Science.gov

Sample records for fatigue immune dysfunction

  1. Retroviral sequences related to human T-lymphotropic virus type II in patients with chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    DeFreitas, E.; Hilliard, B.; Cheney, P.R.; Bell, D.S.; Kiggundu, E.; Sankey, D.; Wroblewska, Z.; Palladino, M.; Woodward, J.P.; Koprowski, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) is a recently recognized illness characterized by debilitating fatigue as well as immunological and neurological abnormalities. Once thought to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, it is now thought to have a different but unknown etiology. The authors evaluted 30 adult and pediatric CFIDS patients from six eastern states for the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I and II by Western immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization of blood samples. The majority of patients were positive for HTLV antibodies by Western blotting and for HTLV-II gag sequences by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Twenty nonexposure healthy controls were negative in all assays. These data support an association between an HTLV-II-like virus and CFIDS.

  2. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: immune dysfunction, role of pathogens and toxic agents and neurological and cardial changes].

    PubMed

    Hilgers, A; Frank, J

    1994-01-01

    375 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) were examined using a standardized questionnaire and subsequent interview on 11 risk factors and 45 symptoms. Additionally immunologic, serologic, toxicologic, neuroradiologic, neurophysiologic and cardiologic investigations were performed. Immunologic tests showed cellular immunodeficiences particularly in functional regard (pathological lymphocyte stimulation in 50% of the patients, disorders of granulocyte function in 44%). Furthermore variable deviations were found in the lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, DR, Leu 11 + 19). In the humoral part tendencies to low IgG-3- and IgG-1-subclass-levels occurred (59% respectively 11% of the patients) also as decreases in complement system (CH50, C3, C4, C1-esterase-inhibitor). In the group of activation markers and cytokines 42% of the investigated patients had circulating immune complexes (CIC), 47% increases of tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF-a) and 21% increases of soluble interleukin-2-receptor (IL-2-R). The increased occurrence of autoantibodies in the CFS-patients (specially antinuclear anti-bodies [ANA], microsomal thyroid antibodies) suggest, that CFS is associated with or the beginning of manifest autoimmune disease. Under the pathogens 78% of the patients had a striking serological constellation of Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV-EA positive, low EBNA-titers), in the HHV-6-Virus 47% showed increased antibody-titers. Tests on further herpes viruses and on Borreliae, Chlamydiae, Candida and Amoebae were positive in 8 to 36% of the examined patients. Furthermore there were found variable deficits of vitamins and trace elements also as hormonal disturbances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Review: Vitamin D3 deficiency results in dysfunctions of immunity with severe fatigue and depression in a variety of diseases.

    PubMed

    Höck, Anna Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Recent immune data on vitamin D3 deficiency help to more clearly understand chronic fatiguing illnesses, such as autoimmune disorders, cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The vitamin D3 pathway is activated by stress and requires sufficient stores of precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 for proper cell and immune functions. In vitamin D3 deficiency, secretion of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin is reduced, leading to impaired auto/xenophagy. As a result, phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, antigen processing and antigen presentation become dysregulated. In addition, vitamin D3 deficiency affects T- and B-lymphocyte activation, as well as quantity, maturation and function of regulatory natural killer T-cells and their counterparts in the gut, i.e. T-cell receptor-αβ, cluster of differentiation-8αα-positive intraepithelial lymphocytes. Consequently, innate and adaptive immunity become de-regulated, with microbial effects contributing further to this. Persistent infections, chronic inflammation and fatigue follow. Vitamin D3 substitution in such conditions may help to prevent or to ameliorate such chronic conditions, even in patients with cancer.

  4. Immune Dysfunction in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Mohd Talha; Manoria, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cirrhosis due to any etiology disrupts the homeostatic role of liver in the body. Cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction leads to alterations in both innate and acquired immunity, due to defects in the local immunity of liver as well as in systemic immunity. Cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction is a dynamic phenomenon, comprised of both increased systemic inflammation and immunodeficiency, and is responsible for 30% mortality. It also plays an important role in acute as well as chronic decompensation. Immune paralysis can accompany it, which is characterized by increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines. There is also presence of increased gut permeability, reduced gut motility and altered gut flora, all of which leads to increased bacterial translocation. This increased bacterial translocation and consequent endotoxemia leads to increased blood stream bacterial infections that cause systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, multiorgan failure and death. The gut microbiota of cirrhotic patients has more pathogenic microbes than that of non-cirrhotic individuals, and this disturbs the homeostasis and favors gut translocation. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of such infections are necessary for better survival. We have reviewed the various mechanisms of immune dysfunction and its consequences in cirrhosis. Recognizing the exact pathophysiology of immune dysfunction will help treating clinicians in avoiding its complications in their patients and can lead to newer therapeutic interventions and reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:28507927

  5. Immune dysfunction in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sipeki, Nora; Antal-Szalmas, Peter; Lakatos, Peter L; Papp, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, also referred to as cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, is a major component of cirrhosis, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both the acute and chronic worsening of liver function. During the evolution of the disease, acute decompensation events associated with organ failure(s), so-called acute-on chronic liver failure, and chronic decompensation with progression of liver fibrosis and also development of disease specific complications, comprise distinct clinical entities with different immunopathology mechanisms. Enhanced bacterial translocation associated with systemic endotoxemia and increased occurrence of systemic bacterial infections have substantial impacts on both clinical situations. Acute and chronic exposure to bacteria and/or their products, however, can result in variable clinical consequences. The immune status of patients is not constant during the illness; consequently, alterations of the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes result in very different dynamic courses. In this review we give a detailed overview of acquired immune dysfunction and its consequences for cirrhosis. We demonstrate the substantial influence of inherited innate immune dysfunction on acute and chronic inflammatory processes in cirrhosis caused by the pre-existing acquired immune dysfunction with limited compensatory mechanisms. Moreover, we highlight the current facts and future perspectives of how the assessment of immune dysfunction can assist clinicians in everyday practical decision-making when establishing treatment and care strategies for the patients with end-stage liver disease. Early and efficient recognition of inappropriate performance of the immune system is essential for overcoming complications, delaying progression and reducing mortality. PMID:24627592

  6. Association of mitochondrial dysfunction and fatigue: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Filler, Kristin; Lyon, Debra; Bennett, James; McCain, Nancy; Elswick, Ronald; Lukkahatai, Nada; Saligan, Leorey N.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is often described by patients as a lack of energy, mental or physical tiredness, diminished endurance, and prolonged recovery after physical activity. Etiologic mechanisms underlying fatigue are not well understood; however, fatigue is a hallmark symptom of mitochondrial disease, making mitochondrial dysfunction a putative biological mechanism for fatigue. Therefore, this review examined studies that investigated the association of markers of mitochondrial dysfunction with fatigue and proposes possible research directions to enhance understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in fatigue. A thorough search using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase databases returned 1220 articles. After the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 25 articles meeting eligibility criteria were selected for full review. Dysfunctions in the mitochondrial structure, mitochondrial function (mitochondrial enzymes and oxidative/nitrosative stress), mitochondrial energy metabolism (ATP production and fatty acid metabolism), immune response, and genetics were investigated as potential contributors to fatigue. Carnitine was the most investigated mitochondrial function marker. Dysfunctional levels were reported in all the studies investigating carnitine; however, the specific type of carnitine that was dysfunctional varied. Genetic profiles were the second most studied mitochondrial parameter. Six common pathways were proposed: metabolism, energy production, protein transport, mitochondrial morphology, central nervous system dysfunction and post-viral infection. Coenzyme Q10 was the most commonly investigated mitochondrial enzyme. Low levels of Coenzyme Q10 were consistently associated with fatigue. Potential targets for further investigation were identified as well as gaps in the current literature. PMID:25147756

  7. Effects of Nutritional Supplementation on Fatigue, and Autonomic and Immune Dysfunction in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Sanae; Koyama, Hidenori; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Hisako; Hirayama, Yoshinobu; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okamura, Mikio; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Okada, Shigeki; Hirata, Sumio; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Kajimoto, Osami; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Inaba, Masaaki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis treatment. We hypothesized that multinutritional support would improve quality of life, fatigue symptoms, and potential quantitative measures including endocrine, immune and autonomic functions in patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis. Methods Two hundred and two hemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to receive active treatment (containing vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin C, carnitine, coenzyme Q10, naïve galacto-oligosaccharide, and zinc) or placebo after each dialysis session for 12 weeks. The patients and attending physicians were blinded to the treatment, and 172 patients (86 in each group) completed the study. Fatigue was evaluated via fatigue questionnaire at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. To assess human herpes virus (HHV) 6 and 7 reactivation, numbers of viral DNA copies were determined in saliva by polymerase chain reaction at weeks 0 and 12. Autonomic function was determined via measurement of beat-to-beat variation by using acceleration plethysmography. Results Clinical characteristics, changes in fatigue, quality of life score, endocrine functions, and laboratory data did not differ significantly between the two groups. Several parameters of heart rate variability significantly increased after nutritional treatment compared to placebo. Nutritional drink for 12 weeks significantly suppressed HHV7 DNA copy numbers. Similarly, HHV6 DNA copy numbers tended to be decreased by treatment but without reaching statistical significance. Conclusions Nutritional supplementation may modulate immune and autonomic dysfunction in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:25746727

  8. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease.

  9. Autonomic dysfunction, immune regulation, and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    To review existing evidence regarding interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system functions in multiple sclerosis. We reviewed the literature regarding new insights linking autonomic dysfunction to immune deregulation in multiple sclerosis, with particular focus on the specific influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction on inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. Autonomic dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis, representing a significant cause of disability. Several connections between pathologic immune pathways and the autonomic nervous system function were found. Autonomic dysfunction may enhance inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways that are of major importance in multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction can present with highly variable manifestations. Sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction displays different patterns in multiple sclerosis, with specific impact on inflammation and neurodegeneration.

  10. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Ward, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after “recovery” from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical “recovery,” with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  11. The Neuro-Immune Pathophysiology of Central and Peripheral Fatigue in Systemic Immune-Inflammatory and Neuro-Immune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Berk, Michael; Galecki, Piotr; Walder, Ken; Maes, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Many patients with systemic immune-inflammatory and neuro-inflammatory disorders, including depression, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's disease, cancer, cardiovascular disorder, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, endure pathological levels of fatigue. The aim of this narrative review is to delineate the wide array of pathways that may underpin the incapacitating fatigue occurring in systemic and neuro-inflammatory disorders. A wide array of immune, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), bioenergetic, and neurophysiological abnormalities are involved in the etiopathology of these disease states and may underpin the incapacitating fatigue that accompanies these disorders. This range of abnormalities comprises: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and interferon (IFN) α; O&NS-induced muscle fatigue; activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Cycle through pathogen-associated (PAMPs) and damage-associated (DAMPs) molecular patterns, including heat shock proteins; altered glutaminergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission; mitochondrial dysfunctions; and O&NS-induced defects in the sodium-potassium pump. Fatigue is also associated with altered activities in specific brain regions and muscle pathology, such as reductions in maximum voluntary muscle force, downregulation of the mitochondrial biogenesis master gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, a shift to glycolysis and buildup of toxic metabolites within myocytes. As such, both mental and physical fatigue, which frequently accompany immune-inflammatory and neuro-inflammatory disorders, are the consequence of interactions between multiple systemic and central pathways.

  12. Immune Dysfunction in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Ishraga; Edwards, Mark J.; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    The association between immunity and neurodevelopmental disorders has been extensively investigated in autism, suggesting a potential involvement of both cellular and humoral immunity in the establishment of synaptic connectivity modulation during development. A similar link has been proposed also for Tourette syndrome (TS), a complex, multifactorial disorder, in which the interplay between genetic, environmental, hormonal and immunological factors might be relevant. Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis in TS suggests a possible systemic activation of several T- and B-cell subtypes, whereas the observed decreased numbers of T regulatory lymphocytes might predispose to autoimmunity. Genes related to both cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses may be over-expressed at specific ages in youngsters with TS. Data from cytokine measurements and transcriptomics profiles in TS patients are coherent with the systemic immune activation detected by studies on lymphocyte subpopulations. Moreover, TS patients have exhibited IgG3 and IgA dysgammaglobulinemia, which might predispose to recurrent infections and autoimmunity. To date, the association between TS and autoantibodies has not been demonstrated. Interestingly, however, there is a higher degree of maternal family history of autoimmune diseases among TS patients. Finally, TS patients could be prone to allergic illnesses (asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, conjunctivitis), but more work is needed in this area. PMID:23187145

  13. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0388 TITLE: Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling 5b. GRANT...at the HLA level that makes you more susceptible to have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) or any differences between the cases and controls. In order

  14. Fatigue, brain, behavior, and immunity: summary of the 2012 Named Series on fatigue.

    PubMed

    Bower, Julienne E

    2012-11-01

    The focus on fatigue for the 2012 Named Series in brain, behavior, and immunity reflects the growing wave of research examining immune underpinnings of fatigue in healthy and clinical populations. Fatigue is prevalent in the general population and in patients with a variety of medical conditions. However, the etiology of fatigue remains elusive. Psychoneuroimmunological approaches to fatigue have yielded important advances in our understanding of this complex symptom and are represented in the twelve articles included in the Named Series. These articles include animal and human models of fatigue and cross a variety of different medical conditions, including cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, and diabetes. This review briefly summarizes the articles included in the series and highlights the themes that have emerged from this body of work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune dysfunction in uremia—an update.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gerald; Hörl, Walter H

    2012-10-24

    Kidney dysfunction leads to disturbed renal metabolic activities and to impaired glomerular filtration, resulting in the retention of toxic solutes affecting all organs of the body. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections are the main causes for the increased occurrence of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both complications are directly or indirectly linked to a compromised immune defense. The specific coordinated roles of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in maintaining an efficient immune response are affected. Their normal response can be impaired, giving rise to infectious diseases or pre-activated/primed, leading to inflammation and consequently to CVD. Whereas the coordinated removal via apoptosis of activated immune cells is crucial for the resolution of inflammation, inappropriately high apoptotic rates lead to a diminished immune response. In uremia, the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory and between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors is disturbed. This review summarizes the interrelated parameters interfering with the immune response in uremia, with a special focus on the non-specific immune response and the role of uremic toxins.

  16. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  17. Endocrine dysfunction following immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Konda, Bhavana; Nabhan, Fadi; Shah, Manisha H

    2017-10-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) represent an important milestone in the modern era of antineoplastic therapy and have ushered optimism amongst oncologists and patients alike. These agents, however, are associated with significant potential toxicities, the importance of which cannot be overstated. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies of immune-related endocrinopathies associated with ICI use are described in this case-based review. An increasing number of ICI have shown promise in the management of various malignancies in the recent years. These include cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 inhibitors, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) antibodies, and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies. Several endocrinopathies, including hypophysitis, thyroid dysfunction, hyperglycemia, and primary adrenal insufficiency, have been associated with the use of these agents. Toxicities may range from mild transient laboratory abnormalities to potentially life-threatening ones, warranting immediate therapeutic intervention. Combination ICI therapies may be associated with a greater risk of endocrine dysfunction when compared with monotherapy. The clinical presentation and laboratory assessment of these patients often pose a diagnostic challenge as they may be confused by the symptoms related to their underlying malignancy or potential associated acute illnesses. ICI use is associated with serious endocrinopathies that may have a nonspecific initial presentation. A constant eye for these symptoms and a systematic approach to diagnosis are essential for prompt initiation of therapy and prevention of significant complications.

  18. Serotonergic dysfunctions and abnormal iron metabolism: Relevant to mental fatigue of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li-Jun; Yu, Shu-Yang; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Piao, Ying-Shan; Lian, Teng-Hong; Yu, Qiu-Jin; Wang, Rui-Dan; Li, Li-Xia; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Zhu, Rong-Yan; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Ya-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chan, Piu; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue is a very common non-motor symptom in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. It included physical fatigue and mental fatigue. The potential mechanisms of mental fatigue involving serotonergic dysfunction and abnormal iron metabolism are still unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the fatigue symptoms, classified PD patients into fatigue group and non-fatigue group, and detected the levels of serotonin, iron and related proteins in CSF and serum. In CSF, 5-HT level is significantly decreased and the levels of iron and transferrin are dramatically increased in fatigue group. In fatigue group, mental fatigue score is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF, and positively correlated with the scores of depression and excessive daytime sleepiness, and disease duration, also, mental fatigue is positively correlated with the levels of iron and transferrin in CSF. Transferrin level is negatively correlated with 5-HT level in CSF. In serum, the levels of 5-HT and transferrin are markedly decreased in fatigue group; mental fatigue score exhibits a negative correlation with 5-HT level. Thus serotonin dysfunction in both central and peripheral systems may be correlated with mental fatigue through abnormal iron metabolism. Depression, excessive daytime sleepiness and disease duration were the risk factors for mental fatigue of PD.

  19. Improving fatigue assessment in immune-mediated neuropathies: the modified Rasch-built fatigue severity scale.

    PubMed

    van Nes, Sonja I; Vanhoutte, Els K; Faber, Catharina G; Garssen, Marcel; van Doorn, Pieter A; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue is a major disabling complaint in patients with immune-mediated neuropathies (IN). The 9-item fatigue severity scale (FSS) has been used to assess fatigue in these conditions, despite having limitations due to its classic ordinal construct. The aim was to improve fatigue assessment in IN through evaluation of the FSS using a modern clinimetric approach [Rasch unidimensional measurement model (RUMM2020)]. Included were 192 stable patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) or polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUSP). The obtained FSS data were exposed to RUMM2020 model to investigate whether this scale would meet its expectations. Also, reliability and validity studies were performed. The original FSS did not meet the Rasch model expectations, primarily based on two misfitting items, one of these also showing bias towards the factor 'walking independent.' After removing these two items and collapsing the original 7-point Likert options to 4-point response categories for the remaining items, we succeeded in constructing a 7-item Rasch-built scale that fulfilled all requirements of unidimensionality, linearity, and rating scale model. Good reliability and validity were also obtained for the modified FSS scale. In conclusion, a 7-item linearly weighted Rasch-built modified FSS is presented for more proper assessment of fatigue in future studies in patients with immune-mediated neuropathies.

  20. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have successfully performed all testing of the approximately 600 samples (200 CFS /ME patients vs 397 healthy...in the pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome ( CFS )/myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). It is likely that these findings will also result in an...unveil the pathogenesis of ME/ CFS and subsequently of GWI. It appears that we will gain a significant understanding of the immune responses and

  1. Monitoring of the Immune Dysfunction in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Welters, Marij J. P.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy shows promising clinical results in patients with different types of cancer, but its full potential is not reached due to immune dysfunction as a result of several suppressive mechanisms that play a role in cancer development and progression. Monitoring of immune dysfunction is a prerequisite for the development of strategies aiming to alleviate cancer-induced immune suppression. At this point, the level at which immune dysfunction occurs has to be established, the underlying mechanism(s) need to be known, as well as the techniques to assess this. While it is relatively easy to measure general signs of immune suppression, it turns out that accurate monitoring of the frequency and function of immune-suppressive cells is still difficult. A lack of truly specific markers, the phenotypic complexity among suppressive cells of the same lineage, but potentially with different functions and functional assays that may not cover every mechanistic aspect of immune suppression are among the reasons complicating proper assessments. Technical innovations in flow and mass cytometry will allow for more complete sets of markers to precisely determine phenotype and associated function. There is, however, a clear need for functional assays that recapitulate more of the mechanisms employed to suppress the immune system. PMID:27598210

  2. Monitoring of the Immune Dysfunction in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2016-09-02

    Immunotherapy shows promising clinical results in patients with different types of cancer, but its full potential is not reached due to immune dysfunction as a result of several suppressive mechanisms that play a role in cancer development and progression. Monitoring of immune dysfunction is a prerequisite for the development of strategies aiming to alleviate cancer-induced immune suppression. At this point, the level at which immune dysfunction occurs has to be established, the underlying mechanism(s) need to be known, as well as the techniques to assess this. While it is relatively easy to measure general signs of immune suppression, it turns out that accurate monitoring of the frequency and function of immune-suppressive cells is still difficult. A lack of truly specific markers, the phenotypic complexity among suppressive cells of the same lineage, but potentially with different functions and functional assays that may not cover every mechanistic aspect of immune suppression are among the reasons complicating proper assessments. Technical innovations in flow and mass cytometry will allow for more complete sets of markers to precisely determine phenotype and associated function. There is, however, a clear need for functional assays that recapitulate more of the mechanisms employed to suppress the immune system.

  3. Frontier studies on fatigue, autonomic nerve dysfunction, and sleep-rhythm disorder.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Tajima, Seiki; Mizuno, Kei; Ishii, Akira; Konishi, Yukuo; Miike, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is defined as a condition or phenomenon of decreased ability and efficiency of mental and/or physical activities, caused by excessive mental or physical activities, diseases, or syndromes. It is often accompanied by a peculiar sense of discomfort, a desire to rest, and reduced motivation, referred to as fatigue sensation. Acute fatigue is a normal condition or phenomenon that disappears after a period of rest; in contrast, chronic fatigue, lasting at least 6 months, does not disappear after ordinary rest. Chronic fatigue impairs activities and contributes to various medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, epileptic seizures, and death. In addition, many people complain of chronic fatigue. For example, in Japan, more than one third of the general adult population complains of chronic fatigue. It would thus be of great value to clarify the mechanisms underlying chronic fatigue and to develop efficient treatment methods to overcome it. Here, we review data primarily from behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging experiments related to neural dysfunction as well as autonomic nervous system, sleep, and circadian rhythm disorders in fatigue. These data provide new perspectives on the mechanisms underlying chronic fatigue and on overcoming it.

  4. Immune activation during cerebellar dysfunction following Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    de Silva, H J; Hoang, P; Dalton, H; de Silva, N R; Jewell, D P; Peiris, J B

    1992-01-01

    Evidence for immune activation was investigated in 12 patients with a rare syndrome of self-limiting, delayed onset cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria which occurred 18-26 d previously. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 6 and interleukin 2 were all significantly higher in serum samples of patients during cerebellar ataxia than in recovery sera and in the sera of 8 patients who did not develop delayed cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria. Cytokine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were also significantly higher in ataxic patients than in controls. These findings suggest that immunological mechanisms may play a role in delayed cerebellar dysfunction following falciparum malaria.

  5. Epigenetic Dysfunction in Turner Syndrome Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Bradly J; Hong, Lee Kyung; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition associated with partial or complete absence of the X chromosome that involves characteristic findings in multiple organ systems. In addition to well-known clinical characteristics such as short stature and gonadal failure, TS is also associated with T cell immune alterations and chronic otitis media, suggestive of a possible immune deficiency. Recently, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on the X chromosome (UTX), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been identified as a downregulated gene in TS immune cells. Importantly, UTX is an X-linked gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation and thus is haploinsufficient in TS. Mice with T cell-specific UTX deficiency have impaired clearance of chronic viral infection due to decreased frequencies of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which are critical for B cell antibody generation. In parallel, TS patients have decreased Tfh frequencies in peripheral blood. Together, these findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the X-linked UTX gene in TS T cells underlies an immune deficit, which may manifest as increased predisposition to chronic otitis media.

  6. Problems with balance and binocular visual dysfunction are associated with post-stroke fatigue.

    PubMed

    Schow, Trine; Teasdale, Thomas William; Quas, Kirsten Jensen; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue after stroke is hard to define and measure and how it is associated with other complications after stroke still needs to be explored. These issues are relevant in stroke rehabilitation and in the patient's daily life. To investigate fatigue after stroke and its relation to balance, gait, and Binocular Visual Dysfunction (BVD). Adults with stroke (n = 29, age 18-67 years) were tested with the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), objective and subjective BVD measures, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, Ten Meter Walk Test, and a Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire, before and after a four-month intervention program and at three- and six-month follow-ups. We used principle component analysis to extract underlying factors of MFIS. Associations between MFIS factors and patient characteristics were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. The associations between MFIS factors and physical measures were assessed using pairwise correlations. Three components were extracted from the MFIS, explaining 71% of variance: Cognitive fatigue, Physical fatigue and Arousal. We found that women register higher MFIS scores than men. There was a strong association between the level of Cognitive and Physical Fatigue and BVD, between Arousal and balance and dizziness, and between Cognitive Fatigue and gait. The three extracted components of MFIS proved clinically informative. The arousal component revealed particularly interesting results in studying fatigue. The correlation analysis shown at this component differs from cognitive and physical fatigue and describes another aspect of PSF, important in future treatment and research.

  7. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Miller, Caragh; Singh, Sukhbir S; Thomas, Richard; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis.

  8. Radiation-Induced Hemopoietic and Immune Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    with a povidone -iodine scrub and an alcohol rinse. Marrow cells obtained six days, after TBI were used as antigen for the immunization of mice. At this...detected by FACS analysis after treatment with antibody and complement. Recovery of white blood cells an1 platelet counts was comparable to the recovery...in triplicate in CFU-GM assay. Each point represents the cumulative number of weekly CFU-GM. need to be autologous compared to the cells of the

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  10. Innate immune dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gersemann, M; Wehkamp, J; Stange, E F

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms that cause the two types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are still under investigation. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that luminal microbes are of particular relevance in the development of these conditions. In recent years, increasing evidence has shown that defects in the innate immunity are at the centre of both types of IBD. The innate intestinal barrier is provided by the epithelium which secretes antimicrobial peptides (so-called defensins) that are retained in the mucus layer. In ileal CD, the alpha-defensins are lacking owing to several Paneth cell defects. In colonic CD, the expression of beta-defensins is inadequate. This may be related to downregulation of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and in some cohorts is associated with a reduced HBD2 gene copy number. In UC, the mucus layer, which protects the host from the enormous amounts of luminal microbes, is defective. This is accompanied by an insufficient differentiation from intestinal stem cells towards goblet cells. All these disturbances in the gut barrier shift the balance from epithelial defence towards bacterial offence. The current treatment for CD and UC is based on suppression of this secondary inflammatory process. In future, patients may benefit from new therapeutic approaches stimulating the protective innate immune system.

  11. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Miller, Caragh; Singh, Sukhbir S.; Thomas, Richard; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis. PMID:26247027

  12. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  13. Muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  14. Muscle Fatigue in the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:25883949

  15. The effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Guang

    2003-12-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue has long been an important field in sports medicine. The electron leak of mitochondrial respiratory chain during the ATP synthesis integrated with proton leak and O-.2 can decrease the efficiency of ATP synthesis in mitochondria. And the exercise-induced fatigue occur followed by the decrease of performance. If the dysfunction of mitochondria can be avoided, the fatigue during the exercise may be delayed and the performance may be enhanced. Indeed there are some kind of materials can partially prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency in mitochondria. But the side effects and safety of these materials is still needed to be studied. Low intensity laser can improve the mitochondria function. It is reasonable to consider that low intensity laser therapy may become the new and more effective way to delay or elimination the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria. Because the effect of laser irradiation may not be controlled exactly when study in vivo, we use electrical stimulation of C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define the effect of low intensity laser on the dysfunction of mitochondria, and to define the optimal laser intensity to prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency. Our study use the C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define some of the mechanisms involved in the contractile-induced changes of mitochondrial function firstly in sports medicine and may suggest a useful study way to other researchers. We also give a new way to delay or eliminating the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria without side effect.

  16. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Immune-Inflammatory Pathways in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been classified as a disease of the central nervous system by the WHO since 1969. Many patients carrying this diagnosis do demonstrate an almost bewildering array of biological abnormalities particularly the presence of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and a chronically activated innate immune system. The proposal made herein is that once generated chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways conspire to generate a multitude of self-sustaining and self-amplifying pathological processes which are associated with the onset of ME/CFS. Sources of continuous activation of O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are chronic, intermittent and opportunistic infections, bacterial translocation, autoimmune responses, mitochondrial dysfunctions, activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle, and decreased antioxidant levels. Consequences of chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are brain disorders, including neuroinflammation and brain hypometabolism / hypoperfusion, toxic effects of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, secondary autoimmune responses directed against disrupted lipid membrane components and proteins, mitochondrial dysfunctions with a disruption of energy metabolism (e.g. compromised ATP production) and dysfunctional intracellular signaling pathways. The interplay between all of these factors leads to self-amplifying feed forward loops causing a chronic state of activated O&NS, immune-inflammatory and autoimmune pathways which may sustain the disease. PMID:24669210

  17. A neuro-immune model of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a neuro-immune model for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). A wide range of immunological and neurological abnormalities have been reported in people suffering from ME/CFS. They include abnormalities in proinflammatory cytokines, raised production of nuclear factor-κB, mitochondrial dysfunctions, autoimmune responses, autonomic disturbances and brain pathology. Raised levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), together with reduced levels of antioxidants are indicative of an immuno-inflammatory pathology. A number of different pathogens have been reported either as triggering or maintaining factors. Our model proposes that initial infection and immune activation caused by a number of possible pathogens leads to a state of chronic peripheral immune activation driven by activated O&NS pathways that lead to progressive damage of self epitopes even when the initial infection has been cleared. Subsequent activation of autoreactive T cells conspiring with O&NS pathways cause further damage and provoke chronic activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways. The subsequent upregulation of proinflammatory compounds may activate microglia via the vagus nerve. Elevated proinflammatory cytokines together with raised O&NS conspire to produce mitochondrial damage. The subsequent ATP deficit together with inflammation and O&NS are responsible for the landmark symptoms of ME/CFS, including post-exertional malaise. Raised levels of O&NS subsequently cause progressive elevation of autoimmune activity facilitated by molecular mimicry, bystander activation or epitope spreading. These processes provoke central nervous system (CNS) activation in an attempt to restore immune homeostatsis. This model proposes that the antagonistic activities of the CNS response to peripheral inflammation, O&NS and chronic immune activation are responsible for the remitting-relapsing nature of ME/CFS. Leads for future research are suggested based on this

  18. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  19. [Immune dysfunction in highly skilled athletes and nutritional rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Trushina, E N; Mustafina, O K; Nikitiuk, D B; Kuznetsov, V D

    2012-01-01

    The present review examines the effects of strenuous and moderate exercise on various components of the immune system including humoral and cell immunity. Acute exercise have been found to affect lymphocyte subsets, immunoglobulin levels, the activity of mononuclear phagocytic system, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cytokine levels, especially IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF. The extreme type of immune deficiency in sportsmen, in which there are not determine different isotypes of immunoglobulins, there are described as phenomenon of Ig disappearance. The immune suppression is associated with an increased risk of subclinical and clinical infection in athletes. The mechanisms immunodeficiency are multifactorial and include neuroendocrinologocal and metabolic disorders. The immunosuppression in sportsmen may be prevented by use of special diets. Although athletes need to eat a well-balanced basic diet, there are several nutritional factors that are difficult to obtain at a sufficient level from a normal diet since athletes require more nutrients than the recommended daily allowances. Thus, appropriate nutrition enrichment of special products and food supplements containing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, probiotics is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, recovery from fatigue after exercise and ward off immunodeficiency.

  20. Giardia-specific cellular immune responses in post-giardiasis chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanevik, Kurt; Kristoffersen, Einar; Mørch, Kristine; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Sørnes, Steinar; Svärd, Staffan; Bruserud, Øystein; Langeland, Nina

    2017-01-28

    The role of pathogen specific cellular immune responses against the eliciting pathogen in development of post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome (PI-CFS) is not known and such studies are difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate specific anti-Giardia cellular immunity in cases that developed CFS after Giardia infection compared to cases that recovered well. Patients reporting chronic fatigue in a questionnaire study three years after a Giardia outbreak were clinically evaluated five years after the outbreak and grouped according to Fukuda criteria for CFS and idiopathic chronic fatigue. Giardia specific immune responses were evaluated in 39 of these patients by proliferation assay, T cell activation and cytokine release analysis. 20 Giardia exposed non-fatigued individuals and 10 healthy unexposed individuals were recruited as controls. Patients were clinically classified into CFS (n = 15), idiopathic chronic fatigue (n = 5), fatigue from other causes (n = 9) and recovered from fatigue (n = 10). There were statistically significant antigen specific differences between these Giardia exposed groups and unexposed controls. However, we did not find differences between the Giardia exposed fatigue classification groups with regard to CD4 T cell activation, proliferation or cytokine levels in 6 days cultured PBMCs. Interestingly, sCD40L was increased in patients with PI-CFS and other persons with fatigue after Giardia infection compared to the non-fatigued group, and correlated well with fatigue levels at the time of sampling. Our data show antigen specific cellular immune responses in the groups previously exposed to Giardia and increased sCD40L in fatigued patients.

  1. Outcomes of Sinus Surgery in Ambulatory Patients with Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Ayesha N.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous outcomes studies of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have mostly excluded subjects with immunodeficiency or autoimmune disease. While expert opinion suggests these patients are often refractory to therapy, outcomes following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) are not well delineated. Objective We evaluated improvement in objective and quality of life (QoL) measures following endoscopic sinus surgery in adult patients treated in the ambulatory setting with immune dysfunction including immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases. Methods Patients with CRS associated with immune dysfunction (n=22) were evaluated and matched 1:1 with control subjects from a prospective cohort in a nested case-control design. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) and pre/postoperative endoscopic findings were recorded. Disease-specific QoL instruments (Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) and Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS)) were administered pre- and postoperatively. Results Mean postoperative follow-up was similar for both cases (18.6±6.6 months) and controls (18.4±8.7 months). Preoperative CT and endoscopy scores (i.e. disease severity) were similar in both cases and controls. Post-operative endoscopy scores were significantly improved for both cases (p<0.001) and controls (p=0.012). Both groups had similar preoperative and postoperative scores on the CSS, however control subjects reported significantly worse RSDI baseline scores. Immunodeficiency and autoimmune cases and CRS controls experienced significant improvement in QoL after surgery (p≤0.041). Conclusion Immunodeficiency and autoimmune cases, in the ambulatory setting, present with similar severity of disease as compared to controls with CRS. We found similar improvements in both objective and QoL outcomes for case subjects and control subjects, suggesting that patients with immune dysfunction may experience similar benefit from ESS. PMID:20537292

  2. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response. PMID:17476345

  3. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  4. Multiple sclerosis and fatigue: A review on the contribution of inflammation and immune-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Patejdl, Robert; Penner, Iris K; Noack, Thomas K; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among young and middle-aged adults in the western world. One of its most prevalent and debilitating symptoms is fatigue. Despite the general acceptance of the idea of an immune pathogenesis of MS itself, the role of autoimmunity in the course of MS-fatigue is a matter of debate. Both immune-related processes (acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, immune-mediated neurodegeneration, immune-mediated alterations of endocrine functions related to fatigue) and presumably non-immune-mediated disturbances and factors (sleep disturbances, depression, cognitive alterations, chronic infections, adverse effects of medications) contribute to the clinical picture. Data from in vitro and animal experiments has provided evidence for a role of cytokines as IL-1 and TNF-alpha. This association could not be verified directly in blood samples from humans whereas whole blood stimulation protocols gave some indirect evidence for a role of cytokines in MS-fatigue. MRI being able to detect acute and chronic immune mediated damage to the CNS could depict that global atrophy of gray or white matter does not correlate with fatigue. Rather, distinctive clusters of lesions and atrophy at different locations, mostly bifrontal or in subcortical structures, correlate specifically with fatigue. Regardless of the difficulties in pinpointing the immunogenesis of MS-fatigue, an important role of autoimmunity is strongly supported by an indirect route: A growing amount of data shows that the highly effective immunotherapeutics which have been introduced to MS-treatment over the last years effectively and sustainably stabilize and ameliorate fatigue in parallel to their dampening effects on the neuroinflammatory process. This review summarizes the existing data on the relation between inflammation, patterns of CNS-lesions and the effects of immunotherapeutics

  5. Hypothalamic Dysfunction and Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Fatigue and Weight Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Yadav, Vijayshree; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-11-01

    Signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis are usually attributed to demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord or cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is a region that is often overlooked yet controls many important homeostatic functions, including those that are perturbed in multiple sclerosis. In this review we discuss how hypothalamic dysfunction may contribute to signs and symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis. While dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is common in multiple sclerosis, the effects and mechanisms of this dysfunction are not well understood. We discuss three hypothalamic mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis: (1) general hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, (2) disordered orexin neurotransmission, (3) abnormal cortisol secretion. We then review potential mechanisms of weight dysregulation caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Lastly, we propose future studies and therapeutics to better understand and treat hypothalamic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. Hypothalamic dysfunction appears to be common in multiple sclerosis, yet current studies are underpowered and contradictory. Future studies should contain larger sample sizes and standardize hormone and neuropeptide measurements.

  6. Mental Fatigue and Executive Dysfunction in Patients with Cushing's Syndrome in Remission

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) in remission often suffer from impaired quality of life and cognitive dysfunction. The primary aim was to investigate the occurrence of mental fatigue, characterized by mental exhaustion and long recovery time following mentally strenuous tasks, in patients with CS in remission. The secondary aim was to examine whether the newly developed parts C and D of the trail making test (TMT) are more sensitive, compared to the conventional parts A and B, to evaluate attention and executive function. This was a cross-sectional study including 51 patients with CS in remission and 51 controls. All subjects completed the self-administrated mental fatigue scale (MFS) and performed all four parts of the TMT. The patients had worse outcome on all components of the MFS except for sensitivity to noise. After adjustment for mental fatigue, depression, and anxiety, the patients performed worse only on part D of the TMT (P < 0.05). Mental fatigue is common in patients with CS in remission and can be captured by using the MFS. The most demanding part of the TMT, part D, is more useful to capture cognitive deficits in patients with CS in remission compared to the conventional parts A and B. PMID:26221060

  7. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica E.; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure. PMID:27740937

  8. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  9. Is DNA methylation responsible for immune system dysfunction in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Khojasteh-Fard, Maryam; Tabrizi, Mina; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2011-10-01

    Association of both environmental and hereditary factors in susceptibility to schizophrenia is well established. Initial diagnosis of schizophrenia in a genetically susceptible individual usually occurs the first time that individual faces a great life-time stressful event. Immune system dysfunction is one of the major factors implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia because it can render an individual more vulnerable to stress. Imbalance between type-1 and type-2 immunity and subsequent alterations in cytokine levels have been reported in schizophrenia patients. Cytokines seem to have neurotropic activities associated with neurologic disorders, suggesting their complex role in the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, it is well known that CpG methylation strongly associates with silencing of genes in differentiated cells at the transcriptional level and variation in genomic DNA methylation of cytokine genes and T cells is an important factor modulating cytokine gene expression in various conditions. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that alterations in methylation pattern of selective cytokine gene promoters be regarded as an underlying mechanism of Th1/Th2 imbalance observed in schizophrenia. Environmental triggers including feto-maternal transmission of viral or bacterial micro-organisms, change in enzymatic activities, or interaction of environmental and genetic factors in individuals with a higher risk of schizophrenia might orchestrate this mechanism.

  10. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, ...

  11. A brain MRI study of chronic fatigue syndrome: evidence of brainstem dysfunction and altered homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barnden, Leighton R; Crouch, Benjamin; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Mernone, Anacleto; Chryssidis, Steve; Scroop, Garry; Del Fante, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To explore brain involvement in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), the statistical parametric mapping of brain MR images has been extended to voxel-based regressions against clinical scores. Using SPM5 we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and analysed T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo MR signal levels in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Clinical scores included CFS fatigue duration, a score based on the 10 most common CFS symptoms, the Bell score, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) anxiety and depression, and hemodynamic parameters from 24-h blood pressure monitoring. We also performed group × hemodynamic score interaction regressions to detect locations where MR regressions were opposite for CFS and NC, thereby indicating abnormality in the CFS group. In the midbrain, white matter volume was observed to decrease with increasing fatigue duration. For T1-weighted MR and white matter volume, group × hemodynamic score interactions were detected in the brainstem [strongest in midbrain grey matter (GM)], deep prefrontal white matter (WM), the caudal basal pons and hypothalamus. A strong correlation in CFS between brainstem GM volume and pulse pressure suggested impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation. It can be argued that at least some of these changes could arise from astrocyte dysfunction. These results are consistent with an insult to the midbrain at fatigue onset that affects multiple feedback control loops to suppress cerebral motor and cognitive activity and disrupt local CNS homeostasis, including resetting of some elements of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). © 2011 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21560176

  12. Humoral and cellular immune responses after influenza vaccination in patients with postcancer fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Hetty; van Laarhoven, Hanneke WM; Pots, Jeanette M; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Mulder, Sasja F; van Herpen, Carla ML; Jacobs, Joannes FM; Leer, Jan Willem H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Stelma, Foekje F; Torensma, Ruurd; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in cancer survivors with and without severe symptoms of fatigue. Severely fatigued (n = 15) and non-fatigued (n = 12) disease-free cancer survivors were vaccinated against seasonal influenza. Humoral immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Cellular immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by lymphocyte proliferation and activation assays. Regulatory T cells were measured at baseline by flow cytometry and heat-shock protein 90 alpha levels by ELISA. Comparable humoral immune responses were observed in fatigued and non-fatigued patients, both pre- and post-vaccination. At baseline, fatigued patients showed a significantly diminished cellular proliferation upon virus stimulation with strain H3N2 (1414 ± 1201 counts), and a trend in a similar direction with strain H1N1 (3025 ± 2339 counts), compared to non-fatigued patients (3099 ± 2401 and 5877 ± 4604 counts, respectively). The percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes was significantly increased (4.4 ± 2.1% versus 2.4 ± 0.8%) and significantly lower amounts of interleukin 2 were detected prior to vaccination in fatigued compared to non-fatigued patients (36.3 ± 44.3 pg/ml vs. 94.0 ± 45.4 pg/ml with strain H3N2 and 28.4 ± 44.0 pg/ml versus 74.5 ± 56.1 pg/ml with strain H1N1). Pre-vaccination heat-shock protein 90 alpha concentrations, post-vaccination cellular proliferation, and post-vaccination cytokine concentrations did not differ between both groups. In conclusion, influenza vaccination is favorable for severely fatigued cancer survivors and should be recommended when indicated. However, compared to non-fatigued cancer survivors, fatigued cancer survivors showed several significant differences in immunological reactivity at baseline, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25996472

  13. Fatigue in immune-mediated polyneuropathies. European Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group.

    PubMed

    Merkies, I S; Schmitz, P I; Samijn, J P; van der Meché, F G; van Doorn, P A

    1999-11-10

    To determine the prevalence and severity of ongoing fatigue and to investigate the internal consistency, reliability, and validity of the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) in patients with immune-mediated polyneuropathies. The FSS was assessed in 113 patients who either experienced Guillain-Barré syndrome in the past or currently have a stable, chronic, inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy or a polyneuropathy associated with a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and in 113 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Data on four additional scales (Medical Research Council sumscore, functional grading scale [f-score], INCAT sensory sumscore, medical outcome study 36-items health survey [SF-36]) were obtained in all patients. SF-36 also was assessed in 59 controls. "Severe" fatigue (FSS scores > or =95th percentile values in controls) was present in 80% of the patients. Fatigue was not significantly related to general strength, sensory deficits, f-score, and duration of symptoms. Severe fatigue was reported in 81% to 86% of patients with normal strength or sensation. Eighty percent of the patients (controls, 12%) reported their fatigue being among the three most disabling symptoms. SF-36 health status scores in the patient group were significantly lower than the obtained values of the controls and partially related to the FSS scores. Good internal consistency, significant reliability, and validity were obtained for the FSS. Fatigue is a major symptom in patients with immune-mediated polyneuropathies and may persist for years after apparent recovery. The Fatigue Severity Scale seems appropriate for assessing fatigue in these patients because good internal consistency, reliability, and validity were demonstrated.

  14. Changes in Immune Parameters Seen in Gulf War Veterans but Not in Civilians with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quanwu; Zhou, Xia-Di; Denny, Thomas; Ottenweller, John E.; Lange, Gudrun; LaManca, John J.; Lavietes, Marc H.; Pollet, Claudia; Gause, William C.; Natelson, Benjamin H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate immune function through the assessment of lymphocyte subpopulations (total T cells, major histocompatibility complex [MHC] I- and II-restricted T cells, B cells, NK cells, MHC II-restricted T-cell-derived naive and memory cells, and several MHC I-restricted T-cell activation markers) and the measurement of cytokine gene expression (interleukin 2 [IL-2], IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Subjects included two groups of patients meeting published case definitions for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)—a group of veterans who developed their illness following their return home from participating in the Gulf War and a group of nonveterans who developed the illness sporadically. Case control comparison groups were comprised of healthy Gulf War veterans and nonveterans, respectively. We found no significant difference for any of the immune variables in the nonveteran population. In contrast, veterans with CFS had significantly more total T cells and MHC II+ T cells and a significantly higher percentage of these lymphocyte subpopulations, as well as a significantly lower percentage of NK cells, than the respective controls. In addition, veterans with CFS had significantly higher levels of IL-2, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α than the controls. These data do not support the hypothesis of immune dysfunction in the genesis of CFS for sporadic cases of CFS but do suggest that service in the Persian Gulf is associated with an altered immune status in veterans who returned with severe fatiguing illness. PMID:9874656

  15. Loneliness Predicts Pain, Depression, and Fatigue: Understanding the Role of Immune Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Glaser, Ronald; Bennett, Jeanette M.; Malarkey, William B.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster is an important health concern. Loneliness is a common risk factor for these symptoms. Little is known about the physiological mechanisms linking loneliness to the symptom cluster; immune dysregulation is a promising candidate. Latent herpesvirus reactivation, which is reflected by elevated herpesvirus antibody titers, provides a window into immune dysregulation. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are two common herpesviruses. Methods Participants were 200 breast cancer survivors who were 2 months to 3 years post-treatment at the time of the study. They completed questionnaires and provided a blood sample that was assayed for CMV and EBV antibody titers. Results Lonelier participants experienced more pain, depression, and fatigue than those who felt more socially connected. Lonelier participants also had higher CMV antibody titers which, in turn, were associated with higher levels of the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. Contrary to expectations, EBV antibody titers were not associated with either loneliness or the symptom cluster. Conclusions The pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster is a notable clinical problem, especially among cancer survivors. Accordingly, understanding the risk factors for these symptoms is important. The current study suggests that loneliness enhances risk for immune dysregulation and the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. The present data also provide a glimpse into the pathways through which loneliness may impact health. PMID:23273678

  16. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Jose Montoya ...W81XWH-12-1-0388 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dr. Jose Montoya , Ian Valencia, Holden Maecker, Michael Mindrinos

  17. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  18. New insights into SMA pathogenesis: immune dysfunction and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Kothary, Rashmi

    2017-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration, although defects in multiple cell types and tissues have also been implicated. Three independent laboratories recently identified immune organ defects in SMA. We therefore propose a novel pathogenic mechanism contributory to SMA, resulting in higher susceptibility to infection and exacerbated disease progression caused by neuroinflammation. Overall, compromised immune function could significantly affect survival and quality of life of SMA patients. We highlight the recent findings in immune organ defects, their potential consequences on patients, our understanding of neuroinflammation in SMA, and new research hypotheses in SMA pathogenesis.

  19. Preliminary differences in peripheral immune markers and brain metabolites between fatigued and non-fatigued breast cancer survivors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna Maria; Zwickey, Heather; Wood, Lisa; Foerster, Bradley; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin; Ichesco, Eric; Sen, Ananda; Harris, Richard Edmund

    2014-12-01

    Persistent cancer-related fatigue (PCRF) is one of the most troubling side-effects of breast cancer (BC) treatment. One explanatory model for PCRF is sickness behavior, which is a set of adaptive responses including sleepiness and depressed mood in reaction to an inflammatory trigger. Prior research has investigated differences in inflammatory cytokines between fatigued and non-fatigued BC survivors, but no study has examined differences in brain metabolites. Differences in inflammatory markers, and brain metabolites using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were evaluated within 16 fatigued and 13 non-fatigued BC survivors. Fatigued BC survivors had significantly higher ratios of two markers derived from brain metabolites; namely (a) creatine, normalized to total creatine (creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr/tCr)) ratio (P = 0.03) and (b) glutamate + glutamine (Glx) to N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (P = 0.01) in the posterior insula compared to non-fatigued breast cancer survivor. Further, serum IL-6 was increased in fatigued women compared to non-fatigued women (P = 0.03), Using receiver operator curves (ROC) we determined that the posterior insula Glx/NAA ratio was the best predictor of fatigue with an overall area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 79%, with a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 69%. However, posterior insula Glx/NAA, Cr/tCr and serum IL-6 were not significantly correlated with one another implying the possibility of independent biological mechanisms for PCRF rather than an interrelated mechanism as represented by the sickness behavior model. This study provides novel preliminary evidence of several distinct neurobiological changes in the posterior insula associated with PCRF in BC survivors. Future, longitudinal studies are needed to explore these distinct biological phenomena where changes through time in peripheral immune markers and brain metabolites are examined to determine if they correlate with

  20. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  1. BIOMARKERS for CHRONIC FATIGUE

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Gordon; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue that persists for 6 months or more is termed chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue (CF) in combination with a minimum of 4 of 8 symptoms and the absence of diseases that could explain these symptoms, constitute the case definition for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). Inflammation, immune system activation, autonomic dysfunction, impaired functioning in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and neuroendocrine dysregulation have all been suggested as root causes of fatigue. The identification of objective markers consistently associated with CFS/ME is an important goal in relation to diagnosis and treatment, as the current case definitions are based entirely on physical signs and symptoms. This review is focused on the recent literature related to biomarkers for fatigue associated with CFS/ME and, for comparison, those associated with other diseases. These markers are distributed across several of the body’s core regulatory systems. A complex construct of symptoms emerges from alterations and/or dysfunctions in the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. We propose that new insight will depend on our ability to develop and deploy an integrative profiling of CFS/ME pathogenesis at the molecular level. Until such a molecular signature is obtained efforts to develop effective treatments will continue to be severely limited. PMID:22732129

  2. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  3. Ebola VP40 in Exosomes Can Cause Immune Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pleet, Michelle L.; Mathiesen, Allison; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao A.; Barclay, Robert A.; Schwab, Angela; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C.; Lepene, Benjamin; Nekhai, Sergei; Aman, M. J.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is an enveloped, ssRNA virus from the family Filoviridae capable of causing severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 80–90% mortality rates. The most recent outbreak of EBOV in West Africa starting in 2014 resulted in over 11,300 deaths; however, long-lasting persistence and recurrence in survivors has been documented, potentially leading to further transmission of the virus. We have previously shown that exosomes from cells infected with HIV-1, HTLV-1 and Rift Valley Fever virus are able to transfer viral proteins and non-coding RNAs to naïve recipient cells, resulting in an altered cellular activity. In the current manuscript, we examined the effect of Ebola structural proteins VP40, GP, NP and VLPs on recipient immune cells, as well as the effect of exosomes containing these proteins on naïve immune cells. We found that VP40-transfected cells packaged VP40 into exosomes, and that these exosomes were capable of inducing apoptosis in recipient immune cells. Additionally, we show that presence of VP40 within parental cells or in exosomes delivered to naïve cells could result in the regulation of RNAi machinery including Dicer, Drosha, and Ago 1, which may play a role in the induction of cell death in recipient immune cells. Exosome biogenesis was regulated by VP40 in transfected cells by increasing levels of ESCRT-II proteins EAP20 and EAP45, and exosomal marker proteins CD63 and Alix. VP40 was phosphorylated by Cdk2/Cyclin complexes at Serine 233 which could be reversed with r-Roscovitine treatment. The level of VP40-containing exosomes could also be regulated by treated cells with FDA-approved Oxytetracycline. Additionally, we utilized novel nanoparticles to safely capture VP40 and other viral proteins from Ebola VLPs spiked into human samples using SDS/reducing agents, thus minimizing the need for BSL-4 conditions for most downstream assays. Collectively, our data indicates that VP40 packaged into exosomes may be responsible for the

  4. Turkey origin reovirus-induced immune dysfunction in specific-pathogen free and commercial turkey poults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, pathogenesis studies using genetically distinct turkey-origin reoviruses (TRVs) revealed that poults infected with certain TRV isolates had moderate to severe bursal atrophy, suggesting virus-induced immune dysfunction. In order to characterize the effect of TRV infection on the turkey imm...

  5. Immune dysfunction in HIV-seronegative, Cryptococcus gattii meningitis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Annemarie E; Siddiqui, Asna A; Kester, Maartje I; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Rajanuwong, Adul; Wannapasni, Saran; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Harrison, Thomas S

    2007-03-01

    The pathophysiology of meningitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii in apparently immunocompetent individuals remains unclear. We measured multiple cytokines in CSF from a HIV-seronegative, apparently immunocompetent, Thai patient with C. gattii meningitis, over the first 2 weeks of antifungal therapy. Levels of proinflammatory IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were very low compared to patients with HIV-related Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis and of IL-10 very high. While patients with C. gattii meningitis may be a heterogeneous group, these data suggest in this case a maladapted immune response to cryptococcal exposure had allowed progression to clinical cryptococcal disease.

  6. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  7. Neuro-immune dysfunction during brain aging: new insights in microglial cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Matt, Stephanie M; Johnson, Rodney W

    2016-02-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are at the center of communication between the central nervous system and immune system. While these brain-immune interactions are balanced in healthy adulthood, the ability to maintain homeostasis during aging is impaired. Microglia develop a loss of integrated regulatory networks including aberrant signaling from other brain cells, immune sensors, and epigenetic modifiers. The low-grade chronic neuroinflammation associated with this dysfunctional activity likely contributes to cognitive deficits and susceptibility to age-related pathologies. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for neuro-immune dysregulation with age is crucial for providing targeted therapeutic strategies to support brain repair and healthy aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuro-immune Dysfunction During Brain Aging: New Insights in Microglial Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Stephanie M.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are at the center of communication between the central nervous system and immune system. While these brain-immune interactions are balanced in healthy adulthood, the ability to maintain homeostasis during aging is impaired. Microglia develop a loss of integrated regulatory networks including aberrant signaling from other brain cells, immune sensors, and epigenetic modifiers. The low-grade chronic neuroinflammation associated with this dysfunctional activity likely contributes to cognitive deficits and susceptibility to age-related pathologies. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for neuro-immune dysregulation with age is crucial for providing targeted therapeutic strategies to support brain repair and healthy aging. PMID:26595306

  9. Chronic fatigue syndrome and the immune system: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Mensah, Fane Kojo Fosu; Bansal, Amolak Singh; Ford, Brian; Cambridge, Geraldine

    2017-04-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterised by multiple symptoms including fatigue, headaches and cognitive impairment, which have a significantly adverse effect on the normal functioning and well-being of the individual. These symptoms are often triggered or worsened following physical or mental exertion. ME/CFS has long been thought of as having a significant immunological component, but reports describing changes in immune function are often inconsistent between study groups. Although the wide range of physical, neurocognitive and autonomic symptoms reported have seriously hampered attempts to understand pathophysiological pathways, investment in biomedical research in ME/CFS is finally increasing with a number of novel and promising investigations being published. The onset of ME/CFS may often be linked to (viral) infections which would be consistent with a variety of alterations in natural killer (NK) cell function as described by a number of different groups. Consistency in cytokine data has been lacking so far, although recently more sophisticated approaches have led to more robust data from large patient cohorts. New hope has also been given to sufferers with the possibility that therapies that deplete B cells can result in clinical improvement. To understand the pathogenic mechanism in this complex condition, it is important to consider repeated analysis in different cohorts. In this review, we will discuss the potential of different components of the immune system to be involved in the pathogenesis of ME/CFS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment-associated Fatigue in Cancer Patients Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors; a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, O; Helbling, D; Schmidt, J; Petrausch, U; Giryes, A; Mehrabi, A; Schöb, O; Mannhart, M; Zidan, A; Oweira, H

    2016-10-01

    Fatigue is one of the most prominent side-effects of immune checkpoint inhibition. Therefore, we assessed the risk of fatigue associated with inhibitors of the immune checkpoints. We examined data from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. We also examined original studies and review articles for cross-references. Eligible studies included randomised phase II and phase III trials of patients with cancer treated with ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab and tremelimumab. The authors extracted relevant information on participants(') characteristics, all-grade and high-grade fatigue and information on the methodology of the studies. In total, 17 trials were considered eligible for the meta-analysis. The odds ratio for all-grade fatigue for CTLA-4 inhibitors was 1.23 (95% confidence interval 1.07, 1.41; P = 0.003) and for high-grade fatigue was 1.72 (95% confidence interval 1.26, 2.33; P = 0.0005). Moreover, the odds ratio for all-grade fatigue for PD-1 inhibitors was 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.62, 0.84; P < 0.0001) and for high-grade fatigue was 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.23, 0.56; P < 0.00001). The analysis of data showed that CTLA-4 inhibitors seem to be associated with a higher risk of all- and high-grade fatigue compared with control regimens, whereas PD-1 inhibitors seem to be associated with a lower risk of all- and high-grade fatigue compared with control regimens. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cognitive dysfunction in adolescents with chronic fatigue: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Sivertsen, Øyvind Stople; Winger, Anette; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Øie, Merete Glenne

    2015-09-01

    To compare cognitive function in adolescents with chronic fatigue with cognitive function in healthy controls (HC). Cross-sectional study. Paediatric department at Oslo University Hospital, Norway. 120 adolescents with chronic fatigue (average age 15.4 years; range 12-18) and 39 HC (average age 15.2 years; range 12-18). The adolescents completed a neurocognitive test battery measuring processing speed, working memory, cognitive inhibition, cognitive flexibility, verbal learning and verbal memory, and questionnaires addressing demographic data, depression symptoms, anxiety traits, fatigue and sleep problems. Parents completed the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), which measures the everyday executive functions of children. Adolescents with chronic fatigue had impaired cognitive function compared to HC regarding processing speed (mean difference 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.5, p=0.003), working memory (-2.4, -3.7 to -1.1, p<0.001), cognitive inhibition response time (6.2, 0.8 to 11.7, p=0.025) and verbal learning (-1.7, -3.2 to -0.3, p=0.022). The BRIEF results indicated that everyday executive functions were significantly worse in the chronic fatigue group compared to the HC (11.2, 8.2 to 14.3, p<0.001). Group differences remained largely unaffected when adjusted for symptoms of depression, anxiety traits and sleep problems. Adolescents with chronic fatigue had impaired cognitive function of clinical relevance, measured by objective cognitive tests, in comparison to HC. Working memory and processing speed may represent core difficulties. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Upregulation of RCAN1 causes Down syndrome-like immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Layton, Daniel; Seach, Natalie; Corlett, Alicia; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Arbonés, Maria L; Boyd, Richard L; Scott, Bernadette; Pritchard, Melanie A

    2013-07-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are more susceptible to infections and autoimmune disease, but the molecular genetic basis for these immune defects remains undetermined. In this study, we tested whether increased expression of the chromosome 21 gene RCAN1 contributes to immune dysregulation. We investigated the immune phenotype of a mouse model that overexpresses RCAN1. RCAN1 transgenic (TG) mice exhibit T cell abnormalities that bear a striking similarity to the abnormalities described in individuals with DS. RCAN1-TG mice display T cell developmental defects in the thymus and peripheral immune tissues. Thymic cellularity is reduced by substantial losses of mature CD4 and CD8 thymocytes and medullary epithelium. In peripheral immune organs T lymphocytes are reduced in number and exhibit reduced proliferative capacity and aberrant cytokine production. These T cell defects are stem cell intrinsic in that transfer of wild type bone marrow into RCAN1-TG recipients restored medullary thymic epithelium and T cell numbers in the thymus, spleen and lymph nodes. However, bone marrow transplantation failed to improve T cell function, suggesting an additional role for RCAN1 in the non-haemopoietic compartment. RCAN1 therefore facilitates T cell development and function, and when overexpressed, may contribute to immune dysfunction in DS.

  13. Increased risk of organic erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chao, C-H; Chen, H-J; Wang, H-Y; Li, T-C; Kao, C-H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex disorder characterized by profound and persistent fatigue and several comorbidities. CFS was previously reported to be associated with female sexual dysfunction. We propose that CFS might also be associated with organic erectile dysfunction (organic ED). We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database. We identified 2156 male patients who were newly diagnosed with CFS between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006. After excluding those younger than 20 years and prevalent cases, 1976 patients were subjected to analysis, and 7904 people served as healthy controls. All study subjects were followed up from the index date to the date of organic ED diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of 2011. Compared with the non-CFS cohort, the incidence density rate of organic ED was 1.88-fold higher than that in the CFS cohort (3.23 vs. 1.73 per 1000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.88 (95% CI = 1.26-2.81) when adjusting for sex and comorbidities. The combined impacts of patients with CFS and cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD), depression, and anxiety showed a significant by joint association with organic ED risk compared with patients with no CFS and no counterpart comorbidity. The greatest magnitude of adjusted HR of ED for CFS was observed in individuals without any comorbidity (3.87, 1.95-7.66). The incidence of organic ED is higher among males aged 40 years and over for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts. As the number of comorbidity increases, the incidence of organic ED increases in males without CFS. Higher incidence of organic ED was observed in males with CVD, DM, CKD, depression, or anxiety for both CFS and non-CFS cohorts.

  14. Efficacy of kinesiology tape versus postural correction exercises on neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue in mechanical neck dysfunction: A randomized blinded clinical trial.

    PubMed

    El-Abd, Aliaa M; Ibrahim, Abeer R; El-Hafez, Haytham M

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical neck dysfunction (MND), with axioscapular muscles fatigue, is highly prevalent worldwide. While postural correction is commonly used for its treatment, efficacy of kinesiology tape (KT) has received considerable attention. To determine the effectiveness of KT versus correction exercises on neck disability, and axioscapular muscles fatigue in MND patients. 46 MND patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 2 groups receiving 4 weeks treatment of either KT or correction exercises. Neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue as median frequency of electromyography (EMG-MF) were measured pre and post treatment. Group-by-time interaction was not significant in the multivariable test. Post hoc tests revealed that KT produced more disability reduction than the postural exercises. However, there was no significant interaction for EMG-MF. KT has been found to be more effective than postural exercises to reduce neck disability. However, both modalities have similar effects to reduce axioscapular muscles fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle Pathway: A New Drug Target in Immune-Related Chronic Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kurt; Morris, Gerwyn; Anderson, George; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss that peripheral and central activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) Radical Cycle may underpin the pathophysiology of immune-related chronic fatigue secondary to other medical diseases and conditions. The TLR Radical Cycle plays a role in illnesses and conditions that are disproportionately commonly comorbid with secondary chronic fatigue, including a) neuroinflammatory disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease, stroke, depression, psychological stressors, and b) systemic disorders, e.g. (auto)immune disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, incl. myocardial infarction, cancer and its treatments. Increased TLR signaling is driven by activated immuneinflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, pathogen derived molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharides, and damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Newly formed redox-derived DAMPs, secondary to oxidative processes, may further activate the TLR complex leading to an auto-amplifying TLR Radical feedback loop. Increased gut permeability with translocation of gram negative bacteria and LPS, which activates the TLR Radical Cycle, is another pathway that may play a role in most of the abovementioned diseases and the secondary fatigue accompanying them. It is concluded that secondary fatigue may be associated with activation of the TLR Radical Cycle pathway due to activated immune-inflammatory pathways, classical and redox-derived DAMPs and PAMPs plays a role in its pathophysiology. Such an activation of the TLR Radical Cycle pathway may also explain why the abovementioned conditions are primed for an increased expression of secondary chronic fatigue. Targeting the TLR Radical Cycle pathway may be an effective method to treat TLR-Radical Cycle-related diseases such as secondary chronic fatigue.

  16. Targeted epithelial tight junction dysfunction causes immune activation and contributes to development of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liping; Shen, Le; Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Nalle, Sam C.; Sullivan, Erika A.; Meddings, Jon B.; Abraham, Clara; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease thought to be caused by alterations in epithelial function, innate and adaptive immunity, and luminal microbiota. The specific role of epithelial barrier function remains undefined, although increased activity of intestinal epithelial myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), which is the primary mechanism of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced barrier dysfunction, occurs in human IBD. We aimed to determine whether in an intact epithelium, primary dysregulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier by pathophysiologically relevant mechanisms can contribute to development of colitis. Methods We developed transgenic (Tg) mice that express constitutively-active MLCK (CA-MLCK) specifically within intestinal epithelia. Their physiology, immune status, and susceptibility to disease were assessed and compared to non-Tg littermate controls. Results CA-MLCK Tg mice demonstrated significant barrier loss, but grew and gained weight normally and did not develop spontaneous disease. CA-MLCK Tg mice did, however, develop mucosal immune activation demonstrated by increased numbers of lamina propria CD4+ lymphocytes, redistribution of CD11c+ cells, increased production of interferon (IFN)-γ and TNF, as well as increased expression of epithelial MHC class I. When challenged with CD4+CD45+ Rbhi lymphocytes, Tg mice developed an accelerated and more severe form of colitis and had shorter survival times than non-Tg littermates. Conclusions Primary pathophysiologically relevant intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction is insufficient to cause experimental intestinal disease but can broadly activate mucosal immune responses and accelerate the onset and severity of immune-mediated colitis. PMID:19027740

  17. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; Del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-15

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases.

  18. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  19. Effector, Memory, and Dysfunctional CD8(+) T Cell Fates in the Antitumor Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Reiser, John; Banerjee, Arnob

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune system plays a pivotal role in the host's ability to mount an effective, antigen-specific immune response against tumors. CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) mediate tumor rejection through recognition of tumor antigens and direct killing of transformed cells. In growing tumors, TILs are often functionally impaired as a result of interaction with, or signals from, transformed cells and the tumor microenvironment. These interactions and signals can lead to transcriptional, functional, and phenotypic changes in TILs that diminish the host's ability to eradicate the tumor. In addition to effector and memory CD8(+) T cells, populations described as exhausted, anergic, senescent, and regulatory CD8(+) T cells have been observed in clinical and basic studies of antitumor immune responses. In the context of antitumor immunity, these CD8(+) T cell subsets remain poorly characterized in terms of fate-specific biomarkers and transcription factor profiles. Here we discuss the current characterization of CD8(+) T cell fates in antitumor immune responses and discuss recent insights into how signals in the tumor microenvironment influence TIL transcriptional networks to promote CD8(+) T cell dysfunction.

  20. Prevention effects of Schisandra polysaccharide on radiation-induced immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Jia, Yun-Long; Ma, Ming; Duan, Yu-Qing; Liu, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficacy of SP (Schisandra polysaccharide) in prevention of radiation-induced immune dysfunction and discussed the underlying mechanisms with a Bal/bc mouse model. The data demonstrated that SP could reverse the decreases in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement C3 in blood serum were all decreased after radiation and SP could restore this radiation disorder. Furthermore, SP could reverse the deregulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood and thymus of mice after radiotherapy. We also performed terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the apoptosis and underlying mechanisms of SP in thymus. Data showed that radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes could be reversed by SP through inducing upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and downregulation of Fas and Bax levels. Furthermore, SP has no any side-effects on immunity of normal mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that SP could effectively prevent immune injury during radiotherapy by protecting the immune system. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for therapeutic interventions of prevention immune system damage in the radiation treatment.

  1. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  2. Index markers of chronic fatigue syndrome with dysfunction of TCA and urea cycles.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Emi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Jin, Guanghua; Tajima, Seiki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Sanae; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-10-11

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a persistent and unexplained pathological state characterized by exertional and severely debilitating fatigue, with/without infectious or neuropsychiatric symptoms, lasting at least 6 consecutive months. Its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses of 133 plasma samples obtained from CFS patients and healthy controls to establish an objective diagnosis of CFS. CFS patients exhibited significant differences in intermediate metabolite concentrations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles. The combination of ornithine/citrulline and pyruvate/isocitrate ratios discriminated CFS patients from healthy controls, yielding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.801 (95% confidential interval [CI]: 0.711-0.890, P < 0.0001) and 0.750 (95% CI: 0.584-0.916, P = 0.0069) for training (n = 93) and validation (n = 40) datasets, respectively. These findings provide compelling evidence that a clinical diagnostic tool could be developed for CFS based on the ratios of metabolites in plasma.

  3. Index markers of chronic fatigue syndrome with dysfunction of TCA and urea cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Emi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Jin, Guanghua; Tajima, Seiki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Sanae; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a persistent and unexplained pathological state characterized by exertional and severely debilitating fatigue, with/without infectious or neuropsychiatric symptoms, lasting at least 6 consecutive months. Its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses of 133 plasma samples obtained from CFS patients and healthy controls to establish an objective diagnosis of CFS. CFS patients exhibited significant differences in intermediate metabolite concentrations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and urea cycles. The combination of ornithine/citrulline and pyruvate/isocitrate ratios discriminated CFS patients from healthy controls, yielding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.801 (95% confidential interval [CI]: 0.711–0.890, P < 0.0001) and 0.750 (95% CI: 0.584–0.916, P = 0.0069) for training (n = 93) and validation (n = 40) datasets, respectively. These findings provide compelling evidence that a clinical diagnostic tool could be developed for CFS based on the ratios of metabolites in plasma. PMID:27725700

  4. Colonic Immune Suppression, Barrier Dysfunction, and Dysbiosis by Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Cheng, Sam X.; Wang, Gary P.; Owen, Jennifer L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax results from the ingestion of Bacillus anthracis. Herein, we investigated the pathogenesis of GI anthrax in animals orally infected with toxigenic non-encapsulated B. anthracis Sterne strain (pXO1+ pXO2−) spores that resulted in rapid animal death. B. anthracis Sterne induced significant breakdown of intestinal barrier function and led to gut dysbiosis, resulting in systemic dissemination of not only B. anthracis, but also of commensals. Disease progression significantly correlated with the deterioration of innate and T cell functions. Our studies provide critical immunologic and physiologic insights into the pathogenesis of GI anthrax infection, whereupon cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in immune cells may play a central role in promoting dysfunctional immune responses against this deadly pathogen. PMID:24945934

  5. Colonic immune suppression, barrier dysfunction, and dysbiosis by gastrointestinal bacillus anthracis Infection.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L; Yang, Tao; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Cheng, Sam X; Wang, Gary P; Owen, Jennifer L; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax results from the ingestion of Bacillus anthracis. Herein, we investigated the pathogenesis of GI anthrax in animals orally infected with toxigenic non-encapsulated B. anthracis Sterne strain (pXO1+ pXO2-) spores that resulted in rapid animal death. B. anthracis Sterne induced significant breakdown of intestinal barrier function and led to gut dysbiosis, resulting in systemic dissemination of not only B. anthracis, but also of commensals. Disease progression significantly correlated with the deterioration of innate and T cell functions. Our studies provide critical immunologic and physiologic insights into the pathogenesis of GI anthrax infection, whereupon cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in immune cells may play a central role in promoting dysfunctional immune responses against this deadly pathogen.

  6. [Immune dysfunction and cognitive deficit in stress and physiological aging (Part I): Pathogenesis and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Pukhal'skiĭ, A L; Shmarina, G V; Aleshkin, V A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of stressful cognitive dysfunction, which is under consideration in this review, allows picking out several therapeutic targets. The brain, immune and endocrine systems being the principal adaptive systems in the body permanently share information both in the form of neural impulses and soluble mediators. The CNS differs from other organs due to several peculiarities that affect local immune surveillance. The brain cells secluded from the blood flow by a specialized blood-brain-barrier (BBB) can endogenously express pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines without the intervention of the immune system. In normal brain the cytokine signaling rather contributes to exclusive brain function (e.g. long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis) than serves as immune communicator. The stress of different origin increases the serum cytokine levels and disrupts BBB. As a result peripheral cytokines penetrate into the brain where they begin to perform new functions. Mass intrusion of biologically active peptides having a lot of specific targets alters the brain work that we can observe both in humans and in animal experiments. In addition owing to BBB disruption dendritic cells and T cells also penetrate into the brain where they take up a perivascular position. The changes observed in stressed subject may accumulate during repeated episodes of stress forming a picture typical of the aging brain. Moreover long-term stress as well as physiological aging result in hormonal and immunological disturbances including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis depletion, regulatory T-cell accumulation and dehydroepiandrosterone decrease.

  7. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity.

  8. Molecular analysis of melanoma-induced sentinel lymph node immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan H; Chen, Yun; Chan, Joseph L; Qian, You-wen; Goydos, James S

    2011-05-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) of melanoma patients show evidence of tumor-induced immune dysfunction. Our previous works have shown that IL-10 and IFNγ co-regulate indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-expressing immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) in melanoma SLNs. The goal of this study is to examine the relationship between melanoma SLN tumor burden and the degree of SLN immune dysfunction as a model to study tumor-induced immune dysfunction. We hypothesize that SLN tumor burden correlates with the degree of SLN immune dysfunction. Patients undergoing SLN biopsy for clinical stages I and II melanomas were enrolled in the study under an IRB-approved protocol. During the SLN biopsy, non-hot and non-blue portion of the SLN was harvested, flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen, and mRNA was extracted. By using quantitative real-time PCR, gene expressions of cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IFNγ, TGFβ, GM-CSF) and the surrogates of immunosuppressive regulatory and effector cells (IDO-expressing DCs and Foxp3-expressing T-regs, respectively) were measured and correlated against the SLN tumor burden (MART1) and against each other. The data were log transformed for normalization. Statistical test used Student's t-test and stepwise multivariate regression analysis. Statistical significance was determined at P < 0.05. SLNs of 74 patients were analyzed in this analysis. Ten of seventy-four patients (13.5%) had tumor-positive SLNs. MART1 gene expression showed a significant difference between the SLN (+) and SLN (-) groups (P = 0.04). Among the various cytokines, multivariate analysis showed that only IFNγ gene expression correlated independently with MART1 gene expression (P < 0.0001, r = 0.91). Similar multivariate analyses show that IFNγ (P < 0.0001, r = 0.78), IL-10 (P = 0.0037, r = 0.60), and TGFβ (P < 0.0001, r = 0.95) gene expressions correlated independently with IDO gene expression. IFNγ (P < 0.0001, r = 0.87) and GM-CSF (P = 0.042, r = 0.76) gene

  9. An approach to symptoms at the interface of medicine and psychiatry: pain, insomnia, weight loss and anorexia, fatigue and forgetfulness, and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Kontos, Nicholas; Nejad, Shamim H; Gross, Anne F

    2010-11-01

    Primary care physicians commonly deal with patients who present with a somatic complaint for which no clear organic etiology can be found. This article discusses how a psychiatrist thinks about somatic symptoms (eg, pain, insomnia, weight loss and loss of appetite, fatigue and forgetfulness, sexual dysfunction) in a patient who might have depression. The management of a patient in whom no satisfactory medical or psychiatric diagnosis can be made is also reviewed briefly.

  10. [ANCA(antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies)-associated vasculitis in a man with extreme fatigue, fever and progressive renal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Bakashvili, N; Swaak, A J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Dees, A

    2008-04-26

    A 55-year-old man, with no previous history, presented with extreme fatigue and fever and was admitted to hospital. He had progressive renal dysfunction and his serum anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were markedly elevated. Renal histology was consistent with ANCA-associated vasculitis. The patient was successfully treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The classification and management of the ANCA-associated vasculitides are described. The classification was guided by the clinical presentation, serology and results of tissue biopsies. The ANCA inflammation had affected the middle sized and small vessels of especially the upper and lower airways, and the kidneys. The antibodies were directed at proteinase-3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). PR3-ANCA is predominantly found in Wegener's granulomatosis, while MPO-ANCA is related to microscopic polyangiitis. Tissue studies showed granulomatous inflammation of the airways which is typical of Wegener's disease. This type of inflammation is absent in microscopic polyangiitis. The initial treatment schedule consists of prednisone 1 mg/kg daily and oral cyclophosphamide 2 mg/kg daily. In the remission phase, the cyclophosphamide is replaced by azathioprine. It is not yet known how long maintenance treatment should be continued and which parameters have prognostic value.

  11. Immune Dysfunction in Children with CHARGE Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Burg, Mirjam; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Hogendorf, Lianne A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a variable, multiple congenital malformation syndrome. Patients with CHARGE syndrome have frequent infections that are presumed to be due to anatomical anomalies of the craniofacial region and upper airway, and cranial nerve problems resulting in swallowing difficulties and aspiration. The possible contribution of immunological abnormalities to these infections has not been systematically studied even though immune deficiencies have been described in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a condition which shares remarkable clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome. We assessed the frequency and nature of immune dysfunction in 24 children with genetically proven CHARGE syndrome. All patients, or their parents, completed a questionnaire on infectious history. Their immune system was extensively assessed through full blood counts, immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subpopulations, peripheral B- and T-cell differentiation, T-receptor excision circle (TREC) analysis, T-cell function, and vaccination responses. All CHARGE patients had a history of infections (often frequent), mainly otitis media and pneumonia, leading to frequent use of antibiotics and to hospital admissions. Decreased T-cell numbers were found in 12 (50%) patients, presumably caused by insufficient thymic output since TREC amounts were also diminished in CHARGE patients. Despite normal peripheral B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production in all patients, 83% of patients had insufficient antibody titers to one or more early childhood vaccinations. Based on our results, we recommend immunological evaluation of CHARGE patients with recurrent infections. PMID:26544072

  12. Variable Neuroendocrine-Immune Dysfunction in Individuals with Unfavorable Outcome after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Kumar, Raj G.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Berga, Sarah L.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems is not well understood in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol and inflammation after TBI, and to determine how these relationships differ by outcome. CSF samples were collected from 91 subjects with severe TBI during days 0–6 post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and inflammatory markers, and compared to healthy controls (n=13 cortisol, n=11 inflammatory markers). Group-based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) delineated subpopulations with similar longitudinal CSF cortisol profiles (high vs. low cortisol). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months served as the primary outcome measure reflecting global outcome. Inflammatory markers that displayed significant bivariate associations with both GOS and cortisol TRAJ (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, soluble Fas [sFas], soluble intracellular adhesion molecule [sICAM]-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]-α) were used to generate a cumulative inflammatory load score (ILS). Subsequent analysis revealed that cortisol TRAJ group membership mediated ILS effects on outcome (indirect effect estimate= −0.253, 95% CI (−0.481, −0.025), p=0.03). Correlational analysis between mean cortisol levels and ILS were examined separately within each cortisol TRAJ group and by outcome. Within the low cortisol TRAJ group, subjects with unfavorable 6-month outcome displayed a negative correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=−0.562, p=0.045). Conversely, subjects with unfavorable outcome in the high cortisol TRAJ group displayed a positive correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=0.391, p=0.006). Our results suggest that unfavorable outcome after TBI may result from dysfunctional neuroendocrine-immune communication wherein an adequate immune response is not mounted or, alternatively, neuroinflammation is prolonged. Importantly, the nature of

  13. Radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction. Technical report, 16 Aug 86-31 Mar 90

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Schuening, F.

    1991-06-01

    This work was aimed at investigating radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction in the dog model. One project was to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against canine hemopoietic precursor cells and specific for pluripotent stem cells. Antibodies obtained reacted with different myeloid and erythroid precursor cells; unfortunately, none of the antibodies were specific for pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells. Positive selections for these cells were performed using magnetic beads and an antibody against class 2-antigen. Transplantation of class 2 positive marrow cells into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs led to sustained recovery in only 1 of 5 dogs. A second project established and investigated long-term marrow cultures in the dog. Culture conditions were studied and optimized, and marrow cells were transplanted into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs to investigate stem cell survival in long-term cultures. Engraftment was observed only with short-term marrow cultures.

  14. A comparison of sex-specific immune signatures in Gulf War illness and chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though potentially linked to the basic physiology of stress response we still have no clear understanding of Gulf War Illness (GWI), a debilitating condition presenting complex immune, endocrine and neurological symptoms. Here we compared male (n = 20) and female (n = 10) veterans with GWI separately against their healthy counterparts (n = 21 male, n = 9 female) as well as subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome/ myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) (n = 12 male, n = 10 female). Methods Subjects were assessed using a Graded eXercise Test (GXT) with blood drawn prior to exercise, at peak effort (VO2 max) and 4-hours post exercise. Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70), 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFNγ, TNFα and TNFβ in plasma samples from each phase of exercise. Linear classification models were constructed using stepwise variable selection to identify cytokine co-expression patterns characteristic of each subject group. Results Classification accuracies in excess of 80% were obtained using between 2 and 5 cytokine markers. Common to both GWI and CFS, IL-10 and IL-23 expression contributed in an illness and time-dependent manner, accompanied in male subjects by NK and Th1 markers IL-12, IL-15, IL-2 and IFNγ. In female GWI and CFS subjects IL-10 was again identified as a delineator but this time in the context of IL-17 and Th2 markers IL-4 and IL-5. Exercise response also differed between sexes: male GWI subjects presented characteristic cytokine signatures at rest but not at peak effort whereas the opposite was true for female subjects. Conclusions Though individual markers varied, results collectively supported involvement of the IL-23/Th17/IL-17 axis in the delineation of GWI and CFS in a sex-specific way. PMID:23800166

  15. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  16. Atopic dermatitis: immune deviation, barrier dysfunction, IgE autoreactivity and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Tsuji, Gaku; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kadono, Takafumi

    2017-01-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic or chronically relapsing, eczematous, severely pruritic skin disorder mostly associated with IgE elevation and skin barrier dysfunction due to decreased filaggrin expression. The lesional skin of AD exhibits Th2- and Th22-deviated immune reactions that are progressive during disease chronicity. Th2 and Th22 cytokines further deteriorate the skin barrier by inhibiting filaggrin expression. Some IgEs are reactive to self-antigens. The IgE autoreactivity may precipitate the chronicity of AD. Upon activation of the ORAI1 calcium channel, atopic epidermis releases large amounts of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which initiates the Th2 and Th22 immune response. Th2-derived interleukin-31 and TSLP induce an itch sensation. Taken together, TSLP/Th2/Th22 pathway is a promising target for developing new therapeutics for AD. Enhancing filaggrin expression using ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor may also be an adjunctive measure to restore the disrupted barrier function specifically for AD.

  17. Effects of acupuncturing Pishu combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 on the immune function of rats with chronic fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Yue; Ma, Xiande; Chen, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of acupuncturing Pishu combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 on the immune function of rats with chronic fatigue. Methods: Forty male SD rats were equally randomized into control group, chronic fatigue system group (CFS), Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) group, acupuncture group and acupuncture combined with Ginsenoside Rg3 (A+Rg3) group. Rats with chronic fatigue were established by bounding and forced swimming in cold water once daily for 21 days except control group, then the rats in the acupuncture and A+Rg3 group were treated by manual acupuncture stimulation of bilateral “Pishu” once daily for 7 days. Ginsenoside Rg3 was administered by intravenous to the rats of the A+Rg3 and Rg3 group for 7 days in dosages of 2 mg/kg body weight, and two markers of physical fatigue were evaluated: body weight and blood lactic acid (LA). The percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes, CD4+ lymphocytes, and CD8+ lymphocytes in the spleens of the rats were evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Serum IFN-gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-4 contents were detected by ELISA. Results: Increased body weight and reduced blood LA concentrations were found in the rat of Rg3 group and A+Rg3 group than that in CFS group. The rat of Rg3 group and A+Rg3 group also showed a significant increase in the percentage of CD4+ lymphocytes and a significant decrease in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes and correct CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Compared with the CFS group, the level of IFN-γ in the Rg3, acupuncture and A+Rg3 groups was reduced and IL-4 was increased. Conclusions: Acupuncture and Rg3 can improve the immune system activity of CFS rats and acupuncturing Pishu combined with Rg3 was significantly superior compared with Rg3 and acupuncture, respectively. PMID:26770528

  18. Drosophila type IV collagen mutation associates with immune system activation and intestinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Márton; Kiss, András A; Radics, Monika; Popovics, Nikoletta; Hermesz, Edit; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-01-01

    The basal lamina (BM) contains numerous components with a predominance of type IV collagens. Clinical manifestations associated with mutations of the human COL4A1 gene include perinatal cerebral hemorrhage and porencephaly, hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps (HANAC), ocular dysgenesis, myopathy, Walker–Warburg syndrome and systemic tissue degeneration. In Drosophila, the phenotype associated with dominant temperature sensitive mutations of col4a1 include severe myopathy resulting from massive degradation of striated muscle fibers, and in the gut, degeneration of circular visceral muscle cells and epithelial cells following detachment from the BM. In order to determine the consequences of altered BMfunctions due to aberrant COL4A1 protein, we have carried out a series of tests using Drosophila DTS-L3 mutants from our allelic series of col4a1 mutations with confirmed degeneration of various cell types and lowest survival rate among the col4a1 mutant lines at restrictive temperature. Results demonstrated epithelial cell degeneration in the gut, shortened gut, enlarged midgut with multiple diverticulae, intestinal dysfunction and shortened life span. Midgut immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed altered expression and distribution of BM components integrin PSI and PSII alpha subunits, laminin gamma 1, and COL4A1 both in larvae and adults. Global gene expression analysis revealed activation of the effector AMP genes of the primary innate immune system including Metchnikowin, Diptericin, Diptericin B, and edin that preceded morphological changes. Attacin::GFP midgut expression pattern further supported these changes. An increase in ROS production and changes in gut bacterial flora were also noted and may have further enhanced an immune response. The phenotypic features of Drosophila col4a1 mutants confirmed an essential role for type IV collagen in maintaining epithelial integrity, gut morphology and intestinal function and suggest that

  19. Form follows function: astrocyte morphology and immune dysfunction in SIV neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Renner, Nicole A; Sansing, Hope A; Didier, Peter J; MacLean, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Cortical function is disrupted in neuroinflammatory disorders, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Astrocyte dysfunction includes retraction of foot processes from the blood-brain barrier and decreased removal of neurotransmitters from synaptic clefts. Mechanisms of astrocyte activation, including innate immune function and the fine neuroanatomy of astrocytes, however, remain to be investigated. We quantified the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-labeled astrocytes per square millimeter and the proportion of astrocytes immunopositive for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to examine innate immune activation in astrocytes. We also performed detailed morphometric analyses of gray and white matter astrocytes in the frontal and parietal lobes of rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), both with and without encephalitis, an established model of AIDS neuropathogenesis. Protoplasmic astrocytes (gray matter) and fibrous astrocytes (deep white matter) were imaged, and morphometric features were analyzed using Neurolucida. Gray matter and white matter astrocytes showed no change in cell body size in animals infected with SIV regardless of encephalitic status. In SIV-infected macaques, both gray and white matter astrocytes had shorter, less ramified processes, resulting in decreased cell arbor compared with controls. SIV-infected macaques with encephalitis showed decreases in arbor length in white matter astrocytes and reduced complexity in gray matter astrocytes compared to controls. These results provide the first evidence that innate immune activation of astrocytes is linked to altered cortical astrocyte morphology in SIV/HIV infection. Here, we demonstrate that astrocyte remodeling is correlated with infection. Perturbed neuron-glia signaling may be a driving factor in the development of HAND.

  20. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  1. Possible impact of plasma RNase activity on immune dysfunction in juvenile diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Gordana; Saranac, Ljiljana; Zivic, Sasa; Jevtovic, Tatjana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Pavlovic, Dusica; Pavlovic, Radmila; Kocic, Radivoj

    2005-09-01

    The ribonuclease (RNase) family represents important enzymes used widely in biomedical and biotechnological applications, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This study was undertaken to test the possibility that plasma alkaline RNase (free or inhibitory bound) determination may be useful in studying the dysregulation of nucleic acid and oligonucleotide metabolism as a possible pathogenetic mechanism in development of immune dysfunction in juvenile diabetes mellitus. Children with type 1 diabetes (n=32, age group of 5--14 yr), together with age-matched control subjects (n=35), were enrolled in the study. None had microvascular complications. According to the metabolic regulation of the disease and the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, all patients were divided into two groups (HbA1c<7.5% and HbA1c>7.5%). According to the duration of diabetes, diabetic children were divided into two groups: duration of diabetes less than 1 yr and duration of diabetes greater than 1 yr. The control group consisted of age-matched subjects (n=35; 15 girls and 20 boys) who were clinically healthy. The activity of free and inhibitory-bound RNase and the level of acid soluble nucleotides were measured in heparinized plasma. The inhibitory-bound enzyme activity was higher in diabetic children, followed by sharply decreased free enzyme, especially in the group with the level of HbA1c above 7.5%. Recent-onset diabetic patients had lower free RNase activity compared with those with longer duration of the disease. The amount of pre-existing acid-soluble oligonucleotides was significantly increased in diabetic children, especially in those with poor metabolic control. Our observed preliminary results may suggest a hypothesis that a persistent increase of oligonucleotide fragments, most probably due to insufficient RNase activity, may lead to T-cell hyperactivity in type 1 diabetes through the activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs). The measurement of RNase(s) activity (free

  2. microRNA Expression in Sentinel Nodes from Progressing Melanoma Patients Identifies Networks Associated with Dysfunctional Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Vallacchi, Viviana; Camisaschi, Chiara; Dugo, Matteo; Vergani, Elisabetta; Deho, Paola; Gualeni, Ambra; Huber, Veronica; Gloghini, Annunziata; Maurichi, Andrea; Santinami, Mario; Sensi, Marialuisa; Castelli, Chiara; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence. PMID:27983661

  3. Innate Immune Signalling Genetics of Pain, Cognitive Dysfunction and Sickness Symptoms in Cancer Pain Patients Treated with Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, Daniel T.; Klepstad, Pål; Dale, Ola; Kaasa, Stein; Somogyi, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Common adverse symptoms of cancer and chemotherapy are a major health burden; chief among these is pain, with opioids including transdermal fentanyl the mainstay of treatment. Innate immune activation has been implicated generally in pain, opioid analgesia, cognitive dysfunction, and sickness type symptoms reported by cancer patients. We aimed to determine if genetic polymorphisms in neuroimmune activation pathways alter the serum fentanyl concentration-response relationships for pain control, cognitive dysfunction, and other adverse symptoms, in cancer pain patients. Cancer pain patients (468) receiving transdermal fentanyl were genotyped for 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 19 genes: CASP1, BDNF, CRP, LY96, IL6, IL1B, TGFB1, TNF, IL10, IL2, TLR2, TLR4, MYD88, IL6R, OPRM1, ARRB2, COMT, STAT6 and ABCB1. Lasso and backward stepwise generalised linear regression were used to identify non-genetic and genetic predictors, respectively, of pain control (average Brief Pain Inventory < 4), cognitive dysfunction (Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 23), sickness response and opioid adverse event complaint. Serum fentanyl concentrations did not predict between-patient variability in these outcomes, nor did genetic factors predict pain control, sickness response or opioid adverse event complaint. Carriers of the MYD88 rs6853 variant were half as likely to have cognitive dysfunction (11/111) than wild-type patients (69/325), with a relative risk of 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.76) when accounting for major non-genetic predictors (age, Karnofsky functional score). This supports the involvement of innate immune signalling in cognitive dysfunction, and identifies MyD88 signalling pathways as a potential focus for predicting and reducing the burden of cognitive dysfunction in cancer pain patients. PMID:26332828

  4. Exacerbated fatigue and motor deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Krzyszton, C P; Sparkman, N L; Grant, R W; Buchanan, J B; Broussard, S R; Woods, J; Johnson, R W

    2008-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation in the periphery and brain, but whether it protects against infection- or age-related psychomotor disturbances and fatigue is unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated motor coordination, time to fatigue, and several central and peripheral proinflammatory cytokines in male young adult (3-mo-old) and middle-aged (12-mo-old) wild-type (IL-10(+/+)) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. No age-related differences were observed; therefore, data from the two ages were pooled and analyzed to determine effects of genotype and treatment. LPS treatment increased IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha mRNA in all brain areas examined in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice, but to a greater extent and for a longer time in IL-10(-/-) mice. Plasma IL-1beta and IL-6 were increased similarly in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice 4 h after LPS but remained elevated longer in IL-10(-/-) mice, whereas TNFalpha was higher in IL-10(-/-) mice throughout after LPS treatment. Motor performance and motor learning in IL-10(+/+) mice were not affected by LPS treatment; however, both were reduced in IL-10(-/-) mice treated with LPS compared with those treated with saline. Furthermore, although LPS reduced the time to fatigue in IL-10(+/+) and IL-10(-/-) mice, the effects were exacerbated in IL-10(-/-) mice. Thus the increased brain and peripheral inflammation induced by LPS in IL-10(-/-) mice was associated with increased coordination deficits and fatigue. These data suggest that IL-10 may inhibit motor deficits and fatigue associated with peripheral infections via its anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Exacerbated fatigue and motor deficits in interleukin-10-deficient mice after peripheral immune stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Krzyszton, C. P.; Sparkman, N. L.; Grant, R. W.; Buchanan, J. B.; Broussard, S. R.; Woods, J.; Johnson, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is important for regulating inflammation in the periphery and brain, but whether it protects against infection- or age-related psychomotor disturbances and fatigue is unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated motor coordination, time to fatigue, and several central and peripheral proinflammatory cytokines in male young adult (3-mo-old) and middle-aged (12-mo-old) wild-type (IL-10+/+) and IL-10-deficient (IL-10−/−) mice after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. No age-related differences were observed; therefore, data from the two ages were pooled and analyzed to determine effects of genotype and treatment. LPS treatment increased IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα mRNA in all brain areas examined in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, but to a greater extent and for a longer time in IL-10−/− mice. Plasma IL-1β and IL-6 were increased similarly in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice 4 h after LPS but remained elevated longer in IL-10−/− mice, whereas TNFα was higher in IL-10−/− mice throughout after LPS treatment. Motor performance and motor learning in IL-10+/+ mice were not affected by LPS treatment; however, both were reduced in IL-10−/− mice treated with LPS compared with those treated with saline. Furthermore, although LPS reduced the time to fatigue in IL-10+/+ and IL-10−/− mice, the effects were exacerbated in IL-10−/− mice. Thus the increased brain and peripheral inflammation induced by LPS in IL-10−/− mice was associated with increased coordination deficits and fatigue. These data suggest that IL-10 may inhibit motor deficits and fatigue associated with peripheral infections via its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:18650318

  6. Endurance training in MS: short-term immune responses and their relation to cardiorespiratory fitness, health-related quality of life, and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Bansi, J; Bloch, W; Gamper, U; Riedel, S; Kesselring, J

    2013-12-01

    The influences of exercise on cytokine response, health-related quality of life (HR-QoL), and fatigue are important aspects of MS rehabilitation. Physical exercises performed within these programs are often practiced in water, but the effects of immersion have not been investigated. To investigate the influences of short-term immune responses and cardiorespiratory fitness on HR-QoL and fatigue during 3 weeks endurance training conducted on a cycle-ergometer or an aquatic-bike. Randomized controlled clinical trial in 60 MS patients. HR-QoL, fatigue, cardiorespiratory fitness, and short-term immune changes (serum concentrations in response to cardiopulmonary exercise test) of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin-6, and the soluble receptor of IL-6 (sIL-6R) were determined at the beginning and end of 3 weeks of training intervention. Subjects performed daily 30 min training at 60 % of their VO2peak. SF-36 total (p = 0.031), physical (p = 0.004), and mental health (p = 0.057) scores show time effects within both groups. Between-group effects were shown for FSMC total (p = 0.040) and motor function score (p = 0.041). MFIS physical fatigue showed time effects (p = 0.008) for both groups. Linear regression models showed relationships between short-term immune responses and cardiorespiratory fitness with HR-QoL and fatigue after the intervention. This study indicates beneficial effects of endurance training independent of the training setting. Short-term immune adaptations and cardiorespiratory fitness have the potential to influence HR-QoL and fatigue in persons with MS. The specific immune responses of immersion to exercise need further clarification.

  7. Dendritic cells modulate lung response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a murine model of sepsis-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pène, Frédéric; Zuber, Benjamin; Courtine, Emilie; Rousseau, Christophe; Ouaaz, Fatah; Toubiana, Julie; Tazi, Asmaa; Mira, Jean-Paul; Chiche, Jean-Daniel

    2008-12-15

    Host infection by pathogens triggers an innate immune response leading to a systemic inflammatory response, often followed by an immune dysfunction which can favor the emergence of secondary infections. Dendritic cells (DCs) link innate and adaptive immunity and may be centrally involved in the regulation of sepsis-induced immune dysfunction. We assessed the contribution of DCs to lung defense in a murine model of sublethal polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligature and puncture, CLP). In this model, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) retained an immature phenotype, associated with decreased capacity of IL-12p70 release and impaired priming of T cell lymphocytes. Eight days after CLP surgery, we induced a secondary pulmonary infection through intratracheal instillation of 5 x 10(6) CFUs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whereas all sham-operated mice survived, 80% of post-CLP mice died after secondary pneumonia. Post-CLP mice exhibited marked lung damage with early recruitment of neutrophils, cytokine imbalance with decreased IL-12p70 production, and increased IL-10 release, but no defective bacterial lung clearance, while systemic bacterial dissemination was almost constant. Concomitant intrapulmonary administration of exogenous BMDCs into post-CLP mice challenged with P. aeruginosa dramatically improved survival. BMDCs did not improve bacterial lung clearance, but delayed neutrophil recruitment, strongly attenuated the early peak of TNF-alpha and restored an adequate Il-12p70/IL-10 balance in post-CLP mice. Thus, adoptive transfer of BMDCs reversed sepsis-induced immune dysfunction in a relevant model of secondary P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Unexpectedly, the mechanism of action of BMDCs did not involve enhanced antibacterial activity, but occurred by dampening the pulmonary inflammatory response.

  8. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: biochemical examination of blood].

    PubMed

    Hakariya, Yukiko; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2007-06-01

    Though patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have lots of complaints, abnormal findings cannot be detected by biochemical screening tests. However, some specialized blood tests have revealed neuroendocrine immune axis abnormalities, which is closely associated with each other. Recent studies indicate that CFS can be understood as a special condition based on abnormality of the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immunological system, with the distinguishing feature of CFS seeming to be the secondary brain dysfunction caused by several cytokines and/or autoantibodies. In this paper, we summarize these abnormalities found in CFS and show the neuro-molecular mechanism leading to chronic fatigue.

  9. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  10. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-28

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed.

  11. Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression following moderate exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea T.; Light, Alan R.; Hughen, Ronald W.; VanHaitsma, Timothy A.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are characterized by debilitating fatigue, yet evaluation of this symptom is subjective. We examined metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression (mRNA) in patients with CFS (n=22) vs. MS (n=20) vs. healthy controls (n=23) and determined their relationship to fatigue and pain before and after exercise. Methods Blood samples and fatigue and pain ratings were obtained at baseline and 0.5, 8, 24, and 48 hours following sustained moderate exercise. Leukocyte mRNA of 4 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3, P2X4, P2X5, TRPV1), 4 adrenergic (α-2a, β-1, β-2 receptors, COMT) and 5 immune markers (CD14, TLR4, IL-6, IL-10, LTa) was examined using quantitative PCR. Results CFS patients had greater post-exercise increases in fatigue and pain (10–29 pts above baseline, p<.001) and greater mRNA increases in P2X4, TRPV1, CD14 and all adrenergic receptors than controls (1.3 ± .14 to 3.4 ± .90 fold increase above baseline, p=.04 – .005). CFS patients with co-morbid fibromyalgia (n=18) also showed greater increases in ASIC3 and P2X5 (p<.05). MS patients had greater post-exercise increases than controls in β-1 and β-2 adrenergic receptor expression (1.4 ± .27 and 1.3 ± .06 fold increase, respectively, p=.02 and <.001) and greater decreases in TLR4 (p=.02). In MS, IL-10 and TLR4 decreases correlated with higher fatigue scores. Conclusion Post-exercise mRNA increases in metabolite-detecting receptors were unique to CFS patients while both MS and CFS showed abnormal increases in adrenergic receptors. Among MS patients, greater fatigue was correlated with blunted immune marker expression. PMID:22210239

  12. Serological profiling of the EBV immune response in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome using a peptide microarray.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Madlen; Eckey, Maren; Sotzny, Franziska; Hahn, Elisabeth; Bauer, Sandra; Grabowski, Patricia; Zerweck, Johannes; Holenya, Pavlo; Hanitsch, Leif G; Wittke, Kirsten; Borchmann, Peter; Rüffer, Jens-Ulrich; Hiepe, Falk; Ruprecht, Klemens; Behrends, Uta; Meindl, Carola; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reimer, Ulf; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV) plays an important role as trigger or cofactor for various autoimmune diseases. In a subset of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) disease starts with infectious mononucleosis as late primary EBV-infection, whereby altered levels of EBV-specific antibodies can be observed in another subset of patients. We performed a comprehensive mapping of the IgG response against EBV comparing 50 healthy controls with 92 CFS patients using a microarray platform. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cancer-related fatigue served as controls. 3054 overlapping peptides were synthesised as 15-mers from 14 different EBV proteins. Array data was validated by ELISA for selected peptides. Prevalence of EBV serotypes was determined by qPCR from throat washing samples. EBV type 1 infections were found in patients and controls. EBV seroarray profiles between healthy controls and CFS were less divergent than that observed for MS or SLE. We found significantly enhanced IgG responses to several EBNA-6 peptides containing a repeat sequence in CFS patients compared to controls. EBNA-6 peptide IgG responses correlated well with EBNA-6 protein responses. The EBNA-6 repeat region showed sequence homologies to various human proteins. Patients with CFS had a quite similar EBV IgG antibody response pattern as healthy controls. Enhanced IgG reactivity against an EBNA-6 repeat sequence and against EBNA-6 protein is found in CFS patients. Homologous sequences of various human proteins with this EBNA-6 repeat sequence might be potential targets for antigenic mimicry.

  13. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  14. Distortion of memory Vδ2 γδ T cells contributes to immune dysfunction in chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Jiao, Yanmei; Hu, Yu; Cui, Lianxian; Chen, Dexi; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2015-09-01

    γδ T cells play important roles in innate immunity as the first-line of defense against infectious diseases. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection disrupts the balance between Vδ(1) T cells and Vδ(2) T cells and causes dysfunction among γδ T cells. However, the biological mechanisms and clinical consequences of this disruption require further investigation. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of phenotype and function of memory γδ T cells in cohorts of Chinese individuals with HIV infection. We found a dynamic change in memory Vδ(2) γδ T cells, skewed toward an activated and terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype T(EMRA) Vδ(2) γδ T cell, which may account for the dysfunction of Vδ(2) γδ T cells in HIV disease. In addition, we found that IL-17-producing γδ T cells were significantly increased in HIV-infected patients with fast disease progression and positively correlated with HLA-DR(+) γδ T cells and CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) γδ T cells. This suggests the IL-17 signaling pathway is involved in γδ T-cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of Vδ(2) T cells during HIV pathogenesis and represent a sound basis on which to consider immune therapies with these cells.

  15. Prehospital immune responses and development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following traumatic injury: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hazeldine, Jon; Naumann, David N; Toman, Emma; Davies, David; Bishop, Jonathan R B; Su, Zhangjie; Hampson, Peter; Dinsdale, Robert J; Crombie, Nicholas; Duggal, Niharika Arora; Harrison, Paul; Belli, Antonio; Lord, Janet M

    2017-07-01

    Almost all studies that have investigated the immune response to trauma have analysed blood samples acquired post-hospital admission. Thus, we know little of the immune status of patients in the immediate postinjury phase and how this might influence patient outcomes. The objective of this study was therefore to comprehensively assess the ultra-early, within 1-hour, immune response to trauma and perform an exploratory analysis of its relationship with the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). The immune and inflammatory response to trauma was analysed in 89 adult trauma patients (mean age 41 years, range 18-90 years, 75 males) with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 24 (range 9-66), from whom blood samples were acquired within 1 hour of injury (mean time to sample 42 minutes, range 17-60 minutes). Within minutes of trauma, a comprehensive leukocytosis, elevated serum pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and evidence of innate cell activation that included neutrophil extracellular trap generation and elevated surface expression of toll-like receptor 2 and CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils, respectively, were observed. Features consistent with immune compromise were also detected, notably elevated numbers of immune suppressive CD16BRIGHT CD62LDIM neutrophils (82.07 x 106/l ± 18.94 control versus 1,092 x 106/l ± 165 trauma, p < 0.0005) and CD14+HLA-DRlow/- monocytes (34.96 x 106/l ± 4.48 control versus 95.72 x 106/l ± 8.0 trauma, p < 0.05) and reduced leukocyte cytokine secretion in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Exploratory analysis via binary logistic regression found a potential association between absolute natural killer T (NKT) cell numbers and the subsequent development of MODS. Study limitations include the relatively small sample size and the absence of data relating to adaptive immune cell function. Our study highlighted the dynamic and complex nature of the immune response to trauma, with immune alterations

  16. Serum Immune Proteins in Moderate and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Sharni Lee; Brenu, Ekua Weba; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Thao; Huth, Teilah; Ramos, Sandra; Staines, Donald; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Immunological dysregulation is present in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), with recent studies also highlighting the importance of examining symptom severity. This research addressed this relationship between CFS/ME severity subgroups, assessing serum immunoglobulins and serum cytokines in severe and moderate CFS/ME patients. Participants included healthy controls (n= 22), moderately (n = 22) and severely (n=19) affected CFS/ME patients. The 1994 Fukuda Criteria defined CFS/ME and severity scales confirmed mobile and housebound CFS/ME patients as moderate and severe respectively. IL-1β was significantly reduced in severe compared with moderate CFS/ME patients. IL-6 was significantly decreased in moderate CFS/ME patients compared with healthy controls and severe CFS/ME patients. RANTES was significantly increased in moderate CFS/ME patients compared to severe CFS/ME patients. Serum IL-7 and IL-8 were significantly higher in the severe CFS/ME group compared with healthy controls and moderate CFS/ME patients. IFN-γ was significantly increased in severe CFS/ME patients compared with moderately affected patients. This was the first study to show cytokine variation in moderate and severe CFS/ME patients, with significant differences shown between CFS/ME symptom severity groups. This research suggests that distinguishing severity subgroups in CFS/ME research settings may allow for a more stringent analysis of the heterogeneous and otherwise inconsistent illness. PMID:26516304

  17. Immune Dysfunctions and Abrogation of the Inflammatory Response by Environmental Chemicals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-31

    or strain (syngeneic). Autoimmune strains of mice and humans with autoimmune diseases have a markedly sup- pressed autologous MLR. The inciting...rHD-Ai3? 7168 IMIMUNE DYSFUNCTIONS AND ABROGATION OF THE INFLARMMARTORY illi I RESPONSE BY ENVIRO ..(U) OHIO STATE UNIV RESEARCH 1FOUNDAT ION COLUMBUS

  18. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  19. Immune cell dysfunctions in breast cancer patients detected through whole blood multi-parametric flow cytometry assay

    PubMed Central

    Verronèse, E.; Delgado, A.; Valladeau-Guilemond, J.; Garin, G.; Guillemaut, S.; Tredan, O.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Bachelot, T.; N'Kodia, A.; Bardin-Dit-Courageot, C.; Rigal, C.; Pérol, D.; Caux, C.; Ménétrier-Caux, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monitoring functional competence of immune cell populations in clinical routine represents a major challenge. We developed a whole-blood assay to monitor functional competence of peripheral innate immune cells including NK cells, dendritic and monocyte cell subsets through their ability to produce specific cytokines after short-term stimulation, detected through intra-cytoplasmic staining and multi-parametric flow-cytometry. A PMA/ionomycin T cell activation assay complemented this analysis. Comparing cohorts of healthy women and breast cancer (BC) patients at different stages, we identified significant functional alteration of circulating immune cells during BC progression prior to initiation of treatment. Of upmost importance, as early as the localized primary tumor (PT) stage, we observed functional alterations in several innate immune populations and T cells i.e. (i) reduced TNFα production by BDCA-1+ DC and non-classical monocytes in response to Type-I IFN, (ii) a strong drop in IFNγ production by NK cells in response to either Type-I IFN or TLR7/8 ligand, and (iii) a coordinated impairment of cytokine (IL-2, IFNγ, IL-21) production by T cell subpopulations. Overall, these alterations are further accentuated according to the stage of the disease in first-line metastatic patients. Finally, whereas we did not detect functional modification of DC subsets in response to TLR7/8 ligand, we highlighted increased IL-12p40 production by monocytes specifically at first relapse (FR). Our results reinforce the importance of monitoring both innate and adaptive immunity to better evaluate dysfunctions in cancer patients and suggest that our whole-blood assay will be useful to monitor response to treatment, particularly for immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27141361

  20. Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression after moderate exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, patients with multiple sclerosis, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    White, Andrea T; Light, Alan R; Hughen, Ronald W; Vanhaitsma, Timothy A; Light, Kathleen C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are characterized by debilitating fatigue, yet evaluation of this symptom is subjective. We examined metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression (messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]) in patients with CFS (n = 22) versus patients with MS (n = 20) versus healthy controls (n = 23) and determined their relationship to fatigue and pain before and after exercise. Blood samples and fatigue and pain ratings were obtained at baseline and 0.5, 8, 24, and 48 hours after sustained moderate exercise. Leukocyte mRNA of four metabolite-detecting receptors (acid-sensing ion channel 3, purinergic type 2X4 and 2X5 receptors, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) and four adrenergic (α-2a, β-1, and β-2 receptors and catechol-O-methyltransferase) and five immune markers (CD14, toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4], interleukin [IL] 6, IL-10, and lymphotoxin α) was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS had greater postexercise increases in fatigue and pain (10-29 points above baseline, p < .001) and greater mRNA increases in purinergic type 2X4 receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, CD14, and all adrenergic receptors than controls (mean ± standard error = 1.3 ± 0.14- to 3.4 ± 0.90-fold increase above baseline, p = .04-.005). Patients with CFS with comorbid fibromyalgia (n = 18) also showed greater increases in acid-sensing ion channel 3 and purinergic type 2X5 receptors (p < .05). Patients with MS had greater postexercise increases than controls in β-1 and β-2 adrenergic receptor expressions (1.4 ± 0.27- and 1.3 ± 0.06-fold increases, respectively, p = .02 and p < .001) and greater decreases in TLR4 (p = .02). In MS, IL-10 and TLR4 decreases correlated with higher fatigue scores. Postexercise mRNA increases in metabolite-detecting receptors were unique to patients with CFS, whereas both patients with MS and patients with CFS showed abnormal

  1. HTT-lowering reverses Huntington's disease immune dysfunction caused by NFκB pathway dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Lahiri, Nayana; Magnusson-Lind, Anna; Weiss, Andreas; Grueninger, Stephan; McKinnon, Chris; Sirinathsinghji, Eva; Kahlon, Shira; Pfister, Edith L; Moser, Roger; Hummerich, Holger; Antoniou, Michael; Bates, Gillian P; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Lowdell, Mark W; Björkqvist, Maria; Ostroff, Gary R; Aronin, Neil; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2014-03-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system contributes to Huntington's disease pathogenesis and has been targeted successfully to modulate disease progression, but mechanistic understanding relating this to mutant huntingtin expression in immune cells has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that human Huntington's disease myeloid cells produce excessive inflammatory cytokines as a result of the cell-intrinsic effects of mutant huntingtin expression. A direct effect of mutant huntingtin on the NFκB pathway, whereby it interacts with IKKγ, leads to increased degradation of IκB and subsequent nuclear translocation of RelA. Transcriptional alterations in intracellular immune signalling pathways are also observed. Using a novel method of small interfering RNA delivery to lower huntingtin expression, we show reversal of disease-associated alterations in cellular function-the first time this has been demonstrated in primary human cells. Glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles were used to lower huntingtin levels in human Huntington's disease monocytes/macrophages, resulting in a reversal of huntingtin-induced elevated cytokine production and transcriptional changes. These findings improve our understanding of the role of innate immunity in neurodegeneration, introduce glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles as tool for studying cellular pathogenesis ex vivo in human cells and raise the prospect of immune cell-directed HTT-lowering as a therapeutic in Huntington's disease.

  2. Severe immune dysfunction after lethal neutron irradiation in a JCO nuclear facility accident victim.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Hitomi; Ooi, Jun; Tomonari, Akira; Iseki, Tohru; Tojo, Arinobu; Tani, Kenzaburo; Takahashi, Tsuneo A; Yamashita, Naohide; Shigetaka, Asano

    2002-08-01

    The optimal treatment for the hematological toxicity of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is not fully established, especially in cases of high-dose nonuniform irradiation by mixed neutrons and gamma-rays, because estimation of the irradiation dose (dosimetry) and prediction of autologous hematological recovery are complicated. For the treatment of ARS, we performed HLA-DRB1-mismatched unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) for a nuclear accident victim who received 8 to 10 GyEq mixed neutron and gamma-ray irradiation at the JCO Co. Ltd. nuclear processing facility in Tokaimura, Japan. Donor/ recipient mixed chimerism was attained; thereafter rapid autologous hematopoietic recovery was achieved in concordance with the termination of immunosuppressants. Immune function examined in vitro showed recovery of the autologous immune system was severely impaired. Although the naive T-cell fraction and the helper T-cell subtype 1 fraction were increased, the mitogenic responses of T-cells and the allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction were severely suppressed. Endogenous immunoglobulin production was also suppressed until 120 days after the accident. Although skin transplantation for ARS was successful, the patient died of infectious complications and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome 210 days after the accident. These results suggest that fast neutrons in doses higher than 8 to 10 Gy cause complete abrogation of the human immune system, which may lead to fatal outcome even if autologous hematopoiesis recovers. The roles of transplantation, autologous hematopoietic recovery, chimerism, immune suppression, and immune function are discussed.

  3. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  4. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christina L; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R; Glover, Sarah C; Wallet, Mark A; Wallet, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs' innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs' soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/- Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate a

  5. Dichloroacetate improves immune dysfunction caused by tumor-secreted lactic acid and increases antitumor immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Akazawa, Takashi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya; Mizuta, Keisuke; Ito, Yatsuji; Inoue, Norimitsu

    2013-09-01

    The activation of oncogenic signaling pathways induces the reprogramming of glucose metabolism in tumor cells and increases lactic acid secretion into the tumor microenvironment. This is a well-known characteristic of tumor cells, termed the Warburg effect, and is a candidate target for antitumor therapy. Previous reports show that lactic acid secreted by tumor cells is a proinflammatory mediator that activates the IL-23/IL-17 pathway, thereby inducing inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Here, we show that lactic acid, or more specifically the acidification it causes, increases arginase I (ARG1) expression in macrophages to inhibit T-cell proliferation and activation. Accordingly, we hypothesized that counteraction of the immune effects by lactic acid might suppress tumor development. We show that dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases, targets macrophages to suppress activation of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and the expression of ARG1 by lactic acid. Furthermore, lactic acid-pretreated macrophages inhibited CD8+ T-cell proliferation, but CD8+ T-cell proliferation was restored when macrophages were pretreated with lactic acid and DCA. DCA treatment decreased ARG1 expression in tumor-infiltrating immune cells and increased the number of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and NK cells in tumor-bearing mouse spleen. Although DCA treatment alone did not suppress tumor growth, it increased antitumor immunotherapeutic activity of Poly(IC) in both CD8+ T cell- and NK cell-sensitive tumor models. Therefore, DCA acts not only on tumor cells to suppress glycolysis but also on immune cells to improve the immune status modulated by lactic acid and to increase the effectiveness of antitumor immunotherapy. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  6. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer. Herewith we report that oncolytic HSV-1716 generates vaccination effects in the same model. Upon HSV-1716 infection, mouse ovarian tumor cells showed high levels of expression viral glycoproteins B and D and were highly phagocyted by dendritic cells (DCs). Interestingly, increased phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells by DCs was impaired by heparin, and anti-HSV glycoproteins B and D, indicating that viral infection enhances adhesive interactions between DCs and tumor apoptotic bodies. Moreover, HSV-1716 infected cells expressed high levels of heat shock proteins 70 and GRP94, molecules that have been reported to induce maturation of DCs, increase cross-presentation of antigens and promote antitumor immune response. After phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells, DCs acquired a mature status in vitro and in vivo, upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecule and increased migration towards MIP-3beta. Furthermore, HSV-1716 oncolytic treatment markedly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tumor-bearing animals thus abrogating tumor immunosuppressive milieu. These mechanisms may account for the highly enhanced antitumoral immune responses observed in HSV-1716 treated animals. Oncolytic treatment induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFNgamma producing cells, and induced a robust tumor infiltration by T cells. These results indicate that oncolytic therapy with HSV-1716 facilitates antitumor immune responses.

  7. Influenza A induces dysfunctional immunity and death in MeCP2-overexpressing mice

    PubMed Central

    Cronk, James C.; Herz, Jasmin; Kim, Taeg S.; Louveau, Antoine; Moser, Emily K.; Smirnov, Igor; Tung, Kenneth S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function or overexpression of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) results in the severe neurodevelopmental disorders Rett syndrome and MeCP2 duplication syndrome, respectively. MeCP2 plays a critical role in neuronal function and the function of cells throughout the body. It has been previously demonstrated that MeCP2 regulates T cell function and macrophage response to multiple stimuli, and that immune-mediated rescue imparts significant benefit in Mecp2-null mice. Unlike Rett syndrome, MeCP2 duplication syndrome results in chronic, severe respiratory infections, which represent a significant cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Here, we demonstrate that MeCP2Tg3 mice, which overexpress MeCP2 at levels 3- to 5-fold higher than normal, are hypersensitive to influenza A/PR/8/34 infection. Prior to death, MeCP2Tg3 mice experienced a host of complications during infection, including neutrophilia, increased cytokine production, excessive corticosterone levels, defective adaptive immunity, and vascular pathology characterized by impaired perfusion and pulmonary hemorrhage. Importantly, we found that radioresistant cells are essential to infection-related death after bone marrow transplantation. In all, these results demonstrate that influenza A infection in MeCP2Tg3 mice results in pathology affecting both immune and nonhematopoietic cells, suggesting that failure to effectively respond and clear viral respiratory infection has a complex, multicompartment etiology in the context of MeCP2 overexpression. PMID:28138553

  8. Chronic Systemic Immune Dysfunction in African-Americans with Small Vessel-Type Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Brown, Candice M; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Samsa, Gregory P; Goldstein, Larry B; Colton, Carol A

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of small vessel-type (lacunar) ischemic strokes is greater in African-Americans compared to whites. The chronic inflammatory changes that result from lacunar stroke are poorly understood. To elucidate these changes, we measured serum inflammatory and thrombotic biomarkers in African-Americans at least 6 weeks post-stroke compared to control individuals. Cases were African-Americans with lacunar stroke (n = 30), and controls were age-matched African-Americans with no history of stroke or other major neurologic disease (n = 37). Blood was obtained >6 weeks post-stroke and was analyzed for inflammatory biomarkers. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to assess immune responsiveness in a subset of cases (n = 5) and controls (n = 4). After adjustment for covariates, the pro-inflammatory biomarkers, soluble vascular cadherin adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and thrombin anti-thrombin (TAT), were independently associated with lacunar stroke. Immune responsiveness to LPS challenge was abnormal in cases compared to controls. African-Americans with lacunar stroke had elevated blood levels of VCAM-1 and TAT and an abnormal response to acute immune challenge >6 weeks post-stroke, suggesting a chronically compromised systemic inflammatory response.

  9. Utilizing the FIV model to understand dendritic cell dysfunction and the potential role of dendritic cell immunization in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Tracy L.; O’Halloran, Kevin P.; Hoover, Edward A.; Avery, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells which initiate and coordinate the immune response making them central targets of and attractive candidates for manipulation in chronic lentiviral infections. Emerging evidence suggests that DC immune function is disrupted during both acute and chronic infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Despite some early promising data, the use of DC for lentiviral immunotherapy has not fulfilled its expected potential and has been complicated by the large number of variables involved in DC harvesting, purifying, and antigen-loading. Pre-clinical studies aimed at identifying successful strategies for DC augmentation of current HIV treatment protocols are needed. Over the past two decades, the FIV model for HIV infection has increased the understanding of retroviral pathogenesis, and studies have begun using the FIV model to study DC dysfunction and DC-mediated immunotherapy. Careful consideration of the many variables involved in DC function and therapy should help develop protocols to explore the potential of DC vaccine-based therapies for lentiviral infection. PMID:19896214

  10. Central pathways causing fatigue in neuro-inflammatory and autoimmune illnesses.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Berk, Michael; Walder, Ken; Maes, Michael

    2015-02-06

    The genesis of severe fatigue and disability in people following acute pathogen invasion involves the activation of Toll-like receptors followed by the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Many patients suffering from neuroinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, also commonly suffer from severe disabling fatigue. Such patients also present with chronic peripheral immune activation and systemic inflammation in the guise of elevated proinflammtory cytokines, oxidative stress and activated Toll-like receptors. This is also true of many patients presenting with severe, apparently idiopathic, fatigue accompanied by profound levels of physical and cognitive disability often afforded the non-specific diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate a positive association between the degree of peripheral immune activation, inflammation and oxidative stress, gray matter atrophy, glucose hypometabolism and cerebral hypoperfusion in illness, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. Most, if not all, of these abnormalities can be explained by a reduction in the numbers and function of astrocytes secondary to peripheral immune activation and inflammation. This is also true of the widespread mitochondrial dysfunction seen in otherwise normal tissue in neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases and in many patients with disabling, apparently idiopathic, fatigue. Given the strong association between peripheral immune activation and neuroinflammation with the genesis of fatigue the latter group of patients should be examined using FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tested for the presence of peripheral immune activation. It is concluded that peripheral inflammation and immune activation, together with the subsequent activation of glial cells and mitochondrial

  11. IL-15 prevents apoptosis, reverses innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, and improves survival in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeaki; Unsinger, Jacqueline; Davis, Christopher G; Muenzer, Jared T; Ferguson, Thomas A; Chang, Katherine; Osborne, Dale F; Clark, Andrew T; Coopersmith, Craig M; McDunn, Jonathan E; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2010-02-01

    IL-15 is a pluripotent antiapoptotic cytokine that signals to cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system and is regarded as a highly promising immunomodulatory agent in cancer therapy. Sepsis is a lethal condition in which apoptosis-induced depletion of immune cells and subsequent immunosuppression are thought to contribute to morbidity and mortality. This study tested the ability of IL-15 to block apoptosis, prevent immunosuppression, and improve survival in sepsis. Mice were made septic using cecal ligation and puncture or Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. The experiments comprised a 2 x 2 full factorial design with surgical sepsis versus sham and IL-15 versus vehicle. In addition to survival studies, splenic cellularity, canonical markers of activation and proliferation, intracellular pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein expression, and markers of immune cell apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cytokine production was examined both in plasma of treated mice and splenocytes that were stimulated ex vivo. IL-15 blocked sepsis-induced apoptosis of NK cells, dendritic cells, and CD8 T cells. IL-15 also decreased sepsis-induced gut epithelial apoptosis. IL-15 therapy increased the abundance of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 while decreasing proapoptotic Bim and PUMA. IL-15 increased both circulating IFN-gamma, as well as the percentage of NK cells that produced IFN-gamma. Finally, IL-15 increased survival in both cecal ligation and puncture and P. aeruginosa pneumonia. In conclusion, IL-15 prevents two immunopathologic hallmarks of sepsis, namely, apoptosis and immunosuppression, and improves survival in two different models of sepsis. IL-15 represents a potentially novel therapy of this highly lethal disorder.

  12. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Puchta, Alicja; Naidoo, Avee; Verschoor, Chris P; Loukov, Dessi; Thevaranjan, Netusha; Mandur, Talveer S; Nguyen, Phuong-Son; Jordana, Manel; Loeb, Mark; Xing, Zhou; Kobzik, Lester; Larché, Maggie J; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo) mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  13. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  14. Immunotoxicology: environmental contamination by polybrominated biphenyls and immune dysfunction among residents of the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Bekesi, J.G.; Roboz, J.P.; Fischbein, A.; Mason, P.

    1987-01-01

    In 1973, inadvertent contamination occurred in a special farm feed supplement for lactating cows. Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) were used in place of magnesium oxide resulting in serious harm to farm animals, including cattle, chickens, geese, ducks. Farm families, accustomed to eating their own products, were most heavily exposed. To study the impact of PBBs, 336 adult Michigan farm residents, 117 general consumers for comparison, 75 dairy farm residents in Wisconsin, who had not eaten PBB-contaminated food, were examined, as were 79 healthy subjects in New York City. Abnormalities in the Michigan groups included hypergammaglobulinemia, exaggerated hypersensitive response to streptococci, significant decrease in absolute numbers and percentage of T and B-lymphocytes, and increased number of lymphocytes with no detectable surface markers (''null cells''). Significant reduction of in vitro immune function was noted in 20-25% of the Michigan farm residents who had eaten food containing PBB. The decreased immune function detected among the PBB-exposed farm residents tended to affect families as a unit and was independent of exposed individuals' age or sex, pointing against the possibility of genetic predisposition.

  15. Is spaceflight-induced immune dysfunction linked to systemic changes in metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao Wen; Bellinger, Denise L; Jonscher, Karen R; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Mohney, Robert P; Gridley, Daila S

    2017-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on its final mission (STS-135) on July 8, 2011. After just under 13 days, the shuttle landed safely at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the last time. Female C57BL/6J mice flew as part of the Commercial Biomedical Testing Module-3 (CBTM-3) payload. Ground controls were maintained at the KSC facility. Subsets of these mice were made available to investigators as part of NASA's Bio-specimen Sharing Program (BSP). Our group characterized cell phenotype distributions and phagocytic function in the spleen, catecholamine and corticosterone levels in the adrenal glands, and transcriptomics/metabolomics in the liver. Despite decreases in most splenic leukocyte subsets, there were increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related activity. Although there were increases noted in corticosterone levels in both the adrenals and liver, there were no significant changes in catecholamine levels. Furthermore, functional analysis of gene expression and metabolomic profiles suggest that the functional changes are not due to oxidative or psychological stress. Despite changes in gene expression patterns indicative of increases in phagocytic activity (e.g. endocytosis and formation of peroxisomes), there was no corresponding increase in genes related to ROS metabolism. In contrast, there were increases in expression profiles related to fatty acid oxidation with decreases in glycolysis-related profiles. Given the clear link between immune function and metabolism in many ground-based diseases, we propose a similar link may be involved in spaceflight-induced decrements in immune and metabolic function.

  16. Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in the treatment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) - a clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Myhill, Sarah; Booth, Norman E; McLaren-Howard, John

    2013-01-01

    We report on an audit of 138 ME/CFS patients who attended a private practice and took the ATP Profile biomedical test. The results revealed that all of these patients had measureable mitochondrial dysfunction. A basic treatment regime, based on 1) eating the evolutionary correct stone-age diet, 2) ensuring optimum hours of good quality sleep, 3) taking a standard package of nutritional supplements, and 4) getting the right balance between work and rest, was recommended for all patients. Additions to the basic regime were tailored for each patient according to the results of the ATP Profile and additional nutritional tests and clues from the clinical history. Mitochondrial function is typically impaired in two ways: substrate or co-factor deficiency, and inhibition by chemicals, exogenous or endogenous. For the former, additional nutrients are recommended where there is a deficiency, and for the latter, improvement of anti-oxidant status and selective chelation therapy or far-infrared saunas are appropriate. We show case histories of nine patients who have taken the ATP Profile on three or four occasions, and a before-and-after treatment summary of the 34 patients who have had at least two ATP Profile tests separated by some months. Finally, we summarize the results for the 30 patients who followed all aspects of the treatment regime and compare them with the 4 patients who were lax on two or more aspects of the treatment regime. All patients who followed the treatment regime improved in mitochondrial function by on average a factor of 4. PMID:23236553

  17. Cognitive dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a possible role for neuromodulatory immune molecules.

    PubMed

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X chromosome-linked disease characterized by progressive physical disability, immobility, and premature death in affected boys. Underlying the devastating symptoms of DMD is the loss of dystrophin, a structural protein that connects the extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton and provides protection against contraction-induced damage in muscle cells, leading to chronic peripheral inflammation. However, dystrophin is also expressed in neurons within specific brain regions, including the hippocampus, a structure associated with learning and memory formation. Linked to this, a subset of boys with DMD exhibit nonprogressing cognitive dysfunction, with deficits in verbal, short-term, and working memory. Furthermore, in the genetically comparable dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model of DMD, some, but not all, types of learning and memory are deficient, and specific deficits in synaptogenesis and channel clustering at synapses has been noted. Little consideration has been devoted to the cognitive deficits associated with DMD compared with the research conducted into the peripheral effects of dystrophin deficiency. Therefore, this review focuses on what is known about the role of full-length dystrophin (Dp427) in hippocampal neurons. The importance of dystrophin in learning and memory is assessed, and the potential importance that inflammatory mediators, which are chronically elevated in dystrophinopathies, may have on hippocampal function is also evaluated.

  18. A new hypothesis of chronic fatigue syndrome: co-conditioning theory.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-08-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is an illness characterized by a profound, disabling, and unexplained sensation of fatigue lasting at least 6 months, which severely impairs daily functioning and is accompanied by a combination of non-specific symptoms. Many potential causes of chronic fatigue syndrome have been investigated, including viral infections, immune dysfunctions, abnormal neuroendocrine responses, central nervous system abnormalities, autonomic dysfunctions, impaired exercise capacities, sleep disruptions, genetic backgrounds, psychiatric abnormalities, personality, and abnormal psychological processes. However, no etiology, specific physical signs or laboratory test abnormalities have been found. It is essential to establish a conceptual theory of chronic fatigue syndrome that can explain its pathophysiology in order to identify the clinical entity and to develop effective treatment methods. In this article, a new conceptual hypothesis about the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome, the co-conditioning theory, is presented: after repetitive overwork and/or stress, alarm signal to rest and fatigue sensation may cause in response to an unconditioned stimulus (impaired homeostasis and function) that has been paired with a conditioned stimulus (overwork and/or stress). In the future, a new treatment strategy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, re-co-conditioning therapy, may be developed on the basis of the co-conditioning theory. In addition, this theory will likely contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is spaceflight-induced immune dysfunction linked to systemic changes in metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Bellinger, Denise L.; Jonscher, Karen R.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Mohney, Robert P.; Gridley, Daila S.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on its final mission (STS-135) on July 8, 2011. After just under 13 days, the shuttle landed safely at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the last time. Female C57BL/6J mice flew as part of the Commercial Biomedical Testing Module-3 (CBTM-3) payload. Ground controls were maintained at the KSC facility. Subsets of these mice were made available to investigators as part of NASA’s Bio-specimen Sharing Program (BSP). Our group characterized cell phenotype distributions and phagocytic function in the spleen, catecholamine and corticosterone levels in the adrenal glands, and transcriptomics/metabolomics in the liver. Despite decreases in most splenic leukocyte subsets, there were increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related activity. Although there were increases noted in corticosterone levels in both the adrenals and liver, there were no significant changes in catecholamine levels. Furthermore, functional analysis of gene expression and metabolomic profiles suggest that the functional changes are not due to oxidative or psychological stress. Despite changes in gene expression patterns indicative of increases in phagocytic activity (e.g. endocytosis and formation of peroxisomes), there was no corresponding increase in genes related to ROS metabolism. In contrast, there were increases in expression profiles related to fatty acid oxidation with decreases in glycolysis-related profiles. Given the clear link between immune function and metabolism in many ground-based diseases, we propose a similar link may be involved in spaceflight-induced decrements in immune and metabolic function. PMID:28542224

  20. Genetic, Immune, and Vasoactive Factors in the Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajjadh M. J.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy that could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of PE are not completely understood, but recent research has begun to unravel some of the potential mechanisms. Areas covered Genetic polymorphisms and altered maternal immune response may cause impaired remodeling of the spiral arteries; a potential early defect in PE. Inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the decidua leads to reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia. Placental ischemia causes the release of biologically active factors such as anti-angiogenic factors, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and angiotensin II receptor autoantibodies. These vasoactive factors could cause systemic vascular endotheliosis and consequent increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure, glomerular endotheliosis causing proteinuria, cerebrovascular endotheliosis causing cerebral edema, seizures and visual disturbances, and hepatic endotheliosis which may contribute to the manifestations of HELLP syndrome. PE-associated vascular endotheliosis causes a decrease in vasodilator mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, an increase in vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2, and enhanced mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction such as intracellular Ca2+, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity and extracellular matrix cause vascular remodeling and further vasoconstriction. Expert opinion Some of the genetic, immune and vasoactive factors involved in vascular endotheliosis could be used as biomarkers for early detection, and as potential targets for prevention and treatment of PE. PMID:26294111

  1. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H(2) was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H(2) could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H(2) treatment. H(2) also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H(2). Finally, we found that H(2) could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H(2) as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species.

  2. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim M.; Chiu, Kevin B.; Didier, Peter J.; Baker, Kate C.; MacLean, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2 mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors. PMID:26191654

  3. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H2 was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H2 could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H2 treatment. H2 also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H2. Finally, we found that H2 could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H2 as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:24618260

  4. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Didier, Peter J; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors.

  5. Genomic deletion of GIT2 induces a premature age-related thymic dysfunction and systemic immune system disruption

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Sana; Lustig, Ana; Carter, Arnell; Sankar, Mathavi; Daimon, Caitlin M.; Premont, Richard T.; Etienne, Harmonie; van Gastel, Jaana; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Janssens, Jonathan; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yongqing; Wood, William; Lehrmann, Elin; Martin, James G.; Martin, Bronwen; Taub, Dennis D.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has proposed that GIT2 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2) acts as an integrator of the aging process through regulation of ‘neurometabolic’ integrity. One of the commonly accepted hallmarks of the aging process is thymic involution. At a relatively young age, 12 months old, GIT2−/− mice present a prematurely distorted thymic structure and dysfunction compared to age-matched 12 month-old wild-type control (C57BL/6) mice. Disruption of thymic structure in GIT2−/− (GIT2KO) mice was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of the cortical thymic marker, Troma-I (cytokeratin 8). Double positive (CD4+CD8+) and single positive CD4+ T cells were also markedly reduced in 12 month-old GIT2KO mice compared to age-matched control wild-type mice. Coincident with this premature thymic disruption in GIT2KO mice was the unique generation of a novel cervical ‘organ’, i.e. ‘parathymic lobes’. These novel organs did not exhibit classical peripheral lymph node-like characteristics but expressed high levels of T cell progenitors that were reflexively reduced in GIT2KO thymi. Using signaling pathway analysis of GIT2KO thymus and parathymic lobe transcriptomic data we found that the molecular signaling functions lost in the dysfunctional GIT2KO thymus were selectively reinstated in the novel parathymic lobe – suggestive of a compensatory effect for the premature thymic disruption. Broader inspection of high-dimensionality transcriptomic data from GIT2KO lymph nodes, spleen, thymus and parathymic lobes revealed a systemic alteration of multiple proteins (Dbp, Tef, Per1, Per2, Fbxl3, Ddit4, Sin3a) involved in the multidimensional control of cell cycle clock regulation, cell senescence, cellular metabolism and DNA damage. Altered cell clock regulation across both immune and non-immune tissues therefore may be responsible for the premature ‘aging’ phenotype of GIT2KO mice. PMID:28260693

  6. Clinical Application of Development of Nonantibiotic Macrolides That Correct Inflammation-Driven Immune Dysfunction in Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cerdeira, Carmen; Sanchez-Blanco, Elena; Molares-Vila, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background. Inflammation-driven immune dysfunction supports the development of several chronic human disorders including skin diseases. Nonantibiotic macrolides have anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory activity that suggests the exploitation of these in the treatment of skin diseases characterized by inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. We performed an extensive review of the nonantibiotic macrolide literature published between 2005 and 2012, including cross-references of any retrieved articles. We also included some data from our own experience. Results. Calcineurin antagonists such as tacrolimus and ascomycins (e.g., pimecrolimus) act by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor for activated T cells (NFAT). There are new applications for these macrolides that have been available for several years and have been applied to skin and hair disorders such as atopic dermatitis, oral lichen planus, vitiligo, chronic autoimmune urticaria, rosacea, alopecia areata, pyoderma gangrenosum, Behcet's disease, neutrophilic dermatosis, and lupus erythematosus. We also reviewed new macrolides, like rapamycin, everolimus, and temsirolimus. In addition to the literature review, we report a novel class of nonantibiotic 14-member macrocycle with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Conclusions. This paper summarizes the most important clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of nonantibiotic macrolides which have opened new avenues in the development of anti-inflammatory strategies in the treatment of cutaneous disorders. PMID:23258954

  7. A unifying hypothesis of schizophrenia: abnormal immune system development may help explain roles of prenatal hazards, post-pubertal onset, stress, genes, climate, infections, and brain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Dennis K; Hintz, Kathryn; Shearer, Erika M; Barch, Daniel H; Riffin, Catherine; Whitley, Katherine; Butler, Robert

    2010-03-01

    We propose a unifying hypothesis of schizophrenia to help reconcile findings from many different disciplines. This hypothesis proposes that schizophrenia often involves pre- or perinatal exposure to adverse factors that produce a latent immune vulnerability. When this vulnerability is manifested, beginning around puberty with changes in immune function and involution of the thymus, individuals become more susceptible to infections and immune dysfunctions that contribute to schizophrenia. Our hypothesis suggests theoretical bridges between different lines of evidence on schizophrenia and offers explanations for many puzzling findings about schizophrenia. For example, the hypothesis helps account for why schizophrenia patients tend to have had increased exposure to neurotropic infections, but most individuals with such exposure do not develop schizophrenia, and why prenatal hardships increase risk for schizophrenia, but the onset of symptoms typically does not occur until after puberty. The hypothesis also explains another paradox: lower socioeconomic status and poor prenatal care increase risk for schizophrenia at the same geographic site, but international comparisons indicate that countries with higher per capita incomes and better prenatal care actually tend to have higher schizophrenia prevalences. As the hypothesis predicts, (1) prenatal adversity, which increases risk for schizophrenia, also impairs post-pubertal immune competence, (2) schizophrenia patients experience elevated morbidity from infectious and auto-immune diseases, (3) genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia increase vulnerability to these diseases, (4) factors that exacerbate schizophrenic symptoms also tend to impair immune function, (5) many anti-psychotic medications combat infection, (6) effects of early infections may not appear until after puberty, when they can produce neurologic and psychiatric symptoms, and (7) immune dysfunctions, such as imbalances of pro- and anti

  8. Incidence of Endocrine Dysfunction Following the Use of Different Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Regimens: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Barry, William T; Garrido-Castro, Ana C; Hodi, F Stephen; Min, Le; Krop, Ian E; Tolaney, Sara M

    2017-09-28

    If not promptly recognized, endocrine dysfunction can be life threatening. The incidence and risk of developing such adverse events (AEs) following the use of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) regimens are unknown. To compare the incidence and risk of endocrine AEs following treatment with US Food and Drug Administration-approved ICI regimens. A PubMed search through July 18, 2016, using the following keywords was performed: "ipilimumab," "MDX-010," "nivolumab," "BMS-963558," "pembrolizumab," "MK-3475," "atezolizumab," "MPDL3280A," and "phase." Thirty-eight randomized clinical trials evaluating the usage of these ICIs for treatment of advanced solid tumors were identified, resulting in a total of 7551 patients who were eligible for a meta-analysis. Regimens were categorized by class into monotherapy with a PD-1 (programmed cell death protien 1) inhibitor, a CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4) inhibitor, or a PD-L1 (programmed cell death 1 ligand 1) inhibitor, and combination therapy with PD-1 plus CTLA-4 inhibitors. The data were extracted by 1 primary reviewer (R.B.-S.) and then independently reviewed by 2 secondary reviewers (W.T.B. and A.C.G.-C.) following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Inferences on the incidence of AEs were made using log-odds random effects models. Incidence of all-grade hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypophysitis, primary adrenal insufficiency, and insulin-deficient diabetes. Overall, 38 randomized clinical trials comprising 7551 patients were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The incidence of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism was highest in patients receiving combination therapy. Patients on the combination regimen were significantly more likely to experience hypothyroidism (odds ratio [OR], 3.81; 95% CI, 2.10-6.91, P < .001) and hyperthyroidism (OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 2.05-8.90; P = .001) than patients on ipilimumab. Compared with patients on

  9. Chemotherapy Necessitates Increased Immune Control of HHVs: A Cause of Persistent Inflammation Enabling Protracted Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    survivors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS breast cancer, chemotherapy, immunology, human herpes viruses, survivor fatigue 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...collected prior to, during, and post chemotherapy from BC patients. Our initial hypotheses focused on the role of HHVs, specifically CMV and EBV , and...study 3, respectively. We have performed CMV, EBV , neopterin, and IFN-γ analysis on the analyzed samples listed in Table 1. We will assess VZV and

  10. Chemotherapy Necessitates Increased Immune Control of HHVs: A Cause of Persistent Inflammation Enabling Protracted Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    found a significant increase in CRP levels between EBV + and EBV /CMV double positive subjects. Moreover, EBV /CMV double positive individuals showed...higher levels of hs-CRP. Similarly, CMV/ EBV double positive breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy showed higher hs-CRP levels than CMV-/ EBV ...TERMS breast cancer, chemotherapy, immunology, human herpes viruses, survivor fatigue 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  11. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  12. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  13. [Endothelial dysfunction and nonspecific immune reactions in development and progression of osteoarthrosis in women engaged into manual work].

    PubMed

    Maliutina, N N; Nevzorova, M S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers mechanisms of development and progression of osteoarthrosis as an occupationally conditioned disease in women of manual work. Women working in physical overstrain conditions are under occupational risk with dysfunction of many body systems. The authors set a hypothesis on association of endothelial dysfunction markers dysbalance and structural remodelling of cartilage matrix as a proof of degenerative changes.

  14. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-05-11

    Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders.

  15. Green tea and its major components ameliorate immune dysfunction in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma and treated with the carcinogen NNK.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Gong, Y; Yang, Z; Ge, G; Han, C; Chen, J

    1999-01-01

    The protective effects of tea and/or its components on dysfunction of immune functions during tumor growth and carcinogenesis in mice were studied using two experimental models: C57/BL6J mice transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and Kunming mice treated with a single dose of 4-(methylnitrosamino-)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). In C57/BL6J mice bearing LLC, the weight of the thymus decreased, the proportion of CD4(+)-positive T lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ decreased, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of white blood cells in peripheral blood stimulated by zymosan increased, and plaque-forming cells (PFC) decreased. However, in LLC-bearing mice given green tea as drinking water, all immune functions were improved, along with inhibition of tumor growth. In Kunming mice treated with NNK, during the four weeks of observation, their immunologic indicators, such as phagocytosis of macrophages in the abdominal cavity, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of white blood cells, plaque-forming cells, and delayed-type hypersensitivity, increased or decreased to various extents compared with normal controls. However, these changes were significantly prevented in the mice given green tea, mixed tea, or tea polyphenol as drinking water. In conclusion, tea and its components ameliorated immune dysfunction in mice bearing LLC or treated with the carcinogen NNK.

  16. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  17. A review of research trends in physiological abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: immune dysregulation, inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and environmental toxicant exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, D A; Frye, R E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated physiological and metabolic abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other psychiatric disorders, particularly immune dysregulation or inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and environmental toxicant exposures (‘four major areas'). The aim of this study was to determine trends in the literature on these topics with respect to ASD. A comprehensive literature search from 1971 to 2010 was performed in these four major areas in ASD with three objectives. First, publications were divided by several criteria, including whether or not they implicated an association between the physiological abnormality and ASD. A large percentage of publications implicated an association between ASD and immune dysregulation/inflammation (416 out of 437 publications, 95%), oxidative stress (all 115), mitochondrial dysfunction (145 of 153, 95%) and toxicant exposures (170 of 190, 89%). Second, the strength of evidence for publications in each area was computed using a validated scale. The strongest evidence was for immune dysregulation/inflammation and oxidative stress, followed by toxicant exposures and mitochondrial dysfunction. In all areas, at least 45% of the publications were rated as providing strong evidence for an association between the physiological abnormalities and ASD. Third, the time trends in the four major areas were compared with trends in neuroimaging, neuropathology, theory of mind and genetics (‘four comparison areas'). The number of publications per 5-year block in all eight areas was calculated in order to identify significant changes in trends. Prior to 1986, only 12 publications were identified in the four major areas and 51 in the four comparison areas (42 for genetics). For each 5-year period, the total number of publications in the eight combined areas increased progressively. Most publications (552 of 895, 62%) in the four major areas were published in the last 5 years (2006–2010). Evaluation

  18. Unstimulated cortisol secretory activity in everyday life and its relationship with fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review and subset meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Powell, Daniel J H; Liossi, Christina; Moss-Morris, Rona; Schlotz, Wolff

    2013-11-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a psychoneuroendocrine regulator of the stress response and immune system, and dysfunctions have been associated with outcomes in several physical health conditions. Its end product, cortisol, is relevant to fatigue due to its role in energy metabolism. The systematic review examined the relationship between different markers of unstimulated salivary cortisol activity in everyday life in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fatigue assessed in other clinical and general populations. Search terms for the review related to salivary cortisol assessments, everyday life contexts, and fatigue. All eligible studies (n=19) were reviewed narratively in terms of associations between fatigue and assessed cortisol markers, including the cortisol awakening response (CAR), circadian profile (CP) output, and diurnal cortisol slope (DCS). Subset meta-analyses were conducted of case-control CFS studies examining group differences in three cortisol outcomes: CAR output; CAR increase; and CP output. Meta-analyses revealed an attenuation of the CAR increase within CFS compared to controls (d=-.34) but no statistically significant differences between groups for other markers. In the narrative review, total cortisol output (CAR or CP) was rarely associated with fatigue in any population; CAR increase and DCS were most relevant. Outcomes reflecting within-day change in cortisol levels (CAR increase; DCS) may be the most relevant to fatigue experience, and future research in this area should report at least one such marker. Results should be considered with caution due to heterogeneity in one meta-analysis and the small number of studies.

  19. Chronic fatigue syndrome: an approach combining self-management with graded exercise to avoid exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Jo; Paul, Lorna; Wallman, Karen

    2008-04-01

    Controversy regarding the aetiology and treatment of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome continues among the medical professions. The Cochrane Collaboration advises practitioners to implement graded exercise therapy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome using cognitive behavioural principles. Conversely, there is evidence that exercise can exacerbate symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome, if too-vigorous exercise/activity promotes immune dysfunction, which in turn increases symptoms. When designing and implementing an exercise programme for chronic fatigue syndrome it is important to be aware of both of these seemingly opposing viewpoints in order to deliver a programme with no detrimental effects on the pathophysiology of the condition. Using evidence from both the biological and clinical sciences, this paper explains that graded exercise therapy for people with chronic fatigue syndrome can be undertaken safely with no detrimental effects on the immune system. Exercise programmes should be designed to cater for individual physical capabilities and should take into account the fluctuating nature of symptoms. In line with cognitive behaviourally and graded exercise-based strategies, self-management for people with chronic fatigue syndrome involves encouraging patients to pace their activities and respect their physical and mental limitations, with the ultimate aim of improving their everyday functioning.

  20. Individual Differences in Self-Regulatory Failure and Menstrual Dysfunction Predict Upper Respiratory Infection Symptoms and Antibody Response to Flu Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Strauman, Timothy J.; Coe, Christopher L.; McCrudden, Megan C.; Vieth, Angela Z.; Kwapil, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Prior research indicates that cognitive priming manipulations that activate personal goals acutely increase or decrease natural killer cell cytotoxicity depending on whether individuals see themselves as making or failing to make progress toward their goals. Those findings in a laboratory setting revealed a psychobiological pathway whereby experiences of failure can influence health, but did not assess the impact of chronic perceived success/failure in goal pursuit on actual health outcomes. Three new studies investigated whether individual differences in perceived failure to attain personal goals influenced the self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory infections (URIs) as well as antibody response to flu immunization. Based on pilot data in young women, it also was hypothesized that the occurrence of menstrual dysfunction might interact with goal pursuit failure to more specifically predict cold and flu symptoms and optimal responses to vaccination. Perceived failure to attain goals did predict the reporting of URI symptoms as well as antibody levels post-immunization, both alone and in combination with menstrual dysfunction. PMID:18294813

  1. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  2. Modified Mediterranean Diet for Enrichment of Short Chain Fatty Acids: Potential Adjunctive Therapeutic to Target Immune and Metabolic Dysfunction in Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Shih, Pei-an B.; Cadenhead, Kristen S.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Growing interest in gut and digestive processes and their potential link to brain and peripheral based inflammation or biobehavioral phenotypes has led to an increasing number of basic and translational scientific reports focused on the role of gut microbiota within the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of dietary modification on specific gut metabolites, in association with immune, metabolic, and psychopathological functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders has not been well characterized. The short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, butyrate, and propionate, major metabolites derived from fermentation of dietary fibers by gut microbes, interact with multiple immune and metabolic pathways. The specific pathways that SCFA are thought to target, are dysregulated in cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and systemic inflammation. Most notably, these disorders are consistently linked to an attenuated lifespan in schizophrenia. Although, unhealthy dietary intake patterns and increased prevalence of immune and metabolic dysfunction has been observed in people with schizophrenia; dietary interventions have not been well utilized to target immune or metabolic illness. Prior schizophrenia patient trials primarily focused on the effects of gluten free diets. Findings from these studies indicate that a diet avoiding gluten benefits a limited subset of patients, individuals with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Therefore, alternative dietary and nutritional modifications such as high-fiber, Mediterranean style, diets that enrich the production of SCFA, while being associated with a minimal likelihood of adverse events, may improve immune and cardiovascular outcomes linked to premature mortality in schizophrenia. With a growing literature demonstrating that SCFA can cross the blood brain barrier and target key inflammatory and metabolic pathways, this article highlights enriching dietary intake for SCFA as a potential adjunctive

  3. HTT-lowering reverses Huntington’s disease immune dysfunction caused by NFκB pathway dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Lahiri, Nayana; Magnusson-Lind, Anna; Weiss, Andreas; Grueninger, Stephan; McKinnon, Chris; Sirinathsinghji, Eva; Kahlon, Shira; Pfister, Edith L.; Moser, Roger; Hummerich, Holger; Antoniou, Michael; Bates, Gillian P.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Lowdell, Mark W.; Björkqvist, Maria; Ostroff, Gary R.; Aronin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system contributes to Huntington’s disease pathogenesis and has been targeted successfully to modulate disease progression, but mechanistic understanding relating this to mutant huntingtin expression in immune cells has been lacking. Here we demonstrate that human Huntington’s disease myeloid cells produce excessive inflammatory cytokines as a result of the cell-intrinsic effects of mutant huntingtin expression. A direct effect of mutant huntingtin on the NFκB pathway, whereby it interacts with IKKγ, leads to increased degradation of IκB and subsequent nuclear translocation of RelA. Transcriptional alterations in intracellular immune signalling pathways are also observed. Using a novel method of small interfering RNA delivery to lower huntingtin expression, we show reversal of disease-associated alterations in cellular function–the first time this has been demonstrated in primary human cells. Glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles were used to lower huntingtin levels in human Huntington’s disease monocytes/macrophages, resulting in a reversal of huntingtin-induced elevated cytokine production and transcriptional changes. These findings improve our understanding of the role of innate immunity in neurodegeneration, introduce glucan-encapsulated small interfering RNA particles as tool for studying cellular pathogenesis ex vivo in human cells and raise the prospect of immune cell-directed HTT-lowering as a therapeutic in Huntington’s disease. PMID:24459107

  4. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  5. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  6. Effects of Chinese medicine shen-fu injection on the expression of inflammatory cytokines and complements during post-resuscitation immune dysfunction in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Chun-sheng; Wang, Shuo; Gu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the action of Shen-Fu Injection (SFI) in regulating the expression of the serum complements and inflammatory cytokines synthesized and released in response to the stress of global ischemia accompanying cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Thirty pigs were randomly divided into the sham (n=6) and 3 returns of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) groups (n=24). After 8-min untreated ventricular fibrillation and 2-min basic life support, 24 pigs of the ROSC groups were randomized into three groups (n=8 per group), which received central venous injection of SFI (SFI group), epinephrine (EP group), or saline (SA group). Hemodynamic status and blood samples were obtained at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after ROSC. Serum concentrations of specific activation markers of the complement system C3, C4 and C5b-9 were increased during cardiopulmonary resuscitation through 24 h after ROSC. There were intense changes of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines as early as 0.5 h after CA. Compared with the EP and SA groups, SFI treatment reduced the proinflammatory cytokines levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, P<0.05), and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine levels of IL-4 and IL-10 (P<0.05). Further, SFI treatment decreased the values of C3, C4 and C5b-9 compared with the EP and SA groups. SFI, derived from the ancient Chinese medicine, has significant effects in attenuating post-resuscitation immune dysfunction by modulating the expression of complements and cytokines levels. The current study provided an experimental basis for the clinical application of a potential pharmacologic target for post resuscitation immune dysfunction.

  7. CDC Grand Rounds: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Advancing Research and Clinical Education.

    PubMed

    Unger, Elizabeth R; Lin, Jin-Mann Sally; Brimmer, Dana J; Lapp, Charles W; Komaroff, Anthony L; Nath, Avindra; Laird, Susan; Iskander, John

    2016-12-30

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex and serious illness that is often misunderstood. Experts have noted that the terminology "chronic fatigue syndrome" can trivialize this illness and stigmatize persons who experience its symptoms (1). The name was coined by a group of clinicians convened by CDC in the late 1980s to develop a research case definition for the illness, which, at the time, was called chronic Epstein-Barr virus syndrome. The name CFS was suggested because of the characteristic persistent fatigue experienced by all those affected and the evidence that acute or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus infection was not associated with many cases (2). However, the fatigue in this illness is striking and quite distinct from the common fatigue everyone experiences. A variety of other names have been used, including myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), ME/CFS, chronic fatigue immune dysfunction, and most recently, systemic exertion intolerance disease (3). The lack of agreement about nomenclature need not be an impediment for advancing critically needed research and education. The term ME/CFS will be used in this article.

  8. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shanely, R. Andrew; Nieman, David C.; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A.; Meaney, Mary P.; Knab, Amy M.; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function. PMID:27556488

  9. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  10. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity.

    PubMed

    Shanely, R Andrew; Nieman, David C; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A; Meaney, Mary P; Knab, Amy M; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-08-22

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  11. Postdialysis fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sklar, A H; Riesenberg, L A; Silber, A K; Ahmed, W; Ali, A

    1996-11-01

    To clarify the demographic and clinicolaboratory features of postdialysis fatigue (PDF), we enrolled 85 patients on maintenance hemodialysis in a cross-sectional study using validated questionnaires and chart review. Forty-three patients complained of fatigue after dialysis. On formal testing using the Kidney Disease Questionnaire, the PDF group had statistically greater severity of fatigue and somatic complaints than the group of patients without subjective fatigue (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). On a scale measuring intensity of fatigue (1 = least to 5 = worst), the PDF group average was 3.4 +/- 1.2. PDF subjects reported that 80% +/- 25% of dialysis treatments were followed by fatigue symptoms. In 28 (65%) of patients, the symptoms started with the first dialysis treatment. They reported needing an average of 4.8 hours of rest or sleep to overcome the fatigue symptoms (range, 0 to 24 hours). There were no significant differences between patients with and without PDF in the following parameters: age; sex; type of renal disease; presence of diabetes mellitus, heart disease (congestive, ischemic), or chronic obstructive lung disease; blood pressure response to dialysis; type or adequacy of dialysis regimen; hematocrit; electrolytes; blood urea nitrogen; creatinine; cholesterol; albumin; parathyroid hormone; ejection fraction; and use of antihistamines, benzodiazepines, and narcotics. In the fatigue group, there was significantly greater use of antihypertensive medications known to have fatigue as a side effect (P = 0.007). Depression was more common in the fatigue group by Beck Depression score (11.6 +/- 8.0 v 7.8 +/- 6.3; P = 0.02). We conclude that (1) postdialysis fatigue is a common, often incapacitating symptom in patients on chronic extracorporeal dialysis; (2) no routinely measured parameter of clinical or dialytic function appears to predict postdialysis fatigue; and (3) depression is highly associated with postdialysis fatigue, but the cause

  12. Mutations in SLC5A6 associated with brain, immune, bone, and intestinal dysfunction in a young child.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Constantinescu, Alexandru R; Benke, Paul J; Said, Hamid M

    2017-02-01

    The human sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (hSMVT) is a product of the SLC5A6 gene and mediates biotin, pantothenic acid, and lipoate uptake in a variety of cellular systems. We report here the identification of mutations R94X, a premature termination, and R123L, a dysfunctional amino acid change, both in exon 3 of the SLC5A6 gene in a child using whole genome-scanning. At 15 months of age, the child showed failure to thrive, microcephaly and brain changes on MRI, cerebral palsy and developmental delay, variable immunodeficiency, and severe gastro-esophageal reflux requiring a gastrostomy tube/fundoplication, osteoporosis, and pathologic bone fractures. After identification of the SLC5A6 mutations, he responded clinically to supplemental administration of excess biotin, pantothenic acid, and lipoate with improvement in clinical findings. Functionality of the two mutants was examined by (3)H-biotin uptake assay following expression of the mutants in human-derived intestinal HuTu-80 and brain U87 cells. The results showed severe impairment in biotin uptake in cells expressing the mutants compared to those expressing wild-type hSMVT. Live cell confocal imaging of cells expressing the mutants showed the R94X mutant to be poorly tolerated and localized in the cytoplasm, while the R123L mutant was predominantly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. This is the first reporting of mutations in the SLC5A6 gene in man, and suggests that this gene is important for brain development and a wide variety of clinical functions.

  13. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Moriya, Junji; Yamakawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    More and more patients have been diagnosed as having chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in recent years. Western drug use for this syndrome is often associated with many side-effects and little clinical benefit. As an alternative medicine, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has provided some evidences based upon ancient texts and recent studies, not only to offer clinical benefit but also offer insights into their mechanisms of action. It has perceived advantages such as being natural, effective and safe to ameliorate symptoms of CFS such as fatigue, disordered sleep, cognitive handicaps and other complex complaints, although there are some limitations regarding the diagnostic standards and methodology in related clinical or experimental studies. Modern mechanisms of TCM on CFS mainly focus on adjusting immune dysfunction, regulating abnormal activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and serving as an antioxidant. It is vitally important for the further development to establish standards for ‘zheng’ of CFS, i.e. the different types of CFS pathogenesis in TCM, to perform randomized and controlled trials of TCM on CFS and to make full use of the latest biological, biochemical, molecular and immunological approaches in the experimental design. PMID:18955323

  14. Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by a STAT5B mutation in the south of Brazil: evidence for a founder effect

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata C.; Gonçalves, Fernanda T.; Santos, Hadassa C.; Cardena, Mari M. S. G.; Tonelli, Carlos A.; Funari, Mariana F. A.; Aracava, Rosana M.; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Fridman, Cintia; Jorge, Alexander A. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homozygous STAT5B mutations causing growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction were described in 10 patients since 2003, including two Brazilian brothers from the south of Brazil. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of their STAT5B mutation in this region and to analyze the presence of a founder effect. We obtained DNA samples from 1,205 local inhabitants, 48 relatives of the homozygous patients and four individuals of another affected family. Genotyping for STAT5B c.424_427del mutation and for two polymorphic markers around it was done through fragment analysis technique. We also determined Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplotypes and genomic ancestry in heterozygous carriers. We identified seven families with STAT5B c.424_427del mutation, with 33 heterozygous individuals. The minor allelic frequency of this mutation was 0.29% in this population (confidence interval 95% 0.08-0.5%), which is significantly higher than the frequency of other pathogenic STAT5B allele variants observed in public databases (p < 0.001). All heterozygous carriers had the same haplotype present in the homozygous patients, found in only 9.4% of non-carriers (p < 0.001), supporting the existence of a founder effect. The Y-chromosome haplotype, mtDNA and genomic ancestry analysis indicated a European origin of this mutation. Our results provide compelling evidence for a founder effect of STAT5B c.424_427del mutation. PMID:28590503

  15. Gene Expression of Mesothelioma in Vinylidene Chloride-Exposed F344/N Rats Reveals Immune Dysfunction, Tissue Damage, and Inflammation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blackshear, Pamela E.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Nagai, Hiroaki; Bhusari, Sachin; Hong, Lily; Ton, Thai-Vu T.; Clayton, Natasha P.; Wyde, Michael; Shockley, Keith R.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Gerrish, Kevin E.; Sills, Robert C.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    A majority (~80%) of human malignant mesotheliomas are asbestos-related. However, non-asbestos risk factors (radiation, chemicals, genetic factors) account for up to 30% of cases. A recent two-year National Toxicology Program carcinogenicity bioassay showed that male F344/N rats exposed to the industrial toxicant vinylidene chloride (VDC) resulted in a marked increase in malignant mesothelioma. Global gene expression profiles of these tumors were compared to spontaneous mesotheliomas and the F344/N rat mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE) in order to characterize the molecular features and chemical-specific profiles of mesothelioma in VDC-exposed rats. As expected, mesotheliomas from control and vinylidene chloride-exposed rats shared pathways associated with tumorigenesis, including cellular and tissue development, organismal injury, embryonic development, inflammatory response, cell cycle regulation, and cellular growth and proliferation, while mesotheliomas from vinylidene chloride-exposed rats alone showed overrepresentation of pathways associated with pro-inflammatory pathways and immune dysfunction such as the NF-kB signaling pathway, IL-8 and IL-12 signaling, interleukin responses, Fc receptor signaling, and NK and DC signaling, as well as overrepresentation of DNA damage and repair. These data suggest that a chronic, proinflammatory environment associated with VDC exposure may exacerbate disturbances in oncogene, growth factor and cell cycle regulation, resulting in an increased incidence of mesothelioma. PMID:24958746

  16. Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by a STAT5B mutation in the south of Brazil: evidence for a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata C; Gonçalves, Fernanda T; Santos, Hadassa C; Cardena, Mari M S G; Tonelli, Carlos A; Funari, Mariana F A; Aracava, Rosana M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Fridman, Cintia; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous STAT5B mutations causing growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction were described in 10 patients since 2003, including two Brazilian brothers from the south of Brazil. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of their STAT5B mutation in this region and to analyze the presence of a founder effect. We obtained DNA samples from 1,205 local inhabitants, 48 relatives of the homozygous patients and four individuals of another affected family. Genotyping for STAT5B c.424_427del mutation and for two polymorphic markers around it was done through fragment analysis technique. We also determined Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplotypes and genomic ancestry in heterozygous carriers. We identified seven families with STAT5B c.424_427del mutation, with 33 heterozygous individuals. The minor allelic frequency of this mutation was 0.29% in this population (confidence interval 95% 0.08-0.5%), which is significantly higher than the frequency of other pathogenic STAT5B allele variants observed in public databases (p < 0.001). All heterozygous carriers had the same haplotype present in the homozygous patients, found in only 9.4% of non-carriers (p < 0.001), supporting the existence of a founder effect. The Y-chromosome haplotype, mtDNA and genomic ancestry analysis indicated a European origin of this mutation. Our results provide compelling evidence for a founder effect of STAT5B c.424_427del mutation.

  17. Altered MARCH1 ubiquination-regulated dendritic cell immune functions during the early stage of zymosan-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jiang-yang; Liu, Qian; Wang, Hong-wei; Guo, Huiqin

    2013-02-01

    Using a zymosan-induced mouse model of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), we previously found profound increases in spleen immune cells' expressions of ubiquitin and MHC-II molecules and increased CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) within 24h of zymosan injection. We postulated that the early stage of MODS altered DCs function via an ubiquitination-associated mechanism. We intraperitoneally injected zymosan into 100 male C57BL/6 mice (0.8mg/g) and randomly divided them into 5 groups based on the days after injection (20mice/group): 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 10d. Mice were examined for spleen CD11c+ DC functions at the indicated days. Untreated mice were used for normal spleen tissue and T cell samples. By qPCR, IL-12 and TNF-α mRNA expressions in spleen CD11c+ DCs were significantly increased in MODS 1d mice; on subsequent days post-injection, these mRNA levels gradually returned to control levels. The same patterns were found for MODS mice DCs induction of untreated mouse T cells proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expressions. When T cell functions were examined using MODS 1d DCs with and without MG132 treatment, an inhibitor of ubiquitinated protein degradation, T cell functional activities were enhanced by DCs treated with MG132. MODS 1d DCs also had significantly reduced MARCH1 mRNA expression, a key ubiquitin ligase that regulates DCs MHC-II expression. Silencing DCs MARCH1 expression with siRNA resulted in enhancing their induction of T cell functional activities. Using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and flow cytometry assays, we deduced that MARCH1 ubiquitinated DC surface MHC-II molecules to regulate DC's immune functions in MODS mice. Our results suggest that aberrant degradation of spleen DCs MARCH1-mediated ubiquitinated proteins is involved during the earliest stage of MODS development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Structure of the Mammalian RNase H2 Complex Provides Insight into RNA.NA Hybrid Processing to Prevent Immune Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Shaban, N.; Harvey, S; Perrino, F; Hollis, T

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian RNase H2 ribonuclease complex has a critical function in nucleic acid metabolism to prevent immune activation with likely roles in processing of RNA primers in Okazaki fragments during DNA replication, in removing ribonucleotides misinserted by DNA polymerases, and in eliminating RNA {center_dot} DNA hybrids during cell death. Mammalian RNase H2 is a heterotrimeric complex of the RNase H2A, RNase H2B, and RNase H2C proteins that are all required for proper function and activity. Mutations in the human RNase H2 genes cause Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. We have determined the crystal structure of the three-protein mouse RNase H2 enzyme complex to better understand the molecular basis of RNase H2 dysfunction in human autoimmunity. The structure reveals the intimately interwoven architecture of RNase H2B and RNase H2C that interface with RNase H2A in a complex ideally suited for nucleic acid binding and hydrolysis coupled to protein-protein interaction motifs that could allow for efficient participation in multiple cellular functions. We have identified four conserved acidic residues in the active site that are necessary for activity and suggest a two-metal ion mechanism of catalysis for RNase H2. An Okazaki fragment has been modeled into the RNase H2 nucleic acid binding site providing insight into the recognition of RNA {center_dot} DNA junctions by the RNase H2. Further structural and biochemical analyses show that some RNase H2 disease-causing mutations likely result in aberrant protein-protein interactions while the RNase H2A subunit-G37S mutation appears to distort the active site accounting for the demonstrated substrate specificity modification.

  19. Chronic pain and fatigue syndromes: overlapping clinical and neuroendocrine features and potential pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Clauw, D J; Chrousos, G P

    1997-01-01

    Patients with unexplained chronic pain and/or fatigue have been described for centuries in the medical literature, although the terms used to describe these symptom complexes have changed frequently. The currently preferred terms for these syndromes are fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, names which describe the prominent clinical features of the illness without any attempt to identify the cause. This review delineates the definitions of these syndromes, and the overlapping clinical features. A hypothesis is presented to demonstrate how genetic and environmental factors may interact to cause the development of these syndromes, which we postulate are caused by central nervous system dysfunction. Various components of the central nervous system appear to be involved, including the hypothalamic pituitary axes, pain-processing pathways, and autonomic nervous system. These central nervous system changes lead to corresponding changes in immune function, which we postulate are epiphenomena rather than the cause of the illnesses.

  20. Chronic fatigue syndrome. A brief review of functional disturbances and potential therapy.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    2005-09-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is debilitating for both athletes and the general population. A review of etiology and mechanisms underlying functional disturbances is undertaken to provide a valid basis for therapeutic options. The review focuses on CFS as characterized by standard diagnostic criteria, building on previous reviews through use of articles identified by Medline search. Overtraining, a negative energy balance, excessive physical or environmental stress, disorders of personality and affect, dysfunction of the hypophyseal-pituitary adrenal axis, hormonal imbalance, nutritional deficits, immune suppression or activation and chronic infection have all been proposed as factors precipitating CFS, but none of these precipitants are observed consistently. Impairments of peak aerobic power and muscle strength, together with many functional disturbances, seem related to patient- or physician-imposed inactivity. Once CFS is established, treatment should aim at breaking the vicious cycle of effort avoidance, deterioration in physical condition and increasing fatigue through a combination of psychotherapy, general encouragement and a progressive exercise regimen.

  1. Mouse social stress induces increased fear conditioning, helplessness and fatigue to physical challenge together with markers of altered immune and dopamine function.

    PubMed

    Azzinnari, Damiano; Sigrist, Hannes; Staehli, Simon; Palme, Rupert; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Leparc, German; Hengerer, Bastian; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2014-10-01

    In neuropsychiatry, animal studies demonstrating causal effects of environmental manipulations relevant to human aetiology on behaviours relevant to human psychopathologies are valuable. Such valid models can improve understanding of aetio-pathophysiology and preclinical discovery and development of new treatments. In depression, specific uncontrollable stressful life events are major aetiological factors, and subsequent generalized increases in fearfulness, helplessness and fatigue are core symptoms or features. Here we exposed adult male C57BL/6 mice to 15-day psychosocial stress with loss of social control but minimal physical wounding. One cohort was assessed in a 3-day test paradigm of motor activity, fear conditioning and 2-way avoid-escape behaviour on days 16-18, and a second cohort was assessed in a treadmill fatigue paradigm on days 19 and 29, followed by the 3-day paradigm on days 30-32. All tests used a physical aversive stimulus, namely mild, brief electroshocks. Socially stressed mice displayed decreased motor activity, increased fear acquisition, decreased 2-way avoid-escape responding (increased helplessness) and increased fatigue. They also displayed increased plasma TNF and spleen hypertrophy, and adrenal hypertrophy without hyper-corticoidism. In a third cohort, psychosocial stress effects on brain gene expression were assessed using next generation sequencing. Gene expression was altered in pathways of inflammation and G-protein coupled receptors in prefrontal cortex and amygdala; in the latter, expression of genes important in dopamine function were de-regulated including down-regulated Drd2, Adora2a and Darpp-32. This model can be applied to identify targets for treating psychopathologies such as helplessness or fatigue, and to screen compounds/biologics developed to act at these targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-intensity resistance training in multiple sclerosis - An exploratory study of effects on immune markers in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and on mood, fatigue, health-related quality of life, muscle strength, walking and cognition.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Olsson, Tomas; Johansson, Sverker; Ygberg, Sofia; Opava, Christina; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Piehl, Fredrik

    2016-03-15

    High-intensity resistance training is unexplored in people with multiple sclerosis. To evaluate effects of high-intensity resistance training on immune markers and on measures of mood, fatigue, health-related quality of life, muscle strength, walking and cognition. Further, to describe participants' opinion and perceived changes of the training. Twenty patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis performed high-intensity resistance training at an intensity of 80% of one-repetition maximum, twice a week for 12 weeks. Blood and optional cerebrospinal fluid samples, and data on secondary outcome measures were collected before and after intervention. A study-specific questionnaire was used for capturing participants' opinion. Seventeen participants completed the study. Plasma cytokine levels of tumor necrosis factor were significantly decreased post-intervention (p=0.001). Exploratory cytokine analyses in cerebrospinal fluid (n=8) did not reveal major changes. Significant and clinically important improvements were found in fatigue (p=0.001) and health-related quality of life (p=0.004). Measures of mood (p=0.002), muscle strength (p ≤ 0.001), walking speed (p=0.013) and cognition (p=0.04) were also improved. A majority of participants evaluated the training as very good and perceived changes to the better. High-intensity resistance training in persons with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis with low disability had positive effects on peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, led to clinically relevant improvements in measures of fatigue and health-related quality of life, and was well tolerated. These results provide a basis for a larger randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: more than fatigue].

    PubMed

    Royes, Badía; Alvarez, Carballo; Lalinde, Sevillano; Vidal, Llinas; Martín, Alegre

    2010-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease recognized by all international medical organizations and WHO, and is classified under the code G93.3 of the International Classification of Diseases. Its prevalence is estimated around 2.54% being more common in women than in men (8/2) aged between 20 and 40 Is defined as a chronic new description characterized by the presence of subjective feeling of fatigue and exhaustion long disabling of more than 6 months duration that is not relieved by rest. It is a multisystem disorder that often presents a significant number of comorbid phenomena. Not known until specific tests to confirm the diagnosis, nor is there a cure to solve this health problem definitively The strongest evidence is based on the multidisciplinary approach for the symptomatic treatment of pain, sleep disorders, neurocognitive dysfunction, autonomic and control of depression and anxiety. The specific contribution of nursing to care for the person who lives and live with the SFC should be developed primarily in the field of health education and supportive care, support and assistance to help the patient and their relatives are an adaptive response to changes in health.

  4. [Auditory fatigue].

    PubMed

    Sanjuán Juaristi, Julio; Sanjuán Martínez-Conde, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Given the relevance of possible hearing losses due to sound overloads and the short list of references of objective procedures for their study, we provide a technique that gives precise data about the audiometric profile and recruitment factor. Our objectives were to determine peripheral fatigue, through the cochlear microphonic response to sound pressure overload stimuli, as well as to measure recovery time, establishing parameters for differentiation with regard to current psychoacoustic and clinical studies. We used specific instruments for the study of cochlear microphonic response, plus a function generator that provided us with stimuli of different intensities and harmonic components. In Wistar rats, we first measured the normal microphonic response and then the effect of auditory fatigue on it. Using a 60dB pure tone acoustic stimulation, we obtained a microphonic response at 20dB. We then caused fatigue with 100dB of the same frequency, reaching a loss of approximately 11dB after 15minutes; after that, the deterioration slowed and did not exceed 15dB. By means of complex random tone maskers or white noise, no fatigue was caused to the sensory receptors, not even at levels of 100dB and over an hour of overstimulation. No fatigue was observed in terms of sensory receptors. Deterioration of peripheral perception through intense overstimulation may be due to biochemical changes of desensitisation due to exhaustion. Auditory fatigue in subjective clinical trials presumably affects supracochlear sections. The auditory fatigue tests found are not in line with those obtained subjectively in clinical and psychoacoustic trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  6. Managing fatigue in the syncope unit.

    PubMed

    Newton, Julia L

    2012-12-01

    The symptom of fatigue is frequently described by patients attending the syncope unit with a wide range of conditions including vasovagal syncope and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. It is possible that the presence of autonomic dysfunction provides the common pathogenetic mechanism linking neurally mediated hypotension and fatigue. Managing this debilitating symptom can often be challenging but, with a structured approach, immensely rewarding, and as a result improve how patients cope with their disease.

  7. Influence of pistachios on performance and exercise-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, immune dysfunction, and metabolite shifts in cyclists: a randomized, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Scherr, Johannes; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dréau, Didier; Sha, Wei; Dew, Dustin A; Henson, Dru A; Pappan, Kirk L

    2014-01-01

    Pistachio nut ingestion (3 oz./d, two weeks) was tested for effects on exercise performance and 21-h post-exercise recovery from inflammation, oxidative stress, immune dysfunction, and metabolite shifts. Using a randomized, crossover approach, cyclists (N = 19) engaged in two 75-km time trials after 2-weeks pistachio or no pistachio supplementation, with a 2-week washout period. Subjects came to the lab in an overnight fasted state, and ingested water only or 3 oz. pistachios with water before and during exercise. Blood samples were collected 45 min pre-exercise, and immediately post-, 1.5-h post-, and 21-h post-exercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoP), granulocyte phagocytosis (GPHAG) and oxidative burst activity (GOBA), and shifts in metabolites. Performance time for the 75-km time trial was 4.8% slower under pistachio conditions (2.84 ± 0.11 and 2.71 ± 0.07 h, respectively, P = 0.034). Significant time effects were shown for plasma cytokines, CRP, F2-IsoP, GPHAG, and GOBA, with few group differences. Metabolomics analysis revealed 423 detectable compounds of known identity, with significant interaction effects for 19 metabolites, especially raffinose, (12Z)-9,10-Dihydroxyoctadec-12-enoate (9,10-DiHOME), and sucrose. Dietary intake of raffinose was 2.19 ± 0.15 and 0.35 ± 0.08 mg/d during the pistachio and no pistachio periods, and metabolomics revealed that colon raffinose and sucrose translocated to the circulation during exercise due to increased gut permeability. The post-exercise increase in plasma raffinose correlated significantly with 9,10-DiHOME and other oxidative stress metabolites. In summary, 2-weeks pistachio nut ingestion was associated with reduced 75-km cycling time trial performance and increased post-exercise plasma levels of raffinose, sucrose, and metabolites related to leukotoxic effects and oxidative stress. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01821820.

  8. GENDER BASED DIFFERENCES IN THE GENOMIC RESPONSE, INNATE IMMUNITY, ORGAN DYSFUNCTION AND CLINICAL OUTCOMES AFTER SEVERE BLUNT TRAUMATIC INJURY AND HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Maria-Cecelia; Efron, Phillip A.; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Zhang, Jianyi; Cuschieri, Joseph; Maier, Ronald V.; Minei, Joseph P.; Baker, Henry V.; Moore, Frederick A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Brakenridge, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of gender on post-traumatic pathophysiology and outcomes after severe traumatic injury remains debated. We sought to determine the relationship of gender to the genomic and inflammatory responses, and clinical outcomes after hemorrhagic shock. Methods We analyzed blunt trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock from a prospective, multi-institutional cohort study to assess for gender based differences in the genomic response and clinical outcomes. Serially drawn blood samples were analyzed to evaluate peripheral leukocyte genome-wide expression and circulating inflammatory mediators at intervals between 0.5 and 28 days after injury. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to assess the effect of gender on outcomes after controlling for age, injury and shock severity, blood transfusion, and comorbidities. Results The cohort consisted of 1,285 (67%) male and 643 (33%) female blunt trauma patients. Injury and shock severity were similar between the two groups. There were small but statistically significant differences between males and females regarding their age, BMI, and 12 hour blood and crystalloid administration. Organ failure was more severe in males, with slower recovery (9.0 vs. 6.5 days) in males compared to females (p<0.01). However, there were no differences between males and females in plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, TNF-α and MCP-1. Multivariate analysis revealed that gender was not a significant independent risk factor for complicated recovery or 28-day mortality. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 333 genes with significant differential expression patterns between males and females (FDR<0.001), including genes associated with general inflammation, innate immunity, cell adhesion and cell signaling. None of the former genes were directly associated with sex hormones or X/Y chromosomes. Conclusion There are gender-specific differences in the leukocyte genomic response to severe injury that are associated with

  9. Sex-based differences in the genomic response, innate immunity, organ dysfunction, and clinical outcomes after severe blunt traumatic injury and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Efron, Philip A; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Zhang, Jianyi; Cuschieri, Joseph; Maier, Ronald V; Minei, Joseph P; Baker, Henry V; Moore, Frederick A; Moldawer, Lyle L; Brakenridge, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    The effect of sex on posttraumatic pathophysiology and outcomes after severe traumatic injury remains debated. We sought to determine the relationship of sex to the genomic and inflammatory responses, and clinical outcomes after hemorrhagic shock. We analyzed blunt trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock from a prospective multi-institutional cohort study to assess for sex-based differences in the genomic response and clinical outcomes. Serially drawn blood samples were analyzed to evaluate peripheral leukocyte genomewide expression and circulating inflammatory mediators at intervals between 0.5 and 28 days after injury. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to assess the effect of sex on outcomes after controlling for age, injury and shock severity, blood transfusion, and comorbidities. The cohort consisted of 1,285 (67%) male and 643 (33%) female blunt trauma patients. Injury and shock severity were similar between the two groups. There were small but statistically significant differences between males and females regarding their age, body mass index, and 12-hour blood and crystalloid administration. Organ failure was more severe in males, with slower recovery (9.0 vs. 6.5 days) in males compared to females (p < 0.01). However, there were no differences between males and females in plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. Multivariate analysis revealed that sex was not a significant independent risk factor for complicated recovery or 28-day mortality. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 333 genes with significant differential expression patterns between males and females (FDR, <0.001), including genes associated with general inflammation, innate immunity, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. None of the former genes were directly associated with sex hormones or X/Y chromosomes. There are sex-specific differences in the leukocyte genomic response to severe injury that are associated

  10. Influence of Pistachios on Performance and Exercise-Induced Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, Immune Dysfunction, and Metabolite Shifts in Cyclists: A Randomized, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, David C.; Scherr, Johannes; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dréau, Didier; Sha, Wei; Dew, Dustin A.; Henson, Dru A.; Pappan, Kirk L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pistachio nut ingestion (3 oz./d, two weeks) was tested for effects on exercise performance and 21-h post-exercise recovery from inflammation, oxidative stress, immune dysfunction, and metabolite shifts. Methods Using a randomized, crossover approach, cyclists (N = 19) engaged in two 75-km time trials after 2-weeks pistachio or no pistachio supplementation, with a 2-week washout period. Subjects came to the lab in an overnight fasted state, and ingested water only or 3 oz. pistachios with water before and during exercise. Blood samples were collected 45 min pre-exercise, and immediately post-, 1.5-h post-, and 21-h post-exercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoP), granulocyte phagocytosis (GPHAG) and oxidative burst activity (GOBA), and shifts in metabolites. Results Performance time for the 75-km time trial was 4.8% slower under pistachio conditions (2.84±0.11 and 2.71±0.07 h, respectively, P = 0.034). Significant time effects were shown for plasma cytokines, CRP, F2-IsoP, GPHAG, and GOBA, with few group differences. Metabolomics analysis revealed 423 detectable compounds of known identity, with significant interaction effects for 19 metabolites, especially raffinose, (12Z)-9,10-Dihydroxyoctadec-12-enoate (9,10-DiHOME), and sucrose. Dietary intake of raffinose was 2.19±0.15 and 0.35±0.08 mg/d during the pistachio and no pistachio periods, and metabolomics revealed that colon raffinose and sucrose translocated to the circulation during exercise due to increased gut permeability. The post-exercise increase in plasma raffinose correlated significantly with 9,10-DiHOME and other oxidative stress metabolites. Conclusions In summary, 2-weeks pistachio nut ingestion was associated with reduced 75-km cycling time trial performance and increased post-exercise plasma levels of raffinose, sucrose, and metabolites related to leukotoxic effects and oxidative stress. Trial Registration Clinical

  11. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  12. Understanding and Treating Fatigue in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jopson, Laura; Dyson, Jessica K; Jones, David E J

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and although experienced less by patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a minority still report significant fatigue. Fatigue is the symptom with the greatest impact on quality of life, particularly when associated with social dysfunction. The pathogenesis of fatigue in cholestatic liver disease is complex, poorly understood, and probably has central and peripheral components. Managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease presents a challenge for clinicians given the complexity and its numerous associations. This article presents a structured approach to managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease to improve fatigue severity and quality of life.

  13. Post-traumatic hypopituitarism and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Masel, Brent E; Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Forman, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) associated with chronic cognitive, psychiatric, and/or behavioural sequelae is common following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). More specifically, due to a cascade of hormonal deficiencies secondary to PTH, individuals with TBI may experience debilitating fatigue that can negatively impact functional recovery, as it can limit participation in brain injury rehabilitation services and lead to an increase in maladaptive lifestyle practices. While the mechanisms underlying fatigue and TBI are not entirely understood, the current review will address the specific anatomy and physiology of the pituitary gland, as well as the association between pituitary dysfunction and fatigue in individuals with TBI.

  14. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Inhibited sexual excitement; Sex - orgasmic dysfunction; Anorgasmia; Sexual dysfunction - orgasmic; Sexual problem - orgasmic ... of knowledge about sexual function Negative feelings about sex (often learned in childhood or teen years) Shyness ...

  15. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Erectile Dysfunction Regardless of whether the nerves were spared during ... time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile ...

  16. Lymphocyte subset differences in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, M J; Schacterle, R S; Mackin, G A; Wilson, S N; Bloomingdale, K L; Ritz, J; Komaroff, A L

    2005-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a heterogeneous disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by debilitating fatigue, along with other symptoms, for at least 6 months. Many studies demonstrate probable involvement of the central and autonomic nervous system, as well as a state of generalized immune activation and selective immune dysfunction in patients with CFS. The aim of this study was to compare the lymphocyte subsets of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome to those of patients with major depression and multiple sclerosis as well as those of healthy control subjects. No differences were found in total numbers of T cells, B cells or natural killer (NK) cells. However, differences were found in T, B and NK cell subsets. Patients with major depression had significantly fewer resting T (CD3+/CD25–) cells than the other groups. Patients with major depression also had significantly more CD20+/CD5+ B cells, a subset associated with the production of autoantibodies. Compared to patients with multiple sclerosis, patients with CFS had greater numbers of CD16+/CD3– NK cells. Further study will be required to determine whether these alterations in lymphocyte subsets are directly involved in the pathophysiology of these disorders, or are secondary effects of the causal agent(s). PMID:15996197

  17. A Multi-Ingredient Containing Carbohydrate, Proteins L-Glutamine and L-Carnitine Attenuates Fatigue Perception with No Effect on Performance, Muscle Damage or Immunity in Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53g carbohydrate, 14.5g whey protein, 5g glutamine, 1.5g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1h and 24h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml-1) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml-1) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml-1). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 109/L vs. 4.9±1.8 109/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 109/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 109/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 109/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis. PMID:25915424

  18. A multi-ingredient containing carbohydrate, proteins L-glutamine and L-carnitine attenuates fatigue perception with no effect on performance, muscle damage or immunity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53 g carbohydrate, 14.5 g whey protein, 5 g glutamine, 1.5 g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1 h and 24 h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24 h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1 h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1 h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml(-1)) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml(-1)) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml(-1)). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 10(9)/L vs. 4.9±1.8 10(9)/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 10(9)/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 10(9)/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 10(9)/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis.

  19. Gender differences in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faro, Mònica; Sàez-Francás, Naia; Castro-Marrero, Jesús; Aliste, Luisa; Fernández de Sevilla, Tomás; Alegre, José

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a chronic condition that predominantly affects women. To date, there are few epidemiologic studies on CFS in men. The objective of the study was to assess whether there are gender-related differences in CFS, and to define a clinical phenotype in men. A prospective, cross-sectional cohort study was conducted including CFS patients at the time of diagnosis. Sociodemographic data, clinical variables, comorbid phenomena, fatigue, pain, anxiety/depression, and health quality of life, were assessed in the CFS population. A comparative study was also conducted between genders. The study included 1309 CFS patients, of which 119 (9.1%) were men. The mean age and symptoms onset were lower in men than women. The subjects included 30% single men vs. 15% single women, and 32% of men had specialist work vs. 20% of women. The most common triggering factor was an infection. Widespread pain, muscle spasms, dizziness, sexual dysfunction, Raynaud's phenomenon, morning stiffness, migratory arthralgias, drug and metals allergy, and facial oedema were less frequent in men. Fibromyalgia was present in 29% of men vs. 58% in women. The scores on physical function, physical role, and overall physical health of the SF-36 were higher in men. The sensory and affective dimensions of pain were lower in men. The clinical phenotype of the men with CFS was young, single, skilled worker, and infection as the main triggering agent. Men had less pain and less muscle and immune symptoms, fewer comorbid phenomena, and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatigue and fluid hydration status in multiple sclerosis: A hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cincotta, Molly C; Engelhard, Matthew M; Stankey, Makela; Goldman, Myla D

    2016-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prevalent and functionally disabling symptom for individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) which is poorly understood and multifactorial in etiology. Bladder dysfunction is another common MS symptom which limits social engagement and quality of life. To manage bladder issues, individuals with MS tend to limit their fluid intake, which may contribute to a low-hydration (LoH) state and fatigue. Objective To evaluate the relationship between patient-reported MS fatigue, bladder dysfunction, and hydration status. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional study in 50 women with MS. Participants submitted a random urine sample and completed several fatigue-related surveys. Using a urine specific gravity (USG) threshold of 1.015, we classified MS subjects into two groups: high-hydration (HiH) and LoH states. Results LoH status was more common in MS subjects with bladder dysfunction. Statistically significant differences in self-reported Fatigue Performance Scale were observed between HiH and LoH subjects (p = 0.022). USG was significantly correlated with fatigue as measured by the MS Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) score (r = 0.328, p = 0.020). Conclusion Hydration status correlates with self-reported fatigue, with lower fatigue scores found in those with HiH status (USG < 1.015). PMID:27542703

  1. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  2. Stress management skills, neuroimmune processes and fatigue levels in persons with chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lattie, Emily G.; Antoni, Michael H.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Penedo, Frank; Czaja, Sara; Lopez, Corina; Perdomo, Dolores; Sala, Andreina; Nair, Sankaran; Fu, Shih Hua; Klimas, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Stressors and emotional distress responses impact chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) symptoms, including fatigue. Having better stress management skills might mitigate fatigue by decreasing emotional distress. Because CFS patients comprise a heterogeneous population, we hypothesized that the role of stress management skills in decreasing fatigue may be most pronounced in the subgroup manifesting the greatest neuroimmune dysfunction. Methods In total, 117 individuals with CFS provided blood and saliva samples, and self-report measures of emotional distress, perceived stress management skills (PSMS), and fatigue. Plasma interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and diurnal salivary cortisol were analyzed. We examined relations among PSMS, emotional distress, and fatigue in CFS patients who did and did not evidence neuroimmune abnormalities. Results Having greater PSMS related to less fatigue (p = .019) and emotional distress (p < .001), greater diurnal cortisol slope (p = .023) and lower IL-2 levels (p = .043). PSMS and emotional distress related to fatigue levels most strongly in CFS patients in the top tercile of IL-6, and emotional distress mediated the relationship between PSMS and fatigue most strongly in patients with the greatest circulating levels of IL-6 and a greater inflammatory (IL-6):anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine ratio. Discussion CFS patients having greater PSMS show less emotional distress and fatigue, and the influence of stress management skills on distress and fatigue appear greatest among patients who have elevated IL-6 levels. These findings support the need for research examining the impact of stress management interventions in subgroups of CFS patients showing neuroimmune dysfunction. PMID:22417946

  3. High dose thiamine improves fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Nappo, Agostino; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Zappone, Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue. Some observations indicate that fatigue and related manifestations concomitant with MS could be associated with an intracellular mild thiamine deficiency. We recruited 15 patients with MS who also experience fatigue and assessed the severity of the fatigue using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Although blood thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels were within normal limit in all the patients, high-dose thiamine therapy administered orally or parenterally led to an appreciable improvement of the fatigue. The absence of apparent decrease in blood thiamine despite the presence of symptoms referable to a mild thiamine deficiency suggests that these patients may have a dysfunction of the mechanisms of intracellular transport or structural enzymatic abnormalities. The administration of large quantities of thiamine was effective in reversing the fatigue in MS, suggesting that the abnormalities in thiamine-dependent processes could be overcome by diffusion-mediated transport at supranormal thiamine concentrations. PMID:23861280

  4. Corrosion Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    their scientific and technical potential; - Recommending effective ways for the member nations to use their research and development capabilities for the...be major considerations In aircraft design. Environmental effects are known to infloij- ence both the initiation and the propagation of fatigue cracks...for the assessment of the effectiveness of sharing between different laboratories an investigation of a size prohibit- Ive for its execution at a

  5. Assessing fatigue.

    PubMed

    Foushee, H C

    1986-05-01

    Despite impressive advances in aircraft technology over the past several decades and an overall decline in the airline accident rate since the introduction of turbine-powered aircraft, flight crew performance problems continue to dominate air transport accident statistics. Researchers have offered many hypotheses to explain this finding, and interest in pilot fatigue has stimulated a large volume of laboratory research. Much of this work, however, is difficult to generalize and to apply to the real world of flight operations, and researchers disagree about the extent and operational significance of fatigue-related reductions in pilot performance. As a result, in 1980 Congress asked the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to undertake a comprehensive research program to assess whether fatigue-related problems are prevalent in long- and short-haul flying. The two major goals of this project are: (1) to assess the psychophysiological effects on pilot performance of flying various types of flight and duty cycles, and (2) to determine the operational significance to flight safety and efficiency of flying these flight and duty cycles.

  6. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  7. Is chronic fatigue syndrome an autoimmune disorder of endogenous neuropeptides, exogenous infection and molecular mimicry?

    PubMed

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    documented symptoms of CFS are explained by vasoactive neuropeptide compromise, namely fatigue and nervous system dysfunction through impaired acetylcholine activity, myalgia through nitric oxide and endogenous opioid dysfunction, chemical sensitivity through peroxynitrite and adenosine dysfunction, and immunological disturbance through changes in immune modulation. Perverse immunological memory established against these substances or their receptors may be the reason for the protracted nature of this condition. The novel status of these substances together with their extremely small concentrations in blood and tissues means that clinical research into them is still in its infancy. A biologically plausible theory of CFS causation associated with vasoactive neuropeptide dysfunction would promote a coherent and systematic approach to research into this and other possibly associated disabling conditions.

  8. Side Effects: Fatigue

    Cancer.gov

    Fatigue is a common side effect of many cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Anemia and pain can also cause fatigue. Learn about symptoms and way to manage fatigue.

  9. Mechanisms of PD-L1/PD-1-mediated CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the context of aging-related immune defects in the Eµ-TCL1 CLL mouse model.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Riches, John C; Miller, Shaun; Day, William P; Kotsiou, Eleni; Neuberg, Donna; Croce, Carlo M; Capasso, Melania; Gribben, John G

    2015-07-09

    T-cell defects, immune suppression, and poor antitumor immune responses are hallmarks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory signaling has emerged as a major immunosuppressive mechanism. However, the effect of different microenvironments and the confounding influence of aging are poorly understood. The current study uses the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model, which replicates human T-cell defects, as a preclinical platform to longitudinally examine patterns of T-cell dysfunction alongside developing CLL and in different microenvironments, with a focus on PD-1/PD-L1 interactions. The development of CLL was significantly associated with changes in T-cell phenotype across all organs and function. Although partly mirrored in aging wild-type mice, CLL-specific T-cell changes were identified. Murine CLL cells highly expressed PD-L1 and PD-L2 in all organs, with high PD-L1 expression in the spleen. CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells from leukemic and aging healthy mice highly expressed PD-1, identifying aging as a confounder, but adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated CLL-specific PD-1 induction. Direct comparisons of PD-1 expression and function between aging CLL mice and controls identified PD-1(+) T cells in CLL as a heterogeneous population with variable effector function. This is highly relevant for therapeutic targeting of CD8(+) T cells, showing the potential of reprogramming and selective subset expansion to restore antitumor immunity.

  10. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  11. Subjective Cognitive Fatigue and Autonomic Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Sander, Carina; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Schlake, Hans-Peter; Eling, Paul; Hanken, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive fatigue and autonomic abnormalities are frequent symptoms in MS. Our model of MS-related fatigue assumes a shared neural network for cognitive fatigue and autonomic failures, i.e., aberrant vagus nerve activity induced by inflammatory processes. Therefore, they should occur in common. To explore the relationship between cognitive fatigue and autonomic symptoms in MS patients, using self-reported questionnaires. In 95 MS patients, cognitive fatigue was assessed with the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions and autonomic abnormalities with the Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale-31 (COMPASS-31). We used exploratory correlational analyses and hierarchical regression analysis, controlling for age, depressive mood, disease status, and disease duration, to analyze the relation between autonomic abnormalities and cognitive fatigue. The cognitive fatigue score strongly correlated with the COMPASS-31 score (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). Regression analysis revealed that a model, including the COMPASS-31 domains: pupillomotor, orthostatic intolerance, and bladder, best predict the level of cognitive fatigue (R(2) = 0.47, p < 0.001) after forcing the covariates into the model. In MS patients, cognitive fatigue and autonomic dysfunction share a proportion of variance. This supports our model assuming that fatigue might be explained at least partially by inflammation-induced vagus nerve activity.

  12. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  13. Immunologic aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome. Report on a Research Symposium convened by The CFIDS Association of America and co-sponsored by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Timothy R; Papanicolaou, Dimitris A; Amsterdam, Jay D; Bingham, Stephen; Grossman, Ashley; Hedrick, Terry; Herberman, Ronald B; Krueger, Gerhard; Levine, Susan; Mohagheghpour, Nahid; Moore, Rebecca C; Oleske, James; Snell, Christopher R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious health concern affecting over 800,000 Americans of all ages, races, socioeconomic groups and genders. The etiology and pathophysiology of CFS are unknown, yet studies have suggested an involvement of the immune system. A symposium was organized in October 2001 to explore the possibility of an association between immune dysfunction and CFS, with special emphasis on the interactions between immune dysfunction and other abnormalities noted in the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems of individuals with CFS. This paper represents the consensus of the panel of experts who participated in this meeting. Data suggest that persons with CFS manifest changes in immune responses that fall outside normative ranges, but current research does not provide definitive evidence on whether these immune abnormalities are a cause or result of the illness. It has become clear that CFS cannot be understood based on single measurements of immune, endocrine, cardiovascular, or autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This panel encourages a new emphasis on multidisciplinary research into CFS.

  14. Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W.; Chen, Horng H

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as subjects with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF), and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity which remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic heart failure including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared to patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients’ morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning preclinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

  15. Blood Proteins Linked to Severity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167505.html Blood Proteins Linked to Severity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Inflammation ... it to changes in 17 immune-system signaling proteins called cytokines. That suggests inflammation plays a part ...

  16. Fatigue, Inflammation, and Projected Mortality in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Anne M.; Gonzalez, Rosalia C.; Lisowski, Tadeusz; Pini, Maria; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Levy, Wayne C.; Piano, Mariann R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prominent and poorly understood symptom of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue correlated with immune biomarkers and prognosis. Methods/Results In patients with HFrEF (N = 59) and healthy controls (N = 25), we prospectively measured fatigue (Profile of Mood States), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and immune biomarkers (plasma C-reactive protein [CRP], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNFα], and interleukins [IL-6 and IL-10]). Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) mortality risk scores were determined. Patients with HFrEF had significantly greater fatigue and depressive symptoms and poorer sleep quality compared to control subjects. When controlling for depressive symptoms, however, fatigue did not differ significantly between patients with HFrEF and controls. Patients with HFrEF had significantly lower levels of IL-10 compared to controls. Cytokines did not correlate significantly with fatigue, but fatigue was significantly associated with higher SHFM scores. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were an important covariate of fatigue in patients with HFrEF. Our study findings were the first to show a positive association between fatigue and the SHFM score, indicating that fatigue was associated with poorer prognosis. PMID:22939040

  17. Fatigue life extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczyk, D. E.; Lin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Potential fatigue rejuvenation processes were carried out on fatigue-damaged material both with and without observable surface-connected fatigue cracks. The fatigue life of fatigue-damaged MAR-M246(Hf)(DS), a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy used in turbine airfoils, was extended by reheat treatment. The fatigue life of fatigue-cracked Inconel 718, a wrought nickel-base superalloy used in a wide variety of advanced rocket engine components, was extended by electron-beam welding to close off the surface-connected crack, followed by hot isostatic pressing and reheat treatment.

  18. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis induced by a new human papillomavirus (HPV-8). Report of a case without immune dysfunction. Effect of treatment with an aromatic retinoid.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A L; Touraine, J L; Mitanne, D

    1982-01-01

    A new case of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is reported in a 35-year-old man characterized by multiple common warts, flat warts, psoriasis-form lesions, and pityriasis-versicolor-(PV) like lesions. There was no familial history, no mental retardation, and no malignant changes. Human papilloma virus type 8 was identified in PV-like lesions. Immunologic studies detected no abnormalities: Delayed skin tests, DNCB sensitization, levels of immunoglobulins, complement components, circulating immune complexes, number of circulating lymphocytes, lymphocyte membrane markers, proliferative responses to mitogens, Ts activity, and Ts subpopulations as detected by monoclonal antibodies were considered to be within normal limits. A treatment with a retinoid aromatic (RO 10-9359) improved the clinical status of the patient and did not modify the immune parameters.

  19. Evidence for inflammation-mediated memory dysfunction in gastropods: putative PLA2 and COX inhibitors abolish long-term memory failure induced by systemic immune challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies associate lipid peroxidation with long-term memory (LTM) failure in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis) of associative learning and memory. This process involves activation of Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), an enzyme mediating the release of fatty acids such as arachidonic acid that form the precursor for a variety of pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites. This study investigated the effect of biologically realistic challenges of L. stagnalis host defense response system on LTM function and potential involvement of PLA2, COX and LOX therein. Results Systemic immune challenges by means of β-glucan laminarin injections induced elevated H2O2 release from L. stagnalis circulatory immune cells within 3 hrs of treatment. This effect dissipated within 24 hrs after treatment. Laminarin exposure has no direct effect on neuronal activity. Laminarin injections disrupted LTM formation if training followed within 1 hr after injection but had no behavioural impact if training started 24 hrs after treatment. Intermediate term memory was not affected by laminarin injection. Chemosensory and motor functions underpinning the feeding response involved in this learning model were not affected by laminarin injection. Laminarin’s suppression of LTM induction was reversed by treatment with aristolochic acid, a PLA2 inhibitor, or indomethacin, a putative COX inhibitor, but not by treatment with nordihydro-guaiaretic acid, a putative LOX inhibitor. Conclusions A systemic immune challenge administered shortly before behavioural training impairs associative LTM function in our model that can be countered with putative inhibitors of PLA2 and COX, but not LOX. As such, this study establishes a mechanistic link between the state of activity of this gastropod’s innate immune system and higher order nervous system function. Our findings underwrite the rapidly expanding view of neuroinflammatory processes as a fundamental, evolutionary conserved cause of cognitive and

  20. Evidence for inflammation-mediated memory dysfunction in gastropods: putative PLA2 and COX inhibitors abolish long-term memory failure induced by systemic immune challenges.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Petra M; Park, Deborah; Beaulieu, Emily; Wildering, Willem C

    2013-08-06

    Previous studies associate lipid peroxidation with long-term memory (LTM) failure in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis) of associative learning and memory. This process involves activation of Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), an enzyme mediating the release of fatty acids such as arachidonic acid that form the precursor for a variety of pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites. This study investigated the effect of biologically realistic challenges of L. stagnalis host defense response system on LTM function and potential involvement of PLA2, COX and LOX therein. Systemic immune challenges by means of β-glucan laminarin injections induced elevated H2O2 release from L. stagnalis circulatory immune cells within 3 hrs of treatment. This effect dissipated within 24 hrs after treatment. Laminarin exposure has no direct effect on neuronal activity. Laminarin injections disrupted LTM formation if training followed within 1 hr after injection but had no behavioural impact if training started 24 hrs after treatment. Intermediate term memory was not affected by laminarin injection. Chemosensory and motor functions underpinning the feeding response involved in this learning model were not affected by laminarin injection. Laminarin's suppression of LTM induction was reversed by treatment with aristolochic acid, a PLA2 inhibitor, or indomethacin, a putative COX inhibitor, but not by treatment with nordihydro-guaiaretic acid, a putative LOX inhibitor. A systemic immune challenge administered shortly before behavioural training impairs associative LTM function in our model that can be countered with putative inhibitors of PLA2 and COX, but not LOX. As such, this study establishes a mechanistic link between the state of activity of this gastropod's innate immune system and higher order nervous system function. Our findings underwrite the rapidly expanding view of neuroinflammatory processes as a fundamental, evolutionary conserved cause of cognitive and other nervous system disorders.

  1. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... your erectile problems, such as drugs used to treat depression or high blood pressure. Making a change to your medications may help. Seek counseling. Anxiety and stress can worsen erectile dysfunction. A psychologist or other mental health provider can ...

  2. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... can — over time — cause chronic health conditions that lead to erectile dysfunction Being overweight, especially if you're obese Certain medical treatments, such as prostate surgery or radiation treatment for cancer Injuries, particularly if they damage ...

  3. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yafi, Faysal A.; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J.; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man’s quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner’s sexual experience and the couple’s quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  4. Long-term follow-up of cognitive dysfunction in patients with aluminum hydroxide-induced macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF).

    PubMed

    Passeri, Elodie; Villa, Chiara; Couette, Maryline; Itti, Emmanuel; Brugieres, Pierre; Cesaro, Pierre; Gherardi, Romain K; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2011-11-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is characterized by specific muscle lesions assessing long-term persistence of aluminum hydroxide within macrophages at the site of previous immunization. Affected patients are middle-aged adults, mainly presenting with diffuse arthromyalgias, chronic fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. Representative features of MMF-associated cognitive dysfunction (MACD) include (i) dysexecutive syndrome; (i) visual memory; (iii) left ear extinction at dichotic listening test. In present study we retrospectively evaluated the progression of MACD in 30 MMF patients. Most patients fulfilled criteria for non-amnestic/dysexecutive mild cognitive impairment, even if some cognitive deficits seemed unusually severe. MACD remained stable over time, although dysexecutive syndrome tended to worsen. Long-term follow-up of a subset of patients with 3 or 4 consecutive neuropsychological evaluations confirmed the stability of MACD with time, despite marked fluctuations.

  5. Longitudinal Intravital Imaging of the Retina Reveals Long-term Dynamics of Immune Infiltration and Its Effects on the Glial Network in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis, without Evident Signs of Neuronal Dysfunction in the Ganglion Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Daniel; Pache, Florence; Günther, Robert; Hornow, Jürgen; Andresen, Volker; Leben, Ruth; Mothes, Ronja; Zimmermann, Hanna; Brandt, Alexander U.; Paul, Friedemann; Hauser, Anja E.; Radbruch, Helena; Niesner, Raluca

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of autoimmune retinal inflammation is the infiltration of the retina with cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to detachment of the retinal layers and even to complete loss of the retinal photoreceptor layer. As the only optical system in the organism, the eye enables non-invasive longitudinal imaging studies of these local autoimmune processes and of their effects on the target tissue. Moreover, as a window to the central nervous system (CNS), the eye also reflects general neuroinflammatory processes taking place at various sites within the CNS. Histological studies in murine neuroinflammatory models, such as experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicate that immune infiltration is initialized by effector CD4+ T cells, with the innate compartment (neutrophils, macrophages, and monocytes) contributing crucially to tissue degeneration that occurs at later phases of the disease. However, how the immune attack is orchestrated by various immune cell subsets in the retina and how the latter interact with the target tissue under in vivo conditions is still poorly understood. Our study addresses this gap with a novel approach for intravital two-photon microscopy, which enabled us to repeatedly track CD4+ T cells and LysM phagocytes during the entire course of EAU and to identify a specific radial infiltration pattern of these cells within the inflamed retina, starting from the optic nerve head. In contrast, highly motile CX3CR1+ cells display an opposite radial motility pattern, toward the optic nerve head. These inflammatory processes induce modifications of the microglial network toward an activated morphology, especially around the optic nerve head and main retinal blood vessels, but do not affect the neurons within the ganglion cell layer. Thanks to the new technology, non-invasive correlation of clinical scores of CNS-related pathologies with immune infiltrate behavior and subsequent

  6. Immune dysfunction and increased oxidative stress state in diet-induced obese mice are reverted by nutritional supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, Caroline; Hernandez, Oskarina; Gheorghe, Alina; Díaz, Ligia Esperanza; Marcos, Ascensión; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-02-23

    Obesity is associated with impaired immune defences and chronic low levels of inflammation and oxidation. In addition, this condition may lead to premature aging. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a nutritional supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on several functions and oxidative stress parameters in peritoneal immune cells of obese mice, as well as on the life span of these animals. Obesity was induced in adult female ICR/CD1 by the administration of a high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. During the last 6 weeks of HFD feeding, one group of obese mice received the same HFD, supplemented with 1500 mg of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA) and another with 3000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Several functions and oxidative stress parameters of peritoneal leukocytes were evaluated. The groups of obese mice treated with 2-OHOA or with EPA and DHA showed a significant improvement in several functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, digestion capacity, Natural killer activity and lymphoproliferation in response to mitogens. All of these functions, which were decreased in obese mice, increased reaching similar levels to those found in non-obese controls. Both treatments also improved oxidative stress parameters such as xanthine oxidase activity, which decreased, catalase activity and glutathione levels, which increased. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could be an effective nutritional intervention to restore the immune response and oxidative stress state, which are impaired in obese mice.

  7. Exercise, inflammation, and fatigue in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    LaVoy, Emily C.P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue significantly disrupts normal functioning and quality of life for a substantial portion of cancer survivors, and may persist for years following cancer treatment. While the causes of persistent fatigue among cancer survivors are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that several pathways, including chronic inflammation, autonomic imbalance, HPA-axis dysfunction, and/or mitochondrial damage, could contribute towards the disruption of normal neuronal function and result in the symptom of cancer-related fatigue. Exercise training interventions have been shown to be some of the more successful treatment options to address cancer-related fatigue. In this review, we discuss the literature regarding the causes of persistent fatigue in cancer survivors and the mechanisms by which exercise may relieve this symptom. There is still much work to be done until the prescription of exercise becomes standard practice for cancer survivors. With improvements in the quality of studies, evidenced-based exercise interventions will allow exercise scientists and oncologists to work together to treat cancer-related fatigue. PMID:26853557

  8. Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Katz, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the current information on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Severe fatigue is common among individuals with RA and has a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). RA-related factors (e.g., inflammation, pain) are associated with greater fatigue, but other factors, such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, and depression, explain the majority of variation in fatigue. Medications targeting RA have little effect on fatigue. Instead, the most effective interventions seem to address non-RA-specific factors such as physical inactivity or use cognitive behavioral approaches. No recommendations have been made for tools to measure fatigue in RA, leading to potential difficulty comparing studies. Although fatigue has great impact on patients' QOL, effective interventions that are feasible for broad dissemination remain elusive. Additional multi-faceted research is needed to identify modifiable sources of fatigue. Such research would be enhanced by harmonization of fatigue measurement across studies.

  9. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (Editor); Kaisand, L. R. (Editor); Halford, G. R. (Editor); Leis, B. N. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  10. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (Editor); Kaisand, L. R. (Editor); Halford, G. R. (Editor); Leis, B. N. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  11. Immune Dysfunction in Rett Syndrome Patients Revealed by High Levels of Serum Anti-N(Glc) IgM Antibody Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Anna Maria; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  12. Immune dysfunction in Rett syndrome patients revealed by high levels of serum anti-N(Glc) IgM antibody fraction.

    PubMed

    Papini, Anna Maria; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Guerranti, Roberto; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Rovero, Paolo; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology.

  13. Transcriptomics: A Step behind the Comprehension of the Polygenic Influence on Oxidative Stress, Immune Deregulation, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing and global health problem with a great economic burden for healthcare system. Therefore to slow down the progression of this condition is a main objective in nephrology. It has been extensively reported that microinflammation, immune system deregulation, and oxidative stress contribute to CKD progression. Additionally, dialysis worsens this clinical condition because of the contact of blood with bioincompatible dialytic devices. Numerous studies have shown the close link between immune system impairment and CKD but most have been performed using classical biomolecular strategies. These methodologies are limited in their ability to discover new elements and enable measuring the simultaneous influence of multiple factors. The “omics” techniques could overcome these gaps. For example, transcriptomics has revealed that mitochondria and inflammasome have a role in pathogenesis of CKD and are pivotal elements in the cellular alterations leading to systemic complications. We believe that a larger employment of this technique, together with other “omics” methodologies, could help clinicians to obtain new pathogenetic insights, novel diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets. Finally, transcriptomics could allow clinicians to personalize therapeutic strategies according to individual genetic background (nutrigenomic and pharmacogenomic). In this review, we analyzed the available transcriptomic studies involving CKD patients. PMID:27419142

  14. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  15. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  16. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  17. Expression of IL-22 in the Skin Causes Th2-Biased Immunity, Epidermal Barrier Dysfunction, and Pruritus via Stimulating Epithelial Th2 Cytokines and the GRP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hongfei; Lu, Jingning; Choi, Eun Byul; Oh, Min Hee; Jeong, Mingeum; Barmettler, Sara; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Increased expression of Th22 cytokine IL-22 is a characteristic finding in atopic dermatitis (AD). However, the specific role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of AD in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Consistent with observations in human AD, IL-22 was significantly increased in the AD skin of mice after epicutaneous sensitization to house dust mite allergen. Utilizing a skin-specific inducible transgenic system, we show in the present study that expression of IL-22 in the skin of mice caused an AD-like phenotype characterized by chronic pruritic dermatitis associated with Th2-biased local and systemic immune responses, downregulation of epidermal differentiation complex genes, and enhanced dermatitis upon epicutaneous allergen exposure. IL-22 potently induced the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide pruritogen, in dermal immune cells and sensory afferents and in their skin-innervating sensory neurons. IL-22 also differentially upregulated the expression of GRP receptor (GRPR) on keratinocytes of AD skin. The number of GRP(+) cells in the skin correlated with the AD severity and the intensity of pruritus. IL-22 directly upregulated the expression of epithelial-derived type 2 cytokines (thymic stromal lymphopoietin and IL-33) and GRP in primary keratinocytes. Furthermore, GRP not only strongly induced thymic stromal lymphopoietin but it also increased the expression of IL-33 and GRPR synergistically with IL-22. Importantly, we found that the expression of GRP was strikingly increased in the skin of patients with AD. These results indicate that IL-22 plays important pathogenic roles in the initiation and development of AD, in part through inducing keratinocyte production of type 2 cytokines and activation of the GRP/GRPR pathway.

  18. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  19. Kindling and Oxidative Stress as Contributors to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jason, L. A.; Porter, N.; Herrington, J.; Sorenson, M.; Kubow, S.

    2010-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is one of the more complex illnesses involving multiple systems within the body. Onset of ME/CFS frequently occurs quickly, and many patients report a prior exposure to a viral infection. This debilitating illness can affect the immune, neuroendocrine, autonomic, and neurologic systems. Abnormal biological findings among some patients have included aberrant ion transport and ion channel activity, cortisol deficiency, sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity, EEG spike waves, left ventricular dysfunction in the heart, low natural killer cell cytotoxicity, and a shift from Th1 to Th2 cytokines. We propose that the kindling and oxidative stress theories provide a heuristic template for better understanding the at times conflicting findings regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of this illness. PMID:21253446

  20. Symptoms of fatigue and coping strategies in maritime pilotage.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Timothy P; Main, Luana C

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the symptoms of fatigue that maritime pilots experience during shift work. Moreover, the strategies these individuals use to cope with the onset of fatigue are also unknown. The current study explored the symptoms of fatigue and coping strategies experienced by maritime pilots when on-shift. Fifty maritime pilots were recruited via an advertisement in the national association's quarterly newsletter (Mage = 51.42; SD = 9.81). Participants responded to a modified version of the questionnaire used with aviation pilots that assessed overall fatigue, and the symptoms pilots associated with fatigue on duty. Methods pilots used to cope with fatigue before shift and when on the bridge were also assessed. There were significant effects for pilot vitality on 4 categories of fatigue: cognitive dysfunction; emotional disturbance; mean physical effects; and sleepiness. There were no significant effects for vitality on any of the self-reported coping strategy factors. The findings indicated that maritime pilots experience a variety of physical, behavioural, and cognitive fatigue symptoms when on shift. Some of these symptoms are similar to those reported by aviation pilots. However, unlike aviation pilots, maritime pilots reported utilising self-sufficient coping strategies to deal with the experience of fatigue.

  1. The Neuroinflammatory Etiopathology of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Glassford, Julian A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating multi-systemic chronic illness of unknown etiology, classified as a neurological disorder by the World Health Organization (WHO). The symptomatology of the condition appears to emanate from a variety of sources of chronic neurological disturbance and associated distortions, and chronicity, in noxious sensory signaling and neuroimmune activation. This article incorporates a summary review and discussion of biomedical research considered relevant to this essential conception perspective. It is intended to provide stakeholders with a concise, integrated outline disease model in order to help demystify this major public health problem. The primary etiopathological factors presented are: (A) Postural/biomechanical pain signaling, affecting adverse neuroexcitation, in the context of compression, constriction, strain, or damage of vertebral-regional bone and neuromuscular tissues; (B) Immune mediated inflammatory sequelae, in the context of prolonged immunotropic neurotrophic infection—with lymphotropic/gliotropic/glio-toxic varieties implicated in particular; (C) A combination of factors A and B. Sustained glial activation under such conditions is associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, and neural sensitivity. These processes collectively enhance the potential for multi-systemic disarray involving endocrine pathway aberration, immune and mitochondrial dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, and tend toward still more intractable synergistic neuro-glial dysfunction (gliopathy), autoimmunity, and central neuronal sensitization. PMID:28261110

  2. Manganese deficiency or excess caused the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier, as regulated by NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling, in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Tang, Ren-Jun; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal mucosal immune components and mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) under dietary manganese (Mn) deficiency or excess were investigated. Fish were fed the diets containing graded levels of Mn [3.65-27.86 mg Mn kg(-1) diet] for 8 weeks. The results demonstrated that Mn deficiency significantly decreased the lysozyme and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, up-regulated tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 8 and the signalling factor nuclear factor-κB p65, and down-regulated interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1, inhibitor of signalling factors κB-α and target of rapamycin mRNA levels in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI). However, Mn deficiency did not change the C3 content in the PI, whereas it decreased the C3 contents in the MI and DI. Additionally, Mn depletion also resulted in significantly low mRNA levels for tight junction proteins (claudin-b, claudin-c, claudin-15, occludin and zonula occludens-1), antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, GPx and CAT) and NF-E2-related factor-2 in the intestines of fish. Excessive Mn exhibited toxic effects similar to Mn deficiency, where optimal Mn contents reversed those indicators. In conclusion, Mn deficiency or excess causes the depression of intestinal immunity, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the intestinal physical barrier relating to NF-κB, TOR and Nrf2 signalling in grass carp. Furthermore, quadratic regression analysis at 95% maximum response of lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities in the distal intestine of young grass carp revealed the optimum dietary Mn levels to be 8.90 and 8.99 mg kg(-1) diet, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatigue of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salkind, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mechanisms in the fatigue of composite materials are analyzed in terms of the requirements for designing fatigue-critical composite structures. Fiber reinforced polymers, fiber reinforced metals, fatigue of composite structures, and composite design considerations are discussed. It is concluded that composite materials offer the engineer the opportunity for tailoring stiffness in different directions for designing dynamic components.

  4. [Fatigue and depression].

    PubMed

    Hell, Daniel

    2015-04-22

    Fatigue is characterised in an overview of the literature as a specific phenomenon of depression. Its differential diagnosis is discussed. Distinctions and correspondences to burnout are elaborated. Fatigue is not an obligatory symptom of depressive episodes, although it can contribute to depressive developments. The importance of fatigue in depressive episodes and its therapy is shown with the help of a circular model of depression.

  5. A Role for Homeostatic Drive in the Perpetuation of Complex Chronic Illness: Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Travis J. A.; Fritsch, Paul; Rice, Mark A.; del Rosario, Ryan M.; Miller, Diane B.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy G.; Broderick, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    A key component in the body's stress response, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis orchestrates changes across a broad range of major biological systems. Its dysfunction has been associated with numerous chronic diseases including Gulf War Illness (GWI) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Though tightly coupled with other components of endocrine and immune function, few models of HPA function account for these interactions. Here we extend conventional models of HPA function by including feed-forward and feedback interaction with sex hormone regulation and immune response. We use this multi-axis model to explore the role of homeostatic regulation in perpetuating chronic conditions, specifically GWI and CFS. An important obstacle in building these models across regulatory systems remains the scarcity of detailed human in vivo kinetic data as its collection can present significant health risks to subjects. We circumvented this using a discrete logic representation based solely on literature of physiological and biochemical connectivity to provide a qualitative description of system behavior. This connectivity model linked molecular variables across the HPA axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in men and women, as well as a simple immune network. Inclusion of these interactions produced multiple alternate homeostatic states and sexually dimorphic responses. Experimental data for endocrine-immune markers measured in male GWI subjects showed the greatest alignment with predictions of a naturally occurring alternate steady state presenting with hypercortisolism, low testosterone and a shift towards a Th1 immune response. In female CFS subjects, expression of these markers aligned with an alternate homeostatic state displaying hypocortisolism, high estradiol, and a shift towards an anti-inflammatory Th2 activation. These results support a role for homeostatic drive in perpetuating dysfunctional cortisol levels through persistent interaction with the

  6. Attention in Parkinson's disease with fatigue: evidence from the attention network test.

    PubMed

    Pauletti, Caterina; Mannarelli, Daniela; Locuratolo, Nicoletta; Pollini, Luca; Currà, Antonio; Marinelli, Lucio; Rinalduzzi, Steno; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Fatigue is a non-specific symptom that is common in chronic diseases and represents one of the most disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PD patients often experience cognitive deficits related above all to executive functions. The relationship between cognitive changes and fatigue in PD patients has not been explored in depth. The Attention Network Test (ANT) is a rapid, widely used test to measure the efficiency of three attentional networks, i.e., alerting, orienting, and executive, by evaluating reaction times (RTs) in response to visual stimuli. To assess the association between fatigue and the efficiency of the attentional networks, according to the Posnerian view, ANT was administered to 15 parkinsonian patients with fatigue (PFS-16 > 2.95), 17 parkinsonian patients without fatigue, and 37 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Anxiety, depression, quality of sleep, and quality of life were also assessed. Parkinsonian patients displayed significantly longer RTs and lower executive network efficiency than controls. Patients with fatigue displayed significantly lower executive network efficiency than patients without fatigue. Moreover, patients with fatigue exhibited a lower accuracy than either patients without fatigue or controls. Finally, patients without fatigue displayed a more efficient alerting network than either patients with fatigue or controls. Although the pathogenesis of fatigue is multifactorial, our results indicate that fatigue may be closely related to an alteration of the striato-thalamo-cortical loop connecting the neostriatum to the prefrontal cortex, which is also responsible for the executive dysfunction that is typical of Parkinson's disease.

  7. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (p<0.01). People with fibromyalgia performed equivalently on measures of physical performance and cognitive performance on the physical and cognitive fatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  8. Special feature for the Olympics: effects of exercise on the immune system: overtraining effects on immunity and performance in athletes.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, L T

    2000-10-01

    Overtraining is a process of excessive exercise training in high-performance athletes that may lead to overtraining syndrome. Overtraining syndrome is a neuroendocrine disorder characterized by poor performance in competition, inability to maintain training loads, persistent fatigue, reduced catecholamine excretion, frequent illness, disturbed sleep and alterations in mood state. Although high-performance athletes are generally not clinically immune deficient, there is evidence that several immune parameters are suppressed during prolonged periods of intense exercise training. These include decreases in neutrophil function, serum and salivary immunoglobulin concentrations and natural killer cell number and possibly cytotoxic activity in peripheral blood. Moreover, the incidence of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection increases during periods of endurance training. However, all of these changes appear to result from prolonged periods of intense exercise training, rather than from the effects of overtraining syndrome itself. At present, there is no single objective marker to identify overtraining syndrome. It is best identified by a combination of markers, such as decreases in urinary norepinephrine output, maximal heart rate and blood lactate levels, impaired sport performance and work output at 110% of individual anaerobic threshold, and daily self-analysis by the athlete (e.g. high fatigue and stress ratings). The mechanisms underlying overtraining syndrome have not been clearly identified, but are likely to involve autonomic dysfunction and possibly increased cytokine production resulting from the physical stress of intense daily training with inadequate recovery.

  9. Myalgic encephalomyelitis, chronic fatigue syndrome: An infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Underhill, R A

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of myalgic encephalomyelitis also known as chronic fatigue syndrome or ME/CFS has not been established. Controversies exist over whether it is an organic disease or a psychological disorder and even the existence of ME/CFS as a disease entity is sometimes denied. Suggested causal hypotheses have included psychosomatic disorders, infectious agents, immune dysfunctions, autoimmunity, metabolic disturbances, toxins and inherited genetic factors. Clinical, immunological and epidemiological evidence supports the hypothesis that: ME/CFS is an infectious disease; the causal pathogen persists in patients; the pathogen can be transmitted by casual contact; host factors determine susceptibility to the illness; and there is a population of healthy carriers, who may be able to shed the pathogen. ME/CFS is endemic globally as sporadic cases and occasional cluster outbreaks (epidemics). Cluster outbreaks imply an infectious agent. An abrupt flu-like onset resembling an infectious illness occurs in outbreak patients and many sporadic patients. Immune responses in sporadic patients resemble immune responses in other infectious diseases. Contagion is shown by finding secondary cases in outbreaks, and suggested by a higher prevalence of ME/CFS in sporadic patients' genetically unrelated close contacts (spouses/partners) than the community. Abortive cases, sub-clinical cases, and carrier state individuals were found in outbreaks. The chronic phase of ME/CFS does not appear to be particularly infective. Some healthy patient-contacts show immune responses similar to patients' immune responses, suggesting exposure to the same antigen (a pathogen). The chronicity of symptoms and of immune system changes and the occurrence of secondary cases suggest persistence of a causal pathogen. Risk factors which predispose to developing ME/CFS are: a close family member with ME/CFS; inherited genetic factors; female gender; age; rest/activity; previous exposure to stress or toxins

  10. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms.

  11. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  12. Differing Leukocyte Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Fatigue in Patients with Prostate Cancer versus Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Light, Kathleen C.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Iacob, Eli; White, Andrea T.; Kinney, Anita Y.; VanHaitsma, Timothy A.; Aizad, Hannah; Hughen, Ronald W.; Bateman, Lucinda; Light, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) often worsens fatigue in patients with prostate cancer, producing symptoms similar to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Comparing expression (mRNA) of many fatigue-related genes in patients with ADT-treated prostate cancer versus with CFS versus healthy controls, and correlating mRNA with fatigue severity may clarify the differing pathways underlying fatigue in these conditions. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on leukocytes from 30 fatigued, ADT-treated prostate cancer patients (PCF), 39 patients with CFS and 22 controls aged 40–79, together with ratings of fatigue and pain severity. 46 genes from these pathways were included: 1) adrenergic/monoamine/neuropeptides, 2) immune, 3) metabolite-detecting, 4) mitochondrial/energy, 5) transcription factors. Results PCF patients showed higher expression than controls or CFS of 2 immune transcription genes (NR3C1 and TLR4), chemokine CXCR4, and mitochondrial gene SOD2. They showed lower expression of 2 vasodilation-related genes (ADRB2 and VIPR2), 2 cytokines (TNF and LTA), and 2 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3 and P2RX7). CFS patients showed higher P2RX7 and lower HSPA2 versus controls and PCF. Correlations with fatigue severity were similar in PCF and CFS for only DBI, the GABA-A receptor modulator (r=−0.50, p<0.005 and r=−0.34, p<0.05). Purinergic P2RY1 was correlated only with PCF fatigue and pain severity (r= +0.43 and +0.59, p=0.025 and p=0.001). Conclusions PCF patients differed from controls and CFS in mean expression of 10 genes from all 5 pathways. Correlations with fatigue severity implicated DBI for both patient groups and P2RY1 for PCF only. These pathways may provide new targets for interventions to reduce fatigue. PMID:24054763

  13. Differing leukocyte gene expression profiles associated with fatigue in patients with prostate cancer versus chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Light, Kathleen C; Agarwal, Neeraj; Iacob, Eli; White, Andrea T; Kinney, Anita Y; VanHaitsma, Timothy A; Aizad, Hannah; Hughen, Ronald W; Bateman, Lucinda; Light, Alan R

    2013-12-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) often worsens fatigue in patients with prostate cancer, producing symptoms similar to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Comparing expression (mRNA) of many fatigue-related genes in patients with ADT-treated prostate cancer versus with CFS versus healthy controls, and correlating mRNA with fatigue severity may clarify the differing pathways underlying fatigue in these conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on leukocytes from 30 fatigued, ADT-treated prostate cancer patients (PCF), 39 patients with CFS and 22 controls aged 40-79, together with ratings of fatigue and pain severity. 46 genes from these pathways were included: (1) adrenergic/monoamine/neuropeptides, (2) immune, (3) metabolite-detecting, (4) mitochondrial/energy, (5) transcription factors. PCF patients showed higher expression than controls or CFS of 2 immune transcription genes (NR3C1 and TLR4), chemokine CXCR4, and mitochondrial gene SOD2. They showed lower expression of 2 vasodilation-related genes (ADRB2 and VIPR2), 2 cytokines (TNF and LTA), and 2 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3 and P2RX7). CFS patients showed higher P2RX7 and lower HSPA2 versus controls and PCF. Correlations with fatigue severity were similar in PCF and CFS for only DBI, the GABA-A receptor modulator (r=-0.50, p<0.005 and r=-0.34, p<0.05). Purinergic P2RY1 was correlated only with PCF fatigue and pain severity (r=+0.43 and +0.59, p=0.025 and p=0.001). PCF patients differed from controls and CFS in mean expression of 10 genes from all 5 pathways. Correlations with fatigue severity implicated DBI for both patient groups and P2RY1 for PCF only. These pathways may provide new targets for interventions to reduce fatigue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiaxial fatigue low cycle fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamrik, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Multiaxial testing methods are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of each type test is discussed. Significant multiaxial data available in the literature is analyzed. The yield theories are compared for multiaxial fatigue analysis.

  15. [Impact of the fibromyalgia in the chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Faro, Mónica; Sáez-Francàs, Naia; Castro-Marrero, Jesús; Aliste, Luisa; Collado, Antonio; Alegre, José

    2014-06-16

    Different studies have showed association of the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with other pathologies, including fibromyalgia (FM). The objective of this study is to analyze whether there are differences in the clinic and in the assessment of fatigue in CFS patients associated or not with FM. A cross-sectional, single-site observational study was undertaken on a consecutive cases of a register of CFS patients at CFS Unit in Vall d'Hebron Hospital, Barcelona, from January 2008 until March 2011. The variables analyzed were FM comorbidity, sleep and fatigue characteristics and cognitive, neurological and autonomic symptoms. Questionnaires of fatigue impact scale, fatigue strength and impact on quality of life SF-36 were evaluated. We included 980 CFS patients (mean age: 48±9 years; 91% women). Fibromyalgia was present in 528 patients (54%). The level of fatigue (P=.001) and pain (P<.001) was higher in FM patients. Patients with CFS and FM had more prevalence of sleep-related phenomena. The percentage of patients and the degree of severity of cognitive symptoms, neurological and autonomic dysfunction was higher in FM patients (P<.001). FM patients scored higher on the fatigue impact scale (P<.001) and showed worse results in the quality of life questionnaire (P<.001). FM co-morbidity worse clinical parameters, fatigue and the perception of quality of life in CFS patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatigue and heat sensitivity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bol, Y; Smolders, J; Duits, A; Lange, I M J; Romberg-Camps, M; Hupperts, R

    2012-12-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and troubling symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), and heat is often reported as a trigger. Although it is assumed that this heat sensitivity is specific for MS, the evidence for disease specificity is limited. We studied the relationship between fatigue, heat sensitivity, and environmental temperature, and its specificity for MS. We compared 88 MS patients with 76 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), another chronic auto-immune disease. As most important outcome measures, heat sensitivity, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, environmental temperature, and ambient UV-light levels were determined. More patients with MS reported heat sensitivity for fatigue, compared to patients with UC (53.4% vs 35.5%, respectively, P = 0.016). However, heat-sensitive patients were equally fatigued as heat-insensitive patients. Climatological data, including day temperature and amount of ambient UV light, were not related to fatigue in both heat-sensitive and heat-insensitive patients with MS. Our findings support the assumption that heat sensitivity regarding fatigue has an MS-specific component. Although patients with MS experience a relationship between environmental temperature and fatigue, objective assessment by climatological data could not confirm this. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  18. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  19. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  20. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Johnson P.; Zick, Suzanna M.; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D.; Harris, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = −0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  1. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Johnson P; Zick, Suzanna M; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D; Harris, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = -0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  2. Clinical neurophysiology of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Zwarts, M J; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G M

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional concept covering both physiological and psychological aspects. Chronic fatigue is a typical symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disorders but is also presented by people in whom no defined somatic disease has been established. If certain criteria are met, chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed. The 4-item Abbreviated Fatigue Questionnaire allows the extent of the experienced fatigue to be assessed with a high degree of reliability and validity. Physiological fatigue has been well defined and originates in both the peripheral and central nervous system. The condition can be assessed by combining force and surface-EMG measurements (including frequency analyses and muscle-fibre conduction estimations), twitch interpolation, magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and analysis of changes in the readiness potential. Fatigue is a well-known phenomenon in both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Examples of the former conditions are multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Although it seems to be a universal symptom of many brain disorders, the unique characteristics of the concomitant fatigue also point to a specific relationship with several of these syndromes. As regards neuromuscular disorders, fatigue has been reported in patients with post-polio syndrome, myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type-I. More than 60% of all neuromuscular patients suffer from severe fatigue, a prevalence resembling that of patients with MS. Except for several rare myopathies with specific metabolic derangements leading to exercise-induced muscle fatigue, most studies have not identified a prominent peripheral cause for the fatigue in this population. In contrast, the central activation of the diseased neuromuscular system is generally found to be suboptimal. The

  3. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  4. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  5. A biopsychosocial model of fatigue and depression following stroke.

    PubMed

    Ormstad, Heidi; Eilertsen, Grethe

    2015-12-01

    Poststroke fatigue (PSF) and poststroke depression (PSD) are both common and difficult sequelae following acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Two main perspectives to explain these sequelae are the biomedical perspective and the psychosocial perspective. Research has shown that PSF and PSD are undoubtedly associated with each other, although each can occur in the absence of the other. However, the nature of the relationship is unclear. For example, do stroke patients become fatigued because of being depressed, or do they become depressed because they are fatigued? Alternatively, is there a bidirectional relationship between these two sequelae, with each influencing the other? We propose a biopsychosocial model of PSF and PSD that supports the AIS-induced immune response and kynurenine pathway activation being related to fatigue but not (directly) to depression. We hypothesize that the risk of developing depression may be reduced if the experience of fatigue is acknowledged, and then addressed accordingly.

  6. Adolescent fatigue, POTS, and recovery: a guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah J; Ahrens, Shelley P; Bruce, Barbara K; Chelimsky, Gisela; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia; Lloyd, Robin M; Mack, Kenneth J; Nelson, Dawn E; Ninis, Nelly; Pianosi, Paolo T; Stewart, Julian M; Weiss, Karen E; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Many teenagers who struggle with chronic fatigue have symptoms suggestive of autonomic dysfunction that may include lightheadedness, headaches, palpitations, nausea, and abdominal pain. Inadequate sleep habits and psychological conditions can contribute to fatigue, as can concurrent medical conditions. One type of autonomic dysfunction, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, is increasingly being identified in adolescents with its constellation of fatigue, orthostatic intolerance, and excessive postural tachycardia (more than 40 beats/min). A family-based approach to care with support from a multidisciplinary team can diagnose, treat, educate, and encourage patients. Full recovery is possible with multi-faceted treatment. The daily treatment plan should consist of increased fluid and salt intake, aerobic exercise, and regular sleep and meal schedules; some medications can be helpful. Psychological support is critical and often includes biobehavioral strategies and cognitive-behavioral therapy to help with symptom management. More intensive recovery plans can be implemented when necessary.

  7. Compassion fatigue in nurses.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Compassion fatigue, trigger situations, and coping strategies were investigated in hospital and home care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale measured compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout. Narrative questions elicited trigger situations and coping strategies. Compassion fatigue scores were significantly different between nurses who worked 8- or 12-hour shifts. Fifteen percent of the participants had scores indicating risk of the compassion fatigue. There were significant differences in compassion satisfaction, depending on the unit worked and time as a nurse. The most common category of trigger situations was caring for the patient. Work-related and personal coping strategies were identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fatigue behaviour of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, G.; Hübner, R.; Knaak, S.; Pannkoke, C.

    An important design parameter for cyclically loaded structures (e.g. transport vessels) is the fatigue endurance limit. The cryogenic fatigue behaviour with different types of fibres and matrices has been investigated. The main emphasis it put on the behaviour of fibre dominated properties. It is surprising that the fatigue strength even of unidirectional fibre composites is strongly influenced by the matrix type. This will be discussed for carbon fibre composites with thermoplastic and duroplastic matrices under tensile and shear loading. For crossplies (with non-woven fabrics) the interaction between laminates controls the fatigue behaviour. The interaction depends on the matrix type and is different for tensile and shear loading.

  9. Neurobiological studies of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a symptom associated with many disorders, is especially common in women and in older adults, and can have a huge negative influence on quality of life. Although most past research on fatigue uses human subjects instead of animal models, the use of appropriate animal models has recently begun to advance our understanding of the neurobiology of fatigue. In this review, results from animal models using immunological, developmental, or physical approaches to study fatigue are described and compared. Common across these animal models is that fatigue arises when a stimulus induces activation of microglia and/or increased cytokines and chemokines in the brain. Neurobiological studies implicate structures in the ascending arousal system, sleep executive control areas, and areas important in reward. In addition, the suprachiasmatic nucleus clearly plays an important role in homeostatic regulation of the neural network mediating fatigue. This nucleus responds to cytokines, shows decreased amplitude firing rate output in models of fatigue, and responds to exercise, one of our few treatments for fatigue. This is a young field but very important as the symptom of fatigue is common across many disorders and we do not have effective treatments. PMID:22841649

  10. The protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing intermittent and graded exercise to usual care for chronic fatigue syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a debilitating disorder with an unknown aetiology but suspected multifactorial origins. Common “triggers” include severe viral infections and emotional stress. Recent studies have also found evidence of immune dysfunction and elevated inflammatory cytokines in CFS patients, but there has been considerable variation in the outcome measures and magnitude of these studies. Currently, there is no cure for CFS but treatments include rest, specialist medical care, cognitive behavioural therapy, and graded (self-paced) exercise. To date, several studies have examined the efficacy of graded exercise with or without Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, with some success for patients. However, improvements in functional capacity have not necessarily correlated with improvements in immune function, fatigue or other symptoms. This 12-week pilot trial compares graded and intermittent exercise to normal care, measuring physiological outcomes, fatigue levels, immune function and wellness. Methods/design 90 patients aged between 16 to 60 years, who meet the diagnostic criteria for CFS and have been diagnosed by their medical practitioner, will be randomly recruited into groups consisting of Intermittent exercise, Graded exercise and usual care (Control). The outcomes will be measured pre-study (Week 0) and post-study (Week 13). Primary outcomes are VO2peak, anaerobic threshold, peak power, levels of fatigue, immune cell (CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, CD 16+CD56+) concentrations and activation. Secondary outcomes include onset of secondary CFS symptoms (e.g. fever, swollen lymph nodes), wellness, mood and sleep patterns. Primary analysis will be based on intention to treat using logistic regression models to compare treatments. Quantitative data will be analysed using repeated measures ANOVA with a linear model, and Cohen’s effect size. Qualitative data such as participants’ responses (e.g. changes in mood and other reactions) following the

  11. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  12. Endocrine dysfunction in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Leal, A M O; Foss, N T

    2009-01-01

    Leprosy is still an endemic disease, especially in Third World countries, and, because of migration, it still persists in Europe and the United States. The disease affects the peripheral nerves, skin, and multiple internal organs, making its clinical recognition difficult. In particular, the endocrine manifestations caused by leprosy have been underestimated, even by specialists. The endocrine changes present in leprosy include hypogonadism, sterility, and osteoporosis. In addition, the spectral immune nature of leprosy offers an attractive model to investigate the pathogenetic correlation between the patterns of inflammation in the poles of its spectrum and the hormonal disarrangements observed in this disease. It is important that those involved in leprosy management be aware of the potential endocrine changes and their treatment to address the disease in all of its aspects. In this article, we review the findings on endocrine dysfunction in leprosy, including a survey of the literature and of our own work.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF TONGUE WEAKNESS AND FATIGUE

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Nancy Pearl

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of nonspeech tongue function is common in speech-language pathology. This paper reviews techniques used to determine tongue strength and endurance, and describes a constant-effort task. These techniques are intended to reveal and quantify the presence of weakness or fatigue of the tongue. The consequences of performing these tasks with and without a bite block, used to fix jaw position, are considered. Whether nonspeech tongue impairment is associated with speech dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease is another topic of interest. Past studies indicated reduced tongue strength and endurance in Parkinson’s disease, but these measures did not correlate with speech measures. It was hypothesized that weakness and fatigue need to be impaired to a “critical” level before speech is perceptibly affected. To examine whether experimentally induced tongue fatigue affects speech, normal speakers performed prolonged strenuous tongue exercise. Speech deteriorated following these exercises. A new investigation examines whether 1 hour of speech-like tongue exercise (rapid syllable repetitions) affects dysarthric speech. Preliminary data from 6 participants with Parkinson’s disease, 1 person with bulbar ALS, and 6 neurologically normal control subjects indicate that sentences sound more precise but less natural after the exercises. Surprisingly, results did not differ significantly between the groups. Continued collection of data and refinement of tasks will contribute to our understanding of the potential relationships between weakness, fatigue, and speech. PMID:15832858

  14. Velocity-specific fatigue: quantifying fatigue during variable velocity cycling.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A Scott; Martin, David T; Jenkins, David G; Dyer, Iain; Van Eiden, Jan; Barras, Martin; Martin, James C

    2009-04-01

    Previous investigators have quantified fatigue during short maximal cycling trials ( approximately 30 s) by calculating a fatigue index. Other investigators have reported a curvilinear power-pedaling rate relationship during short fatigue-free maximal cycling trials (<6 s). During maximal trials, pedaling rates may change with fatigue. Quantification of fatigue using fatigue index is therefore complicated by the power-pedaling rate relationship. The purpose of this study was to quantify fatigue while accounting for the effects of pedaling rate on power. Power and pedaling rate were recorded during Union Cycliste Internationale sanctioned 200-m time trials by eight male (height = 181.5 +/- 4.3 cm, mass = 87.0 +/- 8.0 kg) world-class sprint cyclists with SRM power meters and fixed-gear track bicycles. Data from the initial portion of maximal acceleration were used to establish maximal power-pedaling rate relationships. Fatigue was quantified three ways: 1) traditional fatigue index, 2) fatigue index modified to account for the power-pedaling rate relationship (net fatigue index), and 3) work deficit, the difference between actual work done and work that might have been accomplished without fatigue. Fatigue index (55.4% +/- 6.4%) was significantly greater than net fatigue index (41.0% +/- 7.9%, P < 0.001), indicating that the power-pedaling rate relationship accounted for 14.3% +/- 7% of the traditional fatigue index value. Work deficit (23.3% +/- 6%) was significantly less than either measure of fatigue (P < 0.001). Net fatigue index and work deficit account for the power-pedaling rate relation and therefore more precisely quantify fatigue during variable velocity cycling. These measures can be used to compare fatigue during different fatigue protocols, including world-class sprint cycling competition. Precise quantification of fatigue during elite cycling competition may improve evaluation of training status, gear ratio selection, and fatigue resistance.

  15. Aerodynamic Heating and Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Wilhelmina D.

    1959-01-01

    A review of the physical condition's under which future airplanes will operate has been made and the necessity for considering fatigue in the design has been established. A survey of the literature shows what phases of elevated-temperature fatigue have been investigated. Other studies that would yield data of particular interest to the designer of aircraft structures are indicated.

  16. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  17. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains more than 500 fatigue curves for industrial ferrous and nonferrous alloys. It also includes a thorough explanation of fatigue testing and interpretation of test results. Each curve is presented independently and includes an explanation of its particular importance. The curves are titled by standard industrial designations (AISI, CDA, AA, etc.) of the metals, and a complete reference is given to the original source to facilitate further research. The collection includes standard S-N curves, curves showing effect of surface hardening on fatigue strength, crack growth-rate curves, curves comparing the fatigue strengths of various alloys, effect of variables (i,e, temperature, humidity, frequency, aging, environment, etc.) and much, much more. This one volume consolidates the fatigue data in a single source.

  18. Psychologic and Biologic Factors Associated with Fatigue in Patients with Persistent Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom associated with neuropathic pain (NP) and can have negative consequences on psychosocial functioning, physical endurance, and quality of life. Recent evidence indicates that immune activation modulated through the increased release of proinflammatory cytokines can predict fatigue in some patient populations. Although earlier studies have shown that immune activation is a pathophysiologic feature of NP, there have been no studies to examine the relationship between immune activation and fatigue in persons with NP. Therefore, the purpose of this exploratory study was to: 1) determine the relationships among fatigue, pain, psychosocial factors, and selected biologic markers of immune activation (interleukin [IL] 6 and soluble IL-6 receptor [sIL-6R]) in participants with persistent radiculopathy; and 2) determine the differences in these variables based on fatigue severity. Participants (n = 80) were classified according to their level of fatigue as low (27.5%), moderate (32.5%), or high (40%), and significant differences were found between fatigue categories (p =.001). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that individuals with moderate to high levels of fatigue differed from those with the lowest levels of fatigue in psychologic distress, depressive symptoms, IL-6, and sIL-6R, whereas the differences between moderate and high levels of fatigue were significant for psychologic distress and sIL-6R only. The findings suggest that immune activation affects fatigue severity and possibly other behavioral responses, offering important information when providing care to patients with persistent radiculopathy. The integration of biobehavioral nursing interventions in pain management may have a greater impact on quality of life than treatment focused only on pain. PMID:23452526

  19. Fatigue countermeasures in aviation.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, John A; Mallis, Melissa M; Caldwell, J Lynn; Paul, Michel A; Miller, James C; Neri, David F

    2009-01-01

    Pilot fatigue is a significant problem in modern aviation operations, largely because of the unpredictable work hours, long duty periods, circadian disruptions, and insufficient sleep that are commonplace in both civilian and military flight operations. The full impact of fatigue is often underappreciated, but many of its deleterious effects have long been known. Compared to people who are well-rested, people who are sleep deprived think and move more slowly, make more mistakes, and have memory difficulties. These negative effects may and do lead to aviation errors and accidents. In the 1930s, flight time limitations, suggested layover durations, and aircrew sleep recommendations were developed in an attempt to mitigate aircrew fatigue. Unfortunately, there have been few changes to aircrew scheduling provisions and flight time limitations since the time they were first introduced, despite evidence that updates are needed. Although the scientific understanding of fatigue, sleep, shift work, and circadian physiology has advanced significantly over the past several decades, current regulations and industry practices have in large part failed to adequately incorporate the new knowledge. Thus, the problem of pilot fatigue has steadily increased along with fatigue-related concerns over air safety. Accident statistics, reports from pilots themselves, and operational flight studies all show that fatigue is a growing concern within aviation operations. This position paper reviews the relevant scientific literature, summarizes applicable U.S. civilian and military flight regulations, evaluates various in-flight and pre-/postflight fatigue countermeasures, and describes emerging technologies for detecting and countering fatigue. Following the discussion of each major issue, position statements address ways to deal with fatigue in specific contexts with the goal of using current scientific knowledge to update policy and provide tools and techniques for improving air safety.

  20. The status of and future research into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: the need of accurate diagnosis, objective assessment, and acknowledging biological and clinical subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are used interchangeably, the diagnostic criteria define two distinct clinical entities. Cognitive impairment, (muscle) weakness, circulatory disturbances, marked variability of symptoms, and, above all, post-exertional malaise: a long-lasting increase of symptoms after a minor exertion, are distinctive symptoms of ME. This latter phenomenon separates ME, a neuro-immune illness, from chronic fatigue (syndrome), other disorders and deconditioning. The introduction of the label, but more importantly the diagnostic criteria for CFS have generated much confusion, mostly because chronic fatigue is a subjective and ambiguous notion. CFS was redefined in 1994 into unexplained (persistent or relapsing) chronic fatigue, accompanied by at least four out of eight symptoms, e.g., headaches and unrefreshing sleep. Most of the research into ME and/or CFS in the last decades was based upon the multivalent CFS criteria, which define a heterogeneous patient group. Due to the fact that fatigue and other symptoms are non-discriminative, subjective experiences, research has been hampered. Various authors have questioned the physiological nature of the symptoms and qualified ME/CFS as somatization. However, various typical symptoms can be assessed objectively using standardized methods. Despite subjective and unclear criteria and measures, research has observed specific abnormalities in ME/CFS repetitively, e.g., immunological abnormalities, oxidative and nitrosative stress, neurological anomalies, circulatory deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, to improve future research standards and patient care, it is crucial that patients with post-exertional malaise (ME) and patients without this odd phenomenon are acknowledged as separate clinical entities that the diagnosis of ME and CFS in research and clinical practice is based upon accurate criteria and an objective assessment of characteristic symptoms

  1. Memory for Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Relationships to Fatigue Variability, Catastrophizing, and Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Sohl, Stephanie J.; Friedberg, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is usually assessed with retrospective measures rather than real-time momentary symptom assessments. In this study, the authors hypothesized that in participants with CFS, discrepancies between recalled and momentary fatigue would be related to catastrophizing, anxiety, and depression and to variability of momentary fatigue. They also expected that catastrophizing, anxiety, and depression would be associated with momentary fatigue. The authors asked 53 adults with CFS to carry electronic diaries for 3 weeks and record their experiences of momentary fatigue. The authors assessed participants' fatigue recall with weekly ratings and administered questionnaires for catastrophizing, depression, and anxiety. Recall discrepancy was significantly related to the variability of momentary fatigue. In addition, catastrophizing, depression, and momentary fatigue were all significantly related to recall discrepancy. Catastrophizing, depression, anxiety, and momentary negative affect were all significantly associated with momentary fatigue. The findings suggest that momentary fatigue in patients with CFS is related to modifiable psychological factors. PMID:18400687

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    PubMed

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  3. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  4. Rethinking compassion fatigue.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Nathan

    2017-05-15

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to argue for a revision of the concept of compassion fatigue in light of both its history and psychodynamics. Design/methodology/approach This paper calls into question conventional interpretations of compassion fatigue and the assumptions underlying them. As an alternative, a psychoanalytic interpretation is offered that sheds light on the phenomenon's unconscious and organizational dynamics. This interpretation also aligns with the concept's historical use in media and politics. Findings In contrast to the assumption that compassion fatigue arises from too much compassion, historical use of the term suggests just the opposite: compassion fatigue is the result of too little compassion. Healthcare literature on compassion fatigue has not only failed to account for this opposing view, but also the underlying psychodynamics at play. By attending to these neglected dimensions, healthcare scholars and practitioners can gain new insights into compassion fatigue and devise more sustainable interventions. Originality/value This paper reveals hidden dimensions to compassion fatigue that call into question conventional interpretations and offer novel perspectives on a core concern of healthcare work.

  5. Mechanisms of peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T

    1990-08-01

    Fatigue can be defined as the failure to maintain an expected power output. This is often an antecedent to some sports-related injury. It is important for those involved in physical performance to be familiar with the variety of mechanisms which can lead to fatigue. All too often, a single factor is described as the cause of fatigue when actually fatigue may be a combination of factors that contribute to the sequence of events that results in decreased performance. It may be suggested that every step in the chain of events that leads to voluntary contraction of skeletal muscle could be a culprit in fatigue. Peripheral sites and processes include the motor neuron, neuromuscular junction, sarcolemmal membrane, excitation-contraction coupling, accumulation of metabolites, or depletion of fuels. Physical training is frequently designed to delay the onset of fatigue. The actual mechanism(s) add to the specificity concept, that is, a "specificity of fatigue". To the performer, the end result is the same, the inability to maintain his or her expected level of performance or power output.

  6. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  7. Development of fatigue loading spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.; Watanabe, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present work on fatigue-loading spectra encompasses the current status of standardized stress-time histories, European approaches to standard loading spectrum development, transport aircraft airframe fatigue test spectra, the TURBISTAN fatigue-loading standard for fighter-aircraft engine disks, an automated procedure for the creation of flight-by-flight spectra, and the development of a wave-action standard history for fatigue testing relevant to tubular structures in the North Sea. Also treated is the use of the TURBISTAN mission spectra to evaluate fatigue crack growth in a rotating disk, fatigue-spectra development for airborne stores, a simplified analysis of fatigue-loading spectra, variable-amplitude load models for fatigue-damage crack growth, the tracking time service histories for multiaxis fatigue problems, and the compilation of procedures for fatigue crack propagation testing under complex load sequences.

  8. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  9. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment.

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    Magnetic perturbation signatures and Barkhausen noise results have been obtained from an AISI 4340 steel fatigue specimen stress-cycled at 180ksi...vicinity of the fatigue crack. Barkhausen noise signals were obtained on a grid pattern in the vicinity of several fatigue cracks with a Barkhausen ...fatigue specimens are being fabricated for magnetic perturbation and Barkhausen noise analysis measurements. Fatigue cracks in Ti-6Al-4V specimens were investigated with the electric current injection technique.

  11. Silent Burdens in Disease: Fatigue and Depression in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, R.; Bernardes, M.; Terroso, G.; de Sousa, M.; Figueiredo-Braga, M.

    2014-01-01

    At a time when health is being recognized as more than just avoiding death, age and comorbidity are becoming increasingly important aspects of chronic disease. Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) is probably one of the best paradigms of modern chronic disease, sitting at the crossroads of numerous somatic health problems, immune activation, depression, pain, and fatigue. One hundred forty-eight female participants were enrolled in the present study: 50 diagnosed with SLE, 45 with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 53 age-matched controls. Statistically significant lower scores in quality-of-life dimensions related to physical impairment were found in SLE. Patients with MDD presented significant levels of pain, reduced physical summary component (PSC), and general health scores different from healthy controls. Fatigue was reported in 90% of women with SLE and 77.8% of the MDD patients in contrast with 39.6% in the control group. Significant correlations were seen among fatigue severity, age, and educational level in SLE. From our own previous work and more recent work on the association of immune activation and depression, unexplained fatigue in SLE may signify an early sign of immune activation flare-up. The search for cytokine markers should perhaps be extended to fatigue in SLE. PMID:24592329

  12. The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Robert H; Nguyen, Carvell; Weight, Christopher J; Klein, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (0-27%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 0-67%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

  13. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract.

  14. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... tiredness. You may experience a profound lack of energy that can come on suddenly and bring dramatic ... to manage the severity. Respect the Fatigue The energy you’re accustomed to having has been transferred ...

  15. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatigue. Think "alternative." Acupuncture, reiki, massage, stretching, yoga, and t'ai chi seem to help many ... not beginning therapy — and therapies like the stress-management techniques and graded exercise previously mentioned have been ...

  16. Fatigue - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Polish (polski) Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (українська ) ... English Fatigue - polski (Polish) PDF American Cancer Society Russian (Русский) Expand Section Cancer Related Fatigue - Русский (Russian) ...

  17. Fracture and Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    fracture. The main additional categories of crack growth are elastic-plastic crack growth, fatigue crack growth, and crack growth as affected by...FRACTURE AND FATIGUE R. 0. RITCHIE W. W. GERBERICH J. H. UNDERWOOD DTIC AM ELECTE JUL 1 11988 APRIL 1988 FH US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND...other authorized documents. N The use of trade name(s) and/or manufacturer (s) does not constitute an official indorsement or approval. DESTRUCTION NOTICE

  18. Micromechanics of Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    recalled. Application of the derived tools to Apha-Two- Titanium Aluminide Aliov is made with a first series of strain controlled fatigue tests the locally...accumulation, and, multiaxial fatigue. In section 6, application is performed on the Alpha-Two- Titanium Alum:Aide Alloy.With a first serie of strain controlled ...tests needed for the identification of the model are described in the following figures. Test n’l is a classical tensile test strain controlled 1 = 0

  19. Fatigue in aviation.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, John A

    2005-05-01

    Pilot fatigue is a significant, but often under-reported problem in both civilian and military aviation operations. Although estimates vary, official statistics indicate that fatigue is involved in at least 4-8% of aviation mishaps, and surveys of pilots and aircrew members reveal that fatigue is an important concern throughout today's 24/7 flight operations. Regulatory efforts aimed at limiting flight hours and ensuring at least minimal periods of crew rest have to some extent mitigated fatigue-related difficulties in the cockpit, but it is clear that much remains to be done about this insidious threat to air safety. Scheduling factors, sleep deprivation, circadian disruptions, and extended duty periods continue to challenge the alertness and performance levels of both short-haul and long-haul pilots and crews. Solutions for these problems are not straightforward, but they can be developed through the cooperative efforts of scientists, regulators, managers, and the pilots themselves. Over the past 20 years, scientific understanding of human sleep, fatigue, and circadian rhythms has expanded considerably. The thorough integration of this new knowledge into modern crew-resource management practices will facilitate the establishment of optimal crew scheduling routines and the implementation of valid aviation fatigue countermeasures.

  20. Fatigue and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Béthoux, F

    2006-07-01

    Even if the definition and pathophysiology of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still debated, and despite the scarcity of objective markers correlated with the subjective sensation of fatigue, a review of the literature shows the importance of its detection and management, and allows one to propose therapeutic strategies. Fatigue is not only the most frequently reported symptom in MS, but also a frequent source of activity and participation limitations, psychological distress, and impairment of quality of life. Its management, which must be initiated early, is based on a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics and consequences (sometimes with the use of scales such as the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale), and on the identification of many potential contributing factors (psychological disorders, sleep disturbances, pain, infections and other comorbidities, medications, and deconditioning). Rehabilitative interventions are essential to the treatment of fatigue. Beyond the traditional energy conservation strategies and cooling techniques, several randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the positive impact of aerobic exercise. Medications are partially beneficial, and with the exception of amantadine, their efficacy has not been confirmed by randomized double-blind trials.

  1. Nucleic Acid Delivery for Endothelial Dysfunction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Dipti; Janero, David R.; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Blanco, Elvin; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple cardiovascular diseases and involves components of both innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Identifying signature patterns and targets associated with endothelial dysfunction can help in the development of novel nanotherapeutic platforms for treatment of vascular diseases. This review discusses nucleic acid-based regulation of endothelial function and the different nucleic acid-based nanotherapeutic approaches designed to target endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27826366

  2. The Environment-Immune Route to Chronic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific environmental factors including chemicals, drugs, microbes and both physical and psychological factors can affect the immune system producing dysfunction and, ultimately, an increased risk ofchronic disease. Several different types of immune alterations can result from e...

  3. The Environment-Immune Route to Chronic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific environmental factors including chemicals, drugs, microbes and both physical and psychological factors can affect the immune system producing dysfunction and, ultimately, an increased risk ofchronic disease. Several different types of immune alterations can result from e...

  4. Fatigue in frail elderly people.

    PubMed

    Toye, Christine; White, Kate; Rooksby, Karen

    2006-05-01

    Many frail older people are likely to suffer from fatigue, but tools to measure fatigue in this population are lacking. Stage one of this study explored and described the experiences of fatigue of 12 older people from Australian residential aged care facilities. Themes identified were pacing yourself, battling on, hitting rock bottom, feeling safe, and moving on. Findings indicated that, with support, frail elders may be able to manage fatigue effects themselves. A measure of fatigue was developed from stage one findings, with reference to the literature. In stage two of the study, the Frail Elder Fatigue Assessment Tool was subjected to panel review, piloting, and refinement. The refined tool comprises 20 items in three subscales: fatigue effects; fatigue resources; and adaptation to fatigue. Further work is required to establish the tool's psychometric properties, but it should then be useful for both research and clinical assessment purposes.

  5. Probabilistic Fatigue: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is a primary consideration in the design of aerospace structures for long term durability and reliability. There are several types of fatigue that must be considered in the design. These include low cycle, high cycle, combined for different cyclic loading conditions - for example, mechanical, thermal, erosion, etc. The traditional approach to evaluate fatigue has been to conduct many tests in the various service-environment conditions that the component will be subjected to in a specific design. This approach is reasonable and robust for that specific design. However, it is time consuming, costly and needs to be repeated for designs in different operating conditions in general. Recent research has demonstrated that fatigue of structural components/structures can be evaluated by computational simulation based on a novel paradigm. Main features in this novel paradigm are progressive telescoping scale mechanics, progressive scale substructuring and progressive structural fracture, encompassed with probabilistic simulation. These generic features of this approach are to probabilistically telescope scale local material point damage all the way up to the structural component and to probabilistically scale decompose structural loads and boundary conditions all the way down to material point. Additional features include a multifactor interaction model that probabilistically describes material properties evolution, any changes due to various cyclic load and other mutually interacting effects. The objective of the proposed paper is to describe this novel paradigm of computational simulation and present typical fatigue results for structural components. Additionally, advantages, versatility and inclusiveness of computational simulation versus testing are discussed. Guidelines for complementing simulated results with strategic testing are outlined. Typical results are shown for computational simulation of fatigue in metallic composite structures to demonstrate the

  6. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  7. Autoimmunity and Immune Dysregulation in Primary Immune Deficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Heather K

    2015-09-01

    Primary immune deficiencies are often associated with autoimmune disease due to the dysregulation of the immune system as a whole. In many immune deficiencies, lymphocytes may be present but dysfunctional, allowing for the development of excessive autoreactivity and resultant autoimmune disease. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodyregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked, IL-10/IL-10 receptor deficiencies, and PLCG2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation are disorders in which autoimmunity is a hallmark of the clinical disease presentation. In contrast, adaptive and innate immune deficiencies, which are typically defined by their infectious susceptibilities, can be associated with variable rates of autoimmune manifestations, predominantly autoimmune cytopenias. This review describes the immune dysregulation and autoimmune manifestations that may be encountered in various immune deficiencies.

  8. Consideration of sleep dysfunction in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Marie Carmen; Rodenstein, Daniel O; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2011-07-01

    The physiology of sleep is not completely understood but it is widely accepted that sleep is important to the human body in the recovery of metabolic and neurological processes. This paper summarizes the effects of sleep dysfunction on different systems and considers implications in the context of rehabilitation. When sleep is experimentally completely or partially curtailed important brain functions are impacted leading to psychological and neurological disturbances. Increased cortisol levels, reduction of glucose tolerance, and increased sympathetic nervous system activity have also been identified in healthy subjects under such conditions. Several studies show that 50-80% of patients with chronic pain suffer from sleep dysfunction. It has been suggested that on the one hand pain can cause sleep dysfunction and on the other hand that sleep dysfunction can aggravate pain. The physiologic mechanism behind this interaction is not completely clear; although most authors describe the relationship between pain and sleep dysfunction as aberrant processing of tactile-cutaneous sensory inputs at the meso-encephalic level and in the trigeminal nucleus both when asleep and awake. Decreased duration of sleep also increases heart rate, blood pressure and sympathetic activity magnifying the individual's response to stressful stimuli. Possible causal mechanisms for the established connection between short sleep cycles and coronary pathology include sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity, increased blood pressure increase or reduced glucose tolerance. Finally, sleep and fatigue have traditionally been linked. Fatigue can have a physical etiology but is also associated with depression. Sleep alterations are also considered an important risk factor for psychological dysfunction and also mental illness. However, despite the noted repercussions of sleep dysfunction, studies investigating interventions to improve sleep have been limited in number. Benefits of exercise programs on

  9. A Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) severity score based on case designation criteria

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; Merck, Samantha Jean; Ali, Mushtaq; Ravindran, Murugan K; Timbol, Christian R; Rayhan, Rakib; Zheng, Yin; Le, Uyenphuong; Esteitie, Rania; Petrie, Kristina N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome case designation criteria are scored as physicians’ subjective, nominal interpretations of patient fatigue, pain (headaches, myalgia, arthralgia, sore throat and lymph nodes), cognitive dysfunction, sleep and exertional exhaustion. Methods: Subjects self-reported symptoms using an anchored ordinal scale of 0 (no symptom), 1 (trivial complaints), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate), and 4 (severe). Fatigue of 3 or 4 distinguished “Fatigued” from “Not Fatigued” subjects. The sum of the 8(Sum8) ancillary criteria was tested as a proxy for fatigue. All subjects had history and physical examinations to exclude medical fatigue, and ensure categorization as healthy or CFS subjects. Results: Fatigued subjects were divided into CFS with ≥4 symptoms or Chronic Idiopathic Fatigue (CIF) with ≤3 symptoms. ROC of Sum8 for CFS and Not Fatigued subjects generated a threshold of 14 (specificity=0.934; sensitivity=0.928). CFS (n=256) and CIF (n=55) criteria were refined to include Sum8≥14 and ≤13, respectively. Not Fatigued subjects had highly skewed Sum8 responses. Healthy Controls (HC; n=269) were defined by fatigue≤2 and Sum8≤13. Those with Sum8≥14 were defined as CFS–Like With Insufficient Fatigue Syndrome (CFSLWIFS; n=20). Sum8 and Fatigue were highly correlated (R2=0.977; Cronbach’s alpha=0.924) indicating an intimate relationship between symptom constructs. Cluster analysis suggested 4 clades each in CFS and HC. Translational utility was inferred from the clustering of proteomics from cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusions: Plotting Fatigue severity versus Sum8 produced an internally consistent classifying system. This is a necessary step for translating symptom profiles into fatigue phenotypes and their pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:23390566

  10. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  11. Fatigue With Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Anne M.; Sullivan, Shawna L.; Zerwic, Julie J.; Piano, Mariann R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Research Objective Fatigue is one of the most prevalent symptoms in persons with systolic heart failure (HF). There remains insufficient information about the physiological and psychosocial underpinnings of fatigue in HF. The specific aims of this study were to (1) determine the psychometric properties of 2 fatigue questionnaires in patients with HF, (2) compare fatigue in patients with HF to published scores of healthy adults and patients with cancer undergoing treatment, and (3) identify the physiological (eg, hemoglobin, B-type natriuretic peptide, body mass index, and ejection fraction) and psychosocial (eg, depressed mood) correlates of fatigue in HF. Subjects and Methods A convenience sample of 87 HF outpatients was recruited from 2 urban medical centers. Patients completed the Fatigue Symptom Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Results and Conclusions Patients with HF and patients with cancer reported similar levels of fatigue, and both patient groups reported significantly more fatigue than did healthy adults. Physical functioning and hemoglobin categories explained 30% of the variance in Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Interference Scale scores, whereas depressed mood and physical functioning explained 47% of the variance in Profile of Mood States Fatigue subscale scores. Patients with HF experienced substantial fatigue that is comparable with cancer-related fatigue. Low physical functioning, depressed mood, and low hemoglobin level were associated with HF-related fatigue. PMID:19707101

  12. Fatigue Assessment: Subjective Peer-to-Peer Fatigue Scoring (Reprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    impor- tant role of fatigue in aviation safety and fl ight perfor- mance, the compelling tasks of predicting dangerous fatigued states and quantifying...complex fl ight environment. Indeed, even a precise defi nition of fatigue has been somewhat recondite. It is often stratifi ed into acute versus...Medicine x Vol. 84, No. 10 x October 2013 PEER-TO-PEER FATIGUE SCORING — GAYDOS ET AL. broad and complex skill sets required for fl ight safety

  13. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  14. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  15. An indentation fatigue strength law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Yonezu, Akio; Chen, Xi

    2010-05-01

    Indentation fatigue, where a cyclic load is applied on the sample via an indenter, emerges as an alternative approach for measuring the fatigue properties of materials. We have carried out indentation fatigue tests on a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) bulk material, as well as on TiN and NiP films/coatings deposited on SUS304 steel substrates, and demonstrate that a simple power-law relationship can be established between the indentation load amplitude and number of cycles to failure. Such a law is very similar to the conventional fatigue strength law obtained from uniaxial tests. The agreement between the fatigue stress exponents obtained by uniaxial and indentation fatigue tests suggests the potential applicability of the indentation fatigue technique for extracting the fatigue properties of materials.

  16. Relationship between fatigue and photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shigihara, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It is considered that photosensitivity is one of the most important factors to cause video-game epilepsy. Since photosensitivity is thought to cause various signs of hypersensitivity in the central nervous system and hypersensitivity is believed to be related to fatigue, whether fatigue is associated with photosensitivity was determined. The study group consisted of 68 healthy medical students attending Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine. They completed questionnaires dealing with fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale) and photosensitivity. On simple regression analyses, fatigue score was positively associated with photosensitivity score. Similarly, on multiple regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and sleeping hours, fatigue score was positively associated with photosensitivity score. Fatigue is associated with photosensitivity. Our findings provide new perspectives on fatigue.

  17. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  18. Fecal metagenomic profiles in subgroups of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Williams, Brent L; Mishra, Nischay; Che, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bohyun; Bateman, Lucinda; Klimas, Nancy G; Komaroff, Anthony L; Levine, Susan; Montoya, Jose G; Peterson, Daniel L; Ramanan, Devi; Jain, Komal; Eddy, Meredith L; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W Ian

    2017-04-26

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterized by unexplained persistent fatigue, commonly accompanied by cognitive dysfunction, sleeping disturbances, orthostatic intolerance, fever, lymphadenopathy, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The extent to which the gastrointestinal microbiome and peripheral inflammation are associated with ME/CFS remains unclear. We pursued rigorous clinical characterization, fecal bacterial metagenomics, and plasma immune molecule analyses in 50 ME/CFS patients and 50 healthy controls frequency-matched for age, sex, race/ethnicity, geographic site, and season of sampling. Topological analysis revealed associations between IBS co-morbidity, body mass index, fecal bacterial composition, and bacterial metabolic pathways but not plasma immune molecules. IBS co-morbidity was the strongest driving factor in the separation of topological networks based on bacterial profiles and metabolic pathways. Predictive selection models based on bacterial profiles supported findings from topological analyses indicating that ME/CFS subgroups, defined by IBS status, could be distinguished from control subjects with high predictive accuracy. Bacterial taxa predictive of ME/CFS patients with IBS were distinct from taxa associated with ME/CFS patients without IBS. Increased abundance of unclassified Alistipes and decreased Faecalibacterium emerged as the top biomarkers of ME/CFS with IBS; while increased unclassified Bacteroides abundance and decreased Bacteroides vulgatus were the top biomarkers of ME/CFS without IBS. Despite findings of differences in bacterial taxa and metabolic pathways defining ME/CFS subgroups, decreased metabolic pathways associated with unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis and increased atrazine degradation pathways were independent of IBS co-morbidity. Increased vitamin B6 biosynthesis/salvage and pyrimidine ribonucleoside degradation were the top metabolic pathways in ME/CFS without IBS as well as in the

  19. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Initially known as multiple system organ failure, the term multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was first described in the 1960s in adults with bleeding, respiratory failure, and sepsis. It is defined as "the development of potentially reversible physiologic derangement involving two or more organ systems not involved in the disorder that resulted in ICU admission, and arising in the wake of a potentially life threatening physiologic insult."(3) There are many risk factors predisposing to MODS; however, the most common risk factors are shock due to any cause, sepsis, and tissue hypoperfusion. A dysregulated immune response, or immuneparalysis, in which the homeostasis between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory reaction is lost is thought to be key in the development of MODS. The clinical course and evolution of MODS is dependent on a combination of acquired and genetic factors. There are several nonspecific therapies for the prevention and resolution of MODS, mostly care is supportive. Mortality from MODS in septic pediatric patients varies between 11% and 54%. © 2013 Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Review of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: an evidence-based approach to diagnosis and management by clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bested, Alison C; Marshall, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    This review was written from the viewpoint of the treating clinician to educate health care professionals and the public about Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). It includes: the clinical definition of ME/CFS with emphasis on how to diagnose ME/CFS; the etiology, pathophysiology, management approach, long-term prognosis and economic cost of ME/CFS. After reading this review, you will be better able to diagnose and treat your patients with ME/CFS using the tools and information provided. Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, chronic medical condition characterized by symptom clusters that include: pathological fatigue and malaise that is worse after exertion, cognitive dysfunction, immune dysfunction, unrefreshing sleep, pain, autonomic dysfunction, neuroendocrine and immune symptoms. ME/CFS is common, often severely disabling and costly. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) reviewed the ME/CFS literature and estimates that between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans have ME/CFS at a cost of between 17 and 24 billion dollars annually in the US. The IOM suggested a new name for ME/CFS and called it Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). SEID's diagnostic criteria are less specific and do not exclude psychiatric disorders in the criteria. The 2010 Canadian Community Health Survey discovered that 29% of patients with ME/CFS had unmet health care needs and 20% had food insecurity--lack of access to sufficient healthy foods. ME/CFS can be severely disabling and cause patients to be bedridden. Yet most patients (80%) struggle to get a diagnosis because doctors have not been taught how to diagnose or treat ME/CFS in medical schools or in their post-graduate educational training. Consequently, the patients with ME/CFS suffer. They are not diagnosed with ME/CFS and are not treated accordingly. Instead of compassionate care from their doctors, they are often ridiculed by the very people from whom they seek help

  1. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  2. Fatigue and fracture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    The accomplishments achieved under the isotropic creep-fatigue crack initiation life prediction program are summarized. A sizeable creep-fatigue crack initiation data base was generated on the nickel-base superalloy, B-1900. Companion constitutive modeling programs have also generated extensive data bases on the same heat of material. The crack initiation results have formed the basis of a new approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. The term Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) was coined for the method, which was evaluated under isothermal, uniaxial conditions. Stringent laboratory verification experiments were used to test the accuracy of the method. Considering the quite limited material property data needed to evaluate the constants in the approach, the prediction accuracy is acceptable. At the expense of the larger data base required, Lewis developed total strain- strainrange partitioning method (TS-SRP) is capable of a higher degree of accuracy.

  3. Fatigue and Barkhausen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wei

    Piezomagnetism designates a change in the magnetization of materials induced by mechanical actions such as tension or compression. The type of Barkhausen effect that occurs in this work consists of sudden, discontinuous jumps in a material's magnetization that appear in response to smooth (continuous) stress variations. A series of strain controlled fatigue tests with an alternating sinusoidal waveform were carried out to study the relationship between the endurance limit and the Barkhausen effect. Results of fatigue tests on steel specimens exhibiting Barkhausen pulses at various stages are reported and a threshold-crossing analysis is applied to the test results. These studies show that when the fatigue limit is approached, the Barkhausen pulses become, in general, more intense in amplitude and quantity than at other stress levels. A hypothetical mechanism is proposed that relates the intensity of the Barkhausen response to the inception of micro-cracking and rearrangements of the mechanical lattice at the microscopic level.

  4. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Sci.,12,1g78,64 (6) Antolovich ,S.D.,Rosa,E.and Pineau,A.,Mat.Sci.Eng.,47,1981,47 (7)Bricknell,R.H.and Woodford,D.A.,Metall.Trans.,A12,1981,425 (8...M. Rddhakrishnan, Trans. ASME, J. Engr. Matls. & Tech., 1983, vol. 105, p. 273. (16) J. P. Bailon and S. 0. Antolovich , in FATIGUE MECHANISMS...time t = time (min) th = hold-time period (min) Oc = creep fraction damage OF = fatigue fraction damage REFERENCES (1) Antolovich , S.D. and Zamrik, S

  5. Fatigue and thermal fatigue of Pb-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.; Grivas, D.; McCormack, M.; Tribula, D.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a fundamental investigation of the fatigue and thermal fatigue characteristics, with an emphasis on the microstructural development during fatigue, of Sn-Pb solder joints. Fatigue tests were performed in simple shear on both 60Sn-40Pb and 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Isothermal fatigue tests show increasing fatigue life of 60Sn-40Pb solder joints with decreasing strain and temperature. In contrast, such behavior was not observed in the isothermal fatigue of 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Thermal fatigue results on 60Sn-40Pb solder cycled between -55/sup 0/C and 125/sup 0/C show that a coarsened region develops in the center of the joint. Both Pb-rich and Sn-rich phases coarsen, and cracks form within these coarsened regions. The failure mode 60Sn-40Pb solder joints in thermal and isothermal fatigue is similar: cracks form intergranularly through the Sn-rich phase or along Sn/Pb interphase boundaries. Extensive cracking is found throughout the 5Sn-95Pb joint for both thermal and isothermal fatigue. In thermal fatigue the 5Sn-95Pb solder joints failed after fewer cycles than 60Sn-40Pb.

  6. The Nature of Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olson, Karin; Zimka, Oksana; Stein, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we report the findings of our study on the nature of fatigue in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. Using ethnoscience as a design, we conducted a series of unstructured interviews and card sorts to learn more about how people with chronic fatigue syndrome describe fatigue. Participants (N = 14) described three distinct domains: tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion. Most participants experienced tiredness prior to diagnosis, fatigue during daily life, and exhaustion after overexertion. We also discuss participants' ability to adapt to a variety of stressors and prevent shifts to exhaustion, and relate our findings to stress theory and other current research. Primary strategies that promoted adaptation to stressors included pacing and extended rest periods. These findings can aid health care professionals in detecting impending shifts between tiredness, fatigue, and exhaustion and in improving adaptive strategies, thereby improving quality of life.

  7. Increased Incidence of Fatigue in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders: Prevalence and Associations Within the US Immunodeficiency Network Registry

    PubMed Central

    Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) often report fatigue, yet this symptom has not been studied in PID. Fatigue affects 6–7.5% of healthy adults. The goal of this study is to estimate the prevalence of fatigue in patients with PID and investigate its associated factors. Methods We analyzed 2537 PID patients registered in USIDNET to determine responses to the field “fatigue” in the core registry form. Demographics, immune phenotypes, and comorbid conditions were compared between fatigued and non-fatigued patients to identify relevant associations and potential drivers. A focused analysis was performed for patients with predominantly antibody deficiency disorders (PADs). Results Fatigue was reported in 25.9%(95% CI 23.7–28.3) of PAD patients, compared to 6.4% (95% CI 4.9–8.2) of non-PAD. Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) had the highest prevalence of fatigue (p < 0.001) among all PID diagnoses. Other factors that were associated with a higher rate of fatigue among PAD patients included female sex, higher BMI, depression, bronchiectasis, and autoimmunity. Additionally, fatigued PAD patients had lower absolute lymphocyte, CD3, CD4, and CD8 counts compared to non-fatigued patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that fatigue is overrepresented in PAD patients. Prospective studies to estimate prevalence, risk factors, and fatigue etiology in PID are warranted, so therapeutic interventions can be considered. PMID:28124237

  8. Potential pathophysiological pathways that can explain the positive effects of exercise on fatigue in multiple sclerosis: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Langeskov-Christensen, Martin; Bisson, Etienne J; Finlayson, Marcia L; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-02-15

    Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). It is a multidimensional and complex symptom with multifaceted origins, involving both central and peripheral fatigue mechanisms. Exercise has proven to be safe for people with MS, with cumulating evidence supporting significant reductions in fatigue. However, the potential pathophysiological pathways that can explain the positive effects of exercise on fatigue in MS remain elusive. The objectives were, in PwMS (1) to update the knowledge on the pathophysiology underlying primary and secondary fatigue, and (2) to discuss potential pathophysiological pathways that can explain the positive effects of exercise on MS fatigue. A comprehensive literature search of six databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, PEDro, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus) was performed. To be included, the study had to 1) enroll participants with definite MS according to defined criteria, 2) assess explicit pathophysiological mechanisms related to MS fatigue, 3) be available in English, Danish or French, and 4) had undergone peer-review. A total of 234 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Primary MS fatigue mainly originated from a dysfunction of central nervous system neuronal circuits secondary to increased inflammation, reduced glucose metabolism, brain atrophy and diffuse demyelination and axonal lesions. Secondary MS fatigue was linked with sleep disturbances, depression, cognitive impairments, and deconditioning. Cardiovascular, immunologic, neuroendocrine, and neurotrophic changes associated with exercise may alleviate primary MS fatigue while exercise may improve secondary MS fatigue through symptomatic improvement of deconditioning, sleep disorders, and depression. >30 primary and secondary pathophysiological fatigue pathways were identified underlining the multidimensionality and complexity of MS fatigue. Though the underlying key cellular and molecular cascades still have to be fully elucidated

  9. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  10. Fatigue of insect cuticle.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Parle, Eoin; Taylor, David

    2013-05-15

    Many parts of the insect exoskeleton experience repeated cyclic loading. Although the cuticle of insects and other arthropods is the second most common natural composite material in the world, so far nothing is known about its fatigue properties, despite the fact that fatigue undoubtedly limits the durability of body parts in vivo. For the first time, we here present experimental fatigue data of insect cuticle. Using force-controlled cyclic loading, we determined the number of cycles to failure for hind legs (tibiae) and hind wings of the locust Schistocerca gregaria, as a function of the applied cyclic stress. Our results show that, although both are made from cuticle, these two body parts behave very differently. Wing samples showed a large fatigue range, failing after 100,000 cycles when we applied 46% of the stress needed for instantaneous failure [the ultimate tensile strength (UTS)]. Legs, in contrast, were able to sustain a stress of 76% of the UTS for the same number of cycles to failure. This can be explained by the difference in the composition and structure of the material, two factors that, amongst others, also affect the well-known behaviour of engineering composites. Final failure of the tibiae occurred via one of two different failure modes--propagation in tension or buckling in compression--indicating that the tibia is 'optimized' by evolution to resist both failure modes equally. These results are further discussed in relation to the evolution and normal use of these two body parts.

  11. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  12. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  13. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hysteresis and Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erber, T.; Guralnick, S. A.; Michels, S. C.

    1993-06-01

    Fatigue in materials is the result of cumulative damage processes that are usually induced be repeated loading cycles. Since the energy dissipation associated with damage is irreversible, and the loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat, the corresponding relation between stress and strain is not single-valued; but rather exhibits a memory dependence, or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Engineering design and safety standards for estimating fatigue life are based in part on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress-strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. Experimental and theoretical results show that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Detailed features of the hysteresis can be understood with the help of analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials. In particular, scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns may be used to check on the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level.

  15. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  16. Diagnosis of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Glina, Sidney; Cohen, David J; Vieira, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a very prevalent condition and impairs quality of life of men and their partners. The diagnosis strategy of erectile dysfunction has changed, and it is important for every health professional to learn how to deal with erectile dysfunction. Although very prevalent, the sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction, continue to be underdiagnosed. Patients often expect physicians to initiate the conversation and ask about their troubles having sex. The routine to identify erectile dysfunction causes has undergone significant changes over the last decade. Identification of erectile dysfunction can be made through questionnaires or a complete medical and sexual history. Anamnesis and laboratory tests are sufficient in most cases to identify erectile dysfunction and to manage the treatment. Supplementary tests are used in special cases or when there is a need for an etiological diagnosis. Sexual function must be a part of every medical consultation, as any other body function. Erectile dysfunction diagnosis is not a complex task and can be accomplished by any physician. Even when the professional does not feel secure to treat erectile dysfunction, he or she can just identify the dysfunction and refer the patient to an expert.

  17. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  18. The effects of muscle fatigue on shoulder joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, J E; Blasier, R B; Pellizzon, G G

    1998-01-01

    Proprioception, or joint position sense, probably plays an important role in shoulder joint function. In this study, we assessed the effect of muscle fatigue on shoulder proprioception in 20 volunteers with no shoulder abnormalities. Shoulder proprioception was measured as the threshold to first detection of humeral rotation with the joint at 90 degrees of abduction and 90 degrees of external rotation. Subjects were tested while rested, exercised on a isokinetic testing machine until fatigued, and then retested in an identical fashion. Both shoulders were tested, and the order of dominant and nondominant shoulder was randomized. Shoulder proprioception was analyzed for its dependence on arm dominance, direction of rotation, and muscle fatigue. Subjects detected external rotation after significantly less movement than they did internal rotation. Overall, before exercise, motion was detected after a mean of 0.92 degrees of rotation. After exercise, this threshold to detection of movement increased to 1.59 degrees, an increase of 73%. This significant increase occurred with both internal and external rotation. The decrease in proprioceptive sense with muscle fatigue may play a role in decreasing athletic performance and in fatigue-related shoulder dysfunction. It remains to be determined if training can lessen this loss in position sense.

  19. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse fatigue and its relevance to chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Teng; Du, Xiu-Ming; Ma, Xiu-Juan; Zong, Ying; Chen, Ji-Kuai; Yu, Chen-Lin; Liu, Yan-Gang; Chen, Yong-Chun; Zhao, Li-Jun; Lu, Guo-Cai

    2016-04-05

    The NLRP3 inflammasome (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) is an intracellular protein complex that plays an important role in innate immune sensing. Its activation leads to the maturation of caspase-1 and regulates the cleavage of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Various studies have shown that activation of the immune system plays a pivotal role in the development of fatigue. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between immune activation and fatigue remained elusive, and few reports have described the involvement of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in fatigue. We established a mouse fatigue model with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 3 mg/kg) challenge combined with swim stress. Both behavioural and biochemical parameters were measured to illustrate the characteristics of this model. We also assessed NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the mouse diencephalon, which is the brain region that has been suggested to be responsible for fatigue sensation. To further identify the role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), NLRP3 KO mice were also subjected to LPS treatment and swim stress, and the same parameters were evaluated. Mice challenged with LPS and subjected to the swim stress test showed decreased locomotor activity, decreased fall-off time in a rota-rod test and increased serum levels of IL-1β and IL-6 compared with untreated mice. Serum levels of lactic acid and malondialdehyde (MDA) were not significantly altered in the treated mice. We demonstrated increased NLRP3 expression, IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation in the diencephalons of the treated mice. In NLRP3 KO mice, we found remarkably increased locomotor activity with longer fall-off times and decreased serum IL-1β levels compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice after LPS challenge and the swim stress test. IL-1β levels in the diencephalon were also significantly decreased in the NLRP3 KO mice. By contrast, IL-6 levels were

  20. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  1. Quantifying fatigue risk in model-based fatigue risk management.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Suresh; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2013-02-01

    The question of what is a maximally acceptable level of fatigue risk is hotly debated in model-based fatigue risk management in commercial aviation and other transportation modes. A quantitative approach to addressing this issue, referred to by the Federal Aviation Administration with regard to its final rule for commercial aviation "Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements," is to compare predictions from a mathematical fatigue model against a fatigue threshold. While this accounts for duty time spent at elevated fatigue risk, it does not account for the degree of fatigue risk and may, therefore, result in misleading schedule assessments. We propose an alternative approach based on the first-order approximation that fatigue risk is proportional to both the duty time spent below the fatigue threshold and the distance of the fatigue predictions to the threshold--that is, the area under the curve (AUC). The AUC approach is straightforward to implement for schedule assessments in commercial aviation and also provides a useful fatigue metric for evaluating thousands of scheduling options in industrial schedule optimization tools.

  2. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  3. Adaptive Immunity Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-02-27

    A complex interplay between host and bacterial factors allows Staphylococcus aureus to occupy its niche as a human commensal and a major human pathogen. The role of neutrophils as a critical component of the innate immune response against S. aureus, particularly for control of systemic infection, has been established in both animal models and in humans with acquired and congenital neutrophil dysfunction. The role of the adaptive immune system is less clear. Although deficiencies in adaptive immunity do not result in the marked susceptibility to S. aureus infection that neutrophil dysfunction imparts, emerging evidence suggests both T cell- and B cell-mediated adaptive immunity can influence host susceptibility and control of S. aureus. The contribution of adaptive immunity depends on the context and site of infection and can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Furthermore, S. aureus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate adaptive immune responses to its advantage. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for the role of adaptive immunity during S. aureus infections. Further elucidation of this role will be important to understand how it influences susceptibility to infection and to appropriately design vaccines that elicit adaptive immune responses to protect against subsequent infections.

  4. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  5. Daily cytokine fluctuations, driven by leptin, are associated with fatigue severity in chronic fatigue syndrome: evidence of inflammatory pathology.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Elizabeth Ann; Baker, Katharine Susanne; Carroll, Ian R; Montoya, Jose G; Chu, Lily; Maecker, Holden T; Younger, Jarred W

    2013-04-09

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disorder characterized by persistent fatigue that is not alleviated by rest. The lack of a clearly identified underlying mechanism has hindered the development of effective treatments. Studies have demonstrated elevated levels of inflammatory factors in patients with CFS, but findings are contradictory across studies and no biomarkers have been consistently supported. Single time-point approaches potentially overlook important features of CFS, such as fluctuations in fatigue severity. We have observed that individuals with CFS demonstrate significant day-to-day variability in their fatigue severity. Therefore, to complement previous studies, we implemented a novel longitudinal study design to investigate the role of cytokines in CFS pathophysiology. Ten women meeting the Fukuda diagnostic criteria for CFS and ten healthy age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched women underwent 25 consecutive days of blood draws and self-reporting of symptom severity. A 51-plex cytokine panel via Luminex was performed for each of the 500 serum samples collected. Our primary hypothesis was that daily fatigue severity would be significantly correlated with the inflammatory adipokine leptin, in the women with CFS and not in the healthy control women. As a post-hoc analysis, a machine learning algorithm using all 51 cytokines was implemented to determine whether immune factors could distinguish high from low fatigue days. Self-reported fatigue severity was significantly correlated with leptin levels in six of the participants with CFS and one healthy control, supporting our primary hypothesis. The machine learning algorithm distinguished high from low fatigue days in the CFS group with 78.3% accuracy. Our results support the role of cytokines in the pathophysiology of CFS.

  6. Immunizations, immunology, and autism.

    PubMed

    Chez, Michael G; Chin, Kathleen; Hung, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Public fears of rising rates of children being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders has led to a fear that immunizations, specifically the measles-mumps-varicella vaccine (MMR), may trigger autism. This article reviews theories of immunization as a risk factor for autism, including thimerosal exposure. We also review theories of autoimmunity as a predisposing genetic risk in autistic patients. We summarize from multiple population-based studies and extensive review committee reports that neither immunization nor thimerosal exposure has been conclusively linked to autism. Current treatments for autoimmunity in autism are reviewed and summarized as being only anecdotally effective, with no controlled studies to conclusively determine effectiveness. The goal of this article is to allow child neurologists to effectively counsel parents of autistic patients about vaccination risks and treatment options in presumed cases of autoimmune dysfunction.

  7. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits.

  8. Fatigue Experiences Among OCD Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Piacentino, Daria; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Maraone, Annalisa; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with OCD are impaired in multiple domains of functioning and quality of life. While associated psychopathology complaints and neuropsychological deficits were reported, the subjective experience of general fatigue and mental fatigue was scarcely investigated. In this single-center case-control study we compared 50 non-depressed OCD outpatients consecutively recruited and 50 panic disorder (PD) outpatients, to determine whether they experienced fatigue differently. Assessment consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, severity and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Fatigue was assessed by using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI). Regarding MFI physical fatigue, an OR of 0.196 (95 % CI 0.080-0.478) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD compared to PD. The same can be said for MFI mental fatigue, as an OR of 0.138 (95 % CI 0.049-0.326) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD. Notably, OCD patients with OCDP co-morbidity reported higher scores of mental fatigue. In this study fatigue, including mental fatigue, seems not to be a prominent experience among adult non-depressed OCD patients.

  9. Chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: shifting boundaries and attributions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A R

    1998-09-28

    The subjective symptom of "fatigue" is one of the most widespread in the general population and is a major source of healthcare utilization. Prolonged fatigue is often associated with neuropsychological and musculoskeletal symptoms that form the basis of several syndromal diagnoses including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and neurasthenia, and is clearly not simply the result of a lack of force generation from the muscle. Current epidemiologic research in this area relies predominantly on self-report data to document the prevalence and associations of chronic fatigue. Of necessity, this subjective data source gives rise to uncertain diagnostic boundaries and consequent divergent epidemiologic, clinical, and pathophysiologic research findings. This review will highlight the impact of the case definition and ascertainment methods on the varying prevalence estimates of chronic fatigue syndrome and patterns of reported psychological comorbidty. It will also evaluate the evidence for a true postinfective fatigue syndrome.

  10. Severe fatigue after treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ: A comparison with age-matched breast cancer survivors and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, H J G; Smits, L; Lugt, M de; Roos, W K de; Kamm, Y; Heins, M J; Verhagen, C A H H V M; Gielissen, M F M; Knoop, H

    2017-02-01

    Severe fatigue after treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has not been studied before. The current study examined (i) the prevalence of severe fatigue in DCIS patients versus breast cancer survivors (BCS) and healthy controls (HC), (ii) quality of life and functioning of severely versus non-severely fatigued DCIS patients and BCS, and (iii) the association of fatigue with psychosocial and behavioral factors in DCIS patients. 89 patients treated for DCIS were matched on age and gender to 67 BCS and 178 HC (ratio 1:1:2). Fatigue was measured with the Fatigue Severity subscale of the Checklist Individual Strength. 23% of DCIS patients, 25% of BCS, and 6% of HC were severely fatigued (DCIS versus HC: p < 0.001). Severely fatigued DCIS patients had a lower quality of life and were more impaired in all domains of functioning than non-severely fatigued DCIS patients. Sleep problems, dysfunctional cognitions regarding fatigue, avoidance of activities, all-or-nothing behavior, perceived lack of social support, DCIS-related coping problems, and fear of future cancer occurrence were related to fatigue. The prevalence of severe fatigue in DCIS patients was similar to BCS, but higher than in HC. Severely fatigued DCIS patients had a lower quality of life and more functional impairments. The psychosocial and behavioral fatigue-related factors in DCIS patients are known to perpetuate fatigue in BCS. These factors can be targeted in interventions for cancer-related fatigue. Our findings suggest that the same treatment elements might be applicable to severely fatigued DCIS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of repeated maximal exercise testing on biomarkers and fatigue in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Braam, A W E; de Haan, S N; Vorselaars, A D M; Rijkers, G T; Grutters, J C; van den Elshout, F J J; Korenromp, I H E

    2013-10-01

    Fatigue in the immune mediated inflammatory disease sarcoidosis is thought to be associated with impaired exercise tolerance. This prospective study assessed fatigue and recuperative capacity after repeated exercise, and examined whether changing concentrations in biomarkers upon exercise are associated with fatigue. Twenty sarcoidosis patients and 10 healthy volunteers performed maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests on two successive days. Concentrations of cytokines, stress hormones, ACE and CK were assessed before and after the two exercise tests, and 3 days thereafter. All participants completed a sleep diary. Severely fatigued patients showed significant lower VO2 max (p=0.038, p=0.022) and maximal workload (p=0.034, p=0.028) on both exercise tests compared to healthy controls. No impairment of maximal exercise testing was demonstrated during the second cycling test in any group. Fatigue was not correlated with changes in concentrations of biomarkers upon exercise. Severely fatigued patients rated both tests as significantly more fatiguing, and reported significant lower mean subjective night sleeping time during the testing period. Fatigue in sarcoidosis patients cannot be objectified by reduction of exercise capacity after repeated maximal exercise testing, and is not correlated with significant changes in biomarkers. Severe fatigue is only and consistently featured by patient reported outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fatigue failure load indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, D. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An indicator for recording the load at which a fatigue specimen breaks during the last cycle of a fatigue test is described. A load cell is attached to the specimen which is alternately subjected to tension and compression loads. The output of the load cell which is proportional to the load on the specimen is applied to the input of a peak detector. Each time the specimen is subjected to a compression load, means are provided for applying a positive voltage to the rest of the peak detector to reset it. During the last cycle of the tension load the peak detector measures the maximum load on the specimen. Means are provided for disconnecting the load cell from the peak detector when there is a failure in the specimen.

  13. [Childhood chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miike, Teruhisa

    2007-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome in childhood and adolescents(CCFS) is a complex and debilitation with severe morbidity and confusion. It is common condition with up to 3-5% of children and adolescents showing strange fatigue and confusion for more than 30 days. In this condition, four major symptoms are important: sleep disorders, easy fatigability, disturbed learning and memorization and immunological problems. Routine laboratory studies are similar to adult CFS, although abnormalities can be seen on serum pyruvic acid level, OGTT pattern, deep body temperature rhythm, hormonal secretion rhythm, and cerebral blood flow. For a diagnosis of CCFS, a research group supported by Japanese ministry of health, labor and welfare developed CCFS case definition on 2004. Treatment focused to correct disrupted circadian rhythms and supply of energy.

  14. Probabilistic Mesomechanical Fatigue Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic mesomechanical fatigue life model is proposed to link the microstructural material heterogeneities to the statistical scatter in the macrostructural response. The macrostructure is modeled as an ensemble of microelements. Cracks nucleation within the microelements and grow from the microelements to final fracture. Variations of the microelement properties are defined using statistical parameters. A micromechanical slip band decohesion model is used to determine the crack nucleation life and size. A crack tip opening displacement model is used to determine the small crack growth life and size. Paris law is used to determine the long crack growth life. The models are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical distribution of total fatigue life for the macrostructure. The modeled response is compared to trends in experimental observations from the literature.

  15. Sites of Failure in Muscle Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    sites associated with muscle fatigue. Keywords - Fatigue, failure, site, muscle. I. INTRODUCTION Neuromuscular fatigue impairs the force...generating capacity of muscles and it is experienced commonly in normal everyday physical exercise and especially in neuromuscular diseases...Despite significant progress in research on muscle fatigue, “remarkably little is known of the mechanisms underlying neuromuscular fatigue during human

  16. Detection of Urine Metabolites in a Rat Model of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome before and after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Changzhuan; Ren, Yiming; Wang, Zinan; Kang, Chenzhe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the metabolic mechanisms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) via an analysis of urine metabolites prior to and following exercise in a rat model. Methods. A rat model of CFS was established using restraint-stress, forced exercise, and crowded and noisy environments over a period of 4 weeks. Behavioral experiments were conducted in order to evaluate the model. Urine metabolites were analyzed via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis before and after exercise. Results. A total of 20 metabolites were detected in CFS rats before and after exercise. Three metabolic pathways (TCA cycle; alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism; steroid hormone biosynthesis) were significantly impacted before and after exercise, while sphingolipid metabolism alone exhibited significant alterations after exercise only. Conclusion. In addition to metabolic disturbances involving some energy substances, alterations in steroid hormone biosynthesis and sphingolipid metabolism were detected in CFS rats. Sphingosine and 21-hydroxypregnenolone may be key biomarkers of CFS, potentially offering evidence in support of immune dysfunction and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hypoactivity in patients with CFS. PMID:28421200

  17. Recovery from Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-06-30

    relative effectiveness of this kind of sleep activity on recovery from fatigue as opposed to cycling to deeper stages may prove to be of central 45...suggest that nappers do not interpret Stage I activity as sleep , while non-nappers do. Together with the results suggest- ing that nappers and non...Bette J. Newill, Deborah E. Seeley, and especially Cynthia Bendon who served as one of the scorers of the sleep staging , as well as Robert Hufgard who

  18. Flight Attendant Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Rosenblatt, L.S., Hether- ington, N.W., Higgins, E.A., & DeRoshia, C.W. (1975). Quantitation of desynchronosis. Chrono- biologia , 2, 197-204. A1- 1 ...Page 1 . Report No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. DOT/FAA/AM-07/21 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date...July 2007 Flight Attendant Fatigue 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No. Nesthus T, 1

  19. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  20. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    assisted fat iue Crack grouth in lo~t-r stri-ngth steels, although little informat ion is available regarding this possibility. *Materials Physics and...structure’s resistance to fatigue cracking under specified service conditions. This means that the economic life- time, Including all inspections...and now approaching our common problems. For examples, (a) Economical and reliable analysis of K values (stress intensity factors). (b) Fracture

  1. Helicopter Fatigue Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    de nouveaux materiaux ou technologies accentue I’importance que presente pour les forces de I’O.T.A.N. ce probleme de la maitrise des phenomenes de...fatigue interessant les helicopteres. La commission Structures et Materiaux de I’AGARD a ete conduite a proposer et developper une serie de reflexions...service life for the suspension components due to their vulnerabihty to darnage at high speeds. Spectrum No. 2 led to limitations being applied to

  2. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    2024 Aluminum 271 Alloy Sheet Tested at Several Stress Ratios - A. ANDRADE AND M. FREITAS 𔃼he Effect of Microstructure on the Surface 281 Crack Length...in a Powder Metallurgy Superalloy at Room and at High Temperature - F. SONIAK AND L. REMY Propagation of Small Fatigue Cracks in 2024 -T3 361 Aluminum ...strength aluminum alloys 2124 and 7150 (13,18) in Fig. 3 for the T-L orientation. Despite having 30% higher strength, growth rates in the aluminum

  3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  4. Fatigue and its correlates in cancer patients who had returned to work--a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Taskila, T; de Boer, A G E M; van Dijk, F J H; Verbeek, J H A M

    2011-11-01

    Fatigue and other symptoms in cancer patients often interfere with social and occupational activities. Only a few studies, however, have examined relationship between fatigue and work-related outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate which disease-related factors (treatment, diagnosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression, pain, and sleep disturbance) and work-related factors (work-load, work pressure, relationship to supervisor and colleagues, size of the company, and workplace accommodations) were related to fatigue in employed cancer survivors. Data was collected by questionnaire at 6 months (baseline) and 18 months (end of the follow-up) after cancer diagnosis from 135 people with different types of cancer who had returned to work at follow-up. Fatigue was measured with a four-item sub-scale of MFI. Scores ranged from 4 to 20, with higher scores indicating more fatigue. The mean rate of general fatigue was 11.9 at baseline decreasing to 10.4 at the end of the follow-up (p<0.0001). At 6 months, higher work pressure (p = 0.02), physical workload (p<0.05) and less workplace accommodations (p = 0.03) were related to higher levels of fatigue. From disease-related factors, depression was associated with fatigue (p<0.0001) at baseline. Lack of workplace accommodations was the only factor affecting higher levels of fatigue at 18 months (p<0.001) and was also related to higher levels of depression at 6 months (p = 0.02) and at 18 months (p<0.001). Lack of workplace accommodations was significantly related to fatigue at the end of the follow-up, which suggests that accommodations for illness can help to reduce fatigue and depression. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Burden of Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Balon, Richard

    2017-01-02

    Similar to the burden of other diseases, the burden of sexual dysfunction has not been systematically studied. However, there is growing evidence of various burdens (e.g., economic, symptomatic, humanistic) among patients suffering from sexual dysfunctions. The burden of sexual dysfunction has been studied a bit more often in men, namely the burden of erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE) and testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Erectile dysfunction is frequently associated with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression. These conditions could go undiagnosed, and ED could be a marker of those diseases. The only available report from the United Kingdom estimated the total economic burden of ED at £53 million annually in terms of direct costs and lost productivity. The burden of PE includes significant psychological distress: anxiety, depression, lack of sexual confidence, poor self-esteem, impaired quality of life, and interpersonal difficulties. Some suggest that increase in female sexual dysfunction is associated with partner's PE, in addition to significant interpersonal difficulties. The burden of TDS includes depression, sexual dysfunction, mild cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. One UK estimate of the economic burden of female sexual dysfunctions demonstrated that the average cost per patient was higher than the per annum cost of ED. There are no data on burden of paraphilic disorders. The burden of sexual dysfunctions is underappreciated and not well studied, yet it is significant for both the patients and the society.

  6. Fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Górski, Witold; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Most commonly it results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas in intrathoracic lymph nodes and lung parenchyma, but the clinical course and picture may be complicated by extrapulmonary involvement and many non-respiratory signs and symptoms which are directly related to the disease. In addition, sarcoidosis patients may suffer from a plethora of symptoms of uncertain or unknown origin. Fatigue is one of these symptoms, and according to some authors it is reported by the majority of patients with active sarcoidosis, but also by a smaller proportion of patients with inactive sarcoidosis, or even with complete clinical and radiological remission. Therefore the term fatigue syndrome is frequently used to name this clinical problem. The definition of fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis is imprecise and the syndrome is usually recognized by use of validated questionnaires. In this review the uptodate knowledge in this field was presented and different challenges connected with this syndrome were described.

  7. Hysteresis and fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Erber, T. ); Guralnick, S.A.; Michels, S.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Energy dissipation associated with damage of materials is irreversible and loading cycles are accompanied by the evolution of heat. The relation between energy dissipation and loading therefore exhibits a memory dependence or hysteresis. Conversely, sustained hysteresis is a necessary condition for fatigue and is related to the rate of damage accumulation. Standards for estimating fatigue life are partially based on the Manson-Coffin relations between the width of stress strain hysteresis loops and the number of loading cycles required to produce failure in test pieces. In the present study, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that this relation can be extended into a simple phenomenological description of fatigue that directly links total hysteresis energy dissipation, the cumulation of material damage, and the average number of loading cycles leading to failure. Analogies between the incremental collapse of structures and the inception and organization of damage in materials are used to aid understanding of the detailed features of hysteresis. Scanning tunneling microscope measurements of the threshold of mechanical irreversibility and acoustic emission patterns are used to detect the evolution of hysteresis at the microscopic level. 61 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  9. Compassion fatigue: a nurse's primer.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Barbara; Eyre, Caryl

    2011-01-31

    Most nurses enter the field of nursing with the intent to help others and provide empathetic care for patients with critical physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs. Empathic and caring nurses, however, can become victims of the continuing stress of meeting the often overwhelming needs of patients and their families, resulting in compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue affects not only the nurse in terms of job satisfaction and emotional and physical health, but also the workplace environment by decreasing productivity and increasing turnover. We begin this article with a case study of a reactive nurse who did not seek help for her continuing stress. This is followed by a review of Watson's theoretical perspective related to compassion fatigue. Next we delineate symptoms of, and describe interventions for addressing compassion fatigue. We conclude by presenting a case study of a proactive nurse who avoided developing compassion fatigue and a discussion of future research needed to better prevent and ameliorate compassion fatigue.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  11. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  12. Chronic fatigue syndrome and the treatment process.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue is a common complaint in general practice and is often associated with psychiatric and psychosocial problems and demoralization. Although the Centers for Disease Control definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) excludes pre-existing psychiatric illness, common psychosocial problems short of a clinical disorder (such as irritability, difficulty in thinking, inability to concentrate, depression and sleep disturbance) overlap with the criteria for CFS. Psychological states can affect the course of CFS or become confused in the patient's and doctor's mind with the course of infection. The core dilemma in practice is how aggressively to pursue a possible basis for CFS when it persists in the absence of an identifiable external cause. Possibilities for exploration are numerous and potentially expensive. In practice, the persistence of doctors depends on the patient's illness behaviour, on financial and organizational factors, and on the culture of medical care and practice styles. It is essential to differentiate the appropriate management of CFS from scientific study where intensive investigation may be warranted. In practice doctors should proceed in a manner that conveys concern, supports function, and avoids dysfunctional illness behaviour and inadvertent legitimization and reinforcement of disability.

  13. Translating Fatigue to Human Performance.

    PubMed

    Enoka, Roger M; Duchateau, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    Despite flourishing interest in the topic of fatigue-as indicated by the many presentations on fatigue at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine-surprisingly little is known about its effect on human performance. There are two main reasons for this dilemma: 1) the inability of current terminology to accommodate the scope of the conditions ascribed to fatigue, and 2) a paucity of validated experimental models. In contrast to current practice, a case is made for a unified definition of fatigue to facilitate its management in health and disease. On the basis of the classic two-domain concept of Mosso, fatigue is defined as a disabling symptom in which physical and cognitive function is limited by interactions between performance fatigability and perceived fatigability. As a symptom, fatigue can only be measured by self-report, quantified as either a trait characteristic or a state variable. One consequence of such a definition is that the word fatigue should not be preceded by an adjective (e.g., central, mental, muscle, peripheral, and supraspinal) to suggest the locus of the changes responsible for an observed level of fatigue. Rather, mechanistic studies should be performed with validated experimental models to identify the changes responsible for the reported fatigue. As indicated by three examples (walking endurance in old adults, time trials by endurance athletes, and fatigue in persons with multiple sclerosis) discussed in the review, however, it has proven challenging to develop valid experimental models of fatigue. The proposed framework provides a foundation to address the many gaps in knowledge of how laboratory measures of fatigue and fatigability affect real-world performance.

  14. Gear Fatigue Diagnostics and Prognostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    one for single gear tooth fatigue, and one for gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ) we have been collecting crack initiation and crack propagation...fatigue tester ); and torque, angular speed, vibration, temperature, and crack-propagation (gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ). The main outcome...Description The test consists of two set of tests on a dynamometer and one set of test on the fatigue tester and some additional activities. Fig

  15. Fatigue Performance under Multiaxial Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    pp. 204-208. 3-40.Feltner, C. and J. Morrow, " Microplastic Strain Hysteresis Energy as a Criterion for Fatigue Fracture", Journal of Basic Engineering...34 Symposium on Structural Fatigue in Aircraft, ASTM STP No. 404, Fifth Pacific Area Meeting Papers, pp. 176-189, November 1966. Ronay, M., "Conditions of...J. Morrow, " Microplastic Strain Hysteresis Energy as a Criterion for Fatigue Fracture," Journal of Basic Engineering, ASME, Vol. 83D, March 1961, pp

  16. Fatigue Testing of Vampire Wings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    AD-AOA9 402 AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA) F/G 1/3 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS.(U) JUN 79 R A BRUTON. C A PATCHING...378 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS by R. A. BRUTON and C. A. PATCHING ~- u-~ .~ ~ EL m! s REPORT Approved for Public Release - C- C> LSJ.1...RESEARCH LABORATORIES S TR U C T ~ ~ ~ - 7 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS by R. A. RUTON &W C. A. /PATCHING .i2 j >1 SUMMARY k < ,/ /.. The fatigue

  17. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  18. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Fatigue Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Singher, L.; Notea, A.

    2004-02-01

    Despite the fact that most engineers and designers are aware of fatigue, many severe breakdowns of industrial plant and machinery still occur due to fatigue. In effect, it's been estimated that fatigue causes at least 80% of the failures in modern engineering components. From an operational point of view, the detection of fatigue damage, preferably at a very early stage, is a critically important consideration in order to prevent possible catastrophic equipment failure and associated losses. This paper describes the investigation involving the use of ultrasonic waves as a potential tool for early detection of fatigue damage. The parameters investigated were the ultrasonic wave velocities (longitudinal and transverse waves) and attenuation coefficient before fatigue damage and after progressive stages of fatigue. Although comparatively small uncertainties were observed, the feasibility of utilizing the velocity of ultrasonic waves as a fatigue monitor was barely substantiated within actual research conditions. However, careful measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation parameter had demonstrated its potential to provide an early assessment of damage during fatigue.

  19. Determinants of fatigue and stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatigue can be triggered by previous perceived stress which may lead to impairment of performance and function. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and perceived stress. Method Health determinants including sociodemographic factors for associations between fatigue and perceived stress in the general population (N = 2,483) are outlined. Fatigue and stress were assessed with the Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). Results Within the general population, 25.9% of male and 34.5% of female respondents reported moderate fatigue during the last six months; 9.7% of subjects reported substantial fatigue lasting six months or longer. An adjusted regression analysis (R2corr = .28, p < .001) showed that fatigue is highest associated with perceived stress and self-perceived health status. The following factors were correlated with increased rates of fatigue and perceived stress: female gender, divorce/separation, low social class and poor health status. Conclusion We conclude that the two conditions overlap most in terms of socio-economic status and self-perceived health status. PMID:21774803

  20. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking.

  1. Gene Expression in Response to Exercise in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Keech, Andrew; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Barry, Benjamin K.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signaling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterized sample of patients with CFS (N = 10) and healthy matched control participants (N = 12) were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 h after 25 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise. Leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune, and neurotransmission genes was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS reported substantial fatigue, functional impairment, and poor sleep at baseline (all p < 0.02), and exercise immediately induced worsened patients' fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.17). There were no significant changes in gene expression after exercise and patients did not differ from control participants at any time point. Higher levels of expression of ficolin (FCN1) and a purinergic receptor (P2RX4) in patients with CFS were found when all time points were combined. Patients with CFS did not show significant exercise-induced changes in leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes despite a prominent exacerbation of fatigue. PMID:27713703

  2. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases.

  3. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  4. Erectile dysfunction: management update

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Luke; Brock, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    DRAMATIC ADVANCES IN THE MANAGEMENT of erectile dysfunction have occurred over the past decade. Oral therapy with vasoactive agents has emerged as first-line treatment and has transformed both the manner in which the public views erectile dysfunction and the way health care providers deliver care. Whereas an extensive investigation was previously common in the management of erectile dysfunction, recent treatment guidelines promote a more minimalist, goal-oriented approach. In this article, we review the physiology of erection, and the pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management of erectile dysfunction. We also present the existing evidence for the efficacy of 3 phosphodiesterase inhibitors, the most widely used class of agents for erectile dysfunction. PMID:15111479

  5. Corrosion Fatigue of Metals in Marine Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    AISI 304L and 316L in seawater using smooth cantilever beam specimens rotating at 1450 rpm (24.2 Hz). They defined a corrosion -fatigue strength (CFS...Procedures in Corrosion -Fatigue Testing 3 Fatigue-Life Studies 3 Fatigue-Crack-Growth Studies 9 Environmental Control 10 Phenomena and Mechanisms of... Corrosion Fatigue in Aqueous Environments 15 Mechanical Variables 15 Metallurgical Variables 15 Environmental Variables 16 Fatigue-Crack

  6. Bithermal fatigue: A simplified alternative to thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A bithermal fatigue test technique was proposed as a simplified alternative to the thermomechanical fatigue test. Both the thermomechanical cycle and the bithermal technique can be used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior. The difference between the two cycles is that in a conventional thermomechanical fatigue cycle the temperature is continuously varied concurrently with the applied mechanical strains, but in the bithermal fatigue cycle the specimen is held at zero load during the temperature excursions and all the loads are applied at the two extreme temperatures of the cycle. Experimentally, the bithermal fatigue test technique offers advantages such as ease in synchronizing the temperature and mechanical strain waveforms, in minimizing temperature gradients in the specimen gauge length, and in reducing and interpreting thermal fatigue such as the influence of alternate high and low temperatures on the cyclic stress-strain response characteristics, the effects of thermal state, and the possibility of introducing high- and low-temperature deformation mechanisms within the same cycle. The bithermal technique was used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior of alloys such as single-crystal PWA 1480, single-crystal Rene N4, cast B1900+Hf, and wrought Haynes 188.

  7. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  8. Effect of supplement with lactic-acid producing bacteria on fatigue and physical activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Asa; Nord, Carl E; Evengård, Birgitta

    2009-01-26

    Disturbances in intestinal microbial ecology and in the immune system of the host have been implicated as a part of the pathogenesis in chronic fatigue syndrome. Probiotic lactic acid producing bacteria have been shown to prevent and alleviate gastrointestinal disturbances and to normalize the cytokine profile which might be of an advantage for patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFB 1748 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 on fatigue and physical activity in CFS patients. Fifteen patients fulfilling the criteria set by international researchers in the field at the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in 1994 for chronic fatigue syndrome, were included in the study. The patients had high fatigue severity scores and high disability scores. During the first two weeks baseline observations without treatment were assessed, succeeded by four weeks of intake of a probiotic product and a four-week follow-up period. The fatigue, health and physical activity was assessed by the use of the Visual Analogue Scales and the SF-12 Health Survey. Faecal samples were collected and the normal microflora was analysed. Neurocognitive functions improved during the study period while there were no significant changes in fatigue and physical activity scores. No major changes occurred in the gastrointestinal microflora. At the end of the study 6 of 15 patients reported that they had improved according to the assessment described. The findings in this study that improvement of health is possible to achieve should encourage further studies with interventions with probiotics in patients with CFS.

  9. Factors Associated with Intern Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Vidyarthi, Arpana R.; Baron, Robert B.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Prior data suggest that fatigue adversely affects patient safety and resident well-being. ACGME duty hour limitations were intended, in part, to reduce resident fatigue, but the factors that affect intern fatigue are unknown. OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with intern fatigue following implementation of duty hour limitations. DESIGN Cross-sectional confidential survey of validated questions related to fatigue, sleep, and stress, as well as author-developed teamwork questions. SUBJECTS Interns in cognitive specialties at the University of California, San Francisco. MEASUREMENTS Univariate statistics characterized the distribution of responses. Pearson correlations elucidated bivariate relationships between fatigue and other variables. Multivariate linear regression models identified factors independently associated with fatigue, sleep, and stress. RESULTS Of 111 eligible interns, 66 responded (59%). In a regression analysis including gender, hours worked in the previous week, sleep quality, perceived stress, and teamwork, only poorer quality of sleep and greater perceived stress were significantly associated with fatigue (p < 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively). To identify factors that may affect sleep, specifically duty hours and stress, a secondary model was constructed. Only greater perceived stress was significantly associated with diminished sleep quality (p = 0.04), and only poorer teamwork was significantly associated with perceived stress (p < 0.001). Working >80 h was not significantly associated with perceived stress, quality of sleep, or fatigue. CONCLUSIONS Simply decreasing the number of duty hours may be insufficient to reduce intern fatigue. Residency programs may need to incorporate programmatic changes to reduce stress, improve sleep quality, and foster teamwork in order to decrease intern fatigue and its deleterious consequences. PMID:18807096

  10. Factors associated with intern fatigue.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lindsay D; Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Baron, Robert B; Katz, Patricia P

    2008-12-01

    Prior data suggest that fatigue adversely affects patient safety and resident well-being. ACGME duty hour limitations were intended, in part, to reduce resident fatigue, but the factors that affect intern fatigue are unknown. To identify factors associated with intern fatigue following implementation of duty hour limitations. Cross-sectional confidential survey of validated questions related to fatigue, sleep, and stress, as well as author-developed teamwork questions. Interns in cognitive specialties at the University of California, San Francisco. Univariate statistics characterized the distribution of responses. Pearson correlations elucidated bivariate relationships between fatigue and other variables. Multivariate linear regression models identified factors independently associated with fatigue, sleep, and stress. Of 111 eligible interns, 66 responded (59%). In a regression analysis including gender, hours worked in the previous week, sleep quality, perceived stress, and teamwork, only poorer quality of sleep and greater perceived stress were significantly associated with fatigue (p < 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively). To identify factors that may affect sleep, specifically duty hours and stress, a secondary model was constructed. Only greater perceived stress was significantly associated with diminished sleep quality (p = 0.04), and only poorer teamwork was significantly associated with perceived stress (p < 0.001). Working >80 h was not significantly associated with perceived stress, quality of sleep, or fatigue. Simply decreasing the number of duty hours may be insufficient to reduce intern fatigue. Residency programs may need to incorporate programmatic changes to reduce stress, improve sleep quality, and foster teamwork in order to decrease intern fatigue and its deleterious consequences.

  11. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: A new disorder?

    PubMed

    de Korwin, J-D; Chiche, L; Banovic, I; Ghali, A; Delliaux, S; Authier, F-J; Cozon, G; Hatron, P-Y; Fornasieri, I; Morinet, F

    2016-12-01

    More than 30 years after its individualization, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains a debilitating condition for the patient and a confusing one to the physicians, both because of diagnostic difficulties and poorly codified management. Despite the numerous work carried out, its pathophysiology remains unclear, but a multifactorial origin is suggested with triggering (infections) and maintenance (psychological) factors as well as the persistence of inflammatory (low grade inflammation, microglial activation…), immunologic (decrease of NK cells, abnormal cytokine production, reactivity to a variety of allergens, role of estrogens…) and muscular (mitochondrial dysfunction and failure of bioenergetic performance) abnormalities at the origin of multiple dysfunctions (endocrine, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, digestive…). The complexity of the problem and the sometimes contradictory results of available studies performed so far are at the origin of different pathophysiological and diagnostic concepts. Based on a rigorous analysis of scientific data, the new American concept of Systemic Disease Exertion Intolerance proposed in 2015 simplifies the diagnostic approach and breaks with the past and terminologies (CFS and myalgic encephalomyelitis). It is still too early to distinguish a new disease, but this initiative is a strong signal to intensify the recognition and management of patients with CFS and stimulate research. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Fatigue and fracture: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview of the status of the fatigue and fracture programs is given. The programs involve the development of appropriate analytic material behavior models for cyclic stress-strain-temperature-time/cyclic crack initiation, and cyclic crack propagation. The underlying thrust of these programs is the development and verification of workable engineering methods for the calculation, in advance of service, of the local cyclic stress-strain response at the critical life governing location in hot section compounds, and the resultant crack initiation and crack growth lifetimes.

  13. Social loafing under fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema-van Orden, C Y; Gaillard, A W; Buunk, B P

    1998-11-01

    In 2 experiments, 64 male students worked almost continuously for 20 hr without sleep under varying social conditions. In Experiment 1, participants worked either individually or as a group. As hypothesized, performance deteriorated over time, especially in the group condition, which allowed participants to loaf. In Experiment 2, all participants worked in groups. They were instructed that public feedback would be provided either on the group result only or on the individual results of all group members. As expected, when individual results were made public, performance deteriorated less. Overall, the data suggest that fatigue increases social loafing. However, both individualizing the task and providing public individual feedback seem to counteract these effects.

  14. Exercise and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ament, Wim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise affects the equilibrium of the internal environment. During exercise the contracting muscles generate force or power and heat. So physical exercise is in fact a form of mechanical energy. This generated energy will deplete the energy stocks within the body. During exercise, metabolites and heat are generated, which affect the steady state of the internal environment. Depending on the form of exercise, sooner or later sensations of fatigue and exhaustion will occur. The physiological role of these sensations is protection of the exercising subject from the deleterious effects of exercise. Because of these sensations the subject will adapt his or her exercise strategy. The relationship between physical exercise and fatigue has been the scope of interest of many researchers for more than a century and is very complex. The exercise intensity, exercise endurance time and type of exercise are all variables that cause different effects within the body systems, which in turn create different types of sensation within the subject's mind during the exercise. Physical exercise affects the biochemical equilibrium within the exercising muscle cells. Among others, inorganic phosphate, protons, lactate and free Mg2+ accumulate within these cells. They directly affect the mechanical machinery of the muscle cell. Furthermore, they negatively affect the different muscle cell organelles that are involved in the transmission of neuronal signals. The muscle metabolites produced and the generated heat of muscle contraction are released into the internal environment, putting stress on its steady state. The tremendous increase in muscle metabolism compared with rest conditions induces an immense increase in muscle blood supply, causing an increase in the blood circulatory system and gas exchange. Nutrients have to be supplied to the exercising muscle, emptying the energy stocks elsewhere in body. Furthermore, the contracting muscle fibres release cytokines, which in

  15. Helicopter Fatigue Life Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    L’exp6rimentation que nous venons de d.6crire serait t~rop on6reuse si elle 6tait r~alia~e en totali- t6 swrpiaces appareils , aussi l𔄀quation de la courbe S/N tat...ondommageant sur la structure. La r6p6tition de ce spectre sera effectude un nombre de fois suffisant pour couvrir la vie maximale d’un appareil ...Gazelle et qui a 6t4 utilis6 pour l’essai de fatigue a 6t6 6tabli A partir des observa- tions effectu~es sur trois appareil -. militaires choisis pour

  16. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  17. Cardiovascular Implications of Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Cardiovascular Implications of Erectile Dysfunction Bryan G. Schwartz , Robert A. Kloner Download PDF ... if you think you have ED. What Is Erectile Dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction means that a man is not ...

  18. [Compassion fatigue: a concept analysis].

    PubMed

    Fu, Chia-Yun; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2011-04-01

    Compassion fatigue is a relatively new term in nursing. This term describes mood swings experienced by healthcare providers that are both complex in origin and intensify over time due to cumulative stress. Quality of care can be affected if compassion fatigue goes untreated. This paper presents a concept analysis of compassion fatigue using Walker & Avant's method. Results show the defining attributes of compassion fatigue to include: 1. accumulated patient and family suffering; 2. sufferer unable to release built-up stresses effectively; and 3. negative effects on physical, psychological, and spiritual health. Identified antecedents of compassion fatigue included: (1) working as a healthcare provider; (2) investing sympathy in others over a long period of time; and (3) ignoring stress symptoms and personal emotional needs over time. Identified consequences of compassion fatigue included: (1) decreased coping ability; (2) damage / destruction of patient relationship; and (3) increased medical care costs. This study conducted a concept analysis to offer a better understanding of the concept of compassion fatigue and provide a reference for nursing practice and compassion fatigue-related nursing research.

  19. Understanding compassion fatigue: understanding compassion.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Kathleen

    2015-09-01

    A discussion of how the construct of compassion fatigue is understood in nursing. Compassion fatigue is a topic commonly found in nursing literature. Discussion paper. The literature from 1992-2012 on compassion fatigue was examined. The literature from 1998-2012 on compassion was examined. There are multiple and diverse understandings and definitions of what compassion fatigue is. So much so, there are equally multiple, diverse and conflicting strategies to mitigate it. To understand better what compassion fatigue is, an examination of what compassion is was undertaken. Much is written that nurses are, or should be compassionate. Compassion is an archetype of nursing. However, there is little in the nursing literature defining what compassion is. Literature on compassion outside of nursing was then examined. There is a growing body of theory and research about compassion in other disciplines. None of the multiple definitions of nurse compassion fatigue match this understanding of compassion. The tools most often used to measure nurse compassion fatigue do not appear to measure the construct of compassion. To understand what nurse compassion fatigue is, we must first understand what nurse compassion is. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Improving turbine blade fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buddenbohm, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Turbine airfoil design, materials, and cooling system management are variables which, when optimized, can contribute to longer turbine component lives. These advancements have been identified as redesign techniques to improve the turbine fatigue life of the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. This paper discusses the general program approach toward improving turbine fatigue life.

  1. Caffeine to Sustain Operational Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    It Caffeine is the most widely used psychostimulant and provided data about the most commonly used may be useful in operational fatigue-coping...palpitation, psychomotor agitation. Caffeine candy 05 withdrawal may cause headache, fatigue, anxiety, soda 04 insomnia, nausea, performance impainnents. snuff

  2. Fatigue failure in polysilicon not due to simple stress corrosion cracking.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H; Ballarini, R; Bellante, J J; Heuer, A H

    2002-11-08

    In the absence of a corrosive environment, brittle materials such as silicon should be immune to cyclic fatigue. However, fatigue effects are well known in micrometer-sized polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) samples tested in air. To investigate the origins of this phenomenon in polysilicon, we developed a fixed-grip fracture mechanics microspecimen but could find no evidence of static stress corrosion cracking. The environmental sensitivity of the fatigue resistance was also investigated under cyclic loading. For low-cycle fatigue, the behavior is independent of the ambient conditions, whether air or vacuum, but is strongly influenced by the ratio of compressive to tensile stresses experienced during each cycle. The fatigue damage most likely originates from contact stresses at processing-related surface asperities; subcritical crack growth then ensues during further cyclic loading. The lower far-field stresses involved in high-cycle fatigue induce reduced levels of fatigue damage. Under these conditions, a corrosive ambient such as laboratory air exacerbates the fatigue process. Without cyclic loading, polysilicon does not undergo stress corrosion cracking.

  3. Sympathetic nervous system dysfunction in multiple sclerosis, linking neurodegeneration to a reduced response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara

    2012-01-01

    A lower than normal function of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been identified early in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been shown to play a role in the pathology of the disease. In addition, the chronic use of many drugs commonly used by MS patients could further downregulate SNS by interfering with norepinephrine (NE) synthesis/release and/or interfering with the function of the adrenergic receptors in both the brain and in the periphery. This drug-induced downregulation of SNS activity, when imposed on a background of SNS dysfunction, could not only promote immune inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes, but also can lead to a reduced clinical response to immunomodulaory therapies. Furthermore, low SNS activity could contribute to a higher prevalence of disorders such as depression, fatigue and osteoporosis, which has been observed in MS patients. An algorithm could be constructed based on the combination of baseline NE plasma levels and SNS response levels to a β-adrenergic agonist stimulus. This algorithm, corrected for age and gender, would have the potential to identify MS patients who have a reduced response to immunomodulatory therapies.

  4. Creatine Supplementation and Doxorubicin-Induced Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction: An Ex Vivo Investigation.

    PubMed

    Bredahl, Eric C; Hydock, David S

    2017-01-01

    Supplementing the diet with creatine (Cr) to manage chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue has potential, but little has been done exploring it as an intervention. This study examined the effects of Cr on skeletal muscle dysfunction induced by the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (Dox). Soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) from male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained in an organ bath were incubated in Krebs-Henseleit (KH) buffer with or without creatine monohydrate (25 mM) for 30 min. Skeletal muscle was then incubated in KH buffer with or without Dox (24 μM) for an additional 30 min. Baths were then refreshed with KH buffer, and a 100-s fatigue protocol was administered. At baseline (0 s time point), no significant differences in force production were observed in the slow, type I soleus, but the Dox-treated soleus fatigued quicker than the non-Dox-treated soleus; however, pretreatment with Cr extended the time to fatigue in the Dox-treated soleus. In the fast, type II EDL, Dox treatment decreased force production at baseline and increased fatigue, and Cr treatment prior to Dox attenuated this dysfunction. Creatine pretreatment mitigated Dox-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction ex vivo suggesting that Cr may play a role in managing Dox-induced skeletal muscle side effects.

  5. The representation of inflammatory signals in the brain - a model for subjective fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hanken, Katrin; Eling, Paul; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, fatigue is rated as one of the most common and disabling symptoms. However, the pathophysiology underlying this fatigue is not yet clear. Several lines of evidence suggest that immunological factors, such as elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, may contribute to subjective fatigue in MS patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines represent primary mediators of immune-to-brain-communication, modulating changes in the neurophysiology of the central nervous system. Recently, we proposed a model arguing that fatigue in MS patients is a subjective feeling, which is related to inflammation. Moreover, it implies that fatigue can be measured behaviorally only by applying specific cognitive tasks related to alertness and vigilance. In the present review, we focus on the subjective feeling of MS-related fatigue. We examine the hypothesis that the subjective feeling of MS-related fatigue may be a variant of inflammation-induced sickness behavior, resulting from cytokine-mediated activity changes within brain areas involved in interoception and homeostasis including the insula, the anterior cingulate, and the hypothalamus. We first present studies demonstrating a relationship between pro-inflammatory cytokines and subjective fatigue in healthy individuals, in people with inflammatory disorders, and particularly in MS patients. Subsequently, we discuss studies analyzing the impact of anti-inflammatory treatment on fatigue. In the next part of this review, we present studies on the transmission and neural representation of inflammatory signals, with a special focus on possible neural concomitants of inflammation-induced fatigue. We also present two of our studies on the relationship between local gray and white matter atrophy and fatigue in MS patients. Finally, we discuss some implications of our findings and future perspectives.

  6. Roughness Effects on Fretting Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tongyan; Abdel Wahab, Magd

    2017-05-01

    Fretting is a small oscillatory relative motion between two normal loaded contact surfaces. It may cause fretting fatigue, fretting wear and/or fretting corrosion damage depending on various fretting couples and working conditions. Fretting fatigue usually occurs at partial slip condition, and results in catastrophic failure at the stress levels below the fatigue limit of the material. Many parameters may affect fretting behaviour, including the applied normal load and displacement, material properties, roughness of the contact surfaces, frequency, etc. Since fretting damage is undesirable due to contacting, the effect of rough contact surfaces on fretting damage has been studied by many researchers. Experimental method on this topic is usually focusing on rough surface effects by finishing treatment and random rough surface effects in order to increase fretting fatigue life. However, most of numerical models on roughness are based on random surface. This paper reviewed both experimental and numerical methodology on the rough surface effects on fretting fatigue.

  7. Fatigue monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1995-04-01

    This paper summarizes fatigue monitoring methods and surveys their application in the nuclear power industry. The paper is based on a review of the technical literature. Two main reasons for fatigue monitoring are more frequent occurrence of some transients than that assumed in the fatigue design analysis and the discovery of stressors that were not included in the fatigue design analysis but may cause significant fatigue damage at some locations. One fatigue monitoring method involves use of plant operating data and procedures to update the fatigue usage. Another method involves monitoring of plant operating parameters using existing, or if needed, supplementary plant instrumentation for online computation of fatigue usage. Use of fatigue monitoring has better defined the operational transients. Most operational transients have been found less severe and fewer in numbers than anticipated in the design fatigue analysis. Use of fatigue monitoring has assisted in quantifying newly discovered stressors and has helped in detecting the presence of thermal stratification of unsuspected locations.

  8. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  9. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  10. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction in rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Colombo, Barbara Maria; Cagnati, Paola; Gulli, Rossella; Spanò, Francesca; Puppo, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Rheumatic autoimmune diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and various types of vasculopathies. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition which starts as a "response to injury" favoring endothelial dysfunction which is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, pro-thrombotic factors, oxidative stress upregulation and abnormal vascular tone modulation. Endothelial dysfunction in rheumatic autoimmune diseases involves innate immune responses, including macrophages and dendritic cells expression of scavenger and toll-like receptors for modified or native LDL as well as neutrophil and complement activation, and dysregulation of adaptive immune responses, including proliferation of autoreactive T-helper-1 lymphocytes and defective function of dendritic and regulatory T cells. Specific differences for endothelial function among different disorders include: a) increased amounts of pro-atherogenic hormones, decreased amounts of anti-atherogenic hormones and increased insulin resistance in rheumatoid arthritis; b) autoantibodies production in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome; c) smooth muscle cells proliferation, destruction of internal elastic lamina, fibrosis and coagulation and fibrinolytic system dysfunction in systemic sclerosis. Several self-antigens (i.e. high density lipoproteins, heat shock proteins, β2-glycoprotein1) and self-molecules modified by oxidative events (i.e. low density lipoproteins and oxidized hemoglobin) have been identified as targets of autoimmune responses. Endothelial dysfunction leads to accelerated atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and spondyloarthropaties whereas obliterative vasculopathy is associated with systemic sclerosis. In this paper, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis and we will summarize the similarities

  12. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccination strategies and operational plans to address immunization gaps and reach every person with lifesaving vaccines. WHO ... Assembly in 2018, 2020 and 2022 on the achievements against the GVAP goals and targets. World Immunization ...

  13. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  14. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  15. Fatigue assessment: subjective peer-to-peer fatigue scoring.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Steven J; Curry, Ian P; Bushby, Alaistair J R

    2013-10-01

    Fatigue is a complex entity with contributing factors that may include insufficient sleep, circadian dysrhythmia, high workload, extended duty periods, clinical sleep pathology, psychosocial aspects, environmental factors, and many others. It can contribute to significant performance deficits and crucial safety lapses. Despite maximal implementation of accepted techniques and best practices for mitigation strategies, the deployed military rotary-wing (RW) environment must still contend with substantial fatigue-related issues among aircrew. We introduce a novel subjective peer-to-peer fatigue rating system recently demonstrated in a deployed military RW environment. Each pilot provides an anonymous weekly fatigue rating for every other pilot in the unit exclusive of self. Median and variance of the peer ratings for each pilot are recorded by the safety officer and tracked over time. The program allows for a multidimensional external perspective on a pilot's fatigue state, relative function, and degree of coping. Scoring is predicated upon the recognition of a significant deviation from a peer's baseline that may include social and interpersonal interactions or the observation of deficits in duty performance. The research basis for scientific validity and reliability regarding current peer fatigue scoring systems is exiguous. This novel approach may be of merit, particularly among military aircrew in a deployed-type setting with sustained high workload, operational stress, and limited time for supernumerary tasks. An anonymous subjective peer-to-peer fatigue scoring system is worthy of further scientific investigation, particularly warranting studies of reliability and validity.

  16. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue of beryllium-copper spring materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, R.; Miller, G.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Fine gage, 0.006-in. d(0.15-mm) thick, beryllium-copper (Be-Cu) spring materials with tensile strength in the range of 70 to 145 ksi were subjected to cyclic loading in air and salt water environments. Plain and notched (center hole) hour glass specimens were subjected to sinusoidal loading with R = (minimum/maximum) stress = 0.1 at cyclic frequencies of 50 Hz in air and 1 Hz in salt water. Fatigue life was typically from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles with crack initiation as the dominant fatigue process. The excellence fatigue performance of Be-Cu alloys in salt water is well-known, however, current findings demonstrate 10 to 37% reduction in fatigue strength of unnotched specimens in this environment for a life of 3 x 10[sup 5] cycles. This strength degradation is attributed to the use of a lower cyclic frequency for present than for previous tests, i.e., 1 versus about 20 Hz. There was no effect of salt water on crack initiation in notched specimens. The ratios of the fatigue strengths, namely (cold-rolled/annealed) and (aged/annealed), for plain and notched specimens tested in air, decreased from 2 to about 1.4 as fatigue life increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles. This effect is attributed to cyclic hardening of the annealed material. The fatigue stress concentration factor, K[sub f] = (plain/notched) fatigue strength, increased by about 30% as fatigue cycles increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6]. The ranking of K[sub f] values of the various material conditions from highest to lowest was: cold-rolled, aged, and annealed.

  17. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure), excessive alcohol use or vaginal infections can cause sexual problems. Depression, relationship problems or abuse (current or past abuse) can also cause sexual dysfunction.You may have less sexual desire ...

  18. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Distal median nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy that affects the movement of or sensation in ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Peripheral Nerve Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read more Health ...

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  20. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Micromechanisms of Thermomechanical Fatigue-A Comparison With Isothermal Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-11

    BUREAU Of STANDARDS 1%j A A- USAAVSCOtA ~5 ~ m ~sU~aW 7~W~ . Ted~ ROMsi %-C-7 -.Micromechanisms’ of Thernomechanical Fatigue-A Comparisoni With ~~4f so...eraFatigue I RobeetC.BI PropuLsion Directe m U.S. AM Aviation Rewoar* and TechnooV Activk$AVSCOM Lewis Researoh Centr CevWland, Ohio hqearu for t n...4SUMMARY 14i Thermomechanical Fatigue (TMF) experiments were conducted on Mar- M 200, B-1900, and PWA-1480 (single crystal) over temperature ranges

  2. Development of the electrochemical fatigue sensor for evaluating fatigue damage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.F.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.Z.; DeLuccia, J.; Laird, C.

    1999-07-01

    The Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (EFS) is a device which operates by an electrochemical-mechanical interaction and which can sense the type and extent of fatigue damage both before and after crack initiation. It was initially explored through studies on soft metals. Here the authors report efforts to determine the ability of the device to read damage in hardened commercial alloys: 7075 aluminum alloy, 4130 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. They also demonstrate that the device, which uses an electrolytic medium, does not degrade the fatigue properties if care is used in electrolyte selection.

  3. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Yashika; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Depression is the most debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with significant impact on socio-occupational and well being of individual. The exact pathophysiology of depression is still enigmatic though various theories have been put forwarded. There are evidences showing that mitochondrial dysfunction in various brain regions is associated with depression. Recent findings have sparked renewed appreciation for the role of mitochondria in many intracellular processes coupled to synaptic plasticity and cellular resilience. New insights in depression pathophysiology are revolving around the impairment of neuroplasticity. Mitochondria have potential role in ATP production, intracellular Ca2+ signalling to establish membrane stability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and to execute the complex processes of neurotransmission and plasticity. So understanding the various concepts of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of depression indubitably helps to generate novel and more targeted therapeutic approaches for depression treatment. Objective The review was aimed to give a comprehensive insight on role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. Result Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the mitochondrial functions might act as potential target for the treatment of depression. Conclusion Literature cited in this review highly supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. As impairment in the mitochondrial functions lead to the generation of various insults that exaggerate the pathogenesis of depression. So, it is useful to study mitochondrial dysfunction in relation to mood disorders, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and enhancing the functions of mitochondria might show promiscuous effects in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26923778

  5. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal dysfunction causes significant morbidity in cirrhotic patients. Diagnosis is challenging because it is based on serum creatinine, which is used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate, which itself is not an ideal measure of renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Finding the exact cause of renal injury in patients with cirrhosis remains problematic due to the limitations of the current diagnostic tests. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies used to diagnose renal dysfunction in patients with renal dysfunction and review current treatments. Recent findings New diagnostic criteria and classification of renal dysfunction, especially for acute kidney injury (AKI), have been proposed in hopes of optimizing treatment and improving outcomes. New biomarkers that help to differentiate structural from functional AKI in cirrhotic patients have been developed, but require further investigation. Vasoconstrictors are the most commonly recommended treatment of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given the high mortality in patients with type 1 HRS, all patients with HRS should be evaluated for liver transplantation. When renal dysfunction is considered irreversible, combined liver–kidney transplantation is advised. Summary Development of new biomarkers to differentiate the different types of AKI in cirrhosis holds promise. Early intervention in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction offers the best hope of improving outcomes. PMID:25763790

  6. Fatigue management in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers’ fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management. PMID:26257477

  7. Fatigue management in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers' fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management.

  8. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees shall ensure that fatigue assessments are conducted under the following conditions: (1) For cause. In...

  9. Immunity in arterial hypertension: associations or causalities?

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Marcus; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies describe associations between markers of inflammation and arterial hypertension (aHT), but does that imply causality? Interventional studies that reduce blood pressure reduced also markers of inflammation, but does immunosuppression improve hypertension? Here, we review the available mechanistic data. Aberrant immunity can trigger endothelial dysfunction but is hardly ever the primary cause of aHT. Innate and adaptive immunity get involved once hypertension has caused vascular wall injury as immunity is a modifier of endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall remodelling. As vascular remodelling progresses, immunity-related mechanisms can become significant cofactors for cardiovascular (CV) disease progression; vice versa, suppressing immunity can improve hypertension and CV outcomes. Innate and adaptive immunity both contribute to vascular wall remodelling. Innate immunity is driven by danger signals that activate Toll-like receptors and other pattern-recognition receptors. Adaptive immunity is based on loss of tolerance against vascular autoantigens and includes autoreactive T-cell immunity as well as non-HLA angiotensin II type 1 receptor-activating autoantibodies. Such processes involve numerous other modulators such as regulatory T cells. Together, immunity is not causal for hypertension but rather an important secondary pathomechanism and a potential therapeutic target in hypertension. PMID:25762356

  10. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  11. Fatigue, Creep-Fatigue, and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Testing of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; McGaw, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation resistance of an alloy is determined by conducting a series of tests over a range of values of stress amplitude or strain range. The observed number of cycles to failure is plotted against the stress amplitude or strain range to obtain a fatigue curve. The fatigue properties quoted for an alloy are typically the constants used in the equation(s) that describe the fatigue curve. Fatigue lives of interest may be as low as 10(exp 2) or higher than 10(exp 9) cycles. Because of the enormous scatter associated with fatigue, dozens of tests may be needed to confidently establish a fatigue curve, and the cost may run into several thousands of dollars. To further establish the effects on fatigue life of the test temperature, environment, alloy condition, mean stress effects, creep-fatigue effects, thermomechanical cycling, etc. requires an extraordinarily large and usually very costly test matrix. The total effort required to establish the fatigue resistance of an alloy should not be taken lightly. Fatigue crack initiation tests are conducted on relatively small and presumed to be initially crack-free, samples of an alloy that are intended to be representative of the alloy's metallurgical and physical condition. Generally, samples are smooth and have uniformly polished surfaces within the test section. Some may have intentionally machined notches of well-controlled geometry, but the surface at the root of the notch is usually not polished. The purpose of polishing is to attain a reproducible surface finish. This is to eliminate surface finish as an uncontrolled variable. Representative test specimen geometries will be discussed later. Test specimens are cyclically loaded until macroscopically observable cracks initiate and eventually grow to failure. Normally, the fatigue failure life of a specimen is defined as the number of cycles to separation of the specimen into two pieces. Alternative definitions are becoming more common, particularly for

  12. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome.

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in older adults hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Giordani, Bruno J; Algase, Donna; Schuh, Amanda; Lee, Corinne; Moser, Debra K

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have measured cognitive dysfunction in older adults during acute exacerbations of heart failure (HF), even though 25% of patients are readmitted within 30 days. The aims of this study were to examine cognitive dysfunction and acute HF symptoms in older adults hospitalized for HF and to evaluate the relationship between cognitive dysfunction and 30-day rehospitalization rates for acute HF. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to characterize cognitive function in 53 older adults hospitalized for acute HF with the use of Cogstate computerized neuropsychologic tests. Demographic characteristics, HF symptoms (dyspnea, fatigue, pain, and depressed mood), comorbidity, and 30-day readmission HF rates were also measured. Dyspnea was measured with the use of the Parshall Brief Clinical Dyspnea Rating Questionnaire while fatigue was measured with the use of the Chalder et al Brief Fatigue Scale. We measured pain with the use of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and depressed mood with the use of the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Comorbid conditions were measured with the use of the Charlson comorbidity index. With the use of linear regression, dyspnea (β = -.281; P = .030), pain (β = .323; P = .011), and depressed mood (β = .406, P = .003) were associated with reduced attention and working memory speed, and pain (β = -.372; P = .005) and fatigue (β = -.275; P = .033) were associated with reduced accuracy of attention and working memory. Ten patients were readmitted within 30 days for HF. According to Mann-Whitney U analysis, cognitive dysfunction measures (P = .090-.803) failed to show differences in HF readmission. Participants with more and worse symptoms had decreased speed and decreased accuracy in the cognitive domains tested. Cognitive dysfunction measures did not differentiate participants who were readmitted versus those who were not readmitted within 30 days for acute HF

  14. Fatigue of internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumanois, P

    1924-01-01

    The above conditions enable the employment of a criterion of general fatigue which simultaneously takes account of both mechanical and thermal conditions, for the sake of comparing any projected engine with engines of the same type already in use.

  15. Coping with cancer - managing fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause fatigue. Simply having cancer can drain your energy: Some cancers release proteins called cytokines that can ... tumors can change the way your body uses energy and leave you feeling tired. Many cancer treatments ...

  16. Resolving the frustration of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Harpham, W S

    1999-01-01

    Fatigue is a ubiquitous side effect of many cancer therapies. Nevertheless, after treatment is complete, many survivors continue to feel a profound tiredness that affects almost all aspects of life. Even after recovery, patients are often frustrated by their continuing need for extra rest. In this deeply personal, first-person account, a physician relates the various ways that cancer-related fatigue can affect family dynamics, job responsibilities, social interactions, finances, and intimacy. Clinicians can help by searching for treatable medical conditions, but also by taking cancer-related fatigue, and the frustrations it causes, seriously. Patients should be reassured that the fatigue they feel is real, and that by learning personal energy conservation, they should be able to improve their abilities to function, to socialize, to interact with others, and ultimately to adjust to a "new normal" baseline.

  17. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help reduce symptoms of fatigue. acupuncture, massage, stretching, yoga, and tai chi, which have been helpful for ... that antidepressant medications can help ease the symptoms. Pain medications and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, ...

  18. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  19. Fatigue Fighters in Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Fatigue Fighters in Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Frederick Vivino, MD, FACR, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Rheumatology Associates & Sjögren’s Syndrome Center, Philadelphia, for authoring this Patient Education ...

  20. Immune reconstitution post allogeneic transplant and the impact of immune recovery on the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-11-16

    Infection is the leading cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This occurs as a result of dysfunction to the host immune system from the preparative regimen used prior to HCT, combined with a delay in reconstitution of the donor-derived immune system after HCT. In this article, we elaborate on the process of immune reconstitution post-HCT that begins with the innate system and is followed by recovery of adaptive immunity. Simultaneously, we describe how the tempo of immune reconstitution influences the risk of various infections. We explain some of the key differences in immune reconstitution and the consequent risk of infections in recipients of peripheral blood stem cell, bone marrow or umbilical cord blood grafts. Other factors that impact on immune recovery are also highlighted. Finally, we allude to various strategies that are being tested to enhance immune reconstitution post-HCT.

  1. Fatigue and the criminal law.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher B; Dorrian, Jillian; Rajaratnam, Shanthakumar M W

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue is an increasingly recognised risk factor for transportation accidents. In light of this, there is the question of whether driving whilst fatigued should be a criminal offence. This paper discusses the current legal position, including the problems of voluntary conduct and self awareness. Three models for reform are proposed. The manner in which scientific research can inform legal consideration and future directions for research are discussed.

  2. Vertical jump coordination: fatigue effects.

    PubMed

    Rodacki, André Luiz Felix; Fowler, Neil E; Bennett, Simon J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the segmental coordination of vertical jumps under fatigue of the knee extensor and flexor muscles. Eleven healthy and active subjects performed maximal vertical jumps with and without fatigue, which was imposed by requesting the subjects to extend/flex their knees continuously in a weight machine, until they could not lift a load corresponding to approximately 50% of their body weight. Knee extensor and flexor isokinetic peak torques were also measured before and after fatigue. Video, ground reaction forces, and electromyographic data were collected simultaneously and used to provide several variables of the jumps. Fatiguing the knee flexor muscles did not reduce the height of the jumps or induce changes in the kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic profiles. Knee extensor fatigue caused the subjects to adjust several variables of the movement, in which the peak joint angular velocity, peak joint net moment, and power around the knee were reduced and occurred earlier in comparison with the nonfatigued jumps. The electromyographic data analyses indicated that the countermovement jumps were performed similarly, i.e., a single strategy was used, irrespective of which muscle group (extensor or flexors) or the changes imposed on the muscle force-generating characteristics (fatigue or nonfatigue). The subjects executed the movements as if they scaled a robust template motor program, which guided the movement execution in all jump conditions. It was speculated that training programs designed to improve jump height performance should avoid severe fatigue levels, which may cause the subjects to learn and adopt a nonoptimal and nonspecific coordination solution. It was suggested that the neural input used in the fatigued condition did not constitute an optimal solution and may have played a role in decreasing maximal jump height achievement.

  3. Evaluation of anti-fatigue and immunomodulating effects of quercetin in strenuous exercise mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-qiang

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the anti-fatigue and immunomodulating effects of quercetin in strenuous exercise mice. Mice were given orally either corn oil or quercetin (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg body weight suspended in corn oil) by gavage once a day for 28 day. All mice were sacrificed after rotarod test and the major biochemical parameters were analyzed in serum and liver. The results indicated that quercetin possessed anti-fatigue effects by prolonging retention times, decreasing levels of blood lactate and serum urea nitrogen, and increasing levels of blood glucose, tissue glycogen and serum glucagon. Furthermore, quercetin could improve the immune function of fatigue mice by decreasing tumor necrosis factor-α levels, and elevated interleukin-10 levels. Quercetin possessed anti-fatigue effects may be related to its immunomodulating effects.

  4. Thermo-acoustic fatigue characterization.

    PubMed

    Meyendorf, Norbert G H; Rösner, Henrik; Kramb, Victoria; Sathish, Shamachary

    2002-05-01

    The nondestructive detection of early fatigue damage states is of high importance for safety in aircraft, automobiles, railways, nuclear energy industries and chemical industries. Titanium alloys commonly used in aerospace for structures and engine components are subject to fatigue damage during service. In the current study fatigue damage progression in a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was investigated using thermographic detection of the heat dissipated during short-term mechanical loading. The initial rate of temperature increase induced by the short-term mechanical loading was used to indicate the current microstructural state and presence of prior fatigue damage. Two methods for thermal excitation were investigated (a) high amplitude mechanical loading and (b) small amplitude ultrasonic loading. A formula that describes the temperature enhancement due to heat generation during one loading cycle is derived from high amplitude loading data. A correlation between the temperature increase during short-term ultrasonic loading and accumulated fatigue cycles is used to suggest a methodology for in-field assessment of fatigue condition.

  5. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  6. Inflammation and cancer-related fatigue: mechanisms, contributing factors, and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Bower, Julienne E; Lamkin, Donald M

    2013-03-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Guided by basic research on neuro-immune interactions, a growing body of research has examined the hypothesis that cancer-related fatigue is driven by activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine network. In this review, we examine the current state of the evidence linking inflammation and cancer-related fatigue, drawing from recent human research and from experimental animal models probing effects of cancer and cancer treatment on inflammation and fatigue. In addition, we consider two key questions that are currently driving research in this area: what are the neural mechanisms of fatigue, and what are the biological and psychological factors that influence the onset and/or persistence of inflammation and fatigue in cancer patients and survivors? Identification of the mechanisms driving cancer-related fatigue and associated risk factors will facilitate the development of targeted interventions for vulnerable patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. T-cell homeostasis in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue.

    PubMed

    Bower, Julienne E; Ganz, Patricia A; Aziz, Najib; Fahey, John L; Cole, Steve W

    2003-08-06

    Approximately 30% of women successfully treated for breast cancer suffer persistent fatigue of unknown origin. Recent studies linking inflammatory processes to central nervous system-mediated fatigue led us to examine cellular immune system status in 20 fatigued breast cancer survivors and 19 matched non-fatigued breast cancer survivors. Fatigued survivors, compared with non-fatigued survivors, had statistically significantly increased numbers of circulating T lymphocytes (mean 31% increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6% to 56%; P =.015 by two-sided analysis of variance [ANOVA]), with pronounced elevation in the numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes (mean 41% increase, 95% CI = 15% to 68%; P =.003 by two-sided ANOVA) and CD56+ effector T lymphocytes (mean 52% increase, 95% CI = 4% to 99%; P =.027 by two-sided ANOVA). These changes were independent of patient demographic and treatment characteristics. Absolute numbers of B cells, natural killer cells, granulocytes, and monocytes were not altered. The increased numbers of circulating T cells correlated with elevations in the level of serum interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (for CD3+ cells, r =.56 and P =.001; for CD3+/CD4+ cells, r =.68 and P<.001, by Spearman rank correlation). Results of this study suggest that persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors might be associated with a chronic inflammatory process involving the T-cell compartment. These results require confirmation in a larger study that is specifically designed to address this hypothesis.

  8. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  9. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  10. The effects of fatigue, depression and the level of disability on the health-related quality of life of glatiramer acetate-treated relapsing-remitting patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Fricska-Nagy, Zsanett; Füvesi, Judit; Rózsa, Csilla; Komoly, Sámuel; Jakab, Gábor; Csépány, Tünde; Jobbágy, Zita; Lencsés, Gyula; Vécsei, László; Bencsik, Krisztina

    2016-05-01

    The common symptoms of multiple sclerosis are fatigue, depression, cognitive dysfunction, pain and sexual dysfunction, which influence the health-related quality of life of the patients. We aimed to determine the correlations between the health-related quality of life, the level of disability, fatigue and depression in glatiramer acetate-treated patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. The Hungarian versions of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54, Fatigue Impact Scale and Beck Depression Inventory questionnaires were completed by 428 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with glatiramer acetate from 19 Hungarian centers. The prevalence of fatigue was found to be 62.4%. The prevalence of depression was lower (13.4%) than that described in previous studies (36-54%) among patients with multiple sclerosis. Significant differences in the health-related quality of life were found between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. The level of disability, fatigue, depression and the duration of the disease correlated significantly with the quality of life. However, linear regression analysis indicated that the quality of life was predicted by the level of disability, depression, social and cognitive fatigue, but not by physical fatigue. Decreasing the disease activity in multiple sclerosis with immunomodulatory therapy, together with improvements of the diagnostics and treatment of the accompanying depression and fatigue are of high priority to improve the health-related quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psycho social factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected prior to the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men while the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed towards optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure.

  13. Methods for the assessment of peripheral muscle fatigue and its energy and metabolic determinants in COPD.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Rafaella Rezende; Dal Corso, Simone; Simões, Alexandre; Malaguti, Carla

    2009-11-01

    It has been well established that, in addition to the pulmonary involvement, COPD has systemic consequences that can lead to peripheral muscle dysfunction, with greater muscle fatigue, lower exercise tolerance and lower survival in these patients. In view of the negative repercussions of early muscle fatigue in COPD, the objective of this review was to discuss the principal findings in the literature on the metabolic and bioenergy determinants of muscle fatigue, its functional repercussions, as well as the methods for its identification and quantification. The anatomical and functional substrate of higher muscle fatigue in COPD appears to include lower levels of high-energy phosphates, lower mitochondrial density, early lactacidemia, higher serum ammonia and reduced muscle perfusion. These alterations can be revealed by contraction failure, decreased firing rates of motor units and increased recruitment of motor units in a given activity, which can be functionally detected by a reduction in muscle strength, power and endurance. This review article also shows that various types of muscle contraction regimens and protocols have been used in order to detect muscle fatigue in this population. With this understanding, rehabilitation strategies can be developed in order to improve the resistance to muscle fatigue in this population.

  14. Agomelatine but not melatonin improves fatigue perception: a longitudinal proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Pardini, M; Cordano, C; Benassi, F; Mattei, C; Sassos, D; Guida, S; Serrati, C; Primavera, A; Amore, M; Cocito, L; Emberti Gialloreti, L

    2014-06-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) represents a disabling condition characterized by persistent mental and physical fatigue, bodily discomfort and cognitive difficulties. To date the neural bases of CFS are poorly understood; however, mono-aminergic abnormalities, sleep-wake cycle changes and prefrontal dysfunctions are all thought to play a role in the development and maintenance of this condition. Here we explored in a group of 62 CFS subjects the impact on fatigue levels of agomelatine, an antidepressant with agonist activity at melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) and antagonist activity at serotoninergic 2C receptors (5HT2C). To tease out the relative effects of MT-agonism and 5HT2C antagonism on fatigue, we compared agomelatine 50mg u.i.d. with sustained release melatonin 10mg u.i.d. in the first 12-week-long phase of the study, and then switched all melatonin-treated subjects to agomelatine in the second 12-week-long phase of the study. Agomelatine treatment, but not melatonin, was associated with a significant reduction of perceived fatigue and an increase in perceived quality of life. Moreover the switch from melatonin to agomelatine was associated with a reduction of fatigue levels. Agomelatine was well tolerated by all enrolled subjects. Our data, albeit preliminary, suggest that agomelatine treatment could represent a novel useful approach to the clinical care of subjects with CFS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Voznesensky, Maria; Annam, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  16. Fatigue in advanced cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Katherine; Walsh, Declan; Rybicki, Lisa A; Davis, Mellar P; Seyidova-Khoshknabi, Dilara

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a common advanced cancer symptom. Clinical features are not well known. The authors surveyed consecutive patients admitted to a palliative medicine program to identify clinical correlates of fatigue. Data collected included age, sex, performance status, primary site, prior chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. Visual analogue scales assessed fatigue, quality of life, and ability to perform daily activities. Weight change was estimated. Laboratory results including lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin were recorded. Fatigue severity was associated with brain metastases, poor performance status, poor quality of life, and reduced ability to perform activities. Prior radiation therapy was associated with less severe fatigue. Age, sex, and hemoglobin level were not associated with fatigue. Fatigue was universal on referral. Brain metastases and poor quality of life independently predicted severity. Hemoglobin level did not predict fatigue. Further studies are necessary to define the clinical features and relationships of fatigue.

  17. Fatigue after Stroke: The Patient's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Victoria Louise; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background. Fatigue after stroke is common and distressing to patients. Aims. Our aims were to explore patients' perceptions of post-stroke fatigue, including the causes of fatigue and the factors that alleviate fatigue, in a mixed methods study. Results. We interviewed 15 patients who had had a stroke and were inpatients on stroke rehabilitation wards. A substantial proportion of patients reported that their fatigue started at the time of their stroke. Various different factors were reported to improve fatigue, including exercise, good sleep, rehabilitation and rest. Fatigue influences patients' sense of "control" after their stroke. Conclusion. Our results are consistent with the possibility that poststroke fatigue might be triggered by factors that occur at the time of the stroke (e.g., the stroke lesion itself, or admission to hospital) and then exacerbated by poor sleep and boredom. These factors should be considered when developing complex interventions to improve post-stroke fatigue.

  18. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Increased recognition of the problem of fatigue in cancer patients can be attributed, in part, to the development of measures that have provided researchers with the tools necessary for quantifying and characterizing fatigue and exploring its etiology and treatment. Although a consensus regarding the definition of fatigue is lacking, there is general agreement that it is a subjective and multidimensional phenomenon whose assessment requires the use of self-report methods. Consistent with this view, several multidimensional measures of fatigue have been developed and validated for use with cancer patients. These measures differ considerably in their format and content and, as with the definition of fatigue, there is no consensus at the present time regarding the dimensional structure of fatigue. In addition to measuring fatigue on a continuum along one or more dimensions, it may also be possible to assess a clinical syndrome of cancer-related fatigue. Criteria for assessing fatigue in this manner have been proposed and are currently undergoing evaluation. Despite the progress that has been made, there are several important unresolved issues in the assessment of fatigue in cancer patients. These include how to distinguish fatigue from depression, how to use self-reports of fatigue in clinical decision-making, how to capture temporal changes in fatigue, and how best to address the continuing lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of fatigue.

  19. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  20. Immune mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Bauersachs, Johann; Langer, Harald F

    2017-09-11

    Elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory biomarkers in patients with both ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure (HF) correlate with disease severity and prognosis. Experimental studies have shown activation of immune response mechanisms in the heart to provoke cardiac adverse remodelling and cause left ventricular dysfunction. Consequently, most of the clinical trials targeting elements of the immune response in HF attempted to modulate the inflammatory response. Surprisingly, clinical studies targeting immune effectors were either neutral or even increased pre-specified clinical endpoints, and some studies resulted in worsening of HF. This review discusses immune mediators involved in the pathogenesis and progression of HF and potential therapeutic applications targeting inflammation in HF. Besides more obvious settings featuring immune activation such as inflammatory or ischaemic cardiomyopathy, the relevance of immune activation in acute or chronic HF of other origins, including volume overload or valvular heart disease, is highlighted. Understanding how cell-specific and molecular mechanisms of the immune response interfere with cardiac remodelling in HF may open new avenues to design biomarkers or druggable targets. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  1. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to blame for CFS: iron-poor blood ( anemia ) environmental allergies sleep disorders psychiatric or neurological problems endocrine dysfunction hypotension (low blood pressure) continue Symptoms ...

  2. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  3. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  4. Sleep complaints and fatigue of airline pilots.

    PubMed

    Reis, Cátia; Mestre, Catarina; Canhão, Helena; Gradwell, David; Paiva, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to determine daytime sleepiness and sleep complaints prevalence and the corresponding influence on perceived fatigue and to evaluate the influence of sociodemographic parameters and labour variables on sleep complaints, sleepiness and fatigue. A questionnaire was developed including socio-economic and labour issues and instruments, focused in sleep and fatigue. The response rate was 32% and the final sample had 435 pilots. The prevalence of sleep complaints was 34.9%, daytime sleepiness 59.3% and fatigue 90.6%. The high prevalence of sleep complaints, sleepiness and fatigue was disclosed in pilots, with those who fly short/medium having an added risk of fatigue.

  5. Female sexual dysfunction: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J B; Kalra, Bharti

    2016-05-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a common complex clinical condition, with multiple etiologies, association and pathophysiologic correlations. This review includes the definition, etiology, and diagnosis of FSD. It calls for a bio psychosocial approach to FSD management, which incorporates, but is not limited to, only the psychological aspects of FSD.

  6. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  7. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  8. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  9. Adipocytokines in Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Berna İmge; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines are important mediators of interorgan crosstalk in metabolic regulation. Thyroid diseases have effects on metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of these effects is not clear. Recently, there are several reports suggesting this interrelation between adipocytokines and thyroid dysfunction. In this review, we summarize this relation according to the literature. PMID:24049662

  10. Association of a deficit of arousal with fatigue in multiple sclerosis: effect of modafinil.

    PubMed

    Niepel, Graham; Bibani, Rashid H; Vilisaar, Janek; Langley, Robert W; Bradshaw, Christopher M; Szabadi, Elemer; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, leading to chronic disability. Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom of MS which is unrelated to its clinical form, stage of development, the degree of disability, or the lesion load on magnetic resonance imaging. Fatigue in MS is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and autonomic dysfunction. Recently it has been reported that the wakefulness-promoting drug modafinil may relieve fatigue in MS patients and ameliorate the associated cognitive difficulties. However, it is not clear to what extent the anti-fatigue effect of modafinil may be related to its alerting and sympathetic activating effects. We addressed this question by comparing three groups of subjects, MS patients with fatigue, MS patients without fatigue and healthy controls, matched for age and sex, on measures of alertness (self-ratings on the Epworth and Stanford Sleepiness Scales and on a battery of visual analogue scales; critical flicker fusion frequency; Pupillographic Sleepiness Test; choice reaction time) and autonomic function (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pupil diameter), and by examining the effect of a single dose (200 mg) of modafinil on these measures. MS patients with fatigue, compared with healthy controls, had reduced level of alertness on all the tests used; MS patients without fatigue did not differ from healthy controls. MS patients with fatigue had a reduced level of cardiovascular sympathetic activation compared to the other two groups. Modafinil displayed alerting and sympathomimetic effects in all three groups of subjects. As fatigue in MS is associated with reduced levels of alertness and sympathetic activity, modafinil may exert its anti-fatigue effect in MS by correcting these deficiencies. The anti-fatigue effect of modafinil may reflect the activation of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), since there is evidence that this wakefulness

  11. Fatigue and Corrosion Fatigue of Cold Drawn WE43 Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Adam J.; Schaffer, Jeremy E.

    Interest in magnesium alloys as temporary implant materials continues to grow. However, significant processing and performance gaps exist between material needs for medical devices and traditional magnesium processing technology. To help close this gap, a process to enable cold-drawn magnesium alloy wires has been developed. Cold drawing offers processing and property enhancements including strengthening through work-hardening and grain refinement. Tensile strengths exceeding 600 MPa have been achieved in WE43 wires after significant cold reduction. Understanding the mechanical fatigue performance of these wires will be critical when designing an absorbable implant. In this work, WE43 wires were drawn to a diameter of 127 microns with 90% cold work, and then either aged or annealed to effect various grain sizes. Rotary beam fatigue testing was performed on cold-drawn and thermally treated wires in both ambient air and body-temperature saline with a goal to inform the relationship between processing, environment, and fatigue performance.

  12. Leriche Syndrome Presenting as Depression with Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M S; Gautam, Priyanka; Saha, Rashmita

    2016-03-01

    Leriche syndrome results from thrombotic occlusion of the abdominal aorta immediately above the site of its bifurcation. Impotence in leriche syndrome is caused due to proximal obstruction, commonly involving isolated common iliac, internal iliac, internal pudendal or dorsalis penis artery. The symptoms of Leriche syndrome include intermittent and bilateral claudication, pallor, coldness and fatigue in lower extremities. Data regarding psychiatric morbidity in Leriche syndrome is unavailable. We hereby report the case of Leriche syndrome, presenting to psychiatry outpatient department with depressive disorder and erectile dysfunction (ED) with focus on dilemmas faced in the diagnosis and management in psychiatry.

  13. Fatigue as it Affects Nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.In this month's article from the January 1935 issue, Lillian M. Gilbreth, a highly respected psychologist and industrial engineer, examines the problem of fatigue in nursing. A nonnurse expert, Gilbreth notes the negative effects of fatigue on skills, a problem "enormously more serious when the product of the work is human comfort and sometimes even human life, as it often is with the work of the nurse." In their article in this issue, "Health Care Worker Fatigue," Lea Anne Gardner and Deborah Dubeck of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority share examples of fatigue-related adverse events and discuss the need for both personal and institutional fatigue risk management strategies.

  14. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  15. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes.

  16. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  17. DNA methylation modifications associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Vega, Wilfred C; Vernon, Suzanne D; McGowan, Patrick O

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis, is a complex multifactorial disease that is characterized by the persistent presence of fatigue and other particular symptoms for a minimum of 6 months. Symptoms fail to dissipate after sufficient rest and have major effects on the daily functioning of CFS sufferers. CFS is a multi-system disease with a heterogeneous patient population showing a wide variety of functional disabilities and its biological basis remains poorly understood. Stable alterations in gene function in the immune system have been reported in several studies of CFS. Epigenetic modifications have been implicated in long-term effects on gene function, however, to our knowledge, genome-wide epigenetic modifications associated with CFS have not been explored. We examined the DNA methylome in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from CFS patients and healthy controls using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, controlling for invariant probes and probes overlapping polymorphic sequences. Gene ontology (GO) and network analysis of differentially methylated genes was performed to determine potential biological pathways showing changes in DNA methylation in CFS. We found an increased abundance of differentially methylated genes related to the immune response, cellular metabolism, and kinase activity. Genes associated with immune cell regulation, the largest coordinated enrichment of differentially methylated pathways, showed hypomethylation within promoters and other gene regulatory elements in CFS. These data are consistent with evidence of multisystem dysregulation in CFS and implicate the involvement of DNA modifications in CFS pathology.

  18. Diaphragm dysfunction in heart failure is accompanied by increases in neutral sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide content.

    PubMed

    Empinado, Hyacinth M; Deevska, Gergana M; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Christou, Demetra D; Ferreira, Leonardo F

    2014-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) causes inspiratory (diaphragm) muscle weakness and fatigue that contributes to dyspnoea and limited physical capacity in patients. However, the mechanisms that lead to diaphragm dysfunction in CHF remain poorly understood. Cytokines and angiotensin II are elevated in CHF and stimulate the activity of the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) and accumulation of its reaction product ceramide. In the diaphragm, SMase or ceramide exposure in vitro causes weakness and fatigue. Thus, elevated SMase activity and ceramide content have been proposed as mediators of diaphragm dysfunction in CHF. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that diaphragm dysfunction was accompanied by increases in diaphragm SMase activity and ceramide content. Myocardial infarction was used to induce CHF in rats. We measured diaphragm isometric force, SMase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography, and ceramide subspecies and total ceramide using mass spectrometry. Diaphragm force was depressed and fatigue accelerated by CHF. Diaphragm neutral SMase activity was increased by 20% in CHF, while acid SMase activity was unchanged. We also found that CHF increased the content of C18 -, C20 -, and C24 -ceramide subspecies and total ceramide. Downstream of ceramide degradation, diaphragm sphingosine was unchanged, and sphingosine-1-phosphate level was increased in CHF. Our major novel finding was that diaphragm dysfunction in CHF rats was accompanied by higher diaphragm neutral SMase activity, which is expected to cause the observed increase in diaphragm ceramide content. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Current treatments to counter sleep dysfunction as a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. Polysomnography showed reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal alpha rhythms during nonrapid eye movement sleep in patients with fibromyalgia. However, sleep dysfunction might be pathogenic in fibromyalgia since myalgia and fatigue could be induced in healthy individuals by disrupting sleep. Poor sleep quality was a major risk factor for the subsequent development of chronic widespread pain in healthy pain-free individuals. Sleep disruption leads to impairment of the descending pain inhibition pathways. Aside from good sleep, hygiene, exercise can promote sleep. Among currently available pharmacological treatments, evidence suggests amitriptyline and pregabalin can improve sleep in fibromyalgia.

  20. Innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Revillard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    For more than half a century immunological research has been almost exclusively orientated towards the acquired immune response and the mechanisms of immune tolerance. Major discoveries have enabled us to better understand the functioning of the specific immune system: the structure of antibody molecules, the genetic mechanisms leading to the molecular diversity of B (BCR) and T (TCR) lymphocyte antigen receptors, the biological function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the presentation of peptides to alpha/beta receptor bearing T lymphocytes, the processes of positive and negative selection of lymphocytes during the course of their differentiation. The major role of specific or acquired immunity has been shown by the rapidly lethal character of severe combined immune deficiency diseases and various alterations in the mechanisms of tolerance have been proposed to explain the chronic inflammatory illnesses which are considered to be auto-immune. Natural or innate immunity has been known since the first description of an inflammatory reaction attributed to Cornelius Celsus. It entered into the scientific era at the end of the 19th century with the discovery of phagocytes by Metchnikoff and of the properties of the complement system by Bordet [1] but due to the vastness of the field and its lack of clear definition, it failed to excite the interest of researchers. The discovery of cytokines and progress in knowledge of the mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction have certainly helped to banish preconceived ideas about natural immunity, which was wrongly labelled as non-specific. This has led to the proposition of a wider role for immune functions beyond the level of the cell or the organism [2] and to a better understanding of the importance of the immediate defence mechanisms and their role in the later orientation of the acquired response.

  1. Perceived Fatigue Interference and Depressed Mood: Comparison of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients with Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Daniel L.; Antoni, Michael H.; Lattie, Emily G.; Jutagir, Devika R.; Czaja, Sara J.; Perdomo, Dolores; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Stagl, Jamie M.; Bouchard, Laura C.; Gudenkauf, Lisa M.; Traeger, Lara; Fletcher, MaryAnn; Klimas, Nancy G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persistent fatigue and depressive symptoms are both highly prevalent among patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) as well as breast cancer survivors. This study aimed to assess and directly compare perceptions of fatigue as highly interfering in one’s daily functioning in both patient populations to better understand their relationships with depressed mood. Methods Participants were 95 female CFS/ME patients and 67 females who were approximately 5 years post-treatment for stage 0-III breast cancer presenting with clinically elevated fatigue severity. Self-report measures were obtained on participants’ fatigue-related interference in daily functioning and fatigue severity as well as depressed mood. Hierarchical regression was used to test effects controlling for relevant demographic, psychosocial, and medical covariates. Results CFS/ME patients endorsed greater depressed mood and fatigue interference than did fatigued breast cancer survivors, p’s<.001. These factors were significantly positively correlated among CFS/ME patients (β=.36, p<.001), but not the fatigued breast cancer survivors (β=.18, p=.19). Conclusions CFS/ME patients reported elevated fatigue symptoms and depression relative to fatigued breast cancer survivors. In the former group, greater depressed mood was highly and significantly associated with greater fatigue-related inference in daily activities. Potential targets for cognitive behavioral interventions are discussed. PMID:26180660

  2. Perceived Fatigue Interference and Depressed Mood: Comparison of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients with Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hall, Daniel L; Antoni, Michael H; Lattie, Emily G; Jutagir, Devika R; Czaja, Sara J; Perdomo, Dolores; Lechner, Suzanne C; Stagl, Jamie M; Bouchard, Laura C; Gudenkauf, Lisa M; Traeger, Lara; Fletcher, MaryAnn; Klimas, Nancy G

    Persistent fatigue and depressive symptoms are both highly prevalent among patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) as well as breast cancer survivors. This study aimed to assess and directly compare perceptions of fatigue as highly interfering in one's daily functioning in both patient populations to better understand their relationships with depressed mood. Participants were 95 female CFS/ME patients and 67 females who were approximately 5 years post-treatment for stage 0-III breast cancer presenting with clinically elevated fatigue severity. Self-report measures were obtained on participants' fatigue-related interference in daily functioning and fatigue severity as well as depressed mood. Hierarchical regression was used to test effects controlling for relevant demographic, psychosocial, and medical covariates. CFS/ME patients endorsed greater depressed mood and fatigue interference than did fatigued breast cancer survivors, p's<.001. These factors were significantly positively correlated among CFS/ME patients (β=.36, p<.001), but not the fatigued breast cancer survivors (β=.18, p=.19). CFS/ME patients reported elevated fatigue symptoms and depression relative to fatigued breast cancer survivors. In the former group, greater depressed mood was highly and significantly associated with greater fatigue-related inference in daily activities. Potential targets for cognitive behavioral interventions are discussed.

  3. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  4. Factors which affect fatigue strength of fasteners

    SciTech Connect

    Skochko, G.W.; Herrmann, T.P.

    1992-11-01

    Axial load cycling fatigue tests of threaded fasteners are useful in determining fastener fatigue failure or design properties. By using appropriate design factors between the failure and design fatigue strengths, such tests are used to establish fatigue failure and design parameters of fasteners for axial and bending cyclic load conditions. This paper reviews the factors which influence the fatigue strength of low Alloy steel threaded fasteners, identifies those most significant to fatigue strength, and provides design guidelines based on the direct evaluation of fatigue tests of threaded fasteners. Influences on fatigue strength of thread manufacturing process (machining and rolling of threads), effect of fastener membrane and bending stresses, thread root radii, fastener sizes, fastener tensile strength, stress relaxation, mean stress, and test temperature are discussed.

  5. Fatigue life of laser cut metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted to determine the actual reduction in fatigue life due to weight removal for balancing by: hand grinding, low power (20 watt) Nd:glass laser, and high power (400 watt) Nd:YAG laser.

  6. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  7. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Who's at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Who's at Risk? More ... explore this possibility Related Links Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Print page View page in: Español (Spanish) ...

  8. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  9. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  10. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  11. [Somatic comorbidities in irritable bowel syndrome: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and interstitial cystitis].

    PubMed

    Mathieu, N

    2009-02-01

    Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and interstitial cystitis frequently overlap with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There is a positive correlation between the incidence of these comorbidities and increased health care seeking, reduction in quality of life, and higher levels of mood disorders, which raises the question of a common underlying pathophysiology. A possible central hypersensitization disorder seems to be particularly involved in the dysfunction of bidirectional neural pathways and viscerovisceral cross-interactions within the CNS, thus explaining these many extraintestinal manifestations in IBS.

  12. Statistical analysis of fatigue tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Karl Erik

    1992-07-01

    The ultimate aim of fatigue design, the minimization of the life cycle cost of the product, is discussed. The key is the load-strength model. Load and strength are described by distribution functions. Here the strength distribution is dealt with. Because of the 'weakest link theory' the three parameter Weibull distribution is the proper choice. With test results from a current project, the power of the Weibull analysis is demonstrated and some comments made about the traditional 'standard deviation of log cycles' approach. A Weibull transformation of rare occurrence, with the capability of separating different failure modes, is presented. Low stress level spectrum test results influenced by the 'fatigue limit' are easily separated. The difference between constant and variable amplitude test results is negligible. In the plane of the two Weibull parameters, shape and standardized location, it is possible to give a general view of component strength variation, from roller bearing life and fatigue stength of welds to yield strength.