Science.gov

Sample records for fault protection practices

  1. Protecting Against Faults in JPL Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A paper discusses techniques for protecting against faults in spacecraft designed and operated by NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The paper addresses, more specifically, fault-protection requirements and techniques common to most JPL spacecraft (in contradistinction to unique, mission specific techniques), standard practices in the implementation of these techniques, and fault-protection software architectures. Common requirements include those to protect onboard command, data-processing, and control computers; protect against loss of Earth/spacecraft radio communication; maintain safe temperatures; and recover from power overloads. The paper describes fault-protection techniques as part of a fault-management strategy that also includes functional redundancy, redundant hardware, and autonomous monitoring of (1) the operational and health statuses of spacecraft components, (2) temperatures inside and outside the spacecraft, and (3) allocation of power. The strategy also provides for preprogrammed automated responses to anomalous conditions. In addition, the software running in almost every JPL spacecraft incorporates a general-purpose "Safe Mode" response algorithm that configures the spacecraft in a lower-power state that is safe and predictable, thereby facilitating diagnosis of more complex faults by a team of human experts on Earth.

  2. Methodology for Designing Fault-Protection Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin; Levison, Jeffrey; Kan, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    A document describes a methodology for designing fault-protection (FP) software for autonomous spacecraft. The methodology embodies and extends established engineering practices in the technical discipline of Fault Detection, Diagnosis, Mitigation, and Recovery; and has been successfully implemented in the Deep Impact Spacecraft, a NASA Discovery mission. Based on established concepts of Fault Monitors and Responses, this FP methodology extends the notion of Opinion, Symptom, Alarm (aka Fault), and Response with numerous new notions, sub-notions, software constructs, and logic and timing gates. For example, Monitor generates a RawOpinion, which graduates into Opinion, categorized into no-opinion, acceptable, or unacceptable opinion. RaiseSymptom, ForceSymptom, and ClearSymptom govern the establishment and then mapping to an Alarm (aka Fault). Local Response is distinguished from FP System Response. A 1-to-n and n-to- 1 mapping is established among Monitors, Symptoms, and Responses. Responses are categorized by device versus by function. Responses operate in tiers, where the early tiers attempt to resolve the Fault in a localized step-by-step fashion, relegating more system-level response to later tier(s). Recovery actions are gated by epoch recovery timing, enabling strategy, urgency, MaxRetry gate, hardware availability, hazardous versus ordinary fault, and many other priority gates. This methodology is systematic, logical, and uses multiple linked tables, parameter files, and recovery command sequences. The credibility of the FP design is proven via a fault-tree analysis "top-down" approach, and a functional fault-mode-effects-and-analysis via "bottoms-up" approach. Via this process, the mitigation and recovery strategy(s) per Fault Containment Region scope (width versus depth) the FP architecture.

  3. The Curiosity Mars Rover's Fault Protection Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benowitz, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover, currently operating on Mars, contains flight software onboard to autonomously handle aspects of system fault protection. Over 1000 monitors and 39 responses are present in the flight software. Orchestrating these behaviors is the flight software's fault protection engine. In this paper, we discuss the engine's design, responsibilities, and present some lessons learned for future missions.

  4. The Curiosity Mars Rover's Fault Protection Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benowitz, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover, currently operating on Mars, contains flight software onboard to autonomously handle aspects of system fault protection. Over 1000 monitors and 39 responses are present in the flight software. Orchestrating these behaviors is the flight software's fault protection engine. In this paper, we discuss the engine's design, responsibilities, and present some lessons learned for future missions.

  5. GN and C Fault Protection Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This is a companion presentation for a paper by the same name for the same conference. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on the fundamentals of fault tolerant design for GN&C. The common heritage of ideas behind both faulted and normal operation is explored, as is the increasingly indistinct line between these realms in complex missions. Techniques in common practice are then evaluated in this light to suggest a better direction for future efforts.

  6. GN and C Fault Protection Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This is a companion presentation for a paper by the same name for the same conference. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on the fundamentals of fault tolerant design for GN&C. The common heritage of ideas behind both faulted and normal operation is explored, as is the increasingly indistinct line between these realms in complex missions. Techniques in common practice are then evaluated in this light to suggest a better direction for future efforts.

  7. Photovoltaic system grounding and fault protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolte, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The grounding and fault protection aspects of large photovoltaic power systems are studied. Broadly, the overlapping functions of these two plant subsystems include providing for the safety of personnel and equipment. Grounding subsystem design is generaly governed by considerations of personnel safety and the limiting of hazardous voltages to which they are exposed during the occurrence of a fault or other misoperation of equipment. A ground system is designed to provide a safe path for fault currents. Metal portions of the modules, array structures, and array foundations are used as a part of the ground system, provided that they and their interconnection are designed to be suitably reliable over the life of the plant. Several alternative types of fault protection and detection equipment are designed into the source circuits and dc buses feeding the input terminals of the subfield power conditioner. This design process requires evaluation of plausible faults, equipment, and remedial actions planned to correct faults. The evaluation should also consider life cycle cost impacts.

  8. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for

  9. Protection Relaying Scheme Based on Fault Reactance Operation Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi

    The theories of operation of existing relays are roughly divided into two types: one is the current differential types based on Kirchhoff's first law and the other is impedance types based on second law. We can apply the Kirchhoff's laws to strictly formulate fault phenomena, so the circuit equations are represented non linear simultaneous equations with variables fault point k and fault resistance Rf. This method has next two defect. 1) heavy computational burden for the iterative calculation on N-R method, 2) relay operator can not easily understand principle of numerical matrix operation. The new protection relay principles we proposed this paper focuses on the fact that the reactance component on fault point is almost zero. Two reactance Xf(S), Xf(R) on branch both ends are calculated by operation of solving linear equations. If signs of Xf(S) and Xf(R) are not same, it can be judged that the fault point exist in the branch. This reactance Xf corresponds to difference of branch reactance between actual fault point and imaginaly fault point. And so relay engineer can to understand fault location by concept of “distance". The simulation results using this new method indicates the highly precise estimation of fault locations compared with the inspected fault locations on operating transmission lines.

  10. Fault Management Practice: A Roadmap for Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesq, Lorraine M.; Oberhettinger, David

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous fault management (FM) is critical for deep space and planetary missions where the limited communication opportunities may prevent timely intervention by ground control. Evidence of pervasive architecture, design, and verification/validation problems with NASA FM engineering has been revealed both during technical reviews of spaceflight missions and in flight. These problems include FM design changes required late in the life-cycle, insufficient project insight into the extent of FM testing required, unexpected test results that require resolution, spacecraft operational limitations because certain functions were not tested, and in-flight anomalies and mission failures attributable to fault management. A recent NASA initiative has characterized the FM state-of-practice throughout the spacecraft development community and identified common NASA, DoD, and commercial concerns that can be addressed in the near term through the development of a FM Practitioner's Handbook and the formation of a FM Working Group. Initial efforts will focus on standardizing FM terminology, establishing engineering processes and tools, and training.

  11. Fault Management Practice: A Roadmap for Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesq, Lorraine M.; Oberhettinger, David

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous fault management (FM) is critical for deep space and planetary missions where the limited communication opportunities may prevent timely intervention by ground control. Evidence of pervasive architecture, design, and verification/validation problems with NASA FM engineering has been revealed both during technical reviews of spaceflight missions and in flight. These problems include FM design changes required late in the life-cycle, insufficient project insight into the extent of FM testing required, unexpected test results that require resolution, spacecraft operational limitations because certain functions were not tested, and in-flight anomalies and mission failures attributable to fault management. A recent NASA initiative has characterized the FM state-of-practice throughout the spacecraft development community and identified common NASA, DoD, and commercial concerns that can be addressed in the near term through the development of a FM Practitioner's Handbook and the formation of a FM Working Group. Initial efforts will focus on standardizing FM terminology, establishing engineering processes and tools, and training.

  12. Fault protection of broad-area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, J. H.; Petr, R.; Jaspan, M. A.; Swartz, S. D.; Knapczyk, M. T.; Flusberg, A. M.; Chin, A. K.; Smilanski, I.

    2009-02-01

    Detailed reliability studies of high-power, CW, broad-area, GaAs-based laser- diodes were performed. Optical and electrical transients occurring prior to device failure by catastrophic optical-damage (COD) were observed. These transients were correlated with COD formation as observed in laser diodes with an optical window in the n-side electrode. In addition, custom electronics were designed to fault-protect the laser diodes during aging tests, i.e. each time a transient (fault) was detected, the operating current was temporarily cut off within 4μs of fault detection. The lifetime of fault-protected 808-nm laser-diode bars operated at a constant current of 120A (~130W) and 35°C exceeded similar unprotected devices by factors of 2.

  13. Protection - Principles and practice.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, G. S.; Denning, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The protection mechanisms of computer systems control the access to objects, especially information objects. The principles of protection system design are formalized as a model (theory) of protection. Each process has a unique identification number which is attached by the system to each access attempted by the process. Details of system implementation are discussed, taking into account the storing of the access matrix, aspects of efficiency, and the selection of subjects and objects. Two systems which have protection features incorporating all the elements of the model are described.

  14. Fault-tolerant reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service.

  15. Fault-tolerant reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1997-04-15

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service. 16 figs.

  16. MER Surface Phase; Blurring the Line Between Fault Protection and What is Supposed to Happen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Glenn E.

    2008-01-01

    An assessment on the limitations of communication with MER rovers and how such constraints drove the system design, flight software and fault protection architecture, blurring the line between traditional fault protection and expected nominal behavior, and requiring the most novel autonomous and semi-autonomous elements of the vehicle software including communication, surface mobility, attitude knowledge acquisition, fault protection, and the activity arbitration service.

  17. Advanced power system protection and incipient fault detection and protection of spaceborne power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don

    1989-01-01

    This research concentrated on the application of advanced signal processing, expert system, and digital technologies for the detection and control of low grade, incipient faults on spaceborne power systems. The researchers have considerable experience in the application of advanced digital technologies and the protection of terrestrial power systems. This experience was used in the current contracts to develop new approaches for protecting the electrical distribution system in spaceborne applications. The project was divided into three distinct areas: (1) investigate the applicability of fault detection algorithms developed for terrestrial power systems to the detection of faults in spaceborne systems; (2) investigate the digital hardware and architectures required to monitor and control spaceborne power systems with full capability to implement new detection and diagnostic algorithms; and (3) develop a real-time expert operating system for implementing diagnostic and protection algorithms. Significant progress has been made in each of the above areas. Several terrestrial fault detection algorithms were modified to better adapt to spaceborne power system environments. Several digital architectures were developed and evaluated in light of the fault detection algorithms.

  18. A Generalised Fault Protection Structure Proposed for Uni-grounded Low-Voltage AC Microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Duong Minh; Chen, Shi-Lin; Lien, Keng-Yu; Jiang, Jheng-Lun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents three main configurations of uni-grounded low-voltage AC microgrids. Transient situations of a uni-grounded low-voltage (LV) AC microgrid (MG) are simulated through various fault tests and operation transition tests between grid-connected and islanded modes. Based on transient simulation results, available fault protection methods are proposed for main and back-up protection of a uni-grounded AC microgrid. In addition, concept of a generalised fault protection structure of uni-grounded LVAC MGs is mentioned in the paper. As a result, main contributions of the paper are: (i) definition of different uni-grounded LVAC MG configurations; (ii) analysing transient responses of a uni-grounded LVAC microgrid through line-to-line faults, line-to-ground faults, three-phase faults and a microgrid operation transition test, (iii) proposing available fault protection methods for uni-grounded microgrids, such as: non-directional or directional overcurrent protection, under/over voltage protection, differential current protection, voltage-restrained overcurrent protection, and other fault protection principles not based on phase currents and voltages (e.g. total harmonic distortion detection of currents and voltages, using sequence components of current and voltage, 3I0 or 3V0 components), and (iv) developing a generalised fault protection structure with six individual protection zones to be suitable for different uni-grounded AC MG configurations.

  19. Functional Fault Modeling Conventions and Practices for Real-Time Fault Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the conventions, best practices, and processes that were established based on the prototype development of a Functional Fault Model (FFM) for a Cryogenic System that would be used for real-time Fault Isolation in a Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) system. The FDIR system is envisioned to perform health management functions for both a launch vehicle and the ground systems that support the vehicle during checkout and launch countdown by using a suite of complimentary software tools that alert operators to anomalies and failures in real-time. The FFMs were created offline but would eventually be used by a real-time reasoner to isolate faults in a Cryogenic System. Through their development and review, a set of modeling conventions and best practices were established. The prototype FFM development also provided a pathfinder for future FFM development processes. This paper documents the rationale and considerations for robust FFMs that can easily be transitioned to a real-time operating environment.

  20. Grounding and fault protection of the SMUD PVI array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, D.

    1983-01-01

    If large terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power plants are to provide an economic source of generation, low-cost, reliable and easily maintainable systems must be developed. In addition, if the system is to be a central station powerplant owned and operated by an electric utility, the design must also be consistent with utility specifications and design standards. The particular solutions developed to address these issues, with regard to grounding and fault protection, for the first phase of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) 100 mw(ac) PV powerplant are presented. This plant, known as PV1, is nominally rated at 1 mw(ac) and is scheduled to be in operation by the spring of 1984.

  1. Prediction of sub-seismic faults and fractures to ensure carbon traps - joint project PROTECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesch, Jennifer; Tanner, David C.; Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation in the form of fractures and faults affects many reservoirs and their overburden. In a 3-D seismic data set we can identify faults on the large scale, while in well data we observe small-scale fractures. A large number of faults at the intermediate scale (sub-seismic space) also plays a very important role, but these are not detectable with conventional geophysical methods. Therefore, we use the retro-deformation approach within the context of long-term CO2 storage integrity to determine the characteristics of potential fluid migration pathways between reservoir and surface. This allows to produce strain maps, in order to analyse fault behaviour in the sub-seismic space. As part of the PROTECT (prediction of deformation to ensure carbon traps) project we focus on the sub-seismic faults of the CO2CRC Otway Project site in Australia. We interpreted a geological 3-D model of 8 km x 7 km x 4.5 km that comprises 8 stratigraphic horizons and 24 large-scale faults. This confirmed the site to contain a complex system of south-dipping normal faults and north-dipping antithetic normal faults. The most important aspect is that two different types of fault kinematics were simultaneously active: Dip-slip and a combination of dip-slip with dextral strike slip movement. After the retro-deformation of the 3-D model we calculated strain tensor maps to locate highly deformed or fractured zones and their orientation within the stratigraphic volume. The e1-strain magnitude shows heterogeneous distribution. The south of the study area is at least twice as much fractured on a sub-seismic scale. Four major faults act as "controlling faults" with smaller faults in between. The overburden is tilted northwards after retro-deformation. Thus, we believe that the area was affected by an even larger normal fault outside of the study area. In summary, this study reveals that good knowledge of the kinematics of the large-scale faults is essential to predict sub-seismic structures

  2. Wind Plant Collector System Fault Protection and Coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Bradt, M.; Behnke, M. R.; Bloethe, W.G.; Brooks, C.; Camm, E H; Dilling, W.; Goltz, B.; Li, J.; Niemira, J.; Nuckles, K.; Patino, J.; Reza, M; Richardson, B.; Samaan, N.; Schoene, Jens; Smith, Travis M; Snyder, Isabelle B; Starke, Michael R; Walling, R.; Zahalka, G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the most important protection and coordination considerations for wind power plants. Short-circuit characteristics of both aggregate wind plant and individual wind turbine genera- tors, as well as general interconnection protection requirements are discussed. Many factors such as security, reliability, and safety are considered for proper conservative protection of the wind power plant and individual turbines.

  3. Space Station automated systems testing/verification and the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landano, M. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of Space Station automated systems testing and verification are discussed, taking into account several program requirements. It is found that these requirements lead to a number of issues of uncertainties which require study and resolution during the Space Station definition phase. Most, if not all, of the considered uncertainties have implications for the overall testing and verification strategy adopted by the Space Station Program. A description is given of the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification approach. Attention is given to a mission description, an Orbiter description, the design approach and process, the fault protection design verification approach/process, and problems of 'stress' testing.

  4. Fault tolerance in onboard processors - Protecting efficient FDM demultiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1992-03-01

    The application of convolutional codes to protect demultiplexer filter banks is demonstrated analytically for efficient implementations. An overview is given of the parameters for the efficient implementations of filter banks, and real convolutional codes are discussed in terms of DSP operations. Methods for composite filtering and parity generation are outlined, and attention is given to the protection of polyphase filter demultiplexing systems. Real convolutional codes can be applied to protect demultiplexer filter banks by employing two forms of low-rate parity calculation to each filter bank. The parity values are computed either by the output with an FIR parity filter or in parallel with the normal processing by a composite filter. Hardware similarities between the filter bank and the main demultiplexer bank permit efficient redeployment of the processing resources to the main processing function in any configuration.

  5. Fault tolerance in onboard processors - Protecting efficient FDM demultiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The application of convolutional codes to protect demultiplexer filter banks is demonstrated analytically for efficient implementations. An overview is given of the parameters for the efficient implementations of filter banks, and real convolutional codes are discussed in terms of DSP operations. Methods for composite filtering and parity generation are outlined, and attention is given to the protection of polyphase filter demultiplexing systems. Real convolutional codes can be applied to protect demultiplexer filter banks by employing two forms of low-rate parity calculation to each filter bank. The parity values are computed either by the output with an FIR parity filter or in parallel with the normal processing by a composite filter. Hardware similarities between the filter bank and the main demultiplexer bank permit efficient redeployment of the processing resources to the main processing function in any configuration.

  6. Research on Fault Characteristics and Line Protections Within a Large-scale Photovoltaic Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Zeng, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Guobin; Xu, Qi; Luo, Pandian; Gu, Chenjie; Liu, Bohan

    2017-05-01

    Centralized photovoltaic (PV) systems have different fault characteristics from distributed PV systems due to the different system structures and controls. This makes the fault analysis and protection methods used in distribution networks with distributed PV not suitable for a centralized PV power plant. Therefore, a consolidated expression for the fault current within a PV power plant under different controls was calculated considering the fault response of the PV array. Then, supported by the fault current analysis and the on-site testing data, the overcurrent relay (OCR) performance was evaluated in the collection system of an 850 MW PV power plant. It reveals that the OCRs at downstream side on overhead lines may malfunction. In this case, a new relay scheme was proposed using directional distance elements. In the PSCAD/EMTDC, a detailed PV system model was built and verified using the on-site testing data. Simulation results indicate that the proposed relay scheme could effectively solve the problems under variant fault scenarios and PV plant output levels.

  7. A Novel Wide-Area Backup Protection Based on Fault Component Current Distribution and Improved Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Kong, Xiangping; Yin, Xianggen; Yang, Zengli; Wang, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of the existing wide-area backup protection (WABP) algorithms, the paper proposes a novel WABP algorithm based on the distribution characteristics of fault component current and improved Dempster/Shafer (D-S) evidence theory. When a fault occurs, slave substations transmit to master station the amplitudes of fault component currents of transmission lines which are the closest to fault element. Then master substation identifies suspicious faulty lines according to the distribution characteristics of fault component current. After that, the master substation will identify the actual faulty line with improved D-S evidence theory based on the action states of traditional protections and direction components of these suspicious faulty lines. The simulation examples based on IEEE 10-generator-39-bus system show that the proposed WABP algorithm has an excellent performance. The algorithm has low requirement of sampling synchronization, small wide-area communication flow, and high fault tolerance. PMID:25050399

  8. A novel wide-area backup protection based on fault component current distribution and improved evidence theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Kong, Xiangping; Yin, Xianggen; Yang, Zengli; Wang, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of the existing wide-area backup protection (WABP) algorithms, the paper proposes a novel WABP algorithm based on the distribution characteristics of fault component current and improved Dempster/Shafer (D-S) evidence theory. When a fault occurs, slave substations transmit to master station the amplitudes of fault component currents of transmission lines which are the closest to fault element. Then master substation identifies suspicious faulty lines according to the distribution characteristics of fault component current. After that, the master substation will identify the actual faulty line with improved D-S evidence theory based on the action states of traditional protections and direction components of these suspicious faulty lines. The simulation examples based on IEEE 10-generator-39-bus system show that the proposed WABP algorithm has an excellent performance. The algorithm has low requirement of sampling synchronization, small wide-area communication flow, and high fault tolerance.

  9. Fault Characteristics and Protection Scheme of the MMC-UPFC under Different Grounding Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tao; Wang, Ketan; Wu, Dan; Qi, Huanhuan

    2017-07-01

    The Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) based on Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) is more suitable for high-voltage and large-capacity transmission fields. According to the actual needs of demonstration project, 3 grounding proposals were brought out and the effect of different grounding proposals to the fault characteristics and protection schemes is analyzed in detail. The conclusion that only parallel valve side star connected large resistance grounding is more advantageous in MMC-UPFC was derived.

  10. Basic radiation protection considerations in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Zimmerman, T L

    1999-11-01

    This article provides basic guidance to radiation safety professionals unfamiliar with dental radiography on how to optimize the use of x-ray equipment and maintain occupational and non-occupational doses ALARA. Topics discussed in this article include basic protective measures commonly used to minimize the patient and operator's exposure to radiation, recommendations for the development of operating procedures, and the performance of compliance audits in dental practice.

  11. Toward a Model-Based Approach to Flight System Fault Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Murray, Alex; Meakin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fault Protection (FP) is a distinct and separate systems engineering sub-discipline that is concerned with the off-nominal behavior of a system. Flight system fault protection is an important part of the overall flight system systems engineering effort, with its own products and processes. As with other aspects of systems engineering, the FP domain is highly amenable to expression and management in models. However, while there are standards and guidelines for performing FP related analyses, there are not standards or guidelines for formally relating the FP analyses to each other or to the system hardware and software design. As a result, the material generated for these analyses are effectively creating separate models that are only loosely-related to the system being designed. Development of approaches that enable modeling of FP concerns in the same model as the system hardware and software design enables establishment of formal relationships that has great potential for improving the efficiency, correctness, and verification of the implementation of flight system FP. This paper begins with an overview of the FP domain, and then continues with a presentation of a SysML/UML model of the FP domain and the particular analyses that it contains, by way of showing a potential model-based approach to flight system fault protection, and an exposition of the use of the FP models in FSW engineering. The analyses are small examples, inspired by current real-project examples of FP analyses.

  12. Toward a Model-Based Approach to Flight System Fault Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Murray, Alex; Meakin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fault Protection (FP) is a distinct and separate systems engineering sub-discipline that is concerned with the off-nominal behavior of a system. Flight system fault protection is an important part of the overall flight system systems engineering effort, with its own products and processes. As with other aspects of systems engineering, the FP domain is highly amenable to expression and management in models. However, while there are standards and guidelines for performing FP related analyses, there are not standards or guidelines for formally relating the FP analyses to each other or to the system hardware and software design. As a result, the material generated for these analyses are effectively creating separate models that are only loosely-related to the system being designed. Development of approaches that enable modeling of FP concerns in the same model as the system hardware and software design enables establishment of formal relationships that has great potential for improving the efficiency, correctness, and verification of the implementation of flight system FP. This paper begins with an overview of the FP domain, and then continues with a presentation of a SysML/UML model of the FP domain and the particular analyses that it contains, by way of showing a potential model-based approach to flight system fault protection, and an exposition of the use of the FP models in FSW engineering. The analyses are small examples, inspired by current real-project examples of FP analyses.

  13. Solar Eye Protection Practices of Civilian Aircrew.

    PubMed

    Chorley, Adrian C; Evans, Bruce J W; Benwell, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    There is good evidence that long term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation increases the risk of cataracts. The 'blue light hazard' is considered a risk factor for retinal changes similar to those seen in macular degeneration. Previous studies ascertaining the prevalence of radiation related ocular disease in pilot cohorts have not considered use of solar eye protection. The aim of this study was to explore pilot use of sunglasses and other solar eye protection habits and to gain insight into the difficulties encountered managing sunlight on the flight deck. Additionally, the prevalence of radiation related ocular pathology in the study group was calculated. A web based questionnaire was developed and administered to a large population of current UK professional pilots. There were 2917 respondents who completed the questionnaire, demonstrating a wide range of sunglass use during flight. A number of barriers to sunglass use were identified, the most prevalent being the requirement for corrective lenses to be used. Pilots most commonly increase sunglass use due to ocular health concerns. A high level of dissatisfaction with standard aircraft sun protection systems was reported. Long haul airline pilots were the highest users of nonstandard sunlight blocking strategies. No correlation between reported pathology and flying experience was found. The use of sunglasses during flight is complex; however, a number of practical recommendations can be made to increase the success for those pilots who wish to use sunglasses more. Aircraft manufacturers should consider how greater control of cockpit sunlight levels can be achieved.

  14. Cassini Attitude Control Fault Protection Design: Launch to End of Prime Mission Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) Fault Protection (FP) has been successfully supporting operations for over 10 years from launch through the end of the prime mission. Cassini's AACS FP is complex, containing hundreds of error monitors and thousands of tunable parameters. Since launch there have been environmental, hardware, personnel and mission event driven changes which have required AACS FP to adapt and be robust to a variety of scenarios. This paper will discuss the process of monitoring, maintaining and updating the AACS FP during Cassini's lengthy prime mission as well as provide some insight into lessons learned during tour operations.

  15. A New 600 V Punch Through-Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor with the Monolithic Fault Protection Circuit Using the Floating p-Well Voltage Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, In-Hwan; Jeon, Byung-Chul; Choi, Young-Hwan; Ha, Min-Woo; Han, Min-Koo

    2006-10-01

    A new fault sensing scheme of the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) employing the floating p-well, which detects the over-voltage of the floating p-well under the short circuit fault condition, is proposed and implemented by fabricating the main IGBT and gate voltage pull-down circuit using the widely used planar IGBT process. The floating p-well structure also improves the avalanche energy of IGBT in addition to detecting the fault signal. The detection of fault and gate voltage pull-down operation is achieved by the proposed fault protection scheme employing the floating p-well voltage detection. The proposed fault protection circuit was measured under the hard switching fault (HSF) and fault under load (FUL) conditions. The normal switching behavior of the main IGBT with the proposed protection circuit was also investigated under inductive load switching conditions.

  16. Protecting the GEO Environment: Policies and Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The geosynchronous orbital regime has long been recognized as a unique space resource, dictating special measures to ensure its continuing use for future generations. During the past 20 years a variety of national and international policies have been developed to preserve this environment. A review of current practices involving the deployment and disposal of geosynchronous spacecraft, associated upper stages and apogee kick motors, and geosynchronous orbit transfer objects indicates both positive and negative trends. Most spacecraft operators are indeed performing end-of-mission maneuvers, but the boost altitudes normally fall short of policy guidelines. Russia, a major operator in geosynchronous orbit, maneuvers only 1 in 3 spacecraft out of the region, while China has never refired a spacecraft above GEO. The viability of voluntary protection measures for this regime depends upon the responsible actions of the aerospace community as a whole.

  17. Protecting the GEO Environment: Policies and Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The geosynchronous orbital regime has long been recognized as a unique space resource, dictating special measures to ensure its continuing use for future generations. During the past 20 years a variety of national and international policies have been developed to preserve this environment. A review of current practices involving the deployment and disposal of geosynchronous spacecraft, associated upper stages and apogee kick motors, and geosynchronous orbit transfer objects indicates both positive and negative trends. Most spacecraft operators are indeed performing end-of-mission maneuvers, but the boost altitudes normally fall short of policy guidelines. Russia, a major operator in geosynchronous orbit, maneuvers only 1 in 3 spacecraft out of the region, while China has never refired a spacecraft above GEO. The viability of voluntary protection measures for this regime depends upon the responsible actions of the aerospace community as a whole.

  18. Fault-lines between policy and practice in local partnerships.

    PubMed

    Marks, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore gaps between policy and practice in relation to the involvement of voluntary and community sector (VCS) members in local strategic partnerships (LSPs), using the example of inequalities in health. Documentary analysis; semi-structured interviews with VCS representatives from a sample of LSPs in one region of England; semi-structured interviews with key researchers and national stakeholders. National policy imperatives to expand the role of the VCS in decision-making and to make LSPs an important avenue for addressing inequalities in health are not always translated into practice. VCS members are at the sharp end of tensions in LSPs between thematic and neighbourhood approaches, local views and strategic priorities and between democratic and participatory approaches to decision-making. Effective engagement in addressing inequalities in health requires a strategic approach across the LSP which is reflected in the priorities of each of the constituent partnerships. This is a snapshot of LSPs at one point in time and local interviews are restricted to one region of England. The article illustrates good practice and barriers to VCS involvement in addressing inequalities in health through LSPs. This is relevant to a range of public health partnerships. The views of VCS members on addressing inequalities in health through LSPs have not previously been researched, despite their key role. Lessons are relevant for multi-agency strategic partnerships with a public health focus in England and internationally.

  19. Biometrics IRB best practices and data protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnen, Christopher; Bolme, David; Flynn, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    The collection of data from human subjects for biometrics research in the United States requires the development of a data collection protocol that is reviewed by a Human Subjects Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB reviews the protocol for risks and approves it if it meets the criteria for approval specified in the relevant Federal regulations (45 CFR 46). Many other countries operate similar mechanisms for the protection of human subjects. IRBs review protocols for safety, confidentiality, and for minimization of risk associated with identity disclosure. Since biometric measurements are potentially identifying, IRB scrutiny of biometrics data collection protocols can be expected to be thorough. This paper discusses the intricacies of IRB best practices within the worldwide biometrics community. This is important because research decisions involving human subjects are made at a local level and do not set a precedent for decisions made by another IRB board. In many cases, what one board approves is not approved by another board, resulting in significant inconsistencies that prove detrimental to both researchers and human subjects. Furthermore, the level of biometrics expertise may be low on IRBs, which can contribute to the unevenness of reviews. This publication will suggest possible best practices for designing and seeking IRB approval for human subjects research involving biometrics measurements. The views expressed are the opinions of the authors.

  20. Cautious to a Fault: Self-Protection and the Trajectory of Marital Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sandra L.; Holmes, John G.; Derrick, Jaye L.; Harris, Brianna; Griffin, Dale W.; Pinkus, Rebecca T.

    2012-01-01

    A contextual model of self-protection is proposed to explain when adhering to cautious “if-then” rules in daily interaction erodes marital satisfaction. People can self-protect against partner non-responsiveness by distancing when a partner seems rejecting, promoting a partner’s dependence when feeling unworthy, or by devaluing a partner in the face of costs. The model implies that being less trusting elicits self-protection, and that mismatches between self-protective practices and encountered risk accelerate declines in satisfaction. A longitudinal study of newlyweds revealed that the fit between self-protection practices and risk predicted declines in satisfaction over three years. When people self-protected more initially, satisfaction declined more in low-risk (i.e., low conflict, resilient partner) than high-risk relationships (i.e., high conflict, vulnerable partner). However, when people self-protected less initially, satisfaction declined more in high-risk than low-risk relationships. Process evidence was consistent with moderated mediation: In low-risk relationships only, being less trusting predicted higher levels of self-protective caution that forecast later declines in satisfaction. PMID:25013236

  1. Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem Fault Protection Challenges During Saturn Proximal Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended mission, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn's outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, presents unique fault protection related challenges, the details of which are discussed in this paper.

  2. Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem Fault Protection Challenges During Saturn Proximal Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended mission, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn's outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, presents unique fault protection related challenges, the details of which are discussed in this paper.

  3. A practical morality for ecosystem protection

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, A.

    1995-12-31

    The moral foundations are surprisingly robust of a conservation policy framework based on benefits and costs, but subject to a safe minimum standard (SMS) of conservation. The benefit cost rule provides an account of standard (SMS) of conservation. The benefits cost rule provides an account of the net contribution of policy to the satisfaction of human preferrences. The difficulties confronting benefit cost analysis at the ecosystem level should not be understated, but any reasonably comprehensive evaluating system that takes citizen preferences seriously would encounter similar difficulties. The SMS constraint provides direct protection of ecosystems for their own sakes, or because humans seek prudently to avoid the risks entailed in ecosystem destruction. However, citizen commitment to a SMS policy is unlikely to be iron clad. Moral reasoning might find circumstances in which the sacrifice that would ensure conservation is too much to ask of particular groups of people. Practical reasoning suggests that people asked to bear an enormous cost in order to keep a conservation commitment may well defect. These considerations suggest some general principles for designing a workable conservation policy. First, the objective should focus on the sustainability of ecosystems rather than the preservation of particular species. Second, in order to maintain the commitment to conservation, the costs imposed on any particular group of people must be kept tolerably low. Cost tend to be high, for last-ditch preservation efforts made in a crisis atmosphere; so, early warning and early implementation of conservation strategies make sense. Conservation efforts sometimes impose high costs locally in order to provide benefits for society at large; in such cases, compensation mechanisms are both equitable and effective in facilitating local cooperation.

  4. Radiation protection guidelines for the practicing orthodontist.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2005-08-01

    This article summarizes the most recent (December 2003) dental x-ray guidelines from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements report #145. The guidelines are intended for all dental health-care providers. They address radiation dose limits for occupational and nonoccupational exposure and radiation protection for operators, patients, and the public. Equipment design can play an important role in radiation protection, and recommendations from the guidelines are discussed.

  5. Protection: clarifying the concept for use in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Susan G

    2007-01-01

    The protection of patients is integral in any healthcare setting. Healthcare organizations are increasingly held accountable for preventable medical errors, the attitudes toward safety, and communication among all levels of providers, collaborative practices, and recognition of risks. The concept of protection is inherent in nursing practice. It provides a framework, that further defines healthcare provider's roles in meeting these imperatives. The scope of protection is considered both globally and individually prominent. Nurses protect patients from environmental hazards, themselves, and any perceived threat. In this analysis of the phenomenon, the concept is clarified, and an evidence-based approach to protection is utilized for theory development and concept measurement.

  6. Probabilistic Risk Analysis and Fault Trees as Tools in Improving the Delineation of Wellhead Protection Areas: An Initial Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodak, C. M.; Silliman, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Delineation of a wellhead protection area (WHPA) is a critical component of managing / protecting the aquifer(s) supplying potable water to a public water-supply well. While a number of previous authors have addressed questions related to uncertainties in advective capture zones, methods for assessing WHPAs in the presence of uncertainty in the chemistry of groundwater contaminants, the relationship between land-use and contaminant sources, and the impact on health risk within the receiving population are more limited. Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) combined with fault trees (FT) addresses this latter challenge by providing a structure whereby four key WHPA issues may be addressed: (i) uncertainty in land-use practices and chemical release, (ii) uncertainty in groundwater flow, (iii) variability in natural attenuation properties (and/or remediation) of the contaminants, and (iv) estimated health risk from contaminant arrival at a well. The potential utility of PRA-FT in this application is considered through a simplified case study involving management decisions related both to regional land use planning and local land-use zoning regulation. An application-specific fault tree is constructed to visualize and identify the events required for health risk failure at the well and a Monte Carlo approach is used to create multiple realizations of groundwater flow and chemical transport to a well in a model of a simple, unconfined aquifer. Model parameters allowed to vary during this simplified case study include hydraulic conductivity, probability of a chemical spill (related to land use variation in space), and natural attenuation through variation in rate of decay of the contaminant. Numerical results are interpreted in association with multiple land-use management scenarios as well as multiple cancer risk assumptions regarding the contaminant arriving at the well. This case study shows significant variability of health risk at the well, however general trends were

  7. A Practical Study of the 66kV Fault Current Limiter (FCL) System with Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Noriaki; Matsubara, Yoshio; Yuguchi, Kyosuke; Ohkuma, Takeshi; Hobara, Natsuro; Takahashi, Yoshihisa

    A fault current limiter (FCL) is extensively expected to suppress fault current, particularly required for trunk power systems heavily connected high-voltage transmission lines, such as 500kV class power system which constitutes the nucleus of the electric power system. By installing such FCL in the power system, the system interconnection is possible without the need to raise the capacity of the circuit breakers, and facilities can be configured for efficiency, among other benefits. For these reasons, fault current limiters based on various principles of operation have been developed both in Japan and abroad. In this paper, we have proposed a new type of FCL system, consisting of solid-state diodes, DC coil and bypass AC coil, and described the specification of distribution power system and 66kV model at the island power system and the superconducting cable power system. Also we have made a practical study of 66kV class, which is the testing items and the future subjects of the rectifier type FCL system.

  8. Retrieval practice protects memory against acute stress.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amy M; Floerke, Victoria A; Thomas, Ayanna K

    2016-11-25

    More than a decade of research has supported a robust consensus: Acute stress impairs memory retrieval. We aimed to determine whether a highly effective learning technique could strengthen memory against the negative effects of stress. To bolster memory, we used retrieval practice, or the act of taking practice tests. Participants first learned stimuli by either restudying or engaging in retrieval practice. Twenty-four hours later, we induced stress in half of the participants and assessed subsequent memory performance. Participants who learned by restudying demonstrated the typical stress-related memory impairment, whereas those who learned by retrieval practice were immune to the deleterious effects of stress. These results suggest that the effects of stress on memory retrieval may be contingent on the strength of the memory representations themselves. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Protected areas in Europe: principle and practice.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Jackson, Sarah F; Nagy, Arnold; Cantú-Salazar, Lisette; Johnson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Systematic conservation planning provides a structured, target-driven approach to ensuring the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. However, reviews of how well the steps of such a planning process are applied in different regions are scant; some steps may be implemented although there is no formal systematic conservation planning process taking place. Here we conduct such a review for Europe. Taking in turn the six recognized steps of systematic conservation planning, for this region: (i) The availability of data on biodiversity remains a significant constraint on conservation planning because, although species occurrences have often been better mapped in Europe than elsewhere, there is a continuing mismatch between the spatial resolution at which data coverage is adequate and that of habitat fragmentation. (ii) Although there are important legal frameworks for conservation planning, explicit quantitative goals for the representation and persistence of biodiversity are largely lacking. (iii) Assessment of the effectiveness of existing protected area systems is patchy and rather ill developed, with a substantial gulf between the work being conducted in more academic and policy-oriented arenas. (iv) Nonetheless, particularly through the Natura 2000 process, there has been an extraordinary program to select additional protected areas. (v) Although it has taken longer than originally envisaged, this program is resulting in a substantial expansion of the protected area system. (vi) There are significant concerns over the extent to which existing protected area systems can maintain their biodiversity values, particularly given the small size of many of these areas and likely impacts of climate change.

  10. Fault Protection Design and Testing for the Cassini Spacecraft in a "Mixed" Thruster Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David; Lee, Allan; Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap from the A-branch to the B-branch RCS system. If similar degradation begins to occur on any of the B-branch thrusters, Cassini might have to assume a "mixed" thruster configuration, where a subset of both A and B branch thrusters will be designated as prime. The Cassini Fault Protection FSW was recently updated to handle this scenario. The design, implementation, and testing of this update is described in this paper.

  11. Fault Protection Design and Testing for the Cassini Spacecraft in a "Mixed" Thruster Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David; Lee, Allan; Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap from the A-branch to the B-branch RCS system. If similar degradation begins to occur on any of the B-branch thrusters, Cassini might have to assume a "mixed" thruster configuration, where a subset of both A and B branch thrusters will be designated as prime. The Cassini Fault Protection FSW was recently updated to handle this scenario. The design, implementation, and testing of this update is described in this paper.

  12. Applying Complexity Theory to Risk in Child Protection Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Irene; Hassett, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at the application of complexity theory to risk assessment in child protection practice, and how it may help to give a better understanding of risk in relation to protecting vulnerable children. Within the last 20 years increasing use has been made of the term complexity within the natural sciences. In recent times, some of the…

  13. Applying Complexity Theory to Risk in Child Protection Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Irene; Hassett, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at the application of complexity theory to risk assessment in child protection practice, and how it may help to give a better understanding of risk in relation to protecting vulnerable children. Within the last 20 years increasing use has been made of the term complexity within the natural sciences. In recent times, some of the…

  14. Protecting ground water: pesticides and agricultural practices. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The booklet presents the results of a project conducted by EPA's Office of Ground-Water Protection to evaluate the potential impacts of various agronomic, irrigation, and pesticide application practices on ground water. The report provides State and local water quality and agricultural officials with technical information to help in the development of programs to protect ground water from pesticide contamination. The report explains the principles involved in reducing the risk of pesticide contamination and describes what is known about the impact of various agricultural practices on pesticide leaching. It is hoped that the information will be helpful to water-quality officials in developing and implementing ground-water protection programs.

  15. Reliability Improvement of Ground Fault Protection System Using an S-Type Horn Attachment Gap in AC Feeding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiki, Kohji; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Fumiyuki; Sakai, Shinya; Sasaki, Kazuomi; Sato, Ryogo

    Contact wires used in feeding system for electric railroad are insulated by insulators. However, insulation of an insulator sometimes breaks down by surface dirt of an insulator and contact with a bird. The insulator breakdown derives a ground fault in feeding system. Ground fault will cause a human electric shock and a destruction of low voltage electric equipment. In order to prevent the damage by ground fault, an S-type horn has been applicable as equipped on insulators of negative feeder and protective wire until present. However, a concrete pole breaks down at the time of the ground fault because a spark-over voltage of the S-type horn is higher than a breakdown voltage of a concrete pole. Farther, the S-type horn installed in the steel tube pole does not discharge a case, because the earth resistance of a steel tube pole is very small. We assumed that we could solve these troubles by changing the power frequency spark-over voltage of the S-type horn from 12kV to 3kV. Accordingly, we developed an attachment gap that should be used to change the power frequency spark-over voltage of the S-type horn from 12kV to 3kV. The attachment gap consists of a gas gap arrester and a zinc oxide element. By the dynamic current test and the artificial ground fault test, we confirmed that the attachment gap in the S-type horn could prevent a trouble at the time of the ground fault.

  16. WORKPLACE EXPOSURES AND PROTECTIVE PRACTICES OF HISPANIC WAREHOUSE WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    Livaudais, Jennifer C.; Thompson, Beti; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Anderson, Jennifer; Coronado, Gloria D.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to assess workplace hazards and protective practices among Hispanic men and women working post-harvest in asparagus, apple and pear packaging warehouses. Methods Three focus groups were conducted in July 2003 with 25 workers (20 women, 5 men) recruited from communities in the Yakima Valley, Washington. Focus group content informed the design of an in-person structured interview administered to 50 additional warehouse workers from August-November 2006. Results Focus group participants reported difficult working conditions, exposure to chemicals, adverse health effects and use of work and home protective practices to minimize exposures for themselves and their families. Structured interview participants reported few workplace exposures to chemicals although many reported engaging in workplace and home protective practices. Discussion Findings from this research can direct initial efforts to determine if and how interventions for warehouse workers may be designed to protect against hazardous workplace exposures. PMID:18543104

  17. Assessment of radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Cletus Uche; Abonyi, Livinus Chibuzo; Njoku, Jerome; Irurhe, Nicholas Kayode; Olowu, Oluwabola

    2013-01-01

    Background: Use of ionising radiation in diagnostic radiography could lead to hazards such as somatic and genetic damages. Compliance to safe work and radiation protection practices could mitigate such risks. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The study was a prospective cross sectional survey. Convenience sampling technique was used to select four x-ray diagnostic centres in four tertiary hospitals in Lagos metropolis. Data were analysed with Epi- info software, version 3.5.1. Results: Average score on assessment of knowledge was 73%. Most modern radiation protection instruments were lacking in all the centres studied. Application of shielding devices such as gonad shield for protection was neglected mostly in government hospitals. Most x-ray machines were quite old and evidence of quality assurance tests performed on such machines were lacking. Conclusion: Radiographers within Lagos metropolis showed an excellent knowledge of radiation protection within the study period. Adherence to radiation protection practices among radiographers in Lagos metropolis during the period studied was, however, poor. Radiographers in Lagos, Nigeria should embrace current trends in radiation protection and make more concerted efforts to apply their knowledge in protecting themselves and patients from harmful effects of ionising radiation. PMID:24665152

  18. Synthesis of Fault-Tolerant Embedded Systems Using Games: From Theory to Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hong; Rueß, Harald; Knoll, Alois; Buckl, Christian

    In this paper, we present an approach for fault-tolerant synthesis by combining predefined patterns for fault-tolerance with algorithmic game solving. A non-fault-tolerant system, together with the relevant fault hypothesis and fault-tolerant mechanism templates in a pool are translated into a distributed game, and we perform an incomplete search of strategies to cope with undecidability. The result of the game is translated back to executable code concretizing fault-tolerant mechanisms using constraint solving. The overall approach is implemented to a prototype tool chain and is illustrated using examples.

  19. Sun Exposure Habits and Sun Protection Practices of Skaters.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Morano, Teresa; de Troya-Martín, Magdalena; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Fernández-Peñas, Pablo; Padilla-España, Laura; Sánchez-Blázquez, Nuria; Buendía-Eisman, Agustín

    2016-04-16

    Beach activities and outdoor sports are risk factors for developing skin cancer. Skateboarding is among the most popular sports among adolescents. The aim was to analyse the sun exposure habits and sun protection practices of skaters, in comparison with corresponding sun exposure and protection practices on the beach. This cross-sectional study is based on health surveys carried out into sun exposure and protection practices among young skateboarders. The study population was composed of 102 skaters, of whom 84 (82.4 %) were male. Fifty-eight (56.8 %) of the participants reported having suffered at least one sunburn event the previous summer. Eighty-seven (91.6 %) said they practiced outdoor sports more than 90 days per year, while only six (6.1 %) spent this long at the beach. Forty-nine (52.1 %) practiced outdoor sports for 5 or more hours a day compared to 42 (43.3 %) who spent comparable periods at the beach. A long-sleeved shirt was worn more frequently during sports than at the beach. Keen skaters are a risk group for the development of skin cancer due to excessive sun exposure, high rates of sunburn and scant use of sun protection measures. Specific educational and behavioural interventions should be aimed at this risk group.

  20. Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, R. A.; Lapin, V. I.; Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V.; Yudin, S. M.

    2010-05-15

    The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

  1. Sensitive ground-fault protection for mines. Phase 1. Aalternating-current utilization. Open File report

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, L.A.; Trutt, F.C.; Novak, T.

    1984-09-01

    The report concerns the research and development of sensitive ground-fault relays for ac utilization systems in mining. Sensitive relaying employs very low pickup levels such that, when used in conjunction with very high resistance grounding, the exposure of a human to ventricular fibrillation is significantly reduced. To delineate the desired relay characteristics, the report commences by reviewing and updating previous research in this area. The critical relay component for sensitive ground-fault relays has been found to be the current transformer; their theory and design are detailed. Electronics for two prototype relays have been produced through the research and information is presented so that either may be duplicated.

  2. ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR PROTECTING AND ENHANCING AQUATIC RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes research that addresses the question: Which management practices are most successful for protection and restoration of ecological resources? The Ecosystem Restoration Research Program of EPA/ORD is designed to conduct basic and applied field research to eva...

  3. Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Maternity Services: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazenbatt, Anne; Greer, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This article debates the issues involved in safeguarding and protecting children in maternity services and offers implications for professional practice. Midwives and other staff who work as members of the maternity team have a safeguarding role to play in the identification of babies and children who have been abused, or are at risk of abuse, and…

  4. Targeting of Watershed Management Practices for Water Quality Protection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ensuring a clean and adequate water supply implies conservative use of water and protecting water resources from pollution. Sediment, nutrient, and pesticide losses in runoff are major pollutants of surface waters in the Midwest. This publication addresses the targeting of best management practices ...

  5. Best management practices for creating a community wildfire protection plan

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes; Christine Esposito; Sam Burns; Antony S. Cheng; Kristen C. Nelson; Victoria E. Sturtevant; Daniel R. Williams

    2012-01-01

    A community wildfire protection plan (CWPP) is a means of bringing local solutions to wildland fire management. In developing and implementing CWPPs, communities assume a leadership role in reducing wildfi re risk on federal and nonfederal land. In this publication, we identify best management practices for CWPP development and implementation based on the experiences...

  6. Protection goals in environmental risk assessment: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alonso, Monica; Raybould, Alan

    2014-12-01

    Policy protection goals are set up in most countries to minimise harm to the environment, humans and animals caused by human activities. Decisions on whether to approve new agricultural products, like pesticides or genetically modified (GM) crops, take into account these policy protection goals. To support decision-making, applications for approval of commercial uses of GM crops usually comprise an environmental risk assessment (ERA). These risk assessments are analytical tools, based on science, that follow a conceptual model that includes a problem formulation step where policy protection goals are considered. However, in most countries, risk assessors face major problems in that policy protection goals set in the legislation are stated in very broad terms and are too ambiguous to be directly applicable in ERAs. This means that risk assessors often have to interpret policy protection goals without clear guidance on what effects would be considered harmful. In this paper we propose a practical approach that may help risk assessors to translate policy protection goals into unambiguous (i.e., operational) protection goals and to establish relevant assessment endpoints and risk hypotheses that can be used in ERAs. Examples are provided to show how this approach can be applied to two areas of environmental concern relevant to the ERAs of GM crops.

  7. Design, implementation and testing of an artificial neural network based fault direction discriminator for protecting transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, T.S.; Singh, H.; Sachdev, M.S.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes a fault direction discriminator that uses an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for protecting transmission lines. The discriminator uses various attributes to reach a decision and tends to emulate the conventional pattern classification problem. An equation of the boundary describing the classification is embedded in the Multilayer Feedforward Neural Network (MFNN) by training through the use of an appropriate learning algorithm and suitable training data. The discriminator uses instantaneous values of the line voltages and line currents to make decisions. Results showing the performance of the ANN-based discriminator are presented in the paper and indicate that it is fast, robust and accurate. It is suitable for realizing an ultrafast directional comparison protection of transmission lines.

  8. Fault protection in a multilevel inverter implementation of a static condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, G.; Hochgraf, C.; Lasseter, R.H.; Divan, D.M.; Lipo, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    Multilevel inverters are well suited for static condenser implementation in utility systems. With multilevel inverters, it is possible to realize low distortion voltage waveforms and keep losses low using suitable switching schemes. The complex topology of these inverters coupled with the large number of devices used increases the probability of device failure. In this paper, the fault modes of a multilevel inverter are investigated with special emphasis on the five level inverter. The main focus of the paper is on device failure and the corresponding impact on the operating conditions and resulting stresses. The presence of redundant states offers the possibility of continuing operation with inferior bus and device utilization following a fault. Failure of some devices is more critical than the failure of others, thereby emphasizing the need for adding redundant devices.

  9. The role of professional journalism in protecting against questionable practice.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, John P

    2003-01-01

    The editor in chief of the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association explains that professional journalism alone cannot be expected to protect against questionable practice but it plays a vital role in the network of resources that define standards of excellent and ethical care. According to some, the explosion of biomedical information has created a crisis as emerging science overwhelms practitioners' capacity to intelligently evaluate it and incorporate it into practice. Research in medicine shows that journals play only a part in decisions regarding practice patterns. Some initiatives taken by the Canadian Dental Association to publish professional literature relevant to practitioners' needs to remain current in order to prevent questionable dental practice are described.

  10. Performance factors as a basis of practical fault detection and diagnostic methods for air-handling units

    SciTech Connect

    Kaerki, S.H.; Karjalainen, S.J.

    1999-07-01

    The technical term performance is defined as how well a system fulfills its intended purpose in different operational circumstances. This paper describes the process of establishing the performance factors of air-handling units (AHUs), defining the performance requirements, and connecting them to fault detection and diagnosis methods. The most important performance requirements of AHUs are related to heating and cooling energy, the supply airflow rate and purity, energy efficiency, and control quality. Many solutions made during different life-cycle phases affect the final system performance. These solutions are discussed in this paper. Diagnostic tools and methods can be developed for monitoring the defined performance criteria. Practical FDD methods have been developed for the system considered here. The methods are simple and easy to apply in practice. Methods for monitoring the heat recovery unit and the AHU energy use are presented. Examples of utilizing characteristic curves and fault-symptom trees are also described.

  11. Do workplace and home protective practices protect farm workers? Findings from the For Healthy Kids Study

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Holte, Sarah E.; Vigoren, Eric M.; Griffith, William C; Barr, Dana B.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Thompson, Beti

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess associations of protective workplace and home practices to pesticide exposure levels. Methods Using data from orchard workers in the Yakima Valley, Washington, we examined associations of workplace and home protective practices to (1) urinary metabolite concentrations of dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP) in adults and children aged 2–6; and (2) azinphos-methyl levels in house and vehicle dust. Results Data were from 95 orchard workers and 94 children. Contrary to expectation, adult farm workers who wore boots or washed hands using hand sanitizer had higher concentrations of DMTP than those who did not. Children who attended daycare had higher DMTP concentrations than children who did not. Conclusions Few workplace or home practices were associated with pesticide exposure levels; workers who used hand sanitizer had higher concentrations of DMTP, as did children who attended daycare. PMID:22772953

  12. Toward a Model-Based Approach for Flight System Fault Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Meakin, Peter; Murray, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Use SysML/UML to describe the physical structure of the system This part of the model would be shared with other teams - FS Systems Engineering, Planning & Execution, V&V, Operations, etc., in an integrated model-based engineering environment Use the UML Profile mechanism, defining Stereotypes to precisely express the concepts of the FP domain This extends the UML/SysML languages to contain our FP concepts Use UML/SysML, along with our profile, to capture FP concepts and relationships in the model Generate typical FP engineering products (the FMECA, Fault Tree, MRD, V&V Matrices)

  13. Low Cost Arc Fault Detection and Protection for PV Systems: January 30, 2012 - September 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    McCalmont, S.

    2013-10-01

    Final report for Tigo Energy Incubator project. The specific objective of this 18-month research effort was to develop an off-the-shelf arc-fault detector. The starting point of the project was a prototype detector that was constructed using discrete components and laboratory equipment. An intermediate objective was to build a technically viable detector using programmable components in the detector circuitry. The final objective was to build a commercially viable detector by reducing the cost of the circuitry through the use of more sophisticated programmable components and higher levels of integration.

  14. Toward a Model-Based Approach for Flight System Fault Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Meakin, Peter; Murray, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Use SysML/UML to describe the physical structure of the system This part of the model would be shared with other teams - FS Systems Engineering, Planning & Execution, V&V, Operations, etc., in an integrated model-based engineering environment Use the UML Profile mechanism, defining Stereotypes to precisely express the concepts of the FP domain This extends the UML/SysML languages to contain our FP concepts Use UML/SysML, along with our profile, to capture FP concepts and relationships in the model Generate typical FP engineering products (the FMECA, Fault Tree, MRD, V&V Matrices)

  15. ANNs pinpoint underground distribution faults

    SciTech Connect

    Glinkowski, M.T.; Wang, N.C.

    1995-10-01

    Many offline fault location techniques in power distribution circuits involve patrolling along the lines or cables. In overhead distribution lines, most of the failures can be located quickly by visual inspection without the aid of special equipment. However, locating a fault in underground cable systems is more difficult. It involves additional equipment (e.g., thumpers, radars, etc.) to transform the invisibility of the cable into other forms of signals, such as acoustic sound and electromagnetic pulses. Trained operators must carry the equipment above the ground, follow the path of the signal, and draw lines on their maps in order to locate the fault. Sometimes, even smelling the burnt cable faults is a way of detecting the problem. These techniques are time consuming, not always reliable, and, as in the case of high-voltage dc thumpers, can cause additional damage to the healthy parts of the cable circuit. Online fault location in power networks that involve interconnected lines (cables) and multiterminal sources continues receiving great attention, with limited success in techniques that would provide simple and practical solutions. This article features a new online fault location technique that: uses the pattern recognition feature of artificial neural networks (ANNs); utilizes new capabilities of modern protective relaying hardware. The output of the neural network can be graphically displayed as a simple three-dimensional (3-D) chart that can provide an operator with an instantaneous indication of the location of the fault.

  16. Use of inverse time, adjustable instantaneous pickup circuit breakers for short circuit and ground fault protection of energy efficient motors

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.W.; Bradfield, H.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many energy efficient low voltage motors exhibit first half cycle instantaneous inrush current values greater than the National Electrical Code`s 13 times motor full load amperes maximum permissible setting for instantaneous trip circuit breakers. The alternate use of an inverse time circuit breaker could lead to inadequate protection if the breaker does not have adjustable instantaneous settings. Recent innovations in digital solid state trip unit technology have made available an inverse time, adjustable instantaneous trip circuit breaker in 15A to 150A ratings. This allows the instantaneous pickup to be adjusted to a value slightly above motor inrush so that low level faults will be cleared instantaneously while avoiding nuisance tripping at startup. Applications, settings and comparisons are discussed.

  17. Radiation in dental practice: awareness, protection and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Praveen, B N; Shubhasini, A R; Bhanushree, R; Sumsum, P S; Sushma, C N

    2013-01-01

    Radiation is the transmission of energy through space and matter. There are several forms of radiation, including ionizing and nonionizing. X-rays are the ionizing radiation used extensively in medical and dental practice. Even though they provide useful information and aid in diagnosis, they also have the potential to cause harmful effects. In dentistry, it is mainly used for diagnostic purposes and in a dental set-up usually the practicing dentist exposes, processes and interprets the radiograph. Even though such exposure is less, it is critical to reduce the exposure to the dental personnel and patients in order to prevent the harmful effects of radiation. Several radiation protection measures have been advocated to ameliorate these effects. A survey conducted in the Bengaluru among practicing dentists revealed that radiation protection awareness was very low and the necessary measures taken to reduce the exposure were not adequate. The aim of the article is to review important parameters that must be taken into consideration in the clinical set-up to reduce radiation exposure to patients and dental personnel.

  18. Practical example of the infrastructure protection against rock fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásko, Daniel; Vaníček, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    The protection of transport infrastructures against rock falls represents for the Czech Republic one of the sensitive questions. Rock falls, similarly as other typical geo-hazards for the Czech Republic, as landslides and floods, can have negative impact on safety and security of these infrastructures. One practical example how to reduce risk of rock fall is described in the paper. Great care is devoted to the visual inspection enabling to indicate places with high potential to failure. With the help of numerical modelling the range of rock fall negative impact is estimated. Protection measures are dealing with two basic ways. The first one utilize the results of numerical modelling for the optimal design of protection measures and the second one is focused on the monitoring of the rock blocks with high potential of instability together with wire-less transfer of measured results. After quick evaluation, e.g. comparison with warning values, some protection measures, mostly connected with closure of the potential sector, can be recommended.

  19. Review of personal protection equipment used in practice.

    PubMed

    Hinkin, Jon; Gammon, John; Cutter, Jayne

    2008-01-01

    Standard precautions offer a consistent approach to infection control that does not rely on knowledge or suspicion of infection, and contributes to staff and patient safety by reducing the risk of exposure to potentially infectious material. One of the cornerstones of standard precautions is the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) whenever contact with blood or body fluids is anticipated. However, evidence suggests that compliance with standard precautions including correct use of PPE is inadequate. Demographic and epidemiological changes in the U.K., and the drive to provide more complex patient care outside acute hospitals may lead to increased infection risks for both patients and community healthcare workers. This review examines the importance and use of PPE by community nurses and discusses the implications for practice of poor compliance with standard precautions. Recommendations for practice will be made aimed at improving compliance with this important element of standard precautions.

  20. Sun protection policies and practices in New Zealand primary schools.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Anthony I; Jopson, Janet A; Gray, Andrew

    2012-02-10

    For schools with primary age students, to report the percentages meeting specific requirements of the New Zealand SunSmart Schools Accreditation Programme (SSAP). Schools were randomly selected, within geographic regions, from the Ministry of Education schools database. A questionnaire, mailed to school principals, assessed schools regarding 12 criteria for accreditation: policy, information, hats, 'play in the shade', sunscreen, clothing, role modelling, curriculum, planning, rescheduling, shade provision and review. Post-stratification weights (for achieving each criterion) were used to compensate for oversampling within some regions and differential response rates between regions, using the number of schools per region. 388 schools (representative in socioeconomic decile, size and type) participated. Less than 4% fully met accreditation criteria. Clothing (42%), curriculum delivery and shade (each 54%) requirements were met by the fewest schools. Staff role modelling (92%) was the most commonly met. Schools with uniforms tended to have more protective clothing expectations. Ongoing promotion is needed to consolidate gains and encourage comprehensive sun protection through policies, practices, environment and curriculum. Staff role modelling requirements may be strengthened by implementing existing occupational guidelines for mitigating UVR hazards. There is a need to further assist schools, particularly regarding sun protective clothing, curriculum delivery and environmental shade.

  1. The Fitbit Fault Line: Two Proposals to Protect Health and Fitness Data at Work.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Employers are collecting and using their employees' health data, mined from wearable fitness devices and health apps, in new, profitable, and barely regulated ways. The importance of protecting employee health and fitness data will grow exponentially in the future. This is the moment for a robust discussion of how law can better protect employees from the potential misuse of their health data. While scholars have just begun to examine the problem of health data privacy, this Article contributes to the academic literature in three important ways. First, it analyzes the convergence of three trends resulting in an unprecedented growth of health-related data: the Internet of Things, the Quantified Self movement, and the Rise of Health Platforms. Second, it describes the insufficiencies of specific data privacy laws and federal agency actions in the context of protecting employee health data from employer misuse. Finally, it provides two detailed and workable solutions for remedying the current lack of protection of employee health data that will realign employer use with reasonable expectations of health and fitness privacy. The Article proceeds in four Parts. Part I describes the growth of self-monitoring apps, devices, and other sensor-enabled technology that can monitor a wide range of data related to an employee's health and fitness and the relationship of this growth to both the Quantified Self movement and the Internet of Things. Part II explains the increasing use of employee monitoring through a wide range of sensors, including wearable devices, and the potential uses of that health and fitness data. Part III explores the various regulations and agency actions that might protect employees from the potential misuse of their health and fitness data and the shortcomings of each. Part IV proposes two specific measures that would help ameliorate the ineffective legal protections that currently exist in this context. In order to improve employee notice of and control

  2. Inspection and rehabilitation of tunnels across faults

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1995-12-31

    The inspection and rehabilitation of tunnels that cross faults is unique because they usually are in use and have a large variety of alternative lining types including bare rock, concrete, or steel often coated with accumulations of dirt, grime, algae and other minerals. Inspection methods are important including what to look for, how to clean the inner tunnel lining surfaces, non-destructive testing, coring, soundings, air quality detection and protection, ventilation, lightning, etc. Rehabilitation of tunnels crossing faults requires a practiced knowledge of underground design and construction practices. The most common methods of rehabilitation include grouting and concreting. The Variety of water, wastewater, transit, and highway tunnels in California provide ample examples of tunnels, new and old, that cross active faults. This paper will address specific methods of tunnel inspection and maintenance at fault crossings and give examples of relevant highway, transit, water, and wastewater projects and studies in California to demonstrate the discussions presented.

  3. Protecting single-photon entanglement with practical entanglement source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lan; Ou-Yang, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2017-06-01

    Single-photon entanglement (SPE) is important for quantum communication and quantum information processing. However, SPE is sensitive to photon loss. In this paper, we discuss a linear optical amplification protocol for protecting SPE. Different from the previous protocols, we exploit the practical spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) source to realize the amplification, for the ideal entanglement source is unavailable in current quantum technology. Moreover, we prove that the amplification using the entanglement generated from SPDC source as auxiliary is better than the amplification assisted with single photons. The reason is that the vacuum state from SPDC source will not affect the amplification, so that it can be eliminated automatically. This protocol may be useful in future long-distance quantum communications.

  4. Fault tolerance in space-based digital signal processing and switching systems: Protecting up-link processing resources, demultiplexer, demodulator, and decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Fault tolerance features in the first three major subsystems appearing in the next generation of communications satellites are described. These satellites will contain extensive but efficient high-speed processing and switching capabilities to support the low signal strengths associated with very small aperture terminals. The terminals' numerous data channels are combined through frequency division multiplexing (FDM) on the up-links and are protected individually by forward error-correcting (FEC) binary convolutional codes. The front-end processing resources, demultiplexer, demodulators, and FEC decoders extract all data channels which are then switched individually, multiplexed, and remodulated before retransmission to earth terminals through narrow beam spot antennas. Algorithm based fault tolerance (ABFT) techniques, which relate real number parity values with data flows and operations, are used to protect the data processing operations. The additional checking features utilize resources that can be substituted for normal processing elements when resource reconfiguration is required to replace a failed unit.

  5. Health promotion in childcare centres: a survey of sun protection policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Lynne; Astley, Bronwyn; Peterkin, Danna; Page, Christine; Hampson, Andrew

    2003-10-01

    To describe sun protection policy and practice in child care centres in the Hunter region of New South Wales (NSW) and examine differences in sun protection policy and practice between those who attended a NSW Cancer Council SunSmart workshop and those who did not. One hundred and seventy-seven Hunter child care centres completed a CATI interview (95% consent rate). Ninety seven per cent of centres reported having a written sun protection policy (only 5% deemed comprehensive by review). Sun protection policy components were reported more often than sun protection practices. There were no significant differences in policy or practice according to workshop attendance. Having a sun protection policy in place does not necessarily translate to sun protection practice at child care centres.

  6. Quaternary Geology and Surface Faulting Hazard: Active and Capable Faults in Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.

    2015-12-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.1), in central Italy, raised the issue of surface faulting hazard in Italy, since large urban areas were affected by surface displacement along the causative structure, the Paganica fault. Since then, guidelines for microzonation were drew up that take into consideration the problem of surface faulting in Italy, and laying the bases for future regulations about related hazard, similarly to other countries (e.g. USA). More specific guidelines on the management of areas affected by active and capable faults (i.e. able to produce surface faulting) are going to be released by National Department of Civil Protection; these would define zonation of areas affected by active and capable faults, with prescriptions for land use planning. As such, the guidelines arise the problem of the time interval and general operational criteria to asses fault capability for the Italian territory. As for the chronology, the review of the international literature and regulatory allowed Galadini et al. (2012) to propose different time intervals depending on the ongoing tectonic regime - compressive or extensional - which encompass the Quaternary. As for the operational criteria, the detailed analysis of the large amount of works dealing with active faulting in Italy shows that investigations exclusively based on surface morphological features (e.g. fault planes exposition) or on indirect investigations (geophysical data), are not sufficient or even unreliable to define the presence of an active and capable fault; instead, more accurate geological information on the Quaternary space-time evolution of the areas affected by such tectonic structures is needed. A test area for which active and capable faults can be first mapped based on such a classical but still effective methodological approach can be the central Apennines. Reference Galadini F., Falcucci E., Galli P., Giaccio B., Gori S., Messina P., Moro M., Saroli M., Scardia G., Sposato A. (2012). Time

  7. Proposal on Modeling of Pressure-rise and Propagation due to Short-circuit Fault Arc on a CVT Cable Installed in a Protective Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Tomo; Ohtaka, Toshiya; Amakawa, Tadashi

    In underground distribution systems, a CVT (Cross-Linked Polyethylene Insulated PVC Sheathed Triplex) cable is installed in a protective pipe. When a fault arc occurs on the CVT cable, instantly the pressure increases due to the high temperature of the arc and it propagates in the pipe. The pressure-rise and propagation may seriously damage to the pipe and connected power equipment. There are many different sizes of pipes and cables depending on the installation situations, and fault arc occurs under various conditions. Therefore, the simulation technique is effective for examining such pressure-rise and propagation in addition to short-circuit tests. The objective of this paper is to present a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modeling that can be used to evaluate the characteristics of the pressure-rise and propagation by the fault arc in the protective pipe. As a result, the pressure-rise waveforms by the CFD analysis were similar to those short-circuit test results. In addition, the dependences of maximum pressure-rise on the sizes of the CVT cable and arc current were simulated well. Therefore, the CFD modeling is sufficient for the study of the pressure-rise and propagation in the protective pipe.

  8. Environmental Research In Practice: Restoration And Protection Of Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is tasked to protect human health and the environment. To carry out this task, the EPA makes use of technical expertise within its Office of Research and Development. Restoration and protection of water resources is one area of tec...

  9. Current issues and future directions in evidence-based child protection practices: a view from Romania.

    PubMed

    Iovu, Mihai-Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    The constantly changing nature of social care practice necessitates continuous development of educational programs to prepare current practitioners. Basing social work practice on methodologically sound research evidence is an appealing prospect for the child protection services. However, Romania, once considered an Eastern European model for child welfare policy and practice, is somehow lagging behind. In this article the author gives a short overview of where the Romanian Child Protection System currently stands in terms of evidence-based practice.

  10. A decentralized fault detection and isolation scheme for spacecraft: bridging the gap between model-based fault detection and isolation research and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra, S.; Travé-Massuyès, L.; Chanthery, E.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a decentralized fault diagnosis and isolation (FDI) architecture for spacecraft and applies it to the attitude determination and control system (ADCS) of a satellite. A system is decomposed into functional subsystems. The architecture is composed of local diagnosers for subsystems which work with local models. Fault ambiguities due to interactions between subsystems are resolved at a higher level by a supervisor, which combines the partial view of the local diagnosers and performs isolation on request. The architecture is hierarchically scalable. The structure of the ADCS is modeled as constraints and variables and used to demonstrate the decentralized architecture.

  11. 75 FR 22844 - Construction Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices and Training Requirements; Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Training Requirements; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information... Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices (29 CFR 1926.502) and Training Requirements (29 CFR 1926... Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices (29 CFR 1926.502) and Training Requirements (29 CFR 1926...

  12. 45 CFR 164.520 - Notice of privacy practices for protected health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of privacy practices for protected health... DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.520 Notice of privacy practices for protected health information. (a)...

  13. 45 CFR 164.520 - Notice of privacy practices for protected health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of privacy practices for protected health... DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.520 Notice of privacy practices for protected health information. (a)...

  14. 45 CFR 164.520 - Notice of privacy practices for protected health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... receive protected health information other than summary health information as defined in § 164.504(a) or... Health Information § 164.520 Notice of privacy practices for protected health information. (a) Standard... legal duties with respect to protected health information. (2) Exception for group health plans. (i) An...

  15. Policy and practice in Myanmar's protected area system.

    PubMed

    Myint Aung, U

    2007-07-01

    Myanmar's protected area (PA) system began nearly 150 years ago under royal patronage. Park policies and practices, embodied in 19 pieces of legislation developed sporadically during and after the colonial period. As a result of the FAO-UNDP's Nature Conservation and National Parks Project (1981-1985) the government established the Nature & Wildlife Conservation Division and placed it within the Forest Department as the agency responsible for PA management. As a consequence the number of parks increased from 14 to 33. Myanmar's median park size is less than 50 km(2), but only five parks (15%) are larger than 1000 km(2). Most parks conserve terrestrial habitats; parks encompassing inland wetlands, mangrove, and marine habitats are limited in number and size. Existing PAs unequally represent Myanmar's ecosystems; the Malay Transition, Burmese coast, Burmese Transition and Cardamom Mountains bio-units are under-represented within the system. The effective total PA size (i.e., area of all parks less the area of 13 paper parks) is currently about 2.1%. Budgetary support for parks increased 11% since 1996, but is insufficient to address park needs, particularly in remote parks that are understaffed. Limited education and training of PA staff is a major factor limiting effective park management. Fifty-eight percent of park wardens are educated as foresters, and 42% have university degrees. The average posting in a park is 4 years, which is less than ideal for management continuity. Recommended actions to secure Myanmar's PAs include evaluation and reformulation of policies, increasing representation of Myanmar's habitats within the PA system, management planning, and standardizing protocols for anti-poaching patrols and other forms of law enforcement. Improved leadership training for wardens and range forest officers can also improve park management. Funding for community relations and more integrated management of parks and people can reduce conflicts, while

  16. [Radiation protection using a gaseous hypoxic mixture in oncological practice].

    PubMed

    Strelkov, R B; Chizhov, A Ia; Il'ina, A I; Kuznetsova, L E; Pines, E V

    1979-01-01

    Studies on volunteers have shown that the gas hypoxic mixture containing 10% of oxygen and 90% of nitrogen (GHM-10) renders a protective action on the genetic apparatus of human skin cells but provides no protection of the peripheral blood leucocytes, which show the identical character of metabolic processes as neoplastic cells. Under clinically performed distant x-ray therapy for breast cancer the inhaling of GHM-10 was found to render the antiradiation protective action on different normal tissues (skin, subcellular connective tissue, muscle tissue, mammary gland tissue), but it fails to protect the tumor tissue and regional lymph nodes involved. The clinical observations were supported by pathomorphological examination of the operation material.

  17. Mothers' knowledge and practices related to sun protection in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, T; Bakoula, C; Kavadias, G; Gatos, A; Bilalis, L; Krikos, X; Matsaniotis, N

    1995-09-01

    We attempted to estimate the level of Greek mothers' knowledge relating to the harmful effects of sunlight and whether this knowledge led to protective measures for them and their children. Between September and November 1993, 315 mothers were randomly selected from the outpatient department of our hospital and interviewed by questionnaire about themselves and their children (56% boys, 44% girls, ages 1-12 yrs). Knowledge was estimated by an index score that for 28% of the mothers was considered poor, for 50% moderate, for 16% good, and for only 6% very good or excellent. The score was positively associated with parent education, urban residence, mother's job relevant to the cosmetics industry or the mass media, and history of sunburn in one or both parents. Scores were also established for sunlight-protective measures taken for themselves (28% poor, 45% moderate, 27% just good) and for their children (24% poor, 46% moderate, 30% just good). These scores were significantly associated only with mothers' knowledge of sun protection. Mothers who used sun protection for themselves also applied it to their children. This study shows that mothers in Greece should be encouraged both to increase their knowledge of sun protection and steadily incorporate it into their lifestyle.

  18. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Erroneous measurements in multisensor navigation systems must be detected and isolated. A recursive estimator can find fast growing errors; a least squares batch estimator can find slow growing errors. This process is called fault detection. A protection radius can be calculated as a function of time for a given location. This protection radius can be used to guarantee the integrity of the navigation data. Fault isolation can be accomplished using either a snapshot method or by examining the history of the fault detection statistics.

  19. Workplace violence: protecting your practice from an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Calway, R C

    2001-01-01

    Workplace violence, in the form of verbal threats and/or intimidation and physical aggression, is commonplace in medical practices today. The practice must be prepared to respond to this disaster in the same manner with which they prepare for responses to a medical emergency, fire, or loss of electricity. The risks and liabilities of failing to build a robust program include low staff morale and productivity, employee injury, lost work time, regulatory fines and sanctions, and the risk of civil judgments against the practice. The most successful programs receive commitment (read: involvement) from management and include staff in program development and implementation.

  20. Protecting Confidentiality Rights: The Need for an Ethical Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mary Alice

    2008-01-01

    All psychologists must uphold the same ethical standards about confidentiality even though each state imposes different legal limits on their ability to protect clients' confidences. The resulting ethical-legal confusion is exacerbated by legally based confidentiality training that treats legal exceptions as if they were the rule and fosters the…

  1. Protecting Confidentiality Rights: The Need for an Ethical Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mary Alice

    2008-01-01

    All psychologists must uphold the same ethical standards about confidentiality even though each state imposes different legal limits on their ability to protect clients' confidences. The resulting ethical-legal confusion is exacerbated by legally based confidentiality training that treats legal exceptions as if they were the rule and fosters the…

  2. The challenges of IRB review and human subjects protections in practice-based research.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Leslie E; Croughan, Mary; Lo, Bernard

    2002-06-01

    Practice-based research raises unique challenges with respect to human subjects protections and institutional review board (IRB) review. In this paper, three challenges posed by practice-based research are analyzed: (1) IRB review for clinician investigators who are not affiliated with an institution that has an IRB; (2) multiple IRB review; and (3) required human subjects protection training of key personnel. Investigators should be proactive in addressing required IRB review in practice-based research. In particular, they need to ensure that appropriate IRB review is obtained for all performance sites and plan for review for unaffiliated investigators. Practice-based research investigators and professional societies should educate IRB members and policy makers and publish articles regarding how IRBs might best address human subjects concerns in practice-based research. Furthermore, practice-based research investigators and professional societies should work with IRBs and the Office for Human Research Protections to facilitate centralized or cooperative review of practice-based research. Finally, practice-based research investigators need to ensure that their clinician investigators receive appropriate training in human subjects protection. Practice-based research investigators and professional societies can facilitate this process by helping to define and implement the appropriate training for busy practice-based research clinicians and office staff.

  3. Interacting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Nixon, C. W.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Zuluaga, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The way that faults interact with each other controls fault geometries, displacements and strains. Faults rarely occur individually but as sets or networks, with the arrangement of these faults producing a variety of different fault interactions. Fault interactions are characterised in terms of the following: 1) Geometry - the spatial arrangement of the faults. Interacting faults may or may not be geometrically linked (i.e. physically connected), when fault planes share an intersection line. 2) Kinematics - the displacement distributions of the interacting faults and whether the displacement directions are parallel, perpendicular or oblique to the intersection line. Interacting faults may or may not be kinematically linked, where the displacements, stresses and strains of one fault influences those of the other. 3) Displacement and strain in the interaction zone - whether the faults have the same or opposite displacement directions, and if extension or contraction dominates in the acute bisector between the faults. 4) Chronology - the relative ages of the faults. This characterisation scheme is used to suggest a classification for interacting faults. Different types of interaction are illustrated using metre-scale faults from the Mesozoic rocks of Somerset and examples from the literature.

  4. Lightning protection practices applied to field station installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blalock, T. J.; Uhlig, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical considerations of lightning phenomena and the effects of the magnetic, capacitive, and resistive components of lightning-induced voltages are discussed. A typical tracking station is analyzed from a lightning standpoint. Specific protective methods are discussed, including the implementation of high-surge-current voltage clippers for sensitive electrical and electronic circuits, grounding, counterpoises, and bonding. The safety of operating personnel is also treated as a prime consideration.

  5. Packaged Fault Model for Geometric Segmentation of Active Faults Into Earthquake Source Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    In Japan, the empirical formula proposed by Matsuda (1975) mainly based on the length of the historical surface fault ruptures and magnitude, is generally applied to estimate the size of future earthquakes from the extent of existing active faults for seismic hazard assessment. Therefore validity of the active fault length and defining individual segment boundaries where propagating ruptures terminate are essential and crucial to the reliability for the accurate assessments. It is, however, not likely for us to clearly identify the behavioral earthquake segments from observation of surface faulting during the historical period, because most of the active faults have longer recurrence intervals than 1000 years in Japan. Besides uncertainties of the datasets obtained mainly from fault trenching studies are quite large for fault grouping/segmentation. This is why new methods or criteria should be applied for active fault grouping/segmentation, and one of the candidates may be geometric criterion of active faults. Matsuda (1990) used _gfive kilometer_h as a critical distance for grouping and separation of neighboring active faults. On the other hand, Nakata and Goto (1998) proposed the geometric criteria such as (1) branching features of active fault traces and (2) characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution along the fault traces as tools to predict rupture length of future earthquakes. The branching during the fault rupture propagation is regarded as an effective energy dissipation process and could result in final rupture termination. With respect to the characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution, especially with strike-slip components, the up-thrown sides along the faults are, in general, located on the fault blocks in the direction of relative strike-slip. Applying these new geometric criteria to the high-resolution active fault distribution maps, the fault grouping/segmentation could be more practically conducted. We tested this model

  6. Interagency Collaboration between Child Protection and Mental Health Services: Practices, Attitudes and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Yvonne; Feeney, Judith A.; Rixon, Kylie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to examine some of the factors that facilitate and hinder interagency collaboration between child protection services and mental health services in cases where there is a parent with a mental illness and there are protection concerns for the child(ren). The paper reports on agency practices, worker attitudes and…

  7. Interagency Collaboration between Child Protection and Mental Health Services: Practices, Attitudes and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Yvonne; Feeney, Judith A.; Rixon, Kylie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to examine some of the factors that facilitate and hinder interagency collaboration between child protection services and mental health services in cases where there is a parent with a mental illness and there are protection concerns for the child(ren). The paper reports on agency practices, worker attitudes and…

  8. Faulting Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-15

    This region of Xanthe Terra has mostly been contracted due to thrust faulting, but this local region shows evidence of extensional faulting, also called normal faulting. When two normal faults face each other, they create a bathtub-like depression called a "graben." http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20813

  9. Hepatitis C Avoidance in Injection Drug Users: A Typology of Possible Protective Practices

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Catherine; Harris, Magdalena; Rhodes, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a serious public health concern. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at particular risk and nearly half (45%) of PWID in England may be infected. HCV prevention interventions have only had moderate impact on the prevalence of HCV in this population. Using qualitative methods, we sought to detail the protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance among PWID, and explore the motivations for these. Methods The study used a life history approach allowing participants to detail their lived experience both before and during the course of their injecting careers. Thirty-seven participants were recruited from drug services in London, and from referrals within local injecting networks. A baseline and follow-up in-depth qualitative interview was carried out with each participant, and for half, a third interview was also undertaken. All underwent testing for HCV antibody. Analyses focused on developing a descriptive typology of protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance. Results Practices were deemed to be protective against HCV if they could be expected a priori to reduce the number of overall injections and/or the number of injections using shared injecting equipment. Participants reported engaging in various protective practices which fell into three categories identified through thematic analysis: principles about injecting, preparedness, and flexibility. Conclusions All participants engaged in protective practices irrespective of serostatus. It is important to consider the relative importance of different motivations framing protective practices in order to formulate harm reduction interventions which appeal to the situated concerns of PWID, especially given that these protective practices may also help protect against HIV and other blood borne infections. PMID:24194855

  10. Comanagement practices enhance fisheries in marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Paolo; Claudet, Joachim

    2010-02-01

    Fishing activities worldwide have dramatically affected marine fish stocks and ecosystems. Marine protected areas (MPAs) with no-take zones may enhance fisheries, but empirical evidence of this is scant. We conducted a 4-year survey of fish catches around and within an MPA that was previously fully closed to fishing and then partially reopened under regulated comanaged fishing. In collaboration with the fishers and the MPA authority, we set the fishing effort and selected the gear to limit fishing impact on key fish predators, juvenile fish stage, and benthic communities and habitats. Within an adaptive comanagement framework, fishers agreed to reduce fishing effort if symptoms of overfishing were detected. We analyzed the temporal trends of catch per unit of effort (CPUE) of the whole species assemblages and CPUE of the four most valuable and frequent species observed inside the opened buffer zone and outside the MPA investigated. After the comanaged opening, CPUE first declined and then stabilized at levels more than twice that of catches obtained outside the MPA. Our results suggest that working closely with fishers can result in greater fisheries catches. Partial protection of coastal areas together with adaptive comanagement involving fishers, scientists, and managers can effectively achieve conservation and fishery management goals and benefit fishing communities and alleviate overfishing.

  11. 78 FR 59725 - Construction Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices, and Training Requirements; Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Training Requirements; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information... Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices (29 CFR 1926.502), and Training Requirements (29 CFR... Criteria and Practices (29 CFR 1926.502) and Training Requirements (29 CFR 1926.503) ensure that employers...

  12. Comparing written programs and self-reported respiratory protection practices in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sietsema, Margaret; Conroy, Lorraine M; Brosseau, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Airborne biological hazards in hospitals require the use of respiratory protection. A well-implemented respiratory protection program can protect health care workers from these exposures. This study examines the relationship between written respiratory programs and reported practices in health care settings. Twenty-eight hospitals in Illinois and Minnesota were recruited to a study of respiratory protection programs and practices in acute care settings. Interviews were conducted with hospital managers, unit managers, and health care workers from departments where respirators are commonly required. Each hospital's written respiratory protection program was scored for the 11 elements required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), using a standardized tool, for a maximum possible score of 22 (2 pts. per element). Twenty interview questions associated with program practices were also scored by percent correct responses. Written program scores ranged from 2-17 with an average of 9.2. Hospital and unit managers scored on average 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to the OSHA standard; health care workers scored significantly lower, 71% (p < 0.001). Minnesota written program scores were not significantly higher than Illinois hospitals (p = 0.16), while all Illinois survey respondents scored higher than those in Minnesota (p < 0.001). There was no trend between written programs and interview responses. Written respiratory protection programs in the study sites did not provide the level of detail required OSHA. Interview responses representing hospital practices surrounding respiratory protection indicated that hospitals were aware of and following regulatory guidelines.

  13. How did fixed-width buffers become standard practice for protecting freshwaters and their riparian areas from forest harvest practices?

    Treesearch

    John S. Richardson; Robert J. Naiman; Peter A. Bisson

    2012-01-01

    Riparian buffers provide improved protection for water quality and biota, and narrow, fixed-width buffers of native vegetation along streams have been used to mitigate the effects of forest harvest at least since the 1960s. The practice of leaving unmanaged strips of vegetation along water courses in agricultural lands had been used before the 1960s in southern Europe...

  14. Medical social work practice in child protection in China: A multiple case study in Shanghai hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Hämäläinen, Juha; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of the child welfare system in China over recent years, medical social work has been increasingly involved in providing child protection services in several hospitals in Shanghai. Focusing on five cases in this paper, the exploratory study aims to present a critical overview of current practices and effects of medical social work for child protection, based on a critical analysis of the multidimensional role of social work practitioners engaged in the provision of child protection services as well as potential challenges. Implications and suggestions for future improvements of China's child protection system are also discussed.

  15. Protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Dorado, David; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Inserte, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Even when reperfusion therapy is applied as early as possible, survival and quality of life are compromised in a considerable number of patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. Some cell death following transient coronary occlusion occurs during reperfusion, due to poor handling of calcium in the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria system, calpain activation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial failure, all promoted by rapid normalization of intracellular pH. Various clinical trials have shown that infarct size can be limited by nonpharmacological strategies--such as ischemic postconditioning and remote ischemic conditioning--or by drugs--such as cyclosporine, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, beta-blockers, or stimulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate synthesis. However, some clinical studies have yielded negative results, largely due to a lack of consistent preclinical data or a poor design, especially delayed administration. Large-scale clinical trials are therefore necessary, particularly those with primary clinical variables and combined therapies that consider age, sex, and comorbidities, to convert protection against reperfusion injury into a standard treatment for patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction.

  16. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  18. Active fault databases and seismic hazard calculations: a compromise between science and practice. Review of case studies from Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Martin-Banda, Raquel; Insua-Arevalo, Juan Miguel; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Martinez-Diaz, Jose Jesus

    2017-04-01

    Since the Quaternary Active Faults Database of Iberia (QAFI) was released in February 2012 a number of studies aimed at producing seismic hazard assessments have made use of it. We will present a summary of the shortcomings and advantages that were faced when QAFI was considered in different seismic hazard studies. These include the production of the new official seismic hazard map of Spain, performed in the view of the foreseen adoption of Eurocode-8 throughout 2017. The QAFI database was considered as a complementary source of information for designing the seismogenic source-zone models used in the calculations, and particularly for the estimation of maximum magnitude distribution in each zone, as well as for assigning the predominant rupture mechanism based on style of faulting. We will also review the different results obtained by other studies that considered QAFI faults as independent seismogenic-sources in opposition to source-zones, revealing, on one hand, the crucial importance of data-reliability and, on the other, the very much influence that ground motion attenuation models have on the actual impact of fault-sources on hazard results. Finally, we will present briefly the updated version of the database (QAFI v.3, 2015), which includes an original scheme for evaluating the reliability of fault seismic parameters specifically devised to facilitate decision-making to seismic hazard practitioners.

  19. Women empowerment and practices regarding use of dual protection among family planning clients in urban Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mutowo, Jesca; Kasu, Christine Mary; Mufunda, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Gender related vulnerability may increase women's susceptibility to HIV infection and unintended pregnancy. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between women empowerment and practices regarding use of dual protection. A non-experimental descriptive correlational study design was conducted using systematic sampling method to recruit eighty women aged 18-49 years at an urban clinic in Zimbabwe. Data was collected using a structured interview schedule and was analysed and presented using descriptive and inferential statistics. A weak positive significant correlation existed between women empowerment and use of dual protection (r= .242, p=0.03). Findings demonstrated that as women empowerment levels increase practices regarding use of dual protection also increase. The coefficient of determination, R2=.0.058, b=0.293, indicated that the total amount of variation in utilization of dual protection explained by level of women empowerment was 5.8%. The major finding was that use of dual protection was very low (3.8%) and 67.5% had low levels of practices regarding use of dual protection. Additionally, 85.0% were not confident of using the female condom. Gender inequality within sexual relations was associated with low levels of practices regarding use of dual protection. The study provided evidence for the need for a proactive integrated approach to empower women so that they could negotiate for safer sex practices. To increase female condom utilization, manufacturers need to redesign the female condom so that it becomes user friendly. Health personnel need to involve men for any health reproductive program to succeed.

  20. Women empowerment and practices regarding use of dual protection among family planning clients in urban Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mutowo, Jesca; Kasu, Christine Mary; Mufunda, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gender related vulnerability may increase women's susceptibility to HIV infection and unintended pregnancy. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between women empowerment and practices regarding use of dual protection. Methods A non-experimental descriptive correlational study design was conducted using systematic sampling method to recruit eighty women aged 18-49 years at an urban clinic in Zimbabwe. Data was collected using a structured interview schedule and was analysed and presented using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results A weak positive significant correlation existed between women empowerment and use of dual protection (r= .242, p=0.03). Findings demonstrated that as women empowerment levels increase practices regarding use of dual protection also increase. The coefficient of determination, R2=.0.058, b=0.293, indicated that the total amount of variation in utilization of dual protection explained by level of women empowerment was 5.8%. The major finding was that use of dual protection was very low (3.8%) and 67.5% had low levels of practices regarding use of dual protection. Additionally, 85.0% were not confident of using the female condom. Conclusion Gender inequality within sexual relations was associated with low levels of practices regarding use of dual protection. The study provided evidence for the need for a proactive integrated approach to empower women so that they could negotiate for safer sex practices. To increase female condom utilization, manufacturers need to redesign the female condom so that it becomes user friendly. Health personnel need to involve men for any health reproductive program to succeed. PMID:25328596

  1. Zipper Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  2. Knowledge and practice of sun protection in schools in South Africa where no national sun protection programme exists.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reeder, Anthony I; Albers, Patricia N

    2016-04-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline information and investigated possible associations between strategies regarding sun protection in schools and students' responses to a questionnaire. Principals from randomly selected urban government schools in all nine South African provinces completed a questionnaire and 679 students were surveyed. The mean sun-related knowledge and behaviour scores of students were 4 (range: 1-7) and 3 (range-0-8) out of 9, respectively. The mean school sun protection effort score was 4 out of 14. There were no statistically significant correlations between students' knowledge or behaviour scores and their school score. The World Health Organization recommends an SSAP to address policy, practice and curriculum changes to support sun protection of students. This cross-sectional study demonstrates the feasibility of, and need for, a larger baseline study with longitudinal, multi-variable follow-up which includes other influential factors, such as parent support. Such research could quantify the impact of the SSAP and identify which key factors influence the sun-related knowledge and behaviours of students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Sun protection practices among children with a family history of melanoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Beth A; Bastani, Roshan; Chang, L Cindy; Khanna, Rachna; Chen, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to assess sun protection practices and correlates among children with a family history of melanoma, a high risk and understudied group. Sixty-eight melanoma cases, recruited through the Los Angeles County cancer registry, completed a survey. Survivors provided data on 110 children (mean age = 8.11 years). Although most children used sunscreen (79 %), half experienced a recent sunburn. The mean sun protection level for the sample was similar to levels observed among average risk children. Efforts to reduce sunburn frequency and improve sun protection among these vulnerable children appear warranted.

  4. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  5. Fault Management Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  6. [Data protection, radiation protection and copyright: Problems of transferring results in assessment practice].

    PubMed

    Klemm, H-T

    2015-06-01

    In Germany, the medical assessor is subject to the law on contracts for work and services ("Werksvertragsrecht"). When a medical expert assesses a subject on behalf of a third party, there is no contractual relationship between them. In the field of private insurance law and in social insurance law, the medical expert is faced with various procedural requirements. Failing to meet these legal requirements often makes the assessment difficult or even impossible. The transfer of radiographs to the medical assessor is dealt with in the German X-ray regulations ("Röntgenverordnung"). The assessor, who is without doubt an examining doctor, has the right to have the radiographs temporarily made available (§ 28 et al.). Passing on the radiographs is all the more appropriate if by doing so additional X-ray examinations can be avoided. The right of access to medical data in the social security law, apart from X-ray regulations, is regulated by German Civil Code (BGB) § 810 and German Basic Law section 1 paragraph 1 in connection with section 2 paragraph 1 ("§ 810 BGB; Art. 1 Abs. 1, Art. 2 Abs. 1 GG"). In the absence of third party interest worthy of protection, the right of access to assessment records has to be granted to the subject, who will then authorize the examining medical expert to exercise this right. In private insurance law, only the private health insurance has its regulation concerning obtaining information about treatment or the access to medical assessments. In other types of insurance the medical assessor's right of access to medical examination data and/or the basis for medical findings can only be derived from secondary obligations as part of the insurance contract or directly from general constitutional personal rights.

  7. Farm operator perceptions of water quality protective pest management practices: Selected survey findings

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.; Blair, J.; Webb, B.

    1995-12-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture often poses a tension between water quality and environmental protection goals on the one hand and the viability of food supplies on the other hand. Pesticides used for field crops (e.g., corn, soy beans and wheat) have been detected in waterbodies, and according to some studies, are apparently finding their way into water supplies. A considerable amount of discretion is allowed in farm operator`s choice of pest management practices, and voluntary behavior becomes an important factor in promoting environmentally protective practices. Thus, it is important to know the attitudes of farmers who make pest management decisions including pesticide choices, toward the use of various water quality protective pest management practices. A number of studies show that more general environmental attitudes reflect a general world view that shapes attitudes toward particular environmental issues. This paper addresses the relationship between the more general environmental attitudes of farmers to their attitudes toward water quality issues and pest management practices which are protective of water quality. Some of the personal tradeoffs farmers are willing to make to enhance environmental controls on pesticides are also explored. Results are based on preliminary findings from a survey of farm operators who grow corn, soybeans and other field crops in three eastern states. The survey was conducted via a mail questionnaire to 2,700 farmers with telephone follow-up during the Fall of 1994. Implications of the findings for pest management in general are discussed.

  8. The Data Protection Act 1998: an audit of its effect on surgical trainees' practice.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jill B

    2002-09-01

    The Data Protection Act 1998 came into force in March 2000 and has significant implications on our normal practice. A survey of surgical specialist registrars was made to establish knowledge of the Act and adherence to its eight principles. Knowledge was patchy and adherence minimal, Simple guidelines are suggested to help juniors keep within the principles of the Act.

  9. Defining values in place: A practical application for visitor management in protected areas

    Treesearch

    Gordon Cessford; Mike Edginton

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores a value specification option to better meet a core information need in protected area management for recreation and conservation. It does not debate the meaning or definition of values, but instead identifies a perspective on values that is aimed at meeting practical conservation management needs. The first part of that perspective involves...

  10. Sun protection and sunbathing practices among at-risk family members of patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the increased level of familial risk, research indicates that family members of patients with melanoma engage in relatively low levels of sun protection and high levels of sun exposure. The goal of this study was to evaluate a broad range of demographic, medical, psychological, knowledge, and social influence correlates of sun protection and sunbathing practices among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of melanoma patients and to determine if correlates of sun protection and sunbathing were unique. Methods We evaluated correlates of sun protection and sunbathing among FDRs of melanoma patients who were at increased disease risk due to low compliance with sun protection and skin surveillance behaviors. Participants (N = 545) completed a phone survey. Results FDRs who reported higher sun protection had a higher education level, lower benefits of sunbathing, greater sunscreen self-efficacy, greater concerns about photo-aging and greater sun protection norms. FDRs who reported higher sunbathing were younger, more likely to be female, endorsed fewer sunscreen barriers, perceived more benefits of sunbathing, had lower image norms for tanness, and endorsed higher sunbathing norms. Conclusion Interventions for family members at risk for melanoma might benefit from improving sun protection self-efficacy, reducing perceived sunbathing benefits, and targeting normative influences to sunbathe. PMID:21338483

  11. Managing the Risk of Triggered Seismicity: Can We Identify (and Avoid) Potentially Active Faults? - A Practical Case Study in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Alt, R. C., II; Walsh, F. R.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that throughout the central and eastern U.S. there has been a marked increase in seismicity since 2009, at least some of which appears to increased wastewater injection. No area has seen a greater increase in seismicity than Oklahoma. In this paper, we utilize newly available information on in situ stress orientation and relative magnitudes, the distribution of high volume injection wells and knowledge of the intervals used for waste water disposal to identify the factors potentially contributing to the occurrence of triggered seismicity. While there are a number of sites where in situ stress data has been successfully used to identify potentially active faults, we are investigating whether this methodology can be implemented throughout a state utilizing the types of information frequently available in areas of oil and gas development. As an initial test of this concept, we have been compiling stress orientation data from wells throughout Oklahoma provided by private industry. Over fifty new high quality data points, principally drilling-induced tensile fractures observed in image logs, result in a greatly improved understanding of the stress field in much of the state. A relatively uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress is observed, although stress orientations (and possibly relative stress magnitudes) differ in the southern and southwestern parts of the state. The proposed methodology can be tested in the area of the NE-trending fault that produced the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011, and the Meers fault in southwestern OK, that produced a M~7 reverse faulting earthquake about 1100 years ago. This methodology can also be used to essentially rule out slip on other major faults in the area, such as the ~N-S trending Nemaha fault system. Additional factors leading to the occurrence of relatively large triggered earthquakes in Oklahoma are 1) the overall increase in injection volumes throughout the state in recent

  12. Sun protection practices and sun exposure among children with a parental history of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Beth A; Lin, Tiffany; Chang, L Cindy; Okada, Ashley; Wong, Weng Kee; Glanz, Karen; Bastani, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    First-degree relatives of melanoma survivors have a substantially higher lifetime risk for melanoma than individuals with no family history. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the primary modifiable risk factor for the disease. Reducing UV exposure through sun protection may be particularly important for children with a parental history of melanoma. Nonetheless, limited prior research has investigated sun protection practices and sun exposure among these children. The California Cancer Registry was used to identify melanoma survivors eligible to participate in a survey to assess their children's sun protection practices and sun exposure. The survey was administered by mail, telephone, or web to Latino and non-Latino white melanoma survivors with at least one child (0-17 years; N = 324). Sun exposure was high and the rate of sunburn was equivalent to or higher than estimates from average-risk populations. Use of sun protection was suboptimal. Latino children were less likely to wear sunscreen and hats and more likely to wear sunglasses, although these differences disappeared in adjusted analyses. Increasing age of the child was associated with lower sun protection and higher risk for sunburn, whereas higher objective risk for melanoma predicted improved sun protection and a higher risk for sunburns. Perception of high barriers to sun protection was the strongest modifiable correlate of sun protection. Interventions to improve sun protection and reduce sun exposure and sunburns in high-risk children are needed. Intervening in high-risk populations may help reduce the burden of melanoma in the United States. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Sun Protection Practices and Sun Exposure among Children with a Parental History of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Beth A.; Lin, Tiffany; Chang, L. Cindy; Okada, Ashley; Wong, Weng Kee; Glanz, Karen; Bastani, Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives of melanoma survivors have a substantially higher lifetime risk for melanoma than individuals with no family history. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the primary modifiable risk factor for the disease. Reducing UV exposure through sun protection may be particularly important for children with a parental history of melanoma. Nonetheless, limited prior research has investigated sun protection practices and sun exposure among these children. Methods The California Cancer Registry was used to identify melanoma survivors eligible to participate in a survey to assess their children's sun protection practices and sun exposure. The survey was administered by mail, telephone, or web to Latino and non-Latino white melanoma survivors with at least one child (0–17 years; N = 324). Results Sun exposure was high and the rate of sunburn was equivalent to or higher than estimates from average risk populations. Use of sun protection was suboptimal. Latino children were less likely to wear sunscreen and hats and more likely to wear sunglasses, although these differences disappeared in adjusted analyses. Increasing age of the child was associated with lower sun protection and higher risk for sunburn whereas higher objective risk for melanoma predicted improved sun protection and a higher risk for sunburns. Perception of high barriers to sun protection was the strongest modifiable correlate of sun protection. Conclusions Interventions to improve sun protection and reduce sun exposure and sunburns in high risk children are needed. Impact Intervening in high risk populations may help reduce the burden of melanoma in the U.S. PMID:25587110

  14. Practices Changes in the Child Protection System to Address the Needs of Parents With Cognitive Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Sandra T.; Maggi, Mirella C.; Proctor, Stephon Nathanial

    2016-01-01

    Parents with cognitive disabilities (PCD) are over-represented in the child protection system. However, the current state of the child protection system is not well prepared for working with them. Biases that exist against their parenting, the need for accommodations in assessment and intervention practices, and specific training in staff and cross systems barriers need to be addressed. This paper argues for changes that will ensure such parents are more effectively served and that child protection staff and contract providers are better equipped to work with them. Specific changes are discussed in assessment and intervention practices. These changes will require human capacity building and organizational restructuring. Although empirically based behavioral approaches with PCD will be emphasized, recent empirical work suggests that social information processing and neurocognitive problems occur in PCD. Approaches to working with such problems are emerging and must also be considered and integrated into a blueprint for change. PMID:27610050

  15. Balancing theory and practicality: engaging non-ethicists in ethical decision making related to radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Nicole; Wueste, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This paper discusses an approach for engaging radiation protection professionals in the ethical aspects of decision-making, with discussion on how this approach fits in with the existing system of radiological protection. It explores finding common ground between ethical and scientific theory, how to present relevant moral theory in accessible language, and provides a practical framework for dealing with real-world problems. Although establishing the ethical theory behind the system of radiological protection is an important ongoing endeavour within the community, it is equally important to communicate this information in a way that is useful to non-ethicists. Discussion of both ethical theory and a useful strategy for applying the theory makes ethics more accessible to those working in the field by providing them with the knowledge and confidence to apply ethical principles in decisions and practice.

  16. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...

  17. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...

  18. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...

  19. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...

  20. The relevance of the Goudge inquiry to the practice of child protection/forensic paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Skellern, Catherine; Donald, Terence

    2014-10-01

    In 2008 Ontario, Canada the Goudge Inquiry arose following increasing concerns about practices surrounding forensic pathology and the investigation of paediatric deaths. Some of the considerations and recommendations have relevance to child protection/forensic paediatricians, particularly in relation to their responsibilities in opinion formulation and as expert witnesses. By examining the Inquiry recommendations, this paper applies them in relation to child protection/forensic paediatrics by discussing forensic medicine and its legal context, how interpretation of published reports and data should be used in opinion formulation; issues of 'diagnosis' versus 'opinion'; issues specific to child protection paediatrics; quality control; aspects of report writing and terminological considerations. It concludes with an adaptation of key recommendations directly from those of Goudge, applied to the context of paediatric forensic medicine undertaken in child protection assessments.

  1. Certificates of Confidentiality: Protecting Human Subject Research Data in Law and Practice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Leslie E; Patel, Mayank J; Williams Tarver, Brett A; Austin, Jeffrey L; Dame, Lauren A; Beskow, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    The federal Certificate of Confidentiality plays an important role in research on sensitive topics by authorizing researchers to refuse to disclose identifiable research data in response to subpoenas in any legal setting. However, there is little known about how effective Certificates are in practice. This article draws on our legal and empirical research on this topic to fill this information gap. It includes a description of the purpose of Certificates, their legislative and regulatory history, and a summary of the few reported and unreported cases that have dealt with Certificates. In addition, we outline other statutory confidentiality protections, compare them to the Certificate's protections, and analyze some of the vulnerabilities of a Certificate's protections. This analysis allows us to make specific recommendations for strengthening the protections afforded to research data. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  2. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    To support FAA certification airworthiness standards, composite substrates are subjected to lightning direct-effect electrical waveforms to determine performance characteristics of the lightning strike protection (LSP) conductive layers used to protect composite substrates. Test results collected from independent LSP studies are often incomparable due to variability in test procedures & applied practices at different organizations, which impairs performance correlations between different LSP data sets. Under a NASA supported contract, The Boeing Company developed technical procedures and documentation as guidance in order to facilitate a test method for conducting universal common practice lightning strike protection test procedures. The procedures obtain conformity in future lightning strike protection evaluations to allow meaningful performance correlations across data sets. This universal common practice guidance provides the manufacturing specifications to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) test panels, including finish, grounding configuration, and acceptable methods for pretest nondestructive inspection (NDI) and posttest destructive inspection. The test operations guidance elaborates on the provisions contained in SAE ARP5416 to address inconsistencies in the generation of damage protection performance data, so as to provide for maximum achievable correlation across capable lab facilities. In addition, the guidance details a direct effects test bed design to aid in quantification of the multi-physical phenomena surrounding a lightning direct attachment supporting validation data requirements for the development of predictive computational modeling. The lightning test bed is designed to accommodate a repeatable installation procedure to secure the test panel and eliminate test installation uncertainty. It also facilitates a means to capture the electrical waveform parameters in 2 dimensions, along with the mechanical displacement and thermal

  3. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  4. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  5. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  6. On the design of fault-tolerant robotic manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert

    1993-01-01

    Robotic systems are finding increasing use in space applications. Many of these devices are going to be operational on board the Space Station Freedom. Fault tolerance has been deemed necessary because of the criticality of the tasks and the inaccessibility of the systems to maintenance and repair. Design for fault tolerance in manipulator systems is an area within robotics that is without precedence in the literature. In this paper, we will attempt to lay down the foundations for such a technology. Design for fault tolerance demands new and special approaches to design, often at considerable variance from established design practices. These design aspects, together with reliability evaluation and modeling tools, are presented. Mechanical architectures that employ protective redundancies at many levels and have a modular architecture are then studied in detail. Once a mechanical architecture for fault tolerance has been derived, the chronological stages of operational fault tolerance are investigated. Failure detection, isolation, and estimation methods are surveyed, and such methods for robot sensors and actuators are derived. Failure recovery methods are also presented for each of the protective layers of redundancy. Failure recovery tactics often span all of the layers of a control hierarchy. Thus, a unified framework for decision-making and control, which orchestrates both the nominal redundancy management tasks and the failure management tasks, has been derived. The well-developed field of fault-tolerant computers is studied next, and some design principles relevant to the design of fault-tolerant robot controllers are abstracted. Conclusions are drawn, and a road map for the design of fault-tolerant manipulator systems is laid out with recommendations for a 10 DOF arm with dual actuators at each joint.

  7. The relationship between sun protection policy and associated practices in a national sample of early childhood services in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ettridge, Kerry A; Bowden, Jacqueline A; Rayner, Joanne M; Wilson, Carlene J

    2011-02-01

    Limiting exposure to sunlight during childhood can significantly reduce the risk of skin cancer. This was the first national study to assess the sun protection policies and practices of early childhood services across Australia. It also examined the key predictors of services' sun protection practices. In 2007, 1017 respondents completed a self-administered survey about the sun protection policies and practices in their early childhood service (response rate of 59%). Most (95%) had a written sun protection policy. The most common policy inclusions were hat wearing (91%), sunscreen use (87%) and enforcement of policy (97%). Less frequently reported inclusions were protective clothing (69%), information for parents/caregivers (58%) and regular reviews/updates of policies (65%). Basic sun protection practices (e.g. required any type of hat and sunscreen use) were more commonly reported than extensive practices (required protective clothing or regularly applied sunscreen). Higher sun protection policy scores, being a formal childcare service as opposed to a kindergarten/pre-school and having SunSmart status as opposed to not, were associated with higher sun protection practice scores (P < 0.001). Sun protection policies may be improved through encouraging services to have more specific policy inclusions and to model their policies on the SunSmart Early Childhood Program.

  8. The Impact of Solution-Focused Training on Professionals' Beliefs, Practices and Burnout of Child Protection Workers in Tenerife Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Antonio; Beyebach, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a large-scale research project on the child protection services in Tenerife, Spain. In Study 1, the professional beliefs and practices of 152 child protection workers, as measured by a Professional Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire, were correlated with their scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory.…

  9. The Relationship between Sun Protection Policy and Associated Practices in a National Sample of Early Childhood Services in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettridge, Kerry A.; Bowden, Jacqueline A.; Rayner, Joanne M.; Wilson, Carlene J.

    2011-01-01

    Limiting exposure to sunlight during childhood can significantly reduce the risk of skin cancer. This was the first national study to assess the sun protection policies and practices of early childhood services across Australia. It also examined the key predictors of services' sun protection practices. In 2007, 1017 respondents completed a…

  10. The Relationship between Sun Protection Policy and Associated Practices in a National Sample of Early Childhood Services in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettridge, Kerry A.; Bowden, Jacqueline A.; Rayner, Joanne M.; Wilson, Carlene J.

    2011-01-01

    Limiting exposure to sunlight during childhood can significantly reduce the risk of skin cancer. This was the first national study to assess the sun protection policies and practices of early childhood services across Australia. It also examined the key predictors of services' sun protection practices. In 2007, 1017 respondents completed a…

  11. The Impact of Solution-Focused Training on Professionals' Beliefs, Practices and Burnout of Child Protection Workers in Tenerife Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Antonio; Beyebach, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a large-scale research project on the child protection services in Tenerife, Spain. In Study 1, the professional beliefs and practices of 152 child protection workers, as measured by a Professional Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire, were correlated with their scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory.…

  12. Fault Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Poliakov, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Theoretical stress analysis for a propagating shear rupture suggests that the propensity of the rupture path to branch is determined by rupture speed and by the preexisting stress state. See Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice (JGR, submitted April 2001, URL below). Deviatoric stresses near a mode II rupture tip are found to be much higher to both sides of the fault plane than directly ahead, when rupture speed becomes close to the Rayleigh speed. However, the actual pattern of predicted Coulomb failure on secondary faults is strongly dependent on the angle between the fault and the direction of maximum compression Smax in the pre-stress field. Steep Smax angles lead to more extensive failure on the extensional side, whereas shallow angles give comparable failure regions on both. Here we test such concepts against natural examples. For crustal thrust faults we may assume that Smax is horizontal. Thus nucleation on a steeply dipping plane, like the 53 ° dip for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, is consistent with rupture path kinking to the extensional side, as inferred. Nucleation on a shallow dip, like for the 12 ° -18 ° of the 1985 Kettleman Hills event, should activate both sides, as seems consistent with aftershock patterns. Similarly, in a strike slip example, Smax is inferred to be at approximately 60 ° with the Johnson Valley fault where it branched to the extensional side onto the Landers-Kickapoo fault in the 1992 event, and this too is consistent. Further, geological examination of the activation of secondary fault features along the Johnson Valley fault and the Homestead Valley fault consistently shows that most activity occurs on the extensional side. Another strike-slip example is the Imperial Valley 1979 earthquake. The approximate Smax direction is north-south, at around 35 ° with the main fault, where it branched, on the extensional side, onto Brawley fault, again interpretable with the concepts developed.

  13. Protection of people and environment from radiation risk through good regulatory practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jais, Azlina Mohammad; Hassan, Najwa

    2017-01-01

    The term "good regulatory practice" has seen growing frequency of usage worldwide, especially since the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. However, the term appears quite ambiguous as it may mean differently to different people. This leads us to the first important question: what does "good regulatory practice" actually mean? When used in conjunction with the Fukushima incident, do we imply that there is an absence of "good regulatory practice" in the Japanese' Nuclear and Industry Safety Agency (NISA)? This is quite troubling. It is clear that the term should be defined formally so that our understanding of "good regulatory practice" can be standardized. There is still another important question beyond agreeing on what "good regulatory practice" is: is "good regulatory practice" specific to a region, or is it global? And is it applicable only to nuclear regulators, or to all types of regulators per se? This paper aims to deliberate on the above mentioned questions. Specifically, we hope to discuss the "good regulatory practice" for atomic energy activities in order to protect the people and the environment from radiation risk of such activities. By understanding what "good regulatory practice" truly means, a newcomer country such as Malaysia can quickly learn and adopt these practices so as to assure a competent national nuclear regulatory authority who will be responsible in ensuring the safety, security and safeguards of peaceful atomic energy activities in the country including nuclear liability. In understanding this concept, a holistic approach will be taken by looking into example of advanced and newcomer countries of various nuclear regulatory authorities all around the world. Then the paper will focus on the challenges that the current nuclear regulatory authority in Malaysia which is Atomic Energy Licensing Board has, its challenges to follow the concept of "good regulatory practice" and its ways to overcome it. This study explore the initiatives could be

  14. Determinants of self-reported sun protection practices among Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Abda, Naima; El Rhazi, Karima; Obtel, Majdouline; Bendahhou, Karima; Zidouh, Ahmed; Bennani, Maria; Bekkali, Rachid; Nejjari, Chakib

    2012-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of sunlight exposure and sun protection behaviors and to identify the main determinants of sun protection in a representative sample of the Moroccan population. Cross-sectional survey was carried out during May 2008 among Moroccan adults aged 18 and over, using stratified cluster sampling in origin and sex. A total of 2896 subjects were included. More than half (52.1%) of the participants were regularly exposed to the sun during midday hours (11-16 h) for more than 2h per day. Among those exposed to the sun during midday hours, 16.4% didn't use any means of protection. The subjects who were more protected were women (odds ratio=0.47, 95% confidence interval=[0.35-0.64]), rural residents (odds ratio=2.33, 95% confidence interval=[1.97-2.77]) and worker subjects and students (p<0.0001). This survey has highlighted a high prevalence of sun exposure in the Moroccan population with few protection practices. It is therefore important to promote sun protection in order to maintain the incidence rate of skin cancer at its lower level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Informing evidence-based practice: a review of research analyzing adult protective services data.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Joy Swanson; Ramsey-Klawsnik, Holly; Schillerstrom, Jason E; Dayton, Carol; Mixson, Paula; Counihan, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The mission of Adult Protective Services (APS) is to protect older and vulnerable adults from abuse, neglect, and exploitation. The complexity of APS cases and the potential for life-changing interventions point to the need for research that examines and evaluates APS practices. A literature review identified 50 studies published during a 16-year period that used APS agencies, clients, data, or resources to test hypotheses regarding elder abuse. The analysis revealed promising efforts toward knowledge development about elder mistreatment and self-neglect. This article provides an overview of salient findings, notes the scarcity of studies that analyze the effectiveness of APS, and highlights the need for additional research. Lessons learned are described, and APS practitioners and researchers are urged to work collaboratively to develop key practice-related questions about APS processes and outcomes that can be tested with appropriate research methodologies.

  16. On-line fault diagnosis of power substation using connectionist expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.T.; Chang, W.Y.; Huang, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper proposes a new connectionist (or neural network) expert system for on-line fault diagnosis of a power substation. The Connectionist Expert Diagnosis System has similar profile of an expert system, but can be constructed much more easily from elemental samples. These samples associate the faults with their protective relays and breakers as well as the bus voltages and feeder currents. Through an elaborately designed structure, alarm signals are processed by different connectionist models. The output of the connectionist models is then integrated to provide the final conclusion with a confidence level. The proposed approach has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan Power (Taipower) secondary substation. The test results show that rapid and exactly correct diagnosis is obtained even for the fault conditions involving multiple faults or failure operation of protective relay and circuit breaker. Moreover, the system can be transplanted into various substations with little additional implementation effort.

  17. Fault-tolerant software for the FIMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work reported here provides protection against software failures in the task dispatcher of the FTMP, a particularly critical portion of the system software. Faults in other system modules and application programs can be handled by similar techniques but are not covered in this effort. Goals of the work reported here are: (1) to develop provisions in the software design that will detect and mitigate software failures in the dispatcher portion of the FTMP Executive and, (2) to propose the implementation of specific software reliability measures in other parts of the system. Beyond the specific support to the FTMP project, the work reported here represents a considerable advance in the practical application of the recovery block methodology for fault tolerant software design.

  18. Hymen protection and the sexual practices, perceptions, and attitudes of female university students from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    El Kak, Faysal; El Salibi, Noura; Yasmine, Rola; Ghandour, Lilian

    2017-11-01

    To investigate associations between hymen protection and women's alternative sexual practices, perceptions, and attitudes. A cross-sectional online survey was administered among university students (aged 18-30 years) in Lebanon between April 30 and August 31, 2012. The present analysis focused on female students who had engaged in oral/anal sex. Among 416 included women, 163 (39.3%) reported anal/oral sex to protect their hymen. Women ever concerned with hymen protection were less likely to be non-Lebanese and not religious/spiritual, but more likely to report unwanted sexual activities, a relationship in which they felt things were moving too fast physically, and to feel guilty about sexual feelings (all P<0.01). They were two-to-three times more likely to agree that it is harder to refuse sex after the first time and that oral sex is not as big of a deal as sexual intercourse (both P<0.001). Concerned women who later engaged in vaginal sex (n=75) were less religious and more accepting of premarital sex than were those who continued to protect their hymen (n=88; all P<0.005). Women concerned about hymen-breaking engage in alternative sexual practices, yet experience pressure, guilt, worry, and indecisiveness regarding their sex-related decisions. The navigation of sexual decisions is a more vulnerable process for these women because of prevailing patriarchal values and discriminating gender norms in Lebanon. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  19. Enacting Firm, Fair and Friendly Practice: A Model for Strengths-Based Child Protection Relationships?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Carolyn; Charles, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Strengths-based solution-focused approaches are gaining ground in statutory child protection work, but few studies have asked front line practitioners how they navigate the complex worker-client relationships such approaches require. This paper describes one component of a mixed-methods study in a large Canadian statutory child protection agency in which 225 workers described how they applied the ideas of strengths-based practice in their daily work. Interviews with twenty-four practitioners were analysed using an interpretive description approach. Only four interviewees appeared to successfully enact a version of strengths-based practice that closely mirrored those described by key strengths-based child protection theorists and was fully congruent with their mandated role. They described navigating a shifting balance of collaboration and authority in worker-client relationships based on transparency, impartial judgement, attentiveness to the worker-client interaction and the value that clients were fellow human beings. Their accounts extend current conceptualisations of the worker-client relationship in strengths-based child protection work and are congruent with current understandings of effective mandated relationships. They provide what may be a useful model to help workers understand and navigate relationships in which they must reconcile their own authority and expertise with genuine support for the authority and expertise of their clients.

  20. Rating child passenger safety laws relative to best practice recommendations for occupant protection.

    PubMed

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Benedetti, Marco; Manary, Miriam A; Flannagan, Carol A

    2017-05-19

    State laws regarding child passenger protection vary substantially. The objective of this study was to develop a scoring system to rate child passenger safety laws relative to best practice recommendations for each age of child. State child passenger safety and seat belt laws were retrieved from the LexisNexis database for the years 2002-2015. Text of the laws was reviewed and compared to current best practice recommendations for child occupant protection for each age of child. A 0-4 scale was developed to rate the strength of the state law relative to current best practice recommendations. A rating of 3 corresponds to a law that requires a restraint that is sufficient to meet best practice, and a rating of 4 is given to a law that specifies several options that would meet best practice. Scores of 0, 1, or 2 are given to laws requiring less than best practice to different degrees. The same scale is used for each age of child despite different restraint recommendations for each age. Legislation that receives a score of 3 requires rear-facing child restraints for children under age 2, forward-facing harnessed child restraints for children aged 2 to 4, booster seats for children 5 to 10, and primary enforcement of seat belt use in all positions for children aged 11-13. Legislation requiring use of a "child restraint system according to instructions" would receive a score of 1 for children under age 2 and a 2 for children aged 2-4 because it would allow premature use of a booster for children weighing more than 13.6 kg (30 lb). The scoring system developed in this study can be used in mathematical models to predict how child passenger safety legislation affects child restraint practices.

  1. Handling Software Faults with Redundancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carzaniga, Antonio; Gorla, Alessandra; Pezzè, Mauro

    Software engineering methods can increase the dependability of software systems, and yet some faults escape even the most rigorous and methodical development process. Therefore, to guarantee high levels of reliability in the presence of faults, software systems must be designed to reduce the impact of the failures caused by such faults, for example by deploying techniques to detect and compensate for erroneous runtime conditions. In this chapter, we focus on software techniques to handle software faults, and we survey several such techniques developed in the area of fault tolerance and more recently in the area of autonomic computing. Since practically all techniques exploit some form of redundancy, we consider the impact of redundancy on the software architecture, and we propose a taxonomy centered on the nature and use of redundancy in software systems. The primary utility of this taxonomy is to classify and compare techniques to handle software faults.

  2. System for Collecting, Analyzing, and Using Information on Institutional Consumer Protection Practices: Accreditation User Guide. Improving The Consumer Protection Function in Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Steven M.; And Others

    This accreditation user guide describes: (1) a set of institutional conditions, policies, and practices that are potentially abusive to students, and (2) a system for collecting, analyzing, and using quantitative data on these conditions, policies, and practices. Possible uses include: (1) setting consumer protection standards and goals that…

  3. "Good intentions, but inadequate practices"--sun protection in early childhood centres, a qualitative study from New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Mary; Signal, Louise; Thomson, George

    2014-02-14

    To examine sun protection policies and practices in New Zealand teacher-led early childhood centres, identifying underlying factors and key steps to support effective sun protection. This qualitative study used a review of sun protection information on the New Zealand Ministry of Education early childhood "ECE Lead" website; 10 key informant interviews; and a review of sun protection policy documents provided by key informants. The data indicated a lack of comprehensive sun protection policies and practices; while sunscreen and hats were focused on, sun protective hats, role-modelling and protective clothing were frequently not emphasised. Key underlying reasons for these failures were: (i) insufficient emphasis on sun protection in government early childhood regulatory and monitoring processes, due to focusing on other priorities, and (ii) centre staff lacking access to sun protection information. Recommendations include: (i) that early childhood regulations specifically include sun protection; and (ii) easy access for staff and parents to appropriate evidenced-based information about sun protection. The implications for other countries are that, despite written sun protection policies, and motivated staff, factors such as insufficient emphasis on sun protection in regulations, and inadequate access to information can undermine the quality of sun protection in early childhood centres.

  4. Guide of good practices for occupational radiological protection in plutonium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This Technical Standard (TS) does not contain any new requirements. Its purpose is to provide guides to good practice, update existing reference material, and discuss practical lessons learned relevant to the safe handling of plutonium. the technical rationale is given to allow US Department of Energy (DOE) health physicists to adapt the recommendations to similar situations throughout the DOE complex. Generally, DOE contractor health physicists will be responsible to implement radiation protection activities at DOE facilities and DOE health physicists will be responsible for oversight of those activities. This guidance is meant to be useful for both efforts. This TS replaces PNL-6534, Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Plutonium Facilities, by providing more complete and current information and by emphasizing the situations that are typical of DOE`s current plutonium operations; safe storage, decontamination, and decommissioning (environmental restoration); and weapons disassembly.

  5. Sun protection practices in New Zealand secondary schools: a 2014 baseline study.

    PubMed

    Reeder, A I; McNoe, B M; Iosua, E E

    2016-06-01

    Guided by the established primary school SunSmart programme, a survey of secondary schools' sun protection policies, planning, behavioural expectations, curriculum content and environment was undertaken in order to establish a baseline to inform advocacy and secondary level programme development. All 448 principals of state or state integrated public secondary schools identified from the Ministry of Education database were mailed a hard copy questionnaire. School sun protection practices were assessed and a summative, non-weighted, 11-item Total Sun Protection Score (TSPS) was created. Associations between TSPS and socio-demographic factors, as well as school sun protection policy, were investigated using unadjusted and multiple linear regressions. Usable responses received from 211 of the 448 schools (47% participation) indicated reasonable representativeness of eligible schools, but under-representation of low socioeconomic decile institutions (p = 0.003) and those with the smallest roll size (p = 0.004). Only 50% of schools reported having a sun protection policy. The least attained TSPS components were outdoor event planning (17.1%), student breaks (16.6%), sun-protective clothing (8.5%) and shade provision (6.2%). The mean (SD) TSPS was 4.58 (2.06). In multivariable analysis, TSPS was statistically significantly positively associated with having a sun protection policy (p < 0.001) and the presence of primary level classes (p < 0.001) - the latter suggesting a possible influence of programme continuity, but negatively associated with integrated school status (p = 0.036). A standard SunSmart programme could be promoted to all schools, irrespective of socioeconomic decile, overall roll size, gender status or regional population density. Low attainment of some TSPS components indicates targeting priorities.

  6. Gaps in governance: protective mechanisms used by nurse leaders when policy and practice are misaligned.

    PubMed

    Knight, Kaye M; Kenny, Amanda; Endacott, Ruth

    2015-04-09

    Due to large geographical distances, the telephone is central to enabling rural Australian communities to access care from their local health service. While there is a history of rural nurses providing care via the telephone, it has been a highly controversial practice that is not routinely documented and little is known about how the practice is governed. The lack of knowledge regarding governance extends to the role of Directors of Nursing as clinical leaders charged with the responsibility of ensuring practice safety, quality, regulation and risk management. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical governance processes related to managing telephone presentations, and to explore Directors of Nursing perceptions of processes and clinical practices related to the management of telephone presentations to health services in rural Victoria, Australia. Qualitative documentary analysis and semi structured interviews were used in the study to examine the content of health service policies and explore the perceptions of Directors of Nursing in eight rural health services regarding policy content and enactment when people telephone rural health services for care. Participants were purposively selected for their knowledge and leadership role in governance processes and clinical practice. Data from the interviews were analysed using framework analysis. The process of analysis resulted in the identification of five themes. The majority of policies reviewed provided little guidance for managing telephone presentations. The Directors of Nursing perceived policy content and enactment to be largely inadequate. When organisational structures failed to provide appropriate governance for the context, the Directors of Nursing engaged in protective mechanisms to support rural nurses who manage telephone presentations. Rural Directors of Nursing employed intuitive behaviours to protect rural nurses practicing within a clinical governance context that is inadequate for the

  7. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  8. Hydraulic Diagnostics and Fault Isolation Test Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-13

    and Fault Isolation Test Program was to demonstrate and evaluate the practicality of a fault detection and isolation system on an aircraft. The...system capable of fault detection and isolation in a hydraulic subsystem through the use of sensors and a microprocessor (Fig. 1). The microprocessor...DISCUSSION 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SIMULATOR The fault detection and isolation test arrangement consisted of a high pressure, lightweight

  9. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  10. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  11. Development and implementation of a power system fault diagnosis expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Minakawa, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kunugi, M.; Wada, N.; Shimada, K.; Utsunomiya, M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a fault diagnosis expert system installed at the tohoku Electric Power Company. The main features of this system are careful selection of the inferencing input data, rapid inferencing, integration of the expert system with other systems in a practical structure, and the adoption of a domain shell. This system aims for improved practicability by using time-tagged data from circuit breakers, protective relays, and automatic reclosing relays in addition to the input data used in earlier systems. Furthermore, this system also uses data from fault detection systems that locate fault points within electric stations. This system uses an AI-specific back-end processor to perform inferencing rapidly. Additionally, this fault diagnosis expert system is interfaced and integrated with a restorative operations expert system, an intelligent alarm processing system, and a protective relay setting and management system. Authors developed and adopted a power system fault diagnosis domain shell to ease system development, and used the protective relay operation simulation function of a protective relay setting and management system for system verification.

  12. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  13. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  14. Protective factors against relapse for practicing nurse anesthetists in recovery from anesthetic opiate dependency.

    PubMed

    Wright, E Laura; McGuinness, Teena; Schumacher, Joseph E; Zwerling, Arthur; Moneyham, Linda D

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative inquiry explored factors that protect recovering anesthetic opioid-dependent nurse anesthetists from relapse after their return to anesthesia practice. Practicing nurse anesthetists in recovery from potent opioids were recruited through online advertising and individually interviewed over the telephone. The interview consisted of open-ended questions that aided description of personal experience of individual factors. Content analysis of the interviews revealed an overarching theme of a commitment to the recovery process, which provided the foundational protective element against relapse. Within this context, two major thematic factors emerged: personal factors and external factors. Personal factors came from within the individual and included such features as removing the obsession to use, self-realization, inner strength, and seeing the future. External factors were external to the individual and described as time away from practice, state regulatory agency involvement, and talking with significant others. Although the Twelve-Step process was not a factor per se, it was credited by all participants as the structure on which their recovery was built. This process provided mechanisms for developing the motivation and learning the tools necessary to maintain their sobriety.

  15. Australian speech-language pathologists' knowledge and practice of radiation protection while performing videofluoroscopic swallowing studies.

    PubMed

    Warren-Forward, Helen; Mathisen, Bernice; Best, Sofia; Boxsell, Philip; Finlay, James; Heasman, Anna; Hodis, David; Morgan, Cian; Nixon, Jayce

    2008-12-01

    During a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), speech and language pathologists (SLPs) are potentially exposed to radiation. To effectively limit unnecessary exposure, SLPs performing VFSS are encouraged to actively shield themselves and to be monitored by radiation-monitoring badges. The aim of this research was to assess the level of current knowledge and practice of radiation protection among SLPs performing this procedure. A questionnaire was distributed via Speech Pathology Australia (SPA) and the Australasian Dysphagia Newsletter (ADN). Sixty-nine questionnaires were returned. The results revealed that participants had received some radiation protection training, which provided them with general knowledge on radiation protection. Participants indicated a lack of formal education and were unsure of the adequacy of the information provided. Ninety-seven percent of participants always wore lead aprons, 76% always wore thyroid shields, and 36% wore radiation-monitoring badges. The researchers recommend that education on radiation protection and safety be provided for SLPs at university level to educate them before they enter the workplace. It is also recommended that SLPs always wear lead aprons, thyroid shields, and radiation-monitoring badges.

  16. Search and seizure law practical advice and interpretation for nuclear protective force persons

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    Recent Supreme Court decisions, which interpret the 200-year-old Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, are used to provide a brief overview of some search and seizure subjects important to management and officers responsible for physical protection of nuclear facilities. The overview is framed in practical terms in order to make the comments applicable to the everyday activity of nuclear protective force persons. The Supreme Court has described several exceptions where searches and seizures (arrests) are permitted without a warrant, despite the Fourth Amendment which states that warrants are always required. The seven exceptions briefly discussed are search incidents to a lawful arrest, the automobile search exception, the suitcase or container exception, the hot pursuit or emergency exception, the stop and frisk exception, the plain view exception, and consent to be searched.

  17. Search and seizure law; practical advice and interpretation for nuclear protective force persons

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, J.J.

    1983-07-06

    Recent Supreme Court decisions, which interpret the 200-year-old Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution, are used to provide a brief overview of some search and seizure subjects important to management and officers responsible for physical protection of nuclear facilities. The overview is framed in practical terms in order to make the comments applicable to the everyday activity of nuclear-protective-force persons. The Supreme Court has described several exceptions where searches and seizures (arrests) are permitted without a warrant, despite the Fourth Amendment which states that warrants are always required. The seven exceptions briefly discussed are search incidents to a lawful arrest, the automobile-search exception, the suitcase or container exception, the hot-pursuit or emergency exception, the stop-and-frisk exception, the plain-view exception, and consent to be searched.

  18. A fresh approach to child protection practice and legislation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Carney, T

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the findings and approaches of the Victorian Review. It assesses a stylized "orthodox model" of child welfare law and practice, a model which remains in many Australian jurisdictions and which has its popularity in Britain, Canada, and the United States. It concludes that serious consideration should be given to rebuilding and strengthening these arrangements. This entails emphasis on utilizing laws to serve an educative function and facilitating access by children and families to preventive and support services. It argues that a broad concept of neglect should be adopted and that the "welfare orientation" of the Children's Court requires reconsideration, because the capacity of courts to resolve entrenched structural problems of society has been overrated. Welfare practice, and specifically a community approach to welfare, should shape the primary response to protection of children; judicial involvement should be a last resort.

  19. Protecting the privacy of individual general practice patient electronic records for geospatial epidemiology research.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Konings, Paul; Hewett, Michael; Bagheri, Nasser; McRae, Ian; Del Fante, Peter

    2014-12-01

    General practitioner (GP) practices in Australia are increasingly storing patient information in electronic databases. These practice databases can be accessed by clinical audit software to generate reports that inform clinical or population health decision making and public health surveillance. Many audit software applications also have the capacity to generate de-identified patient unit record data. However, the de-identified nature of the extracted data means that these records often lack geographic information. Without spatial references, it is impossible to build maps reflecting the spatial distribution of patients with particular conditions and needs. Links to socioeconomic, demographic, environmental or other geographically based information are also not possible. In some cases, relatively coarse geographies such as postcode are available, but these are of limited use and researchers cannot undertake precision spatial analyses such as calculating travel times. We describe a method that allows researchers to implement meaningful mapping and spatial epidemiological analyses of practice level patient data while preserving privacy. This solution has been piloted in a diabetes risk research project in the patient population of a practice in Adelaide. The method offers researchers a powerful means of analysing geographic clinic data in a privacy-protected manner. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  20. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  1. Solar UVR exposure, concurrent activities and sun-protective practices among primary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Reeder, Anthony I; Bodeker, Gregory E; Gray, Andrew; Cox, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive measures of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, concurrent activities and sun-protective practices are needed to develop and evaluate skin cancer prevention and sun protection interventions. The UVR exposures of 345 primary schoolchildren at 23 schools around New Zealand were measured using electronic UVR monitors for 1-week periods over 12 weeks in 2004 and 2005. In addition, ambient UVR levels on a horizontal surface were measured on-site at each school. Children completed activity diaries during the period UVR measurements were made and provided information on their indoor and outdoor status and clothing and sun protection worn. Mean total daily UVR exposure (7:00-20:00 h NZST + 1) at the body location where the UVR monitors were worn was 0.9 SED (standard erythemal dose, 1 SED = 100 J m(-2)). This was 4.9% of the ambient UVR on a horizontal surface. Mean time spent outdoors was 2.3 h day(-1). Differences in children's UVR exposure could be explained in part by activity, where outdoor passive pursuits were associated with higher UVR exposure rates than outdoor active and outdoor travel pursuits. Compared with older children, the activities of younger children, although labeled the same, resulted in different UVR exposures, either as a result of reporting differences or a real difference in UVR exposure patterns. UVR exposure rates were generally higher on weekdays compared with the weekend, confirming the important role of school sun protection and skin cancer prevention programs. High UVR exposure activities included physical education, athletics and lunch break.

  2. Fault-tolerant quantum computation with asymmetric Bacon-Shor codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Peter; Preskill, John

    2012-02-01

    Bacon-Shor codes are quantum subsystem codes which are constructed by combining together two quantum repetition codes, one protecting against Z (phase) errors and the other protecting against X (bit flip) errors. In many situations, for example flux qubits, the noise is biased such that faults that produce Z errors are much more common than faults that produce X errors; in these cases it is natural to consider an asymmetric Bacon-Shor code where the code protecting against Z errors is longer than the code protecting against X errors. This work describes fault-tolerant constructions for gadgets that achieve universal fault-tolerant quantum computation using asymmetric Bacon-Shor codes. Gadgets take advantage of the Bacon-Shor structure by breaking up into parallel smaller gadgets that act on a single row or column, with majority voting of the separate results. For a bias of ɛ/ɛ' = 10^4, we prove a threshold around 2.5 x10-3. The effective error strength is shown to decrease rapidly (faster than polynomial) with decreasing ɛ. Therefore it may be practical to use Bacon-Shor codes directly with no additional concatenation. This could greatly reduce the resource overhead required for fault-tolerant computation with biased noise.

  3. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  4. Source Water Protection and Sustainability: a Practical Approach to Assessing Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. O.; Chinitz, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    The recognition of climate change and the realization of the finite nature of sources of drinking water have spurred communities to develop resource sustainable practices. Sustainability requires overall management of the resource, and protecting existing and future water supplies from contamination plays a key role. Continued population growth will place increasing demands on water supplies and climate change will likely reduce groundwater recharge as well as increase the desire to replace dwindling surface water sources with groundwater. Aware of the need to protect its resource, the City of Springfield has delineated the source water protection areas (SWPAs) surrounding its wells and wellfields and has an ordinance in place that allows the City to establish specific guidelines associated with chemical usage. The City has established a range of best management strategies that vary in degree as a function of the time-of-travel zone and the presumed risk that a specific chemical poses to groundwater. When the guidelines were initially established, the City used more of a blanket approach to imposing specific practices on facilities within the SWPAs. The various approaches used were not site-specific and were based on limited information, reflecting limited resources, that were applied throughout the SWPAs as a function of proximity to the well(s). This practice led to the City’s receiving many questions from developers, etc., regarding “Why do you consider this product a risk?” The City needed an objective, consistent risk assessment tool that would reflect not only the specific chemical but also the geologic characteristics of the site where the chemical would be used. We used existing well reports to develop GIS coverages of both weighted hydraulic conductivity and depth to the aquifer that were then overlain on to the SWPA coverages. This exercise provided an assessment of the ease of water movement to the aquifer. Using that information, a spreadsheet was

  5. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010: impact on otolaryngology practice and research.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gordon H; Davis, Matthew M

    2012-05-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. Since its passage, the PPACA has led to increased health insurance coverage for millions more Americans, and it includes provisions leading to new avenues for clinical and health services research funding. The legislation also favors development of the primary care specialties and general surgery, increased training of midlevel health care providers, and medical training and service in underserved areas of the United States. However, the PPACA does not effectively engage otolaryngologists in quality improvement, despite modifications to the Physician Quality Reporting System. The legislation also levies a tax on cosmetic procedures, affecting both clinicians and patients. This article reviews the sections of the PPACA that are most pertinent to otolaryngologists and explains how these components of the bill will affect otolaryngologic practice and research over the coming decade.

  6. Massachusetts Et Al. v Environmental Protection Agency: Implications For Public Health Policy And Practice

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Perry W.; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2007-01-01

    This installment of Law and the Public's Health reviews the U.S. Supreme Court's April 2, 2007, decision in Massachusetts et al. v Environmental Protection Agency1 and considers its implications for public health policy and practice. This landmark decision focused on a central concern in administrative law; namely, when an agency vested with the authority to regulate in the public's health has the power to refuse to carry out a legislative directive. The subject of the case was regulation of greenhouse gas emissions by new motor vehicles under the section 202(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act, but the central question was allocation of powers between a legislative branch that desires action and an executive branch agency that for policy reasons refuses to act. PMID:18051675

  7. Reputation management on facebook: awareness is key to protecting yourself, your practice, and the veterinary profession.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2014-01-01

    From the Social media use by health professionals occurs in a digital environment where etiquette has yet to be solidly defined. The objectives of this study were to explore veterinarians' personal use of Facebook, knowledge of privacy settings, and factors related to sharing personal information online. All American Animal Hospital Association member veterinarians with a valid e-mail address (9469) were invited to complete an online survey about Facebook (e.g., time spent on Facebook, awareness of consequences, types of information posted). Questions assessing personality dimensions including trust, popularity, self-esteem and professional identity were included. The response rate was 17% (1594 of 9469); 72% of respondents (1148 of 1594) had a personal Facebook profile. Veterinarians were more likely to share information on Facebook than they would in general. Trust, need for popularity, and more time spent on Facebook predicted more disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Awareness of consequences and increased veterinary experience predicted lesser disclosure. As veterinary practices use Facebook to improve client services, they need also to manage risks associated with online disclosure by staff. Raising awareness of reputation management and consequences of posting certain types of information to Facebook is integral to protecting the individual, the practice, and the veterinary profession.

  8. Protected block time for teaching and learning in a postgraduate family practice residency program

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Piera; Kennedy, Maggie; Winder, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the elements necessary for a high-quality educational experience in a family practice residency program with respect to scheduling, learning environment, and approaches to teaching and learning. Design An interpretative, qualitative study using a generative-inquiry approach. Setting The Nanaimo Site of the University of British Columbia Family Practice Residency Program. Participants Fifteen physician instructors and 16 first- and second-year residents. Methods Data were gathered from 2 qualitative focus group interviews with residents; 2 qualitative focus group interviews with physician instructors; and structured and semistructured observation of 2 in-class seminars, with a focus on residents’ engagement with the class. Results were analyzed and categorized into themes independently and collectively by the researchers. Main findings Protected block time for teaching and learning at the Nanaimo Site has been effective in fostering a learning environment that supports collegial relationships and in-depth instruction. Residents and physician instructors benefit from the week-long academic schedule and the opportunity to teach and learn collaboratively. Participants specifically value the connections among learning environment, collegiality, relationships, reflective learning, and the teaching and learning process. Conclusion These findings suggest that strategic planning and scheduling of teaching and learning sessions in residency programs are important to promoting a comprehensive educational experience. PMID:22700741

  9. Job satisfaction and its relationship to Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (RPKAP) of Iranian radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S S; Dabbagh, S T; Abbasi, M; Mehrdad, R

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to find the association between job satisfaction and radiation protection knowledge, attitude and practice of medical radiation workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. In this crosssectional study, 530 radiation workers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences completed a knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on protecting themselves against radiation and Job Descriptive Index as a job satisfaction measure during May to November 2014. Opportunities for promotion (84.2%) and payment (91.5%) were the most important factors for dissatisfaction. Radiation workers who were married, had more positive attitudes toward protecting themselves against radiation, and had higher level of education accounted for 15.8% of the total variance in predicting job satisfaction. In conclusion, medical radiation workers with a more positive attitude toward self-protection against radiation were more satisfied with their jobs. In radiation environments, improving staff attitudes toward their safety may be considered as a key strategy to increase job satisfaction.

  10. Effect of organic and conventional crop rotation, fertilization, and crop protection practices on metal contents in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Julia; Sanderson, Roy; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent; Shotton, Peter; Carmichael, Andrew; Haghighi, Reza Sadrabadi; Tetard-Jones, Catherine; Volakakis, Nikos; Eyre, Mick; Leifert, Carlo

    2011-05-11

    The effects of organic versus conventional crop management practices (crop rotation, crop protection, and fertility management strategies) on wheat yields and grain metal (Al, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations were investigated in a long-term field trial. The interactions between crop management practices and the season that the crop was grown were investigated using univariate and redundancy analysis approaches. Grain yields were highest where conventional fertility management and crop protection practices were used, but growing wheat after a previous crop of grass/clover was shown to partially compensate for yield reductions due to the use of organic fertility management. All metals except for Pb were significantly affected by crop management practices and the year that the wheat was grown. Grain Cd and Cu levels were higher on average when conventional fertility management practices were used. Al and Cu were higher on average when conventional crop protection practices were used. The results demonstrate that there is potential to manage metal concentrations in the diet by adopting specific crop management practices shown to affect crop uptake of metals.

  11. Practical Implications of the Use of Aluminide Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of Superalloys in Gas Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    Strategic Materials Usage. Practical Implications of the Use of Aluminide Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of Superalloys in Gas Turbines. Coatings ... Aluminide protective coatings have been in use on nickel a superalloys in gas turbines with a considerable degree of As a result a considerable amount of...used for the application of aluminide coatings to superalloy substitutes are those of chemical vapour deposition (CVÜ

  12. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Knowledge and Practice of Sun Protection in Schools in South Africa Where No National Sun Protection Programme Exists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Reeder, Anthony I.; Albers, Patricia N.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline…

  14. Knowledge and Practice of Sun Protection in Schools in South Africa Where No National Sun Protection Programme Exists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Reeder, Anthony I.; Albers, Patricia N.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline…

  15. A feasibility study of full-bridge type superconducting fault current controller on electric machine power stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. Y.; Hwang, Y. J.; Lee, J.; Ko, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, because of the advent of Smart Grid and integration of distributed generations, electrical power grids are facing uncountable challenges. Increase of fault current is one of such serious challenges and there are some fault current limiters (FCLs) that can limit the fault current. Existing grid protection FCLs, however, simply limit the fault current passively and can allow the existing protection coordination schemes to fail. This phenomenon leads to catastrophic failure in the complex system and may cause unpredictable power grid operation. Unlike a FCL, a superconducting fault current controller (SFCC) employs a full-bridge thyristor rectifier, a high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor, and an embedded control unit to maintain the fault current level at a proper value by adjusting the phase angle of thyristors. This paper contains experimental and numerical analysis to design and fabricate a SFCC system for protection and stability improvement in power grids. At first, fundamental characteristics of a SFCC system were introduced. System circuit diagram and operational principles were proposed. Secondly, the developed small-scale SFCC system was introduced and verified. A 40 Vrms/30 Arms class prototype SFCC employing HTS DC reactor was fabricated and short circuit tests that simulate various fault conditions were implemented to verify the control performance of the fault current. Finally, the practical feasibility of application of the SFCC system to the power system was studied. The problems caused by three-phase faults from the power grid were surveyed and transient stability analysis of the power system was conducted by simulations. From the experimental and simulation results, we can verify the feasibility of the SFCC in power system.

  16. Formal Validation of Fault Management Design Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Corrina; Karban, Robert; Andolfato, Luigi; Day, John

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes an approach used to develop SysML modeling patterns to express the behavior of fault protection, test the model's logic by performing fault injection simulations, and verify the fault protection system's logical design via model checking. A representative example, using a subset of the fault protection design for the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) system, was modeled with SysML State Machines and JavaScript as Action Language. The SysML model captures interactions between relevant system components and system behavior abstractions (mode managers, error monitors, fault protection engine, and devices/switches). Development of a method to implement verifiable and lightweight executable fault protection models enables future missions to have access to larger fault test domains and verifiable design patterns. A tool-chain to transform the SysML model to jpf-Statechart compliant Java code and then verify the generated code via model checking was established. Conclusions and lessons learned from this work are also described, as well as potential avenues for further research and development.

  17. Lower bound of optimization in radiological protection system taking account of practical implementation of clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takatoshi

    2007-07-01

    The dose criterion used to derive clearance and exemption levels is of the order of 0.01 mSv/y based on the Basic Safety Standard (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the use of which has been agreed upon by many countries. It is important for human beings, who are facing the fact that global resources for risk reduction are limited, to carefully consider the practical implementation of radiological protection systems, particularly for low-radiation-dose regions. For example, in direct gamma ray monitoring, to achieve clearance level compliance, difficult issues on how the uncertainty (error) of gamma measurement should be handled and also how the uncertainty (scattering) of the estimation of non-gamma emitters should be treated in clearance must be resolved. To resolve these issues, a new probabilistic approach has been proposed to establish an appropriate safety factor for compliance with the clearance level in Japan. This approach is based on the fundamental concept that 0.1 mSv/y should be complied with the 97.5. percentile of the probability distribution for the uncertainties of both the measurement and estimation of non-gamma emitters. The International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP published a new concept of the representative person in Publication 101 Part I. The representative person is a hypothetical person exposed to a dose that is representative of those of highly exposed persons in a population. In a probabilistic dose assessment, the ICRP recommends that the representative person should be defined such that the probability of exposure occurrence is lower than about 5% that of a person randomly selected from the population receiving a high dose. From the new concept of the ICRP, it is reasonable to consider that the 95. percentile of the dose distribution for the representative person is theoretically always lower than the dose constraint. Using this established relationship, it can be concluded that the minimum dose

  18. Fault diagnosis of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Y. ); Akimoto, Y. ); Kunugi, M. )

    1992-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems plays a crucial role in power system monitoring and control that ensures stable supply of electrical power to consumers. In the case of multiple faults or incorrect operation of protective devices, fault diagnosis requires judgment of complex conditions at various levels. For this reason, research into application of knowledge-based systems go an early start and reports of such systems have appeared in may papers. In this paper, these systems are classified by the method of inference utilized in the knowledge-based systems for fault diagnosis of power systems. The characteristics of each class and corresponding issues as well as the state-of-the-art techniques for improving their performance are presented. Additional topics covered are user interfaces, interfaces with energy management systems (EMS's), and expert system development tools for fault diagnosis. Results and evaluation of actual operation in the field are also discussed. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis of power systems will continue to disseminate.

  19. Predictors of Iranian women's intention to first papanicolaou test practice: An application of protection motivation theory.

    PubMed

    Dehdari, T; Hassani, L; Shojaeizadeh, D; Hajizadeh, E; Nedjat, S; Abedini, M

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of papanicolaou (Pap) test in the early detection and timely treatment of cervical cancer, present study was designed to determine predictors of a sample of Iranian women's intention to first Pap test practice based on the protection motivation theory (PMT) variables. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 240 women referral to the 30 primary health care clinics were selected. They completed a developed scale based on PMT variables including intention, perceived vulnerability and severity, fear, response costs, response efficacy and self-efficacy. Path analysis was used to determine the association between predictive factors and intention. The results showed that PMT had goodness of fit with a χ2/df = 2.37, df = 28, P= 0.001 and RMSEA = 0.076. PMT explained 42% of the variance in women's intention to get first Pap smear test. Self-efficacy (b = 0.55, P< 0.001) and response efficacy (b = 0.19, P< 0.001) were found to be the predictors of intention. These findings may be used to develop tailored, theory-based educational interventions associated with Pap testing among women.

  20. Primary School Sun Protection Policies and Practices 4 Years after Baseline--A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Anthony I.; Jopson, Janet A.; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Before the 2005 launch of the New Zealand SunSmart Schools Accreditation Programme (SSAP), 242 randomly sampled primary schools completed a mail survey about sun protection policies, practices, curriculum and environment. A 2009 follow-up included 189 (78%) and their mean Total Accreditation Score (TAS = total SSAP requirements met, range 0-12),…

  1. Results from an Exploratory Study of Sun Protection Practice: Implications for the Design of Health Promotion Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Douglas; MacAskill, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the research reported here is to provide strategic guidance for the development of a national communication strategy to improve sun protection practice amongst young people. Design/methodology/approach: The research adopted an exploratory approach, employing qualitative focus groups to represent three population groups,…

  2. Baseline Survey of Sun-Protection Knowledge, Practices and Policy in Early Childhood Settings in Queensland, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Simone L.; Saunders, V.; Nowak, M.

    2007-01-01

    Excessive exposure to sunlight during early childhood increases the risk of developing skin cancer. Self-administered questionnaires exploring sun-protection knowledge, practices and policy were mailed to the directors/co-ordinators/senior teachers of all known early childhood services in Queensland, Australia, in 2002 (n = 1383; 56.5% response).…

  3. Results from an Exploratory Study of Sun Protection Practice: Implications for the Design of Health Promotion Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Douglas; MacAskill, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the research reported here is to provide strategic guidance for the development of a national communication strategy to improve sun protection practice amongst young people. Design/methodology/approach: The research adopted an exploratory approach, employing qualitative focus groups to represent three population groups,…

  4. Baseline Survey of Sun-Protection Knowledge, Practices and Policy in Early Childhood Settings in Queensland, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Simone L.; Saunders, V.; Nowak, M.

    2007-01-01

    Excessive exposure to sunlight during early childhood increases the risk of developing skin cancer. Self-administered questionnaires exploring sun-protection knowledge, practices and policy were mailed to the directors/co-ordinators/senior teachers of all known early childhood services in Queensland, Australia, in 2002 (n = 1383; 56.5% response).…

  5. Evaluating Best Management Practices for ephemeral channel protection following forest harvest in the Cumberland Plateau - preliminary findings

    Treesearch

    Emma L. Witt; Christopher D. Barton; Jeffrey W. Stringer; Daniel W. Bowker; Randall K. Kolka

    2011-01-01

    Most states in the United States have established forestry best management practices to protect water quality and maintain aquatic habitat in streams. However, guidelines are generally focused on minimizing impacts to perennial streams. Ephemeral channels (or streams), which function as important delivery systems for carbon, nutrients, and sediment to perennial streams...

  6. Photovoltaic ground fault and blind spot electrical simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2013-06-01

    Ground faults in photovoltaic (PV) systems pose a fire and shock hazard. To mitigate these risks, AC-isolated, DC grounded PV systems in the United States use Ground Fault Protection Devices (GFPDs), e.g., fuses, to de-energize the PV system when there is a ground fault. Recently the effectiveness of these protection devices has come under question because multiple fires have started when ground faults went undetected. In order to understand the limitations of fuse-based ground fault protection in PV systems, analytical and numerical simulations of different ground faults were performed. The numerical simulations were conducted with Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) using a circuit model of the PV system which included the modules, wiring, switchgear, grounded or ungrounded components, and the inverter. The derivation of the SPICE model and the results of parametric fault current studies are provided with varying array topologies, fuse sizes, and fault impedances. Closed-form analytical approximations for GFPD currents from faults to the grounded current carrying conductor-known as %E2%80%9Cblind spot%E2%80%9D ground faults-are derived to provide greater understanding of the influence of array impedances on fault currents. The behavior of the array during various ground faults is studied for a range of ground fault fuse sizes to determine if reducing the size of the fuse improves ground fault detection sensitivity. The results of the simulations show that reducing the amperage rating of the protective fuse does increase fault current detection sensitivity without increasing the likelihood of nuisance trips to a degree. Unfortunately, this benefit reaches a limit as fuses become smaller and their internal resistance increases to the point of becoming a major element in the fault current circuit.

  7. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  8. A new intelligent hierarchical fault diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    As a part of a substation-level decision support system, a new intelligent Hierarchical Fault Diagnosis System for on-line fault diagnosis is presented in this paper. The proposed diagnosis system divides the fault diagnosis process into two phases. Using time-stamped information of relays and breakers, phase 1 identifies the possible fault sections through the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) networks, and phase 2 recognizes the types and detailed situations of the faults identified in phase 1 by using a fast bit-operation logical inference mechanism. The diagnosis system has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan power secondary transmission system. Test results show that rapid and accurate diagnosis can be obtained with flexibility and portability for fault diagnosis purpose of diverse substations.

  9. Risk and Protection in Prodromal Schizophrenia: Ethical Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Nasra; Dunn, Laura; Haroun, Ansar; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade schizophrenia researchers have turned their attention to earlier identification in the prodromal period of illness. A greater understanding of both risk and protective factors can lead to improved prevention and treatment strategies in this vulnerable population. This research, however, has far-reaching ethical implications. One year follow-up data from 50 individuals who met established criteria for a prodromal state is used to illustrate ethical issues that directly affect clinicians and future research strategies. At 1-year follow-up, the psychotic transition rate was 13%, but it increased in subsequent years with smaller sample sizes. One-half developed an affective psychosis. The converted sample was older (p > 0.05) than the nonconverted sample and more likely to have a premorbid history of substance abuse, as well as higher clinical ratings on “subsyndromal” psychotic items (delusional thinking, suspiciousness, and thought disorder). Despite a lack of conversion, the nonconverted sample remained symptomatic and had a high rate of affective and anxiety disorders with evidence of functional disability. This conversion rate is relatively low compared to similar studies at 1 year. Specific risk factors were identified, but these findings need to be replicated in a larger cohort. By examining the rate of conversion and nonconversion in this sample as an example, we hope to contribute to the discussion of implications for clinical practice and the direction of future research in the schizophrenia prodrome. Finally, our data strengthen the evidence base available to inform the discussion of ethical issues relevant to this important research area. PMID:16207892

  10. Association Analysis of System Failure in Wide Area Backup Protection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yagang; Sun, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Wide area backup protection algorithm based on fault component identification is the heart of the whole wide area backup protection system, its validity and reliability is a problem which needs to be first considered in the engineering practice applications of wide area backup protection system. Wide are backup protection algorithm mainly use two kinds of wide area information to realize protection criterion, one is electrical quantity information, such as voltage, current, etc. Another one is protection action and circuit breaker information. The wide area backup protection algorithm based on electrical quantity information is mainly utilizing the significant change of electrical quantity to search fault component, and the primary means include current differential method of wide area multi-measuring points, the comparison method of calculation and measurement, the multiple statistics method. In this paper, a novel and effective association analysis of system failure in wide area backup protection system will be discussed carefully, and the analytical results are successful and reliable.

  11. Tuning of fault tolerant control design parameters.

    PubMed

    DeLima, Pedro G; Yen, Gary G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two major contributions in the field of fault tolerant control. First, it gathers points of concern typical to most fault tolerant control applications and translates the chosen performance metrics into a set of six practical design specifications. Second, it proposes initialization and tuning procedures through which a particular fault tolerant control architecture not only can be set to comply with the required specifications, but also can be tuned online to compensate for a total of twelve properties, such as the noise rejection levels for fault detection and diagnosis signals. The proposed design is realized over a powerful architecture that combines the flexibility of adaptive critic designs with the long term memory and learning capabilities of a supervisor. This paper presents a practical design procedure to facilitate the applications of a fundamentally sound fault tolerant control architecture in real-world problems.

  12. Effective Partnership is an underpinning of ANSI/ASSE Z88.2–2015 Practices for Respiratory Protection

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Richard W.; Spelce, David; Johnson, James S.; Rehak, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., respiratory protection is broadly supported by a system of coordinated efforts among governmental organizations, professional associations, researchers, industrial hygienists, manufacturers, and others who produce knowledge, best practice guidance, standards, regulations, technologies, and products to assure workers can be effectively protected. Ultimately, the work of these partners is applied by employers in establishing and implementing an effective ANSI/ASSE Z88.2–2015 conforming respirator program. This article describes key partners and their activities and/or responsibilities to assure an effective respirator program. PMID:27563169

  13. Position and enforcement practice of the People's Republic of China's pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yu, Xiang; Pecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The concept of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection comes from the West. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) establishes the basic rules for pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection. People's Republic of China's domestic law is consistent with the TRIPS agreement. In the drug registration approval process of the People's Republic of China's Drug Supervision Department, pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection has encountered some problems, including data authentication, exclusive rights to data, number of drugs requiring data to be submitted, and drug costs. In view of the long-term interests of the People's Republic of China's pharmaceutical industry and intellectual property protection trends, there are a lot of difficulties in the enforcement of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection law that need to be overcome. Some measures can be taken, such as establishing a shorter data exclusivity protection period, only protecting the data submitted and relied on in the People's Republic of China, only protecting the drugs that use new chemical components, allowing application and necessary research before the expiry of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection period of generic drugs.

  14. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  15. "I Made Her Realise that I Could Be There for Her, that I Could Support Her": Child Protection Practices with Women in Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Simon; Cote, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study that investigated child protection policies and practices, and focuses on data gathered in a child protection agency located in Quebec, Canada. This research project draws upon a qualitative case-study methodology, involving a documentary analysis of both national and local child protection policies, as…

  16. "I Made Her Realise that I Could Be There for Her, that I Could Support Her": Child Protection Practices with Women in Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapierre, Simon; Cote, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study that investigated child protection policies and practices, and focuses on data gathered in a child protection agency located in Quebec, Canada. This research project draws upon a qualitative case-study methodology, involving a documentary analysis of both national and local child protection policies, as…

  17. 30 CFR 75.824 - Electrical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... interrupting capacity and voltage that provides short-circuit, overload, ground-fault, and under-voltage.... (2) Ground-fault protection. (i) Neutral grounding resistors must limit the ground-fault current to no more than 0.5 ampere. (ii) Ground-fault devices must cause de-energization of the...

  18. 30 CFR 75.824 - Electrical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... interrupting capacity and voltage that provides short-circuit, overload, ground-fault, and under-voltage.... (2) Ground-fault protection. (i) Neutral grounding resistors must limit the ground-fault current to no more than 0.5 ampere. (ii) Ground-fault devices must cause de-energization of the...

  19. 30 CFR 75.824 - Electrical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... interrupting capacity and voltage that provides short-circuit, overload, ground-fault, and under-voltage.... (2) Ground-fault protection. (i) Neutral grounding resistors must limit the ground-fault current to no more than 0.5 ampere. (ii) Ground-fault devices must cause de-energization of the...

  20. 49 CFR 214.105 - Fall protection systems standards and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... components shall be protected from abrasions, corrosion, or any other form of deterioration. (4) All fall protection system components shall be inspected prior to each use for wear, damage, corrosion, mildew, and... prompt rescue of bridge workers in the event of a fall. (7) Connectors shall have a...

  1. 49 CFR 214.105 - Fall protection systems standards and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... components shall be protected from abrasions, corrosion, or any other form of deterioration. (4) All fall protection system components shall be inspected prior to each use for wear, damage, corrosion, mildew, and... prompt rescue of bridge workers in the event of a fall. (7) Connectors shall have a...

  2. 49 CFR 214.105 - Fall protection systems standards and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... components shall be protected from abrasions, corrosion, or any other form of deterioration. (4) All fall protection system components shall be inspected prior to each use for wear, damage, corrosion, mildew, and... prompt rescue of bridge workers in the event of a fall. (7) Connectors shall have a...

  3. 49 CFR 214.105 - Fall protection systems standards and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... components shall be protected from abrasions, corrosion, or any other form of deterioration. (4) All fall protection system components shall be inspected prior to each use for wear, damage, corrosion, mildew, and... prompt rescue of bridge workers in the event of a fall. (7) Connectors shall have a...

  4. 49 CFR 214.105 - Fall protection systems standards and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... components shall be protected from abrasions, corrosion, or any other form of deterioration. (4) All fall protection system components shall be inspected prior to each use for wear, damage, corrosion, mildew, and... prompt rescue of bridge workers in the event of a fall. (7) Connectors shall have a...

  5. Coordinated and Evidence-Based Policy and Practice for Protecting Children outside of Family Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boothby, Neil; Balster, Robert L.; Goldman, Philip; Wessells, Michael G.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Huebner, Gillian; Garbarino, James

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 U.S. Government Evidence Summit on Protecting Children Outside of Family Care brought together leading researchers and technical experts to assess the available evidence to inform policies, strategies, and programs relevant to protecting children outside of family care in lower and middle income countries. While child vulnerabilities are…

  6. Defining best practice in care and protection of children in crisis-affected settings: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Ager, Alastair; Stark, Lindsay; Akesson, Bree; Boothby, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Thirty specialists in humanitarian work supporting the care and protection of children in crisis settings completed a 3-phase Delphi consultation. Proposals of best practice were elicited, reviewed, and rated by participants. A high level of consensus support was reached for 55 statements. These statements emphasized utilization of existing resources, participation, and inclusivity. The influences of resilience theory, social ecology, and cultural sensitivity were clearly evident. The utilization of developmental theory could be strengthened in relation to more differentiated understanding of the operation of protective influences and conceptualization of such influences in terms of "adaptive systems." Wider research engagement by development scientists in diverse cultural settings and clear formulation of findings for practitioners and policy makers would further support evidence-based humanitarian practice.

  7. EYE LENS DOSIMETRY FOR FLUOROSCOPICALLY GUIDED CLINICAL PROCEDURES: PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO PROTECTION AND DOSE MONITORING.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2016-06-01

    Doses to the eye lenses of clinicians undertaking fluoroscopically guided procedures can exceed the dose annual limit of 20 mSv, so optimisation of radiation protection is essential. Ceiling-suspended shields and disposable radiation absorbing pads can reduce eye dose by factors of 2-7. Lead glasses that shield against exposures from the side can lower doses by 2.5-4.5 times. Training in effective use of protective devices is an essential element in achieving good protection and acceptable eye doses. Effective methods for dose monitoring are required to identify protection issues. Dosemeters worn adjacent to the eye provide the better option for interventional clinicians, but an unprotected dosemeter worn at the neck will give an indication of eye dose that is adequate for most interventional staff. Potential requirements for protective devices and dose monitoring can be determined from risk assessments using generic values for dose linked to examination workload.

  8. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of Indonesian farmers regarding the use of personal protective equipment against pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Yuantari, Maria G C; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Van Straalen, Nico M; Widianarko, Budi; Sunoko, Henna R; Shobib, Muhammad N

    2015-03-01

    The use of synthetic pesticides in tropical countries has increased over the years, following the intensification of agriculture. However, awareness among farmers of the importance of protecting themselves from hazards associated with pesticide application is still lacking, especially in Indonesia. This paper reports results of an inventory on knowledge and attitudes regarding pesticide use by melon farmers of a village in Central Java, Indonesia. The importance of using personal protective equipment such as hats, masks, goggles, boots, and gloves on agricultural land is known and well understood by the farmers. However, in practice, only 3.8 % were wearing glasses and 1.9 % were using boots. In fact, the masks used only consisted of a part of their shirt tied around the mouth. The farmers were not wearing long pants and shirts with long sleeves and used the same clothes for more than 1 day without washing. Almost no farmers used personal protective equipment that was standard, in good condition, and complete. Based on the results of statistical analysis, no significant relationship was found between knowledge and attitude on the required practices on the one hand and the use of personal protective equipment in practice on the other hand. This shows that improved knowledge and attitudes are not enough to change the behavior of farmers to work in a healthy and safe way. The gap between knowledge and practice needs to be bridged by a more interactive and participatory training model. It is therefore of paramount importance to develop a special toolkit for pesticide risk reduction which is developed in a participatory manner involving the farmers as the main actors through a series of focus group discussions and field simulations.

  9. Sun Protection and Skin Examination Practices in a Setting of High Ambient Solar Radiation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Thompson, Bridie S; Green, Adèle C; Neale, Rachel E; Whiteman, David C

    2015-09-01

    Primary prevention and early detection are integral strategies to reduce the burden of skin cancer. To describe the prevalence of sun protection and skin examination practices in a population exposed to high levels of ambient solar radiation and to identify associated factors. Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from a prospective cohort of 40,172 adults aged 40 through 69 years from Queensland, Australia, recruited in 2011. We obtained data on all melanoma diagnoses through 2009 via record linkage with the Queensland Cancer Registry (notifications have been mandatory since 1982). We calculated prevalence proportion ratios to compare prevalence of sun protection and skin examination practices in 3 separate groups: those with a history of melanoma (group 1), those with a self-reported history of treated actinic lesions (group 2), and those without either (group 3). We used multivariate generalized linear models to identify factors associated with each practice. Participants with a previously confirmed melanoma (group 1; n = 1433) and/or treated actinic lesions (group 2; n = 24,006) were more likely than those without (group 3; n = 14,733) to report sun protection practices, including regular use of sunscreen (53.3%, 45.1%, and 38.1%, respectively) and wearing hats (74.7%, 68.2%, and 58.2%, respectively). They were also more likely to have had a whole-body skin examination by a physician in the past 3 years (93.7%, 83.4%, and 52.1%, respectively). Within all 3 groups, the strongest association with sun protection practices was with sun-sensitive skin type. Within group 3 (no history of treated skin lesions), the strongest factor associated with clinical skin examinations was self-reported nevus density at 21 years of age, whereas a family history of melanoma was a significant factor in groups 2 and 3. In this large sample exposed to high levels of ambient solar radiation, sun protection and skin examination practices were most frequent among those

  10. Automated fault location and diagnosis on electric power distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Lubkeman, D.L.; Girgis, A.A.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents new techniques for locating and diagnosing faults on electric power distribution feeders. The proposed fault location and diagnosis scheme is capable of accurately identifying the location of a fault upon its occurrence, based on the integration of information available from disturbance recording devices with knowledge contained in a distribution feeder database. The developed fault location and diagnosis system can also be applied to the investigation of temporary faults that may not result in a blown fuse. The proposed fault location algorithm is based on the steady-state analysis of the faulted distribution network. To deal with the uncertainties inherent in the system modeling and the phasor estimation, the fault location algorithm has been adapted to estimate fault regions based on probabilistic modeling and analysis. Since the distribution feeder is a radial network, multiple possibilities of fault locations could be computed with measurements available only at the substation. To identify the actual fault location, a fault diagnosis algorithm has been developed to prune down and rank the possible fault locations by integrating the available pieces of evidence. Testing of the developed fault location and diagnosis system using field data has demonstrated its potential for practical use.

  11. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  12. Technical Research Paper ìMicrocontroller based Fault Detectorî

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nishith

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to develop a device used to detect faults in the line and isolate the connected system or instrument connected to it.Scope: This device involves the use of microcontroller for detection and isolation of the system of instrument with proper use of programming. The instrument devised is economical and effective compared to other protective devices available in market.After the patent of the product a large scale production is also possible for consumer use!Design Approach: The design methodology involves the use of microcontroller in conjugation with the relay circuitry with display on a LCD screen. It is a totally new design in the market and it will be a substitute to ELCBís, MCBís and Relays in near future .Practical Implications: The circuit devised can be used in conjugation with the medical instrument, industrial instrument and even in the household application. It finds a lot of applications in factories and industries where costly instruments are to be saved from faults.Conclusion: The device thus developed is very economical and effective in the use of protection in household as well as industrial instrument protection. The added advantage of this circuit is that it shows the type of fault occurred on LCD and at the same time keeps the circuit in isolation until the fault is cleared.

  13. Genetic Information, Non-Discrimination, and Privacy Protections in Genetic Counseling Practice

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Anya E.R.; Roche, Myra I.

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the Genetic Information Non Discrimination Act (GINA) was hailed as a pivotal achievement that was expected to calm the fears of both patients and research participants about the potential misuse of genetic information. However, six years later, patient and provider awareness of legal protections at both the federal and state level remains discouragingly low, thereby, limiting their potential effectiveness. The increasing demand for genetic testing will expand the number of individuals and families who could benefit from obtaining accurate information about the privacy and anti-discriminatory protections that GINA and other laws extend. In this paper we describe legal protections that are applicable to individuals seeking genetic counseling, review the literature on patient and provider fears of genetic discrimination and examine their awareness and understandings of existing laws, and summarize how genetic counselors currently discuss genetic discrimination. We then present three genetic counseling cases to illustrate issues of genetic discrimination and provide relevant information on applicable legal protections. Genetic counselors have an unprecedented opportunity, as well as the professional responsibility, to disseminate accurate knowledge about existing legal protections to their patients. They can strengthen their effectiveness in this role by achieving a greater knowledge of current protections including being able to identify specific steps that can help protect genetic information. PMID:25063358

  14. An effective and practical fire-protection system. [for aircraft fuel storage and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansfield, J. A.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Fewell, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    A high-performance sandwich-type fire protection system comprising a steel outer sheath and insulation combined in various configurations is described. An inherent advantage of the sheath system over coatings is that it eliminates problems of weatherability, materials strength, adhesion, and chemical attack. An experimental comparison between the protection performance of state-of-the-art coatings and the sheath system is presented, with emphasis on the protection of certain types of steel tanks for fuel storage and transport. Sheath systems are thought to be more expensive than coatings in initial implementation, although they are less expensive per year for sufficiently long applications.

  15. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  16. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  17. Certificates of Confidentiality: Protecting Human Subject Research Data in Law and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayank J.; Williams, Brett A.; Austin, Jeffrey L.; Dame, Lauren A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often require and collect sensitive information about individuals to answer important scientific questions that impact individual health and well-being and the public health. Researchers recognize they have a duty to maintain the confidentiality of the data they collect and typically make promises, which are documented in the consent form. The legal interests of others, however, can threaten researchers’ promises of confidentiality, if they seek access to the data through subpoena. Certificates of Confidentiality (Certificates), authorized by federal statute, are an important tool for protecting individually identifiable sensitive research data from compelled disclosure. However, questions persist in the research community about the strength of Certificate protections, and the evidence on which to judge the strength is scant. In this article, we address those questions through a careful examination of the legislation and regulations concerning Certificates and the reported and unreported cases we have identified through our legal research and interviews with legal counsel about their experiences with Certificates. We also analyze other statutes that protect research data to compare them to the Certificate’s protections, and we review other legal strategies available for protecting research data. Based on our analysis, we conclude with recommendations for how to strengthen protection of sensitive research data. PMID:25392705

  18. Spatial Dependence and Determinants of Dairy Farmers' Adoption of Best Management Practices for Water Protection in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Sharp, Basil

    2017-04-01

    This paper analyses spatial dependence and determinants of the New Zealand dairy farmers' adoption of best management practices to protect water quality. A Bayesian spatial durbin probit model is used to survey data collected from farmers in the Waikato region of New Zealand. The results show that farmers located near each other exhibit similar choice behaviour, indicating the importance of farmer interactions in adoption decisions. The results also address that information acquisition is the most important determinant of farmers' adoption of best management practices. Financial problems are considered a significant barrier to adopting best management practices. Overall, the existence of distance decay effect and spatial dependence in farmers' adoption decisions highlights the importance of accounting for spatial effects in farmers' decision-making, which emerges as crucial to the formulation of sustainable agriculture policy.

  19. Spatial Dependence and Determinants of Dairy Farmers' Adoption of Best Management Practices for Water Protection in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Sharp, Basil

    2017-04-01

    This paper analyses spatial dependence and determinants of the New Zealand dairy farmers' adoption of best management practices to protect water quality. A Bayesian spatial durbin probit model is used to survey data collected from farmers in the Waikato region of New Zealand. The results show that farmers located near each other exhibit similar choice behaviour, indicating the importance of farmer interactions in adoption decisions. The results also address that information acquisition is the most important determinant of farmers' adoption of best management practices. Financial problems are considered a significant barrier to adopting best management practices. Overall, the existence of distance decay effect and spatial dependence in farmers' adoption decisions highlights the importance of accounting for spatial effects in farmers' decision-making, which emerges as crucial to the formulation of sustainable agriculture policy.

  20. Knowledge of Radiation Hazards, Radiation Protection Practices and Clinical Profile of Health Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Awosan, K J; Ibrahim, Mto; Saidu, S A; Ma'aji, S M; Danfulani, M; Yunusa, E U; Ikhuenbor, D B; Ige, T A

    2016-08-01

    Use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging for diagnostic and interventional purposes has risen dramatically in recent years with a concomitant increase in exposure of patients and health workers to radiation hazards. To assess the knowledge of radiation hazards, radiation protection practices and clinical profile of health workers in UDUTH, Sokoto, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 110 Radiology, Radiotherapy and Dentistry staff selected by universal sampling technique. The study comprised of administration of standardized semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire (to obtain information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of radiation hazards, and radiation protection practices of participants), clinical assessment (comprising of chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound and laboratory investigation on hematological parameters), and evaluation of radiation exposure of participants (extracted from existing hospital records on their radiation exposure status). The participants were aged 20 to 65 years (mean = 34.04 ± 8.83), most of them were males (67.3%) and married (65.7%). Sixty five (59.1%) had good knowledge of radiation hazards, 58 (52.7%) had good knowledge of Personal Protective Devices (PPDs), less than a third, 30 (27.3%) consistently wore dosimeter, and very few (10.9% and below) consistently wore the various PPDs at work. The average annual radiation exposure over a 4 year period ranged from 0.0475mSv to 1.8725mSv. Only 1 (1.2%) of 86 participants had abnormal chest X-ray findings, 8 (9.4%) of 85 participants had abnormal abdominal ultrasound findings; while 17 (15.5%) and 11 (10.0%) of 110 participants had anemia and leucopenia respectively. This study demonstrated poor radiation protection practices despite good knowledge of radiation hazards among the participants, but radiation exposure and prevalence of abnormal clinical conditions were found to be low. Periodic in-service training and monitoring on radiation safety was

  1. Diagnosis without repair for hybrid fault situations. [in computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the concept of a hybrid fault situation is introduced, which specifies bounded combinations of permanently faulty and intermittently faulty units in a system. The general class of hybrid fault situations includes, as special cases, the all permanent fault case and the unrestricted intermittent fault case, which have been previously considered with PMC models. An approach compatible with the diagnosis of permanent fault situations is then applied to the diagnosis of hybrid fault situation. The motivation for doing so is the common practice of testing for the presence of intermittent faults in systems by means of repeated applications of tests that are designed for the detection of permanent faults. The testing assignment of PMC models of system is characterized, and interrelationships between the number of intermittently and permanently faulty units that can be diagnosed is established.

  2. Reactive oxygen species as mediators of cardiac injury and protection: the relevance to anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Kevin, Leo G; Novalija, Enis; Stowe, David F

    2005-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are central to cardiac ischemic and reperfusion injury. They contribute to myocardial stunning, infarction and apoptosis, and possibly to the genesis of arrhythmias. Multiple laboratory studies and clinical trials have evaluated the use of scavengers of ROS to protect the heart from the effects of ischemia and reperfusion. Generally, studies in animal models have shown such effects. Clinical trials have also shown protective effects of scavengers, but whether this protection confers meaningful clinical benefits is uncertain. Several IV anesthetic drugs act as ROS scavengers. In contrast, volatile anesthetics have recently been demonstrated to generate ROS in the heart, most likely because of inhibitory effects on cardiac mitochondria. ROS are involved in the signaling cascade for cardioprotection induced by brief exposure to a volatile anesthetic (termed "anesthetic preconditioning"). ROS, therefore, although injurious in large quantities, can have a paradoxical protective effect within the heart. In this review we provide background information on ROS formation and elimination relevant to anesthetic and adjuvant drugs with particular reference to the heart. The sources of ROS, the means by which they induce cardiac injury or activate protective signaling pathways, the results of clinical studies evaluating ROS scavengers, and the effects of anesthetic drugs on ROS are each discussed.

  3. The relationship between sun protection policies and practices in schools with primary-age students: the role of school demographics, policy comprehensiveness and SunSmart membership.

    PubMed

    Dono, J; Ettridge, K A; Sharplin, G R; Wilson, C J

    2014-02-01

    Schools can implement evidence-based sun protection policies that guide practices to help protect children from harmful sun exposure. This national study assessed the relationship between the existence and comprehensiveness of written policies and the comprehensiveness of sun protection practices. The impact of school demographics on the strength of the relationship was also examined, as was the possibility that 'SunSmart' membership would have an additional impact on practices, beyond having any formal policy. In 2011-12, staff members of 1573 schools catering to primary-age students completed a self-administered survey about sun protection policies and practices (response rate of 57%). Results showed that schools with a written policy had more comprehensive practices than schools without a written policy. The relationship between having a written policy and sun protection practices was stronger for remote schools compared with metropolitan and regional schools, and for schools catering to both primary and secondary students compared with primary students only. In addition, policy comprehensiveness was associated with practice comprehensiveness, and SunSmart membership was indirectly related to practice comprehensiveness via policy comprehensiveness. These results indicate that written policies relate to practice comprehensiveness, but the strength of the association can vary according to the characteristics of the organization.

  4. Sun exposure behaviours, attitudes and protection practices among Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University Students- A survey study.

    PubMed

    Othman Bahakim, Nasr Addin; Alanazi, Bader Ghanem; Alead, Mohammed Yousef; Alaql, Abdulrahman Bader; Al-Ogail, Nasser Abdulla; Alghulaydhawi, Fahad Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate sun exposure behaviours, sun protection practices, general knowledge, attitudes and awareness of University students about the benefits of sun exposure and harmful effects of too much or avoidance of sun exposure. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted in December 2014 and January2015 at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire consisting of multiple-choice closed questions was used. Sample was collected using cluster sampling method. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Of the 399 participants, 200(50.1%) were men and 199(49.9%) were women. The overall mean age was 21±1.82years (range: 18-30 years). Moreover, 217(54.4%) participants intentionally exposed themselves to sun. Spending summer holidays in coastal areas was reported by 150(37.6%). Sunglasses were used by 161(40.4%) participants. Besides, 274(68.7%) participants agreed that sun exposure of 5 to 10 minutes for two or three times per week was very important; 189(47.4%) were aware of the importance of sun exposure for child health. 165(66%), knew that too much sun exposure was harmful and might cause skin cancer. Most of the participants were aware of both beneficial effects of the appropriate sun exposure and harmful effects of too much exposure or its avoidance. However, proper sun exposure practices and sun protection practices need further guidance and encouragements from health-promoting programmes.

  5. Processes of Discernment when Considering Issues of Neglect in Child Protection Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Marie L.; White, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The researchers describe a study conducted to explore how child protection practitioners negotiate their way through ambiguous and contradictory evidence when working with families under a "suspicion" of neglect. In depth interviews were conducted in order to understand the processes of discernment that practitioners used to determine how to…

  6. Best management practices: Managing cropping systems for soil protection and bioenergy production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in renewable alternatives to fossil fuels has increased. Crop residue such as corn stover or wheat straw can be used for bioenergy including a substitution for natural gas or coal. Harvesting crop residue needs to be managed to protect the soil and future soil productivity. The amount of bi...

  7. Motivating Power System Protection Course Students by Practical and Computer-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahnia, Farhad; Moghbel, Moayed; Yengejeh, Hadi Hosseinian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents several methods for motivating students taking a power system protection (PSP) course. The paper reviews the laboratory activities developed for the PSP course at Curtin University, Australia; these methods are applicable and can be used for PSP course instruction at any institution. These activities were developed to improve…

  8. 97 Savvy Secrets for Protecting Self and School: A Practical Guide for Today's Teachers and Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesno, Alice Healy

    A teacher's professional integrity faces numerous challenges in the classroom. To help educators safeguard against potentially career-ending incidents, numerous "survival rules" are provided in this text. It argues that teachers must safeguard themselves with self-protecting knowledge and, in some instances, must reprogram themselves…

  9. Examples of Holistic Good Practices in Promoting and Protecting Mental Health in the Workplace: Current and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sivris, Kelly C; Leka, Stavroula

    2015-12-01

    While attention has been paid to physical risks in the work environment and the promotion of individual employee health, mental health protection and promotion have received much less focus. Psychosocial risk management has not yet been fully incorporated in such efforts. This paper presents good practices in promoting mental health in the workplace in line with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance by identifying barriers, opportunities, and the way forward in this area. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 experts who were selected on the basis of their knowledge and expertise in relation to good practice identified tools. Interviewees were asked to evaluate the approaches on the basis of the WHO model for healthy workplaces. The examples of good practice for Workplace Mental Health Promotion (WMHP) are in line with the principles and the five keys of the WHO model. They support the third objective of the WHO comprehensive mental health action plan 2013-2020 for multisectoral implementation of WMHP strategies. Examples of good practice include the engagement of all stakeholders and representatives, science-driven practice, dissemination of good practice, continual improvement, and evaluation. Actions to inform policies/legislation, promote education on psychosocial risks, and provide better evidence were suggested for higher WMHP success. The study identified commonalities in good practice approaches in different countries and stressed the importance of a strong policy and enforcement framework as well as organizational responsibility for WMHP. For progress to be achieved in this area, a holistic and multidisciplinary approach was unanimously suggested as a way to successful implementation.

  10. Examples of Holistic Good Practices in Promoting and Protecting Mental Health in the Workplace: Current and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sivris, Kelly C.; Leka, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    Background While attention has been paid to physical risks in the work environment and the promotion of individual employee health, mental health protection and promotion have received much less focus. Psychosocial risk management has not yet been fully incorporated in such efforts. This paper presents good practices in promoting mental health in the workplace in line with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance by identifying barriers, opportunities, and the way forward in this area. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 experts who were selected on the basis of their knowledge and expertise in relation to good practice identified tools. Interviewees were asked to evaluate the approaches on the basis of the WHO model for healthy workplaces. Results The examples of good practice for Workplace Mental Health Promotion (WMHP) are in line with the principles and the five keys of the WHO model. They support the third objective of the WHO comprehensive mental health action plan 2013–2020 for multisectoral implementation of WMHP strategies. Examples of good practice include the engagement of all stakeholders and representatives, science-driven practice, dissemination of good practice, continual improvement, and evaluation. Actions to inform policies/legislation, promote education on psychosocial risks, and provide better evidence were suggested for higher WMHP success. Conclusion The study identified commonalities in good practice approaches in different countries and stressed the importance of a strong policy and enforcement framework as well as organizational responsibility for WMHP. For progress to be achieved in this area, a holistic and multidisciplinary approach was unanimously suggested as a way to successful implementation. PMID:26929841

  11. The STAR /self-testing and repairing/ computer - An investigation of the theory and practice of fault-tolerant computer design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avizienis, A.; Gilley, G. C.; Mathur, F. P.; Rennels, D. A.; Rohr, J. A.; Rubin, D. K.

    1971-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained in a continuing investigation of fault-tolerant computing which is being conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Initial studies led to the decision to design and construct an experimental computer with dynamic (standby) redundancy, including replaceable subsystems and a program rollback provision to eliminate transient errors. This system, called the STAR computer, began operation in 1969. The following aspects of the STAR system are described: architecture, reliability analysis, software, automatic maintenance of peripheral systems, and adaptation to serve as the central computer of an outer-planet exploration spacecraft.

  12. Fault diagnosis algorithm based on switching function for boost converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-K.; Kwak, S.-S.; Lee, S.-H.

    2015-07-01

    A fault diagnosis algorithm, which is necessary for constructing a reliable power conversion system, should detect fault occurrences as soon as possible to protect the entire system from fatal damages resulting from system malfunction. In this paper, a fault diagnosis algorithm is proposed to detect open- and short-circuit faults that occur in a boost converter switch. The inductor voltage is abnormally kept at a positive DC value during a short-circuit fault in the switch or at a negative DC value during an open-circuit fault condition until the inductor current becomes zero. By employing these abnormal properties during faulty conditions, the inductor voltage is compared with the switching function to detect each fault type by generating fault alarms when a fault occurs. As a result, from the fault alarm, a decision is made in response to the fault occurrence and the fault type in less than two switching time periods using the proposed algorithm constructed in analogue circuits. In addition, the proposed algorithm has good resistivity to discontinuous current-mode operation. As a result, this algorithm features the advantages of low cost and simplicity because of its simple analogue circuit configuration.

  13. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  14. Exploring the Links between Ethnobotany, Local Therapeutic Practices, and Protected Areas in Santa Catarina Coastline, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Zank, Sofia; Hanazaki, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the knowledge of medicinal plants in two areas proposed for the creation of protected areas for sustainable use in the city of Imbituba (SC). In this study, we analyzed the influence of gender, form of learning, and modern medicine on medicinal plant knowledge while also reflecting on the relationship of this knowledge to in situ conservation. Data collection was conducted through structured interviews, free listings, guided tours, and collection of botanical material. 197 species of medicinal plants belonging to 70 botanical families were recorded. Gender and the form of learning were factors that significantly influenced the similarity of the knowledge of medicinal plants among the informants. We also observed the existence of a therapeutic pluralism among key informants. Local medicinal plant knowledge emphasizes the importance of strategies to create protected areas of sustainable use as a way to ensure the maintenance of traditional lifestyles and associated local knowledge. PMID:22203874

  15. What practical factors guide the choice of stent and protection device during carotid angioplasty?

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2008-06-01

    The importance of angioplasty and stenting in the treatment of carotid artery disease cannot be underestimated. Successful carotid stenting does not only depend of the operator's skills and experience, but also an adequate selection of cerebral protection devices and carotid stents can help avoiding neurological complications. A broad spectrum of carotid devices is currently on the market and since all have their assets and downsides, it is virtually impossible to acclaim one specific device as being the best. The individual characteristics of each specific protection system or stent may make it an attractive choice in one circumstance, but render it a less desirable option in others situations. The applicability depends primarily on the arterial anatomy and the specific details of the lesion being treated. But certainly, personal preferences and familiarity with a specific device may legitimately influence the decision to choose one over another.

  16. Exploring the Links between Ethnobotany, Local Therapeutic Practices, and Protected Areas in Santa Catarina Coastline, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zank, Sofia; Hanazaki, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the knowledge of medicinal plants in two areas proposed for the creation of protected areas for sustainable use in the city of Imbituba (SC). In this study, we analyzed the influence of gender, form of learning, and modern medicine on medicinal plant knowledge while also reflecting on the relationship of this knowledge to in situ conservation. Data collection was conducted through structured interviews, free listings, guided tours, and collection of botanical material. 197 species of medicinal plants belonging to 70 botanical families were recorded. Gender and the form of learning were factors that significantly influenced the similarity of the knowledge of medicinal plants among the informants. We also observed the existence of a therapeutic pluralism among key informants. Local medicinal plant knowledge emphasizes the importance of strategies to create protected areas of sustainable use as a way to ensure the maintenance of traditional lifestyles and associated local knowledge.

  17. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  18. Privacy Protection: Mandating New Arrangements to Implement and Assess Federal Privacy Policy and Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-27

    technology — the telephone, the microphone and dictograph recorder, and improved cameras — presented major new challenges to privacy protection. During the...closing decades of the 20th century, extensions of these and other new technology developments — the computer, genetic profiling, and digital...Commission on Federal Paperwork, Confidentiality and Privacy: A Report of the Commission on Federal Paperwork (Washington: GPO, 1977), pp. 139-175. 9

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of the general public toward sun exposure and protection: A national survey in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; AlAklabi, Aeed S; AlQahtani, Abdulla Z

    2016-11-01

    Background: Many international studies have been conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures. However, there are scarce data on these factors from the Middle East. Objectives: This study aimed to explore the KAP of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures among Saudis. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted on a stratified random sample of the general population in the five geographical regions of Saudi Arabia (central, eastern, northern, southern, and western). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2011. Multiple logistic regressions were applied to relate the use of sunscreen and skin cancer awareness with various socio-demographic variables. Results: The questionnaire was distributed to 2900 Saudis. A total of 2622 questionnaires were completed, returned, and included in the data analysis, corresponding to a response rate of 90.4%. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 27.8 ± 9.7 years. Fifty percent (1301/1601) of the respondents were males. Fifty-five percent (1406/2544) were aware of the association between sun exposure and skin cancer. Female, young and student respondents were more likely to be aware of the connection between sun exposure and skin cancer (p < 0.001). Likewise, respondents from the middle social class and those with higher education levels were more likely to be informed (p < 0.02). The prevalence of regular sunscreen use among study participants was only 23.7%, and female and employed respondents were more likely to use sunscreen (p < 0.001). Protective clothes were the most commonly used sun protection measure as reported by more than 90% of our participants. Conclusion: This study has shown that sun awareness and protection are generally inadequate in the Saudi population and suggests the need for health education programs.

  20. Human Subjects Protection: A Source for Ethical Service-Learning Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendler, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Human subjects research ethics were developed to ensure responsible conduct when university researchers learn by interacting with community members. As service-learning students also learn by interacting with community members, a similar set of principles may strengthen the ethical practice of service-learning. This article identifies ethical…

  1. From Game Protection to Wildlife Management: Frame Shifts, Organizational Development, and Field Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brulle, Robert J.; Benford, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    One enduring question in social movements research is the relationship between cultural representations and organizational structure. In this article, we examine the development of different discursive frames over time, and how such frame shifts affect movement structure and practices. This approach seeks to illuminate the dialectical interplay…

  2. From Game Protection to Wildlife Management: Frame Shifts, Organizational Development, and Field Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brulle, Robert J.; Benford, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    One enduring question in social movements research is the relationship between cultural representations and organizational structure. In this article, we examine the development of different discursive frames over time, and how such frame shifts affect movement structure and practices. This approach seeks to illuminate the dialectical interplay…

  3. Fault-Tree Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  4. Associations of contextual risk and protective factors with fathers’ parenting practices in the post-deployment environment

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Laurel; Hanson, Sheila K.; Zamir, Osnat; Gewirtz, Abigail H.; DeGarmo, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Deployment separation and reunifications are salient contexts that directly impact effective family functioning and parenting for military fathers. Yet, we know very little about determinants of post-deployed father involvement and effective parenting. The present study examined hypothesized risk and protective factors of observed parenting for 282 post-deployed fathers who served in the Army National Guard/Reserves. Pre-intervention data were employed from fathers participating in the After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT) randomized control trial. Parenting practices were obtained from direct observation of father-child interaction and included measures of problem solving, harsh discipline, positive involvement, encouragement, and monitoring. Risk factors included combat exposure, negative life events, months deployed, and PTSD symptoms. Protective factors included education, income, dyadic adjustment, and social support. Results of a structural equation model predicting an effective parenting construct indicated that months deployed, income, and father age were most related to observed parenting, explaining 16% of the variance. We are aware of no other study utilizing direct parent-child observations of father’s parenting skills following overseas deployment. Implications for practice and preventive intervention are discussed. PMID:26213794

  5. Pharmacological agents as cerebral protectants during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in adult thoracic aortic surgery. A survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, A T; Moore, S J; Liban, J B

    2002-10-01

    A postal survey was sent to members of the Association of Cardiothoracic Anaesthetists to ascertain current practice in the use of pharmacological agents as cerebral protectants during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. The response rate was 60%. Eighty-three per cent of respondents used some form of pharmacological agent specifically for cerebral protection. Fifty-nine per cent of respondents used thiopental, 29% used propofol and 48% used a variety of other agents, the most common of these being a steroid. There were variations in the dose and timing of administration of drugs. Few respondents believed that there was a body of evidence to support this use of pharmacological agents. Only 35% of respondents believed there to be sufficient evidence to support the use of thiopental. Similarly, only 11% of respondents believe that there is evidence supporting the use of propofol, and 16% the use of steroids. The above findings demonstrate that it would not be possible to create a "best practice" set of guidelines at present. A national database of all cases of adult thoracic surgery involving deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, with methodology and outcome, could probably establish such guidelines, evidence based.

  6. Survey of radiography and radiation protection in general dental practice in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mutyabule, T K; Whaites, E J

    2002-05-01

    To carry out the first survey in Uganda of all dentists and all public health dental officers (PHDO) to assess the status of dental radiography and radiation protection. All 74 dentists and 76 PHDOs in Uganda were sent a postal questionnaire including 33 questions relating to various demographic details, radiographic equipment and radiographic techniques, including processing and radiation protection. A second questionnaire was sent to non-respondents after 3 months. Eighty-two per cent of dentists responded and 83% of PHDOs. Seventy per cent of the dentists and 100% of the PHDOs were trained in Uganda. Seventy-five per cent of the dentists and 30% of the PHDOs had access to one of the approximately 30 X-ray machines in the country. The majority of the equipment did not comply with current recommendations in Europe. Fifty-one per cent of dentists used machines with mechanical timers, 28% used machines with no visual warning signal and 17% used equipment with no audible warning signal. Most of the equipment was over 30 years old and only 15% of dentists knew when the equipment was last serviced. The most relevant finding of the surveys was the level of 'don't know' responses to many questions from both groups. The lack of knowledge regarding dental radiography and radiation protection plus the condition of most equipment in Uganda is a matter of concern. Standards of care are considerably lower than in developed countries requiring improved undergraduate training, provision of postgraduate courses and Ugandan governmental or international financial assistance.

  7. Climate change and natural disasters – integrating science and practice to protect health

    PubMed Central

    Sauerborn, Rainer; Ebi, Kristie

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydro-meteorological disasters are the focus of this paper. The authors examine, to which extent climate change increases their frequency and intensity. Methods Review of IPCC-projections of climate-change related extreme weather events and related literature on health effects. Results Projections show that climate change is likely to increase the frequency, intensity, duration, and spatial distribution of a range of extreme weather events over coming decades. Conclusions There is a need for strengthened collaboration between climate scientists, the health researchers and policy-makers as well as the disaster community to jointly develop adaptation strategies to protect human. PMID:23273248

  8. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: implications for pediatric pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Ximena; Benavides, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on the pediatric health care landscape includes expanded health insurance coverage and health care delivery improvements by increasing implementation of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations. These offer opportunities for pharmacists to assume responsibility for the medication-related needs of pediatric patients through pharmacotherapy selection, medication therapy management performance, and medication reconciliation at each transition of care. Medically complex children with at least 2 chronic disease states may be the target population. Studies demonstrating the positive outcomes and cost-effectiveness of pharmacists in pediatric ambulatory care settings are needed.

  9. Knowledge of Radiation Hazards, Radiation Protection Practices and Clinical Profile of Health Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, MTO; Saidu, SA; Ma’aji, SM; Danfulani, M; Yunusa, EU; Ikhuenbor, DB; Ige, TA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging for diagnostic and interventional purposes has risen dramatically in recent years with a concomitant increase in exposure of patients and health workers to radiation hazards. Aim To assess the knowledge of radiation hazards, radiation protection practices and clinical profile of health workers in UDUTH, Sokoto, Nigeria. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 110 Radiology, Radiotherapy and Dentistry staff selected by universal sampling technique. The study comprised of administration of standardized semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire (to obtain information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of radiation hazards, and radiation protection practices of participants), clinical assessment (comprising of chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound and laboratory investigation on hematological parameters), and evaluation of radiation exposure of participants (extracted from existing hospital records on their radiation exposure status). Results The participants were aged 20 to 65 years (mean = 34.04 ± 8.83), most of them were males (67.3%) and married (65.7%). Sixty five (59.1%) had good knowledge of radiation hazards, 58 (52.7%) had good knowledge of Personal Protective Devices (PPDs), less than a third, 30 (27.3%) consistently wore dosimeter, and very few (10.9% and below) consistently wore the various PPDs at work. The average annual radiation exposure over a 4 year period ranged from 0.0475mSv to 1.8725mSv. Only 1 (1.2%) of 86 participants had abnormal chest X-ray findings, 8 (9.4%) of 85 participants had abnormal abdominal ultrasound findings; while 17 (15.5%) and 11 (10.0%) of 110 participants had anemia and leucopenia respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated poor radiation protection practices despite good knowledge of radiation hazards among the participants, but radiation exposure and prevalence of abnormal clinical conditions were found to be low. Periodic in

  10. Earthquake fault superhighways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. P.; Das, S.; Searle, M. P.

    2010-10-01

    Motivated by the observation that the rare earthquakes which propagated for significant distances at supershear speeds occurred on very long straight segments of faults, we examine every known major active strike-slip fault system on land worldwide and identify those with long (> 100 km) straight portions capable not only of sustained supershear rupture speeds but having the potential to reach compressional wave speeds over significant distances, and call them "fault superhighways". The criteria used for identifying these are discussed. These superhighways include portions of the 1000 km long Red River fault in China and Vietnam passing through Hanoi, the 1050 km long San Andreas fault in California passing close to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Francisco, the 1100 km long Chaman fault system in Pakistan north of Karachi, the 700 km long Sagaing fault connecting the first and second cities of Burma, Rangoon and Mandalay, the 1600 km Great Sumatra fault, and the 1000 km Dead Sea fault. Of the 11 faults so classified, nine are in Asia and two in North America, with seven located near areas of very dense populations. Based on the current population distribution within 50 km of each fault superhighway, we find that more than 60 million people today have increased seismic hazards due to them.

  11. Plastic surgery practice models and research aims under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Aviram M; Yuan, Frank; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-02-01

    As the health care landscape in the United States changes under the Affordable Care Act, providers are set to face numerous new challenges. Although concerns about practice sustainability with declining reimbursement have dominated the dialogue, there are more pressing changes to the health care funding mechanism as a whole that must be addressed. Plastic surgeons, involved in various practice models each with different relationships to hospitals, referring physicians, and payers, must understand these reimbursement changes to dictate adequate compensation in the future. In this article, the authors discuss bundle payments and accountable care organizations, and how plastic surgeons might best engage in these new system designs. In addition, the authors review the value of a focused and driven health-services research agenda in plastic surgery, and the importance of this research in supporting long-term financial stability for the specialty.

  12. Plastic Surgery Practice Models and Research Aims Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Aviram M.; Yuan, Frank; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    As the healthcare landscape in the United States changes under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providers are set to face numerous new challenges. Although concerns about practice sustainability with declining reimbursement have dominated the dialogue, there are more pressing changes to the healthcare funding mechanism as a whole that must be addressed. Plastic surgeons, involved in various practice models each with different relationships to hospitals, referring physicians, and payers, must understand these reimbursement changes in order to dictate adequate compensation in the future. Here we discuss bundle payments and Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), and how plastic surgeons might best engage in these new system designs. In addition, we review the value of a focused and driven health-services research agenda in plastic surgery, and the importance of this research in supporting long-term financial stability for the specialty. PMID:25626805

  13. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  14. Practical and affordable measures for the protection of health care workers from tuberculosis in low-income countries.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Maher, D.; Nunn, P.

    1997-01-01

    With the global upsurge in tuberculosis (TB), fueled by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic, and the increase in multidrug-resistant TB, the condition has become a serious occupational hazard for health care workers worldwide. Much of the current understanding about nosocomial TB transmission stems from the USA; however, little is known about the risk of such transmission in low-income countries. The focus of this review is on sub-Saharan Africa, since this is the region with the highest TB incidence, the highest HIV incidence, the worst epidemic of HIV-related TB, and where the risk to health care workers is probably greatest. Measures used in industralized countries to control nosocomial TB transmission (ventilation systems, isolation rooms, personal protective equipment) are beyond the resources of low-income countries. Protecting health care workers in these settings involves practical measures relating to diagnosis and treatment of infectious cases; appropriate environmental control; and relevant personal protection and surveillance of health care workers. Research needs to be carried out to examine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of measures such as voluntary HIV-testing of health care workers (to enable known HIV-positive health care workers to avoid high-risk settings) and isoniazid preventive therapy for workers in high-risk settings. More resources are also needed to ensure full implementation of currently recommended measures to decrease the risk of nosocomial and laboratory-acquired TB. PMID:9447782

  15. [The Application of the Fault Tree Analysis Method in Medical Equipment Maintenance].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the traditional fault tree analysis method is presented, detailed instructions for its application characteristics in medical instrument maintenance is made. It is made significant changes when the traditional fault tree analysis method is introduced into the medical instrument maintenance: gave up the logic symbolic, logic analysis and calculation, gave up its complicated programs, and only keep its image and practical fault tree diagram, and the fault tree diagram there are also differences: the fault tree is no longer a logical tree but the thinking tree in troubleshooting, the definition of the fault tree's nodes is different, the composition of the fault tree's branches is also different.

  16. Reset Tree-Based Optical Fault Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Geon; Choi, Dooho; Seo, Jungtaek; Kim, Howon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new reset tree-based scheme to protect cryptographic hardware against optical fault injection attacks. As one of the most powerful invasive attacks on cryptographic hardware, optical fault attacks cause semiconductors to misbehave by injecting high-energy light into a decapped integrated circuit. The contaminated result from the affected chip is then used to reveal secret information, such as a key, from the cryptographic hardware. Since the advent of such attacks, various countermeasures have been proposed. Although most of these countermeasures are strong, there is still the possibility of attack. In this paper, we present a novel optical fault detection scheme that utilizes the buffers on a circuit's reset signal tree as a fault detection sensor. To evaluate our proposal, we model radiation-induced currents into circuit components and perform a SPICE simulation. The proposed scheme is expected to be used as a supplemental security tool. PMID:23698267

  17. Immunization to protect the US Armed Forces: heritage, current practice, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Grabenstein, John D; Pittman, Phillip R; Greenwood, John T; Engler, Renata J M

    2006-01-01

    Americans serving with the US Armed Forces need protection from the dangerous infections that they can contract during training, based on occupation, during overseas deployment, or because of underlying health status. For over 230 years, the military health-care system has immunized troops to protect them personally and to help them accomplish their missions. Military researchers have invented, developed, and improved vaccines and immunization delivery methods against more than 20 diseases. This article consolidates content from several previous historical reviews, adds additional sources, and cites primary literature regarding military contributions and accomplishments. Discussion emphasizes smallpox, typhoid fever, tetanus, influenza, meningococcal disease, adenovirus, yellow fever, pneumococcal disease, and anthrax. Delivery issues include documentation, simultaneous immunization, seroscreening, safety surveillance, jet injection, and cold-chain management. Immunization policies for each major US conflict are described. Military immunization programs need to be individualized on the basis of personal contraindications and prior immunity. The proper conduct of military immunization programs respects the need for detailed education of military personnel, maximizes quality in immunization delivery, and supports quality clinical care to prevent and treat adverse events after immunization. Military immunization programs maintain the health of soldiers, marines, sailors, airmen, and coast guardsmen, the resources most critical to military success.

  18. Clinical Practice Policy to Protect Children From Tobacco, Nicotine, and Tobacco Smoke.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harold J; Walley, Susan C; Groner, Judith A; Nelson, Kevin E

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco dependence starts in childhood. Tobacco exposure of children is common and causes illness and premature death in children and adults, with adverse effects starting in the womb. There is no safe level of tobacco smoke exposure. Pediatricians should screen for use of tobacco and other nicotine delivery devices and provide anticipatory guidance to prevent smoking initiation and reduce tobacco smoke exposure. Pediatricians need to be aware of the different nicotine delivery systems marketed and available.Parents and caregivers are important sources of children's tobacco smoke exposure. Because tobacco dependence is a severe addiction, to protect children's health, caregiver tobacco dependence treatment should be offered or referral for treatment should be provided (such as referral to the national smoker's quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW). If the source of tobacco exposure cannot be eliminated, counseling about reducing exposure to children should be provided.Health care delivery systems should facilitate the effective prevention, identification, and treatment of tobacco dependence in children and adolescents, their parents, and other caregivers. Health care facilities should protect children from tobacco smoke exposure and tobacco promotion. Tobacco dependence prevention and treatment should be part of medical education, with knowledge assessed as part of board certification examinations. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  20. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  1. Quantifying structural uncertainty on fault networks using a marked point process within a Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Orhun; Caers, Jef Karel

    2017-08-01

    Faults are one of the building-blocks for subsurface modeling studies. Incomplete observations of subsurface fault networks lead to uncertainty pertaining to location, geometry and existence of faults. In practice, gaps in incomplete fault network observations are filled based on tectonic knowledge and interpreter's intuition pertaining to fault relationships. Modeling fault network uncertainty with realistic models that represent tectonic knowledge is still a challenge. Although methods that address specific sources of fault network uncertainty and complexities of fault modeling exists, a unifying framework is still lacking. In this paper, we propose a rigorous approach to quantify fault network uncertainty. Fault pattern and intensity information are expressed by means of a marked point process, marked Strauss point process. Fault network information is constrained to fault surface observations (complete or partial) within a Bayesian framework. A structural prior model is defined to quantitatively express fault patterns, geometries and relationships within the Bayesian framework. Structural relationships between faults, in particular fault abutting relations, are represented with a level-set based approach. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler is used to sample posterior fault network realizations that reflect tectonic knowledge and honor fault observations. We apply the methodology to a field study from Nankai Trough & Kumano Basin. The target for uncertainty quantification is a deep site with attenuated seismic data with only partially visible faults and many faults missing from the survey or interpretation. A structural prior model is built from shallow analog sites that are believed to have undergone similar tectonics compared to the site of study. Fault network uncertainty for the field is quantified with fault network realizations that are conditioned to structural rules, tectonic information and partially observed fault surfaces. We show the proposed

  2. Comparison of various iron chelators used in clinical practice as protecting agents against catecholamine-induced oxidative injury and cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hašková, Pavlína; Koubková, Lucie; Vávrová, Anna; Macková, Eliška; Hrušková, Kateřina; Kovaříková, Petra; Vávrová, Kateřina; Simůnek, Tomáš

    2011-11-18

    Catecholamines are stress hormones and sympathetic neurotransmitters essential for control of cardiac function and metabolism. However, pathologically increased catecholamine levels may be cardiotoxic by mechanism that includes iron-catalyzed formation of reactive oxygen species. In this study, five iron chelators used in clinical practice were examined for their potential to protect cardiomyoblast-derived cell line H9c2 from the oxidative stress and toxicity induced by catecholamines epinephrine and isoprenaline and their oxidation products. Hydroxamate iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO) significantly reduced oxidation of catecholamines to more toxic products and abolished redox activity of the catecholamine-iron complex at pH 7.4. However, due to its hydrophilicity and large molecule, DFO was able to protects cells only at very high and clinically unachievable concentrations. Two newer chelators, deferiprone (L1) and deferasirox (ICL670A), showed much better protective potential and were effective at one or two orders of magnitude lower concentrations as compared to DFO that were within their clinically relevant plasma levels. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), dexrazoxane (ICRF-187, clinically approved cardioprotective agent against anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity) as well as selected beta adrenoreceptor antagonists and calcium channel blockers exerted no effect. Hence, results of the present study indicate that small, lipophilic and iron-specific chelators L1 and ICL670A can provide significant protection against the oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte damage exerted by catecholamines and/or their reactive oxidation intermediates. This potential new application of the clinically approved drugs L1 and ICL670A warrants further investigation, preferably using more complex in vivo animal models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Codeª (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  4. Evaluating sustainable water quality management in the U.S.: Urban, Agricultural, and Environmental Protection Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oel, P. R.; Alfredo, K. A.; Russo, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable water management typically emphasizes water resource quantity, with focus directed at availability and use practices. When attention is placed on sustainable water quality management, the holistic, cross-sector perspective inherent to sustainability is often lost. Proper water quality management is a critical component of sustainable development practices. However, sustainable development definitions and metrics related to water quality resilience and management are often not well defined; water quality is often buried in large indicator sets used for analysis, and the policy regulating management practices create sector specific burdens for ensuring adequate water quality. In this research, we investigated the methods by which water quality is evaluated through internationally applied indicators and incorporated into the larger idea of "sustainability." We also dissect policy's role in the distribution of responsibility with regard to water quality management in the United States through evaluation of three broad sectors: urban, agriculture, and environmental water quality. Our research concludes that despite a growing intention to use a single system approach for urban, agricultural, and environmental water quality management, one does not yet exist and is even hindered by our current policies and regulations. As policy continues to lead in determining water quality and defining contamination limits, new regulation must reconcile the disparity in requirements for the contaminators and those performing end-of-pipe treatment. Just as the sustainable development indicators we researched tried to integrate environmental, economic, and social aspects without skewing focus to one of these three categories, policy cannot continue to regulate a single sector of society without considering impacts to the entire watershed and/or region. Unequal distribution of the water pollution burden creates disjointed economic growth, infrastructure development, and policy

  5. Analysis of the effects of asymmetric faults in three-phase superconducting inductive fault current limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R.; Pina, J. M.; Vilhena, N.; Arsénio, P.; Pronto, A. G.; Martins, J.

    2014-05-01

    Inductive fault current limiters of magnetic shielding type can be described in terms of the excursion in the plane defined by flux linked with primary and line current, and this methodology has been previously applied to single-phase devices. Practical applications, however, require three-phase limiters, which, for the sake of compactness, may be built by three legged cores, instead of three single phase units. This has the advantage of using well established methods of power transformers industry, but the performance of the devices depends on the type of fault, e.g. phase to ground or phase to phase. For instance, in a three legged core, a phase to ground fault affects healthy phases, and these are the most frequent faults in distribution grids, where such systems are envisaged. The effects of asymmetric faults are analysed in this paper, by means of measured excursions in the linked flux-current plane.

  6. Isolability of faults in sensor fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Reza; Langari, Reza

    2011-10-01

    A major concern with fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods is their robustness with respect to noise and modeling uncertainties. With this in mind, several approaches have been proposed to minimize the vulnerability of FDI methods to these uncertainties. But, apart from the algorithm used, there is a theoretical limit on the minimum effect of noise on detectability and isolability. This limit has been quantified in this paper for the problem of sensor fault diagnosis based on direct redundancies. In this study, first a geometric approach to sensor fault detection is proposed. The sensor fault is isolated based on the direction of residuals found from a residual generator. This residual generator can be constructed from an input-output or a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based model. The simplicity of this technique, compared to the existing methods of sensor fault diagnosis, allows for more rational formulation of the isolability concepts in linear systems. Using this residual generator and the assumption of Gaussian noise, the effect of noise on isolability is studied, and the minimum magnitude of isolable fault in each sensor is found based on the distribution of noise in the measurement system. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to clarify this approach.

  7. Practicality of marine protected areas - Can there be solutions for the River Indus delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwai, Samina; Fanning, Paul; Ahmed, Waqar; Tabrez, Mohsin; Zhang, Jing; Khan, Muhammad Wasim

    2016-12-01

    The River Indus delta is the most prominent feature on the Pakistan coast. Owing to its prominence, mangrove ecosystem, historical, ecological and economic significance it is also a proposed Marine Protected Area (MPA). Currently there are no designated MPAs in Pakistan. This paper presents findings of the Fishery Resource Appraisal Project of Pakistan (FRAPP) a fishery stock assessment carried out for the pelagic and demersal fishery resource of Pakistan from 2009 to 2015 and the Creek Survey Program (CSP) which was part of FRAPP. And discusses how the delta suffers from physical stress. The observations from FRAPP indicates deterioration in the mangrove ecosystem, that are evident in the form of loss of biodiversity and biological productivity. The 600 observations from 10 major creeks showed that trawl catches were a mix of generally small size fish and shrimp. Catches averaged less than 1 kg per tow in all the creeks sampled. Catch weights were somewhat higher in Isaro, WadiKhuddi, Paitiani, Dabbo, Richaal Creeks all of which were near mangrove areas and open sea. The most frequently occurring species of shrimps caught in the trawls belonged to 7 major taxa. The Khobar Creek and Upper Wari Creek are notable for the high rates of occurrence of every group except the Caridea. They are also the only two creeks where the freshwater family Paleomonidae is common. The size composition of the important penaeid family of shrimps in all study areas combined suggests that the smallest shrimps (0.5-1.5 cm carapace length CL) enter the creeks in February/March and adults (5-6 cm CL) move out again 6-12 months later. Four species of Penaeus (monodon, japonicus, semisulcatus, merguiensis), two species of Metapenaeus (monoceros, affinis), Parapeneoposis stylifera and Solenosera sp. were caught, all in low abundance, less than 0.5 Kg tow-1. The shrimp catches in the area off the Sindh coast, the catches averaged 4.30 ± 13.40 kg h-1 on the inner shelf (20-50 m) and 1.7 ± 6

  8. Genetic discrimination in health insurance: current legal protections and industry practices.

    PubMed

    Pollitz, Karen; Peshkin, Beth N; Bangit, Eliza; Lucia, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Most states have enacted genetic nondiscrimination laws in health insurance, and federal legislation is pending in Congress. Scientists worry fear of discrimination discourages some patients from participating in clinical trials and hampers important medical research. This paper describes a study of medical underwriting practices in the individual health insurance market related to genetic information. Underwriters from 23 companies participated in a survey that asked them to underwrite four pairs of hypothetical applicants for health insurance. One person in each pair had received a positive genetic test result indicating increased risk of a future health condition--breast cancer, hemochromatosis, or heart disease--for a total of 92 underwriting decisions on applications involving genetic information. In seven of these 92 applications, underwriters said they would deny coverage, place a surcharge on premiums,or limit covered benefits based on an applicant's genetic information.

  9. A review of recently active faults in Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, Manuel G.

    1975-01-01

    high near Hualien, where an uplift of at least 0.6 m and probably more than 1 m occurred in the 1951 earthquake, and near and south of the 1946 faulting. Sudden uplifts can have serious consequences for installations near the shore. Investigation of this process, study of recently active faults, and continuing study of seismicity are necessary parts of a practical earthquake-hazard reduction program.

  10. Health risk in agricultural villages practicing wastewater irrigation in central Mexico: perspectives for protection.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, E; Blumenthal, U; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Bennett, S; Quigley, M

    2000-01-01

    9,435 individuals participated in a cross-sectional survey in the irrigation districts of the Mezquital Valley (central Mexico). Exposure groups were: 848 households irrigating with untreated wastewater, 544 households irrigating with the effluent from a series of interconnected reservoirs, and 928 households farming with natural rainfall. The unit of analysis was the individual, and the health outcomes included diarrhoeal diseases and Ascaris lumbricoides infection. Water quality was assessed using faecal coliforms (FC) and nematode eggs, as suggested by (WHO, 1989) for the safe use of wastewater in agriculture. Children from households irrigating with untreated wastewater (10(8) FC/100 mL and 135 nematode eggs/L) had a 33% higher risk of diarrhoeal diseases and a fivefold increase in risk of A. lumbricoides infection (OR = 5.71) compared to children from the control group, farming with rainfall. The risk of A. lumbricoides infection in older individuals was even higher (OR = 13.18). The final analysis showed that drinking unboiled water and cultivating vegetables crops were both associated with a higher risk of diarrheal diseases (OR = 1.45 and 2.00); individuals infected with A. lumbricoides infection came mostly from landless households with poorer dwellings and low standards of sanitation (OR = 2.20, 2.23, 1.72 and 1.43, respectively). These results are discussed in the context of health protection measures and policy recommendations.

  11. Conservation in the context of climate change: practical guidelines for land protection at local scales.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, Kevin; August, Peter V; Damon, Christopher; Labash, Charles; Rubinoff, Pamela; Robadue, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will affect the composition of plant and animal communities in many habitats and geographic settings. This presents a dilemma for conservation programs--will the portfolio of protected lands we now have achieve a goal of conserving biodiversity in the future when the ecological communities occurring within them change? Climate change will significantly alter many plant communities, but the geophysical underpinnings of these landscapes, such as landform, elevation, soil, and geological properties, will largely remain the same. Studies show that extant landscapes with a diversity of geophysical characteristics support diverse plant and animal communities. Therefore, geophysically diverse landscapes will likely support diverse species assemblages in the future, although which species and communities will be present is not altogether clear. Following protocols advanced in studies spanning large regions, we developed a down-scaled, high spatial resolution measure of geophysical complexity based on Ecological Land Units (ELUs) and examined the relationship between plant species richness, ecological community richness, and ELU richness (number of different ELU types). We found that extant landscapes with high ELU richness had a greater variety of ecological community types and high species richness of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. We developed a spatial representation of diverse ELU landscapes to inform local conservation practitioners, such as land trusts, of potential conservation targets that will likely support diverse faunas and floras despite the impact of climate change.

  12. Conservation in the Context of Climate Change: Practical Guidelines for Land Protection at Local Scales

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, Kevin; August, Peter V.; Damon, Christopher; LaBash, Charles; Rubinoff, Pamela; Robadue, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will affect the composition of plant and animal communities in many habitats and geographic settings. This presents a dilemma for conservation programs – will the portfolio of protected lands we now have achieve a goal of conserving biodiversity in the future when the ecological communities occurring within them change? Climate change will significantly alter many plant communities, but the geophysical underpinnings of these landscapes, such as landform, elevation, soil, and geological properties, will largely remain the same. Studies show that extant landscapes with a diversity of geophysical characteristics support diverse plant and animal communities. Therefore, geophysically diverse landscapes will likely support diverse species assemblages in the future, although which species and communities will be present is not altogether clear. Following protocols advanced in studies spanning large regions, we developed a down-scaled, high spatial resolution measure of geophysical complexity based on Ecological Land Units (ELUs) and examined the relationship between plant species richness, ecological community richness, and ELU richness (number of different ELU types). We found that extant landscapes with high ELU richness had a greater variety of ecological community types and high species richness of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. We developed a spatial representation of diverse ELU landscapes to inform local conservation practitioners, such as land trusts, of potential conservation targets that will likely support diverse faunas and floras despite the impact of climate change. PMID:24278336

  13. Real benefit of a protective factor against dementia: Importance of controlling for death. Example of sport practice.

    PubMed

    Grasset, Leslie; Joly, Pierre; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Letenneur, Luc; Wittwer, Jérôme; Amieva, Hélène; Helmer, Catherine; Dartigues, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    To analyse the impact of a risk factor on several epidemiological indicators of death and dementia; the example of sport practice is presented. A population of 3670 non-demented subjects living at home and aged 65 and older from the PAQUID study were followed for 22 years. Sport practice was documented at baseline. Dementia (according to DSM-III-R criteria) and death were assessed at each visit. Analyses were performed with an Illness-Death model, providing results on the risks of dementia and death, probabilities and life expectancies. A total of 743 subjects (20.2%) participated in regular sport practice. During the follow-up, the proportion of death was lower in the elderly people practicing sport (EPPS), whereas the proportion of incident dementia cases was the same. The adjusted model showed a decreased risk of dementia (HR = 0.84 (0.72-1.00)) and of death for non-demented subjects (HR = 0.61 (0.51-0.71)) for EPPS but a similar risk of death with dementia in both sport groups. The probability of remaining alive without dementia was higher in EPPS, whereas the probability of dying was lower. The mean lifetime without dementia was 3 years higher for the EPPS, but the mean lifetime with dementia was the same. A preventive measure on a protective factor that is more effective for preventing death than dementia could lead to an increased lifetime without dementia; however, the number of demented cases may remain unchanged, even if the risk of developing dementia is reduced. This dynamic is important to forecast the need for health care and social services for the elderly.

  14. Technology transfer by means of fault tree synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.

    2012-12-01

    Since Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) attempts to model and analyze failure processes of engineering, it forms a common technique for good industrial practice. On the contrary, fault tree synthesis (FTS) refers to the methodology of constructing complex trees either from dentritic modules built ad hoc or from fault tress already used and stored in a Knowledge Base. In both cases, technology transfer takes place in a quasi-inductive mode, from partial to holistic knowledge. In this work, an algorithmic procedure, including 9 activity steps and 3 decision nodes is developed for performing effectively this transfer when the fault under investigation occurs within one of the latter stages of an industrial procedure with several stages in series. The main parts of the algorithmic procedure are: (i) the construction of a local fault tree within the corresponding production stage, where the fault has been detected, (ii) the formation of an interface made of input faults that might occur upstream, (iii) the fuzzy (to count for uncertainty) multicriteria ranking of these faults according to their significance, and (iv) the synthesis of an extended fault tree based on the construction of part (i) and on the local fault tree of the first-ranked fault in part (iii). An implementation is presented, referring to 'uneven sealing of Al anodic film', thus proving the functionality of the developed methodology.

  15. Geoheritage, Geodiversity and natural landscape enhanced and protected through anthropogenic activity: a case study using the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault, Afar and Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Hagos, Miruts; Guilbaud, Marie-Noelle

    2015-04-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage (WH) committee called in 2014 for all thematic geological and volcanological studies to be revised in light of a widening gap between current dogma and the progressive geoheritage science views. We discuss question of natural sites and anthropogenic activity. The Chaîne des Puys and Limagne fault UNESCO WH project is the basis of this presentation, but we also the Afar Region of Ethiopia and UNAM campus, Mexico City. It is now difficult to find any totally 'natural' (devoid of human influence) landscape. This very definition of natural ignores that humankind is a geological force, and humans are part of the natural process. The UNESCO WH guidelines recognise this in paragraph 90: 'it is recognized that no area is totally pristine and that all natural areas are in a dynamic state, and to some extent involve contact with people'. A geological landscape, may be large enough to accommodate human occupation without significantly changing landforms: this is the case of the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne fault. Human activity works in some ways to protect geological landscape: regulating vegetation and erosion. The aesthetic nature of humans may work to enhance the landscape's visibility by organisation of land use, and ceremonial use based on the sense of place. Humans also exercise economic activity such as quarrying and mining, which if uncontrolled can seriously modify a landscape. However, isolated works may not have an impact, or may even enhance the value of the site by uncovering geological features that would not naturally be seen. In the Chaîne des Puys only 0,3% of the land surface has been worked by artisanal methods and certain sites, like the Lemptégy volcano have been extracted with the view of enhancing the landscape's scientific value without detracting from the aesthetic. The site preserves its natural, scientific and aesthetic qualities, because of the human presence. The local population have always been and continue to be

  16. Saturating time-delay transformer for overcurrent protection

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1977-01-01

    Electrical loads connected to d-c supplies are protected from damage by overcurrent in the case of a load fault by connecting in series with the load a saturating transformer that detects a load fault and limits the fault current to a safe level for a period long enough to correct the fault or else disconnect the power supply.

  17. Saturating time-delay transformer for overcurrent protection. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1975-12-18

    Electrical loads connected to dc supplies are protected from damage by overcurrent in the case of a load fault by connecting in series with the load a saturating transformer that detects a load fault and limits the fault current to a safe level for a period long enough to correct the fault or else disconnect the power supply.

  18. Mental Capacity Law, Autonomy, and best Interests: An Argument for Conceptual and Practical Clarity in the Court of Protection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article examines medical decision-making, arguing that the law, properly understood, requires where possible that equal weight be given to the wishes, feelings, beliefs, and values of patients who have, and patients who are deemed to lack, decision-making capacity. It responds critically to dominant lines of reasoning that are advanced and applied in the Court of Protection, and suggests that for patient-centred practice to be achieved, we do not need to revise the law, but do need to ensure robust interpretation and application of the law. The argument is based on conceptual analysis of the law’s framing of patients and medical decisions, and legal analysis of evolving and contemporary norms governing the best interests standard. PMID:28007810

  19. Malaria Knowledge, Concern, Land Management, and Protection Practices among Land Owners and/or Managers in Lowland versus Highland Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Pinault, Lauren L.; Hunter, Fiona F.

    2011-01-01

    To control malaria effectively, it is essential to understand the current knowledge, beliefs, concerns, land management practices, and mosquito bite protection methods in use by citizens. This study presents a comparative, quantitative, interview-based study of land owners and/or managers (n = 262) in the Ecuadorian lowlands (presently considered malarious) (n = 131) and highlands (potentially malarious in the future) (n = 131). Although respondents had a strong understanding of where the disease occurs in their own country and of the basic relationship among standing water, mosquitoes, and malaria, about half of respondents in potential risk areas denied the current possibility of malaria infection on their own property. As well, about half of respondents with potential anopheline larval habitat did not report its presence, likely due to a highly specific definition of suitable mosquito habitat. Most respondents who are considered at risk of malaria currently use at least one type of mosquito bite prevention, most commonly bed nets. PMID:22363897

  20. Identifying biogeochemical processes beneath stormwater infiltration ponds in support of a new best management practice for groundwater protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.; Xuan, Zhemin; Schirmer, Mario; Hoehn, Eduard; Vogt, Tobias

    2011-01-01

     When applying a stormwater infiltration pond best management practice (BMP) for protecting the quality of underlying groundwater, a common constituent of concern is nitrate. Two stormwater infiltration ponds, the SO and HT ponds, in central Florida, USA, were monitored. A temporal succession of biogeochemical processes was identified beneath the SO pond, including oxygen reduction, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, aerobic conditions persisted beneath the HT pond, resulting in nitrate leaching into groundwater. Biogeochemical differences likely are related to soil textural and hydraulic properties that control surface/subsurface oxygen exchange. A new infiltration BMP was developed and a full-scale application was implemented for the HT pond. Preliminary results indicate reductions in nitrate concentration exceeding 50% in soil water and shallow groundwater beneath the HT pond.

  1. A framework for practical and rigorous impact monitoring by field managers of marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Rouphael, Anthony B; Abdulla, Ameer; Said, Yasser

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring is a crucial component of conservation in marine protected areas (MPAs) as it allows managers to detect changes to biodiversity and to infer cause of change. However, the complexities of sampling designs and associated statistical analyses can impede implementation of monitoring by managers. Two monitoring frameworks commonly used in marine environments are statistical testing and parameter estimation. For many managers these two approaches fail to help them detect change and infer causation for one or more reasons: the complexity of the statistical test, no decision-making structure and a sampling design that is suboptimal. In collaboration with marine park rangers in Egypt, we instigated a monitoring framework to detect impacts by snorkelers in a pragmatic but scientifically rigorous way. First, we used a literature review to define causal criteria to facilitate inference. This was essential because our sampling design was suboptimal due to a lack of baseline data and there was only one impact site. Second, we established a threshold level of coral damage that if exceeded would trigger management to reduce the impact of snorkelers. This provided a clear decision-making structure. Third, we estimated effect sizes with confidence intervals to detect change. For the field managers, this approach to detection was easier to understand than assessing a null hypothesis and provided critical information for decision making. At no stage during the short study period did snorkelers cause damage that exceeded the threshold and thus mitigation was not required. In situations of technical and financial constraints this framework will increase the implementation of effective impact monitoring for many activities in MPAs and enhance management of marine biodiversity.

  2. Trends in skin cancer knowledge, sun protection practices and behaviours in the Northern Ireland population.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Anna; Boyle, Rhonda; Donnelly, David; Donnelly, Conan; Gordon, Sandra; McElwee, Gerry; O'Hagan, Art

    2012-06-01

    Sun exposure increases risk of skin cancer, especially melanoma, incidence of which continues to rise. Reported skin cancer knowledge and trends in sun care behaviours are documented in a UK region where there has been 20 years of sun-related health promotion campaigns. In 2000, 2004 and 2008, a 'care in the sun' module was included in the Northern Ireland (NI) Omnibus survey. Randomly selected subjects were asked to complete a sun-related questionnaire and proportions of respondents analysed by demographic and socio-economic factors, with differences tested using z-tests and the chi-squared test. Around 3623 persons responded. Skin cancer knowledge was high (97%). Sun avoidance decreased with time and was lowest among younger age groups and males. Sunscreen use was high (70%), unchanged over 8 years, and more likely among younger age groups, females, those in paid employment, and those with tertiary level education. Use of sunscreen with minimum Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 15 (a campaign message) increased from 45% to 70% (P < 0.01). Skin self-examination was infrequent (8%), less common among those aged ≥65 years, males and those with only primary or secondary level education. Messages on sunscreen use have penetrated the population well, but lower use among the unemployed suggests cost as an issue. Lack of sun avoidance in young people, especially men, poses a risk for further skin cancer increases. Low levels of reported skin self-examination in older people, men and those with lower educational attainment identify areas for further action.

  3. Health education: Effect on knowledge and practice of workplace personal hygiene and protective measures among woodworkers in Enugu, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeugwu, L; Aguwa, E N; Arinze-Onyia, S U; Okeke, T A

    2017-07-01

    There has been increasing incidence of occupational diseases among woodworkers due to exposure to preventable hazards in the workplace. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of health education on the knowledge and practice of workplace hygiene and protective measures among woodworkers in Enugu timber market. This was a before and after study conducted among 290 woodworkers using interviewer administered semi-structured questionnaire and manual on workplace hazards prevention. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 and P-value of 0.05 was set as the significance level. Two hundred and ninety respondents participated in the study; 282 (97.2%) were males, most completed secondary education and had worked for less than 10 years (71% and 58.3%, respectively). The mean knowledge score of participants pre- and postintervention were 89.5% ± 9.03 and 98.5% ± 1.84, respectively (P < 0.001). Educational status had effect on knowledge of participants (P < 0.001), whereas work experience had no effect (P = 0.285). Preintervention, 37.9% of the participants used protective materials regularly, which increased to 65.8% post intervention (P < 0.001). Personal hygiene practices showed mixed responses most of which improved post intervention. The most common reason for eating in workplace was excessive workload (60.3%), while lack of PPEs (29.3%) and lack of training (23.8%) were the most common reasons for nonuse of PPEs. Majority of the participants had good knowledge of workplace hygiene but had poor use of PPEs. Health education intervention improved the use of PPEs and should be recommended.

  4. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  5. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  6. Use of soil and water protection practices among farmers in three midwest watersheds.

    PubMed

    Napier, T L; Tucker, M

    2001-02-01

    Data were collected from 1011 farmers in three Midwestern watersheds (Ohio, Iowa, and Minnesota) to assess factors that influence the use of conservation production systems at the farm level. The "vested interests" perspective used to guide the investigation was derived from elements of social learning and social exchange theories. Respondents were asked to indicate their frequency of use for 18 agricultural production practices that could be adopted on Midwestern farms at the time of the study. Responses to the 18 items were summed to form a composite variable, termed "conservation production index," for use as the dependent variable in multivariate analysis. Eleven independent variables were identified from the theory as likely predictors of conservation adoption, including respondents' perceptions about production costs, output and risks, and perceived importance of access to subsidies, technical assistance, and informational/educational programs. Regression analysis was used to assess the performance of the independent variables in explaining variance in the conservation production index. Explained variance in the three regression models ranged from 2% in the Minnesota watershed to 19% in the Ohio watershed. The researchers concluded that the model had limited utility in predicting adoption of conservation production systems within the three study watersheds. Findings are discussed in the context of conservation programs within the three areas.

  7. Assessing parenting competence in child protection cases: a clinical practice model.

    PubMed

    Budd, K S

    2001-03-01

    Evaluating parents in the context of possible abuse or neglect involves unique challenges. This paper describes a practice model for conducting clinical evaluations of parents' ability to care for young children (under age 8). Core features of the model include (a) a focus on parenting qualities and the parent-child relationship, (b) a functional approach emphasizing behaviors and skills in everyday performance, and (c) application of a minimal parenting standard. Several factors complicate the assessment task, namely, the absence of universally accepted standards of minimal parenting adequacy, the coercive context of the assessment, the scarcity of appropriate measures, difficulties predicting future behavior, and the likely use of the evaluation in legal proceedings. In the proposed model, the evaluator (a) clarifies specific referral questions in advance; (b) uses a multimethod, multisource, multisession approach; (c) organizes findings in terms of parent-child fit; (d) prepares an objective, behaviorally descriptive report that articulates the logic for the evaluator's clinical opinions regarding the referral questions; and (e) refrains from offering opinions regarding ultimate legal issues. The paper describes requisite skills needed to conduct parental fitness evaluations, sample methods, and a protocol for writing the evaluation report.

  8. Fault Diagnosis Method of Fault Indicator Based on Maximum Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    In order to solve the problem of distribution fault diagnosis in case of misreporting or failed-report of fault indicator information, the characteristics of the fault indicator are analyzed, and the concept of the minimum fault judgment area of the distribution network is developed. Based on which, the mathematical model of fault indicator fault diagnosis is evaluated. The characteristics of fault indicator signals are analyzed. Based on two-in-three principle, a probabilistic fault indicator combination signal processing method is proposed. Based on the combination of the minimum fault judgment area model, the fault indicator combination signal and the interdependence between the fault indicators, a fault diagnosis method based on maximum probability is proposed. The method is based on the similarity between the simulated fault signal and the real fault signal, and the detailed formula is given. The method has good fault-tolerance in the case of misreporting or failed-report of fault indicator information, which can more accurately determine the fault area. The probability of each area is given, and fault alternatives are provided. The proposed approach is feasible and valuable for the dispatching and maintenance personnel to deal with the fault.

  9. Controlling the signal: Practical privacy protection of genomic data sharing through Beacon services.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-07-26

    Genomic data is increasingly collected by a wide array of organizations. As such, there is a growing demand to make summary information about such collections available more widely. However, over the past decade, a series of investigations have shown that attacks, rooted in statistical inference methods, can be applied to discern the presence of a known individual's DNA sequence in the pool of subjects. Recently, it was shown that the Beacon Project of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a web service for querying about the presence (or absence) of a specific allele, was vulnerable. The Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) Center modeled a track in their third Privacy Protection Challenge on how to mitigate the Beacon vulnerability. We developed the winning solution for this track. This paper describes our computational method to optimize the tradeoff between the utility and the privacy of the Beacon service. We generalize the genomic data sharing problem beyond that which was introduced in the iDASH Challenge to be more representative of real world scenarios to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis of our method with respect to several state-of-the-art methods using a dataset of 400,000 positions in Chromosome 10 for 500 individuals from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. All methods are evaluated for utility, privacy and efficiency. Our method achieves better performance than all state-of-the-art methods, irrespective of how key factors (e.g., the allele frequency in the population, the size of the pool and utility weights) change from the original parameters of the problem. We further illustrate that it is possible for our method to exhibit subpar performance under special cases of allele query sequences. However, we show our method can be extended to address this issue when the query sequence is fixed and known a priori to the data custodian, so that they may plan stage their

  10. Fault detection and fault tolerance in robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visinsky, Monica; Walker, Ian D.; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

    1992-01-01

    Robots are used in inaccessible or hazardous environments in order to alleviate some of the time, cost and risk involved in preparing men to endure these conditions. In order to perform their expected tasks, the robots are often quite complex, thus increasing their potential for failures. If men must be sent into these environments to repair each component failure in the robot, the advantages of using the robot are quickly lost. Fault tolerant robots are needed which can effectively cope with failures and continue their tasks until repairs can be realistically scheduled. Before fault tolerant capabilities can be created, methods of detecting and pinpointing failures must be perfected. This paper develops a basic fault tree analysis of a robot in order to obtain a better understanding of where failures can occur and how they contribute to other failures in the robot. The resulting failure flow chart can also be used to analyze the resiliency of the robot in the presence of specific faults. By simulating robot failures and fault detection schemes, the problems involved in detecting failures for robots are explored in more depth.

  11. An expert system for power systems fault analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yongli, Z.; Yang, Y.H.; Zhang, W.Q.; Gao, S. ); Hogg, B.W. )

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes an expert system for fault analysis which has been put into field test in the dispatch center of the North East China Electric Network. Previous expert systems for fault analysis on transmission power systems are mainly based on information about the operation of protective relays, whereas this new expert system mainly uses information on tripped circuit breakers, which is more readily available. For some complicated faults, a small number of relay signals are needed. Data concerning the distribution and characteristics of protective relays are concealed in the fault models in the knowledge base of the expert system, and consequently the large database normally required for this data is unnecessary. This also enables the expert system to be more easily transplanted to other networks. Furthermore, because it can distinguish the operational performances of different relays, it analyzes faults more accurately.

  12. Extensional Faulting of the Overturned Coconino Ejecta Layer and Emplacement of Fallback Breccia at Barringer Meteorite Crater (aka Meteor Crater)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Cole, S.; Craft, K.; Crites, S.; Gaither, T.; Jilly, C.; Lemelin, M.; Rosenburg, M.; Seward, L.; Song, E.; Snape, J. F.; Talpe, M.; Thaisen, K.; Veto, M.; Wielicki, M.; Williams, F.; Worsham, E.; Garber, J.

    2012-03-01

    New sections measured at Meteor Crater indicate the extension of the ejecta blanket was partly accommodated by a series of normal faults. Those normal faults also provided a means of "burying" and protecting fallback ejecta.

  13. Reconfigurable fault tolerant avionics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Asami, K.; Cho, Mengu

    This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable avionics system based on modern Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)-based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to be used in future generations of nano satellites. A major concern in satellite systems and especially nano satellites is to build robust systems with low-power consumption profiles. The system is designed to be flexible by providing the capability of reconfiguring itself based on its orbital position. As Single Event Upsets (SEU) do not have the same severity and intensity in all orbital locations, having the maximum at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the polar cusps, the system does not have to be fully protected all the time in its orbit. An acceptable level of protection against high-energy cosmic rays and charged particles roaming in space is provided within the majority of the orbit through software fault tolerance. Check pointing and roll back, besides control flow assertions, is used for that level of protection. In the minority part of the orbit where severe SEUs are expected to exist, a reconfiguration for the system FPGA is initiated where the processor systems are triplicated and protection through Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) with feedback is provided. This technique of reconfiguring the system as per the level of the threat expected from SEU-induced faults helps in reducing the average dynamic power consumption of the system to one-third of its maximum. This technique can be viewed as a smart protection through system reconfiguration. The system is built on the commercial version of the (XC5VLX50) Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA on bulk silicon with 324 IO. Simulations of orbit SEU rates were carried out using the SPENVIS web-based software package.

  14. Algorithm-Based Fault Tolerance Integrated with Replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael; Rennels, David

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed approach to programming and utilization of commercial off-the-shelf computing equipment, a combination of algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT) and replication would be utilized to obtain high degrees of fault tolerance without incurring excessive costs. The basic idea of the proposed approach is to integrate ABFT with replication such that the algorithmic portions of computations would be protected by ABFT, and the logical portions by replication. ABFT is an extremely efficient, inexpensive, high-coverage technique for detecting and mitigating faults in computer systems used for algorithmic computations, but does not protect against errors in logical operations surrounding algorithms.

  15. Fault Attacks against the Miller's Algorithm in Edwards Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mrabet, Nadia

    Initially, the use of pairings did not involve any secret entry. However in an Identity Based Cryptographic protocol, one of the two entries of the pairing is secret, so fault attack can be applied to Pairing Based Cryptography to find it. In [18], the author shows that Pairing Based Cryptography in Weierstrass coordinates is vulnerable to a fault attack. The addition law in Edwards coordinates is such that the exponentiation in Edwards coordinates is naturally protected to Side Channel attacks. We study here if this property protects Pairing Based Cryptography in Edwards coordinates against fault attacks.

  16. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of back-to-back, or comparison, testing for regression test or porting is examined. The efficiency and the cost of the strategy is compared with manual and table-driven single version testing. Some of the key parameters that influence the efficiency and the cost of the approach are the failure identification effort during single version program testing, the extent of implemented changes, the nature of the regression test data (e.g., random), and the nature of the inter-version failure correlation and fault-masking. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed, together with some suggestions concerning its practical use.

  17. Software for Fault-Tolerant Matrix Multiplication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Quintana-Orti, Enrique; Gunnels, John; van de Geijn, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Formal Linear Algebra Recovery Environment is a computer program for high-performance, fault-tolerant matrix multiplication. The program is based on an extension of the prior theory and practice of fault-tolerant matrix matrix multiplication of the form C = AB. This extension provides low-overhead methods for detecting errors, not only in C, but also in A and/or B. These methods enable the detection of all errors as long as, in a given case, only one entry in A, B, or C is corrupted. The program also provides for following a low-overhead rollback approach to correct errors once detected. Results of computational experiments have demonstrated that the methods implemented in this program work well in practice while imposing an acceptably low level of overhead, relative to high-performance matrix-multiplication methods that do not afford fault tolerance.

  18. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  19. New York Bight fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Grow, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The fault parallels a magnetic low to the east, interpreted as a buried Mesozoic rift basin from seismic-reflection data, and a gravity low to the west, interpreted as a structure within Paleozoic rocks from well data. Whether these structures control the location of, or movement on, the fault is not clear.

  20. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  1. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  2. Rough faults, distributed weakening, and off-fault deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Ashley; Nielsen, Stefan; di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2010-08-01

    We report systematic spatial variations in fault rocks along nonplanar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran wavy fault) and Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia wavy fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte thickness varies along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. We conduct a quantitative analysis of fault roughness, microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the Lobbia fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. The models also predict static stress redistribution around bends in the faults which is consistent with distribution of microcracks, indicating significant elastic and inelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to nonplanar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire nonplanar fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the dynamically propagating crack tip.

  3. Validation of Helicopter Gear Condition Indicators Using Seeded Fault Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula; Brandon, E. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    A "seeded fault test" in support of a rotorcraft condition based maintenance program (CBM), is an experiment in which a component is tested with a known fault while health monitoring data is collected. These tests are performed at operating conditions comparable to operating conditions the component would be exposed to while installed on the aircraft. Performance of seeded fault tests is one method used to provide evidence that a Health Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) can replace current maintenance practices required for aircraft airworthiness. Actual in-service experience of the HUMS detecting a component fault is another validation method. This paper will discuss a hybrid validation approach that combines in service-data with seeded fault tests. For this approach, existing in-service HUMS flight data from a naturally occurring component fault will be used to define a component seeded fault test. An example, using spiral bevel gears as the targeted component, will be presented. Since the U.S. Army has begun to develop standards for using seeded fault tests for HUMS validation, the hybrid approach will be mapped to the steps defined within their Aeronautical Design Standard Handbook for CBM. This paper will step through their defined processes, and identify additional steps that may be required when using component test rig fault tests to demonstrate helicopter CI performance. The discussion within this paper will provide the reader with a better appreciation for the challenges faced when defining a seeded fault test for HUMS validation.

  4. Methods to enhance seismic faults and construct fault surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinming; Zhu, Zhihui

    2017-10-01

    Faults are often apparent as reflector discontinuities in a seismic volume. Numerous types of fault attributes have been proposed to highlight fault positions from a seismic volume by measuring reflection discontinuities. These attribute volumes, however, can be sensitive to noise and stratigraphic features that are also apparent as discontinuities in a seismic volume. We propose a matched filtering method to enhance a precomputed fault attribute volume, and simultaneously estimate fault strikes and dips. In this method, a set of efficient 2D exponential filters, oriented by all possible combinations of strike and dip angles, are applied to the input attribute volume to find the maximum filtering responses at all samples in the volume. These maximum filtering responses are recorded to obtain the enhanced fault attribute volume while the corresponding strike and dip angles, that yield the maximum filtering responses, are recoded to obtain volumes of fault strikes and dips. By doing this, we assume that a fault surface is locally planar, and a 2D smoothing filter will yield a maximum response if the smoothing plane coincides with a local fault plane. With the enhanced fault attribute volume and the estimated fault strike and dip volumes, we then compute oriented fault samples on the ridges of the enhanced fault attribute volume, and each sample is oriented by the estimated fault strike and dip. Fault surfaces can be constructed by directly linking the oriented fault samples with consistent fault strikes and dips. For complicated cases with missing fault samples and noisy samples, we further propose to use a perceptual grouping method to infer fault surfaces that reasonably fit the positions and orientations of the fault samples. We apply these methods to 3D synthetic and real examples and successfully extract multiple intersecting fault surfaces and complete fault surfaces without holes.

  5. A testing-coverage software reliability model considering fault removal efficiency and error generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuying; Pham, Hoang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a software reliability model that considers not only error generation but also fault removal efficiency combined with testing coverage information based on a nonhomogeneous Poisson process (NHPP). During the past four decades, many software reliability growth models (SRGMs) based on NHPP have been proposed to estimate the software reliability measures, most of which have the same following agreements: 1) it is a common phenomenon that during the testing phase, the fault detection rate always changes; 2) as a result of imperfect debugging, fault removal has been related to a fault re-introduction rate. But there are few SRGMs in the literature that differentiate between fault detection and fault removal, i.e. they seldom consider the imperfect fault removal efficiency. But in practical software developing process, fault removal efficiency cannot always be perfect, i.e. the failures detected might not be removed completely and the original faults might still exist and new faults might be introduced meanwhile, which is referred to as imperfect debugging phenomenon. In this study, a model aiming to incorporate fault introduction rate, fault removal efficiency and testing coverage into software reliability evaluation is developed, using testing coverage to express the fault detection rate and using fault removal efficiency to consider the fault repair. We compare the performance of the proposed model with several existing NHPP SRGMs using three sets of real failure data based on five criteria. The results exhibit that the model can give a better fitting and predictive performance.

  6. A description of female genital mutilation and force-feeding practices in Mauritania: implications for the protection of child rights and health.

    PubMed

    Ouldzeidoune, Nacerdine; Keating, Joseph; Bertrand, Jane; Rice, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) and force feeding (gavage) practices among children in Mauritania; to investigate factors related to FGM and gavage practices and attitude in Mauritania; and to explore implications related to the protection of children's rights and welfare. Data from the Mauritania 2000-2001 DHS were used in this analysis. Data were collected from men and women about their attitude toward the continuation of FGM and gavage; women only were asked if they ever experienced one of these practices. Chi-square statistics were used to investigate differences in attitude and practice of FGM and gavage by demographic characteristics. Binary logistic regression was used to identify socio-demographic factors related to FGM and gavage outcomes. The overall prevalence of FGM was 77% but varied depending on ethnicity. The majority of both female and male respondents favored the continuation of the practice (64% and 70%, respectively). Almost a quarter (23%) of women reported being force fed as a child and 32% of women and 29% of men approved the continuation of the practice. Gavage is almost exclusively practiced among Arabs. The practice of both FGM and gavage is ongoing, although the prevalence and attitude towards both appears to vary as a function of ethnicity, wealth, education, marital status, and age. Contextually relevant intervention and enforcement strategies are needed to challenge these cultural norms and protect the rights and welfare of children in Mauritania.

  7. A Description of Female Genital Mutilation and Force-Feeding Practices in Mauritania: Implications for the Protection of Child Rights and Health

    PubMed Central

    Ouldzeidoune, Nacerdine; Keating, Joseph; Bertrand, Jane; Rice, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish the prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) and force feeding (gavage) practices among children in Mauritania; to investigate factors related to FGM and gavage practices and attitude in Mauritania; and to explore implications related to the protection of children’s rights and welfare. Methods Data from the Mauritania 2000–2001 DHS were used in this analysis. Data were collected from men and women about their attitude toward the continuation of FGM and gavage; women only were asked if they ever experienced one of these practices. Chi-square statistics were used to investigate differences in attitude and practice of FGM and gavage by demographic characteristics. Binary logistic regression was used to identify socio-demographic factors related to FGM and gavage outcomes. Findings The overall prevalence of FGM was 77% but varied depending on ethnicity. The majority of both female and male respondents favored the continuation of the practice (64% and 70%, respectively). Almost a quarter (23%) of women reported being force fed as a child and 32% of women and 29% of men approved the continuation of the practice. Gavage is almost exclusively practiced among Arabs. Conclusion The practice of both FGM and gavage is ongoing, although the prevalence and attitude towards both appears to vary as a function of ethnicity, wealth, education, marital status, and age. Contextually relevant intervention and enforcement strategies are needed to challenge these cultural norms and protect the rights and welfare of children in Mauritania. PMID:23593257

  8. Multi-version software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1989-01-01

    A number of experimental and theoretical issues associated with the practical use of multi-version software to provide run-time tolerance to software faults were investigated. A specialized tool was developed and evaluated for measuring testing coverage for a variety of metrics. The tool was used to collect information on the relationships between software faults and coverage provided by the testing process as measured by different metrics (including data flow metrics). Considerable correlation was found between coverage provided by some higher metrics and the elimination of faults in the code. Back-to-back testing was continued as an efficient mechanism for removal of un-correlated faults, and common-cause faults of variable span. Software reliability estimation methods was also continued based on non-random sampling, and the relationship between software reliability and code coverage provided through testing. New fault tolerance models were formulated. Simulation studies of the Acceptance Voting and Multi-stage Voting algorithms were finished and it was found that these two schemes for software fault tolerance are superior in many respects to some commonly used schemes. Particularly encouraging are the safety properties of the Acceptance testing scheme.

  9. Multiversion software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1990-01-01

    In this project we have proposed to investigate a number of experimental and theoretical issues associated with the practical use of multi-version software in providing dependable software through fault-avoidance and fault-elimination, as well as run-time tolerance of software faults. In the period reported here we have working on the following: We have continued collection of data on the relationships between software faults and reliability, and the coverage provided by the testing process as measured by different metrics (including data flow metrics). We continued work on software reliability estimation methods based on non-random sampling, and the relationship between software reliability and code coverage provided through testing. We have continued studying back-to-back testing as an efficient mechanism for removal of uncorrelated faults, and common-cause faults of variable span. We have also been studying back-to-back testing as a tool for improvement of the software change process, including regression testing. We continued investigating existing, and worked on formulation of new fault-tolerance models. In particular, we have partly finished evaluation of Consensus Voting in the presence of correlated failures, and are in the process of finishing evaluation of Consensus Recovery Block (CRB) under failure correlation. We find both approaches far superior to commonly employed fixed agreement number voting (usually majority voting). We have also finished a cost analysis of the CRB approach.

  10. Include heuristics in protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kobyakov, A.I. )

    1993-02-01

    Automatic systems based on interlock principles are the most popular method of protecting plants from hazards. Nevertheless, such systems have specific shortcomings. The major one comes from the fact that protection controls are activated at the stage of break down mode development, and not at the moments of pre-fault status origin. It is possible to design protection controls that account for information relating to pre-fault status, causes, locations, and potential danger severity. A method of recreating automatic protection systems (APS) with functioning and structural organization is based on the accepted strategy of potentially hazardous plant protection. APS features these basic functions: pre-fault status classification and diagnostic providing protection controls that depend on pre-fault status type and cause, and suppression process analysis and protection controls correction. The system functions as a parallel/series process. Pre-fault status location data with related classification and diagnostics are based on current startup information. A protection control vector is formed that guarantees pre-fault status suppression. This paper describes these features.

  11. Building method of diagnostic model of Bayesian networks based on fault tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Haijun; Li, Lin

    2008-10-01

    Fault tree (FT) is usually a reliability and security analysis and diagnoses decision model. It is also in common use that expressing fault diagnosis question with fault tree model. But it will not be changed easily if fault free model was built, and it could not accept and deal with new information easily. It is difficult to put the information which have nothing to do with equipment fault but can be used to fault diagnosis into diagnostic course. Bayesian Networks (BN) can learn and improve its network architecture and parameters at any time by way of practice accumulation, and raises the ability of fault diagnosis. The method of building BN based on FT is researched on this article, this method could break through the limitations of FT itself, make BN be more extensively applied to the domain of fault diagnosis and gains much better ability of fault analysis and diagnosis.

  12. The Kunlun Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kunlun fault is one of the gigantic strike-slip faults that bound the north side of Tibet. Left-lateral motion along the 1,500-kilometer (932-mile) length of the Kunlun has occurred uniformly for the last 40,000 years at a rate of 1.1 centimeter per year, creating a cumulative offset of more than 400 meters. In this image, two splays of the fault are clearly seen crossing from east to west. The northern fault juxtaposes sedimentary rocks of the mountains against alluvial fans. Its trace is also marked by lines of vegetation, which appear red in the image. The southern, younger fault cuts through the alluvium. A dark linear area in the center of the image is wet ground where groundwater has ponded against the fault. Measurements from the image of displacements of young streams that cross the fault show 15 to 75 meters (16 to 82 yards) of left-lateral offset. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) acquired the visible light and near infrared scene on July 20, 2000. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  13. NASA Spacecraft Fault Management Workshop Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn; McDougal, John; Barley, Bryan; Fesq, Lorraine; Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fault Management is a critical aspect of deep-space missions. For the purposes of this paper, fault management is defined as the ability of a system to detect, isolate, and mitigate events that impact, or have the potential to impact, nominal mission operations. The fault management capabilities are commonly distributed across flight and ground subsystems, impacting hardware, software, and mission operations designs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that 4 out of the 5 missions studied had significant overruns due to underestimating the complexity and support requirements for fault management. As a result of this and other recent experiences, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Planetary Science Division (PSD) commissioned a workshop to bring together invited participants across government, industry, academia to assess the state of the art in fault management practice and research, identify current and potential issues, and make recommendations for addressing these issues. The workshop was held in New Orleans in April of 2008. The workshop concluded that fault management is not being limited by technology, but rather by a lack of emphasis and discipline in both the engineering and programmatic dimensions. Some of the areas cited in the findings include different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; unclear ownership of end-to-end fault management engineering; inadequate understanding of the impact of mission-level requirements on fault management complexity; and practices, processes, and

  14. NASA Spacecraft Fault Management Workshop Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn; McDougal, John; Barley, Bryan; Fesq, Lorraine; Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fault Management is a critical aspect of deep-space missions. For the purposes of this paper, fault management is defined as the ability of a system to detect, isolate, and mitigate events that impact, or have the potential to impact, nominal mission operations. The fault management capabilities are commonly distributed across flight and ground subsystems, impacting hardware, software, and mission operations designs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that 4 out of the 5 missions studied had significant overruns due to underestimating the complexity and support requirements for fault management. As a result of this and other recent experiences, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Planetary Science Division (PSD) commissioned a workshop to bring together invited participants across government, industry, academia to assess the state of the art in fault management practice and research, identify current and potential issues, and make recommendations for addressing these issues. The workshop was held in New Orleans in April of 2008. The workshop concluded that fault management is not being limited by technology, but rather by a lack of emphasis and discipline in both the engineering and programmatic dimensions. Some of the areas cited in the findings include different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; unclear ownership of end-to-end fault management engineering; inadequate understanding of the impact of mission-level requirements on fault management complexity; and practices, processes, and

  15. The Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault World Heritage project: a view from a scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2013-12-01

    The development of the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault World Heritage UNESCO project has taken about five years, since the Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans was approached by the local Auvergne government. Before this we had been working locally with organisations such as the Lemptégy volcano and Vulcania to help disseminate geoscience ideas to the general public, however the UNESCO project has lead us to do much more outreach. It has also stimulated our research and has taught us to better explain this to the lay person. In visiting other heritage projects, where we have exchanged ideas and best practice, we have been able to help other sites and improve what we do. These links are particularly important, as they can be used to help broaden the outlook of the general public and local actors, and increase further earth science literacy. I have noticed a strong increase in the awareness of the volcanoes, and volcanism as a result of the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault project. I think that, before, many locals considered the volcanoes only as their special back garden, for easy walks and views and leisure, or for that matter farming, mining and hunting. However, now, there is a greater sense of pride rooted in the increased awareness of their geological significance in a historical and global context. While this effect is clear for the volcanoes, it is not yet apparent for the fault. The lay person has no clear concept of a rift and a fault. Thus, one of our major present challenges is to open the public's eyes to the fault. This is vital for the UNESCO project not only for educational reasons, but also because the fault scarp is a natural barrier that protects the rest of the property from urban development. Only if there is awareness of its nature and significance will it be an effective defence. To arrive at this goal, there is now a local government sponsored project to create and disseminate fault walks, fault viewpoints and fault information points. This is

  16. Fault-tolerant electrical power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Ishaque S.; Weimer, Joseph A.

    1987-10-01

    An electrical system that will meet the requirements of a 1990s two-engine fighter is being developed in the Fault-Tolerant Electrical Power System (FTEPS) program, sponsored by the AFWAL Aero Propulsion Laboratory. FTEPS will demonstrate the generation and distribution of fault-tolerant, reliable, electrical power required for future aircraft. The system incorporates MIL-STD-1750A digital processors and MIL-STD-1553B data buses for control and communications. Electrical power is distributed through electrical load management centers by means of solid-state power controllers for fault protection and individual load control. The system will provide uninterruptible power to flight-critical loads such as the flight control and mission computers with sealed lead-acid batteries. Primary power is provided by four 60 kVA variable speed constant frequency generators. Buildup and testing of the FTEPS demonstrator is expected to be complete by May 1988.

  17. Measuring fault tolerance with the FTAPE fault injection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The major parts of the tool include a system-wide fault-injector, a workload generator, and a workload activity measurement tool. The workload creates high stress conditions on the machine. Using stress-based injection, the fault injector is able to utilize knowledge of the workload activity to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio, performance degradation, and number of system crashes are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  18. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  19. Thermoregulatory responses to layered personal protective clothing: practical implications for oil spill clean-up and remediation.

    PubMed

    Sirikul, Bovorn; Bishop, Phillip A; Nevett, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Many jobs in toxic environments and in less than ideal surroundings, such as oil spill remediation, require the use of 2 layers of personal protective equipment (PPE) to maximize worker safety. This study was designed to assess physiological and subjective responses while working in a single-layer (SL) or double-layer (DL) ensemble during a continuous work protocol in a hot environment of 31 °C WBGT. Eleven men in a repeated-measures design performed 2 counterbalanced work-bouts at a time-weighted work rate of 300 kcal/h. All tests were terminated when a rectal temperature (Tre) of 38.7 °C was attained. Total work time was significantly (P < 0.05) shorter in DL (60.5 ± 3.9 versus 66.4 ± 4.6 min in SL), and final microenvironmental temperature (MEt) (35.6 ± 0.9 °C vs 37.1 ± 0.3 °C) and humidity (MEh) (90.0 ± 4.0% vs 95.4 ± 1.1%) were higher in DL. There were no differences for Tre, mean skin temperature, or sweat rate over time. These data have practical implications in that although the physiological strain on workers in DL was not substantially greater than in SL, worker safety, and productivity can be reduced while working in layered PPE.

  20. Assessing plant protection practices using pressure indicator and toxicity risk indicators: analysis of therelationship between these indicators for improved risk management, application in viticulture.

    PubMed

    Oussama, Mghirbi; Kamel, Ellefi; Philippe, Le Grusse; Elisabeth, Mandart; Jacques, Fabre; Habiba, Ayadi; Jean-Paul, Bord

    2015-06-01

    The excessive use of plant protection products (PPPs) has given rise to issues of public and environmental health because of their toxicity. Reducing the use of toxic PPPs and replacing them with products that are less toxic for human health and the environment have become socially, environmentally and economically indispensable. In this article, we assess the plant protection practices of a small group of winegrowers practicing "integrated agriculture" in the south of France, in order to measure the benefit of using toxicity risk indicators as a decision-support tool for different players in land management. An analysis of plant protection practices using indicators of the risk to operator health and the environment (IRSA, IRTE), together with a frequency-of-treatment indicator (TFI), enabled us to (i) show the variability of these indicators depending on the production system and farmers' pesticide use strategies and (ii) calculate correlations between these indicators. This analysis of plant protection practices at different scales (farm, field), carried out in collaboration with the growers, enabled us to perform an initial validation of decision-support tools for determining risk management strategies regarding the use of pesticides.

  1. An Assessment of Personal Health Protective Practices of Out-of-School Adolescents in South-South Senatorial District of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izevbigie, T. I.; Owie, Ikponmwosa

    2006-01-01

    The Personal Health Protective Practices of the out-of-school adolescent was investigated using a survey design. Three research questions were formulated and tested. The population consists of out-of-school adolescents in South-South Senatorial District of Nigeria. The sample consists of 320 adolescents randomly selected using purposive sampling…

  2. The Impact of Poverty, Fear of Crime, and Crime Victimization on Keeping Firearms for Protection and Unsafe Gun-Storage Practices: A Review and Analysis with Policy Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacha, Edward F.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the literature on firearms accidents among young, poor, urban children. Evidence suggests that deciding to keep a gun for protection is a practical response to perceived living conditions. Reducing the consequences of risky gun behavior among poor families requires policies and programs that eliminate experiences associated with such…

  3. School Social Workers' Perceived Understanding of Inner City and Urban Community and Neighborhood Risk and Protective Factors and Effectiveness in Practice Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasley, Martell; Randolph, Karen; Cho, Hyunkag

    2008-01-01

    This is an exploratory study that makes use of survey research methods and a convenience sample (N = 222) to examine how urban school social workers' perceived knowledge of neighborhood and community risk and protective factors affect their levels of self-reported effectiveness in practice tasks. Using hierarchical multiple regression, the…

  4. Practice.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    Practice refers to a characteristic way professionals use common standards to customize solutions to a range of problems. Practice includes (a) standards for outcomes and processes that are shared with one's colleagues, (b) a rich repertoire of skills grounded in diagnostic acumen, (c) an ability to see the actual and the ideal and work back and forth between them, (d) functional artistry, and (e) learning by doing that transcends scientific rationality. Communities of practice, such as dental offices, are small groups that work together in interlocking roles to achieve these ends.

  5. Fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley, California - Field survey and fault model test -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Karasaki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Hamada, T.; Sasaki, T.; Ito, H.; Tsukuda, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, J.; Moriya, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop hydrologic characterization technology of fault zones, it is desirable to clarify the relationship between the geologic structure and hydrologic properties of fault zones. To this end, we are performing surface-based geologic and trench investigations, geophysical surveys and borehole-based hydrologic investigations along the Wildcat fault in Berkeley,California to investigate the effect of fault zone structure on regional hydrology. The present paper outlines the fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley on the basis of results from trench excavation surveys. The approximately 20 - 25 km long Wildcat fault is located within the Berkeley Hills and extends northwest-southeast from Richmond to Oakland, subparallel to the Hayward fault. The Wildcat fault, which is a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip fault, steps right in a releasing bend at the Berkeley Hills region. A total of five trenches have been excavated across the fault to investigate the deformation structure of the fault zone in the bedrock. Along the Wildcat fault, multiple fault surfaces are branched, bent, paralleled, forming a complicated shear zone. The shear zone is ~ 300 m in width, and the fault surfaces may be classified under the following two groups: 1) Fault surfaces offsetting middle Miocene Claremont Chert on the east against late Miocene Orinda formation and/or San Pablo Group on the west. These NNW-SSE trending fault surfaces dip 50 - 60° to the southwest. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 1 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 60 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault gouge and foliated cataclasite show normal right-slip shear sense. 2) Fault surfaces forming a positive flower structure in Claremont Chert. These NW-SE trending fault surfaces are sub-vertical or steeply dipping. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 3 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 200 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault

  6. OpenStudio - Fault Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Stephen; Robertson, Joseph; Cheung, Howard; Horsey, Henry

    2014-09-19

    This software record documents the OpenStudio fault model development portion of the Fault Detection and Diagnostics LDRD project.The software provides a suite of OpenStudio measures (scripts) for modeling typical HVAC system faults in commercial buildings and also included supporting materials: example projects and OpenStudio measures for reporting fault costs and energy impacts.

  7. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-17

    This image of California Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by ESA ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

  8. Faults in Claritas Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image of the Claritas Fossae region, characterized by systems of graben. A graben forms when a block of the planet crust drops down between two faults, due to extension, or pulling, of the crust.

  9. Glossary of normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Knipe, R. J.; Sanderson, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Increased interest in normal faults and extended terranes has led to the development of an increasingly complex terminology. The most important terms are defined in this paper, with original references being given wherever possible, along with examples of current usage.

  10. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  11. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  12. Footwall Extension During Low-Angle Normal Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Collettini, C.; Imber, J.

    2006-12-01

    isolated and `protected' from subsequent detachment faulting where they lie in the hangingwall (`lee') of high-angle faults that thicken the fault core. This indicates that footwall structures must have been active relatively early and has important consequences for transmitting fault zone weakening and for the permeability structure of the fault zone. 2. Hydrofracture veins which link downwards in to footwall faults crosscut the main fault zone, suggesting periodic release of trapped footwall fluids. Locally, channelling of fluids by footwall faults allowed build ups in fluid overpressure beneath the low-permeability fault core which resulted in large scale fluidization of pre-existing quartzite cataclasite. The fluidized cataclasite, which is exposed over an area ~50x30 metres, contains at least three internal variations, defined by colour, matrix texture and average clast size. All three variations `intrude' the base of the fault zone, disrupt the overlying fault rock sequence, and are cut at different levels by discrete brittle detachment surfaces, indicating multiple episodes of fluid overpressure development. Our observations suggest that deformation and fluid circulation in the footwalls of LANF are more important than previously recognised, and may provide essential insights into the mechanics of LANF and the generation of seismicity in such regions.

  13. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  14. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. CIFTS : A coordinated infrastructure for fault-tolerant systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Beckman, P.; Park, B. H.; Lusk, E.; Hargrove, P.; Geist, A.; Panda, D. K.; Lumsdaine, A.; Dongarra, J.; ORNL; LBNL; Ohio State Univ.; Indiana Univ.; Univ. of Tennessee

    2009-01-01

    In the next few years SciDAC applications will utilize petascale systems with tens to hundreds of thousands of processors, hundreds of I/O nodes, and thousands of disks. This leap of two orders of magnitude in scale from today's typical systems is causing a critical gap in fault management of these systems. The fault management issues for these emerging systems are well beyond the scope of today's common infrastructure and practice. Currently, systems software components for large-scale machines remain largely independent in their fault awareness and notification strategies. Faults can arise not just from the hardware but also from the OS, middleware, libraries, and application levels. Petascale applications that are evolving to utilize these platforms face many new challenges. With the CIFTS initiative, we aim to provide a coordinated infrastructure that will enable Fault Tolerant Systems to adapt to faults occuring in the operating environment in a holistic manner. Our approach will be to design a reference implementation of a fault awareness and notification backplane to provide common uniform event handling and notification mechanisms for fault-aware libraries and middleware; create an interface specification that allows libraries, run- time systems, and applications to connect to and use the fault-tolerance backplane; and extend key libraries and applications to validate the interface choices and to form the critical mass necessary for adoption in the community.

  16. Layered clustering multi-fault diagnosis for hydraulic piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Shaoping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Efficient diagnosis is very important for improving reliability and performance of aircraft hydraulic piston pump, and it is one of the key technologies in prognostic and health management system. In practice, due to harsh working environment and heavy working loads, multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump may occur simultaneously after long time operations. However, most existing diagnosis methods can only distinguish pump faults that occur individually. Therefore, new method needs to be developed to realize effective diagnosis of simultaneous multiple faults on aircraft hydraulic pump. In this paper, a new method based on the layered clustering algorithm is proposed to diagnose multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump that occur simultaneously. The intensive failure mechanism analyses of the five main types of faults are carried out, and based on these analyses the optimal combination and layout of diagnostic sensors is attained. The three layered diagnosis reasoning engine is designed according to the faults' risk priority number and the characteristics of different fault feature extraction methods. The most serious failures are first distinguished with the individual signal processing. To the desultory faults, i.e., swash plate eccentricity and incremental clearance increases between piston and slipper, the clustering diagnosis algorithm based on the statistical average relative power difference (ARPD) is proposed. By effectively enhancing the fault features of these two faults, the ARPDs calculated from vibration signals are employed to complete the hypothesis testing. The ARPDs of the different faults follow different probability distributions. Compared with the classical fast Fourier transform-based spectrum diagnosis method, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can diagnose the multiple faults, which occur synchronously, with higher precision and reliability.

  17. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  18. Protecting health care workers from tuberculosis in China: a review of policy and practice in China and the United States.

    PubMed

    Chai, Shua J; Mattingly, Daniel C; Varma, Jay K

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis causes >1.7 million deaths worldwide each year and is frequently transmitted in hospitals. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have led to illness and death among health care workers (HCWs) in many countries. Some countries, such as the United States, implemented occupational health policies that substantially reduced tuberculosis rates among HCWs. Inadequate tuberculosis infection control in China may contribute to its high burden of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, which are both the second highest worldwide. Occupational health policies in China for tuberculosis control can be strengthened. We reviewed the development and content of tuberculosis infection control policies in the United States and China. Sources included published academic literature, Chinese Ministry of Health policies, US government agency reports, legal databases, personal observations of hospitals, review of internet discussion sites, and discussions with HCWs and health care and law experts. In the United States, slow acceptance of the tuberculosis problem in HCWs resulted in decades of inaction. Tuberculosis infection control policies, based mostly on expert opinion, were implemented only after tuberculosis resurged in the 1980s. Effective evidence-based policies were developed only after multiple cycles of policy implementation, evaluation and revision. These policies have now substantially reduced occupational tuberculosis. In China, tuberculosis has not been formally recognized as an occupational disease, and data regarding the burden in HCWs are sparse. Vagueness of current labour laws and suboptimal alignment of infection control authority and expertise result in varied and sometimes absent protection of HCWs against tuberculosis. Formal evaluations of occupational tuberculosis policies have not been reported. By collecting data on its current HCW tuberculosis burden and infection control practices, refining policies, continually evaluating its

  19. Primary school sun protection policies and practices 4 years after baseline—a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Anthony I.; Jopson, Janet A.; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Before the 2005 launch of the New Zealand SunSmart Schools Accreditation Programme (SSAP), 242 randomly sampled primary schools completed a mail survey about sun protection policies, practices, curriculum and environment. A 2009 follow-up included 189 (78%) and their mean Total Accreditation Score (TAS = total SSAP requirements met, range 0–12), increased by 0.8 (95% CI 0.5–1.2, P < 0.001) from 7.8 (95% CI 7.4–8.1) to 8.6 (95% CI 8.3–8.9) with evidence changes differed between regions (P = 0.024). The 2009 mean TAS varied by region (range 7.9–9.4, unadjusted P = 0.004, adjusted P = 0.013) with no clear pattern, but likely resource allocation association. TAS of schools acknowledging input from Health Promoting Schools demonstrated a tendency towards being statistically significantly higher by 0.5 (95% CI −0.1 to 1.1, P = 0.082), but statistically significantly higher by 1.1 (95% CI 0.5–1.7, P < 0.001) for schools acknowledging Cancer Society input. Lowest attainment was for the clothing (43%), shade (52%) and curriculum (55%) criteria. Key perceived barriers were cost, particularly of shade and limited support by parents and others. Schools which had not applied for accreditation identified lack of programme awareness and ‘other priorities’ as barriers; further information, better resourcing and training assistance as key needs. Observed positive change justifies increased support to consolidate gains and achieve sustainable universality. PMID:22907533

  20. The impact of stormwater treatment areas and agricultural best management practices on water quality in the Everglades Protection Area.

    PubMed

    Entry, James A; Gottlieb, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Half of the original Everglades system has been lost to drainage and development. What remains is included within the boundaries of the Everglades Protection Area (EPA), comprised of three Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) and Everglades National Park (Park). Inflows to the EPA contain elevated nutrient concentrations. Best management practices (BMPs) were implemented and six large wetlands called stormwater treatment areas (STAs) were constructed to improve water quality. We analyzed water quality in the WCAs and Park and performed an economic analysis of the STAs to remove nutrients from EPA inflows. In general, nutrient concentrations in all WCAs were higher during the pre-STA period than after the STAs became operational. In WCA2 and the Park, total phosphorus (TP) trends showed more negative slopes prior, as compared to after, the STAs became operational. These results suggest that BMPs lead to large initial decreases in nutrient export resulting in improved downstream water quality. A preliminary economic analysis shows that operation and management of the STAs are complicated and cost intensive. Comparing the cost of phosphorus (P) removal from water entering the EPA using BMPs and STAs may not currently be viable. BMPs prevent P from being applied to, or leaving from agricultural fields while STAs remove P from stormwater. We expect nutrient concentrations in water flowing into and out of the STAs to decline as both BMPs and STAs become more effective. We suggest an economic analysis of BMPs, STAs, and other potential approaches to determine the most cost-effective methods to reduce nutrient concentrations and related stressors affecting the Everglades.

  1. Link practical-oriented research and education: New training tools for a sustainable use of plant protection products.

    PubMed

    Sacchettini, G; Calliera, M

    2017-02-01

    In the Horizon 2020 work programme 2016-17 it is stated that in 2010, 71% of European farm managers were operating on the basis of practical experience only. Education levels greatly vary depending on country, farm managers' age and gender, or farm structures, and this can hamper innovation. Transition towards a more sustainable agriculture requires a renewal and strengthening of the technical skills of all the actors involved and - as a consequence - of the educational system. The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU, 128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides. The objective of this study is to develop new training tools for operators, addressing the new legal requirements and taking into account what is already available. For this reason, the outcomes of different European and national research projects developed by the Opera Research Centre were used, involving stakeholders in the decision making process, but also considering the real behaviours and perceptions of the final users. As a result, an e-learning tool able to build personalized training programmes, by collecting and integrating existing training material on Plant Protection Products use was developed, together with an e-learning course, with the aim to help operators, advisors and distributors to get prepared for their national certificate test. This work highlights the opportunity to create long-term added value through enhanced collaboration between educators and researchers, and identifies a common set of priorities that has to be taken into account in order to nudge the changes required to achieve a more sustainable use of pesticide and, more in general, sustainable development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors

    PubMed Central

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically. PMID:19594530

  3. Rough Faults, Distributed Weakening, and Off-Fault Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Nielsen, S. B.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    We report systematic spatial variations of fault rocks along non-planar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran Wavy Fault) and the Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia Wavy Fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte is present in variable thickness along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. The Lobbia fault surface is self-affine, and we conduct a quantitative analysis of microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. Models also predict stress redistribution around bends in the faults which mirror microcrack distributions, indicating significant elastic and anelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to non-planar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that, along non-planar faults, damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the crack tip as predicted by classical fracture mechanics.

  4. Use of Fuzzy Logic Systems for Assessment of Primary Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Ivica; Jozsa, Lajos; Baus, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    In electric power systems, grid elements are often subjected to very complex and demanding disturbances or dangerous operating conditions. Determining initial fault or cause of those states is a difficult task. When fault occurs, often it is an imperative to disconnect affected grid element from the grid. This paper contains an overview of possibilities for using fuzzy logic in an assessment of primary faults in the transmission grid. The tool for this task is SCADA system, which is based on information of currents, voltages, events of protection devices and status of circuit breakers in the grid. The function model described with the membership function and fuzzy logic systems will be presented in the paper. For input data, diagnostics system uses information of protection devices tripping, states of circuit breakers and measurements of currents and voltages before and after faults.

  5. Not addressing the root cause: An analysis of submissions made to the South Australian Government on a Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice.

    PubMed

    Rigg, Elizabeth; Schmied, Virginia; Peters, Kath; Dahlen, Hannah

    2015-06-01

    Reports of unregulated birth workers attending birth at home, with no registered midwife in attendance (freebirth), have become more frequent in Australia in recent years. A Coronial Inquiry (2012) into the deaths of three babies born at home in South Australia resulted in a call for legislation to restrict the practice of midwifery to registered midwives. A Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice in South Australia was issued as a consultation paper in January 2013. To report the views of those making a submission to the Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice in South Australia. Thirty submissions to the South Australian Government were downloaded, read and thematically analysed. Twenty-five (81%) submissions supported the legislation, 5 (16%) opposed it and 2 (6%) were neither for nor against. Support for the proposed legislation was strong, however the underlying root causes that have led to the rise of UBWs attending homebirth in Australia were not addressed. Recommendations called for all stakeholders to work with women to develop a better framework of care that respected and met their needs and choices whilst safeguarding maternal and neonatal health. The Proposal to Protect Midwifery Practice may promote greater protection of midwifery practice however, Private Indemnity Insurance (PII), collaborative agreements and power struggles associated with the medical domination of childbirth continue to marginalise homebirth and prevent women from accessing the care they want and need. These unresolved issues represent the root causes for UBWs attending homebirth; hence the proposal is only a partial solution. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protection of Renewable-dominated Microgrids: Challenges and Potential Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Elkhatib, Mohamed; Ellis, Abraham; Biswal, Milan; Brahma, Sukumar; Ranade, Satish

    2016-11-01

    In this report we address the challenge of designing efficient protection system for inverter- dominated microgrids. These microgrids are characterised with limited fault current capacity as a result of current-limiting protection functions of inverters. Typically, inverters limit their fault contribution in sub-cycle time frame to as low as 1.1 per unit. As a result, overcurrent protection could fail completely to detect faults in inverter-dominated microgrids. As part of this project a detailed literature survey of existing and proposed microgrid protection schemes were conducted. The survey concluded that there is a gap in the available microgrid protection methods. The only credible protection solution available in literature for low- fault inverter-dominated microgrids is the differential protection scheme which represents a robust transmission-grade protection solution but at a very high cost. Two non-overcurrent protection schemes were investigated as part of this project; impedance-based protection and transient-based protection. Impedance-based protection depends on monitoring impedance trajectories at feeder relays to detect faults. Two communication-based impedance-based protection schemes were developed. the first scheme utilizes directional elements and pilot signals to locate the fault. The second scheme depends on a Central Protection Unit that communicates with all feeder relays to locate the fault based on directional flags received from feeder relays. The later approach could potentially be adapted to protect networked microgrids and dynamic topology microgrids. Transient-based protection relies on analyzing high frequency transients to detect and locate faults. This approach is very promising but its implementation in the filed faces several challenges. For example, high frequency transients due to faults can be confused with transients due to other events such as capacitor switching. Additionally, while detecting faults by analyzing transients

  7. An examination of the Environmental Protection Agency risk assessment principles and practices: a brief commentary on section 4.1.3 of the EPA March 2004 Staff Paper.

    PubMed

    Mundt, K A

    2006-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently issued a Staff Paper that articulates current risk assessment practices. In section 4.1.3, EPA states, "... effects that appear to be adaptive, non-adverse, or beneficial may not be mentioned." This statement may be perceived as precluding risk assessments based on non-default risk models, including the hormetic--or biphasic--dose-response model. This commentary examines several potential interpretations of this statement and the anticipated impact of ignoring hormesis, if present, in light of necessary conservatism for protecting human and environmental health, and the potential for employing alternative risk assessment approaches.

  8. Diagnosable systems for intermittent faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    The fault diagnosis capabilities of systems composed of interconnected units capable of testing each other are studied for the case of systems with intermittent faults. A central role is played by the concept of t(i)-fault diagnosability. A system is said to be t(i)-fault diagnosable when it is such that if no more than t(i) units are intermittently faulty then a fault-free unit will never be diagnosed as faulty and the diagnosis at any time is at worst incomplete. Necessary and sufficient conditions for t(i)-fault diagnosability are proved, and bounds for t(i) are established. The conditions are in general more restrictive than those for permanent-fault diagnosability. For intermittent faults there is only one testing strategy (repetitive testing), and consequently only one type of intermittent-fault diagnosable system.

  9. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  10. Position and enforcement practice of the People’s Republic of China’s pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Yu, Xiang; Pecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The concept of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection comes from the West. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) establishes the basic rules for pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection. People’s Republic of China’s domestic law is consistent with the TRIPS agreement. In the drug registration approval process of the People’s Republic of China’s Drug Supervision Department, pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection has encountered some problems, including data authentication, exclusive rights to data, number of drugs requiring data to be submitted, and drug costs. In view of the long-term interests of the People’s Republic of China’s pharmaceutical industry and intellectual property protection trends, there are a lot of difficulties in the enforcement of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection law that need to be overcome. Some measures can be taken, such as establishing a shorter data exclusivity protection period, only protecting the data submitted and relied on in the People’s Republic of China, only protecting the drugs that use new chemical components, allowing application and necessary research before the expiry of pharmaceutical data exclusivity protection period of generic drugs. PMID:27382254

  11. Changes in fault length distributions due to fault linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.; Alaniz-Álvarez, S. A.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; García-Hernández, J.; Murillo-Muñetón, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fault linkage plays an important role in the growth of faults. In this paper we analyze a published synthetic model to simulate fault linkage. The results of the simulation indicate that fault linkage is the cause of the shallower local slopes on the length-frequency plots. The shallower local slopes lead to two effects. First, the curves of log cumulative number against log length exhibit fluctuating shapes as reported in literature. Second, for a given fault population, the power-law exponents after linkage are negatively related to the linked length scales. Also, we present datasets of fault length measured from four structural maps at the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico (offshore Campeche). The results demonstrate that the fault length data, corrected by seismic resolution at the tip fault zone, also exhibit fluctuating curves of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. The steps (shallower slopes) on the curves imply the scale positions of fault linkage. We conclude that fault linkage is the main reason for the fluctuating shapes of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. On the other hand, our data show that the two-tip faults are better for linear analysis between maximum displacement ( D) and length ( L). Evidently, two-tip faults underwent fewer fault linkages and interactions.

  12. Research on variational mode decomposition in rolling bearings fault diagnosis of the multistage centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Jiang, Zhinong; Feng, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Rolling bearing faults are among the primary causes of breakdown in multistage centrifugal pump. A novel method of rolling bearings fault diagnosis based on variational mode decomposition is presented in this contribution. The rolling bearing fault signal calculating model of different location defect is established by failure mechanism analysis, and the simulation vibration signal of the proposed fault model is investigated by FFT and envelope analysis. A comparison has gone to evaluate the performance of bearing defect characteristic extraction for rolling bearings simulation signal by using VMD and EMD. The result of comparison verifies the VMD can accurately extract the principal mode of bearing fault signal, and it better than EMD in bearing defect characteristic extraction. The VMD is then applied to detect different location fault features for rolling bearings fault diagnosis via modeling simulation vibration signal and practical vibration signal. The analysis result of simulation and experiment proves that the proposed method can successfully diagnosis rolling bearings fault.

  13. An Analysis of IT Governance Practices in the Federal Government: Protecting U.S. Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Terrorist Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. LeWayne

    2012-01-01

    Much of the governing process in the United States (U.S.) today depends on a reliable and well protected public information technology (IT) infrastructure. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is tasked with the responsibility of protecting the country's IT infrastructure. Critics contend that the DHS has failed to address planning and…

  14. The impact of parental knowledge and tanning attitudes on sun protection practice for young children in Germany.

    PubMed

    Gefeller, Olaf; Li, Jiang; Uter, Wolfgang; Pfahlberg, Annette B

    2014-05-05

    Public health campaigns have improved knowledge on UVR-associated skin cancer risk and increased sun protection awareness. However, tanned skin is still a common beauty ideal. The relationship between knowledge, attitudes and protective behavior is not fully understood yet. A population-based survey was thus performed in the district of Erlangen involving 2,619 parents of 3- to 6-year old children. By means of a self-administered standardized questionnaire parental knowledge about risk factors for skin cancer, their attitudes towards tanning and details of protective measures taken for their children were assessed. The study analyzed specifically the impact of parental tanning attitudes on sun-protective measures for their children while controlling for parental knowledge about skin cancer risk factors. While parental knowledge was significantly (inversely) associated with agreement to the statement "Tanned skin is healthy skin", this was not the case for "Tanning makes me look better". Overall, tanning affirmative attitudes were inversely associated with protective measures taken for the children, whereas parental knowledge had a positive impact on sun protection at the beach only. Multivariable analyses provided evidence for an effect of parental attitude on protective behavior independent of parental knowledge. Tanning attitudes and tanned skin as the misguided ideal of beauty need to be addressed in future public health campaigns to enhance the effectiveness of preventive activities in changing sun protective behavior.

  15. An Analysis of IT Governance Practices in the Federal Government: Protecting U.S. Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Terrorist Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. LeWayne

    2012-01-01

    Much of the governing process in the United States (U.S.) today depends on a reliable and well protected public information technology (IT) infrastructure. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is tasked with the responsibility of protecting the country's IT infrastructure. Critics contend that the DHS has failed to address planning and…

  16. "So that our souls don't get damaged": the impact of racism on maternal thinking and practice related to the protection of daughters.

    PubMed

    Banks-Wallace, J; Parks, L

    2001-01-01

    Racism influences the conceptualization of motherhood and the practice of mothering. Narrative analysis was completed on 246 stories collected through five focus groups. Twenty-five African American women participated in the study. The results indicate that living in a racist society profoundly impacts the maternal thinking and practice of African American women in relation to protecting their daughters. Protection of children was viewed as a communal responsibility. Issues related to the provision of safe and nurturing physical, aesthetic, and spiritual environments are addressed. The influence that maternal responsibilities have on women's own health is also discussed. Suggestions are provided for mental health providers who wish to work more effectively with African American women.

  17. Fault terminations, Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic, J.B.; McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Two basement-involved faults terminate in folds in the Seminoe Mountains. Mesoscopic and macroscopic structures in sedimentary rocks provide clues to the interrelationship of faults and folds in this region, and on the linkage between faulting and folding in general. The Hurt Creek fault trends 320[degree] and has maximum separation of 1.5 km measured at the basement/cover contact. Separation on the fault decreases upsection to zero within the Jurassic Sundance Formation. Unfaulted rock units form an anticline around the fault tip. The complementary syncline is angular with planar limbs and a narrow hinge zone. The syncline axial trace intersects the fault in the footwall at the basement/cover cut-off. Map patterns are interpreted to show thickening of Mesozoic units adjacent to the syncline hinge. In contrast, extensional structures are common in the faulted anticline within the Permian Goose Egg and Triassic Chugwater Formations. A hanging wall splay fault loses separation into the Goose Egg formation which is thinned by 50% at the fault tip. Mesoscopic normal faults are oriented 320--340[degree] and have an average inclination of 75[degree] SW. Megaboudins of Chugwater are present in the footwall of the Hurt Creek fault, immediately adjacent to the fault trace. The Black Canyon fault transported Precambrian-Pennsylvanian rocks over Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone. This fault is layer-parallel at the top of the Tensleep and loses separation along strike into an unfaulted syncline in the Goose Egg Formation. Shortening in the pre-Permian units is accommodated by slip on the basement-involved Black Canyon fault. Equivalent shortening in Permian-Cretaceous units occurs on a system of thin-skinned'' thrust faults.

  18. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  19. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  1. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  2. A Pilot Study of the Validity of Self-reported Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Sun Protection Practices Among Lifeguards, Parents and Children

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, David L.; Glanz, Karen; Gies, Peter; Elliott, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation settings, such as swimming pools, provide a promising venue to assess UVR exposure and sun protection practices among individuals who are minimally clothed and exposed to potentially high levels of UVR. Most studies assessing sun exposure/protection practices rely on self-reported data, which are subject to bias. The aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of conducting a multimethod study to examine the validity of self-reported measures within a swimming pool setting. Data were collected from 27 lifeguards, children and parents in Hawaii. Each participant filled out a survey and a 4 day sun habits diary. On two occasions, researchers assessed observable sun protection behaviors (wearing hats, shirts, sunglasses), swabbed the skin to detect the presence of sunscreen, and subjects wore polysulphone dosimeters to measure UVR exposure. Overall, observed sun protection behaviors were more highly correlated with diary reports than with survey reports. While lifeguards and children reported spending comparable amounts of time in the sun, dosimeter measures showed that lifeguards received twice as much UVR exposure. This study demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a multimethod validity study within a broader population of swimming pools. PMID:18179624

  3. Transposing an active fault database into a seismic hazard fault model for nuclear facilities - Part 1: Building a database of potentially active faults (BDFA) for metropolitan France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomard, Hervé; Cushing, Edward Marc; Palumbo, Luigi; Baize, Stéphane; David, Claire; Chartier, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), with the support of the Ministry of Environment, compiled a database (BDFA) to define and characterize known potentially active faults of metropolitan France. The general structure of BDFA is presented in this paper. BDFA reports to date 136 faults and represents a first step toward the implementation of seismic source models that would be used for both deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard calculations. A robustness index was introduced, highlighting that less than 15 % of the database is controlled by reasonably complete data sets. An example of transposing BDFA into a fault source model for PSHA (probabilistic seismic hazard analysis) calculation is presented for the Upper Rhine Graben (eastern France) and exploited in the companion paper (Chartier et al., 2017, hereafter Part 2) in order to illustrate ongoing challenges for probabilistic fault-based seismic hazard calculations.

  4. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  5. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  6. San andreas fault zone head waves near parkfield, california.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, Y; Malin, P

    1991-03-29

    Microearthquake seismograms from the borehole seismic network on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California, provide three lines of evidence that first P arrivals are "head" waves refracted along the cross-fault material contrast. First, the travel time difference between these arrivals and secondary phases identified as direct P waves scales linearly with the source-receiver distance. Second, these arrivals have the emergent wave character associated in theory and practice with refracted head waves instead of the sharp first breaks associated with direct P arrivals. Third, the first motion polarities of the emergent arrivals are reversed from those of the direct P waves as predicted by the theory of fault zone head waves for slip on the San Andreas fault. The presence of fault zone head waves in local seismic network data may help account for scatter in earthquake locations and source mechanisms. The fault zone head waves indicate that the velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault near Parkfield is approximately 4 percent. Further studies of these waves may provide a way of assessing changes in the physical state of the fault system.

  7. A method of measuring fault latency in a digital flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, John; Mulcare, Dennis; Larsen, William E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the motivation, conduct, and analysis of some 2500 low-level hardware fault cases applied in automated testing at the NASA Ames Reconfigurable Digital Flight Control System Facility. Fault detection was correlated with hardware and software fault monitoring and, in limited cases, with sensitivity to flight program execution modes. The results are statistically assessed to ascertain system-level reliability implications based on a single-fault model. Extension to multiple-fault models is addressed. The overall methodology/facility itself is judged to be a promising enhancement to current practice.

  8. Fault diagnosis of analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, J. W.; Salama, A. E.

    1985-08-01

    Theory and algorithms associated with four main categories of modern techniques used to locate faults in analog circuits are presented. These four general approaches are: the fault dictionary (FDA), the parameter identification (PIA), the fault verification (FVA), and the approximation (AA) approaches. The preliminaries and problems associated with the FDA, such as fault dictionary construction, the methods of optimum measurement selection, fault isolation criteria, and efficient methods of fault simulation, are discussed. The PIA techniques that utilize either linear or nonlinear systems of equations for identification of network elements are examined. Description of the FVA includes node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions, as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure-bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. In the AA, probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods are considered. In addition, the artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are presented. A series of block diagrams is included.

  9. Fault injection experiments using FIAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, James H.; Czeck, Edward W.; Segall, Zary Z.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1990-01-01

    The results of several experiments conducted using the fault-injection-based automated testing (FIAT) system are presented. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of distributed system architectures, and it provides the capabilities to monitor system behavior and inject faults for the purpose of experimental characterization and validation of a system's dependability. The experiments consist of exhaustively injecting three separate fault types into various locations, encompassing both the code and data portions of memory images, of two distinct applications executed with several different data values and sizes. Fault types are variations of memory bit faults. The results show that there are a limited number of system-level fault manifestations. These manifestations follow a normal distribution for each fault type. Error detection latencies are found to be normally distributed. The methodology can be used to predict the system-level fault responses during the system design stage.

  10. Fault Tree Analysis Application for Safety and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Dolores R.

    2003-01-01

    Many commercial software tools exist for fault tree analysis (FTA), an accepted method for mitigating risk in systems. The method embedded in the tools identifies a root as use in system components, but when software is identified as a root cause, it does not build trees into the software component. No commercial software tools have been built specifically for development and analysis of software fault trees. Research indicates that the methods of FTA could be applied to software, but the method is not practical without automated tool support. With appropriate automated tool support, software fault tree analysis (SFTA) may be a practical technique for identifying the underlying cause of software faults that may lead to critical system failures. We strive to demonstrate that existing commercial tools for FTA can be adapted for use with SFTA, and that applied to a safety-critical system, SFTA can be used to identify serious potential problems long before integrator and system testing.

  11. Fault Tree Analysis Application for Safety and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Dolores R.

    2003-01-01

    Many commercial software tools exist for fault tree analysis (FTA), an accepted method for mitigating risk in systems. The method embedded in the tools identifies a root as use in system components, but when software is identified as a root cause, it does not build trees into the software component. No commercial software tools have been built specifically for development and analysis of software fault trees. Research indicates that the methods of FTA could be applied to software, but the method is not practical without automated tool support. With appropriate automated tool support, software fault tree analysis (SFTA) may be a practical technique for identifying the underlying cause of software faults that may lead to critical system failures. We strive to demonstrate that existing commercial tools for FTA can be adapted for use with SFTA, and that applied to a safety-critical system, SFTA can be used to identify serious potential problems long before integrator and system testing.

  12. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  13. Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    high deductible is in force, this requires estimation of the epistemic uncertainty on fault geometry and activity. Transport infrastructure insurance is of practical interest in seismic countries. On the North Anatolian Fault in Turkey, there is uncertainty over an unbroken segment between the eastern end of the Dazce Fault and Bolu. This may have ruptured during the 1944 earthquake. Existing hazard maps may simply use a question mark to flag uncertainty. However, a far more informative type of hazard map might express spatial variations in the confidence level associated with a fault map. Through such visual guidance, an insurance risk analyst would be better placed to price earthquake cover, allowing for epistemic uncertainty.

  14. The engine fuel system fault analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Song, Hanqiang; Yang, Changsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    For improving the reliability of the engine fuel system, the typical fault factor of the engine fuel system was analyzed from the point view of structure and functional. The fault character was gotten by building the fuel system fault tree. According the utilizing of fault mode effect analysis method (FMEA), several factors of key component fuel regulator was obtained, which include the fault mode, the fault cause, and the fault influences. All of this made foundation for next development of fault diagnosis system.

  15. Parental practices and political violence: the protective role of parental warmth and authority-control in Jewish and Arab Israeli children.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Iris; Slone, Michelle

    2012-10-01

    Parental warmth and parental authority-control patterns have been documented as practices with highest significance for children's well-being and development in a variety of life areas. Various forms of these practices have been shown to have a direct positive effect on children and also to protect children from adverse effects of numerous stressors. However, surprisingly, few studies have examined the role of these practices as possible protective factors for children exposed to intractable conflict and political violence. Participants in this study were Jewish (n = 88) and Arab (n = 105) Israeli families, with children aged 7-12.5 (M = 10.73, SD = 0.99). Children completed questionnaires assessing political violence exposure, behavioral, psychological, and social difficulties, and perceived paternal and maternal warmth. Mothers and fathers completed questionnaires assessing parental warmth, parental authority-control, and the child's difficulties. Results showed parental warmth to be a significant moderator of political violence, related to low levels of behavioral and social difficulties of children. Parental authority-control patterns were not protectors from adverse effects of political violence exposure. Maternal authoritarian authority-control showed an effect resembling a risk factor. Differential roles of parental warmth and authority-control, fathers' versus mothers' roles, and ethnic differences are discussed, and practical clinical implications are proposed.

  16. Protecting participants in family medicine research: a consensus statement on improving research integrity and participants' safety in educational research, community-based participatory research, and practice network research.

    PubMed

    Hueston, William J; Mainous, Arch G; Weiss, Barry D; Macaulay, Ann C; Hickner, John; Sherwood, Roger A

    2006-02-01

    Recent events that include the deaths of research subjects and the falsification of data have drawn greater scrutiny on assuring research data integrity and protecting participants. Several organizations have created guidelines to help guide researchers working in the area of clinical trials and ensure that their research is safe and valid. However, family medicine researchers often engage in research that differs from a typical clinical trial. Investigators working in the areas of educational research, community-based participatory research, and practice-based network research would benefit from similar recommendations to guide their own research. With funding from the US Office of Research Integrity and the Association of American Medical Colleges, we convened a panel to review issues of data integrity and participant protection in educational research, community-based participatory research, and research conducted by practice-based networks. The panel generated 11 recommendations for researchers working in these areas. Three key recommendations include the need for (1) all educational research to undergo review and approval by an institutional review board (IRB), (2) community-based participatory research to be approved not just by an IRB but also by appropriate community representatives, and (3) practice-based researchers to undertake only valid and meaningful studies that can be reviewed by a central IRB, rather than separate IRBs for each participating practice.

  17. Verification of an IGBT Fusing Switch for Over-current Protection of the SNS HVCM

    SciTech Connect

    Benwell, Andrew; Kemp, Mark; Burkhart, Craig; Nguyen, Minh; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    An IGBT based over-current protection system has been developed to detect faults and limit the damage caused by faults in high voltage converter modulators. During normal operation, an IGBT enables energy to be transferred from storage capacitors to a H-bridge. When a fault occurs, the over-current protection system detects the fault, limits the fault current and opens the IGBT to isolate the remaining stored energy from the fault. This paper presents an experimental verification of the over-current protection system under applicable conditions.

  18. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-20

    California Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA shuttle Radar Topography Mission.

  19. Faults and Flows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-20

    Lava flows of Daedalia Planum can be seen at the top and bottom portions of this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The ridge and linear depression in the central part of the image are part of Mangala Fossa, a fault bounded graben.

  20. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  1. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  2. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  3. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  4. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  5. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  6. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  7. Association between workplace and housing conditions and use of pesticide safety practices and personal protective equipment among North Carolina farmworkers in 2010.

    PubMed

    Levesque, D L; Arif, A A; Shen, J

    2012-04-01

    There are inconsistencies about the effects of farmworker housing and workplace conditions and use of self-protective behavior practices and personal protective equipment (PPE). To investigate the association between workplace and housing conditions and farmworker use of pesticide safety practices and PPE. This study was conducted in 4 counties in North Carolina, USA, from July to October, 2010, during the agricultural growing season. Farmworkers working in agriculture aged 18 to 62 (n = 187) were administered a structured questionnaire to collect self-reported measures on housing and workplace conditions. Use of pesticide safety and PPE were examined by asking questions about wearing gloves, wearing socks, and wearing a hat. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses were used for statistical analyses. Farmworkers reporting availability of enough hot and cold water for bathing and doing laundry were 13.6 times more likely to use pesticide safety practices (adjusted OR: 13.6, 95% CI: 1.4-135.4), whereas, those who reported that soap for handwashing was always or usually available while doing agricultural work were 7.8 times more likely to use pesticide safety practices (adjusted OR: 7.8, 95% CI: 3.3-18.5). Farmworkers that reported access to water to wash their hands with while performing agricultural work were more likely to use PPE (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.3-9.2). Some migrant farmworker labor camps are not supplying acceptable housing conditions such as 1 handwashing sink per 6 people (n = 10, 5.4%). Use of pesticide safety practices and PPE is greater when farmers provide decontamination supplies. Improvement of housing and workplace conditions are crucial to increase use of pesticide safety practices and PPE.

  8. The Impact of Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Fidelity Monitoring on Staff Turnover: Evidence for a Protective Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Hecht, Debra B.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Staff retention is an ongoing challenge in mental health and community-based service organizations. Little is known about the impact of evidence-based practice implementation on the mental health and social service workforce. The present study examined the effect of evidence-based practice implementation and ongoing fidelity monitoring on staff…

  9. The Impact of Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Fidelity Monitoring on Staff Turnover: Evidence for a Protective Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Hecht, Debra B.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Staff retention is an ongoing challenge in mental health and community-based service organizations. Little is known about the impact of evidence-based practice implementation on the mental health and social service workforce. The present study examined the effect of evidence-based practice implementation and ongoing fidelity monitoring on staff…

  10. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  11. Testing simple models of brittle normal faulting: slip rate, spacing, and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J.; Dawers, N. H.

    2005-05-01

    Fault growth and evolution is a complex process, however any predictable pattern will yield important information for assessing seismic hazard and clues to what controls fault behavior. Models of slip rate variation along strike, spacing of active faults, and scaling of segment length are investigated using data from faults located within the parabola of seismicity around the Yellowstone hotspot. Based on displacement-length relations and segment size, Cowie and Roberts used fault geometry to estimate along-strike slip rate variation in their 2001 paper (JSG,23,1901-1915). Following their model, along-strike slip rate profiles were calculated for three active normal faults: the Beaverhead, Lemhi, and Lost River faults. Though the method yields estimated slip rates, the results roughly mirror along-strike variation in total displacement, because the three faults are similar in size and age. The profiles indicate that the Beaverhead is underdisplaced, i.e. having a low slip rate relative to its length. This suggests that segment linkage occurred later in the development of the Beaverhead than in the others. Cowie and Roberts also proposed a model for fault spacing based on initial fault length and spacing, and maximum length and spacing of fully developed fault systems. Fault spacing is important in determining incidence and magnitude of fault movement. If the distance between faults is too small, strain becomes localized along one while the other exhibits a decrease in seismicity until no activity occurs. In practice it is impossible to know if the distance between the largest faults represents maximum fault spacing, because the fault population is still active and evolving; thus, it is difficult to test or implement the method. A relationship was found among faults within the study area, where spacing of adjacent active faults is proportional to the sums of their lengths. It was also observed that average segment length increases with increasing total fault length

  12. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (RP-KAP) as Predictors of Job Stress Among Radiation Workers in Tehran Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, S. Shohreh; Taghizadeh Dabbagh, Sima; Abbasi, Mahya; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, much attention has been paid to occupational stress, but relatively little or no research has been conducted on the influence of knowledge, attitude, and practice of radiation protection (RP-KAP) on job stress among radiation workers Objectives This study aims to assess job stress among health care workers in Iran who are occupationally exposed to radiation in order to determine the effects of KAP on self-protection against radiation on their job stress. Materials and Methods The population in this descriptive cross-sectional study comprised 670 healthcare workers, including 428 staff with a degree in radiology and 242 other medical personnel who were working in 16 hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Tehran, Iran. The census method was used to sample the workers. In total, 264 staff with a degree in radiology and 149 other medical personnel completed the job content questionnaire (JCQ) and the RP-KAP questionnaire from May to November 2014. Results The prevalence rate of job stress was 22.5% based on calculation formulas and possible scores on the JCQ. Sex, RP-knowledge, attitude, practice, and in-service training predicted 41.8% of the variance in job stress. According to the results of the binary logistic regression, workers with higher scores on knowledge (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.75 - 0.90), attitude (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63 - 0.82), and practice (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72 - 0.86) and those who had participated in training programs had significantly lower rates of job stress (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.28 - 0.93). Conclusions The effects of RP knowledge, attitude, and practice on job stress were significant. In order to reduce job stress in radiation environments, ongoing training programs related to self-care and protection principles are recommended. PMID:28180020

  13. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (RP-KAP) as Predictors of Job Stress Among Radiation Workers in Tehran Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S Shohreh; Taghizadeh Dabbagh, Sima; Abbasi, Mahya; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to occupational stress, but relatively little or no research has been conducted on the influence of knowledge, attitude, and practice of radiation protection (RP-KAP) on job stress among radiation workers. This study aims to assess job stress among health care workers in Iran who are occupationally exposed to radiation in order to determine the effects of KAP on self-protection against radiation on their job stress. The population in this descriptive cross-sectional study comprised 670 healthcare workers, including 428 staff with a degree in radiology and 242 other medical personnel who were working in 16 hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Tehran, Iran. The census method was used to sample the workers. In total, 264 staff with a degree in radiology and 149 other medical personnel completed the job content questionnaire (JCQ) and the RP-KAP questionnaire from May to November 2014. The prevalence rate of job stress was 22.5% based on calculation formulas and possible scores on the JCQ. Sex, RP-knowledge, attitude, practice, and in-service training predicted 41.8% of the variance in job stress. According to the results of the binary logistic regression, workers with higher scores on knowledge (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.75 - 0.90), attitude (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63 - 0.82), and practice (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72 - 0.86) and those who had participated in training programs had significantly lower rates of job stress (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.28 - 0.93). The effects of RP knowledge, attitude, and practice on job stress were significant. In order to reduce job stress in radiation environments, ongoing training programs related to self-care and protection principles are recommended.

  14. Rupture history of 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake inferred from near-fault strong motion data and its impact to the practice of ground strong motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Archuleta, Ralph J.; Twardzik, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The spatiotemporal rupture history of the 2014 South Napa earthquake is constrained using near-fault strong motion records. An aggressive source parameterization with 1372 subfaults is adopted to match the signals in the transverse components up to 4 Hz. The result reveals that the rupture of the Napa earthquake initiated at a depth of 9.84 km and propagated mainly to north-northwest (NNW) and updip on a 13 km long fault patch. A gradual increase in average rise time when the rupture propagates to shallower depth is observed. However, it is the rupture of a small (Mw 4.9), isolated, and high stress drop fault patch that excited the largest ground acceleration at stations south of the epicenter. Such fine-scale rupture heterogeneity shall be considered during seismic hazard analysis.

  15. Effect of surrounding fault on distributed fault of blind reverse fault in sedimentary basin - Uemachi Faults, Osaka Basin, Southwest Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.

    2012-12-01

    Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin, which has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The various geological, geophysical surveys, such as seismic reflection, micro tremor, gravity surveys and deep boreholes, revealed the complex basement configuration along the Uemachi faults. The depth of the basement is shallow in the central part of the Osaka plain. The Uemachi faults are locates on the western side of the basement upland. In the central part of the Uemachi faults, the displacement decreases. The fault model of the Uemachi faults consists of the two parts, the north and south parts. The NE-SW trending branch faults, Suminoe and Sakuragawa flexures, are also recognized based on various surveys around the central part. Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the basement configuration without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. Inoue et al. (2011) performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted of 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. In this study, the Osaka-wan fault was considered for the dislocation model. The results show the basement configuration including NE-SW branch faults. The basement configuration differs from the subsurface structure derived from the investigation of abundance geotechnical borehole data around the central part of the Uemachi faults. The tectonic developing process including the erosion and sea level change are require to understanding the structure from the basement to the surface of the Uemachi Fault Zone. This research is partly funded by the Comprehensive

  16. Strategies for Fault Tolerance in Multicomponent Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shet, Aniruddha G; Elwasif, Wael R; Foley, Samantha S; Park, Byung H; Bernholdt, David E; Bramley, Randall B

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses on-going work with the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS), a framework for coupled multiphysics simulations of plasmas, to allow simulations to run through the loss of nodes on which the simulation is executing. While many different techniques are available to improve the fault tolerance of computational science applications on high-performance computer systems, checkpoint/restart (C/R) remains virtually the only one that see widespread use in practice. Our focus here is to augment the traditional C/R approach with additional techniques that can provide a more localized and tailored response to faults based on the ability to restart failed tasks on an individual basis, and the use of information external to the application itself in order to guide decision-making, in many cases avoiding the need to stop and restart the entire simulation. This capability involves several features within the IPS framework, and leverages the Fault Tolerance Backplane, a publish/subscribe event service to disseminate fault-related information throughout HPC systems, to obtain information from the Reliability, Availability and Serviceability (RAS) subsystem of the HPC system. This work is described in the context of Cray XT-series computer systems for concreteness, but is applicable to other environments as well. As part of the analysis of this work, we discuss the requirements to generalize this approach to other complex simulation applications beyond the Integrated Plasma Simulator.

  17. Revisiting Stacking Fault Energy of Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2016-02-01

    The stacking fault energy plays an important role in the transition of deformation microstructure. This energy is strongly dependent on the concentration of alloying elements and the temperature under which the alloy is exposed. Extensive literature review has been carried out and investigated that there are inconsistencies in findings on the influence of alloying elements on stacking fault energy. This may be attributed to the differences in chemical compositions, inaccuracy in measurements, and the methodology applied for evaluating the stacking fault energy. In the present research, a Bayesian neural network model is created to correlate the complex relationship between the extent of stacking fault energy with its influencing parameters in different austenitic grade steels. The model has been applied to confirm that the predictions are reasonable in the context of metallurgical principles and other data published in the open literature. In addition, it has been possible to estimate the isolated influence of particular variables such as nickel concentration, which exactly cannot in practice be varied independently. This demonstrates the ability of the method to investigate a new phenomenon in cases where the information cannot be accessed experimentally.

  18. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  19. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  20. SUSTAIN – A Framework for Placement of Best Management Practices in Urban Watersheds to Protect Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUSTAIN (System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration) is a decision support system to facilitate selection and placement of best management practices (BMPs) and low impact development (LID) techniques at strategic locations in urban watersheds. It was develope...

  1. SUSTAIN – A Framework for Placement of Best Management Practices in Urban Watersheds to Protect Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUSTAIN (System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration) is a decision support system to facilitate selection and placement of best management practices (BMPs) and low impact development (LID) techniques at strategic locations in urban watersheds. It was develope...

  2. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  3. Holocene faulting on the Mission fault, northwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ostenaa, D.A.; Klinger, R.E.; Levish, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    South of Flathead Lake, fault scarps on late Quaternary surfaces are nearly continuous for 45 km along the western flank of the Mission Range. On late Pleistocene alpine lateral moraines, scarp heights reach a maximum of 17 m. Scarp heights on post glacial Lake Missoula surfaces range from 2.6--7.2 m and maximum scarp angles range from 10[degree]--24[degree]. The stratigraphy exposed in seven trenches across the fault demonstrates that the post glacial Lake Missoula scarps resulted from at least two surface-faulting events. Larger scarp heights on late Pleistocene moraines suggests a possible third event. This yields an estimated recurrence of 4--8 kyr. Analyses of scarp profiles show that the age of the most surface faulting is middle Holocene, consistent with stratigraphic evidence found in the trenches. Rupture length and displacement imply earthquake magnitudes of 7 to 7.5. Previous studies have not identified geologic evidence of late Quaternary surface faulting in the Rocky Mountain Trench or on faults north of the Lewis and Clark line despite abundant historic seismicity in the Flathead Lake area. In addition to the Mission fault, reconnaissance studies have located late Quaternary fault scarps along portions of faults bordering Jocko and Thompson Valleys. These are the first documented late Pleistocene/Holocene faults north of the Lewis and Clark line in Montana and should greatly revise estimates of earthquake hazards in this region.

  4. Do Australian Adolescent Female Fake Tan (Sunless Tan) Users Practice Better Sun-Protection Behaviours than Non-Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melinda; Jones, Sandra C.; Caputi, Peter; Iverson, Don

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine differences in sun-protection behaviours, and incidence of sunburn, between Australian adolescent female fake tan users and non-users. Design: Cross sectional survey. Method: 398 adolescent females aged 12 to 18 years participated in a survey at public venues, schools, and online. The main outcome measures were…

  5. No More "Personal Notes"? Data Protection Policy and Practice in Higher Education Counselling Services in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Peter; Potter, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of the Data Protection Act 1998 has presented significant challenges to counselling recording, through its detailed requirements for the processing of personal data. The impact of these changes on recording in Higher Education counselling services in the UK is explored, using responses from an electronic survey of universities and…

  6. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Safety Behaviors among Farm Adolescents: Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah B.; Browning, Steven R.; Westneat, Susan C.; Kidd, Pamela S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Children on farms perform work that places them at risk for acute and chronic negative health outcomes. Despite strategies for preventing and reducing the risk of disease and injury, children's use of personal protective equipment and safety equipped farm machinery has generally remained unreported. Purpose: This paper reports the use of…

  7. Do Australian Adolescent Female Fake Tan (Sunless Tan) Users Practice Better Sun-Protection Behaviours than Non-Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melinda; Jones, Sandra C.; Caputi, Peter; Iverson, Don

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine differences in sun-protection behaviours, and incidence of sunburn, between Australian adolescent female fake tan users and non-users. Design: Cross sectional survey. Method: 398 adolescent females aged 12 to 18 years participated in a survey at public venues, schools, and online. The main outcome measures were…

  8. No More "Personal Notes"? Data Protection Policy and Practice in Higher Education Counselling Services in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Peter; Potter, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of the Data Protection Act 1998 has presented significant challenges to counselling recording, through its detailed requirements for the processing of personal data. The impact of these changes on recording in Higher Education counselling services in the UK is explored, using responses from an electronic survey of universities and…

  9. Multi-faults decoupling on turbo-expander using differential-based ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongguang; Li, Ming; Li, Cheng; Li, Fucai; Meng, Guang

    2017-09-01

    This paper dedicates on the multi-faults decoupling of turbo-expander rotor system using Differential-based Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (DEEMD). DEEMD is an improved version of DEMD to resolve the imperfection of mode mixing. The nonlinear behaviors of the turbo-expander considering temperature gradient with crack, rub-impact and pedestal looseness faults are investigated respectively, so that the baseline for the multi-faults decoupling can be established. DEEMD is then utilized on the vibration signals of the rotor system with coupling faults acquired by numerical simulation, and the results indicate that DEEMD can successfully decouple the coupling faults, which is more efficient than EEMD. DEEMD is also applied on the vibration signal of the misalignment coupling with rub-impact fault obtained during the adjustment of the experimental system. The conclusion shows that DEEMD can decompose the practical multi-faults signal and the industrial prospect of DEEMD is verified as well.

  10. The health workforce: managing the crisis ethical international recruitment of health professionals: will codes of practice protect developing country health systems?

    PubMed

    Martineau, Tim; Willetts, Annie

    2006-02-01

    Many countries are using the strategy of international recruitment to make up for shortages of health professionals to the detriment of health systems in the poorest parts of the world. This study reviewed the potential impact of eight national level and international codes of practice or similar instruments that are being introduced to encourage ethical recruitment in order to protect these countries. Whilst effective dissemination of the instruments is generally in place, support systems, incentives and sanctions and monitoring systems necessary for effective implementation and sustainability are currently weak or have not been planned. If such codes or instruments are to be used to protect developing country health systems, lessons should be learnt from the early adopters; the focus of protecting developing country health systems needs to be emphasised in instruments with multiple objectives; the process of implementing the instruments strengthened; and internal and external pressure needs to be increased to ensure the codes and instruments lead to ethical recruitment and help to protect developing country health systems.

  11. Randomness fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting a fault on a power line carrying a line parameter such as a load current. The apparatus monitors and analyzes the load current to obtain an energy value. The energy value is compared to a threshold value stored in a buffer. If the energy value is greater than the threshold value a counter is incremented. If the energy value is greater than a high value threshold or less than a low value threshold then a second counter is incremented. If the difference between two subsequent energy values is greater than a constant then a third counter is incremented. A fault signal is issued if the counter is greater than a counter limit value and either the second counter is greater than a second limit value or the third counter is greater than a third limit value.

  12. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  13. Fault current limiter with solid-state circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bălan, H.; Neamț, L.; Buzdugan, M. I.; Varodi, T.; Pop, E.

    2016-08-01

    Switching of power circuit breakers is an important technical issue, especially at short circuit, since the fault current cause thermal and dynamic stresses, and the power quality worsens. Recently, the development of distributed renewable electricity induces the short circuit protection problematic because the distributed production of electric energy cause the transport networks to lose their radial character and disturbs the protective relays coordination. The modern technologies for power switching uses static fault current limiters, which offers a viable solution to remove the problems caused by large fault currents in the system. An appropriate design of the current limiting device reduces the thermal and dynamic stress and limits the fault current to a low value. The static switches are based on high power semiconductor devices that offer advantages compared to mechanical switches. Using a fault current limiter that minimizes the effect of distributed generation of electricity in a radial network on the co-ordination of protective relays is a solution to this problem in terms of switching speed and lifespan of power switches.

  14. Fault current reduction by SFCL in a distribution system with PV using fuzzy logic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounika, M.; Lingareddy, P.

    2017-07-01

    In the modern power system, as the utilization of electric power is very wide, there is a frequent occurring of any fault or disturbance in power system. It causes a high short circuit current. Due to this fault, high currents occurs results to large mechanical forces, these forces cause overheating of the equipment. If the large size equipment are used in power system then they need a large protection scheme for severe fault conditions. Generally, the maintenance of electrical power system reliability is more important. But the elimination of fault is not possible in power systems. So the only alternate solution is to minimize the fault currents. For this the Super Conducting Fault Current Limiter using fuzzy logic technique is the best electric equipment which is used for reducing the severe fault current levels. In this paper, we simulated the unsymmetrical and symmetrical faults with fuzzy based superconducting fault current limiter. In our analysis it is proved that, fuzzy logic based super conducting fault current limiter reduces fault current quickly to a lower value.

  15. Fault Tolerant Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0105 BRI) Fault Tolerant Paradigms BENJAMIN ONG MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING Final Report 02/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...property allows the algorithm to outperform FFTW over a wide range of sparsity and noise values, and is to the best of our knowledge novel in the...best of our knowledge novel. The new algorithm gives excellent performance in the noisy setting without significantly increasing the computational

  16. [Health Promotion and Child Protection in the Paediatric Practice - Paediatricians as Protagonists in an Invitation and Reporting System for Child Health Check-ups].

    PubMed

    Metzner, F; Ravens-Sieberer, U; Schwinn, A; Lietz, J; Pawils, S

    2015-12-01

    Since 1971 routine child health check-ups allow the routine identification of dis-eases in children and adolescents. Paediatricians play a central role in health prevention in childhood and adolescence and are - on account of their acceptance and admission requirements - important actors in child protection. Thus, paediatric practitioners were actively involved in the invitation and reporting system for the routine child health check-ups (U6 and U7), which was introduced to increase participation rates and improve child protection in Hamburg. By means of a questionnaire survey, all paediatric practitioners practicing in Hamburg were asked a year after introduction of the invitation and reporting system to report on their practical experience, and to share their assessment and criticism of the system (response rate 73%). Out of 110 participating pediatricians (M=19.5 years practical experience), 81% evaluated the invitation and reporting system as very useful, useful or rather useful; 83% supported an expansion of the system for routine child health check-ups, and about 18% observed an increased utilisation of routine child health check-ups especially from families with a migrant background and by socially-disadvantaged families. Criticism was made concerning ineffective procedures. The invitation and reporting system for routine child health check-ups in Hamburg shows how pediatricians can be integrated into the network of prevention and child welfare. It also shows their support of this system. Paying more systematic attention and an interdisciplinary network connecting paediatricians may contribute to a more comprehensive prevention and child protection. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Large earthquakes and creeping faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Ruth A.

    2017-01-01

    Faults are ubiquitous throughout the Earth's crust. The majority are silent for decades to centuries, until they suddenly rupture and produce earthquakes. With a focus on shallow continental active-tectonic regions, this paper reviews a subset of faults that have a different behavior. These unusual faults slowly creep for long periods of time and produce many small earthquakes. The presence of fault creep and the related microseismicity helps illuminate faults that might not otherwise be located in fine detail, but there is also the question of how creeping faults contribute to seismic hazard. It appears that well-recorded creeping fault earthquakes of up to magnitude 6.6 that have occurred in shallow continental regions produce similar fault-surface rupture areas and similar peak ground shaking as their locked fault counterparts of the same earthquake magnitude. The behavior of much larger earthquakes on shallow creeping continental faults is less well known, because there is a dearth of comprehensive observations. Computational simulations provide an opportunity to fill the gaps in our understanding, particularly of the dynamic processes that occur during large earthquake rupture and arrest.

  18. Large earthquakes and creeping faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ruth A.

    2017-03-01

    Faults are ubiquitous throughout the Earth's crust. The majority are silent for decades to centuries, until they suddenly rupture and produce earthquakes. With a focus on shallow continental active-tectonic regions, this paper reviews a subset of faults that have a different behavior. These unusual faults slowly creep for long periods of time and produce many small earthquakes. The presence of fault creep and the related microseismicity helps illuminate faults that might not otherwise be located in fine detail, but there is also the question of how creeping faults contribute to seismic hazard. It appears that well-recorded creeping fault earthquakes of up to magnitude 6.6 that have occurred in shallow continental regions produce similar fault-surface rupture areas and similar peak ground shaking as their locked fault counterparts of the same earthquake magnitude. The behavior of much larger earthquakes on shallow creeping continental faults is less well known, because there is a dearth of comprehensive observations. Computational simulations provide an opportunity to fill the gaps in our understanding, particularly of the dynamic processes that occur during large earthquake rupture and arrest.

  19. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  20. Conceptual Challenges and Practical Approaches to Screening Capacity for Self-care and Protection in Vulnerable Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Aanand D.; Teal, Cayla R.; Pavlik, Valory N.; Dyer, Carmel B.; McCullough, Laurence B.

    2008-01-01

    Identifying impairments in the capacity to make and execute decisions is critical to the assessment and remediation of elder self-neglect. Few capacity assessment tools are available for use outside of health care settings and none have been validated in the context of elder self-neglect. Health and social services professionals are in need of validated tools to assess capacity for self-care and self protection during initial evaluations of older adults with suspected self-neglect syndrome. Currently, legal and medical declarations of incapacity and guardianship rely on clinical evaluations and instruments developed to assess only decision-making capacity. This paper first describes the conceptual and methodological challenges to assessing the capacity to make and execute decisions regarding safe and independent living. Second, the paper describes the pragmatic obstacles to developing a screening tool for the capacity for self-care and self protection (SC&P). Finally, the paper outlines the process for validation and field testing of the screening tool. A valid and feasible screening tool can then be used during field assessments by social services professionals to screen for potential impairments in the capacity for self-care and protection in vulnerable older adults. PMID:19016970

  1. Wavelet Based Protection Scheme for Multi Terminal Transmission System with PV and Wind Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju Sree, Y.; Goli, Ravi kumar; Ramaiah, V.

    2017-08-01

    A hybrid generation is a part of large power system in which number of sources usually attached to a power electronic converter and loads are clustered can operate independent of the main power system. The protection scheme is crucial against faults based on traditional over current protection since there are adequate problems due to fault currents in the mode of operation. This paper adopts a new approach for detection, discrimination of the faults for multi terminal transmission line protection in presence of hybrid generation. Transient current based protection scheme is developed with discrete wavelet transform. Fault indices of all phase currents at all terminals are obtained by analyzing the detail coefficients of current signals using bior 1.5 mother wavelet. This scheme is tested for different types of faults and is found effective for detection and discrimination of fault with various fault inception angle and fault impedance.

  2. Imaging of subsurface faults using refraction migration with fault flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, Ahmed; Hanafy, Sherif; Guo, Bowen; Kosmicki, Maximillian

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except that it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  3. Legal and ethical standards for protecting women's human rights and the practice of conscientious objection in reproductive healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Zampas, Christina

    2013-12-01

    The practice of conscientious objection by healthcare workers is growing across the globe. It is most common in reproductive healthcare settings because of the religious or moral values placed on beliefs as to when life begins. It is often invoked in the context of abortion and contraceptive services, including the provision of information related to such services. Few states adequately regulate the practice, leading to denial of access to lawful reproductive healthcare services and violations of fundamental human rights. International ethical, health, and human rights standards have recently attempted to address these challenges by harmonizing the practice of conscientious objection with women's right to sexual and reproductive health services. FIGO ethical standards have had an important role in influencing human rights development in this area. They consider regulation of the unfettered use of conscientious objection essential to the realization of sexual and reproductive rights. Under international human rights law, states have a positive obligation to act in this regard. While ethical and human rights standards regarding this issue are growing, they do not yet exhaustively cover all the situations in which women's health and human rights are in jeopardy because of the practice. The present article sets forth existing ethical and human rights standards on the issue and illustrates the need for further development and clarity on balancing these rights and interests.

  4. The Impact of Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Fidelity Monitoring on Staff Turnover: Evidence for a Protective Effect

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Hecht, Debra B.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Staff retention is an ongoing challenge in mental health and community-based service organizations. Little is known about the impact of evidence-based practice implementation on the mental health and social service workforce. The present study examined the effect of evidence-based practice implementation and ongoing fidelity monitoring on staff retention in a children’s services system. The study took place in the context of a statewide regionally randomized effectiveness trial of an evidence-based intervention designed to reduce child neglect. Twenty-one teams consisting of 153 home-based service providers were followed over a 29 month period. Survival analyses revealed greater staff retention in the condition where the evidence-based practice was implemented along with ongoing fidelity monitoring presented to staff as supportive consultation. These results should help to allay concerns about staff retention when implementing evidence-based practices where there is good values-innovation fit and when fidelity monitoring is designed as an aid and support to service providers in providing a high standard of care for children and families. PMID:19309186

  5. Statistical analysis of submarine fault populations associated with oceanic transform boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K.; Soule, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    resolvable fault in a given population regardless of fault size or geometry and without assuming average fault characteristics (e.g., dip angle). In addition, the method captures local variations in fault geometry and is unaffected by instrument look direction. This practically eliminates the possibility of expectation bias and significantly reduces the errors introduced by manual mapping of faults of different scales. This technique, like all others used to map ocean floor faults, is limited to recent faults that are only lightly covered in sediment. Furthermore, measurement errors increase with scarp erosion and talus accumulation. The code is robust and can be applied to fault populations anywhere that sufficiently precise bathymetry or altimetry data exist. Here, we apply our method to several oceanic settings including the Galapagos, Siquieros, Wilkes, Blanco, and Clipperton transform faults. Our comparative study of the fault populations surrounding these transforms provides insight into the processes that control the morphological differences between transform boundaries under various stress regimes.

  6. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  7. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  8. Application of hybrid wavelet neural network for missile fault diagnosis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Li, Guiyan; Jia, Shaowen

    2007-11-01

    In missile weapon system, exact fault prediction and diagnosis is very important for missile security, according to the specialty and complexity of the missile fault diagnosis, a novel expert system design method based on the hybrid neural network ensembles is proposed in this paper. To improve the limitation of applying traditional fault diagnosis method to the diagnosis method of the diagnosis of missile fault, with large amounts of typical missile fault samples and raw measurable parametric data available, the missile fault diagnosis system based on wavelet neural network ensembles can be created applying general construction techniques of the wavelet neural network fault diagnosis system, including signal binary wavelet transform, fault feature extraction/selection and network training. The back-propagation (BP) algorithm is used to fulfill the parameter initialization and the neural network structure (WNN). By means of choosing enough practical samples to verity the wavelet neural network (WNN) and the information representing the faults is inputted into the trained WNN, and according to the output result the type of fault can be determined. It's proved that through diagnosis of the missile from several different sides by use of different parameters the diagnosis result is more reliable. The method can be generalized to other devices' fault diagnosis.

  9. Software Evolution and the Fault Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

    1999-01-01

    In developing a software system, we would like to estimate the way in which the fault content changes during its development, as well determine the locations having the highest concentration of faults. In the phases prior to test, however, there may be very little direct information regarding the number and location of faults. This lack of direct information requires developing a fault surrogate from which the number of faults and their location can be estimated. We develop a fault surrogate based on changes in the fault index, a synthetic measure which has been successfully used as a fault surrogate in previous work. We show that changes in the fault index can be used to estimate the rates at which faults are inserted into a system between successive revisions. We can then continuously monitor the total number of faults inserted into a system, the residual fault content, and identify those portions of a system requiring the application of additional fault detection and removal resources.

  10. Electronic Power Switch for Fault-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volp, J.

    1987-01-01

    Power field-effect transistors reduce energy waste and simplify interconnections. Current switch containing power field-effect transistor (PFET) placed in series with each load in fault-tolerant power-distribution system. If system includes several loads and supplies, switches placed in series with adjacent loads and supplies. System of switches protects against overloads and losses of individual power sources.

  11. Analysis of integral method for fault detection in transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Hijazi, M.E.A.; Basak, A. . Wolfson Centre for Magnetics Technology)

    1993-11-01

    Test results obtained from using the integral method in transformer differential protection against internal fault current, are presented. The effect of various factors on the transient waveforms are considered and conditions to predict the magnetizing inrush current and a faulty system have been digitally simulated.

  12. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  13. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  14. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  15. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  16. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ1 - σ3) and σ3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ3' under constant σ1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

  17. Recommended practice for fire protection for electric generating plants and high voltage direct current converter stations. 2005 ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    The standard outlines fire safety recommendations for gas, oil, coal, and alternative fuel electric generating plants including high voltage direct current converter stations and combustion turbine units greater than 7500 hp used for electric generation. Provisions apply to both new and existing plants. The document provides fire prevention and fire protection recommendations for the: safety of construction and operating personnel; physical integrity of plant components; and continuity of plant operations. The 2005 edition includes revisions and new art that clarify existing provisions. 5 annexes.

  18. SEISMOLOGY: Watching the Hayward Fault.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R W

    2000-08-18

    The Hayward fault, located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, represents a natural laboratory for seismologists, because it does not sleep silently between major earthquakes. In his Perspective, Simpson discusses the study by Bürgmann et al., who have used powerful new techniques to study the fault. The results indicate that major earthquakes cannot originate in the northern part of the fault. However, surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in the area, suggesting that they originated to the north or south of the segment studied by Bürgmann et al. Fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanism by which plate tectonic stresses are transferred to the Hayward fault.

  19. Physical fault tolerance of nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani P; Antoniadis, Dimitri A; Damoulakis, John N

    2011-04-29

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of gates into the most efficient known fault-tolerant architecture is characterized by a subexponential suppression of error rate with electron number, and incurs significant overhead in wiring and complexity. We conclude that it is more efficient to prevent logical errors with physical fault tolerance than to correct logical errors with fault-tolerant architecture.

  20. Stacking Faults in Cotton Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakara, S.; Niranjana, A. R.; Siddaraju, G. N.; Somashekar, R.

    2011-07-01

    The stacking faults in different variety of cotton fibers have been quantified using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data. Exponential functions for the column length distribution have been used for the determination of microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %), stacking faults (αd) and twin faults (β) have been determined by profile analysis using Fourier method of Warren. We examined different variety of raw cotton fibers using WAXS techniques. In all these cases we note that, the stacking faults are quite significant in determining the property of cotton fibers.

  1. Fault trees and sequence dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Boyd, Mark A.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the frequently cited shortcomings of fault-tree models, their inability to model so-called sequence dependencies, is discussed. Several sources of such sequence dependencies are discussed, and new fault-tree gates to capture this behavior are defined. These complex behaviors can be included in present fault-tree models because they utilize a Markov solution. The utility of the new gates is demonstrated by presenting several models of the fault-tolerant parallel processor, which include both hot and cold spares.

  2. Fault-Tree Compiler Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Martensen, Anna L.

    1992-01-01

    FTC, Fault-Tree Compiler program, is reliability-analysis software tool used to calculate probability of top event of fault tree. Five different types of gates allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language of FTC easy to understand and use. Program supports hierarchical fault-tree-definition feature simplifying process of description of tree and reduces execution time. Solution technique implemented in FORTRAN, and user interface in Pascal. Written to run on DEC VAX computer operating under VMS operating system.

  3. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gerald M.

    1982-09-01

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress and slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nosteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  4. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  5. Protection of autonomous microgrids using agent-based distributed communication

    SciTech Connect

    Cintuglu, Mehmet H.; Ma, Tan; Mohammed, Osama A.

    2016-04-06

    This study presents a real-time implementation of autonomous microgrid protection using agent-based distributed communication. Protection of an autonomous microgrid requires special considerations compared to large scale distribution net-works due to the presence of power converters and relatively low inertia. In this work, we introduce a practical overcurrent and a frequency selectivity method to overcome conventional limitations. The proposed overcurrent scheme defines a selectivity mechanism considering the remedial action scheme (RAS) of the microgrid after a fault instant based on feeder characteristics and the location of the intelligent electronic devices (IEDs). A synchrophasor-based online frequency selectivity approach is proposed to avoid pulse loading effects in low inertia microgrids. Experimental results are presented for verification of the pro-posed schemes using a laboratory based microgrid. The setup was composed of actual generation units and IEDs using IEC 61850 protocol. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with the proposed protection scheme.

  6. Bone protection and anti-epileptic drugs: the effect of audit and computer messaging on supplementation prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    Minshall, I; Mahon, M; Neligan, A

    2013-11-01

    This audit assessed the impact of individualised written recommendations and a computer message, on repeat prescriptions for calcium and vitamin D supplements, for patients on long term AEDs. 1041 adult patients with epilepsy were retrospectively followed from 2004, from the time of the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) and the publication of the National Institute of Clinical Evidence (NICE) guidelines for epilepsy, up until 2011. In 2009 a clinical notes review of 414 of the above patients, in Ellesmere Port and Neston (13 practices) was performed, suggesting supplementation, where appropriate, in a written report. A computer message was added to relevant prescriptions also recommending supplements, in the above practices plus all 26 practices in Chester and the surrounding area. The number of patients receiving repeat prescription for supplements in each area between 2004 and 2011 was analysed. There was a significant increase in the repeat prescriptions of supplements in 2010/11 after the interventions, the increase being most marked in Ellesmere Port and Neston where both written recommendations and computer message had occurred compared with the two areas with the computer message only. Quality audit with written recommendations, and a message added to the General Practice (GP) computer systems significantly increased the number of repeat prescriptions of calcium and vitamin D supplements in this group of patients. Where clear guidelines are established, this study demonstrates that continuing education and counselling of GPs and use of computer messaging would result in improved compliance with such guidelines. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Even Worse - Risk Factors and Protective Factors for Transition from Chronic Localized Low Back Pain to Chronic Widespread Pain in General Practice: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Viniol, Annika; Jegan, Nikita; Brugger, Markus; Leonhardt, Corinna; Barth, Jürgen; Baum, Erika; Becker, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin

    2015-08-01

    Prospective cohort study with patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) at primary care setting. The aim of our study was to identify predictors for transition from localized CLBP to chronic widespread pain in general practice. In contrast to the typically investigated risk factors, this study also focuses intensively on protective factors, which decrease the probability of chronic widespread pain. For this, we investigated the resources resilience and coping strategies, which are suspected as potential protective factors for incident chronic pain syndromes. In primary care, about a quarter of patients with CLBP experience chronic widespread pain (CWP). Patients experiencing localized CLBP were included and evaluated after a 6- and 12-month follow-up period regarding the development of CWP. Potential risk factors (sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, somatization), protective factors (resilience, coping strategies), and sample characteristics were assessed at baseline. Predictor identification was done by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The 1-year incidence for the onset of CWP among patients with CLBP was 23.8%. We identified the 3 risk factors, female sex, long duration of back pain, and a high rate of psychosomatic symptoms, for the onset of CWP among patients with CLBP. Coping resources and resilience had no impact on the transition from CLBP to CWP. The results suggest that CWP is no independent entity but rather a particularly negative occurrence on a continuum of chronic pain. Processes of somatization play a major role in the development of this extreme. 2.

  8. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  9. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  10. Fault Tree Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    uat r CmIi S ft II >5±4"’’ NUREG-0492 Fault Tree Handbook Date Published: January 1981 W. E. Vesely, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission F. F...Goldberg, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission N. H. Roberts, University of Washington D. F. Haasl, Institute of System Sciences, Inc. Systems and...Reliability Research Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 RG &,, ý0 For sale by the U.S

  11. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  12. Nonlinear Fault Diagnosis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Systems, New York, Marcel Dekker, (to appear). 3. Desoer , C.A. and S.E. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969, pp. 423-425. 130 NONLINEAR...DIAGNOSIS A 7*ssior For 1 MU3 CRA&T IY’IC TAB Ju-st i.cat IC- P.U A: CONTENTS Fault Diagnosis in Electronic Circuits , R. Saeks and R.-w. Liu...Vincentelli and R. Saeks .............. 61 Multitest Diagnosibility of Nonlinear Circuits and Systems, A. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and R. Saeks

  13. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  14. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  15. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  16. Phytochemicals of Brassicaceae in plant protection and human health--influences of climate, environment and agronomic practice.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Maria; Klingen, Ingeborg; Birch, Andrew N E; Bones, Atle M; Bruce, Toby J A; Johansen, Tor J; Meadow, Richard; Mølmann, Jørgen; Seljåsen, Randi; Smart, Lesley E; Stewart, Derek

    2011-05-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the role of glucosinolates and other phytochemical compounds present in the Brassicaceae in relation to plant protection and human health. Current knowledge of the factors that influence phytochemical content and profile in the Brassicaceae is also summarized and multi-factorial approaches are briefly discussed. Variation in agronomic conditions (plant species, cultivar, developmental stage, plant organ, plant competition, fertilization, pH), season, climatic factors, water availability, light (intensity, quality, duration) and CO(2) are known to significantly affect content and profile of phytochemicals. Phytochemicals such as the glucosinolates and leaf surface waxes play an important role in interactions with pests and pathogens. Factors that affect production of phytochemicals are important when designing plant protection strategies that exploit these compounds to minimize crop damage caused by plant pests and pathogens. Brassicaceous plants are consumed increasingly for possible health benefits, for example, glucosinolate-derived effects on degenerative diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, factors influencing phytochemical content and profile in the production of brassicaceous plants are worth considering both for plant and human health. Even though it is known that factors that influence phytochemical content and profile may interact, studies of plant compounds were, until recently, restricted by methods allowing only a reductionistic approach. It is now possible to design multi-factorial experiments that simulate their combined effects. This will provide important information to ecologists, plant breeders and agronomists.

  17. Report from the Country of Georgia: Protecting and Promoting Breastfeeding through Regulation of Artificial-Feeding Marketing Practices

    PubMed Central

    Nemsadze, Ketevan

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights the southwest Asian country of Georgia's experience in creating efforts to protect and promote breastfeeding and to implement the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Since 1994, the country of Georgia (of the former Soviet Union) has successfully implemented the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. In 1997–1998, Georgia conducted a study throughout the country's various regions to evaluate compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. The research demonstrated numerous violations of the code by various companies and confirmed the necessity of ongoing activities to promote implementation of the code. Due to the great effort of Georgia's Ministry of Health and the International Baby-Food Action Network [IBFAN] Georgian group called “Claritas,” the law titled “On Protection and Promotion of Breastfeeding and Regulation of Artificial Feeding” was adopted in 1999 by the country's parliament. As a result, Georgia has witnessed a sharp increase in breastfeeding percentages, the designation of baby-friendly status at 14 maternity houses, and a decrease in the advertisement of artificial-feeding products. PMID:17273372

  18. Integrated design of fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control against actuator faults using learning observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingxian; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Huayi

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of integrated fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control in linear systems subject to actuator faults via learning observers (LOs). A reconfigurable fault-tolerant controller is designed based on the constructed LO to compensate for the influence of actuator faults by stabilising the closed-loop system. An integrated design of the proposed LO and the fault-tolerant controller is explored such that their performance can be simultaneously considered and their coupling problem can be effectively solved. In addition, such an integrated design is formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that can be conveniently solved in a unified framework using LMI optimisation technique. At last, simulation studies on a micro-satellite attitude control system are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. A fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam Sing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept, design, and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for space and commercial applications that require high dependability. The comprehensive strategy integrates system level hardware/software fault tolerance with task level handling of uncertainties and unexpected events for robotic control. The underlying architecture for system level fault tolerance is the distributed recovery block which protects against application software, system software, hardware, and network failures. Task level fault tolerance provisions are implemented in a knowledge-based system which utilizes advanced automation techniques such as rule-based and model-based reasoning to monitor, diagnose, and recover from unexpected events. The two level design provides tolerance of two or more faults occurring serially at any level of command, control, sensing, or actuation. The potential benefits of such a fault tolerant robotic control system include: (1) a minimized potential for damage to humans, the work site, and the robot itself; (2) continuous operation with a minimum of uncommanded motion in the presence of failures; and (3) more reliable autonomous operation providing increased efficiency in the execution of robotic tasks and decreased demand on human operators for controlling and monitoring the robotic servicing routines.

  20. AGSM Functional Fault Models for Fault Isolation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project implements functional fault models to automate the isolation of failures during ground systems operations. FFMs will also be used to recommend sensor placement to improve fault isolation capabilities. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators.

  1. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing

  2. The importance of upgrading power stations with numerical protection relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilceanu, Radu-Constantin; Surianu, Flavius-Dan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the importance of upgrading power stations with numerical protection relays. We will study the gravity and the economic impact of a power system fault when it appears and it is not cleared by old protection devices. Also we will compare how an old protection scheme works when it clears a power fault with how modern numerical protection relays work. The trip decision and the actual circuit breaker open times will be compared and analyzed.

  3. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  4. Structure and flow properties of syn-rift border faults: The interplay between fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration (Dombjerg Fault, Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Rotevatn, Atle; Peacock, David C. P.; Henstra, Gijs A.; Midtkandal, Ivar; Grundvåg, Sten-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Structurally controlled, syn-rift, clastic depocentres are of economic interest as hydrocarbon reservoirs; understanding the structure of their bounding faults is of great relevance, e.g. in the assessment of fault-controlled hydrocarbon retention potential. Here we investigate the structure of the Dombjerg Fault Zone (Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland), a syn-rift border fault that juxtaposes syn-rift deep-water hanging-wall clastics against a footwall of crystalline basement. A series of discrete fault strands characterize the central fault zone, where discrete slip surfaces, fault rock assemblages and extreme fracturing are common. A chemical alteration zone (CAZ) of fault-related calcite cementation envelops the fault and places strong controls on the style of deformation, particularly in the hanging-wall. The hanging-wall damage zone includes faults, joints, veins and, outside the CAZ, disaggregation deformation bands. Footwall deformation includes faults, joints and veins. Our observations suggest that the CAZ formed during early-stage fault slip and imparted a mechanical control on later fault-related deformation. This study thus gives new insights to the structure of an exposed basin-bounding fault and highlights a spatiotemporal interplay between fault damage and chemical alteration, the latter of which is often underreported in fault studies. To better elucidate the structure, evolution and flow properties of faults (outcrop or subsurface), both fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration must be considered.

  5. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  7. Soft-Fault Detection Technologies Developed for Electrical Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, partner universities, and defense contractors are working to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) technologies for future spacecraft and launch vehicles. The goals are to provide higher performance (efficiency, transient response, and stability), higher fault tolerance, and higher reliability through the application of digital control and communication technologies. It is also expected that these technologies will eventually reduce the design, development, manufacturing, and integration costs for large, electrical power systems for space vehicles. The main focus of this research has been to incorporate digital control, communications, and intelligent algorithms into power electronic devices such as direct-current to direct-current (dc-dc) converters and protective switchgear. These technologies, in turn, will enable revolutionary changes in the way electrical power systems are designed, developed, configured, and integrated in aerospace vehicles and satellites. Initial successes in integrating modern, digital controllers have proven that transient response performance can be improved using advanced nonlinear control algorithms. One technology being developed includes the detection of "soft faults," those not typically covered by current systems in use today. Soft faults include arcing faults, corona discharge faults, and undetected leakage currents. Using digital control and advanced signal analysis algorithms, we have shown that it is possible to reliably detect arcing faults in high-voltage dc power distribution systems (see the preceding photograph). Another research effort has shown that low-level leakage faults and cable degradation can be detected by analyzing power system parameters over time. This additional fault detection capability will result in higher reliability for long-lived power systems such as reusable launch vehicles and space exploration missions.

  8. Effects of an educational intervention based on the protection motivation theory and implementation intentions on first and second pap test practice in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehdari, Tahereh; Hassani, Laleh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Abedini, Mehrandokht

    2014-01-01

    Few Iranian women take the Papanicolaou test despite its important role in preventing cervical cancer. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on the protection motivation theory (PMT) variables and implementation intentions in the first and second Pap test practice among Iranian women. In this quasi-randomized controlled trial, 200 women who were referred to 30 primary health care clinics in Tehran were randomly selected. PMT variables and Pap test practice were measured at baseline and again after 3 and 15 months. The 4-week educational intervention program was conducted for the intervention group. Following the intervention, the mean scores of self-efficacy, perceived vulnerability, and behavior intention variables were significantly higher in the intervention group when compared to the control group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found in the perceived severity, response efficacy, response cost, and fear between the two groups following the intervention. Higher percent of women in the intervention group had obtained first and second Pap test compared to the controls. The PMT and implementation intentions provide a suitable theory-based framework for developing educational interventions regarding Pap test practice in Iran.

  9. The future direction of ecological risk assessment in the United States: reflecting on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Examination of risk assessment practices and principles".

    PubMed

    DeMott, Robert P; Balaraman, Anita; Sorensen, Mary T

    2005-01-01

    As part of an agency evaluation of the development of risk assessment tools, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) issued a staff paper in March 2004 describing the current state of practices and policies regarding risk assessment from the agency's perspective. The staff paper provided a rationale for the agency's positions regarding technical topics frequently the subject of comments or complaints. Considerations relevant to ecological risk assessment were included, primarily in a single chapter focused on this topic. This commentary highlights four technical issues important to the advancement of ecological risk assessment practice and discusses how some of the points raised by the U.S. EPA in the staff paper have significance to ecological risk assessors. Discussion regarding incorporating population- and community-level analysis into risk assessments and the apparent reluctance of the U.S. EPA to adopt advances in this area is provided. Also, continuing inconsistencies in the body weight scaling of toxicity values between human health and ecological risk assessment practices are discussed. Ideas for refining the calculation of exposure point concentrations for ecological receptors and the progression between screening steps and comprehensive risk assessment are also discussed.

  10. A model for classifying and interpreting logs of boreholes that intersect faults in stratified rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvany, P.S. )

    1992-06-01

    A model reveals eleven fundamental relationships between the character of well logs and the geometry of borehole-strata-fault (BSF) intersections. Within limits, the model has two important practical applications. First, it provides a convenient way to classify logs of boreholes that intersect faults in stratified rocks. The different kinds of logs are given names, which can be used in informal and formal discourse to succinctly describe faulted logs. Second, the model can be used to interpret the geometry of BSF intersections directly from well logs. Knowledge of BSF geometry can be useful in interpreting faults in structure. Persons involved in highly deviated and horizontal boreholes should find the model particularly helpful.

  11. On the application of a machine learning technique to fault diagnosis of power distribution lines

    SciTech Connect

    Togami, Masato; Abe, Norihiro; Kitahashi, T.; Ogawa, Harunao

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents one method for fault diagnosis of power distribution lines by using a decision tree. The conventional method, using a decision tree, applies only to discrete attribute values. To apply it to fault diagnosis of power distribution lines, in practice it must be revised in order to treat attributes whose values range over certain widths. This is because the sensor value or attribute value varies owing to the resistance of the fault point or is influenced by noise. The proposed method is useful when the attribute value has such a property, and it takes into consideration the cost of acquiring the information and the probability of the occurrence of a fault.

  12. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  13. Naval Weapons Center Active Fault Map Series.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’MiS PACE NWC TP 6828 CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 2 Active Fault Definition ...established along the trace of the Little Take fault zone, within the City of Ridgecrest. ACTIVE FAULT DEFINITION Although it is a commonly used term...34active fault" lacks a pre- cise and universally accepted definition . Most workers, however, accept the following: "Active fault - a fault along

  14. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1987-01-01

    Multi-version or N-version programming is proposed as a method of providing fault tolerance in software. The approach requires the separate, independent preparation of multiple versions of a piece of software for some application. These versions are executed in parallel in the application environment; each receives identical inputs and each produces its version of the required outputs. The outputs are collected by a voter and, in principle, they should all be the same. In practice there may be some disagreement. If this occurs, the results of the majority are taken to be the correct output, and that is the output used by the system. A total of 27 programs were produced. Each of these programs was then subjected to one million randomly-generated test cases. The experiment yielded a number of programs containing faults that are useful for general studies of software reliability as well as studies of N-version programming. Fault tolerance through data diversity and analytic models of comparison testing are discussed.

  15. NASA Fire Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on fire protection operations and administration at Stennis Space Center (SSC). The presentation also lists innovative practices and recent improvements.

  16. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ_1 - σ_3) and σ_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ_3' under constant σ_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (σ_1' = σ_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing σ_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing σ_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (σ_2 and σ_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in

  17. Performance evaluation of fault detection methods for wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Lluís; Villez, Kris; Aguado, Daniel; Rieger, Leiv; Rosén, Christian; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2011-02-01

    Several methods to detect faults have been developed in various fields, mainly in chemical and process engineering. However, minimal practical guidelines exist for their selection and application. This work presents an index that allows for evaluating monitoring and diagnosis performance of fault detection methods, which takes into account several characteristics, such as false alarms, false acceptance, and undesirable switching from correct detection to non-detection during a fault event. The usefulness of the index to process engineering is demonstrated first by application to a simple example. Then, it is used to compare five univariate fault detection methods (Shewhart, EWMA, and residuals of EWMA) applied to the simulated results of the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 long-term (BSM1_LT). The BSM1_LT, provided by the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies, is a simulation platform that allows for creating sensor and actuator faults and process disturbances in a wastewater treatment plant. The results from the method comparison using BSM1_LT show better performance to detect a sensor measurement shift for adaptive methods (residuals of EWMA) and when monitoring the actuator signals in a control loop (e.g., airflow). Overall, the proposed index is able to screen fault detection methods. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pests, diseases and crop protection practices in the smallholder sweetpotato production system of the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gurr, Geoff M; Liu, Jian; Johnson, Anne C; Woruba, Deane N; Kirchhof, Gunnar; Fujinuma, Ryosuke; Sirabis, William; Jeffery, Yapo; Akkinapally, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomea batatans) is a food crop of global significance. The storage roots and foliage of crop are attacked by a wide range of pests and diseases. Whilst these are generally well controlled in developed countries using approaches such as clean planting material and monitoring with pheromone traps to guide insecticide use, research into methods suitable for developing countries has lagged. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), sweetpotato is grown extensively as a subsistence crop and commercial production as a cash crop is developing. We report results from a survey of 33 smallholder producers located in the Highlands of PNG where the crop is of particular importance. Surveys of interviewees' crops showed high levels of pest and disease impact to foliage, stems and storage roots, especially in crops that were several years old. Weevils (Curculionidae) were reportedly the most damaging pests and scab (caused by the fungus Elisnoe batatus) the most damaging disease. Most producers reported root damage from the former and foliar damage from the latter but the general level of knowledge of pest and disease types was low. Despite the apparency of pest and disease signs and symptoms and recognition of their importance by farmers, a large majority of producers reported practiced no active pest or disease management. This was despite low numbers of farmers reporting use of traditional cultural practices including phytosanitary measures and insecticidal plants that had the scope for far wider use. Only one respondent reported use of insecticide though pesticides were available in nearby cities. This low level of pest and disease management in most cases, likely due to paucity in biological and technical knowledge among growers, hampers efforts to establish food security and constrains the development of sweetpotato as a cash crop.

  19. Protecting and improving breastfeeding practices during a major emergency: lessons learnt from the baby tents in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Kate; Ngnie-Teta, Ismael; Moreaux, Marjolein D; Mamadoultaibou, Aissa; Koo, Leslie; Boyd, Erin; Beauliere, Jean Max; Lesavre, Celine; Marhone, Joseline Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem The 2010 earthquake in Haiti displaced about 1.5 million people, many of them into camps for internally displaced persons. It was expected that disruption of breastfeeding practices would lead to increased infant morbidity, malnutrition and mortality. Approach Haiti’s health ministry and the United Nations Children’s Fund, in collaboration with local and international nongovernmental organizations, established baby tents in the areas affected by the earthquake. The tents provided a safe place for mothers to breastfeed and for non-breastfed infants to receive ready-to-use infant formula. Such a large and coordinated baby tent response in an emergency context had never been mounted before anywhere in the world. Local setting Baby tents were set up in five cities but mainly in Port-au-Prince, where the majority of Haiti’s 1555 camps for displaced persons had been established. Relevant changes Between February 2010 and June 2012, 193 baby tents were set up; 180 499 mother–infant pairs and 52 503 pregnant women were registered in the baby tent programme. Of infants younger than 6 months, 70% were reported to be exclusively breastfed and 10% of the “mixed feeders” moved to exclusive breastfeeding while enrolled. In 2010, 13.5% of registered infants could not be breastfed. These infants received ready-to-use infant formula. Lessons learnt Thanks to rapid programme scale-up, breastfeeding practices remained undisrupted. However, better evaluation methods and comprehensive guidance on the implementation and monitoring of baby tents are needed for future emergencies, along with a clear strategy for transitioning baby tent activities into facility and community programmes. PMID:23940409

  20. Protecting and improving breastfeeding practices during a major emergency: lessons learnt from the baby tents in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Golden, Kate; Ngnie-Teta, Ismael; Moreaux, Marjolein D; Mamadoultaibou, Aissa; Koo, Leslie; Boyd, Erin; Beauliere, Jean Max; Lesavre, Celine; Marhone, Joseline Pierre

    2013-08-01

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti displaced about 1.5 million people, many of them into camps for internally displaced persons. It was expected that disruption of breastfeeding practices would lead to increased infant morbidity, malnutrition and mortality. Haiti's health ministry and the United Nations Children's Fund, in collaboration with local and international nongovernmental organizations, established baby tents in the areas affected by the earthquake. The tents provided a safe place for mothers to breastfeed and for non-breastfed infants to receive ready-to-use infant formula. Such a large and coordinated baby tent response in an emergency context had never been mounted before anywhere in the world. Baby tents were set up in five cities but mainly in Port-au-Prince, where the majority of Haiti's 1555 camps for displaced persons had been established. Between February 2010 and June 2012, 193 baby tents were set up; 180 499 mother-infant pairs and 52 503 pregnant women were registered in the baby tent programme. Of infants younger than 6 months, 70% were reported to be exclusively breastfed and 10% of the "mixed feeders" moved to exclusive breastfeeding while enrolled. In 2010, 13.5% of registered infants could not be breastfed. These infants received ready-to-use infant formula. Thanks to rapid programme scale-up, breastfeeding practices remained undisrupted. However, better evaluation methods and comprehensive guidance on the implementation and monitoring of baby tents are needed for future emergencies, along with a clear strategy for transitioning baby tent activities into facility and community programmes.