diagnosis. Only MND patients had cognitive dysfunction or frontal release signs. Bulbar and respiratory symptoms virtually excluded consideration of immune neuropathy. Conclusions Only half of the patients were diagnosed with MND. A significant minority have treatable conditions. Cognitive involvement, frontal release signs, and bulbar or respiratory symptoms are strongly suggestive of MND. PMID:25042002

  18. Cancer immune cycle: a video introduction to the interaction between cancer and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S; Thallinger, Christiane; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2016-01-01

    This educational video discusses and visualises the key steps of the complex interaction between cancer and the immune system. Essential steps of the cancer immune cycle take place in the tumour itself and in regional lymph nodes, with immune cells travelling between these distinct sites. Antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells migrate into the tumour microenvironment and take up tumour antigens. Antigen-presenting cells travel to regional lymph nodes, where they present the tumour antigens to naïve T cells in order to initiate a tumour-specific T cell response. Activated tumour-specific T cells multiply by clonal expansion and enter the blood flow and travel from the regional lymph node to the tumour site. As soon as activated T cells arrive at the tumor site they start a tumour-specific immune response. Co-inhibitory receptors modulate the immune response and may be exploited by tumour cells to escape immunological destruction. In summary, the cancer immune cycle involves several pivotal steps that are essential for generation of a successful specific antitumour immune response. Importantly, dysfunction of a single step may interrupt the entire cycle, thus impairing the immune-mediated control of tumour growth. Immune modulatory therapies such as vaccines or immune checkpoint modulators target specific steps of the cancer immune cycle with the ultimate aim of facilitating an antitumour immune response.

  19. Fatigue biomarker index: an objective salivary measure of fatigue level.

    PubMed

    Michael, Darren J; Daugherty, Sheena; Santos, Adrienne; Ruby, Brent C; Kalns, John E

    2012-03-01

    Fatigue changed the composition of the small-molecular weight (sMW) proteome of saliva during a 10h session of moderate (70% of maximum ventilatory threshold) physical exertion. Saliva samples were collected from nine recreationally trained cyclists participating in a cross-over study designed to simulate prolonged manual labor, a military operation or wildfire-suppression work. During each hour of the study, participants performed an exercise program that included upper and lower body exercises separated by short periods of recovery. Over the course of the study, fatigue level increased as suggested by a significant increase in the participants' relative perceived exertion. The composition of the sMW proteome was investigated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography with mass-spectrometric detection. Isotopes of acetic anhydride were used for mass-specific labeling of samples and subsequent identification of ions with significant changes in intensity. Cluster analysis was used to identify a pair of peptides with concentrations that changed in opposite directions with fatigue level, i.e. concentration of one peptide increased while concentration of the other decreased. The sequences of the two peptides were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The ratio of the ion intensities of these two peptides, referred to as the fatigue biomarker index, was calculated for subjects throughout the study. The FBI values from the start of the study likely arose from a different distribution than the FBI values measured at the end of the study (Mann-Whitney test, P<.05). While this study is restricted to a small population of recreationally trained cyclists performing exercise under controlled conditions, it holds promise for the development of an objective salivary measurement of fatigue that is applicable to a much broader population performing in uncontrolled environments.

  20. Intermittent and graded exercise effects on NK cell degranulation markers LAMP-1/LAMP-2 and CD8(+)CD38(+) in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Suzanne; Coutts, Rosanne

    2017-03-01

    There is substantial evidence of immune system dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) but little is understood of exercise training effects on lymphocyte function in this illness. This study investigated whether graded and intermittent exercise improved CD8(+) lymphocyte activation and natural killer cell degranulation markers compared to no exercise. Twenty-four chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients (50.2 ± 10 year) were randomized to graded exercise (GE), intermittent exercise (IE) or usual care (UC) groups; a control group (CTL) of 18 matched sedentary non-CFS/ME participants were included for immunological variable comparisons. Main outcome measures were pre- and postintervention expression of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD38(+) and CD3(-)CD16(+)56(+)CD107a(+) (LAMP-1) CD107b(+) (LAMP-2) and aerobic exercise capacity. The postintervention percentage of NK cells expressing LAMP-1 and -2 was significantly higher in IE compared to UC, and higher in GE compared to UC and CTL LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 expression (absolute numbers and percent positive) increased significantly pre-to-postintervention for both GE and IE Preintervention, the absolute number of CD8(+)CD38(+) cells was significantly lower in CTL compared to UC and IE There were no significant pre- to postintervention changes in CD8(+)CD38(+) expression for any group. Aerobic exercise capacity was significantly improved by GE and IE Twelve weeks of GE and IE increased the expression of NK cell activation and degranulation markers, suggesting enhanced immunosurveillance. Low-intensity exercise may also reduce CD8(+)CD38(+) expression, a marker of inflammation. Both GE and IE improved exercise capacity without worsening CFS/ME symptoms, and more robust trials of these exercise modalities are warranted.

  1. Fatigue Fighters in Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help you with tasks. Ask friends and family members to be prepared to do one or two chores for you on your fatigue days. Give them specific instructions in advance and be reasonable with your expectations. Get at least eight hours of sleep every ...

  2. Muscular fatigue: considerations for dance.

    PubMed

    Wyon, Matthew A; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Muscular fatigue can be defined as the failure to maintain an expected power output. It is a multifaceted phenomenon that incorporates metabolic, neural and neuromuscular components, among others. Metabolic causes of fatigue are associated with the ability to maintain energy supply during exercise, the speed at which homeostasis is achieved post-exercise, and the effects of high intensity exercise by-products on the peripheral neuromuscular system. Research has indicated that the central nervous system plays a protective role in preventing catastrophic muscle damage by reducing the intensity and frequency of propagation founded on biofeedback from the muscle cells. The duration and particularly the type of physical activity play a role in the development of muscle fatigue, with impact or weightbearing exercises, such as dance, producing increased symptoms compared to non-impact or non-weightbearing equivalents. The effects of prolonged exercise and the associated increased levels of muscle fatigue that may lead to compromises in neuromuscular propagation need to be considered in dance.

  3. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  4. "Holocaust Fatigue" in Teaching Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweber, Simone

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the problems faced by educators in teaching about the Holocaust. She relates that because the Holocaust is now frequently taught in middle schools and in upper elementary grades, by the time it is taught in high schools, students will experience "Holocaust fatigue." As such, teachers face the challenge of…

  5. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  6. Ultrasonic absortion in fatigued materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, S.; Arnold, W.

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of fatigue damage, allowing an estimate of the residual life-time of components, could contribute to a safe and reliable operation of components and installations. Ultrasonic absorption, i.e. the internal friction, of a material increases with increasing fatigue or creep damage and there are many theories trying to explain the physics behind this phenomenon. Measurement of ultrasonic absorption directly on components could provide information on the degree of damage. A laser ultrasonic method, using laser-generated pulses and optical detection, was applied to study ultrasonic absorption in fatigue specimens of different metals. A characteristic behavior of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient with increasing levels of fatigue damage was found for the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Another aim of this study was to relate the absorption mechanisms to the behavior of ultrasonic absorption observed in metals with complex microstructure. To achieve this, different ultrasonic absorption mechanisms were analyzed with respect to experimental data. A thermoelastic effect related to the size and elasticity of the microstructure is discussed as the origin of the increased ultrasonic absorption.

  7. Psychotropics and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction (SD) is common in patients taking antipsychotics, and is the most bothersome symptom and adverse drug effect compromising treatment compliance. Mechanisms involved in psychotropics–induced SD are either largely unknown or poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an updated analysis of SD associated with the use of psychotropic drugs in psychiatric patients. Results Contemporary evidence from available studies demonstrates that SD rates are drug–related rather than drug–class specific, and that these rates vary widely. Mechanisms involved in psychotropics–induced SD are either largely unknown or poorly understood. Our understanding of psychotropics–induced SD is limited by the inability to differentiate whether these effects are really drug–induced or due to different inclusion criteria. Conclusions Rigorous research, basic and clinical, is needed to understand the exact incidence, severity and mechanisms involved in the development of SD induced by various psychotropic treatment regimens. PMID:24757547

  8. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome.

  9. Fatigue and Psychological Distress: A Case Study Among Shift Workers of an Iranian Petrochemical Plant, During 2013, in Bushehr

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Yahya; Bazazan, Ahmad; Safaiyan, Abdolrasoul; Dianat, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shift work is a well-recognized occupational health hazard in both industrialized and industrially developing countries. Prolonged working time, day/night shift rotation, circadian rhythm and sleep disorders, family and social problems are the most important features of shift working, which have serious complications. Objectives: The present study evaluated the fatigue and psychological distress and their relationship among shift workers, in a petrochemical plant (Southern Pars gas field) in Southwest Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional field study, 400 shift workers from a plant were involved, with participation rate of 72.5% (290 persons). The multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) and general health questionnaire (GHQ-28) were used to evaluate the level of fatigue and psychological distress, respectively. Results: The results showed that the fatigue and psychological distress (particularly social dysfunction, anxiety and insomnia) are frequent among 12-hour shift workers (the total MFI and total GHQ scores were 42.68 ± 17.88 and 34.66 ± 18.56). A relatively strong positive correlation was found between fatigue and psychological distress (r = 0.62). The results of the stepwise regression model indicated that the psychological distress was significantly related only to general fatigue, mental fatigue and reduced motivation, whereas it was not to the physical fatigue and reduced activity. Conclusions: The study findings highlight the importance of the mental aspect of fatigue in this working group. These results have possible implications for workers’ health and well-being and for the design of shift work systems, for industrial workers. PMID:26568862

  10. The nature of self-regulatory fatigue and “ego depletion”: Lessons from physical fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Daniel R.; Boggero, Ian A.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation requires overriding a dominant response, and leads to temporary self-regulatory fatigue. Existing theories of the nature and causes of self-regulatory fatigue highlight physiological substrates such as glucose or psychological processes such as motivation, but these explanations are incomplete on their own. Historically, theories of physical fatigue demonstrate a similar pattern of useful but incomplete explanations, as recent views of physical fatigue emphasize the roles of both physiological and psychological factors. In addition to accounting for multiple inputs, these newer views also explain how fatigue can occur even in the presence of sufficient resources. Examining these newer theories of physical fatigue can serve as a foundation on which to build a more comprehensive understanding of self-regulatory fatigue that integrates possible neurobiological underpinnings of physical and self-regulatory fatigue, and suggests the possible function of self-regulatory fatigue. PMID:26228914

  11. Fatigue in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Poynard, T; Cacoub, P; Ratziu, V; Myers, R P; Dezailles, M H; Mercadier, A; Ghillani, P; Charlotte, F; Piette, J C; Moussalli, J

    2002-07-01

    In numerous studies of symptoms in patients with chronic hepatitis C there has been no systematic assessment of both fatigue and extrahepatic manifestations. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of fatigue in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and to identify associations between fatigue and clinical and biological hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations. We studied 1614 patients. Data were prospectively recorded during the first visit of patients infected with HCV and the prevalence of fatigue and its association with dermatological, rheumatological, neurological and nephrological manifestations; diabetes; arterial hypertension; auto-antibodies, and cryoglobulinaemia were assessed. Then, using multivariate analysis, we identified demographic, biochemical, immunological, virological, and histological factors associated with the presence of fatigue. Fatigue was present in 53% of patients (95% confidence interval 51-56). In 17% of patients (95% confidence interval 15-19) fatigue was severe, impairing activity. Five other extrahepatic manifestations had a prevalence above 10% including, in decreasing order: arthralgia, paresthesia, myalgia, pruritus, and sicca syndrome. In univariate and multivariate analyses, fatigue, in comparison with the absence of fatigue, was associated with female gender, age over 50 years, cirrhosis, depression and purpura. Independent of these associations, fatigue was associated with arthralgia, myalgia, paresthesia, sicca syndrome and pruritus. The prevalence of fibromyalgia (as defined by the association of fatigue with arthralgia or myalgia) was 19% (95% confidence interval 17-21). There was no significant association between fatigue and the following characteristics: viral load or genotype, alcohol consumption, abnormal thyroid function, and type and level of cryoglobulinaemia. Hence, fatigue is the most frequent extrahepatic manifestation in patients infected with HCV. Fatigue is independently associated with female

  12. Adipose tissue immunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-10-02

    Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching toward M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumor growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumor cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumor microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoral drugs.

  13. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF): two "fatigue" syndromes with overlapping symptoms and possibly related aetiologies.

    PubMed

    Rovigatti, Ugo

    2012-12-01

    In July 2010, at the Muscle Fatigue Meeting, I presented an overview of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Cancer Related Fatigue, emphasizing a critical interpretation of the potential association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Cancer Related Fatigue and a newly discovered retrovirus: Xenotropic Murine Related Virus. Since this association was hotly debated at that time, I suggested at the Meeting that it was wrong and most likely due to the identification of the wrong virus culprit. Today, 20 months after the Meeting, the first part of our prediction has turned out to be correct, as Xenotropic Murine Related Virus was shown to be a laboratory-created artefact. Still, the potential association of fatigue-syndromes with an infection (most likely viral) is sustained by a plethora of evidence and this overview will initially summarize data suggesting prior viral infection(s). The principal hypothesized mechanisms for both peripheral and central Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Cancer Related Fatigue will be then summarized, also indicating plausible associations and triggering factors. All evidence accrued so far suggests that further research work should be performed in this interesting area and in order to identify an infectious agent for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Cancer Related Fatigue. One candidate RNA virus, Micro-Foci inducing Virus, will be described in this overview.

  14. Dysfunctional stress responses in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; Picard, Pascale; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Many dysfunctional and chronic pain conditions overlap. This review describes the different modes of chronic deregulation of the adaptive response to stress which may be a common factor for these conditions. Several types of dysfunction can be identified within the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis: basal hypercortisolism, hyper-reactivity, basal hypocortisolism and hypo-reactivity. Neuroactive steroid synthesis is another component of the adaptive response to stress. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form DHEA-S, and progesterone and its derivatives are synthetized in cutaneous, nervous, and adipose cells. They are neuroactive factors that act locally. They may have a role in the localization of the symptoms and their levels can vary both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Persistent changes in neuroactive steroid levels or precursors can induce localized neurodegeneration. The autonomic nervous system is another component of the stress response. Its dysfunction in chronic stress responses can be expressed by decreased basal parasympathethic activity, increased basal sympathetic activity or sympathetic hyporeactivity to a stressful stimulus. The immune and genetic systems also participate. The helper-T cells Th1 secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whereas Th2 secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IGF-10, IL-13. Chronic deregulation of the Th1/Th2 balance can occur in favor of anti- or pro-inflammatory direction, locally or systemically. Individual vulnerability to stress can be due to environmental factors but can also be genetically influenced. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics are the main keys to understanding the influence of genetics on the response of individuals to constraints.

  15. Chronic fatigue syndrome and circulating cytokines: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blundell, S; Ray, K K; Buckland, M; White, P D

    2015-11-01

    There has been much interest in the role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), as CFS may develop following an infection and cytokines are known to induce acute sickness behaviour, with similar symptoms to CFS. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines, a search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Embase and PsycINFO, for CFS related-terms in combination with cytokine-related terms. Cases had to meet established criteria for CFS and be compared with healthy controls. Papers retrieved were assessed for both inclusionary criteria and quality. 38 papers met the inclusionary criteria. The quality of the studies varied. 77 serum or plasma cytokines were measured without immune stimulation. Cases of CFS had significantly elevated concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in five out of eight (63%) studies. No other cytokines were present in abnormal concentrations in the majority of studies, although insufficient data were available for some cytokines. Following physical exercise there were no differences in circulating cytokine levels between cases and controls and exercise made no difference to already elevated TGF-β concentrations. The finding of elevated TGF-β concentration, at biologically relevant levels, needs further exploration, but circulating cytokines do not seem to explain the core characteristic of post-exertional fatigue.

  16. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  17. Probabilistic fatigue methodology for six nines reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Bartlett, F. D., Jr.; Elber, Wolf

    1990-01-01

    Fleet readiness and flight safety strongly depend on the degree of reliability that can be designed into rotorcraft flight critical components. The current U.S. Army fatigue life specification for new rotorcraft is the so-called six nines reliability, or a probability of failure of one in a million. The progress of a round robin which was established by the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Subcommittee for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance is reviewed to investigate reliability-based fatigue methodology. The participants in this cooperative effort are in the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM) and the rotorcraft industry. One phase of the joint activity examined fatigue reliability under uniquely defined conditions for which only one answer was correct. The other phases were set up to learn how the different industry methods in defining fatigue strength affected the mean fatigue life and reliability calculations. Hence, constant amplitude and spectrum fatigue test data were provided so that each participant could perform their standard fatigue life analysis. As a result of this round robin, the probabilistic logic which includes both fatigue strength and spectrum loading variability in developing a consistant reliability analysis was established. In this first study, the reliability analysis was limited to the linear cumulative damage approach. However, it is expected that superior fatigue life prediction methods will ultimately be developed through this open AHS forum. To that end, these preliminary results were useful in identifying some topics for additional study.

  18. Disease, dysfunction, and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2014-08-01

    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield's hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research in synthetic biology. In particular, I argue that the possibility of artifactual organisms and the case of oncomice and other bred or genetically modified strains of organism constitute a significant objection to Wakefield's etiological account of the dysfunction requirement. I then develop a new alternative understanding of the dysfunction requirement that builds on the organizational theory of function. I conclude that my suggestion is superior to Wakefield's theory because it (a) can accommodate both artifactual and naturally evolved organisms, (b) avoids the possibility of there being a conflict between what an organismic part is supposed to do and the health of the organism, and (c) provides a nonarbitrary and practical way of determining whether dysfunction occurs.

  19. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  20. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Harrison, David G

    2014-03-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We and others have shown that mice lacking adaptive immune cells, including recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice and rats and mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension to stimuli such as ANG II, high salt, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Agonistic antibodies to the ANG II receptor, produced by B cells, contribute to hypertension in experimental models of preeclampsia. The central nervous system seems important in immune cell activation, because lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle block hypertension and T cell activation in response to ANG II. Likewise, genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and immune cell activation. Current evidence indicates that the production of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-6, contribute to hypertension, likely via effects on both the kidney and vasculature. In addition, the innate immune system also appears to contribute to hypertension. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, production of cytokines, and, ultimately, vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to the augmentation of hypertension. Studies of immune cell activation will clearly be useful in understanding this common yet complex disease.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of Qigong/Tai Chi Easy on Cancer-Related Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Larkey, Linda K.; Roe, Denise J.; Weihs, Karen L.; Jahnke, Roger; Lopez, Ana Maria; Rogers, Carol E.; Oh, Byeongsang; Guillen-Rodriguez, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background Many breast cancer survivors experience fatigue, mood, and sleep disturbances. Purpose To compare a Meditative Movement practice, Qigong/Tai Chi Easy (QG/TCE), with sham Qigong (SQG), testing effects of meditation/breath aspects of QG/TCE on breast cancer survivors' persistent fatigue and other symptoms. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled trial tested 12-weeks of QG/TCE versus SQG on fatigue, depression and sleep among 87 post-menopausal, fatigued breast cancer survivors, Stage 0-III, age 40–75. Results Fatigue decreased significantly in the QG/TCE group compared to control at post-intervention (p = 0.005) and 3 month follow-up (p = 0.024), but not depression and sleep quality. Improvement occurred over time for both interventions in depression and sleep quality (all p < 0.05). Conclusions QG/TCE showed significant improvement over time compared to SQG for fatigue, but not depression or sleep. Both QG/TCE and SQG showed improvement for two prevalent symptoms among breast cancer survivors, depression and sleep dysfunction. PMID:25124456

  2. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  3. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  4. Markers of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin P.; Melman, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    With the development and marketing of oral pharmacotherapy that is both noninvasive and successful in treating erectile dysfunction (ED), the quest to identify markers of organic ED lost ground. Indeed, the multi-factorial nature of ED may have led many researchers to conclude that searching for a universal marker of ED was futile. However, the realization that ED is strongly correlated with the overall health of men, and may act as a predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, has stimulated interest in identifying genes that can distinguish organic ED. In addition, the potential ability to suggest to the patient that ED is reversible (i.e., psychogenic) with a simple test would be of significance to both the physician and patient, as well as for reimbursement issues for therapy by insurance companies. Such a marker may also act as a non-subjective measure of the degree of ED and the efficacy of treatment. This review discusses the importance of identifying such markers and recent work identifying potential markers in human patients. PMID:19468461

  5. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area.

  6. [Female sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Luria, Mijal

    2009-09-01

    Female sexual problems are common, frequently overlooked and have a significant impact on the lives of women. Research in the last decade has brought to the understanding and recognition of a number of standpoints, mainly the broad range of normative function. In 2003, the American Urological Association Foundation convened an international committee of experts in the field of women's sexuality, to reconsider the existing definitions of women's sexual dysfunction. Based on the circular response cycle developed by Basson, the group emphasized motivations that might move a woman from being sexually "neutral" to making a decision to be sexual with her partner, as a normative alternative to the need for spontaneous sexual desire as the trigger for sexual behavior. Etiology may stem from medical as well as psychological factors, thus assessment must include a complete evaluation. Treatment includes psycho-education, improvement of interpersonal communication, cognitive behavioral treatment and elucidation and treatment of medical problems, if necessary. Several pharmacological treatments are under investigation, with modest results and uncertainties about their long term safety. This review presents the female sexual response as it is understood today and the current diagnostic and therapeutic understandings and directions.

  7. Review of sonic fatigue technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    From the early-1960s until the mid-1980s, there was very little theoretical development for sonic fatigue prediction. Design nomographs based on simple theoretical models and results of specially designed tests were developed for most common aircraft structures. The use of advanced composites in the 1980s, however, generated an increased interest in development of more sophisticated theoretical models because of the possibilities for a much wider range of structural designs. The purpose of this report is to review sonic fatigue technology and, in particular, to assess recent developments. It also suggests a plan for a coordinated program of theoretical and experimental work to meet the anticipated needs of future aerospace vehicles.

  8. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; John, Sandhya Mary; Unni, Amith

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  9. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    PubMed

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  10. Impact of yoga in a case of vocal cord dysfunction with dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwania, Rozina

    2017-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease presented with shortness of breath induced by exercise and certain odors. She reported the symptoms of autonomic dysfunction including fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, headaches, numbness/tingling in the arms and legs, and exercise intolerance. Vital signs were significant for orthostatic intolerance. Volume flow loop in the pulmonary function tests showed a flattening of the inspiratory portion characteristic of vocal cord dysfunction. Laryngoscopy showed dyskinesia of the left vocal cord, especially after exercise. Multifactorial approach was used including increased fluid intake and breathing exercises. After 6 weeks of breathing and isometric exercises, the patient reported improvement in dyspnea after exercise. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic role of breathing and isometric exercises in the management of vocal cord and autonomic dysfunction. PMID:28149069

  11. Impact of yoga in a case of vocal cord dysfunction with dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Wadhwania, Rozina

    2017-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease presented with shortness of breath induced by exercise and certain odors. She reported the symptoms of autonomic dysfunction including fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, headaches, numbness/tingling in the arms and legs, and exercise intolerance. Vital signs were significant for orthostatic intolerance. Volume flow loop in the pulmonary function tests showed a flattening of the inspiratory portion characteristic of vocal cord dysfunction. Laryngoscopy showed dyskinesia of the left vocal cord, especially after exercise. Multifactorial approach was used including increased fluid intake and breathing exercises. After 6 weeks of breathing and isometric exercises, the patient reported improvement in dyspnea after exercise. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic role of breathing and isometric exercises in the management of vocal cord and autonomic dysfunction.

  12. Biaxial Fatigue Cracking from Notch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-04

    Leevers (reference 11) noticed that the variation in  from 0 to 2 has little effect on the da/dN in PVC ( polyvinyl - chloride ), but reduces the da/dN...under biaxial rotating and bending. Ahmad (reference 2) formulated a model for the biaxial fatigue crack growth in aggressive environment, outlined by...1962, Vol. 90, pp. 238-239. 20. ASM Handbook , Vol. 12 Fractography: 1992, p. 430, 438. 21. Metals Handbook , Vol. 9 Fractography and Atlas of

  13. Electroencephalographic Monitoring of Cognitive Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Montgomery, Richard W.; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Mental exhaustion often poses a serious risk, even when performance is not apparently degraded. When such fatigue is associated with sustained performance of a single type of cognitive task it may be related to the metabolic energy required for sustained activation of cortical fields specialized for that task. The objective of this study was to adapt EEG to monitor cortical energy dissipation at a functionally specialized site over a long period of repetitive performance of a cognitive task.

  14. Dynamic Fatigue of ULE Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) glass is used in a number of applications which require a low thermal expansion coefficient. One such application is telescope mirror elements. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure. Delayed failure, due to stress corrosion can significantly shorten the lifetime of a glass article. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of relations between lifetime, applied stress and failure probability for the material under study. Dynamic fatigue is one method of obtaining the necessary information to develop these relationships. In this study, the dynamic fatigue method was used to construct time-to-failure diagrams for both 230/270 ground and optically polished samples. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing materials with successively smaller grinding media. This resulted in an increase in the strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. There was also an increase in the lifetime due to grinding and polishing. It was found that using the fatigue parameters determined from the 230/270 grit surface are not significantly different from the optically polished values. Although the lower bound of the polished samples is more conservative, neither time-to-failure curves lie beyond the upper or lower bound of the confidence limits. Therefore, designers preferring conservative limits could use samples without residual stress present (polished samples) to determine the fatigue parameters and inert Weibull parameters from samples with the service condition surface, to determine time-to-failure of the optical element.

  15. Fracture and fatigue in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Simone; Dooley, Clodagh; Cristofolini, Luca; Taylor, David

    2014-11-01

    Fatigue is a common mode of mechanical failure which occurs when a material is subjected to repeated cycles at a strain level less than that needed for monotonic fracture. Fatigue has been observed and measured in many different materials but, until recently, not in cells. We devised a novel experiment which allowed us to create both monotonic failure and fatigue in the cellular processes of osteocytes within samples of bone (Dooley et al., European Cells and Materials 2014). In the present paper, we describe the results of further experiments and a computer simulation, which has allowed us to estimate the strain history of each sample tested and thus present, for the first time, strain/life data for cells. Failure occurred during the first cycle at strains of 0.1-0.2; at lower strains failure occurred after a number of cycles which depended inversely on the applied strain range. Scatter in the strain/life data was reduced when we allowed for the effects of mean stress using the Smith-Watson-Topper parameter. We confirmed that aspects of our experimental method (the types of microcrack used and the testing of fresh versus frozen samples) did not affect the results. Such information is useful because many cell types, including the cellular processes of osteocytes, experience cyclic strain in vivo.

  16. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation.

  17. Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Sleep loss and fatigue remain an issue for crewmembers working on the International Space Station, and the ground crews who support them. Schedule shifts on the ISS are required for conducting mission operations. These shifts lead to tasks being performed during the biological night, and sleep scheduled during the biological day, for flight crews and the ground teams who support them. Other stressors have been recognized as hindering sleep in space; these include workload, thinking about upcoming tasks, environmental factors, and inadequate day/night cues. It is unknown if and how other factors such as microgravity, carbon dioxide levels, or increased radiation, may also play a part. Efforts are underway to standardize and provide care for crewmembers, ground controllers and other support personnel. Through collaborations between research and operations, evidenced-based clinical practice guidelines are being developed to equip flight surgeons with the tools and processes needed for treating circadian desynchrony (and subsequent sleep loss) caused by jet lag and shift work. The proper implementation of countermeasures such as schedules, lighting protocols, and cognitive behavioral education can hasten phase shifting, enhance sleep and optimize performance. This panel will focus on Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations. Speakers will present on research-based recommendations and technologies aimed at mitigating sleep loss, circadian desynchronization and fatigue on-orbit. Gaps in current mitigations and future recommendations will also be discussed.

  18. Countering compassion fatigue: a requisite nursing agenda.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Deborah A

    2011-01-31

    Nurses have a longstanding history of witnessing the tragedy experienced by patients and families; however, their own reactions to profound loss and premature death have not been systematically addressed. There is a paucity of research describing interventions to prevent or minimize the ramifications of repeated exposure to traumatic events in the clinical workplace. Compassion fatigue is a contemporary label affixed to the concept of personal vicarious exposure to trauma on a regular basis. Yet this phenomenon of compassion fatigue lacks clarity. In this article, the author begins by describing compassion fatigue and distinguishing compassion fatigue from burnout. Next she discusses risk factors for, and the assessment of compassion fatigue. The need to support nurses who witness tragedy and workplace interventions to confront compassion fatigue are described.

  19. A Pair of Identical Twins Discordant for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Differ in Physiological Parameters and Gut Microbiome Composition

    PubMed Central

    Giloteaux, Ludovic; Hanson, Maureen R.; Keller, Betsy A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: ME/CFS Symptoms: Exertion intolerance • loss of functional capacity • pain • severe fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardiopulmonary exercise test Specialty: Sports Medicine Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) present with profound fatigue, flu-like symptoms, pain, cognitive impairment, orthostatic intolerance, post-exertional malaise (PEM), and exacerbation of some or all of the baseline symptoms. Case Report: We report on a pair of 34-year-old monozygotic twins discordant for ME/CFS, with WELL, the non-affected twin, and ILL, the affected twin. Both twins performed a two-day cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), preand post-exercise blood samples were drawn, and both provided stool samples for biochemical and molecular analyses. At peak exertion for both CPETs, ILL presented lower VO2peak and peak workload compared to WELL. WELL demonstrated normal reproducibility of VO2@ventilatory/anaerobic threshold (VAT) during CPET2, whereas ILL experienced an abnormal reduction of 13% in VAT during CPET2. A normal rise in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, creatinine, and ferritin content was observed following exercise for both WELL and ILL at each CPET. ILL showed higher increases of resistin, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) after exercise compared to WELL. The gut bacterial microbiome and virome were examined and revealed a lower microbial diversity in ILL compared to WELL, with fewer beneficial bacteria such as Faecalibacterium and Bifidobacterium, and an expansion of bacteriophages belonging to the tailed dsDNA Caudovirales order. Conclusions: Results suggest dysfunctional immune activation in ILL following exercise and that prokaryotic viruses may contribute to mucosal inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis. Therefore, a two-day CPET and molecular

  20. The Dysfunctions of Bureaucratic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1988-01-01

    Numerous dysfunctions result from bureaucratic school organization, including an overemphasis on specialized tasks, routine operating rules, and formal procedures for managing teaching and learning. Such schools are characterized by numerous regulations; formal communications; centralized decision making; and sharp distinctions among…

  1. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Behavior of Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-09

    according to Elber’s [261 crack closure model . In this connection, in a study of fatigue of aluminum alloys, Schijve and Arkema [271 found that the...air itself is an aggressive environnment for most metals compared to vacuum. Behavior above K may be controlled by either SCC or fatigue and models ...frequen- cies. The approach has met some success with steels but it appears that the superposition model is inadequate for corrosion fatigue of aluminum

  2. [Therapeutic indications for managing symptoms: fatigue].

    PubMed

    Waubant, E

    2001-09-01

    Fatigue is a common complaint in patients affected by multiple sclerosis. Its mechanisms are poorly understood and are likely diverse. The term "fatigue" has been used for asthenia at rest but also for fatigability during exercise. Amantadine is the only drug that has a proven therapeutic benefit in randomized, double blind, controlled trials. Inhibitors of serotonin re-uptake are used pragmatically because of the relationship between fatigue and depression. Aminopyridins may improve fatigability, mainly at the level of lower limbs.

  3. Rotor fatigue monitoring data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    1993-01-01

    The 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) had a requirement to monitor rotor fatigue during a test. This test subjected various rotor components to stress levels higher than their structural fatigue limits. A data acquisition system was developed to monitor the cumulative fatigue damage of rotor components using National Instruments hardware and LabVIEW software. A full description of the data acquisition system including its configuration and salient features, is presented in this paper.

  4. Neural Mechanism of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War Syndrome, functional MRI, 44 electroencephalogram(EEG) Electromyogram( EMG ), brain motor activity, 16. PRICE CODE...analysis. We have developed two software packages for the analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram ( EMG ) data. We used these software...electromyography ( EMG ); voluntary muscle contraction; muscle fatigue; muscle strength. Siernionow et a]. Page 2 Motor-Related Cortical Potential in Chronic Fatigue

  5. Engineering Aspects of Fatigue Crack Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-01-01

    Estimating Notch-Size Effect in Fatigue Tests on Steel. NACA TN 2805, 1952. - 37 - 19. Landers, Charles B., and Hardrath, Herbert F.: Results of Axial- Load... Charles B., and Howell, F. M.: Axial-Load Fatigue Properties of 24S-T and 75S-T Aluminum Alloy as Determined in Several Laboratories. NACA TR 1190, 1954...Hardrath, Herbert F., Leybold, Herbert A., Landers, Charles B., and Hauschild, Louis W.: Fatigue-Crack Propagation in Aluminum- Alloy Box Beams. NACA

  6. Fatigue in patients with erythema migrans.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Sudhindra, Praveen; Lopez, Eliana; Patel, Lisa; Rezai, Sara; Brumbaugh, Aaron D; McKenna, Donna; Scavarda, Carol; Shapiro, Eugene D; Karmen, Carol L; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with Lyme disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize fatigue in untreated adult patients presenting with erythema migrans. Selected variables were assessed to determine if any correlated with the presence or severity of fatigue. Fatigue was assessed on the day of the evaluation by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), over the past 14days by the 11-item Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS-11) and over the past 28days based on a question from the 36-item Short Form General Health Survey version 2. Fifty-one patients with erythema migrans whose mean age was 49.8years, and 33 (64.7%) of whom were male, were evaluated in this study. The 3 measures of fatigue were positively correlated with one another (P≤0.01). Twenty-six (51%) had fatigue based on a VAS score above 0. Ten (19.6%) had severe fatigue based on an FSS-11 score of ≥4. The strongest correlate for higher fatigue scores was having a greater total number of symptoms. Based on the FSS-11 assessment tool, approximately 20% of early Lyme patients have severe fatigue. Having a high total number of symptoms was associated with both the presence and severity of fatigue. Because prior studies have demonstrated the presence of elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and other molecules in the serum of highly symptomatic patients with erythema migrans, the symptom of fatigue in early Lyme disease may be a component of what has been referred to as the acute sickness response.

  7. Does Fatigue Alter Pitching Mechanics?

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter Nissen; Erickson, Brandon J.; Sgroi, Terrance; Vignona, Peter; Lesniak, Matthew; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: Injuries of the adolescent shoulder and elbow are common in baseball pitchers. Fatigue has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for injury. Purpose: To determine if shoulder and elbow kinematics, pitching velocity, accuracy, and pain change during a simulated full baseball game in adolescent pitchers. Methods: Methods: Adolescent pitchers between the ages of 13-16 were recruited to throw a 90 pitch simulated game. Shoulder range of motion was assessed before and after the game. Velocity and accuracy were measured for every pitch and every 15th pitch was videotaped from two orthogonal views in high definition at 240 Hz. Quantitative and qualitative mechanics were measured from these videos. Perceived fatigue and pain were assessed after each inning using the visual analog scale. Data was statistically analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: Results: Twenty-eight elite adolescent pitchers were included. These pitchers, on average, were 14.6±0.9 years old (mean ± standard deviation), had been pitching for 6.3±1.7 years, and threw 94±58 pitches per week. Our experimental model functioned as expected in that pitchers became progressively more fatigued and painful and pitched with a lower velocity as pitch number increased (p<0.001, 0.001, and <0.001 respectively). Knee flexion at ball release progressively increased with pitch number (p=0.008). Hip and shoulder separation significantly decreased as pitch number increased, from 90%±40% at pitch 15 to 40%±50% at pitch 90 (p0.271 in all cases, 91% power for elbow flexion at ball release). External rotation and total range of motion in the pitching shoulder significantly increased post-pitching (p=0.007 and 0.047 respectively). Conclusion: Conclusion: As pitchers progress through a simulated game they throw lower velocity pitches and become fatigued and painful. Core and leg musculature becomes fatigued before upper extremity kinematics change. Based upon these

  8. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of physical fatigue-attenuating components from Rubus parvifolius L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianhong; Wang, Xianfeng; Cai, Yongqing; Tang, Ming; Dai, Qing; Hu, Xiaogang; Huang, Mingchun; Sun, Fengjun; Liu, Yao; Xia, Peiyuan

    2013-09-23

    Alleviation of fatigue has been emerging as a serious issue that requires urgent attention. Health professionals and sports physiologists have been looking for active natural products and synthetic compounds to overcome fatigue in humans. This study was designed to define the anti-fatigue property of Rubus parvifolius L. (RPL) by characterization of active constituents using a mouse forced swimming test model. Four RPL fractions with different polarities containing anti-fatigue activity were sequentially isolated from the n-butanol RPL extract, followed by elution of 50% ethanol-water fraction from D101 macroporous resin chromatography to obtain nigaichigoside F1, suavissimoside R1 and coreanoside F1. Active constituents of the 50% ethanol-water eluate of RPL were total saponins. The fractions were examined based on the effect on weight-loaded swimming capacity of mice. Serum levels of urea nitrogen (SUN), triglyceride fatty acids (TG), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactic acid (LA), ammonia and hepatic glycogen (HG) were also examined for potential mechanisms underlying the anti-fatigue effect of RPL extracts. During the experiment, two inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in serum, were measured. We found that total saponins from RPL possess potent capabilities to alleviate mouse fatigue induced by forced swimming and that nigaichigoside F1 was responsible for the pharmacological effect. The underlying mechanisms include delays of SUN and LA accumulation, a decrease in TG level by increasing fat consumption, increases in HG and LDH so that lactic acid accumulation and ammonia in the muscle were reduced, and suppression of increased immune activation and inflammatory cytokine production. Our findings will be helpful for functional identification of novel anti-fatigue components from natural medicinal herbs.

  9. Low-Cycle Fatigue Life and Fatigue Crack Propagation of Sintered Ag Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioda, Ryutaro; Kariya, Yoshiharu; Mizumura, Noritsuka; Sasaki, Koji

    2017-02-01

    The low-cycle fatigue life and fatigue crack propagation behavior of sintered silver nanoparticles were investigated using miniature specimens sintered at two different temperatures. The fatigue crack initiation life and fatigue crack propagation rate of sintered Ag nanoparticles were extremely sensitive to changes in the range of inelastic energy density and the cyclic J integral, exhibiting brittle characteristics, in contrast to tin-based lead-free solder alloys. With increasing sintering temperature, the fatigue crack propagation rate decreased. On the other hand, the effect of sintering temperature on the fatigue crack initiation life differed depending on the use of either a smooth specimen (low-cycle fatigue test) or notched specimen (fatigue crack propagation test). For the notched specimens, the probability of grain boundaries around the notch decreased due to increased sintering temperature. Therefore, the fatigue crack initiation life was increased with an increase in sintering temperature in the fatigue crack propagation test. In the smooth specimen, however, the fatigue life decreased with an increase in sintering temperature, as the elastic modulus of the specimen increased with increasing sintering temperature. In the low-cycle fatigue test, the specimen sintered with high internal stress started to develop crack initiation early, causing a decrease in the crack initiation life.

  10. Fatigue Risk Management: A Maritime Framework

    PubMed Central

    Grech, Michelle Rita

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that despite efforts directed at mitigating the risk of fatigue through the adoption of hours of work and rest regulations and development of codes and guidelines, fatigue still remains a concern in shipping. Lack of fatigue management has been identified as a contributory factor in a number of recent accidents. This is further substantiated through research reports with shortfalls highlighted in current fatigue management approaches. These approaches mainly focus on prescriptive hours of work and rest and include an individualistic approach to managing fatigue. The expectation is that seafarers are responsible to manage and tolerate fatigue as part of their working life at sea. This attitude is an accepted part of a seafarer’s role. Poor compliance is one manifest of this problem with shipboard demands making it hard for seafarers to follow hours of work and rest regulations, forcing them into this “poor compliance” trap. This makes current fatigue management approaches ineffective. This paper proposes a risk based approach and way forward for the implementation of a fatigue risk management framework for shipping, aiming to support the hours of work and rest requirements. This forms part of the work currently underway to review and update the International Maritime Organization, Guidelines on Fatigue. PMID:26840326

  11. Survivorship: Fatigue, Version 1.2014

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. Management includes education and counseling, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24925198

  12. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  13. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  14. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  15. How the Innate Immune System Senses Trouble and Causes Trouble.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-08-07

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense in response to nonself and danger signals from microbial invasion or tissue injury. It is increasingly recognized that each organ uses unique sets of cells and molecules that orchestrate regional innate immunity. The cells that execute the task of innate immunity are many and consist of not only "professional" immune cells but also nonimmune cells, such as renal epithelial cells. Despite a high level of sophistication, deregulated innate immunity is common and contributes to a wide range of renal diseases, such as sepsis-induced kidney injury, GN, and allograft dysfunction. This review discusses how the innate immune system recognizes and responds to nonself and danger signals. In particular, the roles of renal epithelial cells that make them an integral part of the innate immune apparatus of the kidney are highlighted.

  16. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  17. New insights into upper airway innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Protecting the upper airway from microbial infection is an important function of the immune system. Proper detection of these pathogens is paramount for sinonasal epithelial cells to be able to prepare a defensive response. Toll-like receptors and, more recently, bitter taste receptors and sweet taste receptors have been implicated as sensors able to detect the presence of these pathogens and certain compounds that they secrete. Activation of these receptors also triggers innate immune responses to prevent or counteract infection, including mucociliary clearance and the production and secretion of antimicrobial compounds (e.g., defensins). Objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the upper airway, the mechanisms by which it is carried out, and its clinical relevance. Methods: A literature review of the existing knowledge of the role of innate immunity in the human sinonasal cavity was performed. Results: Clinical and basic science studies have shown that the physical epithelial cell barrier, mucociliary clearance, and antimicrobial compound secretion play pivotal innate immune roles in defending the sinonasal cavity from infection. Clinical findings have also linked dysfunction of these defense mechanisms with diseases, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. Recent discoveries have elucidated the significance of bitter and sweet taste receptors in modulating immune responses in the upper airway. Conclusion: Numerous innate immune mechanisms seem to work in a concerted fashion to keep the sinonasal cavity free of infection. Understanding sinonasal innate immune function and dysfunction in health and disease has important implications for patients with respiratory ailments, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis. PMID:27657896

  18. Flavonoid galangin prevents smooth muscle fatigue of pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dambros, Miriam; de Jongh, Rik; van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Bast, Aalt; Heijnen, C G M; van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V

    2005-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the generation of free radicals plays a role in the development of bladder dysfunction. Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds with broad pharmacological activity. In the present study, the protective effects of the flavonoid galangin on the progressive decrease of bladder smooth muscle contractile responses during repetitive field stimulation (RFS; a model for muscular fatigue) were demonstrated. Pig detrusor strips were mounted for tension recording in organ baths aand were subjected to RFS for 90 min at 32 Hz for 15 s every 5 min. The strips were then washed four times with fresh buffer and allowed a period of recovery for 90 min. The 90 min of RFS caused a progressive decrease in maximal contractile response to electrical field stimulation and to muscarinic agonist-induced contractions (34% and 46% decrease, respectively). Galangin (10(-7) M) prevented the decrease in contractile smooth muscle response of strips to electrical field stimulation during RFS compared with untreated tissues. The antioxidant activity of galangin was assessed by measuring its ability to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by iron and ascorbate in rat liver microsomes (IC50 1.7+0.12x10(-6) M). If the data are confirmed in-vivo, exogenously administered galangin may be a new approach in the prevention and/or treatment of bladder dysfunction.

  19. Immune regulation during chronic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Faleiro, Rebecca J; Kumar, Rajiv; Hafner, Louise M; Engwerda, Christian R

    2014-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a chronic parasitic disease associated with severe immune dysfunction. Treatment options are limited to relatively toxic drugs, and there is no vaccine for humans available. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand immune responses following infection with Leishmania species by studying animal models of disease and clinical samples from patients. Here, we review recent discoveries in these areas and highlight shortcomings in our knowledge that need to be addressed if better treatment options are to be developed and effective vaccines designed.

  20. Exercise and fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Sandor; Diniz, Leonardo R; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo L; da Mota, Licia M H

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue, the enduring sensation of weakness, lack of energy, tiredness or exhaustion, is described by 40%-80% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis as their most disabling symptom with wide-ranging consequences for quality of life. Little attention has been paid to its multidimensional nature or to its reliability as a measure to evaluate progression of the disease. Low impact aerobic exercise affects the level of fatigue, and this same level of fatigue influences the exercise itself. We searched Medline, Cochrane Collaboration Register of Controlled Trials (CCRCT), Lilacs, PubMed and Scopus databases for randomized controlled trials (with appropriate description of methods, materials and results) on the assessment of fatigue and exercise. Review articles, case reports, letters to the editor and editorials were excluded. Of 121 references initially identified, 4 randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Two studies used the MAF scale (Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue), one used the MAC (Mental Adjustment to Cancer) fatigue scale, and all trials used POMS (Profile of Mood States) to assess fatigue. All four trials conducted a 12 week program of two to three times/ week and different periods of follow-up. Two studies used low impact aerobic exercise, one used dance-based exercise, and another study followed a home cardiopulmonary conditioning program using a stationary bicycle. While fatigue appears to be a reliable outcome measure in the clinical management of RA, especially when related to exercise prescription, further research is needed to evaluate the correlation between exercise, fatigue and quality of life, using fatigue scales validated to explore the different components of fatigue and its wide-ranging consequences.

  1. Fatigue behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.Y.; Chen, C.Y.; Chien, K.F.; Kuo, R.C.; Liaw, P.K.; Huang, J.G.

    1999-07-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests have been conducted on reactor pressure vessel steels, SA533-B1, with four levels of sulfur contents at room temperature. The applied stress versus fatigue life cycle (S-N) curves were developed at load ratios, R, of 0.2 and 0.8. At a load ratio of 0.2, the fatigue limit for SA533-B1 steels with sulfur contents less than 0.015 wt % is around 650 MPa, which is slightly higher than that with sulfur contents higher than 0.027 wt %. At a load ratio of 0.8, there were no fatigue indications on the fracture surface. In some fatigue-tested specimens, specifically those with higher sulfur content levels, fatigue cracks were observed to initiate around the inclusions. A digital video camera was used to record the entire fatigue process, and the results demonstrated that the crack initiation period dominated more than 80% of the total fatigue life. The fatigue-tested specimen surface had been thoroughly examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Apparent distinctions were observed between the neighborhood of the crack initiation site and the rest of the specimen surface. A great number of precipitates were found distributed along the sub-grain boundary using transmission electron microscopy. There is no or little change of the morphology of precipitates before and after fatigue tests. The mis-orientation between two neighboring sub-grains ranges from 1 to 5{degree}. The effects of the applied maximum stress, precipitate distribution, and fatigue cycle on the mis-orientation of the sub-grain boundary will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Change in manipulation with muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Todd, Gabrielle; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2010-11-01

    Muscle fatigue is defined as an exercise-induced reduction in the force-generating capacity of muscle. Here, we investigated the effect of muscle fatigue on hand dexterity. Healthy adults (n = 17) gripped and lifted an object (0.342 kg) five times before and after two interventions. The interventions, performed on separate days, involved 2 min of rest (control) or sustained maximal pinch grip that reduced maximal force by 60% (fatigue). Horizontal grip force (GF), vertical lift force (LF) and first dorsal interosseous electromyographic activity (EMG) were measured. The lift (dynamic) and hold (stationary) phase of the task were analysed. Before the intervention, there was no significant difference between the control and fatigue conditions for the 15 measured parameters. However, post-intervention GF was reduced with fatigue compared with the control condition (hold phase), whereas GF coefficient of variation (hold phase) and root mean square EMG (lift phase) increased with fatigue. Fatigue also disrupted the temporal relationship between GF and LF (assessed by cross-correlation of the derivative of GF and LF). The maximum cross-correlation coefficient was significantly reduced with fatigue compared with the control condition. Grip strategy and the kinetics of the lifting movement (minimum LF, maximum LF, maximum derivative of LF, and maximum acceleration) were unchanged with fatigue. Our results suggest that fatigued subjects generate more EMG to lift and hold an object but produce less force and are less able to match changes in LF with changes in GF. Fatigued subjects also exhibit greater fluctuation in GF while holding objects.

  3. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2015-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics.

  4. Endothelial dysfunction in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Aldasoro, Martin; Ortega, Joaquin; Vila, José María

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic multifunctional disease characterized by an accumulation of fat. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction, as defined by an imbalance between relaxing and contractile endothelial factors, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these cardiometabolic diseases. Diminished bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to endothelial dysfunction and impairs endothelium- dependent vasodilatation. But this is not the only mechanism that drives to endothelial dysfunction. Obesity has been associated with a chronic inflammatory process, atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover levels of asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), are elevated in obesity. On the other hand, increasing prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction and decreasing vasodilator prostanoids also lead to endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Other mechanisms related to endothelin-1 (ET-1) or endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) have been proposed. Bariatric surgery (BS) is a safe and effective means to achieve significant weight loss, but its use is limited only to patients with severe obesity including morbid obesity. BS also proved efficient in endothelial dysfunction reduction improving cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities associated with morbid obesity such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. This review will provide a brief overview of the mechanisms that link obesity with endothelial dysfunction, and how weight loss is a cornerstone treatment for cardiovascular comorbidities obesity-related. A better understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction may help develop new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior at Notched Hole in 7075-T6 Under Biaxial and Uniaxial Fatigue with Different Phases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES...CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES THESIS...UNLIMITED AFIT-ENY-MS-15-S-065 CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH

  6. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... which cause borna disease , an infectious neurological syndrome Mycoplasma, a cause of atypical pneumonia Ross River virus, ... patients and in persons with related disorders like fibromyalgia. Cortisol suppresses inflammation and cellular immune activation, and ...

  7. Yang/Qi Invigoration: An Herbal Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with Yang Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Ko, Kam Ming

    2015-01-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body. Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function. It is of interest that the clinical manifestations of Yang/Qi deficiencies in TCM resemble those of chronic fatigue syndrome in Western medicine, which is pathologically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency. PMID:25763095

  8. Overuse, tissue fatigue, and injuries.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Carla

    2013-09-01

    Research has provided abundant evidence that overtraining is associated with fatigue and subsequent injury. For many years, it has been axiomatic that the vast majority of dance injuries are the result of overuse, and that dancers frequently persist in movement activities in the presence of microscopic injury--i.e., "dance through" injuries. While it is well-established fact that rest and adequate nutrition are vital components of training and conditioning, for various reasons it remains problematic for dancers to assimilate these requirements into their daily regimen. This review article provides some physiologically and biomechanically based information about the causes, inter-relationships, and consequences of these fundamental premises in dance science.

  9. Fatigue Performance under Multiaxial Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    to 1 1/2-inches were included. In the case of 3/4 and 1 1/2-inch specimens of HY80 4-42 steel , greater lives were obtained for the 1 1/2-inch material...COMMITTEE MARITIME COLLEGE Dr. William Sandberg Dr. W. R. Porter AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE WELDING RESEARCH COUNCIL Mr. Alexander D. Wilson Dr...Various Specimen Types ...... .4-14 4-4 HY Steel Test Members Used to Investigate Multiaxial Fatigue Response ..... ............. .4-28 4-5 Effect of Mean

  10. Statistical treatment of fatigue test data

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    This report discussed several aspects of fatigue data analysis in order to provide a basis for the development of statistically sound design curves. Included is a discussion on the choice of the dependent variable, the assumptions associated with least squares regression models, the variability of fatigue data, the treatment of data from suspended tests and outlying observations, and various strain-life relations.

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: How Vulnerable Are Athletes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses chronic fatigue syndrome as it affects elite athletes, noting that overtraining may mimic it. In some cases, athletes who have it perform exceedingly well in the face of debilitating fatigue. Among athletes and nonathletes, the cause and the mind-body connection are areas of controversy and research. (Author/SM)

  12. Differential Effects of Fatigue on Movement Variability

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, N.; Onate, J.; Morrison, S.

    2014-01-01

    When individuals perform purposeful actions to fatigue, there is typically a general decline in their movement performance. This study was designed to investigate the effects exercise-induced fatigue has on lower limb kinetics and kinematics during a side-step cutting task. In particular, it was of interest to determine what changes could be seen in mean amplitude and all metrics of signal variability with fatigue. The results of the study revealed that post-fatigue there was an overall decrease in absolute force production as reflected by a decline in mean amplitude and variability (SD) of the ground reaction forces (GRFV and GRFML). A decrease in mean and SD of the knee moments were also observed post-exercise. Interestingly, this trend was not mirrored by similar changes in time-dependent properties of these signals. Instead, there was an increase in the SampEn values (reflecting a more variable, irregular signal) for GRF force profiles, knee kinematics and moments following the exercise-induced fatigue. These results illustrate that fatigue can have differential effects on movement variability, resulting in a both an increase and decrease in movement variability, depending on the variable selected. Thus, the impact of fatigue is not simply restricted to a decline in force producing capacity of the system but more importantly it demonstrates that the ability of the person to perform a smooth and controlled action is limited due to fatigue. PMID:24370441

  13. Attention, effort, and fatigue: Neuropsychological perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ronald A.; Odonnell, Brian F.

    1988-01-01

    Models of attention, effort, and fatigue are reviewed. Methods are discussed for measuring these phenomena from a neuropsychological and psychophysiological perspective. The following methodologies are included: (1) the autonomic measurement of cognitive effort and quality of encoding; (2) serial assessment approaches to neurophysiological assessment; and (3) the assessment of subjective reports of fatigue using multidimensional ratings and their relationship to neurobehavioral measures.

  14. Differential effects of fatigue on movement variability.

    PubMed

    Cortes, N; Onate, J; Morrison, S

    2014-03-01

    When individuals perform purposeful actions to fatigue, there is typically a general decline in their movement performance. This study was designed to investigate the effects exercise-induced fatigue has on lower limb kinetics and kinematics during a side-step cutting task. In particular, it was of interest to determine what changes could be seen in mean amplitude and all metrics of signal variability with fatigue. The results of the study revealed that post-fatigue there was an overall decrease in absolute force production as reflected by a decline in mean amplitude and variability (SD) of the ground reaction forces (GRFV and GRFML). A decrease in mean and SD of the knee moments were also observed post-exercise. Interestingly, this trend was not mirrored by similar changes in time-dependent properties of these signals. Instead, there was an increase in the SampEn values (reflecting a more variable, irregular signal) for GRF force profiles, knee kinematics and moments following the exercise-induced fatigue. These results illustrate that fatigue can have differential effects on movement variability, resulting in a both an increase and decrease in movement variability, depending on the variable selected. Thus, the impact of fatigue is not simply restricted to a decline in force producing capacity of the system but more importantly it demonstrates that the ability of the person to perform a smooth and controlled action is limited due to fatigue.

  15. Fatigue Behavior of Inconel 718 TIG Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos D.; Argyriou, Nikolaos; Stergiou, Vasillis; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical behavior of reference and TIG-welded Inconel 718 specimens was examined in the present work. Tensile, constant amplitude fatigue, and fracture toughness tests were performed in ambient temperature for both, reference and welded specimens. Microstructure revealed the presence of coarse and fine-grained heat-affected zones. It has been shown that without any post-weld heat treatment, welded specimens maintained their tensile strength properties while their ductility decreased by more than 40%. It was found that the welded specimens had lower fatigue life and this decrease was a function of the applied fatigue maximum stress. A 30% fatigue life decrease was noticed in the high cycle fatigue regime for the welded specimens while this decrease exceeded 50% in the low cycle fatigue regime. Cyclic stress-strain curves showed that Inconel 718 experiences a short period of hardening followed by softening for all fatigue lives. Cyclic fatigue response of welded specimens' exhibited cyclically stable behavior. Finally, a marginal decrease was noticed in the Mode I fracture toughness of the welded specimens.

  16. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue strength. 23.627 Section 23.627 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of...

  17. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  18. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and human muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2001-01-01

    During exercise, changes occur at many sites in the motor pathway, including the muscle fiber, motoneuron, motor cortex, and "upstream" of the motor cortex. Some of the changes result in fatigue, which can be defined as a decrease in ability to produce maximal muscle force voluntarily. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the human motor cortex reveals changes in both motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and the silent period during and after fatiguing voluntary contractions in normal subjects. The relationship of these changes to loss of force or fatigue is unclear. However, during a sustained maximal contraction TMS evokes extra force from the muscle and thus demonstrates the development of suboptimal output from the motor cortex, that is, fatigue at a supraspinal level. In some patients with symptoms of fatigue, the response to TMS after exercise is altered, but the changed MEP behavior is not yet linked to particular symptoms or pathology.

  20. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  1. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  2. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  3. [Sexual dysfunctions in selected endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Kowalaczyk, Robert

    2005-01-01

    According to the socio-sexological reports approximately 40-45% of women and up to 30% of males may suffer from different sexual dysfunctions. The prevalence of those disorders is gradually increasing with age. Multiply numbers of endocrinopathies may influence the human sexual life. In diabetic patients all phases of the sexual responses cycle, especially orgasm, might be affected. Women diagnosed with PCOS have decreased adaptation to the sexual life, low self-esteem and perception of self sexual attractiveness. The intimacy of infertile couples has not been well described and the characteristic of particular dysfunction in sex life has not been established yet. Interdisciplinary approach, understood as treatment of the endocrinopathy accompanied with psychological and sexological counseling, seems to be the fundamental issue in the therapy of sexual dysfunctions in patients with endocrinological disorders.

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cardiac Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, Autumn; Quarles, Ellen K.; Basisty, Nathan; Gitari, Lemuel; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in most developed nations. While it has received the least public attention, aging is the dominant risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, as the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases increases dramatically with increasing age. Cardiac aging is an intrinsic process that results in impaired cardiac function, along with cellular and molecular changes. Mitochondria play a great role in these processes, as cardiac function is an energetically demanding process. In this review, we examine mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac aging. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction can disrupt morphology, signaling pathways, and protein interactions; conversely, mitochondrial homeostasis is maintained by mechanisms that include fission/fusion, autophagy, and unfolded protein responses. Finally, we describe some of the recent findings in mitochondrial targeted treatments to help meet the challenges of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging. PMID:26191650

  5. Notched Fatigue Behavior of PEEK

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, JE; Brinkman, JG; Kurtz, SM; Rimnac, CM

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) has been used as a load bearing orthopaedic implant material with clinical success. All of the orthopaedic applications contain stress concentrations (notches) in their design; however, little work has been done to examine the fatigue behavior of PEEK in the presence of a notch. This work examines both stress-life (SN) fatigue behavior and the fracture behavior of unfilled PEEK under tension tension loading in circumferentially grooved round bar specimens with different elastic stress concentration factors. It was found that the majority of the loading was elastic in nature, and that there was only a small portion on the lifetime where there was a detectable change in structural behavior prior to gross fracture. Fractographic analysis via SEM further elucidated the potential fracture micromechanisms. Additional analysis was conducted to estimate the percent of the lifetime spent in crack initiation vs propagation, and it was found that the specimens spent the majority of the time in the crack initiation phase. PMID:20864160

  6. Nutritional strategies to optimize dairy cattle immunity.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, L M

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle are susceptible to increased incidence and severity of both metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. A major contributing factor to increased health disorders is alterations in bovine immune mechanisms. Indeed, uncontrolled inflammation is a major contributing factor and a common link among several economically important infectious and metabolic diseases including mastitis, retained placenta, metritis, displaced abomasum, and ketosis. The nutritional status of dairy cows and the metabolism of specific nutrients are critical regulators of immune cell function. There is now a greater appreciation that certain mediators of the immune system can have a reciprocal effect on the metabolism of nutrients. Thus, any disturbances in nutritional or immunological homeostasis can provide deleterious feedback loops that can further enhance health disorders, increase production losses, and decrease the availability of safe and nutritious dairy foods for a growing global population. This review will discuss the complex interactions between nutrient metabolism and immune functions in periparturient dairy cattle. Details of how either deficiencies or overexposure to macro- and micronutrients can contribute to immune dysfunction and the subsequent development of health disorders will be presented. Specifically, the ways in which altered nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress can interact to compromise the immune system in transition cows will be discussed. A better understanding of the linkages between nutrition and immunity may facilitate the design of nutritional regimens that will reduce disease susceptibility in early lactation cows.

  7. Immune Suppression and Inflammation in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    and cancer: back to Virchow? Lancet 2001;357:539-45. 4. Coussens LM, Werb Z. Inflammation and cancer. Nature 2002;420:860-7. 5. Kusmartsev S...Sotomayor EM, Kast WM. Mechanism of immune dysfunction in cancer mediated by immature Gr-1+ myeloid cells. J Immunol 2001;166:5398-406. 40. Kusmartsev S...cancer. Nature 420:860- 867. 5. Kusmartsev , S., and D. I. Gabrilovich. 2002. Immature myeloid cells and cancer- associated immune suppression. Cancer

  8. Autonomic Dysfunctions in Parkinsonian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyo-Jin; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions are common in the patients with parkinsonian disorders. Because clinical features of autonomic dysfunctions are diverse, the comprehensive evaluation is essential for the appropriate management. For the appreciation of autonomic dysfunctions and the identification of differences, patients with degenerative parkinsonisms are evaluated using structured questionnaire for autonomic dysfunction (ADQ). Methods: Total 259 patients, including 192 patients with [idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD, age 64.6 ± 9.6 years)], 37 with [multiple system atrophy (MSA, 62.8 ± 9.1)], 9 with [dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 73.9 ± 4.3)], and 21 with [progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 69.4 ± 9.6)]. The ADQ was structured for evaluation of the presence of symptoms and its severity due to autonomic dysfunction, covering gastrointestinal, urinary, sexual, cardiovascular and thermoregulatory domains. Patients were also evaluated for the orthostatic hypotension. Results: Although dementia with Lewy body (DLB) patients were oldest and duration of disease was longest in IPD, total ADQ scores of MSA and PSP (23.9 ± 12.6 and 21.1 ± 7.8) were significantly increased than that of IPD (15.1 ± 10.6). Urinary and cardiovascular symptom scores of MSA and gastrointestinal symptom score of PSP were significantly worse than those of IPD. The ratio of patient with orthostatic hypotension in IPD was 31.2% and not differed between groups (35.1% in MSA, 33.3% in DLB and 33.3% in PSP). But the systolic blood pressure dropped drastically after standing in patients with MSA and DLB than in patients with IPD and PSP. Conclusions: Patients with degenerative parkinsonism showed widespread symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions. The severity of those symptoms in patients with PSP were comparing to that of MSA patients and worse than that of IPD. PMID:24868361

  9. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  10. German experiences in local fatigue monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Abib, E.; Bergholz, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2012-07-01

    The ageing management of nuclear power plants (NPP) has gained an increasing importance in the last years. The reasons are mainly due to the international context of extending period of plants operation. Moreover, new scientific discoveries, such as the corrosive influence of the medium on the fatigue process (environmentally assisted fatigue - EAF) play an important role and influence the code development (ASME, EAF code cases). The fatigue damage process takes a central position in ageing mechanisms of components. It must be ensured through appropriate evidence that facilities are being operated under allowable boundary conditions. In the design phase of NPP, fatigue analyses are still based on theoretical considerations and empirical values, which are summarized in the design transient catalogue, necessary for licensing. These analyses aim at proving the admissibility of the loads in terms of stress and fatigue usage. These analyses will also provide the fatigue-relevant positions in the NPP and give a basis for future design improvements and optimization of operating modes. The design transients are in practice conservatively correlated with the real transients occurring during operation. Uncertainties reveal very conservative assumptions regarding forecast temperatures, temperature gradients and frequencies of events. During operation of the plant, it has to be recurrently proved, that the plant is being operated under designed boundary conditions. Moreover, operating signals are constantly acquired to enable a fatigue evaluation. For example, in Germany fatigue evaluation is based on decades of experience and regulatory requirements. The rule KTA 3201.4 [1] establishes the rules for qualified fatigue monitoring. The rule DIN 25475-3 [2] on fatigue monitoring systems is available in draft version. Experience shows that some significant differences occur between the design transients and the real occurred transients during plant operation. The reasons for it

  11. Evidence for a heritable predisposition to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) came to attention in the 1980s, but initial investigations did not find organic causes. Now decades later, the etiology of CFS has yet to be understood, and the role of genetic predisposition in CFS remains controversial. Recent reports of CFS association with the retrovirus xenotropic murine leukemic virus-related virus (XMRV) or other murine leukemia related retroviruses (MLV) might also suggest underlying genetic implications within the host immune system. Methods We present analyses of familial clustering of CFS in a computerized genealogical resource linking multiple generations of genealogy data with medical diagnosis data of a large Utah health care system. We compare pair-wise relatedness among cases to expected relatedness in the Utah population, and we estimate risk for CFS for first, second, and third degree relatives of CFS cases. Results We observed significant excess relatedness of CFS cases compared to that expected in this population. Significant excess relatedness was observed for both close (p <0.001) and distant relationships (p = 0.010). We also observed significant excess CFS relative risk among first (2.70, 95% CI: 1.56-4.66), second (2.34, 95% CI: 1.31-4.19), and third degree relatives (1.93, 95% CI: 1.21-3.07). Conclusions These analyses provide strong support for a heritable contribution to predisposition to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A population of high-risk CFS pedigrees has been identified, the study of which may provide additional understanding. PMID:21619629

  12. Low cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-Mn alloys: Fatigue life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Y.; Margolin, H.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of morphology, particle size, β grain size and volume fraction of β, from 0.025 to 1.0, on the low cycle fatigue life of α -β Ti-Mn alloys, have been studied under total strain control. In general, Widmanstätten plus grain boundary (W+GB) α structures show shorter fatigue lives than equiaxed (E) α structures, and this has been ascribed to the formation of much larger surface cracks and ease of transfer of slip from α to β. For Eα structures, fatigue life increases with decreasing α particle size and when the alloy is single phase β fatigue life increases with decreasing grain size. At high total strains the nearly all α alloy had the longest fatigue life and at lower strains the β alloy, with the higher yield strength, had the longest fatigue life. Fatigue life was correlated with strain hardening. The nearly all α alloy which had the highest strain hardening, over the plastic strains encountered, had the highest fatigue life, while the β alloy, with the lowest strain hardening, had the lowest fatigue life. For a portion of the fatigue life curves, it was found that as the average Baushinger strain (ABS) increased, the Coffin-Manson exponent c decreased. The results are discussed.

  13. Anomalous Fatigue Behavior and Fatigue-Induced Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Nickel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Brad L.; Padilla, Henry A.

    2011-07-01

    Fatigue failure due to repetitive loading of metallic devices is a pervasive engineering concern. The present work reveals extraordinary fatigue resistance in nanocrystalline (NC) alloys, which appears to be associated with the small (<100 nm) grain size inhibiting traditional cyclic damage processes. In this study, we examine the fatigue performance of three electrodeposited NC Ni-based metals: Ni, Ni-0.5Mn, and Ni-22Fe (PERMALLOY). When subjected to fatigue stresses at and above the tensile yield strength where conventional coarse-grained (CG) counterparts undergo low-cycle fatigue failure (<104 cycles to failure), these alloys exhibit exceptional fatigue lives (in some cases, >107 cycles to failure). Postmortem examinations show that failed samples contain an aggregate of coarsened grains at the crack initiation site. The experimental data and accompanying microscopy suggest that the NC matrix undergoes abnormal grain growth during cyclic loading, allowing dislocation activity to persist over length scales necessary to initiate a fatigue crack by traditional fatigue mechanisms. Thus, the present observations demonstrate anomalous fatigue behavior in two regards: (1) quantitatively anomalous when considering the extremely high stress levels needed to drive fatigue failure and (2) mechanistically anomalous in light of the grain growth process that appears to be a necessary precursor to crack initiation.

  14. Predictors and Trajectories of Morning Fatigue Are Distinct from Evening Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fay; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Hammer, Marilyn; Schmidt, Brian L.; Knobf, M. Tish; Paul, Steven M.; Cartwright, Frances; Mastick, Judy; Cooper, Bruce A.; Chen, Lee-May; Melisko, Michelle; Levine, Jon D.; Kober, Kord; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Fatigue is the most common symptom in oncology patients during chemotherapy (CTX). Little is known about the predictors of interindividual variability in initial levels and trajectories of morning fatigue severity in these patients. Objectives An evaluation was done to determine which demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with initial levels as well as the trajectories of morning fatigue and to compare findings with our companion paper on evening fatigue. Methods A sample of outpatients with breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and lung cancer (N=586) completed demographic and symptom questionnaires a total of six times over two cycles of CTX. Fatigue severity was evaluated using the Lee Fatigue Scale. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to answer the study objectives. Results A large amount of interindividual variability was found in the morning fatigue trajectories. A piecewise model fit the data best. Patients with higher body mass index (BMI), who did not exercise regularly, with a lower functional status, and who had higher levels of state anxiety, sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms, reported higher levels of morning fatigue at enrollment. Variations in the trajectories of morning fatigue were predicted by the patients’ ethnicity and younger age. Conclusion The modifiable risk factors that were associated with only morning fatigue were BMI, exercise, and state anxiety. Modifiable risk factors that were associated with both morning and evening fatigue included functional status, depressive symptoms, and sleep disturbance. Using this information, clinicians can identify patients at higher risk for more severe morning fatigue and evening fatigue, provide individualized patient education, and tailor interventions to address the modifiable risk factors. PMID:25828559

  15. Retinoic Acid and Its Role in Modulating Intestinal Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Czarnewski, Paulo; Das, Srustidhar; Parigi, Sara M.; Villablanca, Eduardo J.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA) is amongst the most well characterized food-derived nutrients with diverse immune modulatory roles. Deficiency in dietary VA has not only been associated with immune dysfunctions in the gut, but also with several systemic immune disorders. In particular, VA metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) has been shown to be crucial in inducing gut tropism in lymphocytes and modulating T helper differentiation. In addition to the widely recognized role in adaptive immunity, increasing evidence identifies atRA as an important modulator of innate immune cells, such as tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Here, we focus on the role of retinoic acid in differentiation, trafficking and the functions of innate immune cells in health and inflammation associated disorders. Lastly, we discuss the potential involvement of atRA during the plausible crosstalk between DCs and ILCs. PMID:28098786

  16. Microstructure-Sensitive Modeling of High Cycle Fatigue (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    SUBJECT TERMS microplasticity , microstructure-sensitive modeling, high cycle fatigue, fatigue variability 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...3Air Force Research Laboratory Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 Keywords: Microplasticity , microstructure-sensitive modeling, high cycle...cyclic microplasticity ) plays a key role in modeling fatigue resistance. Unlike effective properties such as elastic stiffness, fatigue is

  17. 14 CFR 121.495 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.495... Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk Management System...

  18. 38 CFR 4.88a - Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chronic fatigue syndrome... Deficiencies § 4.88a Chronic fatigue syndrome. (a) For VA purposes, the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome requires: (1) new onset of debilitating fatigue severe enough to reduce daily activity to less than...

  19. 38 CFR 4.88a - Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chronic fatigue syndrome... Deficiencies § 4.88a Chronic fatigue syndrome. (a) For VA purposes, the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome requires: (1) new onset of debilitating fatigue severe enough to reduce daily activity to less than...

  20. 14 CFR 121.527 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.527... § 121.527 Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk...

  1. 38 CFR 4.88a - Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chronic fatigue syndrome... Deficiencies § 4.88a Chronic fatigue syndrome. (a) For VA purposes, the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome requires: (1) new onset of debilitating fatigue severe enough to reduce daily activity to less than...

  2. 14 CFR 121.495 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.495... Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk Management System...

  3. 38 CFR 4.88a - Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chronic fatigue syndrome... Deficiencies § 4.88a Chronic fatigue syndrome. (a) For VA purposes, the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome requires: (1) new onset of debilitating fatigue severe enough to reduce daily activity to less than...

  4. 14 CFR 121.527 - Fatigue risk management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue risk management system. 121.527... § 121.527 Fatigue risk management system. (a) No certificate holder may exceed any provision of this subpart unless approved by the FAA under a Fatigue Risk Management System. (b) The Fatigue Risk...

  5. 38 CFR 4.88a - Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chronic fatigue syndrome... Deficiencies § 4.88a Chronic fatigue syndrome. (a) For VA purposes, the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome requires: (1) new onset of debilitating fatigue severe enough to reduce daily activity to less than...

  6. Effects of human fatigue on speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamoulis, Catherine

    2004-05-01

    Cognitive performance may be significantly affected by fatigue. In the case of critical personnel, such as pilots, monitoring human fatigue is essential to ensure safety and success of a given operation. One of the modalities that may be used for this purpose is speech, which is sensitive to respiratory changes and increased muscle tension of vocal cords, induced by fatigue. Age, gender, vocal tract length, physical and emotional state may significantly alter speech intensity, duration, rhythm, and spectral characteristics. In addition to changes in speech rhythm, fatigue may also affect the quality of speech, such as articulation. In a noisy environment, detecting fatigue-related changes in speech signals, particularly subtle changes at the onset of fatigue, may be difficult. Therefore, in a performance-monitoring system, speech parameters which are significantly affected by fatigue need to be identified and extracted from input signals. For this purpose, a series of experiments was performed under slowly varying cognitive load conditions and at different times of the day. The results of the data analysis are presented here.

  7. Fatigue Properties of Cast Magnesium Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Luo, Alan A.; Wang, Qigui; Peng, Liming; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the fatigue properties and deformation behavior of a newly developed Mg-2.96Nd-0.21Zn-0.39Zr magnesium alloy wheel in both as-cast and T6 conditions. Compared with the as-cast alloy, the T6-treated alloy shows a significant increase in fatigue strength and cyclic stress amplitude. This is believed to be attributed to the change of defect type from porosity to oxides and the increased matrix strength in the T6 (peak-aged) condition. For the as-cast alloy wheel, fatigue failure mainly originated from the cast defects including porosity, oxide film, and inclusion at or near the sample surface. In the T6-treated alloy, however, oxides and inclusions or slip bands initiate the fatigue cracks. Solution treatment appears to reduce or eliminate the shrinkage porosity because of grain growth and dissolution of as-cast eutectic phases in the grain boundaries. The cyclic stress amplitude of the as-cast alloy increases with increasing the number of cycles, while the T6-treated alloy shows cyclic softening after the stress reaches a maximum value. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation can be used to evaluate the life of low cycle fatigue. The developed long crack model and multi-scale fatigue (MSF) models can be used to predict high-cycle fatigue life of the Mg-2.96Nd-0.21Zn-0.39Zr alloys with or without casting defects.

  8. Fatigue performance of welded aluminum deck structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haagensen, P.J.; Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Kvale, I.

    1996-12-01

    Aluminum alloys are used increasingly in load carrying structures where low weight and low maintenance costs are at a premium. Helicopter decks, structures for living quarters and personnel transfer bridges between platforms are examples of offshore applications. While these structures are not usually subjected to high fatigue loads, the increasing use of aluminum in high speed ships, and more recently in highway bridge structures, makes the question of fatigue performance more important. In this paper the fatigue properties of small scale weldments in an AA6005 alloy are compared with the results of fatigue tests on full scale sections of welded extrusions in the same material, which were used in an aluminum bridge deck structure. The fatigue performance is also compared with the fatigue clauses in the new British design code BS8118 for aluminium structures and the proposed Eurocode 9. The prospects of using a new joining technique, friction stir welding (FSW), in the production of large scale panels for deck and ship hull structures is discussed. The FSW process is described briefly, and some fatigue test data are presented.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  10. High temperature fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1988-01-01

    The high temperature, creep-fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 was investigated as an element in a broader thermomechanical fatigue life prediction model development program at the NASA-Lewis. The models are still in the development stage, but the data that were generated possess intrinsic value on their own. Results generated to date is reported. Data were generated to characterize isothermal low cycle fatigue resistance at temperatures of 316, 704, and 927 C with cyclic failure lives ranging from 10 to more than 20,000. These results follow trends that would be predicted from a knowledge of tensile properties, i.e., as the tensile ductility varies with temperature, so varies the cyclic inelastic straining capacity. Likewise, as the tensile strength decreases, so does the high cyclic fatigue resistance. A few two-minute hold-time cycles at peak compressive strain were included in tests at 760 C. These results were obtained in support of a redesign effort for the Orbital Maneuverable System engine. No detrimental effects on cyclic life were noted despite the added exposure time for creep and oxidation. Finally, a series of simulated thermal fatigue tests, referred to as bithermal fatigue tests, were conducted using 316 C as the minimum and 760 C as the maximum temperature. Only out-of-phase bithermal tests were conducted to date. These test results are intended for use as input to a more general thermomechanical fatigue life prediction model based on the concepts of the total strain version of Strainrange Partitioning.

  11. More awareness needed in treatment of fatigue.

    PubMed

    1996-10-01

    Combination drug therapy and enhanced patient management techniques result in increased survival for many AIDS patients. This phenomenon has brought the issue of fatigue, a common and difficult side effect of HIV/AIDS treatment, to the forefront. Three-quarters of the AIDS patients surveyed in a recent study indicated that fatigue negatively affects their quality of life and influences their willingness to continue aggressive treatment. New advances for combating fatigue include the use of nutritional therapy, anti-depressants, anti-infectives, medications that boost the production of red blood cells, hormone replacement, exercise, massage, and acupuncture. The most common source of fatigue in HIV-positive patients is anemia, which also causes shortness of breath and dizziness. Anti-HIV medications may inhibit red blood cell production. An alternative treatment, Epoetin alfa, works by increasing low levels of naturally producing erythropoietin, a protein manufactured in the kidneys. Fatigue resulting from low testosterone levels can be treated with anabolic steroids. Poorly functioning adrenal glands can be the cause of fatigue in patients with advanced disease. Taking hydrocortisone pills is often effective. Depression is the fourth most common cause of fatigue. Antidepressants work well without traditional side effects.

  12. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  13. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Martin D.; Nicholls, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review. PMID:21726199

  14. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  15. Pathophysiology of diabetic sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Morano, S

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with diabetes mellitus. Vascular, neurological and hormonal alterations are involved in this complication. Many studies showed altered endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxations in corpus cavernosum from diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). This finding has been associated with a lack of nitric oxyde (NO) production and a significant increase in NO synthase (NOS) binding sites in penile tissues, induced by diabetes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) concur to diabetic vascular complications by quenching NO activity and by increasing the expression of mediators of vascular damage such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), possessing permeabilizing and neoangiogenic effects, and endothelin-1 (ET-1), with vaso-constricting and mitogenic action. Moreover, the differential gene expression for various growth factors in penile tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of ED associated with diabetes. Neuropathy is also likely to be an important cause of diabetic ED: morphological alterations of autonomic nerve fibers in cavernosal tissue of patients with diabetic ED have been demonstrated. Finally, androgens enhance nNOS gene expression in the penile corpus cavernosum of rats, suggesting that they play a role in maintaining NOS activity. However, sexual dysfunctions in women with diabetes has received less attention in clinical research. Several studies suggest an increased prevalence of deficient vaginal lubrication, making sexual intercourse unpleasant. Sexual dysfunction is associated with lower overall quality of marital relation and more depressive symptoms in diabetic women.

  16. Self-reported post-exertional fatigue in Gulf War veterans: roles of autonomic testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Mian; Xu, Changqing; Yao, Wenguo; Mahan, Clare M; Kang, Han K; Sandbrink, Friedhelm; Zhai, Ping; Karasik, Pamela A

    2014-01-07

    To determine if objective evidence of autonomic dysfunction exists from a group of Gulf War veterans with self-reported post-exertional fatigue, we evaluated 16 Gulf War ill veterans and 12 Gulf War controls. Participants of the ill group had self- reported, unexplained chronic post-exertional fatigue and the illness symptoms had persisted for years until the current clinical study. The controls had no self-reported post-exertional fatigue either at the time of initial survey nor at the time of the current study. We intended to identify clinical autonomic disorders using autonomic and neurophysiologic testing in the clinical context. We compared the autonomic measures between the 2 groups on cardiovascular function at both baseline and head-up tilt, and sudomotor function. We identified 1 participant with orthostatic hypotension, 1 posture orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, 2 distal small fiber neuropathy, and 1 length dependent distal neuropathy affecting both large and small fiber in the ill group; whereas none of above definable diagnoses was noted in the controls. The ill group had a significantly higher baseline heart rate compared to controls. Compound autonomic scoring scale showed a significant higher score (95% CI of mean: 1.72-2.67) among ill group compared to controls (0.58-1.59). We conclude that objective autonomic testing is necessary for the evaluation of self-reported, unexplained post-exertional fatigue among some Gulf War veterans with multi-symptom illnesses. Our observation that ill veterans with self-reported post-exertional fatigue had objective autonomic measures that were worse than controls warrants validation in a larger clinical series.

  17. Mechanical fatigue of thin copper foil

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, H.D.; Minor, M.G.; Liu, Y.L.

    1999-09-01

    The electrodeposited and the rolled 12 to 35 {micro}m thick copper foils are subjected to the bending/unbending strain-controlled flex fatigue over a wide range of strain amplitudes. The fatigue life is associated with an increase in electrical resistance of the specimen beyond a preassigned threshold. For each foil type, in the rolled or as-deposited as well as in the (recrystallization-like) annealed conditions, the inverse Coffin-Manson (C-M) relationship between strain amplitude ({Delta}{epsilon}/2) and fatigue life (N{sub f}) is established in the high {Delta}{epsilon}/2 (low N{sub f}) and the low {Delta}{epsilon}/2 (high N{sub f}) regimes. The N{sub f}, {Delta}{epsilon}/2, and C-M slopes (c,b) are utilized to calculate the cyclic strain hardening (n{prime}) and fatigue ductility (D{sub f}) parameters. It is shown that for a given foil thickness, an universal relationship exists between D{sub f} and the strength ({sigma}) normalized fatigue life (N{sub f}/{sigma}). The propagation of fatigue crack through the foil thickness and across the sample width is related to the unique fine grain structure for each foil type: pancaked grains for the rolled foil and equiaxed grains for the electrodeposited foil. The fatal failure corresponds to convergence of the through-thickness and the across-the-width fatigue cracks. The variations in (i) electrical resistance, (ii) mid-thickness microhardness and grain structure and (iii) dislocation configurations with fatigue are monitored. Except for a small but significant fatigue induced softening (or hardening), nonconvincing evidence of strain localization (and the associated dislocation configurations generally observed for the bulk samples) has been found.

  18. Chronic fatigue syndrome: aetiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Avellaneda Fernández, Alfredo; Pérez Martín, Álvaro; Izquierdo Martínez, Maravillas; Arruti Bustillo, Mar; Barbado Hernández, Francisco Javier; de la Cruz Labrado, Javier; Díaz-Delgado Peñas, Rafael; Gutiérrez Rivas, Eduardo; Palacín Delgado, Cecilia; Rivera Redondo, Javier; Ramón Giménez, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterised by intense fatigue, with duration of over six months and associated to other related symptoms. The latter include asthenia and easily induced tiredness that is not recovered after a night's sleep. The fatigue becomes so severe that it forces a 50% reduction in daily activities. Given its unknown aetiology, different hypotheses have been considered to explain the origin of the condition (from immunological disorders to the presence of post-traumatic oxidative stress), although there are no conclusive diagnostic tests. Diagnosis is established through the exclusion of other diseases causing fatigue. This syndrome is rare in childhood and adolescence, although the fatigue symptom per se is quite common in paediatric patients. Currently, no curative treatment exists for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. The therapeutic approach to this syndrome requires a combination of different therapeutic modalities. The specific characteristics of the symptomatology of patients with chronic fatigue require a rapid adaptation of the educational, healthcare and social systems to prevent the problems derived from current systems. Such patients require multidisciplinary management due to the multiple and different issues affecting them. This document was realized by one of the Interdisciplinary Work Groups from the Institute for Rare Diseases, and its aim is to point out the main social and care needs for people affected with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. For this, it includes not only the view of representatives for different scientific societies, but also the patient associations view, because they know the true history of their social and sanitary needs. In an interdisciplinary approach, this work also reviews the principal scientific, medical, socio-sanitary and psychological aspects of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. PMID:19857242

  19. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  20. Fatigue and hysteresis modeling of ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, In. K.; Desu, Seshu B.

    1993-10-01

    Due to their nonlinear properties, ferroelectric materials are ideal candidates for smart materials. Degradation properties such as low voltage breakdown, fatigue, and aging have been major problems in commercial applications of these materials. Such degradations affect the lifetime of ferroelectric materials. Therefore, it is important to understand degradation for reliability improvement. In this article, recent studies on fatigue and hysteresis of ferroelectric ceramics such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) thin films is reviewed. A new fatigue model is discussed in detail which is based on effective one-directional movement of defects by internal field difference, defect entrapment at the ferroelectrics-electrode interface, and resultant polarization loss at the interface. A fatigue equation derived from this model is presented. Fatigue parameters such as initial polarization, piling constant, and decay constant are defined from the fatigue equation and voltage and temperature dependence of fatigue parameters are discussed. The jump distance of defect calculated from voltage dependence of the decay constant is close to the lattice constant of ferroelectric materials, which implies that oxygen or lead vacancies migrate either parallel or antiparallel to the polarization direction. From the temperature dependence of the decay constant, it is shown that the activation energy for domain wall movement plays an important role in fatigue. The hysteresis model of ferroelectrics is shown using polarization reversal. The hysteresis loop is made by four polarization stages: nucleation, growth, merging, and shrinkage of domains. The hysteresis equation confirms that dielectric viscosity controls hysteresis properties, and temperature dependence of the coefficient of dielectric viscosity is also discussed in conjunction with fatigue mechanism.

  1. The relationship between observed fatigue damage and life estimation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurath, Peter; Socie, Darrell F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the surface of laboratory specimens subjected to axial and torsional fatigue loadings has resulted in the identification of three damage fatigue phenomena: crack nucleation, shear crack growth, and tensile crack growth. Material, microstructure, state of stress/strain, and loading amplitude all influence which of the three types of fatigue damage occurs during a dominant fatigue life fraction. Fatigue damage maps are employed to summarize the experimental observations. Appropriate bulk stress/strain damage parameters are suggested to model fatigue damage for the dominant fatigue life fraction. Extension of the damage map concept to more complex loadings is presented.

  2. Solder fatigue reduction in point focus photovoltaic concentrator modules

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, T.D.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    Solder fatigue tests have been conducted on point focus photovoltaic concentration cell assemblies to identify a baseline fatigue life and to quantify the fatigue life improvements that result using a copper-molybdenum-copper low-expansion insert between the solar cell and copper heat spreader. Solder microstructural changes and fatigue crack growth were identified using cross sections and ultrasonic scans of the fatigue solder joints. The Coffin-Manson and Total Strain fatigue models for low-cycle fatigue were evaluated for use in fatigue life predictions. Since both of these models require strain calculations, two strain calculation methods were compared: hand-calculated shear strain and a finite element method shear strain. At present, the available theoretical models for low-cycle solder fatigue are limited in their ability to predict failure; consequently, extensive thermal cycling is continuing to define the fatigue life for point focus photovoltaic cell assemblies. 9 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Inflammatory fatigue and sickness behaviour - lessons for the diagnosis and management of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arnett, S V; Clark, I A

    2012-12-10

    Persistent and severe fatigue is a common part of the presentation of a diverse range of disease processes. There is a growing body of evidence indicating a common inflammatory pathophysiology underlying many conditions where fatigue is a primary patient concern, including chronic fatigue syndrome. This review explores current models of how inflammatory mediators act on the central nervous system to produce fatigue and sickness behaviour, and the commonality of these processes in conditions as diverse as surgical trauma, infection, various cancers, inflammatory bowel disease, connective tissue diseases and autoimmune diseases. We also discuss evidence indicating chronic fatigue syndrome may have important pathophysiological similarities with cytokine mediated sickness behaviour, and what lessons can be applied from sickness behaviour to chronic fatigue syndrome with regards to the diagnosis and management.

  4. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  5. Fatigue failure of composite bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, P. D.; Sabbaghian, M.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a number of parameters on the fatigue characteristics of a bolted graphite/epoxy composite laminate are investigated. In particular, tests were performed in order to study the influence of three independent parameters; applied stress level, orientation of the outer layer reinforcing filaments, and the bolt torque level on the fatigue life of a graphite/epoxy composite. Analysis of variance and censoring techniques were used to analyze the experimentally obtained data. Fatigue life data was determined to be adequately characterized by using a log-normal distribution.

  6. Predicting Fatigue Lives Under Complex Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Nelson, R. S.; Janitor, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) computer program performs high-temperature, low-cycle-fatigue life prediction for materials analysis. Designed to account for effects on creep-fatigue life of complex loadings involving such factors as thermomechanical fatigue, hold periods, wave-shapes, mean stresses, multiaxiality, cumulative damage, coatings, and environmental attack. Several features practical for application to actual component analysis using modern finite-element or boundary-element methods. Although developed for use in predicting crack-initiation lifetimes of gas-turbine-engine materials, also applied to other materials as well. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  7. System for estimating fatigue damage

    DOEpatents

    LeMonds, Jeffrey; Guzzo, Judith Ann; Liu, Shaopeng; Dani, Uttara Ashwin

    2017-03-14

    In one aspect, a system for estimating fatigue damage in a riser string is provided. The system includes a plurality of accelerometers which can be deployed along a riser string and a communications link to transmit accelerometer data from the plurality of accelerometers to one or more data processors in real time. With data from a limited number of accelerometers located at sensor locations, the system estimates an optimized current profile along the entire length of the riser including riser locations where no accelerometer is present. The optimized current profile is then used to estimate damage rates to individual riser components and to update a total accumulated damage to individual riser components. The number of sensor locations is small relative to the length of a deepwater riser string, and a riser string several miles long can be reliably monitored along its entire length by fewer than twenty sensor locations.

  8. Endothelial cell dysfunction in viral hemorrhage and edema

    PubMed Central

    Mackow, Erich R.; Gorbunova, Elena E.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium maintains a vascular barrier by controlling platelet and immune cell interactions, capillary tone and interendothelial cell (EC) adherence. Here we suggest common elements in play during viral infection of the endothelium that alter normal EC functions and contribute to lethal hemorrhagic or edematous diseases. In viral reservoir hosts, infection of capillaries and lymphatic vessels may direct immunotolerance without disease, but in the absence of these cognate interactions they direct the delayed onset of human disease characterized by thrombocytopenia and vascular leakage in a severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome. Here we present insight into EC controls of hemostasis, immune response and capillary permeability that are altered by viral infection of the endothelium. PMID:25601858

  9. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood–brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:27230462

  10. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Min-Jung; Kwon, Min-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  11. Fatigue Test Design: Scenarios for Biaxial Fatigue Testing of a 60-Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Current practice in commercial certification of wind turbine blades is to perform separate flap and lead-lag fatigue tests. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching and evaluating biaxial fatigue testing techniques and demonstrating various options, typically on smaller-scale test articles at the National Wind Technology Center. This report evaluates some of these biaxial fatigue options in the context of application to a multimegawatt blade certification test program at the Wind Technology Testing Center in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

  12. Corrosion on Fatigue and Fatigue Crack Growth in Aircraft Structural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    fatigue initiated by stress corrosion cracking and thus is not directly relevant o this work except that conceptually iL has similarities. The other paper...34 Corrosion Fatigue Initiated by Stress Corrosion Cracking ", personal coi’iuni cation. 12. II. Kitagaw,.:a, T. Fugita, K. Miyazawa, "Sniall Randomly...a result, extensive research on corrosion fatigue has led to the traditional model which superimposes the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon upon

  13. Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

    2014-06-01

    Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs.

  14. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Westover, Jonna B.; Rosenspire, Allen J.

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects. PMID:22928105

  15. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  16. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  17. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut.

  18. Evaluating Fatigue in Operational Settings: The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin; Miller, Donna; Webbon, Lissa; Oyung, Ray

    1996-01-01

    In response to a 1980 Congressional request, NASA Ames initiated a program to examine fatigue in flight operations. The Program objectives are to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations, determine the effects of these factors on flight crew performance, and the development of fatigue countermeasures. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program conducts controlled laboratory experiments, full-mission flight simulations, and field studies. A range of subjective, behavioral, performance, physiological, and environmental measures are used depending on study objectives. The Program has developed substantial expertise in gathering data during actual flight operations and in other work settings. This has required the development of ambulatory and other measures that can be carried throughout the world and used at 41,000 feet in aircraft cockpits. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has examined fatigue in shorthaul, longhaul, overnight cargo, and helicopter operations. A recent study of planned cockpit rest periods demonstrated the effectiveness of a brief inflight nap to improve pilot performance and alertness. This study involved inflight reaction time/vigilance performance testing and EEG/EOG measures of physiological alertness. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has applied scientific findings to the development of education and training materials on fatigue countermeasures, input to federal regulatory activities on pilot flight, duty, and rest requirements, and support of National Transportation Safety Board accident investigations. Current activities are examining fatigue in nonaugmented longhaul flights, regional/commuter flight operations, corporate/business aviation, and psychophysiological variables related to performance.

  19. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  20. Development and characterization of fatigue resistant Aramid reinforced aluminium laminates (ARALL) for fatigue Critical aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, M. H.; Umar, S.; Nauman, S.

    2014-06-01

    The structural weight of an aircraft has always been a controlling parameter that governs its fuel efficiency and transport capacity. In pursuit of achieving light-weight aircraft structures, high design stress levels have to be adopted and materials with high specific strength such as Aluminum etc. are to be deployed. However, an extensive spectrum of fatigue load exists at the aircraft wings and other aerodynamic components that may cause initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks and concludes in a catastrophic rupture. Fatigue is therefore the limiting design parameter in such cases and materials with high fatigue resistance are then required. A major improvement in the fatigue behavior was observed by laminating Kevlar fibers with Aluminum using epoxy. ARALL (Aramid Reinforced ALuminum Laminates) is a fatigue resistant hybrid composite that consists of layers of thin high strength aluminum alloy sheets surface bonded with aramid fibers. The intact aramid fibers tie up the fatigue cracks, thus reducing the stress intensity factor at the crack tip as a result of which the fatigue properties of can be enhanced with orders of magnitude as compared to monolithic high strength Aluminum alloy sheets. Significant amount of weight savings can be achieved in fatigue critical components in comparison with the traditional materials used in aircraft.