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Sample records for fault zone structure

  1. The deep structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Cupillard, Paul; Capdeville, Yann; Trampert, Jeannot

    2013-07-01

    Multi-scale full waveform inversion of complete continental- and regional-scale seismograms reveals the crustal and upper-mantle signature of the North Anatolian Fault Zone which shapes the neotectonics of Turkey and the eastern Mediterranean. Within the crust, the fault zone is mostly bounded by several high-velocity blocks, suggesting that it developed along the edges of continental fragments with high rigidity. Below the crust, the surface expression of the eastern and central parts of the North Anatolian Fault Zone correlate with a pronounced low-velocity band that extends laterally over 600 km. Around 100 km depth, the low-velocity band merges into the shallow Anatolian asthenosphere, thereby providing a link to the Kırka-Afyon-Isparta Volcanic Field and the Central Anatolian Volcanics. We interpret the low-velocity band beneath the North Anatolian Fault Zone as the upper-mantle expression of the Tethyan sutures that formed 60-15 Ma ago as a result of Africa-Eurasian convergence. The structurally weak suture facilitated the formation of the younger (less than 10 Ma) crustal fault zone. In this sense, the North Anatolian Fault Zone is not only a crustal feature, but a narrow zone of weakness that extends into the upper mantle.

  2. Internal Structure of Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Zone Gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Song, S.; Tang, M.; Chen, F.; Chen, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Gouge formation is found to exist in brittle faults at all scale (1). This fine-grain gouge is thought to control earthquake instability. And thus investigating the gouge textures and compositions is very important to an understanding of the earthquake process. Employing the transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM), we study the internal structure of fault zone gouges from the cores of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP), which drilled in the fault zone of 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. This X-ray microscope have installed at beamline BL01B of the Taiwan Light Source, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC). It provides 2D imaging and 3D tomography at energy 8-11 keV with a spatial resolution of 25-60 nm, and is equipped with the Zernike-phase contrast capability for imaging light materials. In this work, we show the measurements of gouge texture, particle size distribution and 3D structure of the ultracataclasite in fault gouges within 12 cm about 1111.29 m depth. These characterizations in transition from the fault core to damage zone are related to the comminuting and the fracture energy in the earthquake faulting. The TXM data recently shows the particle size distributions of the ultracataclasite are between 150 nm and 900 nm in diameter. We will keep analyzing the characterization of particle size distribution, porosity and 3D structure of the fault zone gouges in transition from the fault core to damage zone to realize the comminuting and fracture surface energy in the earthquake faulting(2-5).The results may ascertain the implication of the nucleation, growth, transition, structure and permeability of the fault zones(6-8). Furthermore, it may be possible to infer the mechanism of faulting, the physical and chemical property of the fault, and the nucleation of the earthquake. References 1) B. Wilson, T. Dewerw, Z. Reches and J. Brune, Nature, 434 (2005) 749. 2) S. E. Schulz and J. P. Evans

  3. The internal structure of fault zones in basaltic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M.; Urai, J. L.; Martel, S.

    2005-12-01

    In contrary to most sedimentary rocks that need burial for consolidation, effusive basalts solidify quickly thus imposing a different mechanical behavior at the surface. Extensional stresses due to gravitational failure, caldera collapse or general tectonic forces generate prominent morphologies and large dilatant structures with impacts for hydraulic, mechanical and also bionomic aspects. In this study we present insights of field work on the Koa`e fault zone on Kilauea volcano/Hawai`i combined with the analysis of a scaled analogue model of normal faults in cohesive sequences. The Koa`e fault zone is a 12 km long normal fault zone connecting sections of the two rift zones. Unlike the predominantly mode-I cracks of the rift zones, the Koa`e faults show up to 20 m high sub-vertical fault scarps accompanied with footwall fissures. Open fractures, broken or buckled ramp structures and sub-vertical walls are the key elements in what is considered to be a volcanic growth fault system. Our analogue model visualizes the deformation of brittle flow units on top of a buried fault. The model uses dry hemihydrate powder with a tensional strength of 33 Pa, and a curved yield envelope. Depending on the rock prototype a scaling relationship of 1:5000-40000 is apparent. The faults initiate as sub-vertical mode-I fissuring at the surface propagating downward. Some of the open fissures on the footwall are deactivated; others evolve into faults producing the morphological scarps. A shallow antithetic fracture decouples a surface slap on the hanging wall producing the morphological ramps seen in the field. Its rotation is responsible for cavities and buckling. The internal structure of the shallow faults is open and filled partly with collapsing wall fragments that are progressively milled down at deeper levels. The model implies that normal faults in basalt are largely dilatant systems with a prominent mode-I component up to several meters magnitude. If the insights of the work are

  4. Multi-Scale Imaging of the Fault Zone Velocity Structure: Double-difference Tomography, Inversion of Fault Zone Headwaves, and Fault Zone Sensitivity Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Amir A.

    In spite of the close relationship between fault zone structure and earthquake mechanics, fault zone structure at seismogenic depths remains poorly understood. How does localization of the primary slip zone vary with depth? Is there a signature of broad persistent damage zones at seismogenic depths? How does fault zone structure merge with regional structure? To answer these questions, we utilize multiple imaging techniques. We apply high-resolution double-difference tomography to the San Jacinto fault zone, invert for velocity structure along the Hayward fault using fault zone head waves, and use analytical results for idealized geometries to validate sensitivity kernels of fault zone phases for use in adjoint tomographic inversions. Double-difference tomography uses the arrival times of P and S waves to invert simultaneously for compressional velocity, shear wave velocity, and source location in three dimensions. We present results in the southern California plate-boundary area, with a focus on the San Jacinto fault zone, which incorporate arrival times of 247,472 P- and 105,448 S-wave picks for 5493 earthquakes recorded at 139 stations. Starting with a layered 1D model, and continuing in later iterations with various updated initial models, we invert the data for Vp and Vs in a 270 km long, 105 km wide and 35 km deep volume using a spatially variable grid with higher density around the San Jacinto. Our final velocity results show zones of low-velocity and high Vp/Vs ratios associated with various fault strands and sedimentary basins, along with clear velocity contrasts across the San Jacinto. While both features are limited to the upper 10km, the low velocity zones generally have higher amplitude and broader distribution in geometrically complex areas, while the velocity contrasts are more pronounced for Vp than Vs. Along the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay region, we identify fault zone head waves at eight stations on the northeastern side of the fault

  5. The tectonic structure of the Song Ma fault zone, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Strong; Yeh, Yu-Lien; Tang, Chi-Cha; Phong, Lai Hop; Toan, Dinh Van; Chang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Chau-Huei

    2015-08-01

    Indochina area is a tectonic active region where creates complex topographies and tectonic structures. In particular, the Song Ma fault zone plays an important role in understanding the mechanism and revolution of the collision between the Indian plate and Eurasian plate. In order to have better understanding the seismotectonic structures of the Song Ma fault zone, a three-year project is proposed to study the seismotectonic structures of crust in this region. The main goal of this project is to deploy temporary broad-band seismic stations around/near the shear zone to record high quality microearthquakes. By using the data recorded by the temporary array and the local seismic network, we are able to conduct seismological studies which include using waveform inversion to obtain precise fault plane solutions of microearthquakes, one-dimensional (1-D) velocity structure of the crust in the region as well as the characteristics of seismogeneric zone. From the results of earthquake relocation and focal mechanisms, we find that the spatial distribution of events occurred in Song Ma fault zone forms in several distinct groups which are well correlated local geological structures and further use to gain insights on tectonic evolution.

  6. The deep structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, A.; Cupillard, P.; Saygin, E.; Trampert, J.; Taymaz, T.; Capdeville, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-scale full waveform inversion of complete continental- and regional-scale seismograms reveals the crustal and upper-mantle signature of the North Anatolian Fault Zone which shapes the neotectonics of Turkey and the eastern Mediterranean. Within the crust, the fault zone is mostly bounded by several high-velocity blocks, suggesting that it developed along the edges of continental fragments with high rigidity. Below the crust, the surface expression of the eastern and central parts of the North Anatolian Fault Zone correlate with a pronounced low-velocity band that extends laterally over 600 km. Around 100 km depth, the low-velocity band merges into the shallow Anatolian asthenosphere, thereby providing a link to the Kirka-Afyon-Isparta Volcanic Field and the Central Anatolian Volcanics. We interpret the low-velocity band beneath the North Anatolian Fault Zone as the upper-mantle expression of the Tethyan sutures that formed 60-15 Ma ago as a result of Africa-Eurasian convergence. The structurally weak suture facilitated the formation of the younger (less than 10 Ma) crustal fault zone. In this sense, the North Anatolian Fault Zone is not only a crustal feature, but a narrow zone of weakness that extends into the upper mantle. Horizontal slices through the isotropic S velocity, vS, at 20 km (a) and 40 km (b) depth. Indicated are the surface expressions of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) marks the northern boundary of the NAFZ. Dashed rectangles mark regions that are amplified in the two leftmost panels of the figure. Dotted ellipses indicate thin (20-30 km) crust as inferred from receiver function analysis (Vanacore et al., GJI 2013). Key to marked features: ATB: Anatolide-Tauride Block, IZ: Istanbul Zone, KM: Krsehir Massif, SZ: Sakarya Zone. Horizontal slices through the isotropic S velocity, vs, at 70 km and 150 km depth beneath Europe and western Asia. The Anatolian region where shorter-period data have been

  7. Hydraulic structure of a fault zone at seismogenic depths (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Mittempergher, Silvia; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Garofalo, Paolo; Vho, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps) was exhumed from c. 8 km depth, where it was characterized by seismic activity (pseudotachylytes), but also by hydrous fluid flow (alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and cataclasites). Thanks to glacier-polished outcrops exposing the fault zone over a continuous area > 1 km2, the fault zone architecture has been quantitatively described with an unprecedented detail (Bistacchi 2011, PAGEOPH; Smith 2013, JSG; Mittempergher 2016, this meeting), providing a rich dataset to generate 3D Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models and simulate the fault zone hydraulic properties. Based on field and microstructural evidence, we infer that the opening and closing of fractures resulted in a toggle-switch mechanism for fluid flow during the seismic cycle: higher permeability was obtained in the syn- to early post-seismic period, when the largest number of fractures was (re)opened by off-fault deformation, then permeability dropped due to hydrothermal mineral precipitation and fracture sealing. Since the fracture network that we observe now in the field is the result of the cumulative deformation history of the fault zone, which probably includes thousands of earthquakes, a fundamental parameter that cannot be directly evaluated in the field is the fraction of fractures-faults that were open immediately after a single earthquake. Postseismic permeability has been evaluated in a few cases in the world thanks to seismological evidences of fluid migration along active fault systems. Therefore, we were able to develop a parametric hydraulic model of the GLFZ and calibrate it, varying the fraction of faults/fractures that were open in the postseismic period, to obtain on one side realistic fluid flow and permeability values, and on the other side a flow pattern consistent with the observed alteration/mineralization pattern. The fraction of open fractures is very close to the percolation threshold

  8. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  9. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  10. Detailed Northern Anatolian Fault Zone crustal structure from receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, D. G.; Kahraman, M.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G. A.; Rost, S.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present high resolution images derived from receiver functions of the continental crust in Northern Turkey that is dissected by two fault strands of the Northern Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The NAFZ is a major continental strike-slip fault system that is comparable in length and slip rate to the San Andreas Fault Zone. Recent large earthquakes occurred towards the western end of the NAFZ in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2). As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we aim to develop a model of NAFZ crustal structure and locate deformation by constraining variations in seismic properties and anisotropy in the upper and lower crust. The crustal model will be an input to test deformation scenarios in order to match geodetic observations from different phases of the earthquake loading cycle. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield. This Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) was deployed from May 2012 until September 2013 and we selected large events (Mw>5.5) from the high quality seismological dataset to analyze further. Receiver functions were calculated for different frequency bands then collected into regional stacks before being inverted for crustal S-wave velocity structure beneath the entire DANA array footprint. In addition, we applied common conversion point (CCP) migration using a regional velocity model to construct a migrated 3D volume of P-to-S converted and multiple energy in order to identify the major crustal features and layer boundaries. We also performed the CCP migration with transverse receiver functions in order to identify regions of anisotropy within the crustal layers. Our preliminary results show a heterogeneous crust above a flat Moho that is typically at a depth of 33 km. We do not observe a prominent step in the Moho beneath the surface

  11. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  12. Structural and Lithologic Characteristics of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone and its Relationship with Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Pei, J.; Li, T.; Huang, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0) struck the Longmen Shan area, the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in Sichuan, China.It produced a large co-seismic surface rupture zone along the Yingxiu-Beichuan and Guanxian-Anxian fault zones. Our research focuses on the central fault of the Longmuanshan fault belt: the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone. Detailed studies were done on the coseismic surface rupture in Bajiaomiao village, Hongkou town. Combining with analyses of the cores from the No.1 Well of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD-1) Project, the composition features and structures of the Longmenshan fault belt are discussed. Our research indicates that the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone is composed of many small sub-faults (damage zone), which consist of fault breccia, cataclasite and/or fault gouge, and small amounts pseudotachylite in some faults. The thickness of the gouge in the fault zone ranges from several millimeters to 25 centimeters, which is consistent with the fault characteristics recorded in the cores of WFSD-1. Gouge is the product of the frictional effect during the earthquake, representing the principal slip zone (PSZ). The width of the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone is about 120 m viewed from outcrops in Bajiaomiao village. More than 80 small sub-faults that contain gouge are distributed in this area. Only several millimeters to approximately 2 centimeters gouge can be formed in one earthquake, from the results of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) and Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) Project, so we can infer that each layer of gouge in Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone might be produced by at least 1 to 13 large earthquakes. The total thickness of the gouge in this area is about 150 cm, indicating at least 183 earthquake events, and suggesting that strong earthquakes repeatedly occurred along the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone. Each earthquake does not completely slip along the principal slip zone (PSZ) of

  13. Slip zone structure and processes in seismogenic carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.

    2011-12-01

    High velocity rotary shear experiments performed at seismic slip velocities (>1 m/s) have shown that experimental faults are weak; with increasing displacement, friction coefficient values decrease from Byerlee's values (μ = 0.6-0.85) to values of ~0.1. In carbonate rocks, experimental studies have shown that fault lubrication is due to the operation of multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms (e.g., flash heating, thermal pressurization, nanoparticle lubrication), which are thermally activated due to the frictional heat generated along localized slip surfaces during rapid slip. This study has set out to investigate whether evidence for the operation of these weakening mechanisms can be found in naturally occurring carbonate fault zones. Field studies were carried out on the active Gubbio fault zone (1984, Mw = 5.6) in the northern Apennines of Italy. Jurassic-Oligocene carbonates in the footwall are heavily deformed within a fault core of ~15 m thickness, which contains a number of very well exposed, highly localized principal slip surfaces (PSSs). Fault rocks are predominantly breccias and foliated cataclasites. Microstructural analyses of the PSSs reveal that slip is localized within very narrow principal slip zones (PSZs), ranging from 10-85 μm in thickness, with sub-millimetre scale asperities. PSZs are composed of very fine-grained, orange-brown ultracataclasite gouge containing a high proportion of nano-sized particles. The ultracataclasite commonly displays a foliated texture and sub-micron scale zones of extreme shear localization. A broader slip zone, up to 1.5 mm wide and containing multiple slip surfaces, is associated with the most evolved PSSs; it is located on the opposite side of the PSS to the PSZ. Here, the host rock material is heavily fractured, abraded and altered, sometimes with an ultracataclasite matrix. The surrounding wall rock often appears to have a porous texture, and calcite crystals within the slip zone have altered rims with lobate

  14. Upper crustal fault zones: Constraining structure and dynamics using electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, A.; Ritter, O.; Janssen, C.

    2003-04-01

    Upper crustal fault zones, either fossil or active, are often connected with electrical conductivity anomalies. These anomalies depend on properties such as the porosity/permeability of the fault zone material, the fluid content or the state of healing/cementation of the fault-fracture mesh; properties that moreover control the ability of a fault to accumulate strain. Structural heterogeneities caused by the faulting process are therefore believed to either increase or decrease the electrical conductivity in the fault's vicinity. We show results of two combined magnetotelluric and structural studies of large scale strike-slip dominated fault zones. The trench-linked West Fault (WF) in Northern Chile shows a pronounced anomaly of high conductivity confined to the central region of the fault. The zone of high conductivity is approximately 400 m wide and 1.5 km deep. Structural mapping reveals that this conductivity enhancement is closely related to a mesh of faults and fractures ('damage zone') that most likely provides a pathway for fluids. In contrast to this, the Dead Sea Transform Fault (DST) in Jordan shows no obvious evidence of such a fault zone conductor as the DST is expressed as the boundary between two different domains of conductivity on either side of the fault. Correspondingly, a marked macroscopic fault-fracture mesh in the fault core region is not developed. Comparison of the results from the WF with published data from the San Andreas Fault suggests generally a positive correlation of fault activity with geometric extent and conductivity of the fault zone conductor. However, the Dead Sea Transform Fault apparently does not comply with this scheme although it is active. It is possible that intense localisation of deformation caused the formation of a very narrow fault gouge, which cannot be resolved with the MT experiments. This result could suggest that the existence or non-existence of high conductivity in the central parts of large scale strike

  15. Structure of a normal seismogenic fault zone in carbonates: The Vado di Corno Fault, Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The Vado di Corno Fault Zone (VCFZ) is an active extensional fault cutting through carbonates in the Italian Central Apennines. The fault zone was exhumed from ∼2 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ∼2 km since Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the master fault of the VCFZ dips N210/54° and juxtaposes Quaternary colluvial deposits in the hangingwall with cataclastic dolostones in the footwall. Detailed mapping of the fault zone rocks within the ∼300 m thick footwall-block evidenced the presence of five main structural units (Low Strain Damage Zone, High Strain Damage Zone, Breccia Unit, Cataclastic Unit 1 and Cataclastic Unit 2). The Breccia Unit results from the Pleistocene extensional reactivation of a pre-existing Pliocene thrust. The Cataclastic Unit 1 forms a ∼40 m thick band lining the master fault and recording in-situ shattering due to the propagation of multiple seismic ruptures. Seismic faulting is suggested also by the occurrence of mirror-like slip surfaces, highly localized sheared calcite-bearing veins and fluidized cataclasites. The VCFZ architecture compares well with seismological studies of the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence (mainshock MW 6.1), which imaged the reactivation of shallow-seated low-angle normal faults (Breccia Unit) cut by major high-angle normal faults (Cataclastic Units).

  16. Fault-zone structure and weakening processes in basin-scale reverse faults: The Moonlight Fault Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alder, S.; Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    The >200 km long Moonlight Fault Zone (MFZ) in southern New Zealand was an Oligocene basin-bounding normal fault zone that reactivated in the Miocene as a high-angle reverse fault (present dip angle 65°-75°). Regional exhumation in the last c. 5 Ma has resulted in deep exposures of the MFZ that present an opportunity to study the structure and deformation processes that were active in a basin-scale reverse fault at basement depths. Syn-rift sediments are preserved only as thin fault-bound slivers. The hanging wall and footwall of the MFZ are mainly greenschist facies quartzofeldspathic schists that have a steeply-dipping (55°-75°) foliation subparallel to the main fault trace. In more fissile lithologies (e.g. greyschists), hanging-wall deformation occurred by the development of foliation-parallel breccia layers up to a few centimetres thick. Greyschists in the footwall deformed mainly by folding and formation of tabular, foliation-parallel breccias up to 1 m wide. Where the hanging-wall contains more competent lithologies (e.g. greenschist facies metabasite) it is laced with networks of pseudotachylyte that formed parallel to the host rock foliation in a damage zone extending up to 500 m from the main fault trace. The fault core contains an up to 20 m thick sequence of breccias, cataclasites and foliated cataclasites preserving evidence for the progressive development of interconnected networks of (partly authigenic) chlorite and muscovite. Deformation in the fault core occurred by cataclasis of quartz and albite, frictional sliding of chlorite and muscovite grains, and dissolution-precipitation. Combined with published friction and permeability data, our observations suggest that: 1) host rock lithology and anisotropy were the primary controls on the structure of the MFZ at basement depths and 2) high-angle reverse slip was facilitated by the low frictional strength of fault core materials. Restriction of pseudotachylyte networks to the hanging-wall of the

  17. CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE SOUTHERN CALAVERAS FAULT ZONE, CENTRAL CALIFORNIA, FROM SEISMIC REFRACTION INVESTIGATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blumling, Peter; Mooney, Walter D.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1985-01-01

    A magnitude 5. 7 earthquake on August 6, 1979, within the Calaveras fault zone, near Coyote Lake of west-central California, motivated a seismic-refraction investigation in this area. A northwest-southeast profile along the fault, as well as two fan profiles across the fault were recorded to examine the velocity structure of this region. The analysis of the data reveals a complicated upper crustal velocity structure with strong lateral variations in all directions. Velocities within the fault zone were determined from the fan profiles. Near Anderson Lake, a pronounced delay of first arrivals on the fan records indicates a vertical 1- to 2-km-wide near-surface, low-velocity zone along the fault. Near Coyote Lake, the delays observed in the fan records correlate with two subsurface en-echelon fault planes which have been previously identified from lineations in the seismicity pattern. Refs.

  18. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels of seismic waves to fault zone structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Tape, C.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the volumetric sensitivity of fault zone seismic head and trapped waves by constructing finite-frequency sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for these phases using a suite of idealized and tomographically derived velocity models of fault zones. We first validate numerical calculations by waveform comparisons with analytical results for two simple fault zone models: a vertical bimaterial interface separating two solids of differing elastic properties, and a `vertical sandwich' with a vertical low velocity zone surrounded on both sides by higher velocity media. Establishing numerical accuracy up to 12 Hz, we compute sensitivity kernels for various phases that arise in these and more realistic models. In contrast to direct P body waves, which have little or no sensitivity to the internal fault zone structure, the sensitivity kernels for head waves have sharp peaks with high values near the fault in the faster medium. Surface wave kernels show the broadest spatial distribution of sensitivity, while trapped wave kernels are extremely narrow with sensitivity focused entirely inside the low-velocity fault zone layer. Trapped waves are shown to exhibit sensitivity patterns similar to Love waves, with decreasing width as a function of frequency and multiple Fresnel zones of alternating polarity. In models that include smoothing of the boundaries of the low velocity zone, there is little effect on the trapped wave kernels, which are focused in the central core of the low velocity zone. When the source is located outside a shallow fault zone layer, trapped waves propagate through the surrounding medium with body wave sensitivity before becoming confined. The results provide building blocks for full waveform tomography of fault zone regions combining high-frequency head, trapped, body, and surface waves. Such an imaging approach can constrain fault zone structure across a larger range of scales than has previously been possible.

  19. Determining fault zone structure and examining earthquake early warning signals using large datasets of seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Michael Antony

    Seismic signals associated with near-fault waveforms are examined to determine fault zone structure and scaling of earthquake properties with event magnitude. The subsurface structure of faults is explored using fault zone head and/or trapped waves, while various signals from the early parts of seismograms are investigated to find out the extent to which they scale with magnitude. Fault zone trapped waves are observed in three arrays of instruments across segments of the San Jacinto fault. Similarly to previous fault zone trapped wave studies, the low velocity damage zones are found to be 100-200m wide and extend to a depth of ˜3-5km. Observation and modeling indicate that the damage zone was asymmetric around the fault trace. A similar sense of damage asymmetry was observed using detailed geological mapping by Dor et al. (2006) nearby on the San Jacinto fault at Anza. Travel time analysis and arrival time inversions of fault zone head waves were used to produce high resolution images of the fault structure of the San Andreas fault south of Hollister. The contrast of P wave velocities across the fault was found to be ˜50% in the shallow section, lowering to 10-20% below 3 km, with the southwest side having faster velocities. Inversions making use of different subsets of stations suggest that a low velocity damage zone also exists in this area and that it is more prominent on the faster velocity side of the fault. The patterns of damage from these studies of fault zone head waves and trapped waves are consistent (Ben-Zion and Shi, 2005) with the theoretical prediction that earthquake ruptures on these fault sections have statistically-preferred propagation directions. The early parts of P waveforms are examined for signals that have previously been proposed to scale with the final event magnitude. Data from Turkey and a deep South African gold mine show that scaling is present in signals related to the maximum displacement amplitude and frequency content. The high

  20. Multi-scale compressional wave velocity structure of the San Gregorio Fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettemy, G. L.; Tobin, H. J.; Hole, J. A.; Sayed, A. Y.

    2004-03-01

    Understanding fault architecture at multiple scales is crucial to delineate in situ fault zone physical properties and rupture dynamics through modeling and geophysical imaging/monitoring. An exposure of the active large-offset, strike-slip San Gregorio Fault at Moss Beach, CA provides a unique field site to relate the well-mapped fault zone architecture with compressional wave velocity (Vp) structure measured at centimeter to meter scales. Laboratory ultrasonic velocities of fault zone samples, adjusted for fluid-related frequency and structural dispersion, indicate that (i) a seismic velocity reduction of ~30% characterizes the central smectite-rich clay gouge relative to the rocks 100 m away in the relatively undeformed host rocks, and (ii) the across-fault velocity profile trends for the seismic to ultrasonic bandwidth correlate almost exactly to the previously mapped macroscale fault zone structure. These results highlight the value of conducting multiscaled investigations when measuring fault zone properties defined by physical elements at multiple scale lengths.

  1. Shallow seismic trapping structure in the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F. L.

    2005-09-01

    We analyse fault zone trapped waves, generated by ~500 small earthquakes, for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface structure of the Coyote Creek, Clark Valley and Buck Ridge branches of the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California. Based on a small number of selected trapped waves within this data set, a previous study concluded on the existence of a low-velocity waveguide that is continuous to a depth of 15-20 km. In contrast, our systematic analysis of the larger data set indicates a shallow trapping structure that extends only to a depth of 3-5 km. This is based on the following lines of evidence. (1) Earthquakes clearly outside these fault branches generate fault zone trapped waves that are recorded by stations within the fault zones. (2) A traveltime analysis of the difference between the direct S arrivals and trapped wave groups shows no systematic increase (moveout) with increasing hypocentral distance or event depth. Estimates based on the observed average moveout values indicate that the propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers are 3-5 km. (3) Quantitative waveform inversions of trapped wave data indicate similar short propagation distances within the low-velocity fault zone layers. The results are compatible with recent inferences on shallow trapping structures along several other faults and rupture zones. The waveform inversions also indicate that the shallow trapping structures are offset to the northeast from the surface trace of each fault branch. This may result from a preferred propagation direction of large earthquake ruptures on the San Jacinto fault.

  2. 3D modeling of fault-zone architecture and hydraulic structure along a major Alpine wrench lineament: the Pusteria Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Massironi, M.; Menegon, L.

    2007-05-01

    The E-W Pusteria (Pustertal) line is the eastern segment of the Periadriatic lineament, the > 600 km tectonic boundary between the Europe and Adria-vergent portions of the Alpine Collisional Orogen. The lithospheric-scale Periadriatic lineament is characterized by a transcurrent polyphase activity of Tertiary age, and is marked by an array of calcalkaline to shoshonitic magmatic bodies. At the map scale, the western edge of the Pusteria line is characterized by a complex network of generally transcurrent brittle fault zones, interconnected by a full spectrum of transtensional and transpressional features related to releasing and restraining bands respectively. An older ductile/brittle sinistral activity can be recognized in some segments of the fault thanks to their relationships with a strongly tectonized Oligocene tonalite/diorite body (Mules tonalitic "lamella"), emplaced along the Pusteria line, and minor related dikes. A late dextral activity involved the whole Pusteria Fault network and is consistent with the Eastward escape of a major lithospheric block of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian basin. During its polyphase activity, the fault network developed a complex architecture, showing different kinds of damage and core zones. Here we report the first results of a detailed mapping project in which, in addition to a traditional structural geology work, the spatial distribution of fault rocks in core zones and the degree and characteristics of fracturing (e.g. joint spacing and number of joint sets) in damage zones are taken into account. As regards the quantitative characterization of damage zones, a new description schema, partly inspired by engineering geology classifications, is proposed. The results of this work are implemented in a 3D structural model (developed with gOcad), allowing the study of the complex relationships among the various structural, mechanical and lithological parameters which concur in the development of the fault-zone

  3. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    Fault zones commonly have great effects on fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. During fault slip all the pores and small fractures that meet with the slip plane become interconnected so that the inner part of the fault, the fault core, consisting of breccia or gouge, may suddenly develop a very high permeability. This is evidenced, for example by networks of mineral veins in deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields. Inactive faults, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In natural and man-made geothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field and their internal structure needs be known as accurately as possible. One reason is that the activity of the fault zone depends on its angle to the principal stress directions. Another reason is that the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, comprises numerous fractures of various sizes. Here we present field examples of faults, and associated joints and mineral veins, in palaeogeothermal fields, and potential host rocks for man-made geothermal reservoirs, respectively. We studied several localities of different stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); (2) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone, limestone and granite) in the Upper Rhine Graben; and (3) 74 fault zones in two coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (1) and (2) are outcrop analogues of geothermal reservoir horizons, (3) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins. The field studies in the Northwest German Basin (1) show pronounced differences between normal-fault zones in carbonate and clastic rocks. In carbonate rocks clear damage zones occur that are

  4. Large-scale hydraulic structure of a seismogenic fault at 10 km depth (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Mittempergher, Silvia; Garofalo, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The definition of hydraulic properties of fault zones is a major issue in structural geology, seismology, and in several applications (hydrocarbons, hydrogeology, CO2 sequestration, etc.). The permeability of fault rocks can be measured in laboratory experiments, but its upscaling to large-scale structures is not straightforward. For instance, typical permeability of fine-grained fault rock samples is in the 10-18-10-20 m2 range, but, according to seismological estimates, the large-scale permeability of active fault zones can be as high as 10-10 m2. Solving this issue is difficult because in-situ measurements of large-scale permeability have been carried out just at relatively shallow depths - mainly in oil wells and exceptionally in active tectonic settings (e.g. SAFOD at 3 km), whilst deeper experiments have been performed only in the stable continental crust (e.g. KTB at 9 km). In this study, we apply discrete fracture-network (DFN) modelling techniques developed for shallow aquifers (mainly in nuclear waste storage projects like Yucca Mountain) and in the oil industry, in order to model the hydraulic structure of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps). This fault, now exposed in world-class glacier-polished outcrops, has been exhumed from ca. 8 km, where it was characterized by a well-documented seismic activity, but also by hydrous fluid flow evidenced by alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and along cataclasites. The GLFZ does not show a classical seal structure that in other fault zones corresponds to a core zone characterized by fine-grained fault rocks. However, permeability is heterogeneous and the permeability tensor is strongly anisotropic due to fracture preferential orientation. We will show with numerical experiments that this hydraulic structure results in a channelized fluid flow (which is consistent with the observed hydrothermal alteration pattern). This results in a counterintuitive situation

  5. Towards "realistic" fault zones in a 3D structure model of the Thuringian Basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, J.; Malz, A.; Donndorf, S.; Fischer, T.; Zehner, B.

    2012-04-01

    3D computer models of geological architecture are evolving into a standard tool for visualization and analysis. Such models typically comprise the bounding surfaces of stratigraphic layers and faults. Faults affect the continuity of aquifers and can themselves act as fluid conduits or barriers. This is one reason why a "realistic" representation of faults in 3D models is desirable. Still so, many existing models treat faults in a simplistic fashion, e.g. as vertical downward projections of fault traces observed at the surface. Besides being geologically and mechanically unreasonable, this also causes technical difficulties in the modelling workflow. Most natural faults are inclined and may change dips according to rock type or flatten into mechanically weak layers. Boreholes located close to a fault can therefore cross it at depth, resulting in stratigraphic control points allocated to the wrong block. Also, faults tend to split up into several branches, forming fault zones. Obtaining a more accurate representation of faults and fault zones is therefore challenging. We present work-in-progress from the Thuringian Basin in central Germany. The fault zone geometries are never fully constrained by data and must be extrapolated to depth. We use balancing of serial, parallel cross-sections to constrain subsurface extrapolations. The structure sections are checked for consistency by restoring them to an undeformed state. If this is possible without producing gaps or overlaps, the interpretation is considered valid (but not unique) for a single cross-section. Additional constraints are provided by comparison of adjacent cross-sections. Structures should change continuously from one section to another. Also, from the deformed and restored cross-sections we can measure the strain incurred during deformation. Strain should be compatible among the cross-sections: If at all, it should vary smoothly and systematically along a given fault zone. The stratigraphic contacts and

  6. Structure of the eastern Seattle fault zone, Washington state: New insights from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Pratt, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    We identify and characterize the active Seattle fault zone (SFZ) east of Lake Washington with newly acquired seismic reflection data. Our results focus on structures observed in the upper 1 km below the cities of Bellevue, Sammamish, Newcastle, and Fall City, Washington. The SFZ appears as a broad zone of faulting and folding at the southern boundary of the Seattle basin and north edge of the Seattle uplift. We interpret the Seattle fault as a thrust fault that accommodates north-south shortening by forming a fault-propagation fold with a forelimb breakthrough. The blind tip of the main fault forms a synclinal growth fold (deformation front) that extends at least 8 km east of Vasa Park (west side of Lake Sammamish) and defines the south edge of the Seattle basin. South of the deformation front is the forelimb break-through fault, which was exposed in a trench at Vasa Park. The Newcastle Hills anticline, a broad anticline forming the north part of the Seattle uplift east of Lake Washington, is interpreted to lie between the main blind strand of the Seattle fault and a backthrust. Our profiles, on the northern limb of this anticline, consistently image north-dipping strata. A structural model for the SFZ east of Lake Washington is consistent with about 8 km of slip on the upper part of the Seattle fault, but the amount of motion is only loosely constrained.

  7. Geologic structure of Middle Mountain within the San Andreas Fault zone near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, M. R.; Arrowsmith, R.; Young, J.; Fayon, A.; Rymer, M.

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of the geometry and history of motion of rock bodies within fault zones such as the San Andreas fault (SAF) is essential input into mechanical models of earthquake rupture dynamics and fault evolution. The Parkfield segment of the SAF is the focus of significant geophysical characterization and borehole studies. In order to enhance the geologic information about the SAF structure in this area, we undertook an intensive high-resolution geologic mapping effort (1:6000 scale) of the Middle Mountain area (about 40 km^2). The geologic structure differs dramatically across the San Andreas fault zone. The northeast side contains numerous sub-parallel faults that likely accommodated significant strike slip motion. These high-angle faults bound granite, marble, and sedimentary rock slivers. The density and complexity of these faults increases toward the center of the fault zone. The Gold Hill reverse fault on the northeast side of the SAF is a low-angle southwest-dipping fault that locally displaces the older Tertiary Monterey Formation over the younger Tertiary Etchegoin Formation. Folds with axes trending parallel to the strike of the Gold Hill reverse fault are present within the hanging wall. The Plio-Pleistocene Paso Robles Formation dominates the southwest side of the SAF and is a formidable cover. Fault-bounded granitoid slivers are also present within the southwest terrain. One fault striking nearly normal to the SAF cuts rock units near the mid-section of Middle Mountain. To the northwest of this fault, older Tertiary formations are present. The folds within the hanging wall of the Gold Hill reverse fault and the reverse fault itself indicate SAF-normal shortening near the SAF zone. The Gold Hill fault most likely cuts the numerous high-angle sub-parallel faults at depth. With the northeastward-verging nature of this fault, the cross-section on the northeast side is a roughly hewn half-flower structure. The sedimentary basin into which the Paso Robles

  8. Rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Tikoff, Basil; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Newman, Julie; Titus, Sarah J.; Withers, Anthony C.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-04-01

    How well constrained is the rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault systems? Further, how do lithospheric layers, with rheologically distinct behaviors, interact within the strike-slip fault zones? To address these questions, we present rheological observations from the mantle sections of two lithospheric-scale, strike-slip fault zones. Xenoliths from ˜40 km depth (970-1100 ° C) beneath the San Andreas fault system (SAF) provide critical constraints on the mechanical stratification of the lithosphere in this continental transform fault. Samples from the Bogota Peninsula shear zone (BPSZ, New Caledonia), which is an exhumed oceanic transform fault, provide insights on lateral variations in mantle strength and viscosity across the fault zone at a depth corresponding to deformation temperatures of ˜900 ° C. Olivine recrystallized grain size piezometry suggests that the shear stress in the SAF upper mantle is 5-9 MPa and in the BPSZ is 4-10 MPa. Thus, the mantle strength in both fault zones is comparable to the crustal strength (˜10 MPa) of seismogenic strike-slip faults in the SAF system. Across the BPSZ, shear stress increases from 4 MPa in the surrounding rocks to 10 MPa in the mylonites, which comprise the core of the shear zone. Further, the BPSZ is characterized by at least one order of magnitude difference in the viscosity between the mylonites (1018 Paṡs) and the surrounding rocks (1019 Paṡs). Mantle viscosity in both the BPSZ mylonites and the SAF (7.0ṡ1018-3.1ṡ1020 Paṡs) is relatively low. To explain our observations from these two strike-slip fault zones, we propose the "lithospheric feedback" model in which the upper crust and lithospheric mantle act together as an integrated system. Mantle flow controls displacement and the upper crust controls the stress magnitude in the system. Our stress data combined with data that are now available for the middle and lower crustal sections of other transcurrent fault

  9. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: Segmentation and the rupture process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.; Aki, K.; Marone, C.J.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  10. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: segmentation and the rupture process.

    PubMed

    Li, Y G; Aki, K; Vidale, J E; Lee, W H; Marone, C J

    1994-07-15

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  11. Structural and fluid-chemical properties of fault zones

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, R.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Fault fluids are mostly NaCl-CO[sub 2]-H[sub 2]O mixtures that originate by metamorphism, escape of connate water from wall rock, circulation of meteoric water, and perhaps contain components derived form igneous and subcrustal sources. Rupturing extends downward into metamorphic terrains undergoing greenschist and amphibolite facies metamorphism, where mineral alteration triggered by fluid pressure transients may extend several hundred meters to perhaps several kilometers into the wall rock. Fluid flowing into regions of lower temperature and/or pressure causes retrograde metamorphic alteration of fault and wall rock, and cementation of fractures. Fault permeability is heterogeneous because irregular, discontinuous lenses of cataclastic and gouge are encased in a heterogeneous damage layer characterized by intense fracturing and hydrothermal alteration. Permeability is also controlled by the geometry of corrugated slip surfaces which create anisotropic flow channels with greatest permeability parallel to long-axes of corrugations. Mineral assemblages and fluid inclusions provide evidence for fluid pressure cycling. Fluid pressure drops when permeability is enhanced by rupturing and subsequently increases as fractures deform, heal and become cemented with alteration minerals. Rates of hydrothermal alteration are comparable to, and sometimes faster, than those of mechanically induced permeability reduction. Effects of fluid chemistry on fault mechanics are not as well understood as fluid pressure effects. Frictional properties of fault surfaces are changed by chemical corrosion, cementation, and pressure solution. Strengthening by fluid pressure drop during dilatant fracturing may be partially offset by a decrease in fluid bulk modulus triggered by effervescence of CO[sub 2].

  12. Architecture, fracture system, mechanical properties and permeability structure of a fault zone in Lower Triassic sandstone, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2015-04-01

    Close to the western Upper Rhine Graben Main Fault, Alsace, a NNE-SSW-striking fault zone, crosscutting porous, thick bedded Lower Triassic Bunter sandstone was investigated in detail, including its architecture, discontinuity system, mechanical rock properties and implications on its permeability structure and fault zone type. Field observations indicate a three-part fault zone structure including core-, transition- and damage zone. The at least 14 m thick fault core is composed of various slip surfaces and deformation bands, which encompass fractured host rock lenses. When connected, host rock lenses may transport fluids through the core zone. Adjacent transition zones are highly fractured in R1-orientation, show folded beds and contain P1-oriented deformation bands. R1 and P1-fractures are synthetic shear fractures and project with an acute angle (10-20°) toward the fault plane. Only in the damage zone, fault-parallel striking fractures occur. Here, increasing fracture apertures and connectivity may increase the permeability toward the fault core. Mechanical rock properties from 12 rock samples (Young's modulus, uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength) measured in all the parts of the fault zone, show highest values within the transition zone. In-situ measurements of rebound-hardnesses with a Schmidt-Hammer and analytical approaches, however, indicate that effective Young's moduli are two to sixteen times lower than the Young's moduli of intact rock. Values clearly decrease toward the fault core, even in the transition zone and are in average lower than effective Young's moduli in the damage zone. Although many fault zones in sandstone are sealing structures these field study show, that fault zones in porous sandstone may allow fluid flow.

  13. Fault zone structure and seismic reflection characteristics in zones of slow slip and tsunami earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Henrys, Stuart; Sutherland, Rupert; Barker, Daniel; Wallace, Laura; Holden, Caroline; Power, William; Wang, Xiaoming; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Downes, Gaye

    2015-04-01

    Over the last couple of decades we have learned that a whole spectrum of different fault slip behaviour takes place on subduction megathrust faults from stick-slip earthquakes to slow slip and stable sliding. Geophysical data, including seismic reflection data, can be used to characterise margins and fault zones that undergo different modes of slip. In this presentation we will focus on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, which exhibits marked along-strike changes in seismic behaviour and margin characteristics. Campaign and continuous GPS measurements reveal deep interseismic coupling and deep slow slip events (~30-60 km) at the southern Hikurangi margin. The northern margin, in contrast, experiences aseismic slip and shallow (<10-15 km) slow slip events (SSE) every 18-24 months with equivalent moment magnitudes of Mw 6.5-6.8. Updip of the SSE region two unusual megathrust earthquakes occurred in March and May 1947 with characteristics typical of tsunami earthquakes. The Hikurangi margin is therefore an excellent natural laboratory to study differential fault slip behaviour. Using 2D seismic reflection, magnetic anomaly and geodetic data we observe in the source areas of the 1947 tsunami earthquakes i) low amplitude interface reflectivity, ii) shallower interface relief, iii) bathymetric ridges, iv) magnetic anomaly highs and in the case of the March 1947 earthquake v) stronger geodetic coupling. We suggest that this is due to the subduction of seamounts, similar in dimensions to seamounts observed on the incoming Pacific plate, to depths of <10 km. We propose a source model for the 1947 tsunami earthquakes based on geophysical data and find that extremely low rupture velocities (c. 300 m/s) are required to model the observed large tsunami run-up heights (Bell et al. 2014, EPSL). Our study suggests that subducted topography can cause the nucleation of moderate earthquakes with complex, low velocity rupture scenarios that enhance tsunami waves, and the role of

  14. Crustal Structure across The Southwest Longmenshan Fault Zone from Seismic Wide Angle Reflection/Refraction Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuyun; Wang, Shuaijun; Duan, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    The Lushan eathquake, which epicenter and focal depth were at 30.308° N, 102.888° E, and 14.0 km, is the latest intense earthquake occurring in the southwest section of the Longmenshan fault zone after the Ms 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008. According to the emergency field observations, the slip distribution of the Lushan earthquake was concentrated at the hypocenter, and did not rupture to the surface(Chen et al, 2013). The rupture history constrained by inverting waveforms showed that the causative fault plane of the Lushan event is apparently not a simple extension of either the Pengguan fault or the Beichuan fault that ruptured during the 2008 Mw 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake. The focal mechanism using the Cut and Paste algorithm showed this event occurred on a high dip-angle fault, but its dip angle is not steep enough to rupture the surface. All these research is not independent on the heterogeneous crust structure of the Longmenshan fault zone. A 450 km-long wide-angle reflection/refraction profile executed during September and October 2013. This experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Southwest Longmenshan fault zone. This seismic profile extends from the west Sichuan Plain, through the Longmenshan Fault zone, and into the west Sichuan Plateau. We observed clear Pg, refraction Phase from the upper crust, Pi1/Pi2/Pi3, reflection/refraction Phase from intra-crust, PmP, reflection from the Moho boundary, and the Pn phase, refraction Phase from uppermost mantle. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile. The final velocity model reveals large variations both in structure and velocity, and is demonstrated that a particular model has minimum structure. The model shows the crustal thickness of the region is very variable. The Moho topography varies more than 10km in the southwest

  15. Crustal Structure across The Southwest Longmenshan Fault Zone from Seismic Controlled Source Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Wang, F.; Liu, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Lushan eathquake, which epicenter and focal depth were at 30.308° N, 102.888° E, and 14.0 km, is the latest intense earthquake occurring in the southwest section of the Longmenshan fault zone after the Ms 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008. According to the emergency field observations, the slip distribution of the Lushan earthquake was concentrated at the hypocenter, and did not rupture to the surface(Chen et al, 2013). The rupture history constrained by inverting waveforms showed that the causative fault plane of the Lushan event is apparently not a simple extension of either the Pengguan fault or the Beichuan fault that ruptured during the 2008 Mw 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake. The focal mechanism using the Cut and paste algorithm showed this event occurred on a high dip-angle fault, but its dip angle is not steep enough to rupture the surface. All these research is not independent on the heterogeneous crust structure of the Longmenshan fault zone. A 450 km-long wide-angle reflection/refraction profile executed during September and October 2013. This experiment have provided the best opportunities to obtain better knowledge of seismic structure and properties of crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Southwest Longmenshan fault zone. This seismic profile extends from the west Sichuan Plain, through the Longmenshan Fault zone, and into the west Sichuan Plateau. We observed clear Pg, refraction Phase from the upper crust, Pi1/Pi2/Pi3, reflection/refraction Phase from intra-crust, PmP, reflection from the Moho boundary, and the Pn phase, refraction Phase from uppermost mantle. We present a hybrid tomographic and layered velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle along the profile. The final velocity model reveals large variations both in structure and velocity, and is demonstrated that a particular model has minimum structure. The model shows the crustal thickness of the region is very variable. The Moho topography varies more than 10km in the southwest

  16. Dynamic rupture simulations on complex fault zone structures with off-fault plasticity using the ADER-DG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Igel, Heiner

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic rupture models, high stress concentrations at rupture fronts have to to be accommodated by off-fault inelastic processes such as plastic deformation. As presented in (Roten et al., 2014), incorporating plastic yielding can significantly reduce earlier predictions of ground motions in the Los Angeles Basin. Further, an inelastic response of materials surrounding a fault potentially has a strong impact on surface displacement and is therefore a key aspect in understanding the triggering of tsunamis through floor uplifting. We present an implementation of off-fault-plasticity and its verification for the software package SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method. The software recently reached multi-petaflop/s performance on some of the largest supercomputers worldwide and was a Gordon Bell prize finalist application in 2014 (Heinecke et al., 2014). For the nonelastic calculations we impose a Drucker-Prager yield criterion in shear stress with a viscous regularization following (Andrews, 2005). It permits the smooth relaxation of high stress concentrations induced in the dynamic rupture process. We verify the implementation by comparison to the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Benchmarks. The results of test problem TPV13 with a 60-degree dipping normal fault show that SeisSol is in good accordance with other codes. Additionally we aim to explore the numerical characteristics of the off-fault plasticity implementation by performing convergence tests for the 2D code. The ADER-DG method is especially suited for complex geometries by using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Local adaptation of the mesh resolution enables a fine sampling of the cohesive zone on the fault while simultaneously satisfying the dispersion requirements of wave propagation away from the fault. In this context we will investigate the influence of off-fault-plasticity on geometrically complex fault zone structures like subduction

  17. Structural Evidence for Fault Reactivation: the Active Priene-Sazli Fault Zone, Söke-Milet Basin, Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümer, Ö.; Inci, U.; Sözbilir, H.; Uzel, B.

    2009-04-01

    Western Anatolia is located at tha eastern part of the Aegean region that forms one of the most seismically active and rapidly extending regions in the world. One of the most prominent structural component of the Western Anatolia is E-W trending grabens. One of them is the Büyük Menderes Graben (BMG) showing a major change in strike ranging from E-W to NE-SW in its western end. This NE-SW oriented part of the graben is known as the Söke-Milet basin (SMB). The depression is 35 km long and 16 km wide. NW border of the basin is characterized by a morphotectonic structure namely Priene-Sazlı fault zone (PSFZ). The 16 July 1955 Söke-Balat earthquake (M=6.8) was atributed to this fault (Eyidogan and Jackson, 1985; Sengör, 1987; Altunel, 1998). However, field based kinematic studies on the PSFZ are lacking except for Gürer et. al. (2001). In this paper, we studied several reactivated fault segments of the PSFZ that are repeatedly formed under changing stress fields in order to evaluate the kinematic and stress history of the region by using structural relationships between striations and fault-plane related structures. The PSFZ consists of 5 fault segments which are en échelon arranged on the basis of mapping geological structures. The northern segments that strikes NE in the north and bends into an approximately E-W direction around Doganbey to the SW. Each segment is identified as steep opographic scarps ranging in height from a few meters to several hundred meters. Fault segments become to linkage and show breaching of the relay ramps between them. We interpret that such fault patterns have been formed in a region where extension has reactivated on pre-existing structures in an oblique sense. Evidence for this is the presence of three sets of striations each with different orientations on the same slip surface of the studied fault segments. Here, two differently oriented strike-slip slickenlines are postdated by dip-slip striations. Based on our structural

  18. Toward Explaining Scale-dependent Velocity Structure Across an Exposed Brittle Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettemy, G. L.; Tobin, H. J.; Hole, J. A.; Sayed, A. Y.

    2001-12-01

    The lack of preserved surface exposures of faults generally necessitates the use of remote-sensed data to infer lithostructural architecture of the subsurface of any particular fault, particularly seismic experiments which detail physical properties linked to wave propagation phenomena. The exposure of the San Gregorio Fault at Moss Beach (25 km southwest of San Francisco, CA), however, provides a unique opportunity to examine a preserved active fault zone. We combine two scales of geophysical investigation--high-resolution field velocity tomography, and an extensive laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurement program--to produce a 1D across-fault velocity structure that correlates well with the previously mapped structural domains. The absolute velocities within a given domain are strongly scale dependent, with the laboratory velocities 20-50% greater than the field-scale tomography results. This disparity can potentially be attributed to sampling bias (i.e., the inability to sample and ultrasonically test macroscopically fractured rock near \\textit{in situ} conditions), saturation effects, and frequency dispersion. We investigate the importance of the mesoscopic fracture distribution and depositional heterogeneity on the velocity discrepancies through monte carlo analysis by applying an effective medium theory of multi-scaled fractured rock combined with a propagator matrix algorithm. We parameterize the model by generating a 1D model of the fault zone, incorporating dispersion-adjusted saturated rock velocities and mesoscopic fracture distributions consistent with ultrasonic measurements and field-scale geologic mapping. The results clearly demonstrate that differing elastomechanical parameters must be invoked to explain the velocity discrepancy within the hanging wall (massive mudstone) and foot wall (sandstone with interbedded pebble conglomerate). These results highlight the value of conducting multi-scaled investigations when studying complex fault zone

  19. Structural styles of Paleozoic intracratonic fault reactivation: A case study of the Grays Point fault zone in southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clendenin, C.W.; Diehl, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    A pronounced, subparallel set of northeast-striking faults occurs in southeastern Missouri, but little is known about these faults because of poor exposure. The Commerce fault system is the southernmost exposed fault system in this set and has an ancestry related to Reelfoot rift extension. Recent published work indicates that this fault system has a long history of reactivation. The northeast-striking Grays Point fault zone is a segment of the Commerce fault system and is well exposed along the southeast rim of an inactive quarry. Our mapping shows that the Grays Point fault zone also has a complex history of polyphase reactivation, involving three periods of Paleozoic reactivation that occurred in Late Ordovician, Devonian, and post-Mississippian. Each period is characterized by divergent, right-lateral oblique-slip faulting. Petrographic examination of sidwall rip-out clasts in calcite-filled faults associated with the Grays Point fault zone supports a minimum of three periods of right-lateral oblique-slip. The reported observations imply that a genetic link exists between intracratonic fault reactivation and strain produced by Paleozoic orogenies affecting the eastern margin of Laurentia (North America). Interpretation of this link indicate that right-lateral oblique-slip has occurred on all of the northeast-striking faults in southeastern Missouri as a result of strain influenced by the convergence directions of the different Paleozoic orogenies.

  20. Internal structure of Longmenshan fault zone at Hongkou outcrop, Sichuan, China, that caused the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Tetsuhiro; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Ma, Shengli; Wen, Xueze; He, Honglin

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports the internal structures of the Beichuan fault zone of Longmenshan fault system that caused the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, at an outcrop in Hongkou, Sichuan province, China. Present work is a part of comprehensive project of Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration, trying to understand deformation processes in Longmenshan fault zones and eventually to reproduce Wenchuan earthquake by modeling based on measured mechanical and transport properties. Outcrop studies could be integrated with those performed on samples recovered from fault zone drilling, during the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) Project, to understand along-fault and depth variation of fault zone properties. The hanging wall side of the fault zone consists of weakly-foliated, clayey fault gouge of about 1 m in width and of several fault breccia zones of 30-40 m in total width. We could not find any pseudotachylite at this outcrop. Displacement during the Wenchuan earthquake is highly localized within the fault gouge layer along narrower slipping-zones of about 10 to 20 mm in width. This is an important constraint for analyzing thermal pressurization, an important dynamic weakening mechanism of faults. Overlapping patterns of striations on slickenside surface suggest that seismic slip at a given time occurred in even narrower zone of a few to several millimeters, so that localization of deformation must have occurred within a slipping zone during coseismic fault motion. Fault breccia zones are bounded by thin black gouge layers containing amorphous carbon. Fault gouge contains illite and chlorite minerals, but not smectite. Clayey fault gouge next to coseismic slipping zone also contains amorphous carbon and small amounts of graphite. The structural observations and mineralogical data obtained from outcrop exposures of the fault zone of the Wenchuan earthquake can be compared with those obtained from the WFSD-1 and WFSD-2 boreholes, which have been

  1. Deep Heterogeneous Structure and Earthquake Generating Properties in the Yamasaki Fault Zone Estimated from Dense Seismic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishigami, K.; Shibutani, T.; Katao, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mamada, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Yamasaki fault zone is a left-lateral, strike-slip active fault with a total length of about 80 km in southwest Japan. We deployed dense seismic observation network, which is composed of 32 stations with average spacing of 5-10 km, around the Yamasaki fault zone. We have been estimating detailed fault structure such as fault dip and shape, segmentation, and possible location of asperities and rupture initiation point, as well as generating properties of earthquakes in the fault zone, through analyses of accurate hypocenter distribution, focal mechanism, 3-D velocity tomography, coda wave inversion, and other waveform analyses. We also deployed a linear seismic array across the fault, composed of 20 stations with about 20 m spacing, in order to delineate the fault-zone structure in more detail using the seismic waves trapped inside the low velocity fault-zone. We also estimated resistivity structure at shallow depth of the fault zone by AMT (audio-frequency magnetotelluric) and MT surveys. In the scattering analysis of coda waves, we used the waveform data of dense temporary stations from 2008 to 2010 and also the routine stations in 2002 and 2003. Fig.1 shows an example of the result, 3-D distribution of relative scattering coefficients estimated around the Yamasaki fault zone. In this analysis, 2,391 waveforms recorded at 60 stations for 121 earthquakes were used. This result shows that microseismicity is high and scattering coefficient is relatively larger in the upper crust along the entire fault zone. The distribution of strong scatterers suggests that the Ohara and Hijima faults, which are the segments in the northwestern part of the Yamasaki fault zone, have almost vertical fault plane from surface to a depth of about 15 km. We will construct a fault structure model and discuss its relation to seismic activity in the Yamasaki fault zone. We used seismic network data operated by Univs., NIED, AIST, and JMA. This study is carried out as a part of the

  2. Deep Structure and Earthquake Generating Properties in the Yamasaki Fault Zone, Southwest Japan, Estimated from Dense Seismic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishigami, K.; Shibutani, T.; Katao, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mamada, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Yamasaki fault zone is a left-lateral, strike-slip active fault with a total length of about 80 km in southwest Japan. We deployed dense seismic observation network, which is composed of 32 stations with average spacing of 5-10 km, around the Yamasaki fault zone. We have been estimating detailed fault structure such as fault dip and shape, segmentation, and possible location of asperities and rupture initiation point, as well as generating properties of earthquakes in and around the fault zone, through analyses of accurate hypocenter distribution, focal mechanism, 3-D velocity tomography, coda wave inversion, and other waveform analyses. We also deployed a linear seismic array across the fault, composed of 20 stations with about 20 m spacing, in order to delineate the fault-zone structure in more detail using the seismic waves trapped inside the low velocity fault-zone. We also estimated detailed resistivity structure at shallow depth of the fault zone by AMT (audio-frequency magnetotelluric) surveys. In the scattering analysis of seismic coda waves, we used the waveform data of dense temporary stations from 2008 to 2010 and also the routine-stations data in 2002 and 2003, and estimated 3-D distribution of relative scattering coefficients around the Yamasaki fault zone. In this analysis, 3,033 waveforms recorded at 60 stations for 136 earthquakes were used. This result shows that microseismicity is high and scattering coefficient is relatively larger in the upper crust along the entire fault zone. The distribution of strong scatterers suggests that the Ohara and Hijima faults, which are the segments in the northwestern part of the Yamasaki fault zone, have almost vertical fault plane from surface to a depth of about 15 km. We will construct a fault structure model and discuss its relation to seismic activity in the Yamasaki fault zone. We used seismic network data operated by Universities, NIED, AIST, and JMA. This study has been carried out as a part of the

  3. Structure of a seismogenic fault zone in dolostones: the Foiana Line (Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Fondriest, M.; Smith, S. A.; Aretusini, S.

    2012-12-01

    clasts (resulting from force chains) oriented at 60-80 degrees to the slip surfaces. Similar features have been reported in natural and experimental pulverized rocks, the latter produced under dynamic stress wave loading conditions. 3-Dimensional rupture simulations along strike-slip faults predict (1) off-fault damage distributions with "flower-like" shapes (broad damage zone near the surface that rapidly narrows with increasing confining pressure, e.g., Ma and Andrews, 2010) and (2) formation of secondary faults/fractures with disperse attitudes and kinematics near the surface, with horizontal slip at depth. Qualitatively, these theoretical results compare favorably with increasing strain localization and a switch in fault kinematics recognized along the FL moving from the southern, shallower portion of the fault zone to the northern, deeper portion. Observations along the FL suggest that the association of shattered dolostones and mirror-like slip surfaces might be a potential indicator of seismic rupture propagation. Further detailed structural mapping along the FL coupled with experimental work on rock pulverization will be necessary to understand rupture dynamics in dolostones.

  4. Structural and Petrophysical Characterization of Fault Zones in Shales: Example from the Tournemire Url (sw, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DICK, P.; Du Peloux de Saint Romain, A.; Moreno, E.; Homberg, C.; Renel, F.; Dauzères, A.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL) operated by IRSN (French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety) is located on the western border of the Mesozoic sedimentary Causses Basin (SW France). The URL crosses a thick Toarcian shale formation (≈250 m) and is interbedded between two aquiferous limestone formations. In addition to the 250 m thick overlying limestones, the geotechnical and hydrogeological characteristics of this site exhibit similarities with those measured by the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (Andra) in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation of Bure (Meuse/Haute Marne, France). The Tournemire site is marked by numerous minor shear bands that affect not only the shale formation but also the over- and underlying limestone units. Since analogous discontinuities in an underground deep geological repository could act as a preferential pathway for radionuclide migration, the Tournemire site appears as an ideal location to understand the internal and permeability structures of such clay-based faults. In this study, we investigate the structural and petrophysical variations observed in a 10-15 m thick, subvertical, strike-slip shear band. For this, eight fully cored and logged horizontal boreholes were drilled normal to the fault's direction. The internal architecture and permeability of the fault was revealed through a combination of different tools (AMS, SEM, XRD and helium pycnometer) used on samples, as well as optical, induction and neutron porosity logging used in boreholes. The analysis of core samples from the different boreholes indicates that the studied fault zone is divided into a fault core (gouge), surrounded by a damaged zone (e.g., kinematically related fracture sets, small faults, and veins). Porosity and hydraulic conductivity values are low in the undisturbed shale (respectively, 9% and 10-14 m.s-1) and increase progressively towards the fault core (respectively, 15-20% and 5.10-12 m.s-1

  5. A shallow fault-zone structure illuminated by trapped waves in the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault, western Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Peng, Z.; Okaya, D.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J.G.; Ozer, N.; Michael, A.J.; Baris, S.; Aktar, M.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the subsurface structure of the Karadere-Duzce branch of the North Anatolian Fault based on analysis of a large seismic data set recorded by a local PASSCAL network in the 6 months following the Mw = 7.4 1999 Izmit earthquake. Seismograms observed at stations located in the immediate vicinity of the rupture zone show motion amplification and long-period oscillations in both P- and S-wave trains that do not exist in nearby off-fault stations. Examination of thousands of waveforms reveals that these characteristics are commonly generated by events that are well outside the fault zone. The anomalous features in fault-zone seismograms produced by events not necessarily in the fault may be referred to generally as fault-zone-related site effects. The oscillatory shear wave trains after the direct S arrival in these seismograms are analysed as trapped waves propagating in a low-velocity fault-zone layer. The time difference between the S arrival and trapped waves group does not grow systematically with increasing source-receiver separation along the fault. These observations imply that the trapping of seismic energy in the Karadere-Duzce rupture zone is generated by a shallow fault-zone layer. Traveltime analysis and synthetic waveform modelling indicate that the depth of the trapping structure is approximately 3-4 km. The synthetic waveform modelling indicates further that the shallow trapping structure has effective waveguide properties consisting of thickness of the order of 100 m, a velocity decrease relative to the surrounding rock of approximately 50 per cent and an S-wave quality factor of 10-15. The results are supported by large 2-D and 3-D parameter space studies and are compatible with recent analyses of trapped waves in a number of other faults and rupture zones. The inferred shallow trapping structure is likely to be a common structural element of fault zones and may correspond to the top part of a flower-type structure. The motion amplification

  6. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz crystallization and repeated fragmentation in the Rusey fault zone (Cornwall/UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tim I.; Blenkinsop, Tom; Duschl, Florian; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    Silicified fault rocks typically show structures resulting from various stages of fragmentation and quartz crystallization. Both processes interact episodically and result in complex structures on various scales, which require a wide spectrum of analysis tools. Based on field and microstructural data, the spatial-temporal connection between deformation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Rusey fault zone was investigated. The fault can be examined in detail in three dimensions on the north Cornwall coast, UK. It occurs within Carboniferous sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and slates of the Culm basin, and is likely to have had a long history. The fault rocks described here formed during the younger events, possibly due to Tertiary strike-slip reactivation. Frequent fragmentation, flow and crystallization events and their interaction led to various generations of complex-structured quartz units, among them quartz-mantled and partly silicified wall-rock fragments, microcrystalline quartz masses of different compositions and structures, and quartz vein patterns of various ages. Lobate boundaries of quartz masses indicate viscous flow. Fragments are separated by quartz infill, which contains cm-sized open pores, in which quartz crystals have pyramidal terminations. Based on frequent occurrence of feathery textures and the infill geometry, quartz crystallization from chalcedony appears likely, and an origin from silica gel is discussed. Fragmentation structures are generally fractal. This allows differentiation between various processes, such as corrosive wear, wear abrasion and hydraulic brecciation. Material transport along the brittle shear zone, and displacement of the wall-rocks, were at least partly governed by flow of mobile fluid-quartz-particle suspensions. The complex meso- to microstructures were generated by repeated processes of fragmentation, quartz precipitation and grain growth. In general, the brittle Rusey fault zone

  7. Geochemistry, mineralization, structure, and permeability of a normal-fault zone, Casino mine, Alligator Ridge district, north central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, K. Jill; Evans, James P.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the geochemical signature and structure of the Keno fault zone to test its impact on the flow of ore-mineralizing fluids, and use the mined exposures to evaluate structures and processes associated with normal fault development. The fault is a moderately dipping normal-fault zone in siltstone and silty limestone with 55-100 m of dip-slip displacement in north-central Nevada. Across-strike exposures up to 180 m long, 65 m of down-dip exposure and 350 m of along-strike exposure allow us to determine how faults, fractures, and fluids interact within mixed-lithology carbonate-dominated sedimentary rocks. The fault changes character along strike from a single clay-rich slip plane 10-20 mm thick at the northern exposure to numerous hydrocarbon-bearing, calcite-filled, nearly vertical slip planes in a zone 15 m wide at the southern exposure. The hanging wall and footwall are intensely fractured but fracture densities do not vary markedly with distance from the fault. Fault slip varies from pure dip-slip to nearly pure strike-slip, which suggests that either slip orientations may vary on faults in single slip events, or stress variations over the history of the fault caused slip vector variations. Whole-rock major, minor, and trace element analyses indicate that Au, Sb, and As are in general associated with the fault zone, suggesting that Au- and silica-bearing fluids migrated along the fault to replace carbonate in the footwall and adjacent hanging wall rocks. Subsequent fault slip was associated with barite and calcite and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids deposited at the southern end of the fault. No correlation exists at the meter or tens of meter scale between mineralization patterns and fracture density. We suggest that the fault was a combined conduit-barrier system in which the fault provides a critical connection between the fluid sources and fractures that formed before and during faulting. During the waning stages of deposit formation, the fault behaved as

  8. Seismicity and Fault Zone Structure Near the Xinfengjiang Water Reservoir, Guangdong, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Sun, X.; He, L.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Xingfengjiang Water Reservoir (XWR) was built in 1958 and the first impoundment was conducted in 1959. Immediately following the reservoir impoundment, a series of earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of the XWR, including the 1962 M6.1 earthquake that occurred ~1 km next to the dam. Numerous small earthquakes take place in this region presently, making it one of the most active seismic zones in Guangdong. To investigate the present seismicity and associated fault zone structure, we deployed a temporary seismic network, including a dense linear array across the Ren-Zi-Shi fault southwest to the reservoir. The temporary network is consisted of 42 stations that are operated in the field for more than one month. Because of the mountainous terrain, it is impossible to deploy broadband sensors. Here we use DDV-5 seismometer with a central frequency of 120Hz-5s that is independent on external GPS and battery. During our deployment, numerous earthquakes were recorded. Preliminary results of travel time analysis have shown the characteristic of low velocity fault zone. More detailed analysis, including relocation of earthquakes, ambient noise cross correlation, and modeling body waves, will be presented.

  9. Characteristics of the Lithology, Fault-related Rocks and Fault Zone Structures in the TCDP Hole-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Kou, L.; Yeh, E.

    2005-12-01

    Probing a fault zone of recently major activity at depth to study the physical, mechanical and chemical properties is the one of main purposes of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP). We have finished drilling the hole-A which it has the cuttings from 0 to 430 m and cores from 430 to 2003.67 m deep in the end of 2004. Stratigraphically, from surface to 1029 m deep is the Pliocene to Pleistocene Cholan Formation which is dominantly composed of sandstone and sandstone-siltstone alternation with weak to heavy bioturbations. The Pliocene Chinshui Shale occurs from 1029 to 1303 m deep and predominantly consists of siltstone with weak bioturbation. From 1303 to 1712 m deep is the late Miocene to early Pliocene Kueichulin Formation and is dominantly composed of massive sandstone with minor siltstone. Below the 1712 m deep, the Formation is back to the younger Cholan Formation with mollusca-rich thick layered shale and heavy bioturbated sandstone. Four kinds of fault rocks can be identified in the cores. They are the fault breccia, gouge, foliated and non-foliated cataclasites and pseudotachylyte. At least six major fault zones can be found in the cores: FZ1111, FZ1153, FZ1222, FZ1580, FZ1712 and FZ1818. In those fault zones, the FZ1111 may be correlative to the surface rupture of Chi-Chi earthquake,1999, while the FZ1712 may be the Sanyi fault.

  10. Structure and kinematics of the Livingstone Mountains border fault zone, Nyasa (Malawi) Rift, southwestern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Walter H.; Karson, Jeffrey A.

    Reconnaissance mapping of the Livingstone Mountains border fault zone (LMBFZ) at the northern end of the Nyasa (Malawi) Rift in SW Tanzania constrains the geometry and movement history of this typical rift border fault. The fault is a narrow zone of complex brittle deformation, striking 320°, that overprints and reactivates an older ductile shear zone. Long, straight, NW-trending border fault segments are offset by minor NE-trending faults. These two orthogonal fault sets integrate along strike to produce an overall curved fault trace that is concave towards a major depositional basin in the rift. A typical section through the fault zone shows an E to W progression from gneissic country rock through ductilely deformed country rock, into a zone overprinted by closely spaced fractures and grading into an intensely fractured, massive, flinty, aphanitic mylonite band at the lakeshore. Pseudotachylite veins, probably generated during seismic movement on the border fault, are common within and near the aphanitic mylonite. Slickensides indicate dextral oblique-slip, whereas shear belts and rolled porphyroclasts with complex tails in the older ductile shear zone indicate sub-horizontal sinistral motion. The adjacent rift basin is typical of other East African Rift Basins, and contains at least 4 km of Recent to perhaps Mesozoic sediment. Whereas the minimum net slip on the LMBFZ, in the dominant slickenside direction, is on the order of 10 km, regional geologic considerations suggest that dominantly strike-slip motion preceded the oblique-slip phase that produced the LMBFZ and the adjacent rift basin.

  11. Fault zone structure from topography: signatures of en echelon fault slip at Mustang Ridge on the San Andreas Fault, Monterey County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Hilley, George E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Prentice, Carol

    2010-01-01

    We used high-resolution topography to quantify the spatial distribution of scarps, linear valleys, topographic sinks, and oversteepened stream channels formed along an extensional step over on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Mustang Ridge, California. This location provides detail of both creeping fault landform development and complex fault zone kinematics. Here, the SAF creeps 10–14 mm/yr slower than at locations ∼20 km along the fault in either direction. This spatial change in creep rate is coincident with a series of en echelon oblique-normal faults that strike obliquely to the SAF and may accommodate the missing deformation. This study presents a suite of analyses that are helpful for proper mapping of faults in locations where high-resolution topographic data are available. Furthermore, our analyses indicate that two large subsidiary faults near the center of the step over zone appear to carry significant distributed deformation based on their large apparent vertical offsets, the presence of associated sag ponds and fluvial knickpoints, and the observation that they are rotating a segment of the main SAF. Several subsidiary faults in the southeastern portion of Mustang Ridge are likely less active; they have few associated sag ponds and have older scarp morphologic ages and subdued channel knickpoints. Several faults in the northwestern part of Mustang Ridge, though relatively small, are likely also actively accommodating active fault slip based on their young morphologic ages and the presence of associated sag ponds.

  12. Structural heterogeneity of the Longmenshan fault zone and the mechanism of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe; Zhao, Dapeng

    2009-10-01

    We determined detailed 3-D images of P and S wave velocity (Vp, Vs) and Poisson's ratio (σ) in and around the Longmenshan (LMS) fault zone by using a large number of P and S wave arrival times from the aftershocks of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0) and other local events. Our results show that the structure of the LMS fault zone north of the Wenchuan main shock is very different from that south of the main shock. The southern section of the LMS fault zone contains a broad zone with low-Vp, low-Vs, and high-σ anomalies, while the northern segment exhibits more scattered heterogeneities, corresponding to most of the aftershocks which occurred there. A prominent low-Vp, low-Vs, and high-σ anomaly exists directly beneath the Wenchuan main shock hypocenter, suggesting that in addition to compositional variations, fluid-filled fractured rock matrices may exist in the LMS fault zone, which may have influenced the generation of the large Wenchuan earthquake. Our tomographic results provide sound seismic evidence for the hypothesis that an upward intrusion of lower crustal flow occurred along the LMS fault zone. In addition, most small earthquakes before the 2008 Wenchuan main shock occurred around the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault, while the Wenchuan aftershocks were mainly concentrated on the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, suggesting that the rupture process of the Wenchuan earthquake may belong to an out-of-sequence thrusting event, a suggestion which is in good agreement with the results from geological surveys and also quite similar to the rupture processes of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (M 7.5) and the 2005 Kashmir earthquake (M 7.6). A few aftershocks occurred close to the blind Guangyuan-Dayi fault in the Sichuan basin, suggesting that this blind fault was also ruptured by the Wenchuan earthquake, consistent with geological surveys.

  13. Structural heterogeneity of the Longmenshan fault zone and the mechanism of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.; Zhao, D.

    2009-12-01

    We determined detailed 3-D images of P- and S-wave velocity (Vp, Vs) and Poisson’s ratio in and around the Longmenshan (LMS) fault zone by using a large number of P- and S-wave arrival times from the aftershocks of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0) and other local events. Our results show that the structure of the LMS fault zone north of the Wenchuan mainshock is very different from that south of the mainshock. The southern section of the LMS fault zone contains a broad zone with low-Vp, low-Vs and high-Poisson’s ratio anomalies, while the northern segment exhibits more scattered heterogeneities, corresponding to most of the aftershocks which occurred there. A prominent low-Vp, low-Vs and high-Poisson’s ratio anomaly exists directly beneath the Wenchuan mainshock hypocenter, suggesting that, in addition to compositional variations, fluid-filled fractured rock matrices may exist in the LMS fault zone, which may have influenced the generation of the large Wenchuan earthquake. Our tomographic results provide sound seismic evidence for the hypothesis that an upward intrusion of lower-crustal flow occurred along the LMS fault zone. In addition, most small earthquakes before the 2008 Wenchuan mainshock occurred around the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault, while the Wenchuan aftershocks were mainly concentrated on the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, suggesting that the rupture process of the Wenchuan earthquake may belong to an out-of-sequence thrusting event, a suggestion which is in good agreement with the results from geological surveys and also quite similar to the rupture processes of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (M 7.5) and the 2005 Kashmir earthquake (M 7.6). A few aftershocks occurred close to the blind Guangyuan-Dayi fault in the Sichuan basin, suggesting that this blind fault was also ruptured by the Wenchuan earthquake, consistent with geological surveys.

  14. Gravity field and structure of the Sorong Fault Zone, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardjono

    free-air gravity were observed in south of Mangole (about 13 mGal/km) and west of Obi (about 15 mGal/km) but elsewhere were gentler. Analyses of gravity data along the Sorong Fault Zone in the region of Barggal-Sula Islands controlled in part by geological, reflection seismic and sidescan sonar data, have produced four models which suggest that the crustal structures beneath the zone consist predominantly of attenuated continental fragments, juxtaposed to thick layer of tectonic melange and anomalous oceanic crusts. The continental fragments appear to be severely attenuated and limited in extent in the east but thicker and wider towards the west. The tectonic melange is underlain by deep seated oceanic crust in the Molucca Sea region. The anomalously thin North Banda Sea crust appears to underlie a very thin layer of sediments and to have suffered some degree of arching. The deep seated oceanic crust and the thick layer of tectonic melange are interpreted as the result of the sinking of the lithospheric plate of the Molucca Sea. The descent of this plate may have produced bending forces which may have initiated flexure which propagates through the surrounding region. Depending on the rigidity of the crustal slab, arching and fracturing may have occurred in the crustal rocks. The arching of the oceanic crust of the North Banda Sea may have been one result of this process. The continental fragments of the Banggai-Sula region appear to dip northwards and this may, in addition to the effect of shear tectonics along the Sorong Fault Zone, also be interpreted as the response of the continental fragments to the sinking of the lithospheric plate of the Molucca Sea. In the Obi region, the gravity data suggest that most of the island is underlain by peridotitic and basaltic rocks. Continental crust appears to form the basement in the south and extend offshore south of the island and juxtaposed to oceanic rock. The ultramafic and basic rocks appear to be emplaced on Obi by a high

  15. Regional Survey of Structural Properties and Cementation Patterns of Fault Zones in the Northern Part of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico - Implications for Ground-Water Flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the need to document and evaluate the types and variability of fault zone properties that potentially affect aquifer systems in basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, we systematically characterized structural and cementation properties of exposed fault zones at 176 sites in the northern Albuquerque Basin. A statistical analysis of measurements and observations evaluated four aspects of the fault zones: (1) attitude and displacement, (2) cement, (3) lithology of the host rock or sediment, and (4) character and width of distinctive structural architectural components at the outcrop scale. Three structural architectural components of the fault zones were observed: (1) outer damage zones related to fault growth; these zones typically contain deformation bands, shear fractures, and open extensional fractures, which strike subparallel to the fault and may promote ground-water flow along the fault zone; (2) inner mixed zones composed of variably entrained, disrupted, and dismembered blocks of host sediment; and (3) central fault cores that accommodate most shear strain and in which persistent low- permeability clay-rich rocks likely impede the flow of water across the fault. The lithology of the host rock or sediment influences the structure of the fault zone and the width of its components. Different grain-size distributions and degrees of induration of the host materials produce differences in material strength that lead to variations in width, degree, and style of fracturing and other fault-related deformation. In addition, lithology of the host sediment appears to strongly control the distribution of cement in fault zones. Most faults strike north to north-northeast and dip 55? - 77? east or west, toward the basin center. Most faults exhibit normal slip, and many of these faults have been reactivated by normal-oblique and strike slip. Although measured fault displacements have a broad range, from 0.9 to 4,000 m, most are <100 m, and fault zones appear to

  16. Structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone from the Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, George; Rost, Sebastian; Houseman, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the technique of cross-correlating the ambient seismic noise wavefield at two seismometers to reconstruct empirical Green's Functions for the determination of Earth structure has been a powerful tool to study the Earth's interior without earthquakes or man-made sources. However, far less attention has been paid to using auto-correlations of seismic noise to reveal body wave reflections from interfaces in the subsurface. In principle, the Green's functions thus derived should be comparable to the Earth's impulse response to a co-located source and receiver. We use data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for Northern Anatolia - DANA) deployed across the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the region of the 1999 magnitude 7.6 Izmit earthquake in western Turkey. The NAFZ is a major strike-slip system that extends ~1200 km across northern Turkey and continues to pose a high level of seismic hazard, in particular to the mega-city of Istanbul. We construct body wave images for the entire crust and the shallow upper mantle over the ~35 km by 70 km footprint of the 70-station DANA array. Using autocorrelations of the vertical component of ground motion, P-wave reflections can be retrieved from the wavefield to constrain crustal structure. We show that clear P-wave reflections from the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) can be retrieved using the autocorrelation technique, indicating topography on the Moho on horizontal scales of less than 10 km. Offsets in crustal structure can be identified that seem to be correlated with the surface expression of the northern branch of the fault zone, indicating that the NAFZ reaches the upper mantle as a narrow structure. The southern branch has a less clear effect on crustal structure. We also see evidence of several discontinuities in the mid-crust in addition to an upper mantle reflector that we interpret to represent the Hales discontinuity.

  17. Rapid mapping of ultrafine fault zone topography with structure from motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kendra; Nissen, Edwin; Saripalli, Srikanth; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; McGarey, Patrick; Scharer, Katherine M.; Williams, Patrick; Blisniuk, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) generates high-resolution topography and coregistered texture (color) from an unstructured set of overlapping photographs taken from varying viewpoints, overcoming many of the cost, time, and logistical limitations of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and other topographic surveying methods. This paper provides the first investigation of SfM as a tool for mapping fault zone topography in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. First, we present a simple, affordable SfM workflow, based on an unmanned helium balloon or motorized glider, an inexpensive camera, and semiautomated software. Second, we illustrate the system at two sites on southern California faults covered by existing airborne or terrestrial LiDAR, enabling a comparative assessment of SfM topography resolution and precision. At the first site, an ∼0.1 km2 alluvial fan on the San Andreas fault, a colored point cloud of density mostly >700 points/m2 and a 3 cm digital elevation model (DEM) and orthophoto were produced from 233 photos collected ∼50 m above ground level. When a few global positioning system ground control points are incorporated, closest point vertical distances to the much sparser (∼4 points/m2) airborne LiDAR point cloud are mostly 530 points/m2 and a 2 cm DEM and orthophoto were produced from 450 photos taken from ∼60 m above ground level. Closest point vertical distances to existing terrestrial LiDAR data of comparable density are mostly <6 cm. Each SfM survey took ∼2 h to complete and several hours to generate the scene topography and texture. SfM greatly facilitates the imaging of subtle geomorphic offsets related to past earthquakes as well as rapid response mapping or long-term monitoring of faulted landscapes.

  18. Deep resistivity structure along the Longmen Mountain fault zone in the eastern Tibetan plateau of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhang, G.; Luo, W.; Luo, H.; Cai, X.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, W.; Qin, Q.

    2012-12-01

    1.Introduction Many researchers (e.g.,Wang et al.,2009) have proposed the relevant knowledge of tectonic evolution and dynamic characteristics of the Longmen Mountain belt as well as the Songpan-Ganzi and Yangtze blocks in the past few decades, the knowledge of shallow thrust nappe tectonic along the belt has then been generally recognized. It's, however, still difficult to image the deep crust and mantle structures and reveal the dynamic mechanism of the crustal formation under the Longmen Mountain. In this study, we carried out the MT experiments along and across the Longmen mountain region and investigated the relationships between the crust structure and seismic activity basing on the latest MT geological results. 2. Field observations We conducted three MT experiment profiles in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. One is along the Mingshan-Guangyuan profile parallel with the structural direction, and another two profiles (Maqu-Gaoliangzhen and Luqu-Hechuan) perpendicular to the Longmen Mountain fault zone. In this study, we use the conventional magnetotelluric (MT) data combine with the long-period magnetotelluric (LMT) data to observe electromagnetic response. The MT and LMT data was observed by using the V8 instrument and LEMI-417, respectively. 3. Conclusion (1) According to the results of MT inversion, we find that the high concentration of stress process along the Songpan-Ganzi block and the Yangtze block colliding zone might result from the deep crust-mantle tough shear Zone of Longmen Mountain expanded to mid-upper crust, and finally leads to a new rupture. This could be one of the focal mechanisms of the Wenchuan earthquake (Ms 8.0) generating. The deep resistivity structure along the Longmen Mountain fault zone can be divided into southern,middle and northern segments from southwest to northeast. The total resistivity of southern segment is lower than the middle and northern portions. We suggest that the upper crust of the Longmen Mountain, south of Dayi

  19. Depth-Dependent Low-Velocity Structure of the San Andreas Fault near the SAFOD Drilling Site at Parkfield from Fault-Zone Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Li, Y.; Vidale, J.; Cochran, E.

    2004-12-01

    Coordinated by the SAFOD PIs, we used 96 PASSCAL short-period three-component seismometers in linear arrays deployed across and along the San Andreas fault (SAF) near the town of Parkfield and the SAFOD drilling site in 2002 and 2003, respectively. The data recorded for near-surface explosions detonated in the experiments (Li and Vidale), PASO project (Thurber and Roecker) and refraction profiling (Hole), and local earthquakes show fault-zone trapped waves clearly for the source and receivers located close to the fault. The time duration of the dominant trapped energy after S-arrivals increases with the event-to-array distance and focal depth progressively. Using a finite-difference code, we first synthesize fault-zone trapped waves generated by explosions to determine the shallowest 1 or 2 km fault zone structure with the velocity constraints from seismic profiling of the shallow SAF at Parkfield [Catchings et al., 2002]. We then strip shallow effects to resolve deeper structure of the fault zone, and synthesize trapped waves from earthquakes at depths between 2.5 and 11 km to complete a model of the SAF with depth-variable structure in 3-D. We also use the P-first arrivals and polarity as additional information in modeling of velocities and location of the material interface with the structural constraints from seismic tomography at Parkfield [Thurber et al., 2004] to the bed-rock velocities. In grid-search modeling, we tested various values for fault zone depth, width, velocity, Q, and source location. The best-fit model parameters from this study show evidence of a damaged core zone on the main SAF, which likely extends to seismogenic depths. The zone is marked by a low-velocity waveguide ~150 m wide, in which Q is 10-50 and shear velocities are reduced by 30-45% from wall-rock velocities. We also find some seismic energy trapped partitioned in the branching faults that connect to the San Andreas main fault at a shallow depth near Parkfield.

  20. Structural styles of the intracratonic reactivation of the Perimbó fault zone, Paraná basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostirolla, Sidnei Pires; Mancini, Fernando; Rigoti, Augustinho; Kraft, Ronaldo Paulo

    2003-08-01

    The style and origin of intracratonic deformation along the Perimbó fault zone (PFZ) in the Paraná basin, Santa Catarina State, southern Brazil, is defined by the integration of outcrop, borehole, aerial photography, and digital terrain modeling data. Typical structures are high-angle strike-slip and oblique-slip normal faults in the Permian sedimentary cover that propagate upward from medium-angle reverse faults in the underlying Precambrian basement. Regional and minor structures suggest blind transtensional faulting and tilting of the overlying strata controlled by the basement heritage. A hypothesis linking deformation between the cover and the basement is proposed on the basis of a structural analysis of a branched fault pattern striking N40-50E and N70-80E. Semi-detailed scale mapping shows that the PFZ has a complex history of polyphase reactivation and is characterized as a plate margin fault in the Proterozoic, evolving to an intracratonic fault in the Phanerozoic, with a main period of reactivation in Permian or Permian-Triassic transition times. The reported data imply that fault reactivation is characterized by normal to left-lateral strike-slip faulting produced by strain propagation from the La Ventana orogenic belt toward the continental interior.

  1. Location and Shallow Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, Pescadero, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Lent, C.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Steedman, C. E.; Prentice, C. S.

    2003-12-01

    The San Gregorio fault is one of the principal faults of the San Andreas fault system in the San Francisco Bay area. Located west of the active trace of the San Andreas fault and near the coast, the San Gregorio fault zone consists of at least two northwest-southeast-trending strands, the Coastways and Frijoles faults. Little is known about the slip history on the San Gregorio, and information for the Frijoles fault is especially scarce, as it lies mostly offshore. To better understand the contribution of the San Gregorio fault zone to slip along the San Andreas fault system, we conducted a high-resolution, seismic imaging investigation of the Frijoles fault to locate near-surface, onshore, branches of the fault that may be suitable for paleoseismic trenching. Our seismic survey consisted of a 590-meter-long, east-west-trending, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across Butano Creek Valley, in Pescadero, California. The profile included 107 shot points and 120 geophones spaced at 5-m increments. Seismic sources were generated by a Betsy Seisgun in 0.3-m-deep holes. Data were recorded on two Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismographs at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms. Seismic p-wave velocities, determined by inverting first-arrival refractions using tomographic methods, ranged from 900 m/s in the shallow subsurface to 5000 m/s at 200 m depth, with higher velocities in the western half of the profile. Migrated seismic reflection images show clear, planar layering in the top 100-200 meters on the eastern and western ends of the seismic profile. However, to within the shallow subsurface, a 200-m-long zone near the center of the profile shows disturbed stratigraphic layers with several apparent fault strands approaching within a few meters of the surface. The near-surface locations of the imaged strands suggest that the Frijoles fault has been active in the recent past, although further paleoseismic study is needed to detail the slip history of the San Gregorio

  2. Principal fault zone width and permeability of the active Neodani fault, Nobi fault system, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, A.; Nishino, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Hirose, T.; Uehara, S.; Sato, K.; Tanikawa, W.; Shimamoto, T.

    2004-02-01

    The internal structure and permeability of the Neodani fault, which was last activated at the time of the 1891 Nobi earthquake (M8.0), were examined through field survey and experiments. A new exposure of the fault at a road construction site reveals a highly localized feature of the past fault deformation within a narrow fault core zone. The fault of the area consists of three zone units towards the fault core: (a) protolith rocks; (b) 15 to 30 m of fault breccia, and (c) 200 mm green to black fault gouge. Within the fault breccia zone, cataclastic foliation oblique to the fault has developed in a fine-grained 2-m-wide zone adjacent to the fault. Foliation is defined by subparallel alignment of intact lozenge shaped clasts, or by elongated aggregates of fine-grained chert fragments. The mean angle of 20°, between the foliation and the fault plane suggests that the foliated breccia accommodated a shear strain of γ<5 assuming simple shear for the rotation of the cataclastic foliation. Previous trench surveys have revealed that the fault has undergone at least 70 m of fault displacement within the last 20,000 years in this locality. The observed fault geometry suggests that past fault displacements have been localized into the 200-mm-wide gouge zone. Gas permeability analysis of the gouges gives low values of the order of 10 -20 m 2. Water permeability as low as 10 -20 m 2 is therefore expected for the fault gouge zone, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the critical permeability suggested for a fault to cause thermal pressurization during a fault slip.

  3. Cretaceous to Miocene fault zone evolution in the Eastern Alps constrained by multi-system thermochronometry and structural data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Frisch, Wolfgang; Danišík, Martin; Fritz, Harald; Wölfler, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones that display both, ductile and brittle deformation stages offer perfect sites to study the evolution of the earth's crust over a wide range of temperatures and possibly over long time spans. This study combines structural- geo- and thermochronologcial data to evaluate the tectonic evolution of a fault zone to the southeast of the Tauern Window in the Eastern Alps. This fault zone comprises a mylonitic part, the so-called "Main Mylonitic Zone" (MMZ) that has been reworked by brittle faulting, the so-called "Ragga-Teuchl fault" (RTF). Structural data of the MMZ demonstrate ductile deformation with top-to-the NW transport in the Late Cretaceous under greenschist facies conditions. Subsequent SE-directed extension occurred under semi-brittle to brittle conditions during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The Polinik Block to the north of the RTF revealed Late Cretaceous Ar/Ar ages, which reflect cooling subsequent to the thermal peak of Eo-alpine metamorphism. In contrast, the Kreuzeck Block to the south of the RTF shows early Permian Ar/Ar ages that reflect cooling related to both, late Variscan collapse in the late Carboniferous and post-Variscan extension in the Permian. Zircon and apatite fission track ages and thermal history modeling results suggest that the Polinik Block cooled rapidly to near surface temperatures in the middle Miocene. The Kreuzeck Block, in contrast, cooled and exhumed to near surface conditions already in the Oligocene and early Miocene. Thermal history modeling and apatite fission track ages of 23.3±0.8 and 11.5±1.0 suggest that brittle deformation along the RTF occurred in the middle- and late Miocene. Our results demonstrate that one single fault zone may comprise information about the evolution of the Eastern Alps from Late Cretaceous to Miocene time and that low-temperature thermochronology is a viable tool to resolve the timing of brittle faulting and accompanied fluid activity.

  4. Disturbed zones; indicators of deep-seated subsurface faults in the Valley and Ridge and Appalachian structural front of Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohn, Howard A.; Purdy, Terri L.

    1982-01-01

    Field studies of geologic structures in the Valley and Ridge and adjacent parts of the Appalachian Plateau provinces in Pennsylvania have shown a new type of structure, formerly poorly understood and frequently unmapped, is a significant indicator of deep-seated subsurface faulting. These structures, herein called disturbed zones, are formed by movement between closely spaced pairs of thrust faults. Disturbed zones are characterized at the surface by long, narrow, intensely folded and faulted zones of rocks in a relatively undisturbed stratigraphic sequence. These zones are frequently kilometers to tens of kilometers long and tens to hundreds of meters wide. Although disturbed zones generally occur in sequences of alternating siltstone and shale beds, they can also occur in other lithologies including massively-bedded sandstones and carbonates. Disturbed zones are not only easily recognized in outcrop but their presence can also be inferred on geologic maps by disharmonic fold patterns, which necessitates a detachment between adjacent units that show the disharmony. A number of geologic problems can be clarified by understanding the principles of the sequence of formation and the method of location of disturbed zones, including the interpretation of some published geologic cross sections and maps. The intense folding and faulting which accompanies the formation of a typical disturbed zone produces a region of fracture porosity which, if sealed off from the surface, might well serve as a commercially-exploitable hydrocarbon trap. We believe that the careful mapping of concentrations of disturbed zones can serve as an important exploration method which is much less expensive than speculation seismic lines.

  5. Subsurface structure along the eastern marginal fault zone of Yokote Basin by Seismic reflection profiling studies, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagohara, K.; Imaizumi, T.; Echigo, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Sato, H.

    2005-12-01

    Typical reverse faults, which are known as Senya earthquake faults appeared along the western foot of the Mahiru Mountains, associated with The Rikuu Earthquake (Mj7.2) of 1896 in Northeast Japan. Eastern marginal fault zone of the Yokote Basin consist of four main surface ruptures, about 35 km long, Obonai fault, Shiraiwa fault, Ota fault and Senya fault, depending on their continuity and strike (Matsuda et al., 1980). We carried out the seismic reflection profiling across these faults (Kawaguchi03 Seismic line, Unjono04 Seismic line and Kotaki05 Seismic line) to clarify the subsurface structure of these reverse fault system based on the data of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology and furthermore, to discuss the timing of migration of the thrusting from the range front to the basin margin. The seismic source was mini-vibrator trucks, with 20seconds of 10-100Hz signals at 10m or 5m intervals. The sweep signals were recorded by a digital telemetry system (GDAPS-4a) with 10 Hz geophones. The obtained seismic reflection data were processed by conventional Common mid-point (CMP) methods, including post-stack migration and depth conversion. The resulting seismic reflection profile reveals a thrust structure beneath these areas. At the Center of Senya hills there are two thrusts and one high angle reverse fault (1997 Seismic Line). Senya fault is an active frontal emergent thrust with flat and ramp structure. Although, the high angle reverse fault, located along the foot of the range is a short-cut branching fault from the Senya fault in the central part of the Senya hill (Sato et al., 1998), in the Unjono04 seismic line, the depth of the flat and ramp structure gradually shallow in the north part of the Senya hill, where the flexure scarp accompanied with antithetic faults formed on the fluvial terraces. In the Kawaguchi03 seismic line, the concealed fault, 0.5km below the surface, branched from the master Ota fault, form a flexure scarplet on the alluvial fan

  6. Crustal Structure at the vicinity of Nigde Massif and Central Anatolian Fault Zone from Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, B.; Sandvol, E. A.; Karas, M.; Ozaydin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were constructed to examine the electrical resistivity strucuture of a metamorphic core complex renown as Niğde massif and a northeast - southwest aligned fault zone (Central Anatolian Fault Zone, CAFZ) bounding this massif on the east in Central Anatolia. Nigde massif is a crystalline dome close to Inner-Tauride suture at the southern part of Central Anatolian Crystalline Complex. The sinistral CAFZ (in the south it is called Ecemis fault) is a ~700 km long, 2 to 80 km wide zone with an offset of 60 to 80 km. Northwest-southeast aligned Tuz Gölü (Salt Lake) and Derinkuyu faults are other major features that shape up the study area. A three-dimensional numerical modeling routine based on data-space modeling (WSINV3DMT) was used to invert the MT data collected at 85 high quality soundings. A mesh with 76 x 74 x 40 (7 layers for air) cells was used during the inversions. The resulting models suggest that (i) there is a low conductivity dome-like anomaly that coincides with the Nigde massif (presumably matches with Uckapili granite). (ii) Beneath this low conductivity anomaly there is a deeper (>20 km) high conductivity zone caused by partial melting (iii) Ecemis fault near Pozanti appears as a low to high conductivity interface. (iv) Likewise, Tuz Gölü and Derinkuyu faults appear as a low to high conductivity interfaces representing barriers for fluid flow (v) Adana basin sediments show high conductivity values (vi) Mt. Hasan and Mt. Karaca and the volcanic complexes in between them show highly conductive features in their roots, but (vi) older Mt. Erciyes lacks such a deep conductor.

  7. Structural and Morpho-Tectonic Features of the Golbasi-Turkoglu Segment of East Anatolian Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsarac, V.; Tekin, B. M.; Kuterdem, N. K.

    2009-04-01

    East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ) is a 580km. long left lateral active strike slip fault and the width of deformation zone is approximately 30km. Six different fault segments with length varying between 50km to 145km. constitutes the EAFZ. Historical and instrumental earthquake data reveals that, Golbasi-Turoglu segment of EAFZ is seismically dormant since last 500 years and also this segment is accepted as a seismic gap on EAFZ which has a potential to pose a seismic risk on nearby settlement areas. This study aims to determine the main active faults in the study area and determination of fault associated land surfaces by using geographic information system tools (GIS), remote sensing analysis and field observations. The study is conducted in two phases. The initial phase can be defined as office work where extensive morphological analysis and data preparation were performed by using GIS software. The second and the last phase of the study consisted of extensive field surveys, data verification. In the first part of the study a 1/25.000 scaled digital elevation models and derived morphological maps and Landsat ETM and SPOT 5 PAN images were analyzed for the study area. Lineaments were also extracted from DEMs and satellite images and analyzed. Those analysis were correlated with field observations and Analgyph images of the fault zone. Main strike slip fault related landforms like alluvial fans, river offsets and landslides were determined from morphological analysis. As the result of this study The active faults of the study area were delineated and mapped. This data is also used in the site selection of trenches for paleoseismological studies. Further steps will be the paleoseismological studies which will put definite outcomes for the seismic hazard evaluation of this segment and nearby region. It is noteworthy that GIS and remote sensing applications in geology, especially in tectonics and geomorphology, proposes practical practical and valuable solutions in

  8. Quantitative analysis of seismic fault zone waves in the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake: Evidence for a shallow trapping structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A.J.; Zhu, L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyse quantitatively a waveform data set of 238 earthquakes recorded by a dense seismic array across and along the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake. A grid-search method with station delay corrections is used to locate events that do not have catalogue locations. The quality of fault zone trapped waves generated by each event is determined from the ratios of seismic energy in time windows corresponding to trapped waves and direct S waves at stations close to and off the fault zone. Approximately 70 per cent of the events with S-P times of less than 2 s, including many clearly off the fault, produce considerable trapped wave energy. This distribution is in marked contrast with previous claims that trapped waves are generated only by sources close to or inside the Landers rupture zone. The time difference between the S arrival and trapped waves group does not grow systematically with increasing hypocentral distance and depth. The dispersion measured from the trapped waves is weak. These results imply that the seismic trapping structure at the Landers rupture zone is shallow and does not extend continuously along-strike by more than a few kilometres. Synthetic waveform modelling indicates that the fault zone waveguide has depth of approximately 2-4 km, a width of approximately 200 m, an S-wave velocity reduction relative to the host rock of approximately 30-40 per cent and an S-wave attenuation coefficient of approximately 20-30. The fault zone waveguide north of the array appears to be shallower and weaker than that south of the array. The waveform modelling also indicates that the seismic trapping structure below the array is centred approximately 100 m east of the surface break.

  9. Architecture of small-scale fault zones in the context of the Leinetalgraben Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding fault zone properties in different geological settings is important to better assess the development and propagation of faults. In addition this allows better evaluation and permeability estimates of potential fault-related geothermal reservoirs. The Leinetalgraben fault system provides an outcrop analogue for many fault zones in the subsurface of the North German Basin. The Leinetalgraben is a N-S-trending graben structure, initiated in the Jurassic, in the south of Lower Saxony and as such part of the North German Basin. The fault system was reactivated and inverted during Alpine compression in the Tertiary. This complex geological situation was further affected by halotectonics. Therefore we can find different types of fault zones, that is normal, reverse, strike-slip an oblique-slip faults, surrounding the major Leinetalgraben boundary faults. Here we present first results of structural geological field studies on the geometry and architecture of fault zones in the Leinetalgraben Fault System in outcrop-scale. We measured the orientations and displacements of 17 m-scale fault zones in limestone (Muschelkalk) outcrops, the thicknesses of their fault cores and damage zones, as well as the fracture densities and geometric parameters of the fracture systems therein. We also analysed the effects of rock heterogeneities, particularly stiffness variations between layers (mechanical layering) on the propagation of natural fractures and fault zones. The analysed fault zones predominantly show similar orientations as the major fault zones they surround. Other faults are conjugate or perpendicular to the major fault zones. The direction of predominant joint strike corresponds to the orientation of the fault zones in the majority of cases. The mechanical layering of the limestone and marlstone stratification obviously has great effects on fracture propagation. Already thin layers (mm- to cm-scale) of low stiffness - here marl - seem to suffice to change the

  10. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  11. Structure of the San Andreas fault zone at SAFOD from a seismic refraction survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Ryberg, T.; Fuis, G.S.; Bleibinhaus, F.; Sharma, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    Refraction traveltimes from a 46-km long seismic survey across the San Andreas Fault were inverted to obtain two-dimensional velocity structure of the upper crust near the SAFOD drilling project. The model contains strong vertical and lateral velocity variations from <2 km/s to ???6 km/s. The Salinian terrane west of the San Andreas Fault has much higher velocity than the Franciscan terrane east of the fault. Salinian basement deepens from 0.8 km subsurface at SAFOD to ???2.5 km subsurface 20 km to the southwest. A strong reflection and subtle velocity contrast suggest a steeply dipping fault separating the Franciscan terrane from the Great Valley Sequence. A low-velocity wedge of Cenozoic sedimentary rocks lies immediately southwest of the San Andreas Fault. This body is bounded by a steep fault just northeast of SAFOD and approaches the depth of the shallowest earthquakes. Multiple active and inactive fault strands complicate structure near SAFOD. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Structure of the Melajo clay near Arima, Trinidad and strike-slip motion in the El Pilar fault zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P.; Burke, K.; Wadge, G.

    1985-01-01

    No consensus has yet emerged on the sense, timing and amount of motion in the El Pilar fault zone. As a contribution to the study of this problem, a critical area within the zone in North Central Trinidad has been mapped. On the basis of the mapping, it is concluded that the El Pilar zone has been active in right-lateral strike-slip motion during the Pleistocene. Recognition of structural styles akin to those of the mapped area leads to the suggestion that the El Pilar zone is part of a 300 km wide plate boundary zone extending from the Orinoco delta northward to Grenada. Lateral motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to South America has been suggested to amount to 1900 km in the last 38 Ma. Part of this displacement since the Miocene can be readily accommodated within the broad zone identified here. No one fault system need account for more than a fraction of the total motion and all faults need not be active simultaneously.

  13. Investigating the crustal structure of a strike-slip ``step-over'' zone along the Great Glen fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. H.

    1994-10-01

    Strike-slip step-overs and bends are regions of anomalous deformation that may yield clues to the mechanical behavior of the Earth's crust. Experimental reprocessing of a marine deep seismic reflection profile cutting across an ˜35-km-wide right-stepping step-over developed on the Great Glen fault system north of the Inner Moray Firth basin (east of Northwest Highlands, Scotland) reveals a restricted zone of prominent reflections and diffractions beginning at 7-8 km depth, continuing as deep as the interpreted Moho discontinuity at 26-27 km. Geological interpretation of this zone suggests a concentration of possible diffractors marking sharp structural disruption underlain by a ˜12-km thick layer of subhorizontal and moderately dipping reflectors that dominates the lower crust in the step-over region. The known kinematic history of the Great Glen fault system, together with the observed direction of the step-over, implies that a zone of contraction would have formed within the step-over during early Caledonian sinistral strike slip. The seismic reflection structure can be interpreted as developing by deformation associated with contraction and possible block rotation between the two fault segments such that the diffractive zone represents steep structure in a near-vertical zone of strike slip which passes deeper into a layer of low-angle dipping thrusts or shear zones. The results of this study are consistent with a concept of mechanical detachment in the middle crust as documented for areas of contraction along active strike-slip faults.

  14. Anisotropy of Resisitiviy Distributions and Fault Rock Microstructures in Fault Zones -Two Case Studies of Hatagawa and Atotsugawa Fault, Japan-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.

    2015-12-01

    Structure and physical characteristics in a fault zone are not homogeneous. The inhomogeneity should be related to earthquake generation mechanism. However, main features of the inhomogeneity in fault zones are not yet sufficiently understood. It is considered to be effective to compare geophysical data of geophysical survey and/or downhole logging with physical properties, microstructures and mineral compositions of fault rocks in the fault zone. In this presentation, results of the comparisons are introduced in the case of two fault zones; Hatagawa and Atotsugawa fault, in north-east and central Japan, respectively, and factors affecting the inhomogeneity of fault structure are suggested.Anisotropic resistivity measurements in laboratory were compared with microscopic observations of fault rocks recovered from outcrops of Hatagawa fault. In the case of Atotsugawa fault, the anisotropic resistivity profiles by physical survey across the fault zones were compared with microscopic observations and mineral composition analysis of fault rocks provided by drilling into the fault zone. As a result, the anisotropic resistivity profiles are strongly related to foliation structure of fault rocks. It is suggested that fault slip at the earthquake and shear deformation during the earthquake recurrence time develope foliation fabrics of fault rocks, and that the resistivity profile becomes anisotropic progressively in the fault zone.

  15. A re-evaluation of the Eskişehir Fault Zone as a recent extensional structure in NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocakoğlu, Faruk

    2007-10-01

    The Eskişehir Fault Zone (EFZ), one of the major active structures within the Anatolian platelet, is investigated in a 100 km long sector between Bozüyük and Alpu, in vicinity of Eskişehir. The morphotectonic observations indicate that throughout the studied area the EFZ extends WNWwards as a ca. 15 km wide belt, and is composed of some 21 fault segments, 5-25 km long. These segments form a north-dipping southern set and two south-dipping northern sets, all together working both sides of the Eskişehir graben. The faults are dominantly normal in character with a slight right-lateral component in the westernmost areas. The estimated total vertical displacement on certain northern and southern fault segments exceeds 450 m. In order to estimate the initiation age of the EFZ a brief stratigraphic review is given. The generally horizontal Pliocene terrestrial deposits are separated from the Miocene succession by a low-angular unconformity, and are cut in turn by the EFZ. Sedimentological data show that neither the distribution of the Pliocene depositional environments and their paleocurrent directions, nor the preserved Pliocene basal unconformity surface have a genetic relation to the EFZ. These data strongly suggest that the EFZ is a younger post-Pliocene active normal fault zone with low rates of deformation.

  16. Deformation of Sedimentary Rock Across the San Andreas Fault Zone: Mesoscale and Microscale Structures Displayed in Core From SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Kirschner, D. L.; Almeida, R.; Evans, J. P.; Guillemette, R. N.; Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.

    2007-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks captured in cores taken at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) provide an unparalleled sampling of deformation in the transition zone between creeping and locked segments of a major transform fault at 2.5-3.1 km vertical depth. These samples provide the unique opportunity to study deformation processes and the development of brittle structures within porous and granular rocks that have been subjected to variable loading rates and chemically reactive fluids while residing at the top of the seismogenic zone. The samples provide a transect from relatively undeformed host rock through highly fractured and sheared rock, and capture the two prominent zones of active, aseismic slip. Core recovery was almost complete. Wrap-around 1:1 map tracings of the outer surfaces of all cores characterize the lithology and mesoscale deformation. Cores from 3056-3067 m and 3141-3153 m measured depth (MD) sample moderately deformed rock at the western boundary of the fault zone. The cores display massive to finely laminated, pebbly arkosic sandstones with lesser amounts of fine-grained sandstone and siltstone. Numerous shear fractures and cm-thick cataclastic shear zones form a conjugate geometry indicating contraction at high angles to the San Andreas fault. Both intervals display minor faults that juxtapose different lithologies consistent with meters or greater of slip. Fracture density is variable but tends to increase with proximity to the minor faults. Cross-cutting relationships between shear fractures and cataclastic zones indicate a general progression from early faulting along thicker shear zones to later, more localized slip within shear zones and along fractures. Microstructures provide ample evidence for densification of the sandstones through grain-scale fracture and crushing, as well as fluid assisted processes of crack-sealing, dissolution-precipitation, and alteration-neocrystallization. Grain-scale features are consistent with these

  17. Mode-of-Failure Transitions in High Porosity Sedimentary and Ignimbrite Deposits, and Implications for Fault-Zone Structure and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Rawling, G. C.; Wilson, J. E.; Tobin, H.

    2001-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that fault-zone deformation processes, and thus structures and fault-zone architecture, vary with the petrophysical properties of the protolith. Factors controlling whether or not open fractures form within a given fault zone are of particular importance to understanding fault-zone impacts on fluid flow. We discuss three examples of mode-of-failure transitions from strike-slip and normal faults in sedimentary and volcanic protoliths. Each example illustrates a mechanism by which porosity was reduced over time, resulting in changes in the mechanical behavior of the faulted material. These temporal variations are recorded by overprinting relationships within fault-zone architectural elements. The Sand Hill normal growth fault cuts poorly lithified sediments of the Rio Grande rift, NM. Architectural elements include a fault core bound by tabular mixed zones, which are in turn bracketed by deformation-band damage zones. The mixed zones have been described in poorly lithified sediments only; they consist of material derived from adjacent beds during slip, which has been disaggregated and tectonically mixed. Structures developed during mixing and particulate flow include foliations defined by compositional bands and aligned grains and attenuated and disarticulated beds. These structures are cut by deformation bands in the footwall mixed zone. We interpret these relationships as recording a transition from bulk particulate flow (in normally consolidated sediment) to localized shear within deformation bands (in overconsolidated sediment) as the footwall of the fault was syntectonically exhumed. Mixed zones are also present in the San Gregorio fault zone, a branch of the San Andreas fault system. The San Gregorio fault was active through sedimentation and lithification of rocks currently exposed along the CA coast. Attenuated and boudinaged beds on the SW side of the fault are cut by fractures and veins. We interpret these features as

  18. Analecta of structures formed during the 28 June 1992 Landers-Big Bear, California earthquake sequence (including maps of shear zones, belts of shear zones, tectonic ridge, duplex en echelon fault, fault elements, and thrusts in restraining steps)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Johnson, N.A.; Johnson, K.M.; Wei, W.; Fleming, R.W.; Cruikshank, K.M.; Martosudarmo, S.Y.

    1997-12-31

    The June 28, 1992, M{sub s} 7.5 earthquake at Landers, California, which occurred about 10 km north of the community of Yucca Valley, California, produced spectacular ground rupturing more than 80 km in length (Hough and others, 1993). The ground rupturing, which was dominated by right-lateral shearing, extended along at least four distinct faults arranged broadly en echelon. The faults were connected through wide transfer zones by stepovers, consisting of right-lateral fault zones and tension cracks. The Landers earthquakes occurred in the desert of southeastern California, where details of ruptures were well preserved, and patterns of rupturing were generally unaffected by urbanization. The structures were varied and well-displayed and, because the differential displacements were so large, spectacular. The scarcity of vegetation, the aridity of the area, the compactness of the alluvium and bedrock, and the relative isotropy and brittleness of surficial materials collaborated to provide a marvelous visual record of the character of the deformation zones. The authors present a series of analecta -- that is, verbal clips or snippets -- dealing with a variety of structures, including belts of shear zones, segmentation of ruptures, rotating fault block, en echelon fault zones, releasing duplex structures, spines, and ramps. All of these structures are documented with detailed maps in text figures or in plates (in pocket). The purpose is to describe the structures and to present an understanding of the mechanics of their formation. Hence, most descriptions focus on structures where the authors have information on differential displacements as well as spatial data on the position and orientation of fractures.

  19. Shallow seismic structure of Kunlun fault zone in northern Tibetan Plateau, China: Implications for the 2001 M s8.1 Kunlun earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Mooney, W.D.; Ding, Z.; Yang, J.; Yao, Z.; Lou, H.

    2009-01-01

    The shallow seismic velocity structure of the Kunlun fault zone (KLFZ) was jointly deduced from seismic refraction profiling and the records of trapped waves that were excited by five explosions. The data were collected after the 2001 Kunlun M s8.1 earthquake in the northern Tibetan Plateau. Seismic phases for the in-line record sections (26 records up to a distance of 15 km) along the fault zone were analysed, and 1-D P- and S-wave velocity models of shallow crust within the fault zone were determined by using the seismic refraction method. Sixteen seismic stations were deployed along the off-line profile perpendicular to the fault zone. Fault-zone trapped waves appear clearly on the record sections, which were simulated with a 3-D finite difference algorithm. Quantitative analysis of the correlation coefficients of the synthetic and observed trapped waveforms indicates that the Kunlun fault-zone width is 300 m, and S-wave quality factor Q within the fault zone is 15. Significantly, S-wave velocities within the fault zone are reduced by 30-45 per cent from surrounding rocks to a depth of at least 1-2 km, while P-wave velocities are reduced by 7-20 per cent. A fault-zone with such P- and S-low velocities is an indication of high fluid pressure because Vs is affected more than Vp. The low-velocity and low-Q zone in the KLFZ model is the effect of multiple ruptures along the fault trace of the 2001 M s8.1 Kunlun earthquake. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  20. Variable deep structure of a midcontinent fault and fold zone from seismic reflection: La Salle deformation belt, Illinois basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Deformation within the United States mid-continent is frequently expressed as quasilinear zones of faulting and folding, such as the La Salle deformation belt, a northwest-trending series of folds cutting through the center of the Illinois basin. Seismic reflection profiles over the southern La Salle deformation belt reveal the three-dimensional structural style of deformation in the lower Paleozoic section and uppermost Precambrian(?) basement. Individual profiles and structural contour maps show for the first time that the folds of the La Salle deformation belt are underlain at depth by reverse faults that disrupt and offset intrabasement structure, offset the top of interpreted Precambrian basement, and accommodate folding of overlying Paleozoic strata. The folds do not represent development of initial dips by strata deposited over a preexisting basement high. Rather, the structures resemble subdued "Laramide-style" forced folds, in that Paleozoic stratal reflectors appear to be flexed over a fault-bounded basement uplift with the basement-cover contact folded concordantly with overlying strata. For about 40 km along strike, the dominant faults reverse their dip direction, alternating between east and west. Less well expressed antithetic or back thrusts appear to be associated with the dominant faults and could together describe a positive flower structure. The overall trend of this part of the La Salle deformation belt is disrupted by along-strike discontinuities that separate distinct fold culminations. Observations of dual vergence and along-strike discontinuities suggest an original deformation regime possibly involving limited transpression associated with distant late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita mountain building. Moderate-magnitude earthquakes located west of the western flank of the La Salle deformation belt have reverse and strike-slip mechanisms at upper trustai depths, which might be reactivating deep basement faults such as observed in this study

  1. Fault-related structural permeability: Qualitative insights of the damage-zone from micro-CT analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Nehler, Mathias; Bracke, Rolf; Stöckhert, Ferdinand

    2016-04-01

    Fault zones and their related structural permeability play a leading role in the migration of fluids through the continental crust. A first approximation to understanding the structural permeability conditions, and the estimation of its hydraulic properties (i.e. palaeopermeability and fracture porosity conditions) of the fault-related fracture mesh is the 2D analysis of its veinlets, usually made in thin-section. Those estimations are based in the geometrical parameters of the veinlets, such as average fracture density, length and aperture, which can be statistically modelled assuming penny-shaped fractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Thus, this model is related to fracture connectivity, its length and to the cube of the fracture apertures. In this way, the estimated values presents their own inaccuracies owing to the method used. Therefore, the study of the real spatial distribution of the veinlets of the fault-related fracture mesh (3D), feasible with the use of micro-CT analyses, is a first order factor to unravel both, the real structural permeability conditions of a fault-zone, together with the validation of previous estimations made in 2D analyses in thin-sections. This early contribution shows the preliminary results of a fault-related fracture mesh and its 3D spatial distribution in the damage zone of the Jorgillo Fault (JF), an ancient subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault exposed in the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. The JF is a ca. 20 km long NNW-striking strike-slip fault with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. The methodology consisted of the drilling of vertically oriented plugs of 5 mm in diameter located at different distances from the JF core - damage zone boundary. Each specimen was, then, scanned with an x-ray micro-CT scanner (ProCon X-Ray CTalpha) in order to assess the fracture mesh. X-rays were generated in a transmission target x-ray tube with acceleration voltages ranging from 90

  2. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  3. Fault zones in Triassic Muschelkalk limestones of the Upper Rhine Graben: Infrastructure characterization and permeability structure analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2014-05-01

    The characterization of fault zones is of particular importance in geothermal reservoirs since there may be great effects on fluid flow. Fault zones generally consist of two major hydromechanical units: the fault core and the damage zone, surrounded by the unaffected host rock. To improve predictions of fracture system parameters for each unit and resulting estimations of reservoir permeabilities at depths, we perform outcrop analogue studies. We analyze Middle Triassic Muschelkalk limestones that form one potential geothermal reservoir formation in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG), in quarries on its eastern graben shoulder. We measure the orientations and displacements of various fault zones and characterize the fracture systems within the fault zone units and the host rock. Important features in terms of reservoir permeability are the fracture aperture, the fracture connectivity and the fracture vertical extension. Fractures have to be connected to create a hydraulically relevant flow path and non-stratabound fractures could create a hydraulic connectivity between multiple layers. We observed a decreasing fracture length with increasing distance to the fault core but a better connectivity between shorter fractures in the well-developed damage zones. Our studies show, however, that the differing mechanical properties in the analyzed limestone-marl alternations are significant for the fracture propagation, even in the fault zones. Based on the field data we use analytical models to estimate the permeabilities of the analyzed fracture systems. Results show increased fracture frequencies in the fault zone damage zones and larger fracture apertures parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike and to the URG that lead to enhanced permeabilities compared with other fracture orientations. Mineralized fractures accumulated in directions parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike as well as observed mineralizations in some fault cores indicate a fluid flow along the fault

  4. Role of structural inheritances and major transfer fault-zones in the tectonic history of the Alboran Basin (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, Menchu; Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Balanya, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    reorganization (N-S shortening) of the basin, which encompass wrench tectonics, margin rotations, sub-basin inversions, bending of former extensional structures, and further shale-tectonics. The recent NW-SE and NE-SW trending conjugate wrench-fault system that bound the actual structural domains observed offshore locates over major transfer-faults zones from the Miocene extension. The rotated segments of basin-margins and concomitant structural bending, as well as changes in the tectonic regimen of the transfer-fault systems are expressive of the aftermath of superimposed extensional and compressional processes in the Alboran Basin. The spatial and temporary evolution of the tectonic deformation documented by geological and geophysical observables in the Alboran Sea basin provides new insights into the critical role of the tectonic heritage and major transfer fault-zones in the geodynamic history of the GAS. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by projects RNM-3713, RNM-215, CTM2009-07715 and CGL2009-11384 (MINECO, JA, and FEDER founds, Spain).

  5. Palaeopermeability structure within fault-damage zones: A snap-shot from microfracture analyses in a strike-slip system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Cembrano, Jose M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding fault zone permeability and its spatial distribution allows the assessment of fluid-migration leading to precipitation of hydrothermal minerals. This work is aimed at unraveling the conditions and distribution of fluid transport properties in fault zones based on hydrothermally filled microfractures, which reflect the ''frozen-in'' instantaneous advective hydrothermal activity and record palaeopermeability conditions of the fault-fracture system. We studied the Jorgillo Fault, an exposed 20 km long, left-lateral strike-slip fault, which juxtaposes Jurassic gabbro against metadiorite belonging to the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. Tracings of microfracture networks of 19 oriented thin sections from a 400 m long transect across the main fault trace was carried out to estimate the hydraulic properties of the low-strain fault damagezone, adjacent to the high-strain fault core, by assuming penny-shaped microfractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Palaeopermeability values of 9.1*10-11 to 3.2*10-13 m2 in the gabbro and of 5.0*10-10 to 1.2*10-13 m2 in the metadiorite were determined, both decreasing perpendicularly away from the fault core. Fracture porosity values range from 40.00% to 0.28%. The Jorgillo Fault has acted as a left-lateral dilational fault-bend, generating large-scale dilation sites north of the JF during co-seismic activity.

  6. Geophysical and isotopic mapping of preexisting crustal structures that influenced the location and development of the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Matti, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the role of preexisting crustal structure within the Peninsular Ranges batholith on determining the location of the San Jacinto fault zone by analysis of geophysical anomalies and initial strontium ratio data. A 1000-km-long boundary within the Peninsular Ranges batholith, separating relatively mafic, dense, and magnetic rocks of the western Peninsular Ranges batholith from the more felsic, less dense, and weakly magnetic rocks of the eastern Peninsular Ranges batholith, strikes north-northwest toward the San Jacinto fault zone. Modeling of the gravity and magnetic field anomalies caused by this boundary indicates that it extends to depths of at least 20 km. The anomalies do not cross the San Jacinto fault zone, but instead trend northwesterly and coincide with the fault zone. A 75-km-long gradient in initial strontium ratios (Sri) in the eastern Peninsular Ranges batholith coincides with the San Jacinto fault zone. Here rocks east of the fault are characterized by Sri greater than 0.706, indicating a source of largely continental crust, sedimentary materials, or different lithosphere. We argue that the physical property contrast produced by the Peninsular Ranges batholith boundary provided a mechanically favorable path for the San Jacinto fault zone, bypassing the San Gorgonio structural knot as slip was transferred from the San Andreas fault 1.0-1.5 Ma. Two historical M6.7 earthquakes may have nucleated along the Peninsular Ranges batholith discontinuity in San Jacinto Valley, suggesting that Peninsular Ranges batholith crustal structure may continue to affect how strain is accommodated along the San Jacinto fault zone. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  7. Metamorphic and structural evidence for significant vertical displacement along the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel shear zone in the Cordillera of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, J.A.; Whitney, D.L.; Hurlow, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the petrology and structure of the Skymo complex and adjacent terranes constrain the amount, timing, and sense of motion on a segment of the > 600-km-long Late Cretaceous - early Tertiary Ross Lake fault zone (RLFZ), a major orogen-parallel shear zone in the Cordillera of western North America. In the study area in the North Cascades, Washington state, the RLFZ accommodated significant pre-middle Eocene vertical displacement, and it juxtaposes the Skymo complex with upper amphibolite facies (650??-690??C and 6-7 kbar) Skagit Gneiss of the North Cascades crystalline core to the SW and andalusite-bearing phyllite of the Little Jack terrane (Intermontane superterrane) to the NE. The two main lithologic units of the Skymo complex, a primitive mafic intrusion and a fault-bounded block of granulite facies metasedimentary rocks, are unique in the North Cascades. Granulite facies conditions were attained during high-temperature (> 800??C), low pressure (??? 4 kbar) contact metamorphism associated with intrusion of the mafic magma. P-T estimates and reaction textures in garnet-orthopyroxene gneiss suggest that contact metamorphism followed earlier, higher pressure regional metamorphism. There is no evidence that the Skagit Gneiss experienced high-T - low-P contact metamorphism. In the Little Jack terrane, however, texturally late cordierite ?? spinel and partial replacement of andalusite by sillimanite near the terrane's fault contact with Skymo gabbro suggest that the Little Jack terrane experienced high-T (??? 600??C) - low-P (??? 4 kbar) contact metamorphism following earlier low-grade regional metamorphism. Similarities in the protoliths of metasedimentary rocks in the Skymo and Little Jack indicate that they may be part of the same terrane. Differences in pressure estimates for the Little Jack versus Skymo for regional metamorphism that preceded contact metamorphism indicate vertical displacement of ??? 10 km (west side up) on the strand

  8. Mesozoic reactivated transpressional structures and multi-stage tectonic deformation along the Hong-Che fault zone in the northwestern Junggar Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yangli; Wang, Xin; Rao, Gang; Wang, Renfu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition of paleo-strike-slip faulting is often difficult, particularly when the associated structures are presently inactive and covered by thick sediments. Fortunately, high-resolution 3D seismic reflection data can provide a powerful tool to solve this problem. In this study, we focus on the structural features and tectonic evolution of Hong-Che fault system, a paleo-strike-slip fault zone recognized in the NW margin of Junggar Basin by using the 2D and 3D seismic data. The results of our analysis demonstrate that: 1) The Middle Triassic to Jurassic dextral transpressional structures were developed along Hong-Che fault zone, which are characterized by the restraining bend on the southern segment, the highly localized shearing deformation on the central segment, and the horsetail splay faulting of a fault tip zone on the northern segment; 2) The Hong-Che fault zone had also experienced the Early Permian rifting and the Late Permian-Early Triassic tectonic inversion, which probably played important roles in controlling the subsequent tectonic deformation; and 3) The demonstrated dextral strike-slip faulting is consistent with the Middle Triassic-Jurassic deformation in the Ke-Bai, Wu-Xia, and Irtysh fault zones, and therefore supports the counterclockwise rotation of Junggar Basin, which might be the far-field effect of the collision between Qiangtang block and Songpan-Ganzi terrane in the Triassic. The results of this study also prove that high-resolution seismic reflection data can serve as a useful tool for investigating the buried paleo-structures.

  9. Rapid, decimeter-resolution fault zone topography mapped with Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nissen, E.; Saripalli, S.; Arrowsmith, R.; McGarey, P.; Scharer, K. M.; Williams, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in the generation of high-resolution topography have revolutionized our ability to detect subtle geomorphic features related to ground-rupturing earthquakes. Currently, the most popular topographic mapping methods are airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Though powerful, these laser scanning methods have some inherent drawbacks: airborne LiDAR is expensive and can be logistically complicated, while TLS is time consuming even for small field sites and suffers from patchy coverage due to its restricted field-of-view. An alternative mapping technique, called Structure from Motion (SfM), builds upon traditional photogrammetry to reproduce the topography and texture of a scene from photographs taken at varying viewpoints. The improved availability of cheap, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as camera platforms further expedites data collection by covering large areas efficiently with optimal camera angles. Here, we introduce a simple and affordable UAV- or balloon-based SfM mapping system which can produce dense point clouds and sub-decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) registered to geospatial coordinates using either the photograph's GPS tags or a few ground control points across the scene. The system is ideally suited for studying ruptures of prehistoric, historic, and modern earthquakes in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. We use two sites from southern California faults to illustrate. The first is the ~0.1 km2 Washington Street site, located on the Banning strand of the San Andreas fault near Thousand Palms. A high-resolution DEM with ~700 point/m2 was produced from 230 photos collected on a balloon platform flying at 50 m above the ground. The second site is the Galway Lake Road site, which spans a ~1 km strip of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake on the Emerson Fault. The 100 point/m2 DEM was produced from 267 photos taken with a balloon platform at a height of 60 m above the ground

  10. Low-velocity fault-zone guided waves: Numerical investigations of trapping efficiency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that shear waves trapped within low-velocity fault zones may be the most sensitive measure of fault-zone structure (Li et al., 1994a, 1994b). Finite-difference simulations demonstrate the effects of several types of complexity on observations of fault-zone trapped waves. Overlying sediments with a thickness more than one or two fault-zone widths and fault-zone step-overs more than one or two fault widths disrupt the wave guide. Fault kinks and changes in fault-zone width with depth leave readily observable trapped waves. We also demonstrate the effects of decreased trapped wave excitation with increasing hypocentral offset from the fault and the effects of varying the contrast between the velocity in the fault zone and surrounding hard rock. Careful field studies may provide dramatic improvements in our knowledge of fault-zone structure.

  11. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fault Zones: Methods and Examples From The San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Prentice, C. S.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths is challenging. Conventional seismic reflection methods do not work well in fault zones that consist of non-planar strata or that have large variations in velocity structure, two properties that occur in most fault zones. Understanding the structure and geometry of fault zones is important to elucidate the earthquake hazard associated with fault zones and the barrier effect that faults impose on subsurface fluid flow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) at San Andreas Lake on the San Francisco peninsula, we acquired combined seismic P-wave and S-wave reflection, refraction, and guided-wave data to image the principal strand of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that ruptured the surface during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and additional fault strands east of the rupture. The locations and geometries of these fault strands are important because the SFPUC is seismically retrofitting the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system, which provides much of the water for the San Francisco Bay area, and the delivery system is close to the SAF at San Andreas Lake. Seismic reflection images did not image the SAF zone well due to the brecciated bedrock, a lack of layered stratigraphy, and widely varying velocities. Tomographic P-wave velocity images clearly delineate the fault zone as a low-velocity zone at about 10 m depth in more competent rock, but due to soil saturation above the rock, the P-waves do not clearly image the fault strands at shallower depths. S-wave velocity images, however, clearly show a diagnostic low-velocity zone at the mapped 1906 surface break. To image the fault zone at greater depths, we utilized guided waves, which exhibit high amplitude seismic energy within fault zones. The guided waves appear to image the fault zone at varying depths depending on the frequency of the seismic waves. At higher frequencies (~30 to 40 Hz), the guided waves show strong amplification at the

  12. Fault Zone Architecture and Permeability-Structure Evolution in Basalts: the Generation of Fluid-Flow Pathways in low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Armitage, P. J.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding fluid flow and sealing potential in basaltic sequences is becoming increasingly important with the rising economic significance of intra- and sub-volcanic hydrocarbon plays. Fluid flow in upper-crustal brittle fault zones is dependent on the permeability of the fault rock assemblage and its architecture. Models for clastic sedimentary sequences typically involve a low-permeability fault core surrounded by a high-permeability damage zone, relative to the intermediate permeability of the undeformed host rock. Here we present a combined field, microstructural and experimental characterization of basalt-hosted fault zones from the Faroe Islands. Samples that are representative of the various fault zone components, and of early to late stage fault development, were used for experimental determination of the permeability structure of faults in basalts. Fault rock characterization reveals that the intensity of fault-associated brittle deformation increases towards the principal slip surface, from crackle and mosaic breccias, to chaotic breccias and cataclasite along the principal slip zone. Identified breccia styles involve collapse/infill, wear/abrasion, and implosion processes, which respectively indicate increasingly short-lived syn-kinematic permeability. Collapse/infill breccias indicate sustained fluid-migration pathways, as they require open, subterranean cavities that are formed faster than mineral precipitation can seal them. Wear/abrasion and implosion breccias record crack-seal behaviour during successive slip events. Experimental permeability measurements were performed with argon gas, at a range of confining pressures (20-200 MPa) and constant fluid pressure (10 MPa) using the Transient Pulse Decay technique. Results indicate that, within the depth range of ~0.3 to ~3.0 km, basalt-hosted faults evolve from relatively low-permeability mm-cm-scale displacement structures (e.g. ~9.47x10-18 to 3.40x10-19 m2), to relatively high-permeability metre

  13. Fault Zones from Top to Bottom: A Geophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W.; Beroza, G.; Kind, R.

    2006-12-01

    Geophysical studies of the Earth's crust, including fault zones, have greatly developed over the past 80 years. Among the first methods to be employed, seismic refraction and reflection profiles were recorded in the North American Gulf Coast to detect salt domes which were known to trap hydrocarbons. Seismic methods continue to be the most important geophysical technique in use today due to the methods' relatively high accuracy, high resolution, and great depth of penetration. However, in the past decade, a much expanded repertoire of seismic and non-seismic techniques have been brought to bear on studies of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle. Important insights have also been obtained using seismic tomography, measurements of seismic anisotropy, fault zone guided waves, borehole surveys, and geo-electrical, magnetic, and gravity methods. In this paper we briefly review recent geophysical progress in the study of the structure and internal properties of faults zones, from their surface exposures to their lower limit. We focus on the structure of faults within continental crystalline and competent sedimentary rock rather than within the overlying, poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We find that 1) The width of the fault damage zone is proportional to total fault offset, 2) Large strike-slip faults have vertical low-velocity, high-conductivity zones, 3) Anomalous fault zone properties undergo temporal "healing" after a large earthquake, and 4) Fault zones can either act as a fluid conduit or an impermeable barrier, depending on composition and history.

  14. Geophysical data reveal the crustal structure of the Alaska Range orogen within the aftershock zone of the Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Pellerin, L.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Geophysical information, including deep-crustal seismic reflection, magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data, cross the aftershock zone of the 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake. These data and aftershock seismicity, jointly interpreted, reveal the crustal structure of the right-lateral-slip Denali fault and the eastern Alaska Range orogen, as well as the relationship between this structure and seismicity. North of the Denali fault, strong seismic reflections from within the Alaska Range orogen show features that dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal crustal structures, probably ductile shear zones, that most likely formed during the Late Cretaceous, but these structures appear to be inactive, having produced little seismicity during the past 20 years. Furthermore, seismic reflections mainly dip north, whereas alignments in aftershock hypocenters dip south. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but modeling of MT, gravity, and magnetic data suggests that the Denali fault dips steeply to vertically. However, in an alternative structural model, the Denali fault is defined by one of the reflection bands that dips to the north and flattens into the middle crust of the Alaska Range orogen. Modeling of MT data indicates a rock body, having low electrical resistivity (>10 ??-m), that lies mainly at depths greater than 10 km, directly beneath aftershocks of the Denali fault earthquake. The maximum depth of aftershocks along the Denali fault is 10 km. This shallow depth may arise from a higher-than-normal geothermal gradient. Alternatively, the low electrical resistivity of deep rocks along the Denali fault may be associated with fluids that have weakened the lower crust and helped determine the depth extent of the after-shock zone.

  15. Fault Zone Architecture and Mineralogy: Implications in Fluid Flow and Permeability in Crustal Scale Fault Zones in the Southern Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquer, T.; Terrón, E.; Perez-Flores, P.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in the upper crust is controlled by the permeability and interconnection of fractures in the fault zones. The permeability within the fault zone is determined by its activity, architecture and, in particular, by the mineralogy of the core and the damage zone. Whereas the permeability structure of a fault zone can be defined by the volume proportion of the core with respect to the damage zone, the relationship between the mineralogy and permeability along fault zones still remains obscure. This work examines structural and mineralogical data to show the relationship between the mineral composition of the fault zone with its permeability in the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems (ALFS), Southern Chile. The LOFS is an active ca. 1200 km long strike-slip Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE in its master traces and NE in its subsidiary traces, with dextral and dextral-normal movement mostly developed in the last 6 My. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement fault system where seismic and field evidences record sinistral, sinistral-normal and sinistral-reverse movements. One 22-m-long NE transect was mapped orthogonal to a segment of the ALFS, where host rocks are Miocene andesitic rocks. Structural and XRD sampling were conducted in the core and damage zone. Structural mapping shows a multiple core, NW-striking fault zone with foliated gouge and an asymmetric damage zone, where the hanging wall has significantly higher mesoscopic fracture density than the footwall. The hanging wall is characterized by NW-striking, steeply dipping veins. Preliminary XRD results indicate the presence of homogenously distributed Ca-rich zeolite (mainly laumontite) in the core and the veins of the damage zone, which could indicate that the core acted as a conduit for low-temperature (ca. 220°C) fluids.

  16. Probable origin of the Livingston Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Watson H.

    1991-09-01

    Most faulting in the Coastal Plain is high angle and generally normal, but the faults in the Livingston Fault Zone are all medium-angle reverse, forming a series of parallel horsts and grabens. Parallel to the fault zone are a number of phenomena all leading to the conclusion that the faults result from the solution of a late Cretaceous salt anticline by fresh groundwater, which then migrated up to the Eutaw and perhaps Tuscaloosa aquifers, causing an anomalous elongated area of highly saline water. The origin of the Livingston Fault Zone and the association of salt water in underlying aquifers is of particular importance at this time in relation to environmental concerns associated with hazardous waste management in the area.

  17. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  18. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Okubo, Paul G; Shearer, Peter M

    2003-04-18

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (>/=13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  19. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Okubo, P.G.; Shearer, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (???13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  20. Understanding of the rheology of the structure on the NW-SE crosssection of the North Anatolian Fault Zone around İzmit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayın, Nurdan; Özer, Naşide; Ceylan, Savaş

    2016-04-01

    Anatolia is located on the Alp-Himalaya orogenic belt and consists of continental blocks which have historically different metamorphism and deformation. These blocks are separated by ophiolitic suture belts represented old oceanic crust and mantle. As a result of the continental collision of the Eurasian and African plates, the Anatolian plate is bounded by the dextral North Anatolian Fault Zone and the sinistral East Anatolian Fault Zone has been moving westward and simultaneously rotating counterclockwise since ~5 Ma. The North Anatolian Fault Zone splits into two branches bounding the different tectonic units of the Pontide, Armutlu-Ovacık and Sakarya Zones from north to south in the western part of 31E longitude of Northwestern Anatolia where is showing complex geological structures. The surface heat flow obtained from the temperature measurements in the shallow wells by different sources described to range from ~52 to ~60 mW m-2 , ~20 to ~36 mW m-2 and ~25 to ~35 mW m-2 in Istanbul-Zonguldak unit of Pontide Zone, Armutlu-Ovacık Zone and Sakarya Zone, respectively. The proportion of brittle to ductile behavior of the model is governed by the local crustal geotherm derived from surface heat flow measurements for these units. Temperature dependence of strain rate in the model is controlled by the creep equation.

  1. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  2. The seismic velocity structure of a foreshock zone on an oceanic transform fault: Imaging a rupture barrier to the 2008 Mw 6.0 earthquake on the Gofar fault, EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Collins, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    East Pacific Rise (EPR) oceanic transform faults are known to exhibit a number of unique seismicity characteristics, including abundant seismic swarms, a prevalence of aseismic slip, and high rates of foreshock activity. Until recently the details of how this behavior fits into the seismic cycle of large events that occur periodically on transforms have remained poorly understood. In 2008 the most recent seismic cycle of the western segment (G3) of the Gofar fault (4 degrees South on the EPR) ended with a Mw 6.0 earthquake. Seismicity associated with this event was recorded by a local array of ocean bottom seismometers, and earthquake locations reveal several distinct segments with unique slip behavior on the G3 fault. Preceding the Mw 6.0 event, a significant foreshock sequence was recorded just to the east of the mainshock rupture zone that included more than 20,000 detected earthquakes. This foreshock zone formed the eastern barrier to the mainshock rupture, and following the mainshock, seismicity rates within the foreshock zone remained unchanged. Based on aftershock locations of events following the 2007 Mw 6.0 event that completed the seismic cycle on the eastern end of the G3 fault, it appears that the same foreshock zone may have served as the western rupture barrier for that prior earthquake. Moreover, mainshock rupture associated with each of the last 8 large (~ Mw 6.0) events on the G3 fault seems to terminate at the same foreshock zone. In order to elucidate some of the structural controls on fault slip and earthquake rupture along transform faults, we present a seismic P-wave velocity profile crossing the center of the foreshock zone of the Gofar fault, as well as a profile for comparison across the neighboring Quebrada fault. Although tectonically similar, Quebrada does not sustain large earthquakes and is thought to accommodate slip primarily aseismically and with small magnitude earthquake swarms. Velocity profiles were obtained using data collected

  3. Quantitative Inversion of Seismic Fault Zone Waveforms in the Rupture Zone of the 1992 Landers Earthquake for Structural Properties at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Waveform modeling of seismic fault zone (FZ) trapped waves has the potential for providing a high-resolution imaging of seismic velocities, seismic attenuation, FZ width, and structural continuity at depth. From a digital waveform data set generated by 238 aftershocks of the 1992 Landers earthquake [William Lee, per. com., '99], we identified 60 events with good candidate trapped waves. Each event was recorded by 33 three-component, short-period (2 Hz), L-22 seismometers, 22 of which on a line crossing the surface rupture zone of the mainshock. Locations of 102 events out of the 238 aftershocks are given in the catalog of Richards-Dinger and Shearer [JGR, '00]. These include 16 events generating candidate trapped waves. A plane-wave fitting technique is applied to estimate the back-azimuth angle of the unlocated events that produce candidate trapped waves. The source-receiver distance for these events is estimated from the S - P travel time. Of the 60 candidate trapped waves, about 75% are generated by events with locations close to the FZ, while the reminder are likely produced by events at considerable distance from the fault. The latter observation is compatible with 3D numerical calculations of Igel et al. [Pageoph, '01]. The FZ waveforms with candidate trapped waves are modeled with a genetic inversion algorithm (GIA) that maximizes the correlation between observed and synthetic waveforms [Michael and Ben-Zion, ms. in preparation, '01]. The synthetic seismograms are generated with a two-dimensional analytical solution for a scalar wavefield in a layered vertical FZ between two quarter-spaces [Ben-Zion and Aki, BSSA,'90; Ben-Zion, JGR, '98]. Our previous results showed that the GIA is able to provide very good fits for Landers FZ waveforms with a model consisting of a single uniform FZ layer in a half space. However, it is possible to get equally good fits for a wide range of parameters. This is due to significant trade-offs among FZ width, propagation distance

  4. Seismic measurements of the internal properties of fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, W.D.; Ginzburg, A.

    1986-01-01

    The internal properties within and adjacent to fault zones are reviewed, principally on the basis of laboratory, borehole, and seismic refraction and reflection data. The deformation of rocks by faulting ranges from intragrain microcracking to severe alteration. Saturated microcracked and mildly fractured rocks do not exhibit a significant reduction in velocity, but, from borehole measurements, densely fractured rocks do show significantly reduced velocities, the amount of reduction generally proportional to the fracture density. Highly fractured rock and thick fault gouge along the creeping portion of the San Andreas fault are evidenced by a pronounced seismic low-velocity zone (LVZ), which is either very thin or absent along locked portions of the fault. Thus there is a correlation between fault slip behavior and seismic velocity structure within the fault zone; high pore pressure within the pronounced LVZ may be conductive to fault creep. Deep seismic reflection data indicate that crustal faults sometimes extend through the entire crust. Models of these data and geologic evidence are consistent with a composition of deep faults consisting of highly foliated, seismically anisotropic mylonites. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag, Basel.

  5. Slip compensation at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    to those of the main traces. In contrast, when the L/W < 2, the vertical slip is either increased or decreased as the horizontal slip is decreased, depending on the maturity of the linking zone. Thus, we argue that slip patterns at linking damage zones may be controlled by the LW-ratio of linking damage zones and hence structural maturities of the segmented fault systems. In conclusion, slip patterns at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures are various depending on the maturity of linkage zones and/or the rupture propagation direction. Therefore, the consideration of slip compensation as well as damage structures along surface ruptures must be very useful to understand fault evolution and, hence, to assess seismic hazards around active fault systems.

  6. Continuity of the West Napa Fault Zone Inferred from Aftershock Recordings on Fault-Crossing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R.; Goldman, M.; Slad, G. W.; Criley, C.; Chan, J. H.; Fay, R. P.; Fay, W.; Svitek, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    In an attempt to determine the continuity and lateral extent of the causative fault(s) of the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa earthquake and possible interconnections with other mapped faults, we recorded aftershocks on three closely spaced (100 m) seismograph arrays that were positioned across the coseismic rupture zone and across mapped faults located north and south of coseismic rupture. Array 1 was located in northwest Napa, between Highway 29 and the intersection of Redwood and Mt. Veeder roads, array 2 was located southwest of Napa, ~1 km north of Cuttings Wharf, and array 3 was located south of San Pablo Bay, within the town of Alhambra. Our intent was to record high-amplitude guided waves that only travel within the causative fault zone and its extensions (Li and Vidale, 1996). Preliminary analysis of seismic data from an M 3.2 aftershock shows high-amplitude (up to 1 cm/s) seismic waves occurred on seismographs within 100 m of mapped surface ruptures and fault zones. Northwest of Napa, the high amplitudes along array 1 coincide with zones of structural damage and wide spread surface ground cracking, and along array 2 near Cuttings Wharf, the high amplitudes occur slightly east of surface ruptures seen along Los Amigas Road. We also observe relatively high-amplitude seismic waves across the Franklin Fault (array 3), approximately 32 km southeast of the mainshock epicenter; this observation suggests the West Napa and the Franklin faults may be continuous or connected. Existing fault maps show that the Franklin Fault extends at least 15 km southward to the Calaveras Fault zone and the West Napa Fault extends at least 25 km north of our array 1. Collectively, the mapped faults, surface ruptures, and guided waves suggest that the West Napa- Franklin Fault zone may extend more than 85 km before it merges with the Calaveras Fault. Assuming a continuous fault zone, the West Napa - Franklin Fault zone may be capable of generating a much larger magnitude earthquake that

  7. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  8. Seismic velocity structure in the Hot Springs and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto fault zone, California, from double-difference tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Kurzon, I.; Vernon, F.

    2014-08-01

    We present tomographic images of crustal velocity structures in the complex Hot Springs and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) based on double-difference inversions of earthquake arrival times. We invert for VP, VS and hypocentre location within 50 × 50 × 20 km3 volumes, using 266 969 P and 148 249 S arrival times. We obtain high-fidelity images of seismic velocities with resolution on the order of a few kilometres from 2 to 12 km depth and validate the results using checkerboard tests. Due to the relatively large proportion of S-wave arrival times, we also obtain stable maps of VP/VS ratios in both regions. The velocity of the Trifurcation Area as a whole is lower than adjacent unfaulted material. We interpret a 4-km-wide low velocity zone with high VP/VS ratio in the trifurcation itself as related to fault zone damage. We also observe clear velocity contrasts across the Buck Ridge, Clark and Coyote Creek segments of the SJFZ. The Anza segment of the SJFZ, to the NW of the trifurcation area, displays a strong (up to 27 per cent) contrast of VS from 2 to 9 km depth. In the Hot Springs area, a low velocity zone between the Claremont and Casa Loma Strands narrows with depth, with clear velocity contrasts observed across both segments. A roughly 10-km-wide zone of low velocity and low VP/VS ratio at the NW tip of the Hot Springs fault is indicative of either unconsolidated sediments associated with the San Jacinto basin, or fluid-filled cracks within a broad deformation zone. High VP/VS ratios along the Anza segment could indicate a preferred nucleation location for future large earthquakes, while the across-fault velocity contrast suggests a preferred northwest rupture propagation direction for such events.

  9. Seismic velocity structure in the Hemet Stepover and Trifurcation Areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone from double-difference earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F.; Kurzon, I.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of crustal velocity structures in the Hemet Stepover and Trifurcation areas of the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) based on double-difference inversions of earthquake arrival times. We discretize both regions with a horizontal 250m grid spacing and a vertical 500m spacing within 50km by 50km by 20km volumes. We invert for VP, VS, and hypocenter location using data from 16064 earthquakes recorded at 136 stations. In total, we use 266,969 P and 148,249 S arrivals to constrain the seismic velocity structures in the two regions. With large numbers of both arrivals, we are able to obtain images of VP and VS at similar resolutions, enabling us to make spatial maps of and interpret the VP/VS ratios. Though ray coverage is limited at shallow depths, we obtain high-fidelity images of seismic velocities from 2 to 12 km, and validate the results using checkerboard tests. The tomographic images indicate that the velocity of the trifurcation area as a whole is lower than adjacent unfaulted material. We interpret a 4km-wide low velocity zone in the trifurcation itself as fault zone damage related due to high VP/VS ratio. We also observe clear velocity contrasts across the Buck Ridge, Clark, and Coyote Creek segments of the SJFZ. The Anza segment of the SJFZ, to the NW of the trifurcation area, displays a strong (up to 27%) contrast of VS from 2km to 9km. In the Hemet Stepover, a low velocity zone between the Claremont and Casa Loma Strands narrows with depth, with clear velocity contrasts observed across both segments. A roughly 10km-wide zone of low velocity and low VP/VS ratio at the NW tip of the Hot Springs fault is indicative of either unconsolidated sediments associated with the San Jacinto basin, or fluid-filled cracks within a broad deformation zone. Relocated seismicity tends to align with the surface traces of the various fault strands, though it is offset to the northeast of the Casa Loma-Clark strand and to the southwest of the Hot Springs

  10. Remote sensing and field analysis of the Palaeozoic structural style in NW Libya: The Qarqaf arch a paleo-transfer fault zone between the Ghadamis and Murzuq basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowicz, Jean; Benissa, Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    The N75°E-trending Qarqaf arch in NW Libya separates the Ghadamis and Murzuq basins. We have updated existing geological maps by remote sensing analysis and fieldwork in order to describe the tectonic style of the Palaeozoic units. We have evidenced a Bir Aishah anticline, a Wadi Ash Shabiyat graben and arrays of sedimentary and/or vein quartz dykes that relate to extension fractures or open faults some of them being filled up by on-going sedimentation. We show that continuous brittle syn-depositional deformation occurred throughout the Palaeozoic and progressively with time focused into major faults. The Qarqaf arch is a Palaeozoic right-lateral fault zone comprising main conjugate dextral N60°E and sinistral N90°E fault families. It also comprises ∼ N-striking extensional faults with related drag or fault-propagation folds. The Palaeozoic tectonic style is that of rift basins connected by a major transfer fault zone. The arch is as a consequence of strike-slip mechanism. In order to account for distinct folds affecting the Carboniferous strata we argue that partly consolidated silty Devonian and Carboniferous deposits slid in mass by places at the end of their deposition over tilting Devonian layers. Our model is alternative to the currently considered concept of major Variscan compressional orogen in this area. The regional so called 'Variscan' age disconformity actually is the Triassic early Neo-Tethyan event. These general concepts have potential impact on basin modelling of subsidence, uplift, thermal history and hydrocarbon migration. Any new structural geology study in this area is important for oil exploration.

  11. Displacements and segment linkage in strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.

    Small-scale, well exposed strike-slip fault zones near Kirkcudbright, Scotland, cut sub-vertical bedding, so that mapped bed separations allow the displacements, linkage and evolution of fault segments to be assessed. Displacement variations along the segments can be related to lithologic variations, conjugate relationships, offsets, segment linkage and fault bends. High displacement gradients at the tips of conjugate and offset faults produce convex-upwards ( E-type) displacement-distance ( d-x) profiles. Contractional fault bends and linkage points are marked by a decrease in fault displacement, producing partially concave-upwards ( D-type) d-x profiles. Where fault displacement gradients are steep, wallrocks are marked by structures such as synthetic faults, normal drag folding, ductile strain and veining, which transfer displacement. The faults studied tend to have lower r/ dMAX ratios (where r = distance between the point of maximum displacement and the fault tip on a particular profile, and dMAX = maximum displacement on the profile) than are shown by normal faults in map view. This may be because r is measured parallel to the displacement direction and/or because of lithologic variations.

  12. A method for generating volumetric fault zone grids for pillar gridded reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Dongfang; Røe, Per; Tveranger, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The internal structure and petrophysical property distribution of fault zones are commonly exceedingly complex compared to the surrounding host rock from which they are derived. This in turn produces highly complex fluid flow patterns which affect petroleum migration and trapping as well as reservoir behavior during production and injection. Detailed rendering and forecasting of fluid flow inside fault zones require high-resolution, explicit models of fault zone structure and properties. A fundamental requirement for achieving this is the ability to create volumetric grids in which modeling of fault zone structures and properties can be performed. Answering this need, a method for generating volumetric fault zone grids which can be seamlessly integrated into existing standard reservoir modeling tools is presented. The algorithm has been tested on a wide range of fault configurations of varying complexity, providing flexible modeling grids which in turn can be populated with fault zone structures and properties.

  13. Late Cenozoic Reverse Faulting in the Fall Zone, Southeastern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Berquist Jr; Bailey

    1999-11-01

    A set of en-echelon reverse faults cut Paleozoic metamorphosed igneous rocks of the Piedmont and overlying late Cenozoic sediments at the Old Hickory Heavy Mineral Deposit in the Fall Zone of southeastern Virginia. Diorite of the eastern Slate Belt was faulted over nearshore to shore-face deposits of the Pliocene Yorktown Formation. These NW-SE-striking faults experienced oblique dip-slip movement with a maximum displacement of up to 6 m on individual faults. Faults tip out along strike and are overlain by distinct cobble beds, suggesting that sediment deposition and faulting were contemporaneous. Deformation at Old Hickory may have been formed by reactivation of existing Paleozoic structures under a regionally extensive compressional stress field parallel to the modern one. PMID:10517887

  14. Late Cenozoic Reverse Faulting in the Fall Zone, Southeastern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Berquist Jr; Bailey

    1999-11-01

    A set of en-echelon reverse faults cut Paleozoic metamorphosed igneous rocks of the Piedmont and overlying late Cenozoic sediments at the Old Hickory Heavy Mineral Deposit in the Fall Zone of southeastern Virginia. Diorite of the eastern Slate Belt was faulted over nearshore to shore-face deposits of the Pliocene Yorktown Formation. These NW-SE-striking faults experienced oblique dip-slip movement with a maximum displacement of up to 6 m on individual faults. Faults tip out along strike and are overlain by distinct cobble beds, suggesting that sediment deposition and faulting were contemporaneous. Deformation at Old Hickory may have been formed by reactivation of existing Paleozoic structures under a regionally extensive compressional stress field parallel to the modern one.

  15. Some Recent Laboratory Measurements of Fault Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    depth is likely to occur through these larger-scale features rather than through the matrix of the rock. Then a `typical' fault structure might consist of a narrow, low-permeability fault zone surrounded by a higher permeability damage zone, in which the damage zone acts as a conduit for fluids parallel to the fault. The low-permeability, often clay-rich shear zone will impede flow across the fault. Quartzo-feldspathic lithologies such as those of the Nojima Fault in Japan, fit this scenario. However, such a fault model may not be appropriate in many cases, particularly in sedimentary sequences. For instance, there may be little difference in the permeability of the fault-rock and surrounding rock in clay-rich sandstones or siltstones, such as those of the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan. For interbedded sandstones and siltstones sequences such as the Moab Fault in Utah, clay-rich layers may be entrained in the fault zone, forming a continuous barrier to fluid flow (fault gouge) across the fault, but with very different damage zone/country rock evolution and hydrologic properties.

  16. Porosity variations in and around normal fault zones: implications for fault seal and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, David; Neilson, Joyce; Farrell, Natalie; Timms, Nick; Wilson, Moyra

    2015-04-01

    Porosity forms the building blocks for permeability, exerts a significant influence on the acoustic response of rocks to elastic waves, and fundamentally influences rock strength. And yet, published studies of porosity around fault zones or in faulted rock are relatively rare, and are hugely dominated by those of fault zone permeability. We present new data from detailed studies of porosity variations around normal faults in sandstone and limestone. We have developed an integrated approach to porosity characterisation in faulted rock exploiting different techniques to understand variations in the data. From systematic samples taken across exposed normal faults in limestone (Malta) and sandstone (Scotland), we combine digital image analysis on thin sections (optical and electron microscopy), core plug analysis (He porosimetry) and mercury injection capillary pressures (MICP). Our sampling includes representative material from undeformed protoliths and fault rocks from the footwall and hanging wall. Fault-related porosity can produce anisotropic permeability with a 'fast' direction parallel to the slip vector in a sandstone-hosted normal fault. Undeformed sandstones in the same unit exhibit maximum permeability in a sub-horizontal direction parallel to lamination in dune-bedded sandstones. Fault-related deformation produces anisotropic pores and pore networks with long axes aligned sub-vertically and this controls the permeability anisotropy, even under confining pressures up to 100 MPa. Fault-related porosity also has interesting consequences for the elastic properties and velocity structure of normal fault zones. Relationships between texture, pore type and acoustic velocity have been well documented in undeformed limestone. We have extended this work to include the effects of faulting on carbonate textures, pore types and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp, Vs) using a suite of normal fault zones in Malta, with displacements ranging from 0.5 to 90 m. Our results show a

  17. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  18. Significance of brittle deformation in the footwall of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Smithy Creek Fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund Snee, J.-E.; Toy, V. G.; Gessner, K.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithy Creek Fault represents a rare exposure of a brittle fault zone within Australian Plate rocks that constitute the footwall of the Alpine Fault zone in Westland, New Zealand. Outcrop mapping and paleostress analysis of the Smithy Creek Fault were conducted to characterize deformation and mineralization in the footwall of the nearby Alpine Fault, and the timing of these processes relative to the modern tectonic regime. While unfavorably oriented, the dextral oblique Smithy Creek thrust has kinematics compatible with slip in the current stress regime and offsets a basement unconformity beneath Holocene glaciofluvial sediments. A greater than 100 m wide damage zone and more than 8 m wide, extensively fractured fault core are consistent with total displacement on the kilometer scale. Based on our observations we propose that an asymmetric damage zone containing quartz-carbonate-chlorite-epidote veins is focused in the footwall. Damage zone asymmetry likely resulted from the fact that the hanging wall was mostly deformed at greater depth than the footwall, rather than resulting from material contrasts across the fault plane. Kinematic inversions on mineralized fractures within the damage zone suggest veins formed in the current stress regime, from fluids comparable to those now circulating in the footwall. The Smithy Creek Fault zone is therefore a rare exhumed example of the modern footwall hydrothermal system, and of a structure actively accommodating footwall deformation near the Alpine Fault zone. Two significantly less mature, subvertical faults having narrow (20 cm or less) damage zones and similar orientations to nearby strike-slip segments of the Alpine Fault crosscut the mineralized zone at Smithy Creek. We envisage that hydrothermal mineralization strengthened the fault core, causing it to widen as later slip was partitioned into the (now) weaker surrounding damage zone. With progressive alteration, formation of favorably oriented faults became

  19. Characterising the Alpine Fault Damage Zone using Fault Zone Guided Waves, South Westland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, J. D.; Gulley, A.; Boese, C. M.; Malin, P. E.; Townend, J.; Thurber, C. H.; Guo, B.; Sutherland, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fault Zone Guided Waves (FZGWs) are observed within New Zealand's transpressional continental plate boundary, the Alpine Fault, which is late in its typical seismic cycle. Distinctive dispersive seismic coda waves (~7-35 Hz), trapped within the low-velocity fault damage zone, have been recorded on three component 2 Hz borehole seismometers installed within 20 m of the principal slip zone in the shallow (< 150 m deep) DFDP-1 boreholes. Near the central Alpine Fault, known for low background seismicity, FZGW-generating microseismic events are located beyond the catchment-scale strike-slip and thrust segment partitioning of the fault indicating lateral connectivity of the low-velocity zone immediately below the near-surface segmentation. Double-difference earthquake relocation of events using the dense SAMBA and WIZARD seismometer arrays allows spatio-temporal patterns of 2013 events to be analysed and the segmentation and low velocity zone depth extent further explored. Three layer, dispersion modeling of the low-velocity zone indicates a waveguide width of 60-200 m with a 10-40% reduction in S-wave velocity, similar to that inferred for the fault core of other mature plate boundary faults such as the San Andreas and North Anatolian Faults.

  20. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  1. Damage, permeability and sealing processes of an exhumed seismic fault zone; The Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Thomas; Rempe, Marieke; Smith, Steven; Renner, Joerg; Di Toro, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ) in the Italian Southern Alps has been extensively studied as a natural laboratory for seismic faulting. Ancient seismicity is attested by the widespread occurrence of cataclasites associated with pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts) formed at 9 - 11 km depth in tonalite host rock at ambient temperatures of 250 - 300° C. Here we sythesise systematic meso- and micro-structural data with permeability and ultrasonic velocity laboratory measurements from samples collected along fault transects, in order to define the damage structure, fluid flow properties and sealing history of a seismogenic source in the crystalline basement. The GLFZ (~600m wide) and surrounding tonalite wall rocks have a broadly symmetric damage structure and can be divided in to five distinct zones, distinguished by large variations in fracture density, distribution of pseudotachylyte, volume of fault rock materials, and microfracture sealing characteristics. The ~80 m wide central zone has pervasive fracture damage in the form of dense cataclastic fault-fracture networks, and is bordered by two unusually (2 m) thick and continuous cataclastic horizons. This central zone is flanked by outer damage zones ~250 m wide where the fracture density is lower, and individual fault surfaces surround relatively intact blocks of tonalite. In the southern damage zone, macroscopic fracture density (faults + joints) increases gradually from background wall-rock values towards the central zone where it remains relatively high throughout. The boundary between the wall rocks and the southern damage zone is defined by an abrupt transition from joints to cataclasite- and pseudotachylyte-bearing faults. Fracture density drops off sharply within the northern damage zone. Within and immediately surrounding the central zone, the syn-tectonic sealing of both micro- and macro-fractures by epidote, K-feldspar, and chlorite minerals was pervasive, resulting in low permeabilities

  2. Fracturing and rock pulverization along an exhumed seismogenic fault zone in dolostones: The Foiana Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, Michele; Aretusini, Stefano; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2015-07-01

    The Foiana Fault Zone (FFZ) is a major sinistral transpressive fault zone exhumed from < 2 km depth in the Italian Southern Alps. The fault zone crosscuts thick sequences of sedimentary dolostones and shows increasing cumulative throw (0.3-1.8 km) moving from south to north along fault strike. The FFZ consists of variably fractured and fragmented dolostones locally cut by small-displacement (< 0.5 m) faults containing discrete, highly-reflective (so-called "mirror-like") slip surfaces. The mirror-like slip surfaces are typically embedded within fine-grained cataclasite layers up to a few centimeters thick. Preservation of bedding planes in the fragmented dolostones indicates a lack of significant shear strain. Instead, the fragmented dolostones are affected by in-situ shattering from the centimeter down to the micrometer scale, resembling pulverized rocks in crystalline lithologies. Detailed field and aerial structural mapping reveals significant changes in the structure of the FFZ along strike. In particular, the fault zone exhibits large variations in thickness (from c. 100 m in the north to more than 300 m in the south) and changes in mean fault orientation and fault kinematics (from dominant oblique- and strike-slip in the north to dip-slip reverse in the south), together with the reactivation of preexisting anisotropies (i.e. bedding). Overall, the structure of the FFZ, when considered together with possible variable exhumation levels along strike, compares favorably to the predicted damage distribution in three-dimensional earthquake rupture simulations on strike-slip faults, as well as to the characteristics of active seismic sources hosted in carbonate rocks as illuminated by recent seismological studies.

  3. The Maradi fault zone: 3-D imagery of a classic wrench fault in Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhaus, D. )

    1993-09-01

    The Maradi fault zone extends for almost 350 km in a north-northwest-south-southeast direction from the Oman Mountain foothills into the Arabian Sea, thereby dissecting two prolific hydrocarbon provinces, the Ghaba and Fahud salt basins. During its major Late Cretaceous period of movement, the Maradi fault zone acted as a left-lateral wrench fault. An early exploration campaign based on two-dimensional seismic targeted at fractured Cretaceous carbonates had mixed success and resulted in the discovery of one producing oil field. The structural complexity, rapidly varying carbonate facies, and uncertain fracture distribution prevented further drilling activity. In 1990 a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey covering some 500 km[sup 2] was acquired over the transpressional northern part of the Maradi fault zone. The good data quality and the focusing power of 3-D has enabled stunning insight into the complex structural style of a [open quotes]textbook[close quotes] wrench fault, even at deeper levels and below reverse faults hitherto unexplored. Subtle thickness changes within the carbonate reservoir and the unconformably overlying shale seal provided the tool for the identification of possible shoals and depocenters. Horizon attribute maps revealed in detail the various structural components of the wrench assemblage and highlighted areas of increased small-scale faulting/fracturing. The results of four recent exploration wells will be demonstrated and their impact on the interpretation discussed.

  4. Pseudotachylyte-bearing faults and shear zones along the Norumbega fault system in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Price, N. A.; Swanson, M.; Pollock, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Norumbega fault system represents the eroded roots of a >400 km long fault system that records a Middle Paleozoic through Mesozoic history of superimposed deformational processes. The Paleozoic history is dominated by right lateral shearing that evolved from a wide zone of regional scale dextral transpression to more highly focused and in many cases seismogenic slip along relatively narrow faults and shear zones. The Mesozoic history, largely deduced through geochronological studies, likely involved localized reactivation in association with the transition between Late Paleozoic dextral transpression and Early Mesozoic extension in the northern Appalachians. Pseudotachylyte, found in a variety of structural settings, has been identified on numerous fault strands along the southern 250 km of the fault system in Maine and provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate evolving seismogenic processes, at a variety of depths, along a regional scale fault system. The oldest pseudotachylyte (Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous) formed at frictional-to-viscous transitional depths during dextral deformation and is most commonly characterized by multiple generations of foliation-parallel frictional melt veins that were subsequently deformed through viscous shearing and transformed into thin ultramylonite layers. While this variety of pseudotachylyte has only been positively identified along three ~25 km long fault segments within the central portion of the Norumbega (e.g., Sandhill Corner), we speculate it may be more widespread in the fault system owing to difficulties in recognition in the field and a lack of detailed imaging and laboratory studies of mylonite-hosted pseudotachylyte-bearing rocks in the fault system. Younger (Permian-Early Triassic) undeformed pseudotachylyte-bearing faults have been found discontinuously along much of the Norumbega and presumably these occurrences reflect countless high velocity coseismic slip events at shallower depths. Spectacularly

  5. A neotectonic tour of the Death Valley fault zone, Inyo County

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The Death Valley fault zone has recently been evaluated by the Division of Mines and Geology for zoning under the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. This act requires the State Geologist to zone for special studies those faults that are sufficiently active and well defined as to constitute a potential hazard to structures from surface faulting or fault creep. The Death Valley fault zone is part of a system of faults that extends over 180 miles (300 km) from Fish Lake Valley in Nevada to the Garlock fault. The northern part of this system, the Northern Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone, is an active right-lateral fault zone. The southern part of the system, the Death Valley fault zone, is a right-lateral oblique-slip fault between Furnace Creek and Shoreline Butte. From Shoreline Butte to the Garlock fault, it is a right-lateral strike-slip fault. Landforms along this fault indicate that it is the source of many earthquakes and that it has been active in Holocene time. The heights of the scarps and magnitude of the smallest right-lateral offsets (4 feet; 1.2 m) suggest that the most recent of these events was M 6.5 or larger. The freshness of the geomorphic features and the youth of the offset materials suggest that event occurred late in the Holocene, and that multiple Holocene earthquakes have occurred.

  6. The permeability of fault zones: a case study of the Dead Sea rift (Middle East)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Gabay; Eyal, Shalev; Yoseph, Yechieli; Amir, Sagy; Noam, Weisbrod

    2014-03-01

    Fault zone architecture plays an important role in flow regimes of hydrological systems. Fault zones can act as conduits, barriers, or conduits/barrier systems depending on their spatial architecture. The goal of this study is to determine the fault-zone permeability structure and its effect on the local hydrogeological system in the Dead Sea fault system. Permeability was measured on small-scale outcrop plug samples at four faults along the Dead Sea fault system, and large-scale slug tests in four boreholes, in different parts of the fault, at Yair fault in Israel. The research results show that values in the damage zone are two to five orders of magnitude higher than those of the fault core (~3.5 × 10-10, 1 × 10-15 m2 respectively), resulting in an anisotropic permeability structure for the overall fault zone and preferable flow parallel to the fault. A set of injection tests in the Yair fault damage zone revealed a water-pressure-dependent behavior. The permeability of this zone increases when employing a higher water pressure in the fault fracture-dominated damage zone, due to the reopening of fractures.

  7. Influence of syn-sedimentary faults on orogenic structures in a collisional belt: Insights from the inner zone of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the possible influence of syn-sedimentary structures on the development of orogenic structures during positive tectonic inversion in the inner Northern Apennines (Italy). Examples from key areas located in southern Tuscany provided original cartographic, structural and kinematics data for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene thrusts, organized in duplex systems, verging in the opposite direction of the foreland propagation (back-thrusts), which affected the Late Triassic-Oligocene sedimentary succession of the Tuscan Domain, previously affected by pre-orogenic structures. These latter consist of mesoscopic-to cartographic-scale Jurassic syn-sedimentary normal faults and extensional structures, which gave rise to effective stratigraphic lateral variation and mechanical heterogeneities. Structural analysis of both syn-sedimentary faults and back-thrusts were therefore compared in order to discuss the possible role of the pre-existing anisotropies in influencing the evolution of the back-thrusts. As a result, it can be reasonably proposed that back-thrusts trajectories and stacking pattern were controlled by relevant syn-sedimentary normal faults; these latter were reactivated, in some cases, if properly oriented. Such an issue adds new inputs for discussing the potential role of structural inheritance during tectonic inversions, and helps to better understand the processes suitable for the development of back-thrusts in the inner zones of orogenic belts, as it is the case of the inner Northern Apennines.

  8. Geophysical evidence for wedging in the San Gorgonio Pass structural knot, southern San Andreas fault zone, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Matti, J.C.; Hauksson, E.; Morton, D.M.; Christensen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical data and surface geology define intertonguing thrust wedges that form the upper crust in the San Gorgonio Pass region. This picture serves as the basis for inferring past fault movements within the San Andreas system, which are fundamental to understanding the tectonic evolution of the San Gorgonio Pass region. Interpretation of gravity data indicates that sedimentary rocks have been thrust at least 5 km in the central part of San Gorgonio Pass beneath basement rocks of the southeast San Bernardino Mountains. Subtle, long-wavelength magnetic anomalies indicate that a magnetic body extends in the subsurface north of San Gorgonio Pass and south under Peninsular Ranges basement, and has a southern edge that is roughly parallel to, but 5-6 km south of, the surface trace of the Banning fault. This deep magnetic body is composed either of upper-plate rocks of San Gabriel Mountains basement or rocks of San Bernardino Mountains basement or both. We suggest that transpression across the San Gorgonio Pass region drove a wedge of Peninsular Ranges basement and its overlying sedimentary cover northward into the San Bernardino Mountains during the Neogene, offsetting the Banning fault at shallow depth. Average rates of convergence implied by this offset are broadly consistent with estimates of convergence from other geologic and geodetic data. Seismicity suggests a deeper detachment surface beneath the deep magnetic body. This interpretation suggests that the fault mapped at the surface evolved not only in map but also in cross-sectional view. Given the multilayered nature of deformation, it is unlikely that the San Andreas fault will rupture cleanly through the complex structures in San Gorgonio Pass. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  9. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  10. Geophysical investigation of the Hockai Fault Zone, Eastern Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Nguyen, Frédéric; Halleux, Lucien; Hölz, Sebastian; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of a regional project evaluating the geothermal potential of the Wallonian Region of Belgium, the Hockai Fault Zone has been identified as one of the most interesting targets. It is a seismically active fault zone that hosted the largest historical earthquake in Northwestern Europe, the M6-6.5 Verviers event in 1692 as well as a swarm of small earthquakes that was recorded in 1989-90. On the surface, the presence of the fault zones is marked by a series of geomorphic features, such as several landslides near the borders in the northern part, repeated NW-SE oriented scarps all along the Eastern border (over a distance of 40 km), river diversions and captures with formation of paleo-valleys. Along the most prominent paleo-valley, the Paleo-Warche Valley crossing the fault zone over a distance of 5 km, a geophysical survey has been organized by several teams to better characterize the shallow (<150 m) subsurface of the fault zone. It included electro-magnetic sounding (frequency-based and TEM), shallow seismics (refraction, walk-away, surface waves analysis), electrical resistivity tomography as well as ambient noise recordings. To support an integrated interpretation of all geophysical results in combination with geomorphic and seismo-tectonic aspects, surface morphology, soundings and profiles were represented in a 3D model. This model clearly reveals low-resistivity and low-velocity zones near the Eastern border of the fault zone, vertically above the hypocenters of the 1989-90 earthquake swarm. Across the structure, low-resistivity zones have a limited extent while they are repeatedly identified all along Eastern border.

  11. Fold-to-fault progression of a major thrust zone revealed in horses of the North Mountain fault zone, Virginia and West Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orndorff, Randall C.

    2012-01-01

    The method of emplacement and sequential deformation of major thrust zones may be deciphered by detailed geologic mapping of these important structures. Thrust fault zones may have added complexity when horse blocks are contained within them. However, these horses can be an important indicator of the fault development holding information on fault-propagation folding or fold-to-fault progression. The North Mountain fault zone of the Central Appalachians, USA, was studied in order to better understand the relationships of horse blocks to hanging wall and footwall structures. The North Mountain fault zone in northwestern Virginia and eastern panhandle of West Virginia is the Late Mississippian to Permian Alleghanian structure that developed after regional-scale folding. Evidence for this deformation sequence is a consistent progression of right-side up to overturned strata in horses within the fault zone. Rocks on the southeast side (hinterland) of the zone are almost exclusively right-side up, whereas rocks on the northwest side (foreland) of the zone are almost exclusively overturned. This suggests that the fault zone developed along the overturned southeast limb of a syncline to the northwest and the adjacent upright limb of a faulted anticline to the southeast.

  12. Complex Rift-Parallel, Strike-Slip Faulting in Iceland: Kinematic Analysis of the Gljúfurá Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanfito, A.; Karson, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The N-S striking Gljúfurá Fault Zone is an anomalous, dextral, strike-slip fault cutting Tertiary basaltic lavas in west-central Iceland. The fault zone is nearly parallel to structures formed at extinct spreading centers that were active from ~15 to 7 Ma ago in this region, suggesting ridge-parallel strike-slip faulting. The fault zone is well exposed in a river gorge for ~2 km along a well-defined regional lineament. The combined damage zone and fault core are about 50 m wide revealing an especially intense and complex style of deformation compared to other Icelandic fault zones. Basaltic lava flows on either side of the fault zone are cut by numerous closely spaced (10s of cm to m) Riedel shear fractures that grade into a fault core of progressively more intensely fractured lava and strongly altered and mineralized fault breccias, cataclasite and fault gouge. Riedel shears are frequently rotated or bend into the main fault zone. Distinctive bands of fault breccia derived from lava flow interiors, flow tops and dike rock are mapped for tens of meters along strike and reach thicknesses of several meters wide. Breccias contain angular basaltic fragments that range from few meters to millimeters. Fault breccias are typically clast supported with a matix of finely comminuted basalt clasts to clay gouge. 'Jigsaw' breccias are supported by a calcite matrix. Discrete faults and shear fractures show dominantly gently plunging slickenlines and abundant kinematic indicators showing dextral>normal oblique slip. Zeolite and calcite veins show multiple episodes of extension. Local left steps in fault zone are marked by extensional duplex structures with vertical separations of tens of meters bounded by major strike-slip fault strands. The overall architecture of the fault zone in interpreted as an exhumed flower structure. Numerous deformed and undeformed basaltic dikes sub-parallel the deformation structures, suggesting synkinematic intrusion. Some dikes deviate from the

  13. Characterization of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures in the offshore Santa Maria Basin, south-central California: Chapter CC of Evolution of sedimentary basins/onshore oil and gas investigations - Santa Maria province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willingham, C. Richard; Rietman, Jan D.; Heck, Ronald G.; Lettis, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone trends subparallel to the south-central California coast for 110 km from north of Point Estero to south of Purisima Point and forms the eastern margin of the present offshore Santa Maria Basin. Knowledge of the attributes of the Hosgri Fault Zone is important for petroleum development, seismic engineering, and environmental planning in the region. Because it lies offshore along its entire reach, our characterizations of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures are primarily based on the analysis of over 10,000 km of common-depth-point marine seismic reflection data collected from a 5,000-km2 area of the central and eastern parts of the offshore Santa Maria Basin. We describe and illustrate the along-strike and downdip geometry of the Hosgri Fault Zone over its entire length and provide examples of interpreted seismic reflection records and a map of the structural trends of the fault zone and adjacent structures in the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. The seismic data are integrated with offshore well and seafloor geologic data to describe the age and seismic appearance of offshore geologic units and marker horizons. We develop a basin-wide seismic velocity model for depth conversions and map three major unconformities along the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. Accompanying plates include maps that are also presented as figures in the report. Appendix A provides microfossil data from selected wells and appendix B includes uninterpreted copies of the annotated seismic record sections illustrated in the chapter. Features of the Hosgri Fault Zone documented in this investigation are suggestive of both lateral and reverse slip. Characteristics indicative of lateral slip include (1) the linear to curvilinear character of the mapped trace of the fault zone, (2) changes in structural trend along and across the fault zone that diminish in magnitude toward the ends of the fault zone, (3) localized compressional and extensional structures

  14. Structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone from the Auto-Correlation of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at a Dense Seismometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. G.; Rost, S.; Houseman, G.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the technique of cross-correlating the ambient seismic noise wavefield at two seismometers to reconstruct empirical Green's Functions for the determination of Earth structure has been a powerful tool to study the Earth's interior without earthquake or man-made sources. However, far less attention has been paid to using auto-correlations of seismic noise to reveal body wave reflections from interfaces in the subsurface. In principle, the Green's functions thus derived should be comparable to the Earth's impulse response to a co-located source and receiver. We use data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for Northern Anatolia - DANA) deployed across the northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the region of the 1999 magnitude 7.6 Izmit earthquake in western Turkey. The NAFZ is a major strike-slip system that extends ~1200 km across northern Turkey and continues to pose a high level of seismic hazard, in particular to the mega-city of Istanbul. We construct reflection images for the entire crust and upper mantle over the ~35 km by 70 km footprint of the 70-station DANA array. Using auto-correlations of vertical and horizontal components of ground motion, both P- and S-wave velocity information can be retrieved from the wavefield to constrain crustal structure further to established methods. We show that clear P-wave reflections from the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) can be retrieved using the autocorrelation technique, indicating topography on the Moho on horizontal scales of less than 10 km. Offsets in crustal structure can be identified that seem to be correlated with the surface expression of the fault zone in the region. The combined analysis of auto-correlations using vertical and horizontal components will lead to further insight into the fault zone structure throughout the crust and upper mantle.

  15. A Geophysical Study of the Carcavai Fault Zone, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J.; Ramalho, E.; Dias, R.; Pinto, C.; Ressurreição, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Algarve province is located a few hundred kilometres north of the crossing of the E-W Eurasia-Africa plate boundary in an area of diffuse seismicity and broad deformation. It is characterised by a moderate seismicity, with some important historical and instrumental earthquakes causing loss of lives and significant material damages. The area is affected not only by plate boundary earthquakes but also by moderate to large events generated by local sources. The assessment of onshore local sources is, therefore, of vital importance for an evaluation of the regional seismic hazard. This paper discusses the application of geophysical data to the study of the Carcavai fault zone, an outcropping structure more than 20 km long which is seen to deform sediments of the Plio-Quaternary age. The location of some sectors of the fault zone, as well as the vertical offsets of the structure, are still to be confirmed. In order to estimate these and to study the geometry of the fault zone at depth, geophysical data were acquired together with new geological data. Where the location of the fault was less certain, EM and seismic reflection profiles with coarse spatial sampling were carried out. After the detailed location of the fault zone, seismic reflection profiles with a more dense spatial resolution were acquired. The integrated interpretation of the geological and geophysical data confirmed the presence of a large fault zone. The total fault length is still unknown as its extension offshore is still being studied. Together with estimated values of the throw obtained, this data set has improved understanding the seismic hazard in the area by providing more refined estimates of co-seismic rupture, maximum expected earthquake and return periods.

  16. Fault-Zone Maturity Defines Maximum Earthquake Magnitude: The case of the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco; Bulut, Fatih; Stierle, Eva; Martinez-Garzon, Patricia; Benzion, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the maximum likely magnitude of future earthquakes on transform faults near large metropolitan areas has fundamental consequences for the expected hazard. Here we show that the maximum earthquakes on different sections of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) scale with the duration of fault zone activity, cumulative offset and length of individual fault segments. The findings are based on a compiled catalogue of historical earthquakes in the region, using the extensive literary sources that exist due to the long civilization record. We find that the largest earthquakes (M~8) are exclusively observed along the well-developed part of the fault zone in the east. In contrast, the western part is still in a juvenile or transitional stage with historical earthquakes not exceeding M=7.4. This limits the current seismic hazard to NW Turkey and its largest regional population and economical center Istanbul. Our findings for the NAFZ are consistent with data from the two other major transform faults, the San Andreas fault in California and the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East. The results indicate that maximum earthquake magnitudes generally scale with fault-zone evolution.

  17. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  18. Fault zone characterization using P- and S-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Polom, Ulrich; Tanner, David C.; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Although deep fault zones have high potential for geothermal energy extraction, their real usability depends on complex lithological and tectonic factors. Therefore a detailed fault zone exploration using P- and S-wave reflection seismic data is required. P- and S-wave reflection seismic surveys were carried out along and across the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben in Lower Saxony, Germany, to analyse the structural setting, different reflection characteristics and possible anisotropic effects. In both directions the P-wave reflection seismic measurements show a detailed and complex structure. This structure was developed during several tectonic phases and comprises both steeply- and shallowly-dipping faults. In a profile perpendicular to the graben, a strong P-wave reflector is interpreted as shallowly west-dipping fault that is traceable from the surface down to 500 m depth. It is also detectable along the graben. In contrast, the S-waves show different reflection characteristics: There is no indication of the strong P-wave reflector in the S-wave reflection seismic measurements - neither across nor along the graben. Only diffuse S-wave reflections are observable in this region. Due to the higher resolution of S-waves in the near-surface area it is possible to map structures which cannot be detected in P-wave reflection seismic, e.g the thinning of the uppermost Jurassic layer towards the south. In the next step a petrophysical analysis will be conducted by using seismic FD modelling to a) determine the cause (lithological, structural, or a combination of both) of the different reflection characteristics of P- and S-waves, b) characterize the fault zone, as well as c) analyse the influence of different fault zone properties on the seismic wave field. This work is part of the gebo collaborative research programme which is funded by the 'Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kultur' and Baker Hughes.

  19. Detailed Shallow Structure and Seismic Catalog Based on Data of a Spatially-Dense Array on the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    I review results on imaging the shallow structure of San Jacinto fault zone and detection/location of seismic energy sources using data of a spatially-dense Nodal array centered on the Clark branch of the fault. The array operated at the Sage Brush site south of Anza for about 4 weeks in 2014 with 1108 vertical (10 Hz) geophones in about 650 m x 700 m box configuration. Continuous waveforms with signals generated by the ambient seismic noise, earthquakes, and Betsy gunshots were recorded with useable frequencies up to 200 Hz. Imaging the shallow structure is done with surface and body waves extracted from the ambient noise, arrivals from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and waves generated by the gunshots. The results reveal shallow material with very low seismic velocities and attenuation coefficients, strong lateral and vertical variations, seismic trapping structure, local sedimentary basin, and overall lithology contrast across the fault. The detection/location techniques include stacking, beamforming, matched field processing, and templates generated by these methods. The analysis uncovers many hundred of daily earthquakes not detected by the regional networks and several different types of surface noise sources.

  20. Seismic velocity models for the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Ratchkovski, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crustal-scale seismic-velocity models across the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway show a 50-km-thick crust, a near vertical fault trace, and a 5-km-wide damage zone associated with the fault near Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station 10, which provided the closest strong ground motion recordings of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake. We compare models, derived from seismic reflection and refraction surveys acquired in 1986 and 1987, to laboratory measurements of seismic velocities for typical metamorphic rocks exposed along the profiles. Our model for the 1986 seismic reflection profile indicates a 5-km-wide low-velocity zone in the upper 1 km of the Denali fault zone, which we interpret as fault gouge. Deeper refractions from our 1987 line image a 40-km wide, 5-km-deep low-velocity zone along the Denali fault and nearby associated fault strands, which we attribute to a composite damage zone along several strands of the Denali fault zone and to the obliquity of the seismic line to the fault zone. Our velocity model and other geophysical data indicate a nearly vertical Denali fault zone to a depth of 30 km. After-shocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake and our velocity model provide evidence for a flower structure along the fault zone consisting of faults dipping toward and truncated by the Denali fault. Wide-angle reflections indicate that the crustal thickness beneath the Denali fault is transitional between the 60-km-thick crust beneath the Alaska Range to the south, and the extended, 30-km-thick crust of the Yukon-Tanana terrane to the north.

  1. On the Origin and Distribution of Fracture Damage Surrounding Strike-Slip Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    with distance. We believe we have successfully isolated fracture damage which is related to fault tip processes, and the damage zone width scales linearly with the active fault length (proportional to fault displacement), which is consistent with a post- yield fracture mechanics model. Macrofractures are a combination of shear and opening mode, but a significant proportion also occur at a high angle to the main fault trace, which may be related to dynamic loading or hydrofracturing with the greatest principal stress oriented at a high angle to the fault trace. It has been thought that the overall fault structure of large displacement zones is established early in a fault's history. We interpret the microfracture damage surrounding the faults studied accumulated as a result of the initial process zone migration; geometrical irregularities on the fault plane and dynamic loading have also contributed to off-fault damage, although this is less well understood. Early fault damage zone width scales with displacement, and core structure becomes more complex with increased displacement. By separating damage from fault tip processes from dynamic slip induced damage, we can make better estimates of fracture energies related to slip events, and also better understand how fault zone permeability evolves with time.

  2. Fluids in the damage zone: Insights from clumped isotope thermometry of fault-hosted carbonate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Hodson, Keith R.; Huntington, Katharine W.

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate cements in fault zone rocks contain both chemical and physical information about the interaction and coevolution of their source fluids with surrounding fault rock. In this work, we present an analysis of textural relationships and isotopic compositions of carbonate cements in sandstone, within a well-characterized upper-crustal fault intersection zone, 'Courthouse Junction' along the Moab Fault in southeast Utah, USA. Structures exposed at the outcrop record several phases of overprinting brittle deformation, including cataclastic deformation bands, fracturing and faulting. Carbonate diagenesis is thought to be a later stage, possibly facilitated by an increase in fault parallel permeability. Calcite is hosted within joints and concretions associated with both deformation-band faults and fracture-based faults. We have used cathodoluminescence, oxygen and carbon isotopes, and clumped isotope paleothermometry to differentiate two populations of calcite cement in the fault intersection zone: cool (

  3. The Bocono Fault Zone, Western Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, C. ); Estevez, R. ); Henneberg, H.G. )

    1993-02-01

    The Bocono Fault Zone, the western part of the Bocono Moron-El Pilar Fault System of the southern Caribbean plate boundary, consists of aligned valleys, linear depressions, pull-apart basins and other morphological features, which extend for about 500 km in a N45[degrees]E direction, between the Tachira depression (Venezuela-Colombia border) and the Caribbean Sea. It crosses obliquely the Cordillera de Merida and cuts across the Caribbean Mountains, two different geologic provinces of Late Tertiary-Quaternary and Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary age, respectively. Therefore, the maximum age that can be assigned to the Bocono Fault Zone is Late Tertiary (probably Pliocene). A total maximum right-lateral offset rate of 3.3 mm/a. The age of the sedimentary fill o[approximately] the La Gonzalez pull-apart basin suggests that the 7-9 km right-lateral offset necessary to produce it took place in Middle to Late Pleistocene time. The majority of seismic events are well aligned with the main fault trace; minor events are distributed in a belt several kilometers wide. Focal depth is typically 15 km and focal mechanisms indicate an average east-west compression across the zone. Return periods of 135-460 a (Richter M = 8), 45-70 a (M = 7), and 7-15 a (M = 6) have been calculated. Geodetic studies of several sites along the zone indicate compressive and right-lateral components; at Mucubaji the rate of right-lateral displacement observed is about 1 mm every 5 months (15 a of measurements).

  4. Rheological Control of Interbedded Siliciclastic Strata on Damage Zone Evolution During Fault Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wightman, R. H.; Imber, J.; Healy, D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Jones, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Fault damage zones can have a major impact on fluid flow through sub-surface reservoirs. The typical resolution of seismic reflection data is such that faults with throws <15m are not imaged, and those with throws >15 m are imaged as discrete planes, revealing none of the smaller scale architecture of the fault damage zones. Previous field studies show that damage zone width scales with fault throw, which suggests that a relationship exists between fault growth and increasing damage zone width. However, this hypothesis remains largely untested and the factors controlling damage zone evolution are poorly understood. This study develops kinematic models to describe the evolution of damage zones during fault growth. The predictions of these models are tested against quantitative geometric attributes of natural fault damage zones preserved in siliciclastic sand/shale sequences from the Carboniferous Northumberland Basin, NE England. These data, obtained from faults with throws spanning 0.1-20 m, were measured from detailed (cm-resolution) digital outcrop models captured using terrestrial laser scanning techniques. Study locations include areas of active open-cast coal mining that provide good 3D exposure of faults during progressive coal extraction. The damage zones comprise complex arrays of structural elements including: fault splays and oversteps; drag folds; rotated fault-bound blocks; sub-parallel fracture sets and ductile shear zones; cataclasite lenses; and intensely deformed scaly gouge. We propose two complimentary kinematic models to explain the structural relationships observed within these damage zones. The first model predicts the development of cataclasite lenses from fault-bounded blocks in contractional oversteps with increasing fault throw. In this scenario, the damage zone width remains approximately constant, defined by the initial fault separation. The second model describes the space incompatibility that develops between discrete fault planes in

  5. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10-7 - 2.4x10-5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 - 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 - 10 μm s-1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are conditional unstable (stress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 - 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are fully unstable and generate seismic stick-slip behaviour. However at higher normal stress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10-6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a - b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the distribution and physical

  6. Constraints on Shallow Crustal Structure across the San Andreas Fault Zone, Coachella Valley, Southern California: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A.; Persaud, P.; Bauer, K.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The strong influence of basin structure and crustal heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation suggests that these factors should be included in calculations of strong ground shaking. Knowledge of the shallow subsurface is thus essential for an accurate seismic hazard estimate for the densely populated Coachella Valley, the region north of the potential M7.8 rupture near the Salton Sea. Using SSIP data, we analyzed first arrivals from nine 65-911 kg explosive shots recorded along a profile in the Coachella Valley in order to evaluate the interpretation of our 2D tomographic results and give added details on the structural complexity of the shallow crust. The line extends 37 km from the Peninsular Ranges to the Little San Bernardino Mountains crossing the major strands of the San Andreas Fault Zone. We fit traveltime curves to our picks with forward modeling ray tracing, and determined 1D P-wave velocity models for traveltime arrivals east and west of each shot, and a 2D model for the line. We also inferred the geometry of near-vertical faults from the pre-stack line migration method of Bauer et al. (2013). In general, the 1D models east of individual shots have deeper basement contacts and lower apparent velocities, ~5 km/s at 4 km depth, whereas the models west of individual shots have shallower basement and velocities up to 6 km/s at 2 km depth. Mismatches in basement depths (assuming 5-6 km/s) between individual 1D models indicate a shallowly dipping basement, deepening eastward towards the Banning Fault and shoaling abruptly farther east. An east-dipping structure in the 2D model also gives a better fit than horizontal layers. Based on high velocity zones derived from traveltimes at 9-20 km from the western end of the line, we included an offset from ~2 km to 4 km depth near the middle of the line, which significantly improved the 2D model fit. If fault-related, this offset could represent the Garnet Hill Fault if it continues southward in the subsurface.

  7. Fine-scale structure of the San Andreas fault zone and location of the SAFOD target earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.; Roecker, S.; Zhang, H.; Baher, S.; Ellsworth, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from the tomographic analysis of seismic data from the Parkfield area using three different inversion codes. The models provide a consistent view of the complex velocity structure in the vicinity of the San Andreas, including a sharp velocity contrast across the fault. We use the inversion results to assess our confidence in the absolute location accuracy of a potential target earthquake. We derive two types of accuracy estimates, one based on a consideration of the location differences from the three inversion methods, and the other based on the absolute location accuracy of "virtual earthquakes." Location differences are on the order of 100-200 m horizontally and up to 500 m vertically. Bounds on the absolute location errors based on the "virtual earthquake" relocations are ??? 50 m horizontally and vertically. The average of our locations places the target event epicenter within about 100 m of the SAF surface trace. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. The offshore Palos Verdes fault zone near San Pedro, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Langenheim, V.E.; Calvert, A.J.; Sliter, R.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data are combined with a variety of other geophysical and geological data to interpret the offshore structure and earthquake hazards of the San Pedro shelf, near Los Angeles, California. Prominent structures investigated include the Wilmington graben, the Palos Verdes fault zone, various faults below the west part of the San Pedro shelf and slope, and the deep-water San Pedro basin. The structure of the Palos Verdes fault zone changes markedly along strike southeastward across the San Pedro shelf and slope. Under the north part of the shelf, this fault zone includes several strands, with the main strand dipping west. Under the slope, the main fault strands exhibit normal separation and mostly dip east. To the southeast near Lasuen Knoll, the Palos Verdes fault zone locally is low angle, but elsewhere near this knoll, the fault dips steeply. Fresh seafloor scarps near Lasuen Knoll indicate recent fault movement. We explain the observed structural variation along the Palos Verdes fault zone as the result of changes in strike and fault geometry along a master right-lateral strike-slip fault at depth. Complicated movement along this deep fault zone is suggested by the possible wave-cut terraces on Lasuen Knoll, which indicate subaerial exposure during the last sea level lowstand and subsequent subsidence of the knoll. Modeling of aeromagnetic data indicates a large magnetic body under the west part of the San Pedro shelf and upper slope. We interpret this body to be thick basalt of probable Miocene age. This basalt mass appears to have affected the pattern of rock deformation, perhaps because the basalt was more competent during deformation than the sedimentary rocks that encased the basalt. West of the Palos Verdes fault zone, other northwest-striking faults deform the outer shelf and slope. Evidence for recent movement along these faults is equivocal, because we lack age dates on deformed or offset sediment.

  9. The Hengshan low-angle normal fault zone: Structural and geochronological constraints on the Late Mesozoic crustal extension in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yueqiao; Dong, Shuwen; Su, Jinbao; Li, Yong; Cui, Jianjun; Shi, Wei

    2013-10-01

    We document in this paper a significant low-angle normal fault, namely the Hengshan detachment fault, which extends more than 150 km long in NNE orientation and bounds an elongated Early Cretaceous basin in Hunan Province, central South China. Detailed structural and geochronological analyses have been conducted along its southern segment, where a well exposed, ~ 3 km thick, flat ductile shear zone develops along the western margin of the Hengshan granitic massif. This zone is featured by shallow-dipping foliations of varied trend from NE to NW, which bear penetrative stretching lineations varying from NW to SW trend. Shear sense criteria indicate top-to-the-NW and top-to-the-SW motions along its northern and southern parts, respectively. Quartz c-axis orientations of mylonitic rocks from the shear zone exhibit asymmetric single or crossed girdle patterns, and the distributions of fabric point maxima suggest a simultaneous operation of basal and prism slips, indicating a deformation temperature ranging from 400 °C to 550 °C. One zircon U-Pb age of the sheared albitite and three muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages of the mylonitic rocks indicate that the ductile shearing initiated at 136 Ma and lasted till 97 Ma. The zircon U-Pb dating results of five granitic samples from the Hengshan granitic pluton yield two phases of crystallization ages of 232-228 Ma and 150-151 Ma respectively, indicating two preceding magmatic events prior to the ductile shearing in the lower plate. Our structural and geochronological data allow defining the Hengshan massif as an extensional dome, rather than a metamorphic core complex as previously predicted, due to the lack of syn-tectonic plutonism and the origin of detachment fault associated with the reactivation of the inherited thrust. This study provides crucial evidence for understanding how the mid-upper crust deformed during the process of extension, which testifies to a coeval occurrence of non-coaxial deformation of the ductile

  10. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  11. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-07-08

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  12. Recurrent late Quaternary surface faulting along the southern Mohawk Valley fault zone, NE California

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, T.L.; Hemphill-Haley, M.A. ); Page, W.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The Mohawk Valley fault zone comprises NW- to NNW-striking, normal and strike-slip( ) faults that form the western edge of the Plumas province, a diffuse transitional zone between the Basin and Range and the northern Sierra Nevada. The authors detailed evaluation of the southern part of the fault zone reveals evidence for recurrent late Pleistocene to possibly Holocene, moderate to large surface-faulting events. The southern Mohawk fault zone is a complex, 6-km-wide zone of faults and related features that extends from near the crest of the Sierra Nevada to the middle of southern Sierra Valley. The fault zone has two distinct and generally parallel subzones, 3 km apart, that are delineated by markedly different geomorphic characteristics and apparently different styles of faulting. Paleoseismic activity of the western subzone was evaluated in two trenches: one across a fault antithetic to the main range-bounding fault, and the other across a splay fault delineated by a 3.7-m-high scarp in alluvium. Stratigraphic relations, soil development, and radiocarbon dates indicate that at least four mid- to late-Pleistocene surface-faulting events, having single-event displacements in excess of 1.6 to 2.6 m, occurred along the splay fault prior to 12 ka. The antithetic fault has evidence of three late Pleistocene events that may correspond to event documented on the splay fault, and a Holocene event that is inferred from youthful scarplets and small closed depressions.

  13. Nature of Subduction Megathrust Faults at the Ryukyu Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, R.; Kaiho, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Nakanishi, A.; Fujie, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Miura, S.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Ryukyu subduction zone (RSZ) has been intensively examined in terms of seismic coupling along the plate boundary and tsunami potentials. On the contrary to other subduction zones nearby, such as the Nankai Trough and the Japan Trench, the RSZ has lacked clear evidence of great interplate earthquakes (M>8) for the last few hundred years and thus the overall interplate coupling is thought to be weak (Peterson and Seno, 1984). Correspondingly, geodetic observation implies that a possible coupled zone is narrow and limited to a shallow portion of the plate boundary near the trench (Ando et al., 2009). Recent seismic studies show that very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are ubiquitously distributed in the forearc region of the Ryukyu arc, implying a variety of slip behaviors along the subduction faults related to fluid distribution (Nakamura and Sunagawa, 2015). However, these findings were derived from land station network and did not have sufficient resolution near the trench to determine spatial relationship of megathrust faults to the seismic activity. Since 2013 we JAMSTEC have been carrying out marine active- and passive-source seismic experiments in the Ryukyu subduction zone to reveal the fine-scale geometry and nature of subduction faults. Here we present integrated seismological evidence for megathrust fault structure and its relation to VLFEs at the southern Ryukyu Trench. Active-source seismic data consistently reveal that the plate boundary and backstop interface form a 40-km-wide frontal prism where low-velocity sedimentary rocks fill in. We find VLFEs occur around the low-velocity wedge where fluids are distributed as suggested by negative polarity in the reflection data. This forearc structure is also coincident with the source region of Yaeyama earthquake tsunami in 1771 (Nakamura, 2009), the most devastating disaster known in this region. Slow ruptures enhanced by the fluid-rich condition at the plate boundary and/or surrounding faults may be a

  14. Three-dimensional characterization of a crustal-scale fault zone: The Pusteria and Sprechenstein fault system (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Massironi, Matteo; Menegon, Luca

    2010-12-01

    The characterization and representation of fault zones is of paramount importance for studies of fault and earthquake mechanics, since their rheological and geometric complexity controls seismic/aseismic behaviour and fluid circulation at depth. We present a 3D geological model of a fault system, created by integrating borehole and surface structural data, which allows us to bridge the gap between outcrop-scale descriptions and large-scale geophysical models. The model integrates (i) fault geometry and topology, (ii) fault-rock distribution, and (iii) characterization of fracturing in damage zones at the km scale. The dextral-reverse Pusteria and Sprechenstein-Mules Faults (Italian Eastern Alps) provide an opportunity to study fault rocks and damage distribution as a function of host-rock lithology and fabric, and of fault geometry. A first-order control is exerted by the composition of protoliths (quartzo-feldspathic vs. phyllosilicate-rich) and/or by the presence of an inherited anisotropic fabric (massive vs. foliated), resulting in a marked asymmetry of damage zones. Interestingly, the pervasive foliation typical of some protoliths may explain both this asymmetry and the relative weakness of one of the faults. The importance of geometrical factors is highlighted when the damage zone thickness increases five times in proximity to a km-scale contractional jog. On the other hand, the type of fault rock present within the fault core does not show a direct relationship with damage intensity. In addition, the thickness of damage zones along planar fault segments does not appear to grow indefinitely with displacement, as might be envisaged from some scaling laws. We interpret both of these observations as reflecting the maturity of these large-displacement faults.

  15. Geophysical investigation of landslides and fault scarps in the Hockai Fault Zone, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mreyen, Anne-Sophie; Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    During several years, a series of geophysical surveys have been carried out in East Belgium to study the seismically active Hockai Fault Zone (HFZ). The most prominent earthquake that occurred in that fault zone is the 1692 Verviers Earthquake with a magnitude of M6-6.5; it is also the largest historical seismic event in NW Europe. The geomorphic impact of the fault zone is expressed by several landslides, NW-SE orientated scarps and paleo-valleys generated by river diversions. The NW part of the HFZ (near Battice, Belgium) is also known as the Graben de la Minerie; here, geophysical measurements confirmed the presence of a series of fault scarps and helped imaging the general basin structure related to vertical offsets of coal seams that had been found during former mining works. In the southern part of the HFZ, the ENE-SWS orientated Paleo-Warche-Valley (that was formed before upstream capturing of the Warche River) crosses the fault zone over a distance of 5 km. The shallow subsurface of this area was further investigated by geophysics to identify fault structures. The work presented here is focused on the SE prolongation of the HFZ (region of Malmedy, Belgium). Two new clear morphological markers unknown before were detected through analysis of a LiDAR-DEM recently published by the Walloon Region. The following geological-geomorphic survey confirmed the presence of a NNW-SSE oriented, 100 m long and 20 m high, scarp and an associated landslide (about 8 ha) with minimum age of 300 years. The landslide was formed in the Poudingue de Malmedy, a local Permian conglomerate lying on top of a quartz-phyllite bedrock. Different geophysical methods were applied to investigate the subsurface: microseismic measurements (H/V method), seismic refraction tomography (combined with surface wave analysis) and electrical resistivity tomography. To establish the structural relationship between the fault scarp and the landslide and to estimate the offset of the Poudingue de

  16. The evolution of faults formed by shearing across joint zones in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Rodrick; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    The evolution of strike-slip and normal faults formed by slip along joint zones is documented by detailed field studies in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA. Zones of closely spaced planar sub-parallel joints arranged en échelon are sheared, forming faults. Fracturing occurs as a result of shearing, forming new joints. Later shearing along these joints leads to successively formed small faults and newer joints. This process is repeated through many generations of fracturing with increasing fault slip producing a hierarchical array of structures. Strain localization produced by shearing of joint zones at irregularities in joint traces, fracture intersections, and in the span between adjacent sheared joints results in progressive fragmentation of the weakened sandstone, which leads to the formation of gouge along the fault zone. The length and continuity of the gouge and associated slip surfaces is related to the slip magnitude and fault geometry with slip ranging from several millimeters to about 150 m. Distributed damage in a zone surrounding the gouge core is related to the original joint zone configuration (step sense, individual sheared joint overlaps and separation), shear sense, and slip magnitude. Our evolutionary model of fault development helps to explain some outstanding issues concerning complexities in faulting such as, the variability in development of fault rock and fault related fractures, and the failure processes in faults.

  17. Scaling Between Fault Length, Damaged Zone Thickness and Width of Secondary Fault Fans Derived from Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Mao, Xiaolin

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between earthquakes, fault network geometry and fault zone structure is a key question motivating the integration of dynamic rupture and long-term crustal deformation modeling. Here, we address the scaling between fault structural properties from the perspective of dynamic and quasi-static processes involved in fault system evolution. Faults are surrounded by materials damaged through quasi-static and dynamic processes, forming damaged zones whose thickness and damage intensity may vary as a function of fault maturity and length. In the vicinity (typically less than a few hundred meters) of their principal slip surface, faults develop an "inner damage zone", usually characterized by micro-fracture observations. At a larger scale, faults develop an "outer damage zone" of secondary macroscopic fault branches at their tips, which organize into fans of splay faults. Inner damage zones can significantly affect earthquake ruptures, enhance near-field ground motions and facilitate fluid transport in the crust. Fault zone trapped waves can generate pulse-like rupture and oscillatory rupture speed, facilitate supershear rupture transition and allow for steady rupture propagation at speeds that are unstable or inadmissible in homogeneous media. The effects of a fault damage zone crucially depend on its thickness. Field observations of inner damage zone thickness as a function of cumulated slip show linear scaling at small slip but saturation at large slip, with maximum damage zone thickness of a few hundred meters. We previously developed fracture mechanics theoretical arguments and dynamic rupture simulations with off-fault inelastic deformation that predict saturation of the thickness of co-seismic damage zone controlled by the depth extent of the seismogenic zone. In essence, the stress intensity factor at the front of a rupture, which controls the distance reached by the large off-fault stresses that cause damage, scales with the shortest characteristic

  18. Interplay between magmatic accretion, spreading asymmetry and detachment faulting at a segment end: Crustal structure south of the Ascension Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Jörg; Dannowski, Anke; Reston, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    A wide-angle seismic section across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge just south of the Ascension transform system reveals laterally varying crustal thickness, and to the east a strongly distorted Moho that appears to result from slip along a large-offset normal fault, termed an oceanic detachment fault. Gravity modelling supports the inferred crustal structure. We investigate the interplay between magmatism, detachment faulting and the changing asymmetry of crustal accretion, and consider several possible scenarios. The one that appears most likely is remarkably simple: an episode of detachment faulting which accommodates all plate divergence and results in the westward migration of the ridge axis, is interspersed with dominantly magmatic and moderately asymmetric (most on the western side) spreading which moves the spreading axis back towards the east. Following the runaway weakening of a normal fault and its development into an oceanic detachment fault, magma both intrudes the footwall to the fault, producing a layer of gabbro (subsequently partially exhumed).

  19. The internal deformation of the Peridotite Nappe of New Caledonia: A structural study of serpentine-bearing faults and shear zones in the Koniambo Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Benoît; Gautier, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; Boulvais, Philippe; Couteau, Clément; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    We present a structural analysis of serpentine-bearing faults and shear zones in the Koniambo Massif, one of the klippes of the Peridotite Nappe of New Caledonia. Three structural levels are recognized. The upper level is characterized by a dense network of fractures. Antigorite and polygonal serpentine form slickenfibers along fault planes with distinct kinematics. As a result, the upper level keeps the record of at least two deformation events, the first associated with the growth of antigorite (WNW-ESE extension), the second with the growth of polygonal serpentine (NW-SE compression). The lower level coincides with the 'serpentine sole' of the nappe, which consists of massive tectonic breccias overlying a layer of mylonitic serpentinites. The sole records pervasive tangential shear with top-to-SW kinematics and represents a décollement at the base of the nappe. The intermediate level is characterized by the presence of several meters-thick conjugate shear zones accommodating NE-SW shortening. Like the sole, these shear zones involve polygonal serpentine and magnesite as the main syn-kinematic mineral phases. The shear zones likely root into the basal décollement, either along its roof or, occasionally, around its base. Compared to top-to-SW shearing along the sole, the two deformation events recorded in the upper level are older. The three structural levels correlate well with previously recognized spatial variations in the degree of serpentinization. It is therefore tempting to consider that the intensity of serpentinization played a major role in the way deformation has been distributed across the Peridotite Nappe. However, even the least altered peridotites, in the upper level, contain so much serpentine that, according to theoretical and experimental work, they should be nearly as weak as pure serpentinite. Hence, no strong vertical gradient in strength due to variations in the degree of serpentinization is expected within the exposed part of the nappe

  20. Inferred fluid flow through fault damage zones based on the observation of stalactites in carbonate caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Sanderson, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Faults and fractures are important factors that control fluid flow in rock masses in hydrothermal, groundwater, and hydrocarbon systems. In this paper we examine local variations in fluid flow as evidenced by the distribution patterns and sizes of stalactites in fractured limestone. We observe that the size and distribution of stalactites relate to fluid flow and is strongly controlled by the fracture apertures, intersection of fractures, and development of damage zones around a fault. Fault damage zones are the volumes of deformed wall rocks around a fault surface that result from the initiation, propagation, interaction, termination, and build-up of slip along the fault. They are divided into tip-, wall-, and linkage damage zones depending on their location along the fault. The pattern of deformation within a damage zone mainly depends on fault tip modes (mode II or III), the 3-D locations around a fault surface, and the evolutionary stage of the fault. The development of different structures within damage zones gives valuable information about fault initiation and termination, fault propagation and growth, and fluid flow. Stalactites indicate fluid flow variation within a fault in that fluid flow is high in dilational jogs, variable along the main fault traces, and low in contractional jogs. Variation in ore fluid flow within faults is also important in controlling the position of ore shoots in structurally-controlled hydrothermal mineral deposits. Thus, the characteristics of fluid flow in fractured carbonate rocks can be related to patterns of damage around faults. Hence, the mapping of damage zones can be applied to the study of fracture-controlled fluid flow in the fields of petroleum geology, hydrogeology, and ore deposits.

  1. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    and collecting these into "disturbance geobodies". These seismic image processing methods represents a first efficient step toward a construction of a robust technique to investigate sub-seismic strain, mapping noisy deformed zones and displacement within subsurface geology (Dutzer et al.,2011; Iacopini et al.,2012). In all these cases, accurate fault interpretation is critical in applied geology to building a robust and reliable reservoir model, and is essential for further study of fault seal behavior, and reservoir compartmentalization. They are also fundamental for understanding how deformation localizes within sedimentary basins, including the processes associated with active seismogenetic faults and mega-thrust systems in subduction zones. Dutzer, JF, Basford., H., Purves., S. 2009, Investigating fault sealing potential through fault relative seismic volume analysis. Petroleum Geology Conference series 2010, 7:509-515; doi:10.1144/0070509 Marfurt, K.J., Chopra, S., 2007, Seismic attributes for prospect identification and reservoir characterization. SEG Geophysical development Iacopini, D., Butler, RWH. & Purves, S. (2012). 'Seismic imaging of thrust faults and structural damage: a visualization workflow for deepwater thrust belts'. First Break, vol 5, no. 30, pp. 39-46.

  2. Style of deformation along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone and other faults in the southern Walker Lane, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Noller, J.S. ); Reheis, M.C. )

    1993-04-01

    Quaternary normal and right-lateral faults and associated lineaments in the southern part of the Walker Lane are anomalous with respect to the north-striking normal faults in most of the central Great Basin. The authors identify and characterize many faults and lineaments that were previously unmapped, with the exception of faults in the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone (DVFCFZ) and some faults in and near the Nevada Test Site. Faults and associated lineaments in deposits of late Cenozoic age are distinguished on the basis of age of most recent activity and orientation, and are grouped into two domains. One domain is characterized by northwest-striking faults and lineaments and associated north-striking en echelon structures within the DVFCFZ and the Pahrump fault zone; the other domain is characterized by north- to northeast-striking faults and linearments within a broad region east of the DVFCFZ that narrows southward toward the Pahrump fault zone. Preliminary observations of faults and linearments suggest dominantly right-oblique slip in the first domain and dominantly dip-slip in the second domain. The DVFCFZ is a regional right-lateral strike-slip system that shows changes in style of deformation along strike. Numerous normal faults at the northern end of the DVFCFZ in northern fish Lake Valley and the Volcanic Hills form an extensional right step that links the DVFCFZ with northwest-striking right-lateral faults of the northern part of the Walker Lane. South of this extensional step, the DVFCFZ trends southeast along strike-slip faults from central Fish Lake Valley to the latitude of Furnace Creek. From Furnace Creek, the fault zone apparently steps left to the Pahrump fault zone in the area of Ash Meadows where a complex zone of folds and faults of diverse orientation suggest local compression. This stepover coincides with east-northeast-striking faults that appear to be an extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone.

  3. Geomorphic and Structural Analysis of the Verona-Williams-Pleasanton fault zone and implications for seismic hazard, eastern San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, T. L.; Unruh, J. R.; Hoirup, D. F.; Barry, G.; Pearce, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Folds and thrust faults adjacent to and beneath the Livermore Valley have accommodated Quaternary crustal shortening between major dextral faults of the eastern San Andreas fault system. The Verona and Williams faults are NE-dipping thrust or reverse faults that have uplifted the Pliocene-Pleistocene Livermore gravels along the western and southern margins of the valley. The Williams fault extends ~13 km northwest from the Mt. Lewis seismic trend to the sinistral Las Positas fault, which forms the southern margin of the valley. A 3-km left step along the Las Positas fault separates the surface traces of the Verona and Williams faults. The Verona fault extends ~8 km northwest from the stepover to southwestern Livermore Valley. It is possible that the Las Positas fault extends to the base of the seismogenic crust and separates the Verona and Williams faults into two kinematically independent structures. Alternatively, the Verona and Williams faults may merge downdip into a common thrust fault plane, with the Las Positas fault confined to the hanging wall as a tear fault. The Verona and Williams faults exhibit geomorphic evidence for late Quaternary fault rupture propagating to or very near the ground surface. The Williams fault tightly folds and overturns the Livermore gravels, and appears to form scarps that impound late Quaternary alluvium and cross Holocene landslide deposits. Many Holocene(?) alluvial fans exhibit distinct convex longitudinal profiles across the fault trace suggesting active folding above the Verona fault. The geomorphic position of a stream-terrace remnant suggests that >7 m of tectonic uplift is possible across the Verona fault during the late Quaternary. Surficial geologic mapping and geomorphic analysis of the ancestral Arroyo Valle drainage system reveals numerous paleochannels that generally decrease in elevation (age) to the northwest, and provide useful isochronous markers delineating a subtle tectonic uplift in western Livermore Valley

  4. Comparing Biases of Fault Zone Permeability Magnitudes and Inferred Conceptual Models - Global Multidisciplinary Compilation and Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fault zones have been studied worldwide, there have been no global mapping, compilation and meta-analysis of interpretations of the fault zone permeability structures and/or methodological biases. To investigate biases in data collection sources we review ~2000 published studies and reports and summarize categorical data from over 600 cases, including ~200 studies with reported fault zone permeability, transmissivity, or diffusivity estimates from the fault damage zone, fault core, whole fault zone, and protolith. The data are categorized into fault zone permeability structures (e.g. barrier, conduit, barrier-conduit, etc.) and are evaluated with respect to the type of fluid flow or permeability observation, the data collection source (e.g. studies in structural geology, hydrogeology, tunneling, mining, engineering, etc.), and on the scale of measurement. Our results show that the combined conduit-barrier fault zone structure is observed in only 15-20% of the cases (but up to 60% of structural geology cases if paleo-conduit studies are included). The barrier structure is observed in ~30% of the faults in structural geology, hydrogeology, and mining studies, and in over 40% petroleum engineering studies, but in less than 10% in tunnel engineering and rarely in geothermal engineering. The barrier nature of faults is detected primarily with qualitative observations (water levels and pressures, water geochemistry), and is difficult to measure in the subsurface. Some hydrogeological observations favour the detection of hydraulic barriers or conduits, but not both equally. Therefore, the frequency of fault zone conceptual models (barriers/conduits) globally or within a region may be a result of measurement bias and not of actual conditions. We also compare reported permeability values at three scales of measurement: matrix permeability, small scale fractured bulk permeability, and whole fault zone permeability. The quantitative permeability anisotropy or scaling

  5. Fault zone reverberations from cross-correlations of earthquake waveforms and seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, Gregor; Campillo, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Seismic wavefields interact with low-velocity fault damage zones. Waveforms of ballistic fault zone head waves, trapped waves, reflected waves and signatures of trapped noise can provide important information on structural and mechanical fault zone properties. Here we extend the class of observable fault zone waves and reconstruct in-fault reverberations or multiples in a strike-slip faulting environment. Manifestations of the reverberations are significant, consistent wave fronts in the coda of cross-correlation functions that are obtained from scattered earthquake waveforms and seismic noise recorded by a linear fault zone array. The physical reconstruction of Green's functions is evident from the high similarity between the signals obtained from the two different scattered wavefields. Modal partitioning of the reverberation wavefield can be tuned using different data normalization techniques. The results imply that fault zones create their own ambiance, and that the here reconstructed reverberations are a key seismic signature of wear zones. Using synthetic waveform modelling we show that reverberations can be used for the imaging of structural units by estimating the location, extend and magnitude of lateral velocity contrasts. The robust reconstruction of the reverberations from noise records suggests the possibility to resolve the response of the damage zone material to various external and internal loading mechanisms.

  6. Kinematics of the Eastern California shear zone: Evidence for slip transfer from Owens and Saline Valley fault zones to Fish Lake Valley fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Dixon, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary slip rates and satellite-based geodetic data for the western Great Basin constrain regional fault-slip distribution and evolution. The geologic slip rate on the Fish Lake Valley fault zone (the northwest extension of the Furnace Creek fault zone) increases northward from about 3 to 5 mm/yr, in agreement with modeled geodetic data. The increase coincides with the intersections of the Deep Springs fault, connected to the Owens Valley fault zone, and of other faults connected to the Saline Valley fault. The combined geologic and geodetic data suggest that (1) the northwest-striking faults of the Eastern California shear zone north of the Garlock fault are connected by north- to northeast-striking normal faults that transfer slip in a series of right steps, and (2) the amount and distribution of slip among the many faults of this broad, complex plate boundary have changed through time.

  7. Earthquake ruptures modulated by waves in damaged fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Helmberger, Don V.

    2014-04-01

    Faults are usually surrounded by damaged zones of lower elastic moduli and seismic wave velocities than their host rocks. If the interface between the damaged rocks and host rocks is sharp enough, earthquakes happening inside the fault zone generate reflected waves and head waves, which can interact with earthquake ruptures and modulate rupture properties such as rupture speed, slip rate, and rise time. We find through 2-D dynamic rupture simulations the following: (1) Reflected waves can induce multiple slip pulses. The rise time of the primary pulse is controlled by fault zone properties, rather than by frictional properties. (2) Head waves can cause oscillations of rupture speed and, in a certain range of fault zone widths, a permanent transition to supershear rupture with speeds that would be unstable in homogeneous media. (3) Large attenuation smears the slip rate function and delays the initial acceleration of rupture speed but does not affect significantly the rise time or the period of rupture speed oscillations. (4) Fault zones cause a rotation of the background stress field and can induce plastic deformations on both extensional and compressional sides of the fault. The plastic deformations are accumulated both inside and outside the fault zone, which indicates a correlation between fault zone development and repeating ruptures. Spatially periodic patterns of plastic deformations are formed due to oscillating rupture speed, which may leave a permanent signature in the geological record. Our results indicate that damaged fault zones with sharp boundaries promote multiple slip pulses and supershear ruptures.

  8. Geomorphological and Paleoseismological Studies of the Malatya Fault (Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sançar, Taylan; Zabcı, Cengiz; Karabacak, Volkan; Akyüz, Hüsnü Serdar

    2016-04-01

    The Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone (MOFZ is about 240 km-long sinistral strike-slip tectonic structure within the Anatolian Scholle. Although the MOFZ is claimed to be an inactive structure since 3 Ma (Westaway and Arger, 2001), recent GPS measurements, morphotectonic studies and micro seismicity strongly suggest considerable amount of strain accumulation along this tectonic feature. The GPS-based elastic block model results yield horizontal slip rates of about 1.2 and 1.6 mm/a, for the northeastern and southwestern sections of this fault zone, respectively (Aktuǧ et al., 2013). In order to understand the seismic potential of the southwestern section, Malatya Fault (MF), of the MOFZ, we carried out paleoseismological trenching and morphometric analyses in the frame of the TÜBİTAK project no. 114Y580. The preliminary results of morphometric analyses, including the hypsometric curve and channel longitudinal profiles, suggest that the northernmost part of the MF accommodate more deformation than the southern part, where the fault zone bifurcates into several discrete segments. Relatively high values of hypsometric integral and the shape of hypsometric curves and the longitudinal channel profiles, indicate youthful topography at northern part of the MF. In the northern section of the MF, Kızık Basin is one of the most remarkable fault-related landforms, which is 9 km long and 2 km wide, and is directly controlled by the extensional step-over of the fault segments. On the northern parts of this relatively narrow depression, a linear scarp prolongs between Kızık and Ahlas villages for about 150 m. In summer 2015, we excavated a single trench on this straight lineament, where mostly braided river-related gravels and sands were exposed. Although we could not observe any evidence of surface faulting inside the erosional channel systems, the bedrock has very well-developed shear fabric at the toe of the observed scarp. We sampled the most bottom section of the undeformed

  9. Shoreline and Oceano Fault Zones' Intersection Geometry, San Luis Obispo Bay, Offshore South Central Coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P. J.; Nishenko, S. P.; Greene, H. G.; Bergkamp, B.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project, high-resolution 3D low energy marine seismic-reflection data were acquired within San Luis Obispo Bay in 2011 and 2012. Mapping of the sediment-buried bedrock surface using 2D and 3D data clearly reveals that the trace of the Shoreline fault zone bifurcates at Souza Rock. The eastern strand is a reverse fault that trends toward the east-southeast, connecting with the Oceano fault zone onshore. The Shoreline fault is a vertical dextral fault with a very linear geometry that continues south to near the Santa Maria river mouth, and may intersect the Casmalia fault onshore. Both of these fault strands are crossed by Pleistocene low-stand paleochannels eroded into bedrock, and are buried by marine and non-marine sediment. The 3D data show that both the Oceano and Shoreline faults are narrow, well defined fault zones. The reverse slip rate for the Oceano fault (~0.1 mm/y.) falls within published slip rate estimates for the Oceano fault onshore (0.01-0.20 mm/y). The dextral slip rate for the Shoreline fault southeast of Souza Rock is estimated to be 0.06 mm/y. Souza Rock is located on the hanging wall of the Oceano Fault, north of the point of intersection between the Shoreline and Oceano faults. Water depths shoal from 60 m on the surrounding seafloor to 5 m on top of Souza Rock. This structure is interpreted as a structural popup in a restraining bend where the N65°W-trending Oceano fault intersects the N25°W-trending Shoreline fault. The structural geometry near the point of intersection has several minor secondary fault strands, but is remarkably simple.

  10. Syn-collisional transform faulting of the Tan-Lu fault zone, East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Liu, Guo Sheng; Niu, Man Lan; Xie, Cheng Long; Wang, Yong Sheng; Xiang, Biwei

    2009-02-01

    Origin of the continental-scale Tan-Lu fault zone (TLFZ), East China, remains controversial. About 550 km sinistral offset of the Dabie orogenic belt (DOB) and Sulu orogenic belt (SOB) is shown along the NE-NNE-striking TLFZ. Syn-collisional, sinistral ductile shear belts in the TLFZ have been identified. Thirteen phengite bulk separates from the mylonites were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method. They gave cooling ages of the 198-181 Ma for the shear belts along the eastern margin of the DOB and 221-210 Ma from the western margin of the SOB. Distribution of the foreland basin deposits suggests that sinistral offset of the DOB and SOB by the TLFZ took place prior to deposition of the Upper Triassic strata. The marginal structures around the DOB and SOB support syn-collisional faulting, and indicate anticlockwise rotation of the DOB during the displacement. The folding and thrust faulting related to crustal subduction, coeval with the Tan-Lu faulting, is older than the foreland basin deposition related to the orogenic exhumation. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that the TLFZ was developed as a syn-collisional transform fault during latest Middle to earliest Late Triassic time when the DOB and SOB experienced crustal subduction of the South China Block (SCB). Eastward increase of the crustal subduction rates is believed to be responsible for the sinistral transform faulting.

  11. The width of fault zones in a brittle-viscous lithosphere: Strike-slip faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    A fault zone in an ideal brittle material overlying a very weak substrate could, in principle, consist of a single slip surface. Real fault zones have a finite width consisting of a number of nearly parallel slip surfaces on which deformation is distributed. The hypothesis that the finite width of fault zones reflects stresses due to quasistatic flow in the ductile substrate of a brittle surface layer is explored. Because of the simplicity of theory and observations, strike-slip faults are examined first, but the analysis can be extended to normal and thrust faulting.

  12. Damaged beyond repair? Characterising the damage zone of a fault late in its interseismic cycle, the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jack N.; Toy, Virginia G.; Massiot, Cécile; McNamara, David D.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of drill-core, recovered from the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) through New Zealand's Alpine Fault, provide an excellent opportunity to study the damage zone of a plate-bounding continental scale fault, late in its interseismic cycle. Documentation of the intermediate-macro scale damage zone structures observed in the CT images show that there is no increase in the density of these structures towards the fault's principal slip zones (PSZs), at least within the interval sampled, which is 30 m above and below the PSZs. This is in agreement with independent analysis using borehole televiewer data. Instead, we conclude the density of damage zone structures to correspond to lithology. We find that 72% of fractures are fully healed, by a combination of clays, calcite and quartz, with an additional 24% partially healed. This fracture healing is consistent with the Alpine Fault's late interseismic state, and the fact that the interval of damage zone sampled coincides with an alteration zone, an interval of extensive fluid-rock interaction. These fractures do not impose a reduction of P-wave velocity, as measured by wireline methods. Outside the alteration zone there is indirect evidence of less extensive fracture healing.

  13. Spatiotemporal evolution of a fault shear stress patch due to viscoelastic interseismic fault zone rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Hiroki; Uchide, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    We conducted numerical studies to explore how shear stress anomalies on fault planes (shear stress patches) evolve spatiotemporally during the interseismic period under the influence of viscoelastic rheology assigned to fault zones of finite thickness. 2-D viscoelastic models consisting of a fault zone and host rock were sheared to simulate shear stress accumulation along fault zones due to tectonic loading. No fault slip along a distinct fault planes is implied in the model, thus all fault shear motion is accommodated by distributed deformation in the viscoelastic fault zone. Results show that magnitudes of shear stress patches evolve not only temporally, but also spatially, especially when the stress anomaly is created by a geometrical irregularity (asperity) along the interface of an elastic host rock and viscoelastic fault zone. Such shear stress anomalies diffuse spatially so that the spatial dimension of the shear stress patch appears to grow over time. Models with varying fault zone viscoelastic properties and varying fault zone viscosity both show that such spatial diffusion of shear stress is enhanced by increasing the contribution of the viscous behavior. The absolute rate at which shear stress patches grow spatially is generally not influenced by the size of the shear stress patch. Therefore shear stress patches with smaller dimensions will appear to grow quicker, in the relative sense, compared to larger stress patches. These results suggest that the minimum dimensions of shear stress patches that can exist along a fault could be governed by the effective viscosity of the fault zone. Therefore patterns of accumulated shear stress could vary along faults when viscous properties are heterogeneous, for instance due to depth or material heterogeneity, which has implications on how earthquake rupture behavior could vary along faults.

  14. Location, structure, and seismicity of the Seattle fault zone, Washington: Evidence from aeromagnetic anomalies, geologic mapping, and seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Weaver, C.S.; Johnson, S.Y.

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Puget Lowland shows details of the Seattle fault zone, an active but largely concealed east-trending zone of reverse faulting at the southern margin of the Seattle basin. Three elongate, east-trending magnetic anomalies are associated with north-dipping Tertiary strata exposed in the hanging wall; the magnetic anomalies indicate where these strata continue beneath glacial deposits. The northernmost anomaly, a narrow, elongate magnetic high, precisely correlates with magnetic Miocene volcanic conglomerate. The middle anomaly, a broad magnetic low, correlates with thick, nonmagnetic Eocene and Oligocene marine and fluvial strata. The southern anomaly, a broad, complex magnetic high, correlates with Eocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks. This tripartite package of anomalies is especially clear over Bainbridge Island west of Seattle and over the region east of Lake Washington. Although attenuated in the intervening region, the pattern can be correlated with the mapped strike of beds following a northwest-striking anticline beneath Seattle. The aeromagnetic and geologic data define three main strands of the Seattle fault zone identified in marine seismic-reflection profiles to be subparallel to mapped bedrock trends over a distance of >50 km. The locus of faulting coincides with a diffuse zone of shallow crustal seismicity and the region of uplift produced by the M 7 Seattle earthquake of A.D. 900-930.

  15. Tectonic creep in the Hayward fault zone, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, Dorothy H.; Bonilla, M.G.

    1966-01-01

    Tectonic creep is slight apparently continuous movement along a fault. Evidence of creep has been noted at several places within the Hayward fault zone--a zone trending northwestward near the western front of the hills bordering the east side of San Francisco Bay. D. H. Radbruch of the Geological Survey and B. J. Lennert, consulting engineer, confirmed a reported cracking of a culvert under the University of California stadium. F. B. Blanchard and C. L. Laverty of the East Bay Municipal Utility District of Oakland studied cracks in the Claremont water tunnel in Berkeley. M. G. Bonilla of the Geological Survey noted deformation of railroad tracks in the Niles district of Fremont. Six sets of tracks have been bent and shifted. L. S. Cluff of Woodward-Clyde-Sherard and Associates and K. V. Steinbrugge of the Pacific Fire Rating Bureau noted that the concrete walls of a warehouse in the Irvington district of Fremont have been bent and broken, and the columns forced out of line. All the deformations noted have been right lateral and range from about 2 inches in the Claremont tunnel to about 8 inches on the railroad tracks. Tectonic creep almost certainly will continue to damage buildings, tunnels, and other structures that cross the narrow bands of active movement within the Hayward fault zone.

  16. Controls on damage zone asymmetry of a normal fault zone: outcrop analyses of a segment of the Moab fault, SE Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Silje S.; Skar, Tore

    2005-10-01

    Outcrop data has been used to examine the spatial arrangement of fractures in the damage zones of a segment of the large-scale Moab Fault (45 km in length), SE Utah. The characteristics of the footwall and hanging wall damage zones show pronounced differences in the deformation pattern: (1) there is a well-developed syncline in the hanging wall, as opposed to sub-horizontal bedding of the footwall; (2) the footwall damage zone is sub-divided into an inner zone (0-5 m from fault core) and an outer zone (>5 m) based on differences in deformation band frequency, whereas no clear sub-division can be made in the hanging wall; (3) the hanging wall damage zone is more than three times wider than the footwall damage zone; (4) there is a higher abundance of antithetic fractures and deformation bands in the hanging wall than in the footwall; and (5) the antithetic structures generally have more gentle dips in the hanging wall than in the footwall. The main conclusion is that the structural pattern across the fault zone is strongly asymmetric. The deformation pattern is partly influenced by lithology and/or partly by processes associated with the development of the fault core. We suggest, however, that the most important cause for the asymmetric strain distribution is the development of the hanging wall syncline and the resulting asymmetric stress pattern expected to exist during fault propagation.

  17. An Inexpensive Device for Modelling Strike-Slip and Oblique-Slip Fault Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larter, Richard C. L.; Allison, Iain

    1983-01-01

    Describes construction/use of a device to simulate structures produced in fault zones of dominantly strike-dip motion. Apparatus modifications allow simulation of transtension and transpression as well as pure strike-slip fault motion. Illustrates formation of several structures using the apparatus, comparing them with natural examples. Includes…

  18. Characteristics of faults and shear zones in deep mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, R.E.; Morris, H.T.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of fault and shear zones to depths of 2.5 km are well documented in deep mines in North America. The characteristics may be summarized as follows. (a) Fault zones usually are irregular, branched, anastomosed, and curved rather than simple and planar. (b) Faults are generally composed of one or more clay or clay-like gouge zones in a matrix of sheared and foliated rock bordered by highly fractured rock. (c) The widths of fault zones appear to be greater when faults have greater displacement, probably as a result of a long history of repeated minor movements. Fault zones with kilometers of displacement tend to be 100 m or more wide, whereas those with only a few hundred meters of displacement commonly are only 1 m or less wide. (d) Some zones represent shear distributed across hundreds of meters without local concentration in a narrow gouge zone. (e) Many fault zones are wet even above the water table, and water moves along them at various rates, but some also serve as subsurface dams, ponding ground water as much as several hundred meters higher on one side than on the other. No striking differences in the characteristics of faults over the vertical range of 2.5 km are documented. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag.

  19. Geometry and kinematics of adhesive wear in brittle strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Mark T.

    2005-05-01

    Detailed outcrop surface mapping in Late Paleozoic cataclastic strike-slip faults of coastal Maine shows that asymmetric sidewall ripouts, 0.1-200 m in length, are a significant component of many mapped faults and an important wall rock deformation mechanism during faulting. The geometry of these structures ranges from simple lenses to elongate slabs cut out of the sidewalls of strike-slip faults by a lateral jump of the active zone of slip during adhesion along a section of the main fault. The new irregular trace of the active fault after this jump creates an indenting asperity that is forced to plow through the adjoining wall rock during continued adhesion or be cut off by renewed motion along the main section of the fault. Ripout translation during adhesion sets up the structural asymmetry with trailing extensional and leading contractional ends to the ripout block. The inactive section of the main fault trace at the trailing end can develop a 'sag' or 'half-graben' type geometry due to block movement along the scallop-shaped connecting ramp to the flanking ripout fault. Leading contractional ramps can develop 'thrust' type imbrication and forces the 'humpback' geometry to the ripout slab due to distortion of the inactive main fault surface by ripout translation. Similar asymmetric ripout geometries are recognized in many other major crustal scale strike-slip fault zones worldwide. Ripout structures in the 5-500 km length range can be found on the Atacama fault system of northern Chile, the Qujiang and Xiaojiang fault zones in western China, the Yalakom-Hozameen fault zone in British Columbia and the San Andreas fault system in southern California. For active crustal-scale faults the surface expression of ripout translation includes a coupled system of extensional trailing ramps as normal oblique-slip faults with pull-apart basin sedimentation and contractional leading ramps as oblique thrust or high angle reverse faults with associated uplift and erosion. The

  20. Smoothing and re-roughening processes: The geometric evolution of a single fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, Katherine A. H.; Kirkpatrick, James D.

    2016-10-01

    The geometry of a fault zone exerts a major control on earthquake rupture processes and source parameters. Observations previously compiled from multiple faults suggest that fault surface shape evolves with displacement, but the specific processes driving the evolution of fault geometry within a single fault zone are not well understood. Here, we characterize the deformation history and geometry of an extraordinarily well-exposed fault using maps of cross-sectional exposures constructed with the Structure from Motion photogrammetric method. The La Quinta Fault, located in southern California, experienced at least three phases of deformation. Multiple layers of ultracataclasite formed during the most recent phase. Crosscutting relations between the layers define the evolution of the structures and demonstrate that new layers formed successively during the deformation history. Wear processes such as grain plucking from one layer into a younger layer and truncation of asperities at layer edges indicate that the layers were slip zones and the contacts between them slip surfaces. Slip surfaces that were not reactivated or modified after they were abandoned exhibit self-affine geometry, preserving the fault roughness from different stages of faulting. Roughness varies little between surfaces, except the last slip zone to form in the fault, which is the smoothest. This layer contains a distinct mineral assemblage, indicating that the composition of the fault rock exerts a control on roughness. In contrast, the similar roughness of the older slip zones, which have comparable mineralogy but clearly crosscut one another, suggests that as the fault matured the roughness of the active slip surface stayed approximately constant. Wear processes affected these layers, so for roughness to stay constant the roughening and smoothing effects of fault slip must have been approximately balanced. These observations suggest fault surface evolution occurs by nucleation of new surfaces and

  1. How can fluid overpressures be developed and maintained in crustal fault zones ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LECLÈRE, H.; Cappa, F.; Faulkner, D. R.; Armitage, P. J.; Blake, O. O.; Fabbri, O.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of fluid overpressure in crustal fault zones is known to play a key role on the stability of faults and it has often been invoked to explain the triggering of earthquakes and the apparent weakness of misoriented faults. However, the mechanisms allowing the development and maintenance of fluid overpressures in fault remain unresolved. We investigate how fluid overpressures can be developed and maintained in complex fault zones with hydraulic and elastic heterogeneities. Here we address this question combining geological observations, laboratory experiments and hydromechanical models of an active crustal fault zone in the Ubaye-Argentera area (southeastern France). The fault zone studied is located in the Argentera external crystalline massif and is connected to regional NW-SE steeply-dipping dextral strike-slip faults with an offset of several kilometers. The fault zone cuts through migmatitic gneisses composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and muscovite. It exposes several anastomosing core zones surrounded by damage zones with a pluri-decametric total width. The core zones are made up of centimetric to pluridecimetric phyllosilicate-rich gouge layers while the damage zones are composed of pluri-metric phyllonitic rock derived from mylonite. The determination of fault structure in the field and its hydraulic and mechanical properties in the lab are key aspects to improve our understanding of the role of fluids in fault mechanics and earthquake triggering. Here, the permeability and elastic moduli of the host rock, damage zone and fault core were measured from natural plugs with a diameter of 20 mm and lengths between 26 to 51 mm, using a high-pressure hydrostatic fluid-flow apparatus. Measurements were made with confining pressures ranging from 30 to 210 MPa and using argon pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa. Data show a reduction of the permeability values of one order of magnitude between host rock and fault damage zone and a decrease of 50

  2. Paleofluid evolution of strike-slip compartmentalized extensional fault zones in the Jabal Qusaybah anticline, Salakh Arc, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Mozafari, Mahtab; Solum, John; Swennen, Rudy; Taberner, Conxita; Tueckmantel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The E-W-trending Jabal Qusaybah anticline, developed in layered Cretaceous carbonates, is located at the western termination of the Salakh Arc, Oman Mountains. The anticline is 10 km long and is characterized by a complex fault pattern which mainly includes NE-SW left-lateral strike-slip and N-S extensional fault zones. The N-S striking extensional fault zones are best developed in the central sector of the anticlinal crest, likely due to along-strike outer-arc extension associated with positive fault inversion and salt migration. Extensional fault zones are perpendicular to the fold axis and geometrically confined within major NE-SW left-lateral strike-slip fault zones. They have trace lengths ranging from a few m up to ~800 m, and displacements ranging from a few dm up to ~60 m. Fault zones consist of cataclastic fault cores (~1-15 cm thick) surrounded by vein-dominated damage zones. Overall, fault zones show significant volumes of dilation breccia texture, m-thick infillings of calcite crystals, and cm- to m-thick veins localized at fault tip zones, areas of fault overlap, and zones of interaction between strike-slip and extensional fault segments. By analyzing fault abutting geometries, detailed vein relative chronology, delta13C and delta18O signatures and fluid inclusion data from calcite veins and calcite fault infillings, we propose a model where a deep seated left-lateral strike-slip fault system, active during the growth of the anticline, inhibited the lateral propagation of late-stage transversal extensional fault zones. Our findings show that, in this geological setting, the structural position, rather than fault throw, is the parameter controlling the location of the more dilatant fault segments.

  3. Tectonic history of the northern Nabitah fault zone, Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, J.E.; Bosch, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the presence of similar lithologies, similar structure, and analogous tectonic setting, the Mother Lode District in California is reviewed as a model for gold occurrences near the Nabitah fault zone in this report.

  4. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis.

  5. 3D insight into fault geometries, deformation, and fluid-migration within the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California: Results from high-resolution 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Brothers, D. S.; Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution 3D seismic P-Cable data and advanced seismic attribute analyses were used to detect and interpret complex strike-slip fault geometries, deformation patterns, and fluid-pathways across a portion of the Hosgri Fault Zone (HFZ) offshore central California. Combination of the fault attribute results with structural analysis provides 3D insight into the geometry and internal structure of restraining and releasing bends, step-over zones, fault convergence zones, and apparent paired fault bends. The 3D seismic volume covers a 13.7 km2 region along the HFZ offshore of Point Sal and was collected in 2012 as part of the PG&E Central California Seismic Imaging Project (PG&E, 2014). Application of the fault attribute workflow isolated and delineated fault strands within the 3D volume. These results revealed that the northern and southern edges of the survey region are characterized by single fault strands that exhibit an approximate 6° change in strike across the 3D volume. Between these single faults strands is a complex network of fault splays, bends, stepovers, and convergence zones. Structural analysis reveals that the southern portion of the HFZ in the region is characterized by transtensional deformation, whereas transpressional-related folding dominates the central and northern portions of the HFZ. In the central region, convergence of the Lions Head Fault from the southeast results in an apparent impinging block, leading to development of a "paired fault bend" to the west. Combination of the fault and "chimney" attribute results indicates a strong connection between faults and fluid-migration pathways. Fluid-pathways are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones.

  6. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  7. Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

  8. An Attempt of Hydrogeological Classification of Fault Zones in Karst Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Decker, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Around 60% of Vienna`s drinking water originates in the Hochschwab plateau (Eastern Alps, Austria). The hydrogeology (groundwater storage and flow) of the Hochschwab is essentially governed by karstified, large-scale faults. Previous work has shown that faults that formed during the Oligocene/L. Miocene lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps act as groundwater pathways draining the karst massif preferably in E-W-direction. However, further analysis of flow processes in karstified aquifers requires hydrogeological relevant data from natural fault zones. We investigated E- to ENE- striking strike-slip faults in limestones and dolomites of the Wetterstein Fm. in terms of potential permeability properties that result from structural composition and fault rock content. Using the standard fault core-damage zone model, we analyzed fault rock characteristics and volumes at the fault cores and connective fracture networks surrounding faults in the damage zones. Special attention has been drawn to fracture densities and the spatial extent of fracture networks. Small-scale fractures are generally assumed to carry most of the effective porosity and have a great influence on the permeability of a fault zone. Therefore, we established a classification scheme and measuring method that provides semi-quantitative estimates of the density and abundance of small-scale fractures by using scanning line techniques to quantify the total joint surface in a volume of rock (m² joint surfaces per m³ rock). This easily applicable method allows to generate fracture density data for the entire damage zones (over tens of meters) and thus to enhance the understanding of permeability properties of damage zones. The field based data is supported by effective porosity and permeability measurements of fractured wall rock and fault rock samples. Different fault rock categories turned out to have complex poro/perm properties due to differences in grain sizes, matrix content, cementation and fracturing

  9. Distribution of faults in a transition zone: Bimodal faulting in the Pit River region, Shasta County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, L. J.; Weldon, R. J.; Paulson, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    Northern California marks a zone of transition between oblique subduction in Cascadia, dextral transtension in Walker Lane, and north-south compression of the Klamath Mountains. Because of its unique location, the region between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak provides insight into the distribution of deformation in regions of transitional tectonic regimes. In particular, the Pit River region provides several excellent exposures of faults in a diatomite quarry and in larger regional structures. We present information on the distribution, amount of slip, and orientation of local faults, and demonstrate how these data reflect the interaction of multiple regional stress fields. We have measured and compiled the orientations of many small faults to evaluate the distribution of deformation in a complex zone of oblique extension and compression. A ~0.5 km2 diatomite quarry near the Pit River and Lake Britton exposes hundreds of faults with small amounts of displacement. Two main faulting patterns emerge: 1) high angle NW/SE-striking faults characterized by normal, oblique normal, or strike slip kinematic indicators; and 2) lower angle E/W-striking faults with evidence of reverse to oblique reverse motion. We find that the regional landscape reflects a dominant mode of faulting that is NW/SE-striking normal, oblique normal, or strike slip; the Hat Creek and Rocky Ledge faults, each with tens of meters of oblique normal offset, exemplify this. Observations of numerous smaller faults in the diatomite quarry also show a dominant pattern of NW/SE-striking faults. E/W-striking compressional structures are present, but are less abundant. Faults of differing orientations occur together in the quarry and occasionally cross cut one another. Many faults cross but do not offset each other, indicating that they formed simultaneously. Where cross-cutting faults do exhibit offset, the NW/SE-striking faults offset E/W-striking faults, which suggests that NW/SE oriented faults have been

  10. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the

  11. The Sundance fault: A newly recognized shear zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.W.; Braun, C.A.; Martin, L.G.; Weisenberg, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    Ongoing detailed mapping at a scale of 1:240 of structural features within the potential repository area indicates the presence of several previously unrecognized structural features. Minor north-trending west-side-down faults occur east and west of the Ghost Dance fault and suggest a total width of the Ghost Dance fault system of nearly 366 m (1200 ft). A zone of near-vertical N30{degrees}-40{degrees} W-trending faults, at least 274 m (900 ft) wide, has been identified in the northern part of our study area and may traverse across the potential repository area. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of available data, we propose to name this zone the {open_quotes}Sundance fault system{close_quotes} and the dominant structure, occurring near the middle of the zone, the {open_quotes}Sundance fault{close_quotes}. Some field relations suggest left-stepping deflections of north-trending faults along a pre-existing northwest-trending structural fabric. Other field observations suggest that the {open_quotes}Sundance fault system{close_quotes} offsets the Ghost Dance fault system in an apparent right lateral sense by at least 52 m (170 ft). Additional detailed field studies are needed to better understand structural complexities at Yucca Mountain.

  12. The Sundance fault: A newly recognized shear zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.W.; Braun, C.A.; Martin, L.G.; Weisenberg, C.W.

    1994-04-01

    Ongoing detailed mapping at a scale of 1:240 of structural features within the potential repository area indicates the presence of several previously unrecognized structural features. Minor north-trending west-side-down faults occur east and west of the Ghost Dance fault and suggest a total width of the Ghost Dance fault system of nearly 366 m (1200 ft). A zone of near-vertical N30{degrees} {minus} 40{degrees}W {minus} trending faults, at least 274 m (900 ft) wide, has been identified in the northern part of our study area and may traverse across the proposed repository area. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of available data, we propose to name this zone the ``Sundance fault system`` and the dominant structure, occurring near the middle of the zone, the ``Sundance fault.`` Some field relations suggest left-stepping deflections of north-trending faults along a preexisting northwest-trending structural fabric. Other field observations suggest that the ``Sundance fault system`` offsets the Ghost Dance fault system in an apparent right lateral sense by at least 52 m (170 ft). Additional detailed field studies, however, are needed to better understand structural complexities at Yucca Mountain.

  13. When did movement begin on the Furnace Creek fault zone

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M. )

    1993-04-01

    About 50 km of post-Jurassic right-lateral slip has occurred on the northern part of the Furnace Creek fault zone (FCFZ). The sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structure of Tertiary rocks suggest that movement on the fault began no earlier than 12--8 Ma and possibly as late as 5--4 Ma. Large remnants of erosion surfaces occur on both sides of the FCFZ in the southern White Mountains and Fish Lake Valley and are buried by rhyolite and basalt, mostly 12--10 Ma; the ash flows and welded tuffs were likely erupted from sources at least 40 km to the east. Thus, the area probably had gentle topography, suggesting a lengthy period of pre-late Miocene tectonic stability. On the west side of the FCFZ, Cambrian sedimentary rocks are buried by a fanglomerate with an [sup [minus

  14. The effects of lateral property variations on fault-zone reactivation by fluid pressurization: Application to CO2 pressurization effects within major and undetected fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we performed in situ multidisciplinary analyses of two different fault zones in carbonate formations. One is a seismically active fault zone several kilometers long (the Roccasseira Fault Zone); the other is a small fault zone a few hundred meters long (the GAS Fault Zone). The smaller, "immature" fault zone displays a discontinuous damage zone, because tectonic deformations have been accommodated differently according to the initial properties of the host rock. The larger, "mature" fault zone displays a continuous damage zone caused by the presence of secondary fault cores embedded in a heavily fractured area inside the damage zone. These markedly different fault-zone architectures were reflected in two hydraulic and geomechanical fault models, both generated from a coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical simulator, to examine the impact of hydromechanical property distribution on fault stability when the faults are reactivated by CO2 injection. In the smaller fault zone, marked differences in hydromechanical properties (Young's modulus and permeability) favor fluid accumulation, inducing high pressurization in parts of the damage zone, potentially resulting in small seismic events. On the other hand in the mature fault zone, fluid flows more easily and thus fluid-induced earthquakes may not readily occur, because the fault-zone pressurization is much lower, insufficient for triggering a seismic event.

  15. Geologic map of the Hayward fault zone, Contra Costa, Alameda, and Santa Clara counties, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, R.W.; Jones, D.L.; Brabb, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Hayward is one of three major fault zones of the San Andreas system that have produced large historic earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area (the others being the San Andreas and Calaveras). Severe earthquakes were generated by this fault zone in 1836 and in 1868, and several large earthquakes have been recorded since 1868. The Hayward fault zone is considered to be the most probable source of a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area, as much as 28% chance for a magnitude 7 earthquake before the year 2021 (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1990). The Hayward fault zone, as described in this work, is a zone of highly deformed rocks, trending north 30 degrees west and ranging in width from about 2 to 10 kilometers. The historic earthquake generating activity has been concentrated in the western portion of the zone, but the zone as a whole reflects deformation derived from oblique right-lateral and compressive tectonic stress along a significant upper crustal discontinuity for the past 10 million or more years. The Hayward fault zone is bounded on the east by a series of faults that demarcate the beginning of one or more structural blocks containing rocks and structures unrelated to the Hayward fault zone. The eastern bounding faults are, from the south, the Calaveras, Stonybrook, Palomares, Miller Creek, and Moraga faults. These faults are not considered to be part of the Hayward fault zone, although they are shown on the map to demarcate its boundary. The western boundary of the zone is less clearly defined, because the alluvium of the San Francisco Bay and Santa Clara Valley basins obscures bedrock and structural relationships. Although several of the westernmost faults in the zone clearly project under or through the alluvium, the western boundary of the fault is generally considered to be the westernmost mapped fault, which corresponds more or less with the margin of thick unconsolidated surficial deposits. The Hayward fault

  16. Fracture systems in normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks, Northwest German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2012-12-01

    Field studies of fracture systems associated with 58 normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks were performed in the Northwest German Basin. Fracture orientations, densities, apertures and lengths, as well as fault zone structural indices, were analysed separately for fault damage zones and host rocks. The results show a pronounced difference between carbonate and clastic rocks: mainly in carbonate rocks we found presence of clear damage zones, characterized by higher fracture densities than in the host rocks. While the maximum aperture is similar for both units, the percentage of fractures with large apertures is much higher in the damage zones than in the host rocks. Based on laboratory measurements of Young's moduli and field measurements of fracture densities, we calculate effective stiffnesses Ee, that is the Young's moduli of the in situ rock masses, within the normal fault zones. Compared with carbonate rocks, Ee computed for clastic-rock damage zones decreases significantly less due to lower fracture densities. We conclude that normal fault zones in carbonate rocks have more profound effects on enhancing permeability in fluid reservoirs than those in clastic rocks. The results are of great importance for modelling the hydromechanical behaviour of normal fault zones in subsurface fluid reservoirs.

  17. Geometry and kinematics of the fold-thrust belt and structural evolution of the major Himalayan fault zones in the Darjeeling -- Sikkim Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kathakali

    The Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya lies in the eastern part of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt (FTB) in a zone of high arc-perpendicular convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates. In this region two distinct faults form the Main Central thrust (MCT), the structurally higher MCT1 and the lower MCT2; both these faults have translated the Greater Himalayan hanging wall rocks farther towards the foreland than in the western Himalaya. The width of the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan rocks progressively decreases from the western Himalaya to this part of the eastern Himalaya, and as a result, the width of the FTB is narrower in this region compared to the western Himalaya. Our structural analysis shows that in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan duplex is composed of two duplex systems and has a more complex geometry than in the rest of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The structurally higher Dating duplex is a hinterland-dipping duplex; the structurally lower Rangit duplex varies in geometry from a hinterland-dipping duplex in the north to an antiformal stack in the middle and a foreland-dipping duplex in the south. The MCT2 is the roof thrust of the Daling duplex and the Ramgarh thrust is the roof thrust of the Rangit duplex. In this region, the Ramgarh thrust has a complex structural history with continued reactivation during footwall imbrication. The foreland-dipping component of the Rangit duplex, along with the large displacement associated with the reactivation of the Ramgarh thrust accounts for the large translation of the MCT sheets in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. The growth of the Lesser Himalayan duplex modified the final geometry of the overlying MCT sheets, resulting in a plunge culmination that manifests itself as a broad N-S trending "anticline" in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. This is not a "river anticline" as its trace lies west of the Teesta river. A transport parallel balanced cross section across this region has accommodated

  18. Tectonic Geomorphology of the Hanging Wall Blocks of the Cimandiri Fault Zone, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    In areas where regional strain is accommodated by broad zones of short and low slip-rate faults, geomorphic and paleoseismic characterization of faults is difficult because of poor surface expression and long earthquake recurrence intervals. In humid areas, faults can be buried by thick sediments and undetectable until the next earthquake. In Java, despite the frequency of damaging shallow earthquakes, active faults are diffuse and their characterization is challenging. Among them is the ENE-trending Cimandiri fault. Cumulative displacement along the fault produces prominent ENE-oriented ranges with the east side moving relatively upward and to the north. Along its length, the few hundred meter wide fault zone is expressed in the bedrock by numerous NE, E and NW-trending thrust- and strike slip faults and folds. However, it is unclear which of these structures are active, as the diffuse nature of the fault zone has so far stymied conventional paleoseismic study. To address this, we performed a tectonic geomorphology analysis of the fault zone. We used the 30-m resolution SRTM-DEM to construct longitudinal profiles of 601 bedrock rivers along the ranges and calculated the normalized channel steepness index (ksn). Our preliminary results rely on the assumption that ksn is a reasonable proxy for relative rock uplift rate in a region, assuming variations in rock type and climate are insignificant. While the active traces of the Cimandiri fault are obscured, the spatial variation in ksn allows us to delineate 4 discontinuous hanging wall blocks that vary between E and NE striking along the zone. The largest ksn values are along the central-western block (Cibeber area). The longest block is in the central eastern portion of the fault zone and comprises 45 km of the 100 km long fault zone. The fault bifurcates at its eastern termination and steps into the Lembang fault. The distribution of ksn suggests that reverse motion is more dominant than lateral because of a lack of

  19. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  20. Vertical tectonic deformation associated with the San Andreas fault zone offshore of San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Parsons, T.; Sliter, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    A new fault map of the shelf offshore of San Francisco, California shows that faulting occurs as a distributed shear zone that involves many fault strands with the principal displacement taken up by the San Andreas fault and the eastern strand of the San Gregorio fault zone. Structures associated with the offshore faulting show compressive deformation near where the San Andreas fault goes offshore, but deformation becomes extensional several km to the north off of the Golden Gate. Our new fault map serves as the basis for a 3-D finite element model that shows that the block between the San Andreas and San Gregorio fault zone is subsiding at a long-term rate of about 0.2-0.3??mm/yr, with the maximum subsidence occurring northwest of the Golden Gate in the area of a mapped transtensional basin. Although the long-term rates of vertical displacement primarily show subsidence, the model of coseismic deformation associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake indicates that uplift on the order of 10-15??cm occurred in the block northeast of the San Andreas fault. Since 1906, 5-6??cm of regional subsidence has occurred in that block. One implication of our model is that the transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault to a fault 5??km to the east, the Golden Gate fault, is not required for the area offshore of San Francisco to be in extension. This has implications for both the deposition of thick Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments (the Merced Formation) observed east of the San Andreas fault, and the age of the Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault.

  1. Vertical tectonic deformation associated with the San Andreas fault zone offshore of San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, H. F.; Parsons, T.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-10-01

    A new fault map of the shelf offshore of San Francisco, California shows that faulting occurs as a distributed shear zone that involves many fault strands with the principal displacement taken up by the San Andreas fault and the eastern strand of the San Gregorio fault zone. Structures associated with the offshore faulting show compressive deformation near where the San Andreas fault goes offshore, but deformation becomes extensional several km to the north off of the Golden Gate. Our new fault map serves as the basis for a 3-D finite element model that shows that the block between the San Andreas and San Gregorio fault zone is subsiding at a long-term rate of about 0.2-0.3 mm/yr, with the maximum subsidence occurring northwest of the Golden Gate in the area of a mapped transtensional basin. Although the long-term rates of vertical displacement primarily show subsidence, the model of coseismic deformation associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake indicates that uplift on the order of 10-15 cm occurred in the block northeast of the San Andreas fault. Since 1906, 5-6 cm of regional subsidence has occurred in that block. One implication of our model is that the transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault to a fault 5 km to the east, the Golden Gate fault, is not required for the area offshore of San Francisco to be in extension. This has implications for both the deposition of thick Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments (the Merced Formation) observed east of the San Andreas fault, and the age of the Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault.

  2. Style and rate of quaternary deformation of the Hosgri Fault Zone, offshore south-central coastal California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Kathryn L.; Lettis, William R.; McLaren, Marcia; Savage, William U.; Hall, N. Timothy; Keller, Mararget A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone is the southernmost component of a complex system of right-slip faults in south-central coastal California that includes the San Gregorio, Sur, and San Simeon Faults. We have characterized the contemporary style of faulting along the zone on the basis of an integrated analysis of a broad spectrum of data, including shallow high-resolution and deep penetration seismic reflection data; geologic and geomorphic data along the Hosgri and San Simeon Fault Zones and the intervening San Simeon/Hosgri pull-apart basin; the distribution and nature of near-coast seismicity; regional tectonic kinematics; and comparison of the Hosgri Fault Zone with worldwide strike-slip, oblique-slip, and reverse-slip fault zones. These data show that the modern Hosgri Fault Zone is a convergent right-slip (transpressional) fault having a late Quaternary slip rate of 1 to 3 mm/yr. Evidence supporting predominantly strike-slip deformation includes (1) a long, narrow, linear zone of faulting and associated deformation; (2) the presence of asymmetric flower structures; (3) kinematically consistent localized extensional and compressional deformation at releasing and restraining bends or steps, respectively, in the fault zone; (4) changes in the sense and magnitude of vertical separation both along trend of the fault zone and vertically within the fault zone; (5) strike-slip focal mechanisms along the fault trace; (6) a distribution of seismicity that delineates a high-angle fault extending through the seismogenic crust; (7) high ratios of lateral to vertical slip along the fault zone; and (8) the separation by the fault of two tectonic domains (offshore Santa Maria Basin, onshore Los Osos domain) that are undergoing contrasting styles of deformation and orientations of crustal shortening. The convergent component of slip is evidenced by the deformation of the early-late Pliocene unconformity. In characterizing the style of faulting along the Hosgri Fault Zone, we assessed

  3. Continuity, segmentation and faulting type of active fault zones of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake inferred from analyses of a gravity gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Nayuta; Yoshihiro, Hiramatsu; Sawada, Akihiro

    2016-10-01

    We analyze Bouguer anomalies in/around the focal region of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake to examine features, such as continuity, segmentation and faulting type, of the active fault zones related to the earthquake. Several derivatives and structural parameters calculated from a gravity gradient tensor are applied to highlight the features. First horizontal and vertical derivatives, as well as a normalized total horizontal derivative, characterize well the continuous subsurface fault structure along the Futagawa fault zone. On the other hand, the Hinagu fault zone is not clearly detected by these derivatives, especially in the case of the Takano-Shirahata segment, suggesting a difference of cumulative vertical displacement between the two fault zones. The normalized total horizontal derivative and the dimensionality index indicate a discontinuity of the subsurface structure of the Hinagu fault zone, that is, a segment boundary between the Takano-Shirahata and the Hinagu segments. The aftershock distribution does not extend beyond this segment boundary. In other words, this segment boundary controls the southern end of the rupture area of the foreshock. We also recognize normal fault structures dipping to the northwest in some areas of the fault zones from estimations of dip angles.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Fault-Zone Maturity Defines Maximum Earthquake Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, M.; Bulut, F.; Stierle, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating the maximum likely magnitude of future earthquakes on transform faults near large metropolitan areas has fundamental consequences for the expected hazard. Here we show that the maximum earthquakes on different sections of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) scale with the duration of fault zone activity, cumulative offset and length of individual fault segments. The findings are based on a compiled catalogue of historical earthquakes in the region, using the extensive literary sources that exist due to the long civilization record. We find that the largest earthquakes (M~8) are exclusively observed along the well-developed part of the fault zone in the east. In contrast, the western part is still in a juvenile or transitional stage with historical earthquakes not exceeding M=7.4. This limits the current seismic hazard to NW Turkey and its largest regional population and economical center Istanbul. Our findings for the NAFZ are consistent with data from the two other major transform faults, the San Andreas fault in California and the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East. The results indicate that maximum earthquake magnitudes generally scale with fault-zone evolution.

  5. Kinematics at Death Valley-Garlock fault zone junction

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, R.B.; Verosub, K.; Finnerty, A.

    1987-08-01

    The Garlock and Death Valley fault zones in southeast California are two active strike-slip faults that come together on the east side of the Avawatz Mountains. The kinematics of this intersection, and the possible continuation of either fault zone, is being investigated using a combination of detailed field mapping, and processing and interpretation of remotely sensed image data from satellite and aircraft platforms. Regional and local relationships are derivable from the thematic Mapper data (30 m resolution), including discrimination and relative age dating of alluvial fans, bedrock mapping, and fault mapping. Aircraft data provide higher spatial resolution data over more limited areas. Hypotheses that are being considered are (1) the Garlock fault extends east of the intersection; (2) the Garlock fault terminates at the intersection and the Death Valley fault continues southeastward; and (3) the Garlock fault has been offset right laterally by the Death Valley fault that continues to the southeast. Preliminary work indicates that the first hypothesis is invalid. Kinematic considerations, image analysis, and field work results favor the third hypothesis. The projected continuation of the Death Valley zone defines the boundary between the Mojave crustal block and the Basin and Range block.

  6. Hydrothermal circulation and subsidence in ocean basins : evidence from the Southeast Indian Ridge. Implications on the permeability structure within fault zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, L.; Lee, T. C.; Cochran, J. R.; Francheteau, J.; Abbott, D.; Christine, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recent heat flow data collected with 18 m long probes along a 14 Ma old isochron exhibit high variability, low heat flow values, but rather linear temperature profiles. This linearity may reflect conductive heat transfer from the sediment surface to the highly permeable, igneous basement. However, near troughs, where heat flow values as low as 2 to 12 mWm-2 are measured, linear temperature profiles are observed together with large variations in conductivity with depth. Here, we suggest that heat transfer near troughs is likely to be mainly controlled by downward advection of seawater. To explain the linearity, we propose that the depth of penetration (H) of seawater along faults is much greater than the probe length (d). Hence, the convex curvature of the temperature profile cannot be resolved along the probe length, resulting in an apparent linear temperature profile. Assuming that seawater penetrates down to the base of the faults, we predict (by solving the 1D equation of heat transfer with vertical advection of water near troughs) that temperatures as low as 100°C to 130°C can be found at the base of the crust (H ~3 to 7 km). Such low temperatures can be achieved with average, vertical flow velocities of 10-10 ms-1 and formation average permeabilities as low as 1015 to 10-17 m2, consistently with what is known on the physical properties of sediments and of oceanic crust. In presence of convenient fault spacing, steady state circulation of water within the highly permeable, damaged zone that probably exist along faults can maintain (by lateral, conductive cooling) low, but non-zero, temperatures at the base of the crust. Hence, while the crust is instantaneously ``pre-subsided'' at the ridge axis, the sub-crustal lithosphere contracts slowly, at a rate that is proportional to the difference between the mantle temperature and the average temperature at the base of the ``wet'' domain. This process significantly affected subsidence rates during the [0-25 Ma

  7. Arshan palaeoseismic feature of the Tunka fault (Baikal rift zone, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekalin, Oleg P.; Shchetnikov, Alexander A.; White, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The traditional concept of the rift development of flank depressions in the Baikal rift zone is now doubted in view of some indicators for compression deformations identified by the seismogeological and geodetic methods. Besides, the paleoseismological investigations revealed seismogenic strike-slips and reverse faults in the Tunka fault zone that is a major structure-controlling element of the Tunka rift depression. However, a detailed study of the upslope-facing scarp in the Arshan paleoseismogenic structure zone has shown that its formation might be due to rift mechanism of basin formation. Age estimation has been made for the previously unknown pre-historic earthquake whose epicentral area coincides with the western flank of the Arshan paleoseismogenic structure. Judging from previously determined ages of paleoearthquakes, the mean recurrence period for faulting events on the central Tunka fault is 2780-3440 years.

  8. Seismic imaging of deformation zones associated with normal fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapadat, Alexandru; Imber, Jonathan; Iacopini, David; Hobbs, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Folds associated with normal faulting, which are mainly the result of fault propagation and linkage of normal fault segments, can exhibit complex deformation patterns, with multiple synthetic splay faults, reverse faults and small antithetic Riedel structures accommodating flexure of the beds. Their identification is critical in evaluating connectivity of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and sealing capacity of faults. Previous research showed that seismic attributes can be successfully used to image complex structures and deformation distribution in submarine thrust folds. We use seismic trace and coherency attributes, a combination of instantaneous phase, tensor discontinuity and semblance attributes to identify deformation structures at the limit of seismic resolution, which accommodate seismic scale folding associated with normal faulting from Inner Moray Firth Basin, offshore Scotland. We identify synthetic splay faults and reverse faults adjacent to the master normal faults, which are localized in areas with highest fold amplitudes. This zone of small scale faulting is the widest in areas with highest fault throw / fold amplitude, or where a bend is present in the main fault surface. We also explore the possibility that changes in elastic properties of the rocks due to deformation can contribute to amplitude reductions in the fault damage zones. We analyse a pre-stack time-migrated 3D seismic data-set, where seismic reflections corresponding to a regionally-continuous and homogeneous carbonate layer display a positive correlation between strain distribution and amplitude variations adjacent to the faults. Seismic amplitude values are homogeneously distributed within the undeformed area of the footwall, with a minimum deviation from a mean amplitude value calculated for each seismic line. Meanwhile, the amplitude dimming zone is more pronounced (negative deviation increases) and widens within the relay zone, where sub-seismic scale faults, which accommodate

  9. Thermo-mechanical coupling of faults and mantle shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Valere; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Paleo-seismological records suggest non-steady and potentially periodic trends in slip rates over time scales of the order of millennia. It is unclear whether the variability of recurrence times is due to fault processes alone or if they are modulated by off-fault deformation. Theoretical and numerical modeling of fault kinematics from geodetic data have enabled an explosion of new findings about the mechanics of the earthquake cycle. However, these models have been mostly confined to processes along the interface of a fault. Therefore many sources of off-fault deformation, such as thermoelasticity and viscoelasticity, cannot yet be accounted for in the earthquake cycle. Here, we couple fault kinematics and viscoelastic deformation within shear zones using the integral method to simulate unified earthquake cycles that combine fault and off-fault processes. We consider the modulation of slip rates along a fault within the brittle layer due to strain in a viscoelastic substrate beneath the brittle-ductile transition. By implementing a thermally-activated rheology accounting for thermal diffusion, we investigate the thermo-mechanical coupling of faults and mantle shear zones and its implications for earthquake recurrence.

  10. Imaging Faults and Shear Zones Using Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, Vera; Mahan, Kevin H.

    2014-11-01

    The geometry of faults at seismogenic depths and their continuation into the ductile zone is of interest for a number of applications ranging from earthquake hazard to modes of lithospheric deformation. Teleseismic passive source imaging of faults and shear zones can be useful particularly where faults are not outlined by local seismicity. Passive seismic signatures of faults may arise from abrupt changes in lithology or foliation orientation in the upper crust, and from mylonitic shear zones at greater depths. Faults and shear zones with less than near-vertical dip lend themselves to detection with teleseismic mode-converted waves (receiver functions) provided that they have either a contrast in isotropic shear velocity ( V s), or a contrast in orientation or strength of anisotropic compressional velocity ( V p). We introduce a detection method for faults and shear zones based on receiver functions. We use synthetic seismograms to demonstrate common features of dipping isotropic interfaces and contrasts in dipping foliation that allows determination of their strike and depth without making further assumptions about the model. We proceed with two applications. We first image a Laramide thrust fault in the western U.S. (the Wind River thrust fault) as a steeply dipping isotropic velocity contrast in the middle crust near the surface trace of the fault; further downdip and across the range, where basin geometry suggests the fault may sole into a subhorizontal shear zone, we identify a candidate shear zone signal from midcrustal depths. The second application is the use of microstructural data from exhumed ductile shear zones in Scotland and in the western Canadian Shield to predict the character of seismic signatures of present-day deep crustal shear zones. Realistic anisotropy in observed shear fabrics generates a signal in receiver functions that is comparable in amplitude to first-order features like the Moho. Observables that can be robustly constrained without

  11. Possible Connections Between the Coronado Bank Fault Zone and the Newport-Inglewood, Rose Canyon, and Palos Verdes Fault Zones Offshore San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow Huntec data collected by the USGS were interpreted to map the Coronado Bank fault zone (CBFZ) offshore San Diego County, California. The CBFZ is comprised of several major strands (eastern, central, western) that change in both orientation and degree of deformation along strike. Between Coronado Bank and San Diego, the CBFZ trends N25W and occupies a narrow 7 km zone. Immediately north of La Jolla submarine canyon (LJSC), the easternmost strand changes orientation to almost due north and appears to be offset in a right-lateral sense across the canyon axis. The strand merges with a prominent fault that follows the base of the continental slope in about 600 m water depth. The central portion of the CBFZ is mapped as a negative flower structure and deforms seafloor sediment as far north as 15 km north of LJSC. Farther north, this structure is buried by more than 400 m of basin sediment. Along the eastern edge of the Coronado Bank, the western portion of the CBFZ is characterized by high angle normal faults that dip to the east. North of the Coronado Bank, the western segment follows the western edge of a basement high; it cuts through horizontal basin reflectors and in places deforms the seafloor. We mapped an additional splay of the CBFZ that trends N40W; it is only observed north and west of LJSC. Although the predominant trend of the CBFZ is about N40W, along strike deviations from this orientation of some of the strands indicate that these strands connect with other offshore fault zones in the area. Based on the limited data available, the trend of the CBFZ south of Coronado Bank suggests that it might connect with the Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ) that has been mapped in San Diego Bay. North of Coronado Bank, the CBFZ is a much broader fault zone (about 25 km wide) composed of diverging fault strands. The westernmost strand may merge with the western strand of the Palos Verdes fault zone (PVFZ) south of

  12. Fault zone development and strain partitioning in an extensional strike-slip duplex: A case study from the Mesozoic Atacama fault system, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembrano, J.; González, G.; Arancibia, G.; Ahumada, I.; Olivares, V.; Herrera, V.

    2005-05-01

    Upper crustal strike-slip duplexes provide an excellent opportunity to address the fundamental question of fault zone development and strain partitioning in an evolving system. Detailed field mapping of the Mesozoic Atacama fault system in the Coastal Cordillera of Northern Chile documents the progressive development of second- and third-order faults forming a duplex at a dilational jog between two overstepping master faults: the sinistral strike-slip, NNW-striking, Jorgillo and Bolfin faults. These are constituted by a meter-wide core of foliated S-C ultracataclasite and cataclasite, flanked by a damage zone of protocataclasite, splay faults and veins. Lateral separation of markers along master faults is on the order of a few kilometers. Second-order, NW-striking, oblique-slip subsidiary fault zones do not show foliated ultracataclasite; lateral sinistral separations are in the range of ˜ 10 to 200 m with a relatively minor normal dip-slip component. In turn, third-order, east-west striking normal faults exhibit centimetric displacement. Oblique-slip (sinistral-normal) fault zones located at the southern termination of the Bolfin fault form a well-developed imbricate fan structure. They exhibit a relatively simple architecture of extensional and extensional-shear fractures bound by low displacement shear fractures. Kinematic analysis of fault slip data from mesoscopic faults within the duplex area, document that the NW-striking and the EW-striking faults accommodate transtension and extension, respectively. Examination of master and subsidiary faults of the duplex indicates a strong correlation between total displacement and internal fault structure. Faults started from arrays of en echelon extensional/extensional-shear fractures that then coalesced into throughgoing strike-slip faults. Further displacement leads to the formation of discrete bands of cataclasite and ultracataclasite that take up a significant part of the total displacement. We interpret that the

  13. Geometry and kinematics of the fold-thrust belt and structural evolution of the major Himalayan fault zones in the Darjeeling -- Sikkim Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kathakali

    The Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya lies in the eastern part of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt (FTB) in a zone of high arc-perpendicular convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates. In this region two distinct faults form the Main Central thrust (MCT), the structurally higher MCT1 and the lower MCT2; both these faults have translated the Greater Himalayan hanging wall rocks farther towards the foreland than in the western Himalaya. The width of the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan rocks progressively decreases from the western Himalaya to this part of the eastern Himalaya, and as a result, the width of the FTB is narrower in this region compared to the western Himalaya. Our structural analysis shows that in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya the sub-MCT Lesser Himalayan duplex is composed of two duplex systems and has a more complex geometry than in the rest of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The structurally higher Dating duplex is a hinterland-dipping duplex; the structurally lower Rangit duplex varies in geometry from a hinterland-dipping duplex in the north to an antiformal stack in the middle and a foreland-dipping duplex in the south. The MCT2 is the roof thrust of the Daling duplex and the Ramgarh thrust is the roof thrust of the Rangit duplex. In this region, the Ramgarh thrust has a complex structural history with continued reactivation during footwall imbrication. The foreland-dipping component of the Rangit duplex, along with the large displacement associated with the reactivation of the Ramgarh thrust accounts for the large translation of the MCT sheets in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. The growth of the Lesser Himalayan duplex modified the final geometry of the overlying MCT sheets, resulting in a plunge culmination that manifests itself as a broad N-S trending "anticline" in the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. This is not a "river anticline" as its trace lies west of the Teesta river. A transport parallel balanced cross section across this region has accommodated

  14. Discovery of amorphous carbon veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone: implications for the fault weakening mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Li, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake generated 270- and 80-km-long surface ruptures along Yingxiu-Beichuan fault and Guanxian-Anxian fault, respectively. At the outcrop near Hongkou village, southwest segment of Yingxiu-Beichuan rupture, network black amorphous carbon veins were discovered near fault planes in the 190-m-wide earthquake fault zone. These veins are mainly composed of ultrafine- and fine-grained amorphous carbon, usually narrower than 5mm and injected into faults and cracks as far as several meter. Flowage structures like asymmetrical structures around few stiff rock fragments indicate materials flew when the veins formed. Fluidization of cataclastic amorphous carbon and the powerful driving force in the veins imply high pore pressure built up during earthquakes. High pore pressure solution and graphite reported in the fault gouge (Togo et al., 2011) can lead very low dynamic friction during the Wenchuan earthquake. This deduction hypothesis is in accordance with the very low thermal abnormal measured on the principle fault zone following the Wenchuan earthquake (Mori et al., 2010). Furthermore, network amorphous carbon veins of different generations suggest similar weakening mechanism also worked on historical earthquakes in Longmenshan fault zone. Reference: Brodsky, E. E., Li, H., Mori, J. J., Kano, Y., and Xue, L., 2012, Frictional Stress Measured Through Temperature Profiles in the Wenchuan Scientific Fault Zone Drilling Project. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T44B-07 Li, H., Xu, Z., Si, J., Pei, J., Song, S., Sun, Z., and Chevalier, M., 2012, Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling program (WFSD): Overview and Results. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T44B-01 Mori, J. J., Li, H., Wang, H., Kano, Y., Pei, J., Xu, Z., and Brodsky, E. E., 2010, Temperature measurements in the WFSD-1 borehole following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (MW7.9). American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T53E

  15. Transpressive duplex and flower structure: Dent Fault System, NW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Nigel H.; Rickards, Barrie

    2003-12-01

    Revised mapping along the Dent Fault (northwest England) has improved the resolution of folds and faults formed during Variscan (late Carboniferous) sinistral transpression. A NNE-trending east-down monocline, comprising the Fell End Syncline and Taythes Anticline, was forced in Carboniferous cover above a reactivated precursor to the Dent Fault within the Lower Palaeozoic basement. The Taythes Anticline is periclinal due to interference with earlier Acadian folds. The steep limb of the monocline was eventually cut by the west-dipping Dent Fault. The hangingwall of the Dent Fault was dissected by sub-vertical or east dipping faults, together forming a positive flower structure in cross-section and a contractional duplex in plan view. The footwall to the Dent Fault preserves evidence of mostly dip-slip displacements, whereas strike-slip was preferentially partitioned into the hangingwall faults. This pattern of displacement partitioning may be typical of transpressive structures in general. The faults of the Taythes duplex formed in a restraining overlap zone between the Dent Fault and the Rawthey Fault to the west. The orientations of the duplex faults were a response to kinematic boundary conditions rather than to the regional stress field directly. Kinematic constraints provided by the Dent and neighbouring Variscan faults yield a NNW-SSE regional shortening direction in this part of the Variscan foreland.

  16. The Influence of a Local Fault Zone on High Energy Tremor Occurrence during Longwall Mining of a Coal Seam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtecki, Łukasz; Knopik, Małgorzata; Zuberek, Wacław Marian

    2016-08-01

    Underground mining of coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin in Poland is accompanied by seismic activity of varying magnitude. The investigations which have been performed for several years distinguished high energy mine tremors connected directly with mining or coupled with geological structures, such as large faults. In mined seams, local fault zones occur. Faults in these zones are usually small, with throws comparable with coal seams thicknesses. Local fault zone may be responsible for the occurrence of high energy tremors as well as large faults, as presented in this article. An analysis of source mechanism of high energy tremors generated during longwall mining of the coal seam No. 510, with presence of a local fault zone, in one of the Polish hard coal mines in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin was performed. For this purpose, the seismic moment tensor inversion method was used. In most of foci, the process of shear predominated. Determined nodal plane parameters were correlated with parameters of faults forming the local fault zone. High energy tremors were generated mostly by dislocations on faults of the local fault zone. Weakening of roof rocks in the neighborhood of local fault zone takes an important role too, and was responsible for share of implosion in the focal mechanism.

  17. Multiscale seismic imaging of active fault zones for hazard assessment: A case study of the Santa Monica fault zone, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Dolan, J.F.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Templeton, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles at two different scales were acquired across the transpressional Santa Monica Fault of north Los Angeles as part of an integrated hazard assessment of the fault. The seismic data confirm the location of the fault and related shallow faulting seen in a trench to deeper structures known from regional studies. The trench shows a series of near-vertical strike-slip faults beneath a topographic scarp inferred to be caused by thrusting on the Santa Monica fault. Analysis of the disruption of soil horizons in the trench indicates multiple earthquakes have occurred on these strike-slip faults within the past 50 000 years, with the latest being 1000 to 3000 years ago. A 3.8-km-long, high-resolution seismic reflection profile shows reflector truncations that constrain the shallow portion of the Santa Monica Fault (upper 300 m) to dip northward between 30?? and 55??, most likely 30?? to 35??, in contrast to the 60?? to 70?? dip interpreted for the deeper portion of the fault. Prominent, nearly continuous reflectors on the profile are interpreted to be the erosional unconformity between the 1.2 Ma and older Pico Formation and the base of alluvial fan deposits. The unconformity lies at depths of 30-60 m north of the fault and 110-130 m south of the fault, with about 100 m of vertical displacement (180 m of dip-slip motion on a 30??-35?? dipping fault) across the fault since deposition of the upper Pico Formation. The continuity of the unconformity on the seismic profile constrains the fault to lie in a relatively narrow (50 m) zone, and to project to the surface beneath Ohio Avenue immediately south of the trench. A very high-resolution seismic profile adjacent to the trench images reflectors in the 15 to 60 m depth range that are arched slightly by folding just north of the fault. A disrupted zone on the profile beneath the south end of the trench is interpreted as being caused by the deeper portions of the trenched strike

  18. The Longriqu fault zone, eastern Tibetan Plateau: Segmentation and Holocene behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansberque, Claire; Bellier, Olivier; Godard, Vincent; Lasserre, Cécile; Wang, Mingming; Braucher, Régis; Talon, Brigitte; Sigoyer, Julia; Xu, Xiwei; Bourlès, Didier L.

    2016-03-01

    The dextral Longriba fault system (LFS), ~300 km long and constituting of two fault zones, has recently been recognized as an important structure of the eastern Tibetan plateau (Sichuan province), as it accommodates a significant amount of the deformation induced by the ongoing Indo-Asian collision. Although previous paleoseismological investigations highlighted its high seismogenic potential, no systematic quantification of the dextral displacements along the fault system has been undertaken so far. As such information is essential to appraise fault behavior, we propose here a first detailed analysis of the segmentation of the Longriqu fault, the northern fault zone of the LFS, and an offset inventory of morphological features along the fault, using high-resolution Pleiades satellite images. We identify six major segments forming a mature fault zone. Offsets inventory suggests a characteristic coseismic displacement of ~4 m. Two alluvial fans, with minimum ages of 6.7 and 13.2 ka, respectively displaced by 23 ± 7 m and 40 ± 5 m, give an estimate of the maximal horizontal slip rate on the Longriqu fault of 3.2 ± 1.1 mm yr-1. As a result, a minimum ~1340 year time interval between earthquakes is expected.

  19. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and paleoseismicity of the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, SW Peloponessus (Messinia, Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Betzelou, Konstantina; Zygouri, Vassiliki; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Ganas, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    The southwestern part of Peloponnesus, Messinia and Laconia, is an area of significant tectonic activity situated near the Hellenic trench. Most of the deformation in this area is accommodated by the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, bordering the western part of Taygetos Mt range and the west coast of Mani peninsula. The Eastern Messinia Fault Zone (EMFZ) is a complex system of primarily normal faults dipping westwards with a strike of NNW-SSE to N-S direction attaining a total length of more than 100 km from the northern Messinia plain in the north to the southern part of Mani peninsula in the south. The continuity of the EMFZ is disrupted by overlapping faults and relay ramp structures. The central part of the EMFZ, from the town of Oichalia to the city of Kalamata, was investigated by detailed field mapping of fault structures and post-alpine sediment formations together with re-evaluation of historical and modern seismicity. Several fault segments with lengths of 6 to 10 km were mapped, defined and evaluated according to their state of activity and age. Analysis of fault striation measurements along fault planes of the fault zone shows a present regime of WSW-ENE extension, in accordance with focal mechanisms from modern seismicity. Known faults like the Katsareika and Verga faults near the city of Kalamata are interpreted as older-generation faults that are re-activated (e.g. the 1986 Ms 6.0 Kalamata earthquake on Verga Fault) as part of a system of distributed deformation. New fault segments, some of them previously unmapped like the Asprohoma fault to the west of Kalamata, and offshore faults like Kitries and Kourtissa, are being assigned to the EMFZ. Moreover, a paleoseismological trench was excavated in the northern part of Pidima fault segment, one of the most prominent active segments of the central part of the EMFZ, in order to examine the paleoearthquake record of the fault system. A significant number of historical and instrumental earthquakes in the area

  20. Complex Faulting within the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, H. R.; Powell, C. A.; Magnani, M.; Bisrat, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    Relative relocations derived using double-difference tomography techniques reveal a complex sequence of faulting within the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) and upper Mississippi Embayment. The majority of NMSZ seismicity recorded over the last 30 years occurs along four limbs: 1) a NE-SW trending dextral strike-slip fault, termed the Axial fault, coincident with the central valley of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift system; 2) the SE-NW trending Reelfoot thrust fault; 3) a E-W trending left lateral strike-slip fault extending off of the northern terminus of the Reelfoot fault, here termed New Madrid west; and 4) a NE-SW dextral strike-slip fault also extending off of the northern terminus of the Reelfoot fault, here termed New Madrid north. Each of these segments is thought to have ruptured during the 1811-1812 large earthquake sequence. A fifth segment, the Bootheel lineament, is marked by 1811-1812 related liquefaction features but appears largely aseismic, though we suggest there are at least five events in the catalog associated with this feature. Geological and geophysical evidence across the embayment suggests that the region is crossed by additional faults at shallow depths (<1-2 km), while seismicity is generally confined to the 3-20 km depth range. Here we present relative relocations derived using catalog and waveform cross-correlation differential times of the 1989-1992 local PANDA network and the 1995-2010 Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network. We show that the four known seismic lineations exhibit internal complexity. For example, New Madrid north is composed of two parallel faults rather then a single fault, and seismicity associated with the Axial lineation exhibits temporal changes along strike and becomes spatially more diffuse south of the Axial fault/Bootheel lineament intersection. Seismicity along the southern Reelfoot fault does not define a dipping plane consistent with thrust faulting, unlike the northern Reelfoot fault, and is associated with

  1. Palaeoseismological evidence for Holocene activity on the Manisa Fault Zone,Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkaymak, Ç.; Sözbilir, H.; Uzel, B.; Akyüz, H. S.

    2009-04-01

    Manisa Fault Zone (MFZ) is an active structural discontinuity that is geomorphologically expressed as a trace of north-facing Quaternary fault scarps bounding the southern margin of the Manisa basin which is subsidiary to the Gediz Graben. We note that the present-day fault trace is over 50 km long from Manisa city in the northwest to the Turgutlu town in the southeast. The MFZ consists of two major sections: (i) eastern section that strikes NW-SE direction in the south and bends into an approximately E-W direction around Manisa to the northwest, (ii) an approximately 10-km-long western section that strikes approximately WNW-ESE direction from Manisa city in the east to the Akgedik town in the west. In this study, we present the geologic, geomorphologic, and palaeoseismologic observations indicating Holocene activity on the western section of the fault zone. We identify that the MFZ, at its western end, consists of three fault segments which are en échelon arranged in left step; the fault segments show evidence for linkage and breaching at the relay ramps. One of them is named as the Manastir Fault. In front of this fault, two Holocene colluvial fans older of which is uncorformity bounded are cut and displaced by the syntethic faults. Palaeoseismologic data show that the syntethic fault segments correspond to the surface ruptures of the historical earthquakes. As a result of detailed stratigraphic, sedimentologic and structural observations on the trench walls, some evidences for at least two earthquakes are recorded which are supported by radio-carbon dating. Besides this, an archaic aqueduct that were used to transport water from Emlakdere town, located on the hanging wall of the Manastir Fault, to the basin is cut and displaced by the syntethic fault egments. It is known that this archaic architecture were in use after 11. century by the Ottomans. On the basis of the mentioned data, fault segments which are belong to the western part of the Manisa Fault Zone

  2. Fluid-rock Interaction and Episodic Fluid Flow within the Hurricane Fault-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koger, J.; Newell, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane Fault is an active 250-km long, west dipping, Basin and Range bounding normal fault in SW Utah and NW Arizona. Fault rock alteration and mineralization is common in the damage zone along strike, indicating that this structure has influenced past groundwater flow. Multiple Quaternary basaltic centers are located proximal to the fault. This study tests the hypothesis that fault-zone diagenesis is being driven by deeply circulated meteoric groundwater infiltration and associated rock-water interaction that is punctuated by periods of hydrothermal alteration associated with local magmatism. Fault-parallel/oblique fractures and small-offset antithetic and synthetic normal faults have been found within fault-zone rocks. The intensity of fracturing and associated evidence of fluid-rock interaction progressively decreases away from the main fault trace into the footwall. Host rock alteration, hematite mineralized fault surfaces, and calcite and hematite cemented deformation bands and veins are observed. These features are focused in 1 - 2 m wide zones of fracturing with densities of 6 - 18 m-1 located within the footwall damage zone. Host rock alteration in the form of both "bleaching" and oxidation along fractures provides evidence for past redox reactions. Mineralization in deformation bands suggests that some fluid flow and diagenesis was penecontemporaneous with deformation. Laminations and cross-cutting relationships in veins indicate periodic mineralization that could be controlled by episodic fluid flow, or fracturing and degassing leading to calcite precipitation. Stable isotopic results from calcite veins show δ13CPDB values of -7 to 3 ‰ and δ18OPDB values of -19 to -9 ‰. Carbon stable isotope ratios suggest multiple carbon sources such as marine carbonates, organic sedimentary rocks, and mantle derived CO2. Temperature differences in paleofluids and associated fluid-rock interaction may explain the observed range in δ18O values. Fluid

  3. Fault pattern at the northern end of the Death Valley - Furnace Creek fault zone, California and Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A. (Principal Investigator); Childs, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The pattern of faulting associated with the termination of the Death Valley-Furnace Creek Fault Zone in northern Fish Lake Valley, Nevada was studied in ERTS-1 MSS color composite imagery and color IR U-2 photography. Imagery analysis was supported by field reconnaissance and low altitude aerial photography. The northwest-trending right-lateral Death Valley-Furnace Creek Fault Zone changes northward to a complex pattern of discontinuous dip slip and strike slip faults. This fault pattern terminates to the north against an east-northeast trending zone herein called the Montgomery Fault Zone. No evidence for continuation of the Death Valley-Furnace Creek Fault Zone is recognized north of the Montgomery Fault Zone. Penecontemporaneous displacement in the Death Valley-Furnace Creek Fault Zone, the complex transitional zone, and the Montgomery Fault Zone suggests that the systems are genetically related. Mercury mineralization appears to have been localized along faults recognizable in ERTS-1 imagery within the transitional zone and the Montgomery Fault Zone.

  4. Spatial variability of time-constant slip rates on the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Sharp, W. D.; Meriaux, A. B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Fletcher, K.; Owen, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In southern California, the San Andreas (SAF) and San Jacinto fault (SJF) zones account for 70-80% of the relative dextral motion between the Pacific and North American plates, with some studies suggesting that the SJF zone may be the dominant structure. However, few slip rate measurements are available for the SJF zone, making it difficult to evaluate the partitioning of deformation across the plate boundary. To more reliably constrain the late Quaternary slip history of the SJF zone, we measured the displacement of well-preserved alluvial fans along the Clark and Coyote Creek fault strands of the SJF zone using field mapping and high-resolution LiDAR topographic data, and dated the fans using U-series on pedogenic carbonate clast-coatings and in situ cosmogenic 10Be. Our results from four sites along the Clark fault strand and two sites along the Coyote Creek fault strand indicate that late Quaternary slip rates have fluctuated along their length but have remained constant since the late Pleistocene. Slip rates along the Clark fault strand over the past 50-30 kyr decrease southward over a distance of ~60 km from ~13 mm/yr at Anza, to 8.9 ± 2.0 mm/yr at Rockhouse Canyon, and 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr near the SE end of the Santa Rosa Mountains, probably due to transfer of slip from the Clark fault strand to the Coyote Creek fault strand and nearby zones of distributed deformation. Slip rates of up to ~14 to 18 mm/yr summed across the southern SJF zone suggest that since the latest Pleistocene, the SJF zone may rival the southern SAF zone in accommodating deformation across the Pacific-North America Plate boundary.

  5. Geochemical Characterisation of the Alpine Fault Zone from the DFDP Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Boulton, C. J.; Toy, V.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2015-12-01

    . These findings imply that chemical alteration resulting from the circulation of meteoric waters modifies the fault zone's permeability structure by redistributing mass and changing the material properties of the plate boundary, and therefore plays an important role in the evolution of the fault zone which may prime it for repeated rupture.

  6. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  7. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  8. The kinematic and geodynamic significance of the Atacama fault zone, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuber, Ekkehard; Andriessen, Paul A. M.

    The Atacama fault zone (AFZ) is the dominant feature in the structure of the North Chilean Coastal Cordillera. Left lateral displacement took place along its system of longitudinal faults during the Jurassic and early Cretaceous. This development was contemporaneous with arc magmatism and was later reactivated, resulting in a steep normal fault. Strike-slip movements along the AFZ consist of two sets of ductile shear zones of different ages: one Jurassic, formed under amphibolite-facies conditions; the other early Cretaceous, with greenschist-facies mylonites. Structural asymmetries point to a sinistral sense of shear in both sets. The AFZ can be interpreted as a magmatic arc structure which accommodated the oblique subduction of an oceanic plate (trench-linked strike-slip fault). The sinistral sense of shear is consistent with reconstructions of late Jurassic to early Cretaceous plate configurations in the SE Pacific.

  9. Fault roughness evolution with slip (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Griffith, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    Fault surface roughness is a principal factor influencing fault and earthquake mechanics. However, little is known on roughness of fault surfaces at seismogenic depths, and particularly on how it evolves with accumulating slip. We have studied seismogenic fault surfaces of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone, which exploit precursor cooling joints of the Adamello tonalitic pluton (Italian Alps). These faults developed at 9-11 km and 250-300°C. Seismic slip along these surfaces, which individually accommodated from 1 to 20 m of net slip, resulted in the production of cm-thick cataclasites and pseudotachylytes (solidified melts produced during seismic slip). The roughness of fault surfaces was determined with a multi-resolution aerial and terrestrial LIDAR and photogrammetric dataset (Bistacchi et al., 2011, Pageoph, doi: 10.1007/s00024-011-0301-7). Fault surface roughness is self-affine, with Hurst exponent H < 1, indicating that faults are comparatively smoother at larger wavelengths. Fault surface roughness is inferred to have been inherited from the precursor cooling joints, which show H ≈ 0.8. Slip on faults progressively modified the roughness distribution, lowering the Hurst exponent in the along-slip direction up to H ≈ 0.6. This behaviour has been observed for wavelengths up to the scale of the accumulated slip along each individual fault surface, whilst at larger wavelengths the original roughness seems not to be affected by slip. Processes that contribute to modify fault roughness with slip include brittle failure of the interacting asperities (production of cataclasites) and frictional melting (production of pseudotachylytes). To quantify the "wear" due to these processes, we measured, together with the roughness of fault traces and their net slip, the thickness and distribution of cataclasites and pseudotachylytes. As proposed also in the tribological literature, we observe that wearing is scale dependent, as smaller wavelength asperities have a shorter

  10. Fault zone exploration in a geothermal context using P- and S-wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Musmann, Patrick; Tanner, David C.; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the collaborative research programme gebo ('Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling') we applied seismic P- and S-wave measurements to analyse and characterise fault zones. Fault zones have a high potential for geothermal energy extraction, but their usability depends on complex factors (structure, lithology, tectonics), underlining the need for detailed fault zone exploration and the deeper understanding of the factors' interplay. In this study, we carried out both P- and S-wave reflection seismic surveys parallel and perpendicular to the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, to explore the fault system. The seismic data reveal a high-resolution image of the complex graben structure which comprises both steeply-dipping normal faults and shallowly west-dipping normal faults, which cause a roll-over structure. In addition halokinesis is observed. The structural image of the graben structure indicates independent tectonic development of the uppermost (<500 m) and deeper (>500 m) depth levels. One of the shallowly west-dipping normal faults is traceable from the surface down to 500 m depth. To further investigate this fault zone which shows different reflection characteristics of P- and S-waves, a petrophysical analysis was conducted, including elastic parameter derivation and seismic modelling. Elastic parameters change strongly in the near-surface area, e.g., vs increases from 300 m/s at the surface to 900 m/s at 100 m depth, leading to a decrease in vp/vs from 6 to approx. 2.5. Changes in elastic parameters correlate with the geological interpretation and are in correspondence to literature values for the given lithologies. However, the fault zone itself shows no significant changes in elastic parameters due to the low resolution of the derived seismic velocities. Seismic modelling is a helpful tool to check elastic parameters which are assigned to the fault zone in the model. A comparison between synthetic and field data

  11. The role of bedding in the evolution of meso- and microstructural fabrics in fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of bedding in the evolution of meso- and microstructural fabrics in fault zones, detailed microscopic, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses were conducted on bedding-oblique and bedding-parallel faults that cut a folded Neogene siliceous mudstone that contains opal-CT, smectite, and illite. An analysis of asymmetric structures in the fault gouges indicates that the secondary fractures associated with each fault exhibit contrasting characteristics: those of the bedding-oblique fault are R1 shears, whereas those of the bedding-parallel fault are reactivated S foliation. The bedding-oblique fault shows the pervasive development of S foliation, lacks opal-CT, and has low SiO2/TiO2 ratios only in gouge, whereas the bedding-parallel fault exhibits these characteristics in both gouge and wall rocks. The development of S foliation and the lack of silica can result from local ductile deformation involving the sliding of phyllosilicates, coupled with pressure solution of opal-CT. Although such deformation can occur in gouge, the above results indicate that it may occur preferentially along bedding planes, preceding the formation of a gouge/slip surface. Thus, in sedimentary rocks that contain phyllosilicates and soluble minerals, bedding can influence the rheological evolution of meso- and microstructural fabrics in fault zones.

  12. Fault segmentation: New concepts from the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Olig, Susan S.; Hylland, Michael D.; Lund, William R.; Schwartz, David P.

    2016-02-01

    The question of whether structural segment boundaries along multisegment normal faults such as the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) act as persistent barriers to rupture is critical to seismic hazard analyses. We synthesized late Holocene paleoseismic data from 20 trench sites along the central WFZ to evaluate earthquake rupture length and fault segmentation. For the youngest (<3 ka) and best-constrained earthquakes, differences in earthquake timing across prominent primary segment boundaries, especially for the most recent earthquakes on the north-central WFZ, are consistent with segment-controlled ruptures. However, broadly constrained earthquake times, dissimilar event times along the segments, the presence of smaller-scale (subsegment) boundaries, and areas of complex faulting permit partial-segment and multisegment (e.g., spillover) ruptures that are shorter (~20-40 km) or longer (~60-100 km) than the primary segment lengths (35-59 km). We report a segmented WFZ model that includes 24 earthquakes since ~7 ka and yields mean estimates of recurrence (1.1-1.3 kyr) and vertical slip rate (1.3-2.0 mm/yr) for the segments. However, additional rupture scenarios that include segment boundary spatial uncertainties, floating earthquakes, and multisegment ruptures are necessary to fully address epistemic uncertainties in rupture length. We compare the central WFZ to paleoseismic and historical surface ruptures in the Basin and Range Province and central Italian Apennines and conclude that displacement profiles have limited value for assessing the persistence of segment boundaries but can aid in interpreting prehistoric spillover ruptures. Our comparison also suggests that the probabilities of shorter and longer ruptures on the WFZ need to be investigated.

  13. Fault segmentation: New concepts from the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duross, Christopher; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Olig, Susan S.; Hylland, Michael D.; Lund, William R.; Schwartz, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether structural segment boundaries along multisegment normal faults such as the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) act as persistent barriers to rupture is critical to seismic hazard analyses. We synthesized late Holocene paleoseismic data from 20 trench sites along the central WFZ to evaluate earthquake rupture length and fault segmentation. For the youngest (<3 ka) and best-constrained earthquakes, differences in earthquake timing across prominent primary segment boundaries, especially for the most recent earthquakes on the north-central WFZ, are consistent with segment-controlled ruptures. However, broadly constrained earthquake times, dissimilar event times along the segments, the presence of smaller-scale (subsegment) boundaries, and areas of complex faulting permit partial-segment and multisegment (e.g., spillover) ruptures that are shorter (~20–40 km) or longer (~60–100 km) than the primary segment lengths (35–59 km). We report a segmented WFZ model that includes 24 earthquakes since ~7 ka and yields mean estimates of recurrence (1.1–1.3 kyr) and vertical slip rate (1.3–2.0 mm/yr) for the segments. However, additional rupture scenarios that include segment boundary spatial uncertainties, floating earthquakes, and multisegment ruptures are necessary to fully address epistemic uncertainties in rupture length. We compare the central WFZ to paleoseismic and historical surface ruptures in the Basin and Range Province and central Italian Apennines and conclude that displacement profiles have limited value for assessing the persistence of segment boundaries but can aid in interpreting prehistoric spillover ruptures. Our comparison also suggests that the probabilities of shorter and longer ruptures on the WFZ need to be investigated.

  14. Transfer zones and fault reactivation in inverted rift basins: Insights from physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinovskaya, Elena A.; Harris, Lyal B.; Poulin, Jimmy; Ivanov, Gennady M.

    2007-08-01

    Lateral transfer zones of deformation and fault reactivation were investigated in multilayered silicone-sand models during extension and subsequent co-axial shortening. Model materials were selected to meet similarity criteria and to be distinguished on CT scans; this approach permitted non-destructive visualisation of the progressive evolution of structures. Transfer zones were initiated by an orthogonal offset in the geometry of a basal mobile aluminium sheet and/or by variations of layer thickness or material rheology in basal layers. Transfer zones affected rift propagation and fault kinematics in models. Propagation and overlapping rift culminations occurred in transfer zones during extension. During shortening, deviation in the orientation of frontal thrusts and fold axes occurred within transfer zones in brittle and ductile layers, respectively. CT scans showed that steep (58-67°) rift-margin normal faults were reactivated as reverse faults. The reactivated faults rotated to shallower dips (19-38°) with continuing shortening after 100% inversion. Rotation of rift phase faults appears to be due to deep level folding and uplift during the inversion phase. New thrust faults with shallow dips (20-34°) formed outside the inverted graben at late stages of shortening. Frontal ramps propagated laterally past the transfer structure during shortening. During inversion, the layers filling the rift structures underwent lateral compression at the depth, the graben fill was pushed up and outwards creating local extension near the surface. Sand marker layers in inverted graben have showed fold-like structures or rotation and tilting in the rifts and on the rift margins. The results of our experiments conform well to natural examples of inverted graben. Inverted rift basins are structurally complex and often difficult to interpret in seismic data. The models may help to unravel the structure and evolution of these systems, leading to improved hydrocarbon exploration

  15. High-Resolution Fault Zone Monitoring and Imaging Using Long Borehole Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, B. N.; Karrenbach, M.; Goertz, A. V.; Milligan, P.

    2004-12-01

    Long borehole seismic receiver arrays are increasingly used in the petroleum industry as a tool for high--resolution seismic reservoir characterization. Placing receivers in a borehole avoids the distortion of reflected seismic waves by the near-surface weathering layer which leads to greatly improved vector fidelity and a much higher frequency content of 3-component recordings. In addition, a borehole offers a favorable geometry to image near-vertically dipping or overturned structure such as, e.g., salt flanks or faults. When used for passive seismic monitoring, long borehole receiver arrays help reducing depth uncertainties of event locations. We investigate the use of long borehole seismic arrays for high-resolution fault zone characterization in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). We present modeling scenarios to show how an image of the vertically dipping fault zone down to the penetration point of the SAFOD well can be obtained by recording surface sources in a long array within the deviated main hole. We assess the ability to invert fault zone reflections for rock physical parameters by means of amplitude versus offset or angle (AVO/AVA) analyzes. The quality of AVO/AVA studies depends on the ability to illuminate the fault zone over a wide range of incidence angles. We show how the length of the receiver array and the receiver spacing within the borehole influence the size of the volume over which reliable AVO/AVA information could be obtained. By means of AVO/AVA studies one can deduce hydraulic properties of the fault zone such as the type of fluids that might be present, the porosity, and the fluid saturation. Images of the fault zone obtained from a favorable geometry with a sufficient illumination will enable us to map fault zone properties in the surrounding of the main hole penetration point. One of the targets of SAFOD is to drill into an active rupture patch of an earthquake cluster. The question of whether or not

  16. Southeastern extension of the Lake Basin fault zone in south- central Montana: implications for coal and hydrocarbon exploration ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, L.N.; Barnum, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Lake Basin fault zone consists mainly of en echelon NE-striking normal faults that have been interpreted to be surface expressions of left-lateral movement along a basement wrench fault. Information gathered from recent field mapping of coal beds and from shallow, closely-spaced drill holes resulted in detailed coal bed correlations, which revealed another linear zone of en echelon faulting directly on the extended trend of the Lake Basin fault zone. This faulted area, referred to as the Sarpy Creek area, is located 48 km E of Hardin, Montana. It is about 16 km long, 13 km wide, and contains 21 en echelon normal faults that have an average strike of N 63oE. We therefore extend the Lake Basin fault zone 32 km farther SE than previously mapped to include the Sarpy Creek area. The Ash Creek oil field, Wyoming, 97 km due S of the Sarpy Creek area, produces from faulted anticlinal structues that have been interpreted to be genetically related to the primary wrench-fault system known as the Nye-Bowler fault zone. The structural similarities between the Sarpy Creek area and the Ash Creek area indicate that the Sarpy Creek area is a possible site for hydrocarbon accumulation.-from Authors

  17. The Olmsted fault zone, southernmost Illinois: A key to understanding seismic hazard in the northern new Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Geological deformation in the northern New Madrid seismic zone, near Olmsted, Illinois (USA), is analyzed using integrated compressional-wave (P) and horizontally polarized-wave (SH) seismic reflection and regional and dedicated borehole information. Seismic hazards are of special concern because of strategic facilities (e.g., lock and dam sites and chemical plants on the Ohio River near its confluence with the Mississippi River) and because of alluvial soils subject to high amplification of earthquake shock. We use an integrated approach starting with lower resolution, but deeper penetration, P-wave reflection profiles to identify displacement of Paleozoic bedrock. Higher resolution, but shallower penetration, SH-wave images show deformation that has propagated upward from bedrock faults into Pleistocene loess. We have mapped an intricate zone more than 8 km wide of high-angle faults in Mississippi embayment sediments localized over Paleozoic bedrock faults that trend north to northeast, parallel to the Ohio River. These faults align with the pattern of epicenters in the New Madrid seismic zone. Normal and reverse offsets along with positive flower structures imply a component of strike-slip; the current stress regime favors right-lateral slip on northeast-trending faults. The largest fault, the Olmsted fault, underwent principal displacement near the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 to 70 million years ago. Strata of this age (dated via fossil pollen) thicken greatly on the downthrown side of the Olmsted fault into a locally subsiding basin. Small offsets of Tertiary and Quaternary strata are evident on high-resolution SH-wave seismic profiles. Our results imply recent reactivation and possible future seismic activity in a critical area of the New Madrid seismic zone. This integrated approach provides a strategy for evaluating shallow seismic hazard-related targets for engineering concerns. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Shallow velocity structure and hidden faults of Kunming city region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geng-Xin; Lou, Hai; Wang, Chun-Yong; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Qin, Jia-Zheng; Yang, Run-Hai; Li, Hai-Ou

    2008-09-01

    In order to image the 3-D velocity structure of its shallow crust in Kunming region, China, finite-difference seismic tomography is used to invert the seismic data selected carefully from six-shot data. The result lays a foundation for the discussion of the relationship between the obtained velocity structure and the hidden faults, and for the illumination of the depth extents of main active faults surrounding Kunming city. Puduhe-Xishan fault lies on the western margin of the Kunming basin and is just situated on the west edge of the low velocity anomaly zone found at all depth levels. This indicates that this fault is a borderline fault of the Kunming basin. It can be concluded that the fault dips eastwards with a steep angle and its depth extent is large. Puji-Hanjiacun fault and Heilongtan-Guandu fault play a role in controlling the low velocity anomaly zone in middle basin. The depth extents of the two faults are comparatively small, without traversing the interface of basin floor.

  19. Reconnaissance study of late quaternary faulting along cerro GoDen fault zone, western Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.S.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Grindlay, N.R.; Abrams, L.J.; Lao-Davila, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cerro GoDen fault zone is associated with a curvilinear, continuous, and prominent topographic lineament in western Puerto Rico. The fault varies in strike from northwest to west. In its westernmost section, the fault is ???500 m south of an abrupt, curvilinear mountain front separating the 270- to 361-m-high La CaDena De San Francisco range from the Rio A??asco alluvial valley. The Quaternary fault of the A??asco Valley is in alignment with the bedrock fault mapped by D. McIntyre (1971) in the Central La Plata quadrangle sheet east of A??asco Valley. Previous workers have postulated that the Cerro GoDen fault zone continues southeast from the A??asco Valley and merges with the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone of south-central Puerto Rico. West of the A??asco Valley, the fault continues offshore into the Mona Passage (Caribbean Sea) where it is characterized by offsets of seafloor sediments estimated to be of late Quaternary age. Using both 1:18,500 scale air photographs taken in 1936 and 1:40,000 scale photographs taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1986, we iDentified geomorphic features suggestive of Quaternary fault movement in the A??asco Valley, including aligned and Deflected drainages, apparently offset terrace risers, and mountain-facing scarps. Many of these features suggest right-lateral displacement. Mapping of Paleogene bedrock units in the uplifted La CaDena range adjacent to the Cerro GoDen fault zone reveals the main tectonic events that have culminated in late Quaternary normal-oblique displacement across the Cerro GoDen fault. Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the La CaDena range exhibit large folds with wavelengths of several kms. The orientation of folds and analysis of fault striations within the folds indicate that the folds formed by northeast-southwest shorTening in present-day geographic coordinates. The age of Deformation is well constrained as late Eocene-early Oligocene by an angular unconformity separating folDed, Deep

  20. Late Neogene kinematics of intra-arc oblique shear zones: The Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone (Calabrian Arc, Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, J. P.

    1994-10-01

    The kinematics of intra-arc shear zones play a key role in the secondary shaping of orogenic arcs such as the Calabrian Arc (central Mediterranean). Comparison of the Neogene structural development of the Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone and the basement structure of the bordering Sila massif reveals that the fault zone is the surface expression of a deep NW-SE trending sinistral crustal oblique shear zone. This shear zone continues over a length of more than 130 km across the northern segment of the Calabrian Arc and shows a post-Eocene sinistral displacement of about 50 km. The late Neogene forearc basin development and syndepositional tectonics along the fault zone are reconstructed in great detail by analyzing the middle Miocene-Recent tectonic sequence stratigraphy. A strike-slip cycle can be recognized whereby the subsequent activity of Riedel shears, tensional faults, and P shears, positive flower structures and principle displacement wrench faults, can accurately be traced in time. Observed phenomena are discussed in terms of the activity of a conjugate system of oblique thrust zones within the growing accretionary complex. The evolution of special types of thrust belt basins is illustrated. These include oblique thin-skinned pull-apart basins, oblique rhomboidal "harmonica" basins, and "detached slab" basins (new terms introduced here), evolving one into the other. A new feature illustrated is the recurrent basin inversion which generated passive roof duplexes through back-shear motion and out-of-sequence thrusting along the wedge. The fault patterns and the style of inversion tectonics imply an E-W directed axis of effective compressive stress in this part of the arc. This resulted from an interaction of (1) local E-W directed compression related to a differential displacement of two parallel segments of the arc (generated by the migration to the southeast of the Calabrian Arc and opening of the Tyrrhenian backarc basin); (2) alternating NW-SE directed

  1. An algorithm for automated identification of fault zone trapped waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Z. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We develop an algorithm for automatic identification of fault zone trapped waves in data recorded by seismic fault zone arrays. Automatic S picks are used to identify time windows in the seismograms for subsequent search for trapped waves. The algorithm calculates five features in each seismogram recorded by each station: predominant period, 1 s duration energy (representative of trapped waves), relative peak strength, arrival delay and 6 s duration energy (representative of the entire seismogram). These features are used collectively to identify stations in the array with seismograms that are statistical outliers. Applying the algorithm to large data sets allows for distinguishing genuine trapped waves from occasional localized site amplification in seismograms of other stations. The method is verified on a test data set recorded across the rupture zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake, for which trapped waves were previously identified manually, and is then applied to a larger data set with several thousand events recorded across the San Jacinto fault zone. The developed technique provides an important tool for systematic objective processing of large seismic waveform data sets recorded near fault zones.

  2. Fault structure and mechanics of the Hayward Fault, California from double-difference earthquake locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldhauser, F.; Ellsworth, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between small-magnitude seismicity and large-scale crustal faulting along the Hayward Fault, California, is investigated using a double-difference (DD) earthquake location algorithm. We used the DD method to determine high-resolution hypocenter locations of the seismicity that occurred between 1967 and 1998. The DD technique incorporates catalog travel time data and relative P and S wave arrival time measurements from waveform cross correlation to solve for the hypocentral separation between events. The relocated seismicity reveals a narrow, near-vertical fault zone at most locations. This zone follows the Hayward Fault along its northern half and then diverges from it to the east near San Leandro, forming the Mission trend. The relocated seismicity is consistent with the idea that slip from the Calaveras Fault is transferred over the Mission trend onto the northern Hayward Fault. The Mission trend is not clearly associated with any mapped active fault as it continues to the south and joins the Calaveras Fault at Calaveras Reservoir. In some locations, discrete structures adjacent to the main trace are seen, features that were previously hidden in the uncertainty of the network locations. The fine structure of the seismicity suggest that the fault surface on the northern Hayward Fault is curved or that the events occur on several substructures. Near San Leandro, where the more westerly striking trend of the Mission seismicity intersects with the surface trace of the (aseismic) southern Hayward Fault, the seismicity remains diffuse after relocation, with strong variation in focal mechanisms between adjacent events indicating a highly fractured zone of deformation. The seismicity is highly organized in space, especially on the northern Hayward Fault, where it forms horizontal, slip-parallel streaks of hypocenters of only a few tens of meters width, bounded by areas almost absent of seismic activity. During the interval from 1984 to 1998, when digital

  3. Evaluating Temporal Variations in Fault Slip-Rate and Fault Interaction in the Eastern California Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. B.; Jayko, A.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-12-01

    Delineating spatiotemporal patterns of strain accumulation and release within plate boundaries remains fundamental to our understanding of the dynamics of active crustal deformation. The timescales at which active strain varies or remains constant for individual fault systems, however, are often poorly resolved. The origin of large-magnitude strain transients in the Eastern California shear zone remains enigmatic and underpins the importance of quantifying active deformation at multiple geologic timescales along this tectonic boundary. Here, we focus on the Late Pleistocene- Holocene record of slip on the NW-striking Little Lake fault zone, one of the primary structures responsible for transferring Pacific-North American plate motion between the northern Mojave Desert and the east side of the Sierra Nevada block north of the Garlock fault. Discrepancies between geologic and geodetically determined rates of motion along the Little Lake fault zone in the China Lake-Indian Wells Valley area suggest a potentially complex temporal history of slip on this structure with some slip stepping eastward onto structures bounding the west side of the Coso Range. Preliminary reconstruction of a slip-rate history on the Little Lake fault from multiple generations of displaced Quaternary geomorphic features suggests potential variation in fault-slip rates at timescales of 104- 105 years. Two paleochannel margins on a basalt strath in the Little Lake spillway represent the youngest of these features. Each margin exhibits ~30 m of right-lateral displacement and suggests a minimum slip rate of ~1.4 mm/yr during Holocene-Late Pleistocene time. Additionally, a prominent fluvial escarpment or terrace riser along the east side of Little Lake wash is offset at least ~150 to 700 m, depending on how the initial geometry of this feature is reconstructed. Pending geochronologic constraints on the age of this feature, such an offset potentially suggests higher rates of slip averaged over longer

  4. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    The expansion of pore water caused by frictional heating during large crustal events provides a powerful weakening mechanism (Sibson, 1973; Lachenbruch, 1980). It may explain the magnitude of seismically inferred fracture energy and aspects of its variation with increased slip (Abercrombie and Rice, 2003; Rice et al., 2003; Rice, this section, 2003). The weakening is mediated by the effects of fluid transport, which are sensitive to the permeability structure of the fault zone and its modification by damage induced by the passing rupture front (Poliakov et al., 2002), as well as by the increase in pore pressure itself. Higher permeabilities allow partial drainage to occur, so that enough strength remains for the heat generated to cause partial melting of the fault gouge at large enough slip. We use recent field and laboratory data for fluid transport through pressurized fault gouge (e.g. Lockner et al., 2000; Wibberley and Shimamoto, 2003) to motivate models for drainage and melting during earthquake slip. A dramatic illustration of the role of drainage is provided by an idealized model in which we assume that a freshly damaged, highly permeable region extends right up to a localized shear zone of thickness ho=5 mm, with fixed porosity n and much lower permeability k. At 7 km depth, for n=0.02 and k=10-19 m2, the slip distance required to reach the onset of melting at 750oC is approximately 0.4 m for a constant friction coefficient of f=0.6. At 14 km depth, for n=0.01 and k=10-20 m2, the same temperature is reached after only 0.1 m of slip. Yet more efficient drainage might occur due to the permeability increases that accompany reductions in the effective stress, so that even more rapid temperature increases would be predicted. For example, with ten times higher k, melting begins after 0.1 m slip at 7 km depth and just 0.05 m at 14 km. At onset of melting the high melt viscosity impedes further drainage and, with increasing melt fraction, inter-particle contact is

  5. Seismic Imaging of the San Jacinto Fault Zone Area From Seismogenic Depth to the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    I review multi-scale multi-signal seismological results on structural properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ). The results are based on data of the regional southern California and ANZA networks, additional near-fault seismometers and linear arrays with instrument spacing 25-50 m that cross the SJFZ at several locations, and a spatially-dense rectangular array with 1108 vertical-component sensors separated by 10-30 m centered on the fault. The studies utilize earthquake data to derive Vp and Vs velocity models with horizontal resolution of 1-2 km over the depth section 2-15 km, ambient noise with frequencies up to 1 Hz to image with similar horizontal resolution the depth section 0.5-7 km, and high-frequency seismic noise from the linear and rectangular arrays for high-resolution imaging of the top 0.5 km. Pronounced damage regions with low seismic velocities and anomalous Vp/Vs ratios are observed around the SJFZ, as well as the San Andreas and Elsinore faults. The damage zones follow generally a flower-shape with depth. The section of the SJFZ from Cajon pass to the San Jacinto basin has a faster SW side, while the section farther to the SE has an opposite velocity contrast with faster NE side. The damage zones and velocity contrasts produce at various locations fault zone trapped and head waves that are utilized to obtain high-resolution information on inner fault zone components (bimaterial interfaces, trapping structures). Analyses of high-frequency noise recorded by the fault zone arrays reveal complex shallow material with very low seismic velocities and strong lateral and vertical variations.

  6. Insights into the damage zones in fault-bend folds from geomechanical models and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the rock mass deformation and stress states, the fracture development and distribution are critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and development, and geothermal reservoir characterization and management. Geomechanical modeling can be used to simulate the forming processes of faults and folds, and predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables the development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., the bed thickness, bedding planes and competence contrasts), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the geometry of the fold structures, and allow tracking strain and stress through the whole deformation process. In this present study, we combine field observations and finite element models to calibrate the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds, and discuss the mechanical controls (e.g., the slip displacement, ramp cutoff angle, frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults) that are able to influence the development and distribution of fractures during fault-bend folding. A linear relationship between the slip displacement and the fracture damage zone, the ramp cutoff angle and the fracture damage zone, and the frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults and the fracture damage zone was established respectively based on the geomechanical modeling results. These mechanical controls mentioned above altogether contribute to influence and control the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds.

  7. San Andreas fault zone drilling project: scientific objectives and technological challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen; Younker, Leland; Zobeck, Mark; Cooper, George

    1994-01-01

    We are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through an integrated program of coring, fluid sampling, in-situ and laboratory experimentation and long-term monitoring, we hope to provide fundamental constraints on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: 1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300??C; 2) continuous coring of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6 and 9 km; 3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and 4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of seismicity and a broad range of physical and chemical properties over periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, we expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the regions of greatest scientific interest.

  8. San Andreas fault zone drilling project: scientific objectives and technological challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, S.H.; Younker, L.W.; Zoback, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    We are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through a comprehensive program of coring, fluid sampling, downhole measurements, laboratory experimentation, and long-term monitoring, we hope to obtain critical information on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: 1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300°C; 2) continuous coring and completion of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6, and 9 km; 3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and 4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of earthquake activity, fluid pressure, deformation and other parameters for periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, we expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the region of greatest scientific interest.

  9. Hydrothermal alteration in an exhumed crustal fault zone: geochemical mobility in the Caleta Coloso Fault, Atacama Fault System, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia, G.; Fujita, K.; Hoshino, K.; Mitchell, T. M.; Cembrano, J. M.; Gomila, R.; Morata, D.; Faulkner, D. R.; Rempe, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fault zones must be considered as complex and heterogeneous systems, with areas of high permeability that alternate with very low permeability bands. Strike-slip fault zones play an important role in fluid migration in the crust, and exhumed faults can provide insights into the interrelationships of deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interactions and bulk chemical redistributions. We determined the mineral chemistry and whole-rock geochemistry of the damage zone and fault core of the Caleta Coloso Fault, a complex major crustal scale strike-slip fault in Northern Chile, in order to constrain the physical and chemical conditions of fluids that lead to strong hydrothermal alteration. Caleta Coloso Fault consists of variably altered protocataclasites, cataclasites and discrete bands of ultracataclasite derived from a protolith of Jurassic tonalite. Hydrothermal alteration associated with fault-related fluid flow is characterized by a very low-grade association composed by chlorite, epidote, albite, quartz and calcite. Chlorite thermometry indicates T-values in the range of 284 to 352 °C (average temperature of 323 °C) and no differences in mineral composition or T-values were observed among different cataclastic rock types. Mass balance and volume change calculations document that the major chemical mobility was observed in protocataclasite, whereas cataclasite and ultracataclasite show smaller changes. This suggests that fluid flow and chemical alteration post-dated the faulting, when the protocataclasite was relatively permeable and the cataclasite and ultracataclasite acted as a barrier for fluid flow having a very low permeability due to extreme grain size reduction during cataclasis.

  10. Fault zone amplified waves as a possible seismic hazard along the Calaveras fault in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Olsen, K.B.

    2001-01-01

    The Calaveras fault lies within a low velocity zone (LVZ) 1-2 km wide near Gilroy, California. Accelerographs G06, located in the LVZ 1.2 km from the Calaveras fault, and G07, 4 km from G06, recorded both the M 6.2 1984 Morgan Hill and the M 6.9 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes. Comparison of the ground motions shows that a large 0.6-1.0 Hz velocity pulse observed at G06 during the Morgan Hill event may be amplified by focussing caused by the LVZ. Such amplified waves might be a mappable seismic hazard, and the zone of increased hazard can extend as much as 1.2 km from the surface trace of the fault. Finite-difference simulations of ground motions in a simplified LVZ model show a zone of amplified motion similar to the observations.

  11. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  12. Decimeter Scale Ultra-Fine Fault Rocks (Possible Pseudotachylites) in an Ancient Subduction Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Moore, J. C.; Meneghini, F.; McKiernan, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    Large bodies of ultrafine fault rock (possible pseudotachylite or frictional melt) occur within cataclastic thrust zones in the Ghost Rocks Formation, Kodiak Accretionary Complex, Alaska. The Paleocene Ghost Rocks Formation includes map-scale mélange belts formed by flattening and shearing of seafloor sediments and volcanic rocks at about 250 degrees C and 325 MPa (~13 km depth) during subduction between 65-60Ma. Ten to 15-meter thick cataclastite zones crosscut the mélange fabric at a low angle, representing a stage of increasingly localized shear during subduction thrusting. Ultrafine fault rocks occur as thick (10-25cm) continuous planar beds along the boundaries of cataclastites, or in discontinuous accumulation bodies within cataclastite zones. The boundaries of the ultrafine fault rocks are intrusive, sharp but irregular and deform the cataclastite host fabric. Single pulse intrusions of the ultrafine fault rock range up to 0.5m in intrusive dimension and form complex morphologies resembling both upward and downward directed flame structures and dike-sill complexes, as well as sheath folds and disharmonic flow banding and folding. These field characteristics indicate fluidization and perhaps frictional melting of the ultrafine fault rocks. Ultrafine fault rock bodies can be traced laterally for meters to tens of meters at individual outcrops and occur for about 2 km along strike. Preliminary SEM analysis reveals that the primary matrix material is physically and chemically homogenous down to few-micron scale, consistent with the field identification of pseudotachylite. Thin sections show rounded remnant quartz aggregates, typical of pseudotachylytes. Although some thin sections show suggest melting others may represent ultracataclastite. Some ultrafine fault rock material is rebrecciated and cataclastized to a fine scale, indicating reactivation of previous fault rock generation surfaces. These ultrafine fault rock zones represent the most highly deformed

  13. Fault damage zones in mechanically layered rocks: The effects of planar anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Ellis, Susan; Mandal, Nibir

    2015-08-01

    This study shows how inherited strength anisotropy influences damage localization at both the tip and wall regions of a fault or fracture. We performed analogue and numerical compression experiments on transversely isotropic models with single and multiple cuts of finite length, simulating the propagation of preexisting faults and cracks in layered rock. The stress-strain curves from the analogue experiments show a change in bulk yield behavior with fault inclination and anisotropy orientation with respect to the stress direction. Earlier isotropic models demonstrated a brittle (wing fracturing) to ductile (shear-zone formation) transition as the fault angle (α) to the principal compression direction increased. The experiments with anisotropic models show patterns of damage localization change dramatically with the orientation of transversely isotropic planes (θ, measured with respect to principal extension direction). Under layer-normal (θ = 0°) and layer-parallel compression (θ = 90°), preexisting faults undergo significant reactivation when 0 < α < 90°, and fault slip eventually leads to mechanical instabilities within the anisotropic layering, causing damage zones in the tip regions. For layer-normal (θ = 0°) compression, the damage processes involve intense extensional shear localization, whereas for layer-parallel compression, contractional shear localization and tensile opening result in characteristic internal shear-band structures. In contrast, for 0 < θ < 90°, the faults undergo little or no reactivation, irrespective of α. In this case, bulk compression leads to an interlayer slip-mediated global deformation. Obliquely anisotropic models thus produce weak or no fault damage zones. We also show that the fault-parallel principal damage localized at the tips can be coupled with transversely oriented, antithetic secondary damage in the wall regions. However, secondary damage develops predominantly when θ = 90°. Field examples of fault damage

  14. Holocene activity of the Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvall, Scott C.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    1995-12-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California, has many well-expressed geomorphic characteristics of an active strike-slip fault, including scarps, offset and deflected drainages and channel walls, pressure ridges, a closed depression, and vegetation lineaments. Geomorphic expression of the fault zone from Mount Soledad south to Mission Bay indicates that the Mount Soledad strand is the most active. A network of trenches excavated across the Mount Soledad strand in Rose Creek demonstrate a minimum of 8.7 m of dextral slip in a distinctive early to middle Holocene gravel-filled channel that crosses the fault zone. The gravel-filled channel was preserved within and east of the fault but was removed west of the fault zone by erosion or possibly grading during development. Consequently, the actual displacement of the channel could be greater than 8.7 m. Radiocarbon dates on detrital charcoal recovered from the sediments beneath the channel yield a maximum calibrated age of about 8.1±0.2 kyr. The minimum amount of slip along with the maximum age yield a minimum slip rate of 1.07±0.03 mm/yr on this strand of the Rose Canyon fault zone for much of Holocene time. Other strands of the Rose Canyon fault zone, which are east and west of our site, may also have Holocene activity. Based on an analysis of the geomorphology of fault traces within the Rose Canyon fault zone, along with the results of our trenching study, we estimate the maximum likely slip rate at about 2 mm/yr and a best estimate of about 1.5 mm/yr. Stratigraphie evidence of at least three events is present during the past 8.1 kyr. The most recent surface rupture displaces the modern A horizon (topsoil), suggesting that this event probably occurred within the past 500 years. Stratigraphie and structural relationships also indicate the occurrence of a scarp-forming event at about 8.1 kyr, prior to deposition of the gravel-filled channel that was used as a piercing line. A third event is indicated by the

  15. Stress and strain around a multiply reactivated deep-seated fault zone and its impact on a potential geothermal reservoir - The Freiburg-Bonndorf-Bodensee fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Daniel; Madritsch, Herfried; Ibele, Tobias; Mosar, Jon; Vietor, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The Swiss and German Molasse Basin is generally of high geo-economical interest as it is considered to host potential reservoirs for natural gas and geothermal energy production, as well as sites for radioactive waste disposal and CO2 storage. Its successful exploration and eventually exploitation requires detailed understanding of its deep underground in particular its structural characteristics. Information of the rocks underlying the up to km thick Molasse sediments is mainly available from drillhole and seismic data. Outcrops of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments as well as the crystalline basement that could provide additional information on structural geological characteristics are very rare and mostly restricted to the borders of the basin. This study focuses on the eastern part of the Freiburg-Bonndorf-Bodensee Fault Zone (FBBFZ; e.g. Paul 1948, Carlé 1955), a roughly 100 km long fault system, which runs approximately from the Kaiserstuhl in the Upper Rhein Graben across the Black Forest Massif to the Lake Constance. Its extensive present day surface trace allows to study the fault zone as it cuts through a wide range of lithologies from the Variscan basement of the Black Forest to the Tertiary sediments of the Molasse west of Lake Constance. As such, it can serve as natural analogue for the characterization of fault structures in the subsurface of the Molasse Basin. The Randen Fault is a well-exposed NW-SE trending fault segment of the FBBFZ, situated in NE Switzerland and SW Germany. In the field, as well as in seismic sections the structure shows the characteristics of a normal fault but there are indications for a dextral transcurrent overprint. We presents a kinematic analysis of outcrop scale fracture systems collected along the various segments of the FBBFZ with a focus on the Randen Fault segment. The results indicate a perturbation of the regional fracture characteristics and the paleostress pattern in the vicinity of the fault zone. A recently

  16. Fault zone hydrogeologic properties and processes revealed by borehole temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution borehole temperature monitoring can provide valuable insight into the hydrogeologic structure of fault zones and transient processes that affect fault zone stability. Here we report on results from a subseafloor temperature observatory within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault. In our efforts to interpret this unusual dataset, we have developed several new methods for probing hydrogeologic properties and processes. We illustrate how spatial variations in the thermal recovery of the borehole after drilling and other spectral characteristics provide a measure of the subsurface permeability architecture. More permeable zones allow for greater infiltration of cool drilling fluids, are more greatly thermally disturbed, and take longer to recover. The results from the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) observatory are consistent with geophysical logs, core data, and other hydrologic observations and suggest a permeable damage zone consisting of steeply dipping faults and fractures overlays a low-permeability clay-rich plate boundary fault. Using high-resolution time series data, we have also developed methods to map out when and where fluid advection occurs in the subsurface over time. In the JFAST data, these techniques reveal dozens of transient earthquake-driven fluid pulses that are spatially correlated and consistently located around inferred permeable areas of the fault damage zone. These observations are suspected to reflect transient fluid flow driven by pore pressure changes in response to dynamic and/or static stresses associated with nearby earthquakes. This newly recognized hydrologic phenomenon has implications for understanding subduction zone heat and chemical transport as well as the redistribution of pore fluid pressure which influences fault stability and can trigger other earthquakes.

  17. The Plio-Pleistocene evolution of the Southern Middle Atlas Fault Zone (SMAFZ) front of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laville, E.; Delcaillau, B.; Charroud, M.; Dugué, O.; Ait Brahim, L.; Cattaneo, G.; Deluca, P.; Bouazza, A.

    2007-06-01

    The South Middle Atlas front constitutes a northeast-trending shear zone, located north of the Neogene Missour basin and east of the Taza Guercif basin. This paper analyses the Southern Middle Atlas Fault Zone (SMAFZ) deformation since the Pliocene. The set of structures observed suggests that reverse and thrust faulting along the central part of the SMAFZ are combined with left-lateral slip along N S striking faults of its south-western termination and right-lateral faulting along E NE striking faults of the east northeast termination. Thrusts and oblique thrust-related anticlines of the two lateral ramps partly accommodate north-west directed motion of the African plate. The Thrusts probably resulted from rejuvenation of Jurassic normal faults; they were active during the Upper Miocene Pliocene and the Pleistocene. The geometries of positive inversion structures and buttressing effects are clearly dependent on the geometry and sedimentology of the original basin-controlling fault system and on the presence of a décollement level. Field mapping is integrated with Landsat imagery and a digital elevation model to investigate the morphotectonic evolution of the south-eastern range front of the Middle Atlas. Geomorphological features provide significant information on the processes that govern lateral propagation of active anticlines. Both suggest that the deformation front may have been active since Pliocene.

  18. Structural character of the Ghost Dance Fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.W.; Braun, C.A.; Linden, R.M.; Martin, L.G.; Ross-Brown, D.M.; Blackburn, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Detailed structural mapping of an area that straddles the southern part of the Ghost Dance Fault has revealed the presence of several additional subparallel to anastomosing faults. These faults, mapped at a scale of 1:240, are: (1) dominantly north-trending, (2) present on both the upthrown and downthrown sides of the surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault, (3) near-vertical features that commonly offset strata down to the west by 3 to 6 m (10 to 20 ft), and (4) commonly spaced 15 to 46 m (50 to 150 ft) apart. The zone also exhibits a structural fabric, containing an abundance of northwest-trending fractures. The width of the zone appears to be at least 213 m (700 ft) near the southernmost boundary of the study area but remains unknown near the northern extent of the study area, where the width of the study area is only 183 m (600 ft).

  19. Structural character of the Ghost Dance fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spengler, R.W.; Braun, C.A.; Linden, R.M.; Martin, L.G.; Ross-Brown, D. M.; Blackburn, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed structural mapping of an area that straddles the southern part of the Ghost Dance Fault has revealed the presence of several additional subparallel to anastomosing faults. These faults, mapped at a scale of 1:240, are: 1) dominantly north trending, 2) present on both the upthrown and downthrown sides of the surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault, 3) near-vertical features that commonly offset strata down to the west by 3 to 6 m (10 to 20 ft), and 4) commonly spaced 15 to 46 m (50 to 150 ft) apart. The zone also exhibits a structural fabric, containing an abundance of northwest-trending fractures. The width of the zone appears to be at least 213 m (700 ft) near the southernmost boundary of the study area but remains unknown near the northern extent of the study area, where the width of the study area is only 183 m (600 ft).

  20. Seismic reflection images of shallow faulting, northernmost Mississippi embayment, north of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection surveys document tectonic faults that displace Pleistocene and older strata just beyond the northeast termination of the New Madrid seismic zone, at the northernmost extent of the Mississippi embayment. These faults, which are part of the Fluorspar Area fault complex in southeastern Illinois, are directly in line with the northeast-trending seismic zone. The reflection data were acquired using an elastic weight-drop source recorded to 500 msec by a 48-geophone array (24-fold) with a 10-ft (??3.0m) station interval. Recognizable reflections were recorded to about 200 msec (100-150 m). The effects of multiple reflections, numerous diffractions, low apparent velocity (i.e., steeply dipping) noise, and the relatively low-frequency content of the recorded signal provided challenges for data processing and interpreting subtle fault offsets. Data processing steps that were critical to the detection of faults included residual statics, post-stack migration, deconvolution, and noise-reduction filtering. Seismic migration was crucial for detecting and mitigating complex fault-related diffraction patterns, which produced an apparent 'folding' of reflectors on unmigrated sections. Detected individual offsets of shallow reflectors range from 5 to 10 m for the top of Paleozoic bedrock and younger strata. The migrated sections generally indicate vertical to steeply dipping normal and reverse faults, which in places outline small horsts and/or grabens. Tilting or folding of stratal reflectors associated with faulting is also locally observed. At one site, the observed faulting is superimposed over a prominent antiformal structure, which may itself be a product of the Quaternary deformation that produced the steep normal and reverse faults. Our results suggest that faulting of the Paleozoic bedrock and younger sediments of the northern Mississippi embayment is more pervasive and less localized than previously thought.

  1. Paleoseismic results of the east strand of the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone, Central Portugal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, Carolina; Vilanova, Susana; Besana-Ostman, Glenda; Heleno, Sandra; Fonseca, Joao; Domingues, Ana; Pinheiro, Patricia; Pinto, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ) is a northeast-southwest trending tectonic structure located within the Lower Tagus Valley (LTV), in central Portugal associated with at least two historical events: the 1909 Mw 6.0-6.2 Benavente earthquake and the 1531 Mw 6.9 earthquake. Recent investigations indicate that the relatively linear valley associated with the Lower Tagus River is controlled by active faults in varying geometry and slip rates. Based on mapped traces, LTVFZ is about 80 kilometers long and transects Miocene to Holocene deposit. The east and west strands of the fault zone may have different level of activity based on the variable clarity of mapped morphological expressions. In recent studies new fault strands were identified using aerial photos and field survey on eastern side of LTV. These eastern faults have a trend that almost parallel those active traces previously mapped by Besana-Ostman et al., 2012 on the western side of the valley. Quaternary activity of this fault deforms fluvial terraces and produces morphological features related to left-lateral strike-slip movement like river offsets. In this work we present the results of the first paleoseismic analysis carried out on this strand of the fault. Trenching studies shows that surface rupture events have occurred affecting Tagus fluvial terraces. The geometry of faulting exposed in the trench provides valuable insights into the kinematics of the fault, and provides a preliminary minimum net slip rate. New relative ages of the deformation are established on preliminary trenching results, and recurrence intervals will be determined upon receipt of results of sample processing for C14 dating. The aim of this work is to contribute with new data to parameterize the paleoseismic activity of this active fault in order to be included in the future seismic hazard assessments. Further studies are proposed and underway to characterize the LTVFZ, including high-resolution LIDAR images analysis, more

  2. The Damage and Geochemical Signature of a Crustal Scale Strike-Slip Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Arancibia, G.; Jensen Siles, E.; Rempe, M.; Cembrano, J. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid-flow migration in the upper crust is strongly controlled by fracture network permeability and connectivity within fault zones, which can lead to fluid-rock chemical interaction represented as mineral precipitation in mesh veins and/or mineralogical changes (alteration) of the host rock. While the dimensions of fault damage zones defined by fracture intensity is beginning to be better understood, how such dimensions compare to the size of alteration zones is less well known. Here, we show quantitative structural and chemical analyses as a function of distance from a crustal-scale strike-slip fault in the Atacama Fault System, Northern Chile, to compare fault damage zone characteristics with its geochemical signature. The Jorgillo Fault (JF) is a ca. 18 km long NNW striking strike-slip fault cutting Mesozoic rocks with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. In the study area, the JF cuts through orthogranulitic and gabbroic rocks at the west (JFW) and the east side (JFE), respectively. A 200 m fault perpendicular transect was mapped and sampled for structural and XRF analyses of the core, damage zone and protolith. The core zone consists of a ca. 1 m wide cataclasite zone bounded by two fault gouge zones ca. 40 cm. The damage zone width defined by fracture density is ca. 50 m wide each side of the core. The damage zone in JFW is characterized by NW-striking subvertical 2 cm wide cataclastic rocks and NE-striking milimetric open fractures. In JFE, 1-20 mm wide chlorite, quartz-epidote and quartz-calcite veins, cut the gabbro. Microfracture analysis in JFW reveal mm-wide cataclasitic/ultracataclasitic bands with clasts of protolith and chlorite orientated subparallel to the JF in the matrix, calcite veins in a T-fractures orientation, and minor polidirectional chlorite veins. In JFE, chlorite filled conjugate fractures with syntaxial growth textures and evidence for dilational fracturing processes are seen. Closest to the core, calcite veins crosscut chlorite veins

  3. Late Holocene earthquakes on the Toe Jam Hill fault, Seattle fault zone, Bainbridge Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Johnson, S.Y.; Kelsey, H.M.; Wells, R.E.; Sherrod, B.L.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Bradley, L.-A.; Koehler, R. D.; Bucknam, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    Five trenches across a Holocene fault scarp yield the first radiocarbon-measured earthquake recurrence intervals for a crustal fault in western Washington. The scarp, the first to be revealed by laser imagery, marks the Toe Jam Hill fault, a north-dipping backthrust to the Seattle fault. Folded and faulted strata, liquefaction features, and forest soil A horizons buried by hanging-wall-collapse colluvium record three, or possibly four, earthquakes between 2500 and 1000 yr ago. The most recent earthquake is probably the 1050-1020 cal. (calibrated) yr B.P. (A.D. 900-930) earthquake that raised marine terraces and triggered a tsunami in Puget Sound. Vertical deformation estimated from stratigraphic and surface offsets at trench sites suggests late Holocene earthquake magnitudes near M7, corresponding to surface ruptures >36 km long. Deformation features recording poorly understood latest Pleistocene earthquakes suggest that they were smaller than late Holocene earthquakes. Postglacial earthquake recurrence intervals based on 97 radiocarbon ages, most on detrital charcoal, range from ???12,000 yr to as little as a century or less; corresponding fault-slip rates are 0.2 mm/yr for the past 16,000 yr and 2 mm/yr for the past 2500 yr. Because the Toe Jam Hill fault is a backthrust to the Seattle fault, it may not have ruptured during every earthquake on the Seattle fault. But the earthquake history of the Toe Jam Hill fault is at least a partial proxy for the history of the rest of the Seattle fault zone.

  4. Observations on Faults and Associated Permeability Structures in Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prothro, Lance B.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Haugstad, Dawn N.; Huckins-Gang, Heather E.; Townsend, Margaret J.

    2009-03-30

    Observational data on Nevada Test Site (NTS) faults were gathered from a variety of sources, including surface and tunnel exposures, core samples, geophysical logs, and down-hole cameras. These data show that NTS fault characteristics and fault zone permeability structures are similar to those of faults studied in other regions. Faults at the NTS form complex and heterogeneous fault zones with flow properties that vary in both space and time. Flow property variability within fault zones can be broken down into four major components that allow for the development of a simplified, first approximation model of NTS fault zones. This conceptual model can be used as a general guide during development and evaluation of groundwater flow and contaminate transport models at the NTS.

  5. Anatomy of a Complex Fault Zone: Land Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Tacoma Fault Zone, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, K.; Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary interpretations of new land-based seismic reflection images across the Tacoma fault zone in western Washington State document a complex pattern of faulting and folding. The Tacoma fault zone bounds gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies for 50 km across the central Puget Lowland west of the city of Tacoma, and tomography data suggest there is as much as 6 km of post-Eocene uplift of the hanging wall relative to Tacoma basin sediments to the south. We acquired four north-south seismic reflection profiles to define the character and tectonic history of the Tacoma fault zone. The 6-km long Powerline Road profile, located west of Case Inlet, perpendicularly crosses the 4-km-long Catfish Lake scarp discerned from Lidar data and trenching. The profile shows flat-lying strata on the south, but the north part of the profile is dominated by south-dipping Tertiary and older strata that appear to form the limb of an anticline. There appears to be at least one, and likely two faults in the Tertiary and older strata, although it is not clear these faults penetrate the shallowest Pleistocene strata. The 8.5-km long Carney Lake profile is located east of Case Inlet and spans two scarps imaged on Lidar data. This profile shows a similar geometry to the Powerline Road profile, folded and faulted Tertiary and older strata adjacent to flat-lying marine sediments of the Tacoma Basin. The 9-km long Bethel-Burley profile across the east portion of the Tacoma fault near Gig Harbor shows a significantly different reflector geometry than the profiles to the west. The Bethel-Burley profile is dominated by a strong, south-dipping reflection that becomes a prominent arch near the north end of the section. The strength of the reflector suggests that it marks the top of the Eocene basement rocks. South-dipping strata on this profile match those imaged on marine profiles from Carr Inlet. The new seismic reflection data support an interpretation in which the north edge of the Tacoma basin

  6. Deep view of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault in the Calabrian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesano, Francesco Emanuele; Tiberti, Mara Monica; Basili, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Subduction Zone plays a key role in the evolution of the central Mediterranean in the framework of the convergence between Africa and Europe. Here, the remnants of the World's oldest oceanic crust form a narrow NW-dipping slab passively subducting beneath the Calabrian Arc. Recently published high-resolution seismic profiles and bathymetric data of the western Ionian Sea highlight the presence of a NNW-SSE faulting system connected with a series of Plio-Pleistocene syn-tectonic basins. These features are correlated with the recent activity of a major NNW-SSE deformation zone confining the active subduction to the SW and interpreted as a Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault. The goal of this work is to jointly reconstruct the geometry of the STEP fault and the subduction interface in its surroundings. We use multichannel seismic profiles acquired in the southwestern part of the Calabrian accretionary wedge to focus on the STEP fault geometry at depth and to analyse its relationships with shallow deformation features. The quantitative analysis and enhancement of seismic data provided an accurate image of the internal structure of the accretionary wedge at various depths, showing growth strata in the Plio-Pleistocene succession and major discontinuities in the lower crust. Our results depict a main subvertical, slightly east-dipping, lithospheric fault cutting the oceanic crust down to the Moho, and a rich set of associated secondary synthetic and antithetic faults. This picture also provides new insights on the STEP fault propagation mechanism. In addition, the tridimensional correlation of the STEP fault occurrences in various seismic profiles provides a preliminary scheme of its segmentation and highlights the relationships of this master fault with other main structural elements of the Calabrian Arc and Eastern Sicily, including some of the faults deemed to be responsible for major historical earthquakes in the area.

  7. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  9. Permeability of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, A. P.; Song, I.; Saffer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying fault rock permeability is important toward understanding both the regional hydrologic behavior of fault zones, and poro-elastic processes that affect fault mechanics by mediating effective stress. These include long-term fault strength as well as dynamic processes that may occur during earthquake slip, including thermal pressurization and dilatancy hardening. Despite its importance, measurements of fault zone permeability for relevant natural materials are scarce, owing to the difficulty of coring through active fault zones seismogenic depths. Most existing measurements of fault zone permeability are from altered surface samples or from thinner, lower displacement faults than the SAF. Here, we report on permeability measurements conducted on gouge from the actively creeping Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) of the San Andreas Fault, sampled in the SAFOD borehole at a depth of ~2.7 km (Hole G, Run 4, sections 4,5). The matrix of the gouge in this interval is predominantly composed of particles <10 µm, with ~5 vol% clasts of serpentinite, very fine-grained sandstone, and siltstone. The 2.6 m-thick CDZ represents the main fault trace and hosts ~90% of the active slip on the SAF at this location, as documented by repeated casing deformation surveys. We measured permeability in two different configurations: (1) in a uniaxial pressure cell, in which a sample is placed into a rigid steel ring which imposes a zero lateral strain condition and subjected to axial load, and (2) in a standard triaxial system under isostatic stress conditions. In the uniaxial configuration, we obtained permeabilities at axial effective stresses up to 90 MPa, and in the triaxial system up to 10 MPa. All experiments were conducted on cylindrical subsamples of the SAFOD core 25 mm in diameter, with lengths ranging from 18mm to 40mm, oriented for flow approximately perpendicular to the fault. In uniaxial tests, permeability is determined by running constant rate of strain (CRS) tests up

  10. Apparent stress, fault maturity and seismic hazard for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of apparent stress for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones is derived by examining the apparent stress (?? a = ??Es/Mo, where E s is radiated energy and Mo is seismic moment) of all globally distributed shallow (depth, ?? 1 MPa) are also generally intraslab, but occur where the lithosphere has just begun subduction beneath the overriding plate. They usually occur in cold slabs near trenches where the direction of plate motion across the trench is oblique to the trench axis, or where there are local contortions or geometrical complexities of the plate boundary. Lower ??a (< 1 MPa) is associated with events occurring at the outer rise (OR) complex (between the OR and the trench axis), as well as with intracrustal events occurring just landward of the trench. The average apparent stress of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes is considerably higher than the average apparent stress of interplate-thrust-fault earthquakes. In turn, the average ?? a of strike-slip earthquakes in intraoceanic environments is considerably higher than that of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes. The variation of average ??a with focal mechanism and tectonic regime suggests that the level of ?? a is related to fault maturity. Lower stress drops are needed to rupture mature faults such as those found at plate interfaces that have been smoothed by large cumulative displacements (from hundreds to thousands of kilometres). In contrast, immature faults, such as those on which intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes generally occur, are found in cold and intact lithosphere in which total fault displacement has been much less (from hundreds of metres to a few kilometres). Also, faults on which high ??a oceanic strike-slip earthquakes occur are predominantly intraplate or at evolving ends of transforms. At subduction zones, earthquakes occurring on immature faults are likely to be more hazardous as they tend to generate higher amounts of radiated energy per unit of moment than

  11. Map of the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones, Salinas River Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberg, Lewis I.; Clark, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    The Rinconada Fault and its related faults constitute a major structural element of the Salinas River valley, which is known regionally, and referred to herein, as the 'Salinas Valley'. The Rinconada Fault extends 230 km from King City in the north to the Big Pine Fault in the south. At the south end of the map area near Santa Margarita, the Rinconada Fault separates granitic and metamorphic crystalline rocks of the Salinian Block to the northeast from the subduction-zone assemblage of the Franciscan Complex to the southwest. Northwestward, the Rinconada Fault lies entirely within the Salinian Block and generally divides this region into two physiographically and structurally distinct areas, the Santa Lucia Range to the west and the Salinas Valley to the east. The Reliz Fault, which continues as a right stepover from the Rinconada Fault, trends northwestward along the northeastern base of the Sierra de Salinas of the Santa Lucia Range and beyond for 60 km to the vicinity of Spreckels, where it is largely concealed. Aeromagnetic data suggest that the Reliz Fault continues northwestward another 25 km into Monterey Bay, where it aligns with a high-definition magnetic boundary. Geomorphic evidence of late Quaternary movement along the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones has been documented by Tinsley (1975), Dibblee (1976, 1979), Hart (1976, 1985), and Klaus (1999). Although definitive geologic evidence of Holocene surface rupture has not been found on these faults, they were regarded as an earthquake source for the California Geological Survey [formerly, California Division of Mines and Geology]/U.S. Geological Survey (CGS/USGS) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Assessment because of their postulated slip rate of 1+-1 mm/yr and their calculated maximum magnitude of 7.3. Except for published reports by Durham (1965, 1974), Dibblee (1976), and Hart (1976), most information on these faults is unpublished or is contained in theses, field trip guides, and other types of reports

  12. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-11-27

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  13. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  14. Scaling of the critical slip distance for seismic faulting with shear strain in fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marone, C.; Kilgore, B.

    1993-01-01

    THEORETICAL and experimentally based laws for seismic faulting contain a critical slip distance1-5, Dc, which is the slip over which strength breaks down during earthquake nucleation. On an earthquake-generating fault, this distance plays a key role in determining the rupture nucleation dimension6, the amount of premonitory and post-seismic slip7-10, and the maximum seismic ground acceleration1,11. In laboratory friction experiments, Dc has been related to the size of surface contact junctions2,5,12; thus, the discrepancy between laboratory measurements of Dc (??? 10-5 m) and values obtained from modelling earthquakes (??? 10-2 m) has been attributed to differences in roughness between laboratory surfaces and natural faults5. This interpretation predicts a dependence of Dc on the particle size of fault gouge 2 (breccia and wear material) but not on shear strain. Here we present experimental results showing that Dc scales with shear strain in simulated fault gouge. Our data suggest a new physical interpretation for the critical slip distance, in which Dc is controlled by the thickness of the zone of localized shear strain. As gouge zones of mature faults are commonly 102-103 m thick13-17, whereas laboratory gouge layers are 1-10 mm thick, our data offer an alternative interpretation of the discrepancy between laboratory and field-based estimates of Dc.

  15. Dynamic fracturing by successive coseismic loadings leads to pulverization in active fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aben, F. M.; Doan, M.-L.; Mitchell, T. M.; Toussaint, R.; Reuschlé, T.; Fondriest, M.; Gratier, J.-P.; Renard, F.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies show that pulverized rocks observed along large faults can be created by single high-strain rate loadings in the laboratory, provided that the strain rate is higher than a certain pulverization threshold. Such loadings are analogous to large seismic events. In reality, pulverized rocks have been subject to numerous seismic events rather than one single event. Therefore, the effect of successive "milder" high-strain rate loadings on the pulverization threshold is investigated by applying loading conditions below the initial pulverization threshold. Single and successive loading experiments were performed on quartz-monzonite using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. Damage-dependent petrophysical properties and elastic moduli were monitored by applying incremental strains. Furthermore, it is shown that the pulverization threshold can be reduced by successive "milder" dynamic loadings from strain rates of ~180 s-1 to ~90 s-1. To do so, it is imperative that the rock experiences dynamic fracturing during the successive loadings prior to pulverization. Combined with loading conditions during an earthquake rupture event, the following generalized fault damage zone structure perpendicular to the fault will develop: furthest from the fault plane, there is a stationary outer boundary that bounds a zone of dynamically fractured rocks. Closer to the fault, a pulverization boundary delimits a band of pulverized rock. Consecutive seismic events will cause progressive broadening of the band of pulverized rocks, eventually creating a wider damage zone observed in mature faults.

  16. A morphotectonic study of an extensional fault zone in a magma-rich rift: the Baringo Trachyte Fault System, central Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, B.; Tiercelin, J.-J.; Richert, J.-P.; Gente, P.; Sturchio, N. C.; Stead, D.; Le Turdu, C.

    2000-05-01

    The Baringo Trachyte Fault System is located within the central Kenya Rift and forms part of a N-S-trending linked extensional fault network. This fault system bounds to the west the 8 km deep Baringo Basin which itself lies within the axial valley of the central Kenya Rift. It mainly affects a middle Pleistocene trachytic dome (510 ka), the so-called Baringo Trachyte (BT). A morphotectonic study of the 10 km long BT master fault and associated downthrow geometries provides constraints on the evolution of a magma-type rift fault system from an initial stage of crack opening through to propagation. A model of radial fault growth is proposed in order to account for the longitudinal segmentation of the main fault escarpment from the median part to the tips. The small-scale half-graben geometry developed in the median high-strain zone is progressively accommodated laterally by both flexure and related narrow compensation grabens. The resulting crack swarms are well-developed at the free southern tip zone. Both the spatial distribution of rock-breaking products and their relations to the immediate hangingwall provide further evidence for this hypothesis. Well-developed screes and other gravity-driven structures (slumps) preferentially occur along the median part of the Baringo Trachyte Fault Escarpment, probably as earthquake-induced features. The hangingwall fault zone shows an asymmetrical triangular-shape with a maximum width of about half the length of the main scarp. This zone of maximum deformation and subsidence appears to be laterally controlled by two major, conjugate, transverse basement discontinuities lying with a conjugate geometry. Its internal architecture is dominated by antithetic westerly-dipping normal faults bounding discrete half-grabens, locally infilled by syn-tectonic volcaniclastics. Chronological data on hydrothermal silica filling open cracks on the BT footwall suggest that the master fault evolution occurred from 345 to 198 ka, as the

  17. A Comparison of Seismicity Characteristics and Fault Structure Between Stick-Slip Experiments and Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Becker, T. W.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2015-08-01

    Fault zones contain structural complexity on all scales. This complexity influences fault mechanics including the dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of small seismic events. Incomplete earthquake records, unknown stresses, and unresolved fault structures within the crust complicate a quantitative assessment of the parameters that control factors affecting seismicity. To better understand the relationship between fault structure and seismicity, we examined dynamic faulting under controlled conditions in the laboratory by creating saw-cut-guided natural fractures in cylindrical granite samples. The resulting rough surfaces were triaxially loaded to produce a sequence of stick-slip events. During these experiments, we monitored stress, strain, and seismic activity. After the experiments, fault structures were imaged in thin sections and using computer tomography. The laboratory fault zones showed many structural characteristics observed in upper crustal faults, including zones of localized slip embedded in a layer of fault gouge. Laboratory faults also exhibited a several millimeter wide damage zone with decreasing micro-crack density at larger distances from the fault axis. In addition to the structural similarities, we also observed many similarities between our observed distribution of acoustic emissions (AEs) and natural seismicity. The AEs followed the Gutenberg-Richter and Omori-Utsu relationships commonly used to describe natural seismicity. Moreover, we observed a connection between along-strike fault heterogeneity and variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value. As suggested by natural seismicity studies, areas of low b value marked the nucleation points of large slip events and were located at large asperities within the fault zone that were revealed by post-experimental tomography scans. Our results emphasize the importance of stick-slip experiments for the study of fault mechanics. The direct correlation of

  18. Towards quantifying the matrix permeability of fault damage zones in low porosity rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2012-07-01

    In nature, permeability is enhanced in the damage zone of faults in crystalline rocks, where fracturing occurs on a wide range of scales. Understanding this permeability structure is paramount for predicting crustal fluid flow. We combine quantitative field and laboratory measurements to predict microfracture damage zone permeability in low-porosity granitic rocks as a function of distance from the fault core and displacement. Microfracture controlled matrix permeability exerts an increasingly dominant role on fluid flow with increasing depth. In the field we analysed the scaling relationships of microfracture densities surrounding strike-slip faults developed in granodiorite within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile. Displacements ranging over 5 orders of magnitude (˜0.012-5000 m), allow the variation of microfracture damage with increasing distance from faults to be determined empirically as a function of displacement. We reproduce microfracture damage in the laboratory in a suite of triaxial deformation experiments by inducing cyclic damage in initially intact samples while continuously measuring permeability. Combining field and laboratory datasets through the microfracture density allows the permeability profile with distance from the fault to be predicted from fault displacement.

  19. Kinematics at the Intersection of the Garlock and Death Valley Fault Zones, California: Integration of TM Data and Field Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.; Brady, Roland H., III; Abrams, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic relationships at the intersection of the southern Death Valley and Garlock fault zones were examined to identify and delineate the eastern structural boundary between the Mojave and the Basin and Range geologic terrains, and to construct a model for the evolution of this boundary through time. In order to accomplish this, satellite imagery was combined with field investigations to study six areas in the vicinity of the intersection, or possible extensions, of the fault zones. The information gathered from these areas allows the test of various hypotheses that were proposed to explain the interaction between the Death Valley and Garlock fault zones.

  20. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  1. Remote sensing analysis for fault-zones detection in the Central Andean Plateau (Catamarca, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traforti, Anna; Massironi, Matteo; Zampieri, Dario; Carli, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been extensively used to detect the structural framework of investigated areas, which includes lineaments, fault zones and fracture patterns. The identification of these features is fundamental in exploration geology, as it allows the definition of suitable sites for the exploitation of different resources (e.g. ore mineral, hydrocarbon, geothermal energy and groundwater). Remote sensing techniques, typically adopted in fault identification, have been applied to assess the geological and structural framework of the Laguna Blanca area (26°35'S-66°49'W). This area represents a sector of the south-central Andes localized in the Argentina region of Catamarca, along the south-eastern margin of the Puna plateau. The study area is characterized by a Precambrian low-grade metamorphic basement intruded by Ordovician granitoids. These rocks are unconformably covered by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Miocene age, followed by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Upper Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene age. All these units are cut by two systems of major faults, locally characterized by 15-20 m wide damage zones. The detection of main tectonic lineaments in the study area was firstly carried out by classical procedures: image sharpening of Landsat 7 ETM+ images, directional filters applied to ASTER images, medium resolution Digital Elevation Models analysis (SRTM and ASTER GDEM) and hill shades interpretation. In addition, a new approach in fault zone identification, based on multispectral satellite images classification, has been tested in the Laguna Blanca area and in other sectors of south-central Andes. In this perspective, several prominent fault zones affecting basement and granitoid rocks have been sampled. The collected fault gouge samples have been analyzed with a Field-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer. We acquired bidirectional reflectance spectra, from 0.35μm to 2.5μm with 1nm spectral sampling, of the sampled fault rocks

  2. Fault-related amorphous materials and their influence on the rheological behavior of fault zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.; Drury, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Identification of fault-related amorphous materials in both nature as well as experiment has significantly increased over the last years. Amorphous materials provide new possibilities for our understanding of the rheological behavior of fault zones and the seismic cycle. We performed a series of experiments on granitoid fault rocks under a range of temperatures (T ≈ 300 to 600°C), confining pressures (Pc ≈ 300 to 1500 MPa) and slow displacement rates of (10-8 ms-1 < ddot < 10-6 ms-1). Granitoid powder (d ≤ 200 μm), with 0.2 wt% water added was sheared in a solid medium deformation apparatus to a range of finite shear strains (γ = 0 - 5). Samples reach peak shear strengths of (0.56 GPa < τ < 1.6 GPa) then weaken slightly (10 MPa < τ < 190 MPa) and continue to deform at approximately constant stress. A clear temperature and a weak rate dependence of steady-state stress is observed. Only at the fastest displacement rates (10-6 ms-1), and lowest temperatures (300°C) the samples fail abruptly and audibly shortly after reaching peak strength. Microstructural observations show the development of an S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. At peak strength (γ ≈ 2 - 2.5), deformation partitions in several C' - C slip zones which cover 5-10 vol% of the sample. TEM observations show small, highly strained nanocrystalline fragments with an average grain size of ~ 35 nm surrounded by up to ~90% of TEM-amorphous material (partly amorphous material - PAM). During higher strain deformation (γ > 2.5) some C' - C slip zones continue to accommodate strain and further change their microstructure. Up to 25 vol% of the sample consists of PAM as well as fully TEM-amorphous material (AM). This material shows injection veins, flow structures and contains quartz clasts surrounded by a thin layer of different z-contrast material. At highest stresses (> 1.1 GPa) and lowest temperatures (300°C) stretched bubbles, and bubble trains following the local flow

  3. Earthquake rupture extents and coseismic slips promoted by damaged fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Huihui; Yang, Hongfeng; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-06-01

    Here we investigate the effects of damage fault zones on rupture propagation by conducting a series of 3-D dynamic rupture simulations on a planar vertical strike-slip fault. We find that damage fault zones can promote rupture extent and increase earthquake potency. The waves reflected from the bottom of shallow damage fault zones can increase shear stress on the fault and thus promote rupture propagation. In addition, the promotional effects increase with the width and depth extent of damage fault zones. The overall effects of the waves reflected from the fault-parallel side boundaries of damage fault zones are unfavorable for rupture propagation. Therefore, rupture propagation is promoted with the increased width of fault zones due to geometrical spreading effects. Moreover, nonground-breaking ruptures may reach the ground surface with the effects of damage fault zones. Furthermore, along-strike segmented fault zones as suggested by observations could also promote ruptures and may lead to preferred rupture directions if epicenters are close to fault zones. The effects of damage fault zones on rupture propagation hold important implications on assessing earthquake risk.

  4. Faults and associated landslides on the Torrey Pines mesa, an expression of the active Rose Canyon fault zone, La Jolla, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rindell, A.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ), San Diego's active NW striking right-lateral wrench, bends to the left at La Jolla, creating a poorly understood zone of transpression. North of La Jolla, continuing investigations along seacliffs and road-cuts have exposed a number of en echelon, NE striking antithetic faults previously interpreted as either E-W striking faults, landslides, and/or Eocene soft-sediment deformations. However, thrust faulting and left-lateral movement, in addition to antithetic strikes, indicates that at least one of these, the Marine Fisheries fault, is associated with the RCFZ. A graben formed by a left-step along this fault has led to land subsidence and engineering problems for the National Marine Fisheries building. In addition, progressive seacliff retreat here and at other locations is partly controlled by fault associated fractures. A cliff-face exposure of the Salk fault reveals diverging fault splays flattening to the near horizontal with movement occurring along bedding planes within the sedimentary section, creating the appearance of landsliding. Classic flower structures have also been found up to 5 km inland, along NE strikes to the shoreline exposures of the Salk and Scripps faults. Faults traces are generally obscured by urbanization and numerous ancient and/or presently active coherent landslides. Although these faults are classified as only potentially active, timing and risk of seismic movement are not well constrained. In addition, record rainfalls in San Diego County have dramatically increased landsliding potential. A well exposed dike, dated at 11 Ma (older than the Pliocene age of the RCFZ), is exposed from the seacliffs offshore towards the RCFZ. It has a significant magnetic anomaly ranging up to 450 gammas and appears to be offset by the Marine Fisheries and Scripps faults. Measuring offsets of this and other reported and suspected offshore dikes may better define total offset from both the RCFZ and antithetic faulting.

  5. High-yielding aquifers in crystalline basement: insights about the role of fault zones, exemplified by Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Clément; Bour, Olivier; Aquilina, Luc; Dewandel, Benoît

    2016-08-01

    While groundwater constitutes a crucial resource in many crystalline-rock regions worldwide, well-yield conditions are highly variable and barely understood. Nevertheless, it is well known that fault zones may have the capacity to ensure sustainable yield in crystalline media, but there are only a few and disparate examples in the literature that describe high-yield conditions related to fault zones in crystalline rock basements. By investigating structural and hydraulic properties of remarkable yielding sites identified in the Armorican Massif, western France, this study discusses the main factors that may explain such exceptional hydrogeological properties. Twenty-three sites, identified through analysis of databases available for the region, are investigated. Results show that: (1) the highly transmissive fractures are related to fault zones which ensure the main water inflow in the pumped wells; (2) the probability of intersecting such transmissive fault zones does not vary significantly with depth, at least within the range investigated in this study (0-200 m); and (3) high yield is mainly controlled by the structural features of the fault zones, in particular the fault dip and the presence of a connected storage reservoir. Conceptual models that summarize the hydrological properties of high-yield groundwater resources related to fault zones in crystalline basement are shown and discussed.

  6. Static versus dynamic fracturing in shallow carbonate fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, M.; Doan, M. L.; Aben, F. M.; Fusseis, F.; Mitchell, T. M.; Di Toro, G.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often nucleate within and propagate through carbonates in the shallow crust, therefore several field and experimental studies were recently aimed to constrain earthquake-related deformation processes within carbonate fault rocks. In particular, the occurrence of thick belts (10-100s m) of low-strain fault-related breccias (average size of rock fragments >1 cm), which is relatively common within carbonate damage zones, was generally interpreted as resulting from the quasi-static growth of fault zones rather than from the cumulative effect of multiple earthquake ruptures. Here we report the occurrence of up to hundreds of meters thick belts of intensely fragmented dolostones along the major transpressive Foiana Fault Zone (Italian Southern Alps) which was exhumed from < 2 km depth. Such dolostones are reduced into fragments ranging from few centimeters down to few millimeters in size with ultrafine-grained layers in proximity to the principal slip zones. Preservation of the original bedding indicates a lack of significant shear strain in the fragmented dolostones which seem to have been shattered in situ. To investigate the origin of the in-situ shattered rocks, the host dolostones were deformed in uniaxial compression both under quasi-static loading (strain rate ~10-3 s-1) and dynamic loading (strain rate >50 s-1). Dolostones deformed up to failure under low-strain rate were affected by single to multiple discrete (i.e. not interconnected) extensional fractures sub-parallel to the loading direction. Dolostones deformed under high-strain rate were shattered above a strain rate threshold of ~200 s-1(strain >1.2%) while they were split in few fragments or were macroscopically intact for lower strain rates. Experimentally shattered dolostones were reduced into a non-cohesive material with most rock fragments a few millimeters in size and elongated parallel to the loading direction. Fracture networks were investigated by X

  7. Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

    2012-01-01

    Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

  8. Seismicity around the Cimandiri fault zone, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febriani, Febty

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed the seismicity activity around the Cimandiri fault zone, West Java, Indonesia by using the earthquake catalogs listed by Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical (BMKG) and International Seismological Centre (ISC) from 1973 to 2013 (M>=1 and depth ≤ 0-50 km), along with the focal mechanism data from National Research Institute of Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) from 2007 to 2014 (M>4; depth ≤ 50 km) and Global CMT catalog from 1976 to 2014 (M=0-10 and depth ≤ 50 km). The result from earthquake catalogs suggest that there are earthquake activities around the Cimandiri fault zone in the recent years, which is also supported by the results of focal mechanism data analysis from NIED data and Global CMT catalog.

  9. Brecciation processes in fault zones: Inferences from earthquake rupturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Surface-rupture patterns and aftershock distributions accompanying moderate to large shallow earthquakes reveal a residual brittle infrastructure for established crustal fault zones, the complexity of which is likely to be largely scale-invariant. In relation to such an infrastructure, continued displacement along a particular master fault may involve three dominant mechanical processes of rock brecciation: (a) attrition brecciation, from progressive frictional wear along principal slip surfaces during both seismic and aseismic sliding, (b) distributed crush brecciation, involving microfracturing over broad regions when slip on the principal slip surfaces is impeded by antidilational jogs or other obstructions, and (c) implosion brecciation, associated with the sudden creation of void space and fluid-pressure differentials at dilational fault jogs during earthquake rupture propagation. These last, high-dilation breccias are particularly favorable sites for hydrothermal mineral deposition, forming transitory low-pressure channels for the rapid passage of hydrothermal fluids. Long-lived fault zones often contain an intermingling of breccias derived from all three processes.

  10. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  11. Shallow subsurface structure of the Wasatch fault, Provo segment, Utah, from integrated compressional and shear-wave seismic reflection profiles with implications for fault structure and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.; South, J.V.; Brinkerhoff, A.R.; Keach, R.W.; Okojie-Ayoro, A. O.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vibroseis compressional and experimental hammer-source, shear-wave, seismic reflection profiles across the Provo segment of the Wasatch fault zone in Utah reveal near-surface and shallow bedrock structures caused by geologically recent deformation. Combining information from the seismic surveys, geologic mapping, terrain analysis, and previous seismic first-arrival modeling provides a well-constrained cross section of the upper ~500 m of the subsurface. Faults are mapped from the surface, through shallow, poorly consolidated deltaic sediments, and cutting through a rigid bedrock surface. The new seismic data are used to test hypotheses on changing fault orientation with depth, the number of subsidiary faults within the fault zone and the width of the fault zone, and the utility of integrating separate elastic methods to provide information on a complex structural zone. Although previous surface mapping has indicated only a few faults, the seismic section shows a wider and more complex deformation zone with both synthetic and antithetic normal faults. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of a combined shallow and deeper penetrating geophysical survey, integrated with detailed geologic mapping to constrain subsurface fault structure. Due to the complexity of the fault zone, accurate seismic velocity information is essential and was obtained from a first-break tomography model. The new constraints on fault geometry can be used to refine estimates of vertical versus lateral tectonic movements and to improve seismic hazard assessment along the Wasatch fault through an urban area. We suggest that earthquake-hazard assessments made without seismic reflection imaging may be biased by the previous mapping of too few faults. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  12. Rupture and creep behaviours of subduction interface controlled by fault zone heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kelin; Brown, Lonn; Gao, Xiang; Bilek, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The behaviour of fault slip varies tremendously, ranging from seismic rupture to aseismic creep. We explore the role of fault zone heterogeneity in controlling large-scale (> 100 km in strike dimension) rupture and creep behaviours of subduction faults. Geometrically smooth subduction faults can (although not always) provide relatively homogeneous structural and stress conditions to allow large fault patches to be locked over prolonged periods and then rupture in great earthquakes. During the rupture, however, frictional heterogeneities arising from lithological changes, pore-fluid pressure variations, and low-amplitude geometrical irregularities always cause a very heterogeneous distribution of stress drop. Although some parts of the fault may undergo high or complete stress drop (local weakening), many other parts undergo very low stress drop or stress increase (local strengthening). The mixing of stress drop and increase in different parts of the rupture zone makes the average stress drop in each great earthquake very small, of the order of a couple of MPa, as widely observed in seismological studies. We use the 2011 Mw=9 Tohoku-oki earthquake to demonstrate this averaging effect. Geometrically extremely rough subduction faults, such as those featuring multiple subducting seamounts, provide very heterogeneous structural and stress conditions that promote creep and numerous small earthquakes. A global inspection of geodetically constrained locking and creeping states of subduction zones indicates that these extremely rough faults all tend to creep (Wang and Bilek, 2014). Depending on the degree of roughness and other geological conditions (e.g., sediment and fluid), some of the rough faults may host a mixture of seismic and aseismic patches and may exhibit a variety of creep behaviour ranging from steady creep to transient creep pulses (i.e., slow slip events) of different time scales. It can be envisioned that the heterogeneity in these rough faults is generally

  13. Geophysical characterization of the Ota-Vila Franca de Xira-Lisbon-Sesimbra fault zone, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João; Rabeh, Taha; Cabral, João; Carrilho, Fernando; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2008-08-01

    This paper focuses on the reprocessing of seismic reflection profiles, aeromagnetic and seismicity data, to locate and characterize the Ota-Vila Franca de Xira-Lisbon-Sesimbra fault zone. The studied structure is sited in the Lower Tagus Valley, an area with over 2 million inhabitants, that has experienced historical earthquakes causing many casualties, serious damage and economical losses (e.g. 1531 January 26 and 1909 April 23 earthquakes), whose tectonic sources are mostly unknown. The fault zone trends NNE-SSW to N-S, is located near the eastern border of the Mesozoic Lusitanian Basin and partially delimits the Lower Tagus Cenozoic Basin at the west, mostly hidden under the Cenozoic sedimentary fill. According to the data presented here, the normal structures that compose the fault zone were reactivated in Cenozoic times, with positive inversion and the development of splays towards the east. The fault zone shows three distinct segments with different behaviour, in conformity with their various orientations relative to the NW-SE maximum compressive stress. The northern segment splays into a series of NNE-SSW oriented, east verging, imbricate thrusts, which merge to the west into a major reverse fault that resulted from the tectonic inversion of the former normal fault bordering the Mesozoic Lusitanian Basin in this area-the well known Ota (or Pragança) fault. The central segment corresponds to the approximately 20 km long outcropping Vila Franca de Xira fault, which suffered a maximum degree of inversion. The southern segment extends for ~45 km, crossing Lisbon and the Setúbal Península at depth until approximately Sesimbra (probably continuing offshore), with an N-S trend and distinct geometry. South of Vila Franca de Xira, there is evidence for a WSW-ENE fault located at depth, producing a righ-lateral stepover on the major structure and splitting the central from the southern segment. We hypothesize that this obliquely trending fault is a possible source

  14. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, Silvia; Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution in outcrops of exhumed fault zones is of fundamental importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation. We present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM), developed on the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ), a well exposed strike-slip fault in the Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). The GLFZ has been exhumed from ca. 8-10 km depth, and consists of hundreds of individual seismogenic slip surfaces lined by green cataclasites (crushed wall rocks cemented by the hydrothermal epidote and K-feldspar) and black pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts, considered as a marker for seismic slip). A digital model of selected outcrop exposures was reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs processed with VisualSFM software. The resulting DOM has a resolution up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Most of the outcrop was imaged using images each one covering a 1 x 1 m2 area, while selected structural features, such as sidewall ripouts or stepovers, were covered with higher-resolution images covering 30 x 40 cm2 areas.Image processing algorithms were preliminarily tested using the ImageJ-Fiji package, then a workflow in Matlab was developed to process a large collection of images sequentially. Particularly in detailed 30 x 40 cm images, cataclasites and hydrothermal veins were successfully identified using spectral analysis in RGB and HSV color spaces. This allows mapping the network of cataclasites and veins which provided the pathway for hydrothermal fluid circulation, and also the volume of mineralization, since we are able to measure the thickness of cataclasites and veins on the outcrop surface. The spectral signature of pseudotachylyte veins is indistinguishable from that of biotite grains in the wall rock (tonalite), so we tested morphological analysis tools to discriminate

  15. Fault-zone guided waves from explosions in the San Andreas fault at Parkfield and Cienega Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Thurber, C.H.; Malin, P.E.; Aki, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fault-zone guided waves were successfully excited by near-surface explosions in the San Andreas fault zone both at Parkfield and Cienega Valley, central California. The guided waves were observed on linear, three-component seismic arrays deployed across the fault trace. These waves were not excited by explosions located outside the fault zone. The amplitude spectra of guided waves show a maximum peak at 2 Hz at Parkfield and 3 Hz at Cienega Valley. The guided wave amplitude decays sharply with observation distance from the fault trace. The explosion-excited fault-zone guided waves are similar to those generated by earthquakes at Parkfield but have lower frequencies and travel more slowly. These observations suggest that the fault-zone wave guide has lower seismic velocities as it approaches the surface at Parkfield. We have modeled the waveforms as S waves trapped in a low-velocity wave guide sandwiched between high-velocity wall rocks, resulting in Love-type fault-zone guided waves. While the results are nonunique, the Parkfield data are adequately fit by a shallow wave guide 170 m wide with an S velocity 0.85 km/sec and an apparent Q ??? 30 to 40. At Cienega Valley, the fault-zone wave guide appears to be about 120 m wide with an S velocity 0.7 km/sec and a Q ??? 30.

  16. Two-dimensional seismic image of the San Andreas Fault in the Northern Gabilan Range, central California: Evidence for fluids in the fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.; Roecker, S.; Ellsworth, W.; Chen, Y.; Lutter, W.; Sessions, R.

    1997-01-01

    A joint inversion for two-dimensional P-wave velocity (Vp), P-to-S velocity ratio (Vp/Vs), and earthquake locations along the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California reveals a complex relationship among seismicity, fault zone structure, and the surface fault trace. A zone of low Vp and high Vp/Vs lies beneath the SAF surface trace (SAFST), extending to a depth of about 6 km. Most of the seismic activity along the SAF occurs at depths of 3 to 7 km in a southwest-dipping zone that roughly intersects the SAFST, and lies near the southwest edge of the low Vp and high Vp/Vs zones. Tests indicate that models in which this seismic zone is significantly closer to vertical can be confidently rejected. A second high Vp/Vs zone extends to the northeast, apparently dipping beneath the Diablo Range. Another zone of seismicity underlies the northeast portion of this Vp/Vs high. The high Vp/Vs zones cut across areas of very different Vp values, indicating that the high Vp/Vs values are due to the presence of fluids, not just lithology. The close association between the zones of high Vp/Vs and seismicity suggests a direct involvement of fluids in the faulting process. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. High-velocity frictional properties and microstructures of clay-rich fault gouge in megasplay fault zone, Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Tsutsumi, A.

    2010-12-01

    In accretionary margins, a large out-of-sequence fault system (the megasplay fault) commonly branches from the megathrust and intersects the seafloor along the lower slope of the margin. Detailed seismic reflection surveys and theoretical studies have suggested that the propagation of earthquake rupture occurred repeatedly along the megasplay fault during great subduction earthquakes. Recently, IODP Expedition 316 drilled into the shallow portion of the megasplay fault zone in the Nankai subduction zone offshore the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan and found the evidence for the slip localization and past frictional heating along ~10-mm-thick dark gouges in the microbreccia. Thus, high-velocity frictional properties of the megasplay fault material are crucial for understanding whether the megasplay fault efficiently transfers displacement toward the seafloor and fosters a tsunami genesis during a subduction earthquake. We conducted high-velocity friction experiments on clay-rich fault gouge taken from the Nankai megasplay fault zone at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.6-2.0 MPa under dry and wet conditions. After the experiments, the microstructures of the fault gouges were examined by optical microscope and SEM. In the dry tests, dehydration of clay minerals occurred by frictional heating, and the slip weakening is related to the fault gouge expansion due to a water phase transition from liquid to vapor. The water is derived from the dehydration of clay minerals by frictional heating. The resulting microstructure in the gouge layer is a random distribution of spherical clay-clast aggregates (CCA) in the optically isotropic, dark matrix. In the wet tests, the slip weakening is caused by pore-fluid pressurization resulting from shear-enhanced compaction of the water-saturated gouge and frictional heating. Compared to the dry tests, the wet tests show smaller dynamic stress drops and slip weakening distance. The steady-state shear stress in the wet tests

  18. Physical and Transport Properties of the carbonate-bearing faults: experimental insights from the Monte Maggio Fault zone (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippetta, Fabio; Scuderi, Marco Maria; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Physical properties of fault zones vary with time and space and in particular, fluid flow and permeability variations are strictly related to fault zone processes. Here we investigate the physical properties of carbonate samples collected along the Monte Maggio normal Fault (MMF), a regional structure (length ~10 km and displacement ~500 m) located within the active system of the Apennines. In particular we have studied an exceptionally exposed outcrop of the fault within the Calcare Massiccio formation (massive limestone) that has been recently exposed by new roadworks. Large cores (100 mm in diameter and up to 20 cm long) drilled perpendicular to the fault plane have been used to: 1) characterize the damage zone adjacent to the fault plane and 2) to obtain smaller cores, 38 mm in diameter both parallel and perpendicular to the fault plane, for rock deformation experiments. At the mesoscale two types of cataclastic damage zones can be identified in the footwall block (i) a Cemented Cataclasite (CC) and (ii), a Fault Breccia (FB). Since in some portions of the fault the hangingwall (HW) is still preserved we also collected HW samples. After preliminary porosity measurements at ambient pressure, we performed laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs, and permeability at effective confining pressures up to 100 MPa in order to simulate crustal conditions. The protolith has a primary porosity of about 7 %, formed predominantly by isolated pores since the connected porosity is only 1%. FB samples are characterized by 10% and 5% of bulk and connected porosity respectively, whilst CC samples show lower bulk porosity (7%) and a connected porosity of 2%. From ambient pressure to 100 MPa, P-wave velocity is about 5,9-6,0 km/s for the protolith, ranges from 4,9 km/s to 5,9 km/s for FB samples, whereas it is constant at 5,9 km/s for CC samples and ranges from 5,4 to 5,7 for HW sample. Vs shows the same behaviour resulting in a constant Vp/Vs ratio from 0 to 100 MPa that ranges from 1

  19. Geophysical and geochemical tracing of fault-zone slip and seal mechanisms through diagenetic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonti, Christophe; Guglielmi, Yves; Viseur, Sophie; Leonide, Phlippe; Floquet, Marc; Garambois, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Fault and fractures properties are responsible of a large part of the fluid transfer properties at all scales, especially in tight rocks. Fault reactivations increase the complexity of the fault zone structure and cause slip reactivation on previously formed fractures. Multiple fracture reactivations can deeply modify the initial fracture properties all along the rocks diagenetic history, leading to alternate periods of fractures sealing and seismic instability. For instance, each slip step may be associated with cementation/dissolution that can be traced through combined geophysical and geochemical analyses. To that end, we studied a polyphased fault-zone outcropping on a quarry presenting a very smooth surface due to diamond wire saw exploitation of rock blocks. The quarry is composed of carbonates displaying non-porous inner-platform rudist facies of Late Cenomanian. Inside the fault zone, the rock is affected by two en-échelon fracture clusters, the first one being simply formed in mode 1 and cemented, the second one being polyphased (multiple reactivations, cementation and karstification phases). We performed a detailed structural and diagenetical characterization (fractures, karsts and stylolites digitalization on Gocad software; thin section and plug porosity), along with geochemical analyses of carbon and oxygen isotopes ratios on fracture fillings/cements and geophysical measurements at two scales. First, 1298 ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements using a piezoelectric source were performed on a rock block (2.4x1.5x1.1m parallelepiped sampled in the fault zone border), along a vertical cross section. Then, more than 200 seismic measurements using hammer source across the decameter scale outcrop. Source and receivers were precisely located using a LIDAR 3D model of the fault-zone outcrop. First key results from ultrasonic measurements show that the fracture diagenetical/temporal evolution induces an anisotropic Vp variation regarding the dip angle of the

  20. Application of electric and electromagnetic prospection methods for the investigation of geological fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, G.; Günther, T.; Musmann, P.; Grinat, M.

    2012-04-01

    Electric and electromagnetic prospection methods are applied in combination and investigated concerning their ability to image geological fault zones with depths up to a few km. Faults are prominent targets to explore because they bear possible flow paths for hydrothermal fluids. Therefore resistivity can become a valuable key parameter. Within the German Research Association gebo (Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling, www.gebo-nds.de) the electric/electromagnetic methods are operated alongside with the seismic exploration method. While seismic investigations yield information about the subsurface structure, electric and electromagnetic methods supplement these results with their ability to provide information about the resistivity distribution. Commonly used survey setups are analysed with respect to their investigation depth. Non-standard large-scale DC resistivity measurements in a dipole-dipole configuration energized by a high current source were applied in the field. Furthermore, Transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings with a high transmitter moment were carried out. The setup in the field was modified in order to reach greater investigation depths. The course of seismic reflectors was incorporated into the inversion of the DC resistivity data by structural constraints. Especially thin low-resistive layers, detected by a 1D interpretation of the TEM data show a correlation to the seismic reflectors. While the 2D DC results give information about the resistivity structure of the fault zone, layers of low resistivity that are poorly determined with the DC measurements can be observed with an adapted TEM survey setup. After an initial investigation of known shallow fault zones more emphasis will be attached to the exploration of deeper structures in the subsurface, significant for geothermal tasks. A concept for a suitable field survey design is under development, especially adapted to the specific geological features in the sedimentary basin of

  1. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as

  2. Measuring Transient Signals in Plate Boundary Faults Zones with Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, Dave; Phillips, David; Henderson, Brent; Gottlieb, Mike; Gallaher, Warren; Johnson, Wade; Pyatt, Chad; Van Boskirk, Elizabeth; Fox, Otina; Mattioli, Glen; Meertens, Chuck

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental goals the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Earthscope program was to provide a high-quality, continuous geodetic data set that would allow the scientific community to study the evolution of plate boundary zones. Of particular importance was enabling investigation of the role aseismic transient deformation plays in the release of accumulated stress. For example, to allow the comparison of the amount of strain released through Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events to that released in subduction zone earthquakes or, provide the ability to geodetically illuminate the kinematics of fault creep in strike-slip fault zones. The ability to easily integrate these measurements with compatible geophysical data sets was also an essential objective. With goals such as these in mind NSF funded the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to record the continuous deformation field across the western US Plate Boundary. PBO, built and operated by UNAVCO, now consists of over 1100 GPS stations, 76 co-located borehole strain and seismic sites, 6 long baseline strainmeters, Depending on the scientific questions being addressed sites may also have tiltmeter, meteorological, pore pressure and meteorological instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the transient deformation signals recorded by the PBO strainmeter network. PBO strainmeters, which excel in recording signals on the order of nanostrain over hours, have provided unprecedented temporal resolution of aseismic transients such as ETS events in the Cascadia subduction zone, creep signals along the central section of the San Andreas fault system and tsunami generated strain waves. UNAVCO is responsible not only for the ongoing operation of PBO but also the generation of data products associated with each instrument type. In this presentation we will highlight some of the transient signals these instruments have captured, outline the processing steps required to extract these signals data and

  3. More Evidence for Young Tectonism Along the Saline River Fault Zone, Southern Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, R. T.; Harris, J. B.; Hill, A. A.; Forman, S. L.; Gardner, C.; Csontos, R.

    2004-12-01

    Within the southern Mississippi embayment the 315-striking Saline River fault zone (SRFZ) was recently recognized from linear river segments, aligned epicenters, fault and fold exposures, sand blows, seismic reflection profiles, and trench investigations. In our latest work, shallow S-wave reflection profiles were acquired across the SRFZ within a sand blow field in Holocene alluvium at the southeastern limit of the mapped SRFZ. Along the central part of the SRFZ our field surveys of linear river segments subparallel to the SRFZ reveal that these segments are associated with faulting, fracturing, and folding of Eocene, late Pleistocene, and Holocene strata. In addition, we used logs of coal exploration holes to map shallow Eocene structure across the central SRFZ. In the SE of our study region, two S-wave reflection profiles (parallel and overlapping) were acquired along a 0.6 km N-S transect of the fault zone in NE Ashley County, AR. They reveal the SRFZ has a flower structure geometry with both positive and negative elements. The Eocene/Quaternary contact is clearly seen at 0.3 s (30 to 40 m depth). Several faults cut through the Quaternary section, and Quaternary and Eocene strata are folded harmonically. A fault in the overlap zone can be shown to strike 289 deg. New luminescence (IRSL) dates constrain a significant sand blow episode near this locality to between 7690 and 5725 yrs BP and a later significant episode to younger than 6845 yrs BP, consistent with previous results of middle to late Holocene sand venting here. In the central portion of the SRFZ, previous investigations of a linear river segment revealed a faulted anticline deforming alluvium younger than 720 years old. Our latest river surveys reveal that other linear river segments are associated with fractures and folds in Eocene substrate and young alluvium. Some oblique structures suggest a subsidiary strike-slip array. Shallow subsurface structure in Eocene strata mapped from coal exploration

  4. Subsurface geometry and evolution of the Seattle fault zone and the Seattle Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Molzer, P.C.; Fisher, M.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Bucknam, R.C.; Parsons, T.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Seattle fault, a large, seismically active, east-west-striking fault zone under Seattle, is the best-studied fault within the tectonically active Puget Lowland in western Washington, yet its subsurface geometry and evolution are not well constrained. We combine several analysis and modeling approaches to study the fault geometry and evolution, including depth-converted, deep-seismic-reflection images, P-wave-velocity field, gravity data, elastic modeling of shoreline uplift from a late Holocene earthquake, and kinematic fault restoration. We propose that the Seattle thrust or reverse fault is accompanied by a shallow, antithetic reverse fault that emerges south of the main fault. The wedge enclosed by the two faults is subject to an enhanced uplift, as indicated by the boxcar shape of the shoreline uplift from the last major earthquake on the fault zone. The Seattle Basin is interpreted as a flexural basin at the footwall of the Seattle fault zone. Basin stratigraphy and the regional tectonic history lead us to suggest that the Seattle fault zone initiated as a reverse fault during the middle Miocene, concurrently with changes in the regional stress field, to absorb some of the north-south shortening of the Cascadia forearc. Kingston Arch, 30 km north of the Seattle fault zone, is interpreted as a more recent disruption arising within the basin, probably due to the development of a blind reverse fault.

  5. Structure of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Sills, D. W.; Heron, B.; Almeida, R. V.; Guillemette, R. N.

    2010-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) provides a unique opportunity to characterize the deformation of sedimentary and crystalline rocks subjected to variable loading rates and chemically reactive fluids at seismogenic depths along an active continental transform fault. The spot core captured relatively undeformed host rock, highly fractured and sheared rock from within the fault zone, and gouge from two prominent zones of aseismic creep, the Southwestern Deforming Zone (SDZ), and the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ). Distinct structural units sampled from west to east, include: (i) deformed crystalline rock west of the active zone, (ii) a fault-bordering damage zone composed of two distinct, highly fractured and cemented arkosic sandstones, (iii) a fault core associated with the SDZ composed of foliated cataclasites, gouge, and variably sheared siltstones and shales, (iv) deformed siltstones and shales within the central portion of the low velocity zone, and (v) the gouge associated with the CDZ. We have characterized the structure and syndeformation-alteration reactions of these units through detailed mapping at the mesoscopic and microscopic scales, XCT imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and elemental mapping. The San Andreas Fault zone at SAFOD is a broad zone of damage containing multiple fault-cores that juxtapose distinct structural-petrologc units. Multiple episodes of fracture, chemically-assisted comminution, neomineralization, and fault healing through cementation are evident. The SDZ and CDZ are composed of distinct 1-3 m-thick layers of incohesive, foliated fault gouge containing survior clasts up to 4 cm in diameter. Deformation of the gouge is relatively homogeneous at mesoscopic scale, occurring by slip along penetrative anastomosing polished shears that often occur at the boundaries of the survivor clasts. We suggest that 1) the extremely low frictional strength of the gouge reflects slip in shears containing a significant fraction of

  6. Long-term Petrological Evolution of the Wenchuan and Beichuan Fault Zones (Longmen Shan, Sichuan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sigoyer, J.; Carrier, A.; Wu, X.; Billerot, A.; Robert, A.; Pubellier, M.

    2008-12-01

    The epicentre of the May 12 2008 (M7.9) Sichuan Earthquake seems to be near the junction between two main faults, the Wenchuan fault to the west and the Beichuan fault to the east. The rupture mainly propagated along the Beichuan fault over more than 250 km, with thrusting toward the East in the southern part becoming more dextral slip in the northern part. Displacement on the Wenchuan fault can not been excluded nevertheless. The structures of this area result from a polyphased evolution dating back from Triassic times. Particularly, intense deformation is concentrated around the Wenchuan shear zone, and was reactivated during Cenozoic times as a far effect of the Indian Asia collision. Our study was focussed on several sections across the Wenchuan and Beichuan fault zones to document their long term tectono- metamorphic evolution. Two cross sections across the Wenchuan fault were sampled, a southern one and northern one. The deformation to the south reflects southwest verging tranpressional movement, whereas strike slip movement dominated along the northern profile. The southern profile cross cut several slices in which a metamorphic gradient increasing from West to East. The largest and westermost slice consists of metabasic rocks, including metagrabbros, metabasalts and oceanic metasediments. Chemical analyses of the basic rocks show an adakitic signature. The PT estimations reveal that high pressure condition was reached for these rocks (~ 14 kbar). This slice may represented a former back arc unit having been subducted at great depth (45 km), and later exhumed along the Pengguan crystalline massif. Such gradient is not observed on the northern part of the Wenchuan fault where the temperature increases at constant depth. The age of the metamorphism is so far unknown. Hence, the metamorphic evolution of the northern Wenchuan is compatible with long term strike slip movement with little exhumation. The southern part exhumation from greater depth is evidenced

  7. The Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone: A component of upper plate extension of the subduction transform edge propagator fault linking Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J.; Aksu, A. E.; Elitez, I.; Yaltırak, C.; Çifçi, G.

    2014-11-01

    The Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, that mark the convergent boundary of the African and Aegean-Anatolian plates, are offset along a subduction transform edge propagator ('STEP') fault running NE-SW along the Pliny and Strabo Trenches. The continuation of the fault to the northeast through the Rhodes Basin and into SW Anatolia is assessed. Seismic reflection profiles show that the structural architecture of the northern sector of the Rhodes Basin includes a large crustal-scale fold-thrust belt which is overprinted by numerous faults with small extensional stratigraphic separations. A protracted episode of convergence in the Miocene resulted in the development of a prominent NE-SW-striking and NW-verging fold-thrust belt in the Rhodes Basin. The absence of evaporites in the Rhodes Basin and several seaward prograded vertically stacked Quaternary delta successions resting at 2500-3500 m water depth collectively suggest that the Rhodes Basin must have remained above the depositional base of marine evaporite environment during the Messinian and that the region must have subsided very rapidly during the Pliocene-Quaternary. During the Pliocene-Quaternary, a NE-SW-trending belt developed across the Rhodes Basin: while the structural framework of this belt was characterised by reactivated thrusts in the central portion of the basin, a prominent zone of NE-SW-striking and NW- and SE-dipping faults with extensional separations developed in the northern portion of the basin. Two seismic profiles running parallel to the present-day coastline provide the much needed linkage between the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone onland and the reactivated thrusts in central Rhodes Basin, and show that the Pliocene-Quaternary zone of high-angle faults with extensional separations clearly link with the similarly trending and dipping strike-slip faults onland in the Eşen Valley, thus providing the continuity between the Pliny-Strabo Trenches in the southwest and the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone in the

  8. Unraveling faulting in a complex earthquake sequence in the South Iceland Seismic Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decriem, J.; Arnadottir, T.; Geirsson, H.; Keiding, M.; Ofeigsson, B. G.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Lafemina, P.; Hooper, A.; Sigmunsson, F.; Bennett, R.

    2008-12-01

    The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is an E-W transform zone, where the relative spreading of the North American and Eurasian plates across southern Iceland is accommodated by motion on many parallel N-S right-lateral strike slip faults, rather than left-lateral motion on a single E-W through going fault. Historically, earthquake sequences with main shocks reaching M7 have occurred in the SISZ, many initiating in the eastern part of the zone with subsequent events further west. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake occurred in the western part of the SISZ on May29, 2008. Aftershock locations and global centroid-moment-tensor solutions indicate rupture on at least two parallel N-S faults. The rupture on the second fault, located about 4 km west of the initial event,appears to have initiated less than one second after the main shock,suggesting dynamic triggering. The May 2008 earthquakes are a continuation of the June 2000 sequence, when two Mw=6.5 events struck the eastern and central part of the SISZ. The June 2000 main shocks ruptured two parallel N-S faults, spaced about 17 km apart, occurring about 3 1/2 days apart. Here, we present a geodetic and seismic study of the May 2008 earthquakes based on continuous and annual GPS measurements, as well as InSAR and aftershock locations. The GPS network was surveyed in April, a month before the events and remeasured immediately after. Maximum coseismic displacements of about 15 cm (horizontal) were recorded at the closest continuous GPS stations on each side of the two faults. We also measured continuously at about 20 GPS benchmarks for more than a month after the event. A small transient (about 1 cm) was recorded during the first 10 days following the earthquake. This transient motion does not appear to be caused by poro-elastic rebound due to pressure changes in the ground water system, as was observed following the June 2000 earthquakes. The aftershocks lineate at least two N-S structures as well as an E-W conjugate fault

  9. Laboratory and Numerical Observations of the Spectrum of Fault Slip Behaviors: Implications for Fault Zone Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    Slow earthquakes, tectonic fault tremor and other modes of quasi-dynamic slip represent an important enigma. In the standard earthquake model, elastic energy is released catastrophically as the fault weakens and dynamic rupture expands at speeds measured in km/s. The spectral content of the resulting seismic waves is understood in terms of a source model based on elastodynamic rupture propagation. However, faults also fail in slow earthquakes and there is no such understanding of rupture dynamics, seismic spectra, or source scaling relations in these cases. The mechanics of slow earthquakes are poorly understood in part because there are few systematic laboratory observations that can be used to identify the underlying mechanics. Here, I summarize and discuss results from numerical models of slow slip using rate/state friction laws and recent lab studies showing slow slip and the full spectrum of stick-slip behaviors. Early lab studies saw slow slip during frictional sliding or in association with dehydration or ductile flow; however, they did not include systematic measurements that could be used to isolate the underlying mechanics. Numerical studies based on rate/state friction also document slow slip and chaotic forms of stick-slip, however they require special conditions including two state variable frictional behavior. Recent lab work sheds new light on slow earthquakes by showing: 1) that repetitive, slow stick-slip can occur if the fault friction-velocity relation becomes positive during slip acceleration, and 2) that slow slip and the full spectrum of fault slip modes can occur if loading stiffness k matches the fault zone critical rheologic stiffness kc given by the frictional weakening rate and the critical frictional distance. These data show that the key control parameter for stress drop, slip speed, and slip duration is the non dimensional stiffness k' = k/kc, with the spectrum of fast to slow slip mode occurring in a narrow range around k'=1. I

  10. Strike-Slip displacement along the Furnace Creek Fault Zone, southern Basins and Ranges, Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baucke, W.; Cemen, I.

    2007-12-01

    The southern Basins and Ranges contain several strike-slip fault zones in addition to predominant normal faults. One of the strike-slip faults is the Furnace Creek fault zone (FCFZ) which extends from the Amor¬gosa Valley in eastern California northwestward continuously about 200 km and termi¬nates in the Fish Lake Valley in Nevada. The fault zone is a part of the Eastern California Shear Zone. Although the right-lateral sense of strike-slip movement along the FCFZ is undisputed, the magnitude of displacement has been controversial since the 1970s. Recently, we have mapped conglomerates exposed in the Travertine point area of the Furnace Creek Wash of the Death Valley region. The conglomerates are composed of Paleozoic clasts from the following formations: Bonanza King, Nopah, Pogonip, Eureka Quartzite, Hidden Valley, and Ely Springs Dolomite. Our analysis of these breccias showed that they are made out of clasts of one composition and a matrix that was slightly different. This observation and our microscopic analysis suggest to us that these breccias were formed as fault breccias along the Furnace Creek fault zone. We have also mapped breccias in the Desolation Canyon on the southwestern side of the FCFZ where the Bonanza King Formation is brought into structural contact over the Ely Spring Dolomite and Eureka Quartzite suggesting the presence of a thrust fault. We correlate this thrust fault with a similar structural setting along the Clery Thrust of the southern Funeral Mountains on northeastern sides of the FCFZ where the Clery thrust brings the Cambrian Bonanza King Formation over the Eureka Quartzite and Ely Spring Dolomite in the southern Funeral Mountains. These observations suggest to us that the thrust fault in the Desolation Canyon area is the continuation of the Clery Thrust of the southern Funeral Mountains. If this interpretation is correct, the strike-slip displacement along the FCFZ is about 30 km.

  11. Electrical Structure of the Creeping San Andreas Fault at Hollister, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrosian, P. A.; Unsworth, M. J.; Egbert, G.; Thurber, C.

    2001-12-01

    Individual segments of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) exhibit markedly different patterns of seismicity ranging from locked to creeping. The factors controlling such variation are not well understood, but could include fault geometry, geology, and the presence or absence of fault-zone fluids. Magnetotelluric data have been used to image the geoelectric structure of the San Andreas Fault zone and surrounding areas in an attempt to understand the distribution and role of fault-zone fluids. Previous surveys have studied the locked Carrizo segment and the transitional Parkfield segment. This study has been extended to consider creeping segments of the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults. Magnetotelluric data were collected in 1999 along two profiles near Paicines and Bear Valley, with continuous coverage within 1-2 km of the faults. Robust time-series processing and a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm were employed to produce models of the electrical structure of the fault-zone. The features of the model required by the data include: 1) A highly resistive body southwest of the SAF, adjacent to the SAF with a near-vertical contact. This unit is coincident with the Gabilan granites. 2) A broad zone of enhanced electrical conductivity is imaged between the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults. Discrete shallow regions of high conductivity are coincident with the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults. 3) A prominent fault-zone conductor (FZC) is imaged down to at least 8 km depth. This zone has a (horizontally-integrated) conductance of 600 Siemens, similar in magnitude to that observed at Parkfield. The upper to mid-crustal depths of these conductive zones suggest that they are due to the presence of saline fluids, since nearby wells have encountered brines at depths of several hundred meters. Additionally, seismic tomographic studies image a zone of decreased Vp and enhanced Poisson's ratio which is essentially coincident with the imaged zone of high conductivity beneath the

  12. Seismic Structural Differences across the Norumbega Fault, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, P.; Menke, W. H.; Levin, V. L.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Norumbega fault zone crosses Southern Maine in a Southwest direction and represents the boundary between cratonic North America ('Laurentia') and an accreted microcontinent ('Avalonia'). The objective was to determine if a difference in the mantle or crust could be seismically detected across the fault. Secondly, if there was a difference observed was this difference caused or contained by the fault zone? To study this question seismic data was assembled from existing stations in Maine and Canada and new seismic stations placed in Maine in 2012 as part of the QMIII Project. Large (magnitude >6) teleseismic earthquakes that occurred to the north west of the fault zone were selected from the USGS Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) database. Rayleigh waves from pairs of stations on the north and south side of the fault were analyzed. For each pair a dispersion curve of phase velocities was created using an initial hand tuning followed by the Monte Carlo method. Dispersion curves for paths north of and south of the fault were grouped and averaged to obtain mean dispersion curves for the two regions. A simple three layer earth model (upper-crust, lower crust, mantle) was determined for the mean dispersion curves by forward modeling. Excellent fits were achieved and an exploration of possible combinations of parameters gave a sense of which model features were unique. The two regions have significantly different dispersion curves, implying some difference in structure. The compressional velocities for waves in the mantle observed in the northern pairs are faster than those for the pair of stations in the south. Compressional velocities for the upper part of the crust, possibly the upper ~7.5km, are slower in the northern stations than those in the south.The stations in the south are near the fault zones, but there are not yet stations as close to the fault in north. These stations would help to constrain wether or not the observed differences could be

  13. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic to seismic scale. They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data scale. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies, from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve structure within SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  14. Possible oil and gas traps related to a wrench-fault zone in Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Kilenyi, E.; Loerincz, K.; Kantor. I. )

    1991-08-01

    The Szolnok-Maramures flysch zone, penetrating deep into the Great Hungarian Plain, is an appendix of the inner Carpathian flysch. The biggest gas field of Hungary (found in 1960) is in this zone. Since 1960, the flysch zone was explored thoroughly but nothing comparable was found; however, most of the boreholes had some hydrocarbon indications. The Szolnok area represents the western termination of the flysch zone with some minor gas fields. From recent seismic data, the authors determined the dominant tectonic style of the extremely complex tectonic features: wrench faulting. In the presented seismic time sections, all possible hydrocarbon traps are in connection with strike-slip movement: (1) domes in upper Pannonian Pliocene clastic sediments (probability is low because of listric faults in the top zone); (2) channels in the lower Pannonian delta series (probability is higher but the danger of open listric fault still exists); (3) closed highs above the dome of positive flower structure of the fly, in the lower Pannonian marine sequence; (4) similar situation in Badenian-Sarmatian neritic to terrestrial sediments and volcanic-sedimentary formations (these last two represent most finds); and (5) the overthrust plane (terminating the flysch with crushed crystalline schists) and the Miocene sediments trapped beneath it while the two blocks of Mesozoic and Precambrian basement moved by, forming ideal trapping conditions for the hydrocarbons moved by, forming ideal trapping conditions for the hydrocarbons generated in the flysch and in older Mesozoic source rocks.

  15. Geophysical characterization of transtensional fault systems in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M.; Keranen, K. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Feldman, J. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) and Walker Lane belt (WL) accommodate ~25% of plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. Faults within the Mina deflection link the ECSZ and the WL, transferring strain from the Owens Valley and Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault systems to the transcurrent faults of the central Walker Lane. During the mid to late Miocene the majority of strain between these systems was transferred through the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain (SPLM) extensional complex via a shallowly dipping detachment. Strain transfer has since primarily migrated north to the Mina Deflection; however, high-angle faults bounding sedimentary basins and discrepancies between geodetic and geologic models indicate that the SPLM complex may still actively transfer a portion of the strain from the ECSZ to the WL on a younger set of faults. Establishing the pattern and amount of active strain transfer within the SPLM region is required for a full accounting of strain accommodation, and provides insight into strain partitioning at the basin scale within a broader transtensional zone. To map the active structures in and near Clayton Valley, within the SPLM region, we collected seismic reflection and refraction profiles and a dense grid of gravity readings that were merged with existing gravity data. The primary goals were to determine the geometry of the high-angle fault system, the amount and sense of offset along each fault set, connectivity of the faults, and the relationship of these faults to the Miocene detachment. Seismic reflection profiles imaged the high-angle basin-bounding normal faults and the detachment in both the footwall and hanging wall. The extensional basin is ~1 km deep, with a steep southeastern boundary, a gentle slope to the northwest, and a sharp boundary on the northwest side, suggestive of another fault system. Two subparallel dip-slip faults bound the southeast (deeper) basin margin with a large lateral velocity change (from ~2

  16. Internal Structure of a Strike-Slip Dilational Fault Jog: Overlander Fault, Mt Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Overlander Fault is one of a set of NE-SW subvertical dextral strike-slip faults which, together with a NW-SE conjugate sinistral set, disrupt the Mt Isa Proterozoic orogen (1590-1500 Ma) in NW Queensland, Australia. These late- to post-orogenic faults thus define a regional stress field with σ 1 oriented approximately E-W and σ 3 oriented approximately N-S. The Overlander Fault trends ˜060° across the metamorphic assemblage except where it refracts to 070-074° across an outcropping granitic pluton, the margins of which it offsets dextrally by ˜1.5 km. The stepover width of this dilational fault jog approaches 1 km, comparable to dilational stepovers within active strike-slip faults (e.g. the San Andreas fault at Parkfield). In the surrounding amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblage the fault trace is comparatively inconspicuous and unmineralized but where it crosses the granite it is defined by upstanding ridges of silicified microbreccia and associated quartz veining. The stepover region provides opportunities for studying incremental and finite dilatation associated with slip transfer across the jog, and associated influx of hydrothermal fluids. Shearing across the stepover region is accommodated by a mesh structure with principal components that include: (1) a series of silicified microbreccia-cataclasite `walls' <10 m or so thick with associated quartz veins <1 m or so thick trending 070° and defining a `main zone' about 100±20 m wide; (2) parallel subsidiary strike-slip cataclastic shear zones occurring <200 m laterally from the main zone; (3) a set of subvertical <1-2 m thick extension veins oriented 090-100° , some with evidence of marginal shearing (both sinistral and dextral); (4) a conspicuous sinistral extensional-shear curving eastwards for ˜250 m from the main fault core on a trend of 100-115° ; and (5) a set of unmineralized faults with sinistral separations trending 120-130° . Slickenfibers and striations along the main fault

  17. The Study of Crustal Heterogeneity in Ma River Fault Zone, Vietnam : An Application in Receiver Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. M. M.; Wen, S.; Tang, C. C.; Yeh, Y. L.; Toan, D. V.; Phong, L. H.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Indochina block is located at the junction of four plates, which are India, Eurasia, Philippine Sea and Pacific plates, and the geological evolution at this area is also complex. Due to the well-known Red River fault zone play an important role in the evolution of the escape of the Indochina block, the southern part of this fault zone also exist another boundary fault zone, which is called Ma river fault. This area still exists many unknowns in the tectonic evolution. Therefore, this study analyzes teleseismic receiver functions to determine the crustal structure along the Ma river fault, northern Vietnam. We have selected teleseismic events with Mw≥5, and epicenter distance is between 30° and 90° and a Multiple-Taper Correlation (MTC) method is adapted to calculate receiver functions (RFs) for each station. The converted phase, such as P-to-S obtained from RFs, allows us to have insights on the characteristics of crustal structures including the dip of discontinuous interface and anisotropy as well. The above properties have significant effects on amplitudes and arrival time of RFs. Thus, we use Neighborhood Algorithm applied to receiver functions computed from 5 stations has yielded optimum crustal models that include anisotropy and has minimum misfit between the observed RFs and synthetic ones. Our preliminary results indicate that the depth of the Moho discontinuity in the Ma river fault zone is between 25 km and 35 km, the range of S-wave velocity is from 3.6 km/s to 4.5 km/s, and the orientations of crustal anisotropy are related with the local stress status as well. In addition, the low-velocity zone in the lower crust is observed beneath our study area. We hypothesize that the low-velocity zone in the lower crust might be caused by rising of upper mantle, or an extension of the low-velocity zone in the lower crust which is observed beneath the southeastern Tibet and the South China block.

  18. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, D.; Butler, R. W. H.; Purves, S.; McArdle, N.; De Freslon, N.

    2016-08-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic (10 s m) to seismic scale (100 s m). They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  19. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three brittle strike-slip fault localities in coastal Maine have developed pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins and other reservoir structures in a variety of host rocks where the pre-existing layering can serve as a controlling fabric for brittle strike-slip reactivation. Host rocks with a poorly-oriented planar anisotropy at high angles to the shear direction will favor the development of R-shears in initial en echelon arrays as seen in the Two Lights and Richmond Island Fault Zones of Cape Elizabeth that cut gently-dipping phyllitic quartzites. These en echelon R-shears grow to through-going faults with the development of P-shear linkages across the dominantly contractional stepovers in the initial arrays. Pseudotachylyte on these faults is very localized, typically up to 1-2 mm in thickness and is restricted to through-going fault segments, P-shear linkages and some sidewall ripouts. Overall melt production is limited by the complex geometry of the multi-fault array. Host rocks with a favorably-oriented planar anisotropy for reactivation in brittle shear, however, preferentially develop a multitude of longer, non-coplanar layer-parallel fault segments. Pseudotachylyte in the newly-discovered Harbor Island Fault Zone in Muscongus Bay is developed within vertical bedding on regional upright folds with over 50 individual layer-parallel single-slip fault veins, some of which can be traced for over 40 meters along strike. Many faults show clear crosscuts of pre-existing quartz veins that indicate a range of coseismic displacements of 0.23-0.53 meters yielding fault vein widths of a few mm and dilatant reservoirs up to 2 cm thick. Both vertical and rare horizontal lateral injection veins can be found in the adjoining wall rock up to 0.7 cm thick and 80 cm in length. The structure of these faults is simple with minor development of splay faults, sidewall ripouts and strike-slip duplexes. The prominent vertical flow layering within the mylonite gneisses of

  20. Oceanic Transform Fault-Zone Geomorphology in the Gulf of California from High-Resolution Bathymetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, G. E.; Aron, F.; Baden, C. W.; Castillo, C. M.; Johnstone, S. A.; Nevitt, J. M.; McHargue, T.; Paull, C. K.; Sare, R.; Shumaker, L.; Young, H.

    2015-12-01

    We use high-resolution, deep-water bathymetry to examine the structure of, and offset along, transform faults in the Gulf of California. These data provide detailed observations of fault-zone geomorphology of an active transform fault hosted in an area transitioning from continental to oceanic crust. Bathymetric data were collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle deployed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in 2012. Dense ocean-bottom point clouds allowed construction of an ~1-m-resolution digital terrain model, which provides comparable spatial resolution to early airborne laser swath mapping surveys. The data reveal a set of complex, multi-stranded fault zones, whose morphologies suggest a temporal migration of deformation between individual strands contained within an up to 1 km wide zone, similar to complex fault zones observed within continental crust in subaerial environments. Individual fault strands show restraining steps that create positive relief along the ocean floor in their vicinity. Although the depositional nature of these deep-water systems makes identification of offset features challenging, we found a series of offset fans along a fault strand with consistent right-lateral offsets of 17-21 m. These are likely multi-event offsets, given the length of the transform segments and magnitudes of historically recorded earthquakes in the region. The consistency of these multi-event offsets suggests that an external process predating the displacement of the fans, such as seismic shaking due to large earthquakes, may be responsible for the synchroneity of these features. Our study demonstrates that the fault-zone geomorphology of oceanic transform faults in the Gulf of California bears resemblance to that of terrestrial strike-slip faults hosted in continental crust, and that high-resolution, deep water bathymetry can provide information about the earthquake history of these environments.

  1. Geomorphological analysis of the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone, Central Portugal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora-Catalan, Carolina; Besana-Ostman, Glenda; Vilanova, Susana; Fonseca, Joao; Pinto, Luis; Domingues, Ana; Narciso, Joao; Pinheiro, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    The Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ) is a northeast-southwest trending tectonic structure located within the Lower Tagus Valley (LTV), in central Portugal associated with at least two historical events: the 1909 Mw 6.0-6.2 Benavente earthquake and the 1531 Mw 6.9 earthquake. Recent investigations indicate that the relatively linear valley associated with the Lower Tagus River is controlled by active faults in varying geometry and slip rates. Based on mapped traces, LTVFZ is about 80 kilometers long and transects Miocene to late Quaternary deposit. The east and west strands of the fault zone may have different level of activity based on the variable clarity of mapped morphological expressions. In this work, new fault strands were identified using aerial photos on eastern side of LTV. These eastern faults has a trend that almost parallel those active traces previously mapped by Besana-Ostman et al., 2012 on the western side of the valley. The newly-mapped faults has left-lateral strike-slip movements and can be separated into two segments based on the kinematic indicators like offsets on river, ridges, and valley together with fluvial terraces displacements. Until this study, no Holocene fault scarps have been identified on the eastern portion of the LTV. Quaternary activity of faults can be assessed by the evaluation of morphometric indexes. In case of LTVFZ, the most characteristic landforms are fault-generated mountain fronts and valleys where the mountain front sinuosity index Smf is measured for fault activity evaluation. Through this morphometric index, mountain fronts are classified into Class I (Smf 1-1.4); active, Class II (Smf 1.4-2.5); intermediate, and Class III (Smf >2.5); inactive. In this paper, the Smf is calculated for the western and eastern sides of LTV as 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. These Smf values indicate that the western mountain front of the LTV corresponds to Class I while the eastern mountain front is Class II. However, considering the

  2. Evolution of elastic wave speed during shear-induced damage and healing within laboratory fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaproth, Bryan M.; Marone, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Earthquake faults fail and restrengthen repeatedly during the seismic cycle. Faults restrengthen via a set of processes known collectively as fault healing, which is well documented in the laboratory but less well understood in tectonic fault zones. Recent observations of fault zone wave speed following earthquakes suggest opportunities to connect laboratory and field observations of fault healing. However, existing laboratory data lack detail necessary to identify specific processes linking elastic wave speed to fault damage and healing. Here we document changes in elastic properties during laboratory seismic cycles, simulated via periods of nonshear and quasistatic fault slip. Experiments were conducted on brine-saturated halite under conditions favoring pressure solution, analogous to healing processes within and at the base of the seismogenic zone. We find that elastic wave speed (V) and amplitude (A) correlate with porosity. For each percent of porosity lost during compaction, VP increases by ~3%, VS by ~2%, AP by ~10%, and AS by ~7%. Moreover, V and A decrease with granular dilation during fault slip. With increasing shear strain, fabric formation dominates the ultrasonic signals. We find that fault strength depends on fault porosity, making VP and VS potential proxies for fault strength evolution. Our data show that a 1% change in VP or VS results in a friction increase of 0.01 or 0.02, respectively. Within natural fault zones, advances in monitoring elastic wave speed may provide critical information on the evolution of fault strength and seismic hazard throughout the seismic cycle.

  3. Fine-scale delineation of the location of and relative ground shaking within the San Andreas Fault zone at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Prentice, C.S.; Sickler, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is seismically retrofitting the water delivery system at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California, where the reservoir intake system crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF). The near-surface fault location and geometry are important considerations in the retrofit effort. Because the SAF trends through highly distorted Franciscan mélange and beneath much of the reservoir, the exact trace of the 1906 surface rupture is difficult to determine from surface mapping at San Andreas Lake. Based on surface mapping, it also is unclear if there are additional fault splays that extend northeast or southwest of the main surface rupture. To better understand the fault structure at San Andreas Lake, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a series of seismic imaging profiles across the SAF at San Andreas Lake in 2008, 2009, and 2011, when the lake level was near historical lows and the surface traces of the SAF were exposed for the first time in decades. We used multiple seismic methods to locate the main 1906 rupture zone and fault splays within about 100 meters northeast of the main rupture zone. Our seismic observations are internally consistent, and our seismic indicators of faulting generally correlate with fault locations inferred from surface mapping. We also tested the accuracy of our seismic methods by comparing our seismically located faults with surface ruptures mapped by Schussler (1906) immediately after the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake of approximate magnitude 7.9; our seismically determined fault locations were highly accurate. Near the reservoir intake facility at San Andreas Lake, our seismic data indicate the main 1906 surface rupture zone consists of at least three near-surface fault traces. Movement on multiple fault traces can have appreciable engineering significance because, unlike movement on a single strike-slip fault trace, differential movement on multiple fault traces may exert compressive and

  4. A geophysical investigation of shallow deformation along an anomalous section of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Stephenson, W.J.; Thompson, T.J.; Harper, M.P.; Eipert, A.A.; Hoopes, J.C.; Tingey, D.G.; Keach, R.W.; Okojie-Ayoro, A. O.; Gunderson, K.L.; Meirovitz, C.D.; Hicks, T.C.; Spencer, C.J.; Yaede, J.R.; Worley, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a geophysical study of the Wasatch fault zone near the Provo and Salt Lake City segment boundary. This area is anomalous because the fault zone strikes more east-west than north-south. Vibroseis was used to record a common mid-point (CMP) profile that provides information to depths of ???500 m. A tomographic velocity model, derived from first breaks, constrained source and receiver static corrections; this was required due to complex terrain and significant lateral velocity contrasts. The profile reveals an ???250-m-wide graben in the hanging wall of the main fault that is associated with both synthetic and antithetic faults. Faults defined by apparent reflector offsets propagate upward toward topographic gradients. Faults mapped from a nearby trench and the seismic profile also appear to correlate with topographic alignments on LiDAR gradient maps. The faults as measured in the trench show a wide range of apparent dips, 20??-90??, and appear to steepen with depth on the seismic section. Although the fault zone is likely composed of numerous small faults, the broad asymmetric structure in the hanging wall is fairly simple and dominated by two inward-facing ruptures. Our results indicate the feasibility of mapping fault zones in rugged terrain and complex near-surface geology using low-frequency vibroseis. Further, the integration of geologic mapping and seismic reflection can extend surface observations in areas where structural deformation is obscured by poorly stratified or otherwise unmappable deposits. Therefore, the vibroseis technique, when integrated with geological information, provides constraints for assessing geologic hazards in areas of potential development.

  5. Three dimensional elastoplastic response of compliant fault zones to nearby earthquakes: A theoretic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Duan, B.

    2012-12-01

    Response of compliant fault zone to the nearby dynamic rupture is detected by seismic and InSAR observations. Seismic observations of damage to the Landers fault zone by the Hector Mine earthquake suggest that response of fault zones can be inelastic. Recent two dimensional theoretical studies reveal that inelastic response of fault zones results in distinguished features in the surface residual displacement field that can be detected by InSAR images. In this study, we extend the recent theoretical studies to three dimensions, so that we may compare modeling results with InSAR observations in the future. We use a Drucker-Prager criterion to characterize elastoplastic response of rocks to nearby spontaneous dynamic rupture in an inhomogeneous medium that contains a compliant fault zone. A finite element method is used to simulate dynamic rupture and seismic wave propagations in the model. Preliminary results show that 1) depth dependence of plastic strain within the fault zone may have important effects on the surface deformation field, 2) plastic strain near the Earth's surface within the fault zone can occur in both extensional and compressive quadrants of the rupture, which is different from previous two dimensional studies, and 3) the vertical surface residual displacement is enhanced within the fault zone, while is reduced outside of the fault zone.

  6. From accommodation zones to metamorphic core complexes: Tracking the progressive development of major normal fault systems

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The along-strike dimension in rifted continental crust is critical to assessing models of continental extension because individual normal faults or fault systems can potentially be traced from their tips in accommodation zones to their culminations in metamorphic core complexes. Accommodation zones and the linkages between the zones and core complexes have not been thoroughly studied or incorporated extensively into models of continental extension. Regionally extensive, gently dipping normal faults (i.e., detachment faults) that surface in metamorphic core complexes terminate and flip polarity in accommodation zones. Diametrical lateral transport of upper-plate rocks in positively dipping detachment terranes should presumably induce strike-slip faulting on segments of accommodation zones paralleling the extension direction. Most accommodation zones correspond, however, to belts of intermeshing conjugate normal faults with little strike-slip faulting. Normal faults simply terminate along-strike in the zones with little, if any, transfer of slip to strike-slip faults. Decreases in cumulative strain within individual normal fault systems toward some accommodation zones cannot alone account for the lack of strike-slip faulting. These findings pose a serious challenge to generally accepted notions of large-magnitude, lateral motion of parts of detachment terranes. Large-scale lateral translations of rifted continental crust may be governed more by discrete axes of extension than by detachment geometries. The dovetail-like interfingering of conjugate normal fault systems and attendant tilt-block domains observed in some accommodation zones (e.g., Colorado River extensional corridor, US) does suggest, however, that at least some major normal faults projecting into the zones from metamorphic core complexes have listric geometries that flatten out at relatively shallow depths.

  7. Penetration of Meteoric Fluids to the Seismogenic Zone of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, C. D.; Cox, S.; Boyce, A. J.; Barrie, C. D.; Hathorne, E.; Teagle, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand marks the transpressional plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Rapid uplift (~10 mm/yr) on the Alpine Fault has elevated the regional geothermal gradient (>60 °C/km) that together with elevated topography drives geothermal fluid flow in the Southern Alps. Documenting the sources and evolution of fluids as they move through the crust provides insight into the depth of fluid circulation and how this may affect heat transport, crustal strength, and permeability in crustal scale fault zones. Here we compare the chemistry and stable (δD, δ13C, δ18O) and Sr isotopic composition of veins, that record different generations of fluid-rock interaction at a variety of crustal depths in the Plate Boundary Zone, with waters using from active warm springs in the Southern Alps. Vein stable isotope compositions require that meteoric waters are the dominant fluid component, with little evidence for upwelling fluids derived from metamorphic reactions. δD of veins formed from all levels are meteoric-like and provide evidence for the penetration of surface-derived fluids down to the Brittle-Plastic Transition (BPT) at >5 km depth. At shallow levels (<2 km) water/rock ratios are high and fluids retain meteoric δ18O signatures. Fluid chemistries calculated from vein analyses are similar to modern warm springs. At deeper crustal levels, down to the BPT, water/rock ratios are low and fluids have more extensively exchanged oxygen and trace elements with the host rocks. Results from the DFDP-1 stage of drilling through the Alpine Fault Zone have revealed that the Alpine Fault is a hydraulic seal at shallow depths (<140 m). Our study extends the knowledge of the Alpine Fault Zone permeability structure to seismogenic depths. 87Sr/86Sr of hangingwall veins that record fluid-rock interactions in the BPZ show no evidence for fluid exchange with highly radiogenic footwall rocks, indicating that the Alpine Fault is a

  8. Neogene Sequence Along the Eskişehir Fault Zone (EFZ), NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın Poşluk, Elif; Koral, Hayrettin

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the stratigraphy and structural features of Neogene units located in the Bozüyük (Bilecik) and Oklubalı (Eskişehir) area in southern Marmara, which lies on the collision zone between the Sakarya and Tauride-Anatolide blocks. Pre-Mesozoic marbles, schists and granodiorites, Mesozoic marbles, schists, ophiolitic units and limestones are basement rocks. Cover units include Neogene age formations. From the bottom to top, they are named the Porsuk Formation and the Akpınar Limestone, the İnönü Volcanics and the Ilıca Formation. Paleontological data which could yield a geological age have not been observed in fluvial sediments of the Porsuk Formation and lacustrine deposits of the Akpınar Limestone. The 40K/40Ar dating analyses on trachy-andesite of the overlying İnönü Volcanics have yielded middle Miocene ages (15.0-15.5 Ma), suggesting the underlying sedimentary units namely the Porsuk Formation and the Akpınar Limestone to be lower-middle Miocene in age. Fossils have been discovered in the lacustrine limestone of the Ilıca Formation in Oklubalı (İnönü-Eskişehir) village, and the age is determined to be lower Pliocene. The Eskişehir Fault Zone (EFZ) transects the Neogene formations and Quaternary sediments along an E-W'ly orientation. The Ormangüzle, Bozalan, Kandilli and İnönü Faults are segments observed from the west to east inside the Eskişehir Fault Zone. Some of these faults have NW-SE and others WNW-ESE orientations. The faults in NW-SE directions were effective for the formation of the Neogene sequence based on NE, SE and SW-oriented paleo-flow orientations and abrupt facies changes. The faults with WNW-ESE orientations, as noted in the Çukurhisar earthquake of February 2, 1956 (M=6.4), still keep their seismic activity and have a potential of producing earthquakes. Keywords: Neogene sediments, 40K/40Ar dating, the Eskişehir Fault Zone, active fault, Çukurhisar earthquake

  9. Preliminary models of normal fault development in subduction zones: lithospheric strength and outer rise deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, J. B.; Billen, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    A characteristic feature of global subduction zones is normal faulting in the outer rise region, which reflects flexure of the downgoing plate in response to the slab pull force. Variations in the patterns of outer rise normal faulting between different subduction zones likely reflects both the magnitude of flexural induced topography and the strength of the downgoing plate. In particular, the rheology of the uppermost oceanic lithosphere is likely to strongly control the faulting patterns, which have been well documented recently in both the Middle and South American trenches. These recent observations of outer rise faulting provide a unique opportunity to test different rheological models of the oceanic lithosphere using geodynamic numerical experiments. Here, we develop a new approach for modeling deformation in the outer rise and trench regions of downgoing slabs, and discuss preliminary 2-D numerical models examining the relationship between faulting patterns and the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere. To model viscous and brittle deformation within the oceanic lithosphere we use the CIG (Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics) finite element code Gale, which is designed to solve long-term tectonic problems. In order to resolve deformation features on geologically realistic scales (< 1 km), we model only the portion of the subduction system seaward of the trench. Horizontal and vertical stress boundary conditions on the side walls drive subduction and reflect, respectively, the ridge-push and slab-pull plate-driving forces. The initial viscosity structure of the oceanic lithosphere and underlying asthenosphere follow a composite viscosity law that takes into account both Newtonian and non-Newtonian deformation. The viscosity structure is consequently governed primarily by the strain rate and thermal structure, which follows a half-space cooling model. Modification of the viscosity structure and development of discrete shear zones occurs during yielding

  10. Geodetic Investigation of Compliant Fault Zones on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materna, K.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    At many places along the San Andreas Fault, geodetic and seismic studies have suggested the presence of near-field compliant fault zones (CFZs). These zones of damaged rock display reduced elastic moduli compared to intact rock, resulting in both higher geodetic strain rates and lower seismic velocities within the fault zones. In this study, we investigate the CFZ surrounding the San Andreas Fault in the San Francisco Peninsula by examining interseismic deformation over the past several decades. We use new and existing survey GPS measurements, as well as older electronic distance measurements, to characterize the deformation of the CFZ. The data come from networks at Black Mountain and Lake San Andreas, both small-aperture geodetic networks on the San Francisco Peninsula with survey GPS occupations spanning at least 15 years. We compare the inferred fault zone properties between the two networks, which are separated by less than 40 kilometers but which represent different geologic boundaries and show different fault ages. We also compare patterns in seismicity between the two regions. The differences in inferred fault parameters between these two regions may be related to differences in fault age and development, giving clues into how CFZs develop over time.

  11. Fault zone architecture, San Jacinto fault zone, southern California: evidence for focused fluid flow and heat transfer in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N.; Girty, G. H.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report results of a new study of the San Jacinto fault zone architecture in Horse Canyon, SW of Anza, California, where stream incision has exposed a near-continuous outcrop of the fault zone at ~0.4 km depth. The fault zone at this location consists of a fault core, transition zone, damage zone, and lithologically similar wall rocks. We collected and analyzed samples for their bulk and grain density, geochemical data, clay mineralogy, and textural and modal mineralogy. Progressive deformation within the fault zone is characterized by mode I cracking, subsequent shearing of already fractured rock, and cataclastic flow. Grain comminution advances towards the strongly indurated cataclasite fault core. Damage progression towards the core is accompanied by a decrease in bulk and grain density, and an increase in porosity and dilational volumetric strain. Palygorskite and mixed-layer illite/smectite clay minerals are present in the damage and transition zones and are the result of hydrolysis reactions. The estimated percentage of illite in illite/smectite increases towards the fault core where the illite/smectite to illite conversion is complete, suggesting elevated temperatures that may have reached 150°C. Chemical alteration and elemental mass changes are observed throughout the fault zone and are most pronounced in the fault core. We conclude that the observed chemical and mineralogical changes can only be produced by the interaction of fractured wall rocks and chemically active fluids that are mobilized through the fault zone by thermo-pressurization during and after seismic events. Based on the high element mobility and absence of illite/smectite in the fault core, we expect that greatest water/rock ratios occur within the fault core. These results indicate that hot pore fluids circulate upwards through the fractured fault core and into the surrounding damage zone. Though difficult to constrain, the site studied during this investigation may represent the top

  12. Fault zone characteristics and basin complexity in the southern Salton Trough, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persaud, Patricia; Ma, Yiran; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Fuis, Gary S.; Han, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing oblique slip at the Pacific–North America plate boundary in the Salton Trough produced the Imperial Valley (California, USA), a seismically active area with deformation distributed across a complex network of exposed and buried faults. To better understand the shallow crustal structure in this region and the connectivity of faults and seismicity lineaments, we used data primarily from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project to construct a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model down to 8 km depth and a velocity profile to 15 km depth, both at 1 km grid spacing. A VP = 5.65–5.85 km/s layer of possibly metamorphosed sediments within, and crystalline basement outside, the valley is locally as thick as 5 km, but is thickest and deepest in fault zones and near seismicity lineaments, suggesting a causative relationship between the low velocities and faulting. Both seismicity lineaments and surface faults control the structural architecture of the western part of the larger wedge-shaped basin, where two deep subbasins are located. We estimate basement depths, and show that high velocities at shallow depths and possible basement highs characterize the geothermal areas.

  13. Characterizing Fault Damage Zones in the Field and Laboratory; Scaling and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Armitage, P. J.; Blake, O. O.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault damage zones are a key component of faults as they control the fluid flow, rupture and seismological properties of faults. Fracturing around faults occurs on a range of scales, from small scale (microfracturing) to larger scale (macrofracturing), with varying intensities ranging from background levels to pervasive pulverization of the country rock. Fracturing generally results in permeability increases in crystalline rocks. Fracturing in the damage zone during earthquake rupture leads to energy loss, and pre-existing fracture damage and associated modifications of elastic properties may control rupture properties such as directivity. Despite their importance, the full characterization of the spatial extent of damage zones and their associated physical properties is still at an early stage. Recent field measurements of the width of damage zones suggest that they scale positively with fault displacement, although this relationship is masked by other parameters such as depth of faulting, lithology, mode of faulting and tectonic environment. The well-established exponential decay of fracture damage with distance from the fault likely relates to elastic decay of stress. Determining the physical properties of natural fault damage zones has proved problematic, as fault-related fractures in the damage zones are commonly modified by healing and sealing, and the rocks are generally affected by exhumation. Another approach is to mimic the level of fracture damage on the small scale in laboratory experiments on initially intact rocks. Here, experiments have been completed under triaxial stresses. Variably fractured samples are produced by stress cycling, and the seismic velocity, crack surface area and permeability have been measured. These physical properties can be mapped onto natural fault damage zones by relating the fracture damage in laboratory samples with that in natural faults. The results give insights into the transport properties of faults and the energy

  14. Relationship of the 1999 Hector Mine and 1992 Landers fault ruptures to offsets on neogene faults and distribution of late Cenozoic basins in the eastern California shear zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Langenheim, V.E.; Matti, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    This report examines the Hector Mine and Landers earthquakes in the broader context of faults and fault-related basins of the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). We compile new estimates of total strike-slip offset (horizontal separation) at nearly 30 fault sites based on offset magnetic anomaly pairs. We also present a map of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rock (thickness of basin-filling late Cenozoic deposits) for the region, based on an inversion of gravity and geologic data. Our estimates of total long-term strike-slip offsets on faults that slipped during the 1999 Hector Mine (3.4 km), and the 1992 Landers earthquakes (3.1 ? to 4.6 km) fall within the 3- to 5-km range of total strike-slip offset proposed for most faults of the western ECSZ. Faults having offsets as great as 20 km are present in the eastern part of the ECSZ. Although the Landers rupture followed sections of a number of faults that had been mapped as independent structures, the similarity in total strike-slip offset associated with these faults is compatible with one of the following hypotheses: (1) the Landers multistrand rupture is a typical event for this linked fault system or (2) this complex rupture path has acted as a coherent entity when viewed over some characteristic multiearthquake cycle. The second hypothesis implies that, for each cycle, slip associated with smaller earthquakes on individual fault segments integrates to a uniform slip over the length of the linked faults. With one exception, the region surrounding the Hector Mine and Landers ruptures is devoid of deep late Cenozoic basins. In particular, no deep basins are found immediately north of the Pinto Mountain fault, a place where a number of kinematic models for development of the ECSZ have predicted basins. In contrast, some basins exist near Barstow and along the eastern part of the ECSZ, where the model of Dokka et al. (1998) predicts basins.

  15. A mega-splay fault system and tsunami hazard in the southern Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Kun; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Doo, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Ching-Hui

    2013-01-01

    In April 1771, a subduction earthquake generated a great tsunami that struck the south Ryukyu islands and killed ˜12,000 people, whereas its mechanism is still enigmatic (Nakata and Kawana, 1995; Nakamura, 2006; Matsumoto et al., 2009). In this paper, we show its probable source on a mega-splay fault system existing along the southern Ryukyu forearc. Analyses of deep multi-channel seismic reflection profiles indicate that the mega-splay fault system is rising from the summit of a ˜1 km high ridge situated at a ˜5° landward dipping plate interface. An outer ridge marks the seafloor outcrop of the splay fault system and separates the landward inner wedge and the oceanward outer wedge. The inner wedge is uplifting and exhibits widespread normal faulting while the outer wedge shows folded structures. The mega-splay fault system is parallel to the Ryukyu Trench east of 125.5°E and is estimated to be ˜450 km long. The origin of this south Ryukyu mega-splay fault system is ascribed to a resistant subduction of the elevated transverse ridges associated with the subducting portion of the trench-parallel Luzon-Okinawa Fracture Zone. In contrast, no similar splay fault is found west of 125.5°E where the oblique subduction has produced large shear zones along the south Ryukyu forearc. We infer that a thrust earthquake linked to the mega-splay fault system is responsible for the south Ryukyu tsunami. However, another possible scenario of generating a large tsunami affecting the south Ryukyu islands is that the subducted ridge in the western end of the mega-splay fault system nucleated a large earthquake and simultaneously triggered the ˜100 km long E-W trending strike-slip fault west of 125.5°E and induced a southward-dipping tsunami-genic subsidence. In any case, after a quiescence of ˜241 yr, a large earthquake and tsunami is anticipated in the south Ryukyu forearc in the near future.

  16. Evidence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line 35 deg 30 min to 36 deg 30 min north latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic reconnaissance guided by analysis of ERTS-1 and Apollo-9 satellite imagery and intermediate scale photography from X-15 and U-2 aircraft has confirmed the presence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line, between 35 deg 30 min and 36 deg 30 min north latitude. The name Pahrump Fault Zone has been suggested for this feature after the valley in which it is best exposed. Field reconnaissance has indicated the existence of previously unreported faults cutting bedrock along range fronts, and displacing Tertiary and Quaternary basin sediments. Gravity data support the interpretation of regional structural discontinuity along this zone. Individual fault traces within the Pahrump Fault Zone form generally left-stepping en echelon patterns. These fault patterns, the apparent offset of a Laramide age thrust fault, and possible drag folding along a major fault break suggest a component of right lateral displacement. The trend and postulated movement of the Pahrump Fault Zone are similar to the adjacent Las Vegas Shear Zone and Death Valley-Furnace Creek Faults, which are parts of a regional strike slip system in the southern Basin-Range Province.

  17. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  18. Hydromechanical heterogeneities of a mature fault zone: impacts on fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluid flow is examined for a mature strike-slip fault zone with anisotropic permeability and internal heterogeneity. The hydraulic properties of the fault zone were first characterized in situ by microgeophysical (VP and σc ) and rock-quality measurements (Q-value) performed along a 50-m long profile perpendicular to the fault zone. Then, the local hydrogeological context of the fault was modified to conduct a water-injection test. The resulting fluid pressures and flow rates through the different fault-zone compartments were then analyzed with a two-phase fluid-flow numerical simulation. Fault hydraulic properties estimated from the injection test signals were compared to the properties estimated from the multiscale geological approach. We found that (1) the microgeophysical measurements that we made yield valuable information on the porosity and the specific storage coefficient within the fault zone and (2) the Q-value method highlights significant contrasts in permeability. Fault hydrodynamic behavior can be modeled by a permeability tensor rotation across the fault zone and by a storativity increase. The permeability tensor rotation is linked to the modification of the preexisting fracture properties and to the development of new fractures during the faulting process, whereas the storativity increase results from the development of micro- and macrofractures that lower the fault-zone stiffness and allows an increased extension of the pore space within the fault damage zone. Finally, heterogeneities internal to the fault zones create complex patterns of fluid flow that reflect the connections of paths with contrasting properties.

  19. Internal structure, fault rocks, and inferences regarding deformation, fluid flow, and mineralization in the seismogenic Stillwater normal fault, Dixie Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, J.S.; Bruhn, R.L.; Forster, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Outcrop mapping and fault-rock characterization of the Stillwater normal fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada are used to document and interpret ancient hydrothermal fluid flow and its possible relationship to seismic deformation. The fault zone is composed of distinct structural and hydrogeological components. Previous work on the fault rocks is extended to the map scale where a distinctive fault core shows a spectrum of different fault-related breccias. These include predominantly clast-supported breccias with angular clasts that are cut by zones containing breccias with rounded clasts that are also clast supported. These are further cut by breccias that are predominantly matrix supported with angular and rounded clasts. The fault-core breccias are surrounded by a heterogeneously fractured damage zone. Breccias are bounded between major, silicified slip surfaces, forming large pod-like structures, systematically oriented with long axes parallel to slip. Matrix-supported breccias have multiply brecciated, angular and rounded clasts revealing episodic deformation and fluid flow. These breccias have a quartz-rich matrix with microcrystalline anhedral, equant, and pervasively conformable mosaic texture. The breccia pods are interpreted to have formed by decompression boiling and rapid precipitation of hydrothermal fluids whose flow was induced by coseismic, hybrid dilatant-shear deformation and hydraulic connection to a geothermal reservoir. The addition of hydrothermal silica cement localized in the core at the map scale causes fault-zone widening, local sealing, and mechanical heterogeneities that impact the evolution of the fault zone throughout the seismic cycle. ?? 2010.

  20. Spatial Evolution of Neogene Normal Faults, Northern Owens Valley: Constraints on Oblique-slip Partioning Within the Eastern California Shear Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simple geometric constraints can be used to predict fault interaction at depth. Such interaction within crustal scale fault populations plays an important role in the tectonic evolution of extensional tectonic settings. Here we use a theoretical relationship between fault dip, horizontal fault spacing, and depth to the base of the seismogenic zone to explain the late Cenozoic temporal and spatial evolution of faulting within the Eastern California shear zone, including the northern extent of Owens Valley, California. Our results show that during its evolution, the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault in northern Owens Valley became inactive due to intersection with the larger west-dipping range-bounding fault of the White Mountains. The horizontal spacing of 10 km between these two conjugate faults is such that they intersect within the brittle seismic layer resulting in the locking of this segment of Sierra Nevada frontal fault. Continued accumulation of normal displacement along the White Mountains fault zone has since resulted in the present-day half-graben basement structure of northern Owens Valley. This down-dropping along the eastern margin of the valley imposes a flexural tension across the surface of the Coyote Warp, which can be considered a large relay zone between the Sierra Nevada frontal fault and the Round Valley fault further west. It is suggested that this tension is responsible for the formation of west-dipping antithetic normal faults that are distributed locally around the Coyote Warp. This extensional fault geometry has imposed a kinematic restraint on the development and distribution of right-lateral shear within this part of the Eastern California shear zone, including northeastward transfer of right-lateral slip from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault.

  1. Longriba fault zone in eastern Tibet: An important tectonic boundary marking the westernmost edge of the Yangtze block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Gao, Rui; Xu, Xiao; Keller, G. Randy; Yin, An; Xiong, Xiaosong

    2015-05-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements across eastern Tibet reveal a sharp velocity gradient zone located about 150 km west of the Longmen Shan frontal thrust zone, where eastward block motion of Tibet decreases from ~12 mm/yr to ~3 mm/yr over a distance of less than 10 km. In order to investigate the tectonic cause for this rapid change in GPS velocity, together with systematic review on the available geological and geophysical data in easternmost Tibet, we provide new constraints on the tectonic feature of the Longriba fault zone from Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data. We propose that the NE striking Longriba fault zone is the key structure responsible for the observed sharp gradient in GPS velocities. In addition, the evidence indicates that the Longriba fault zone, instead of the Longmen Shan fault zone, marks the westernmost edge of the Yangtze crustal block. Given the irregular western margin of the Yangtze block, the Longriba fault zone represents part of the actual tectonic boundary between the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and the Yangtze block. The newly identified western edge of the Yangtze block implies a paleocontinent-ocean boundary at depth. This boundary was a potential weak zone and may have been exploited during the formation of the Longriba fault zone. The results of this paper should advance our understanding of the tectonic relationship between the Songpan-Ganzi terrane and Yangtze block and provide additional constraints for studies of the geodynamic response of eastern Tibet to the ongoing India-Eurasia collision.

  2. Slip on 'Weak' Faults by the Rotation of Regional Stress in the Fracture Damage Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Healy, D.; Heap, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    The concept of stress rotation within fault zones is important in order to understand the strength of fault zones that are unfavourably oriented with respect to the remotely-applied driving stress. The San Andreas 'stress-heat flow paradox' and slip on low-angle normal faults imply that fault zone weakening must occur. Possible explanations for this weakening include weak fault materials, dynamic slip weakening and elevated pore fluid pressures. Stress rotation within the fault zone must accompany high pore fluid pressures, or effective σ3 will be pushed well into the tensile field, resulting in hydrofracture, pore fluid pressure loss and fault strengthening. Here we show from field observations of a major tectonic fault, laboratory experiments and numerical modelling, that stress rotation is significant within the fractured damage zone surrounding a fault. We characterize the microfracture damage surrounding a major strike-slip fault within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile, which shows an exponential decrease with distance from the fault core. We then relate the microfracture damage to changes in elastic properties as measured in laboratory experiments. The field and laboratory data are then used in a two-dimensional plane strain model to show how the remotely applied stress field is affected as the fault core is approached. We show that greatest principal stress orientations of 80° with respect to the fault plane can be rotated to less than 45° within the damage zone. The damage-induced change in elastic properties provide the necessary stress rotation to allow high pore pressure faulting, without resulting in hydrofracture.

  3. Hydrogeological properties of fault zones in a karstified carbonate aquifer (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, H.; Schröckenfuchs, T. C.; Decker, K.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a comparative, field-based hydrogeological characterization of exhumed, inactive fault zones in low-porosity Triassic dolostones and limestones of the Hochschwab massif, a carbonate unit of high economic importance supplying 60 % of the drinking water of Austria's capital, Vienna. Cataclastic rocks and sheared, strongly cemented breccias form low-permeability (<1 mD) domains along faults. Fractured rocks with fracture densities varying by a factor of 10 and fracture porosities varying by a factor of 3, and dilation breccias with average porosities >3 % and permeabilities >1,000 mD form high-permeability domains. With respect to fault-zone architecture and rock content, which is demonstrated to be different for dolostone and limestone, four types of faults are presented. Faults with single-stranded minor fault cores, faults with single-stranded permeable fault cores, and faults with multiple-stranded fault cores are seen as conduits. Faults with single-stranded impermeable fault cores are seen as conduit-barrier systems. Karstic carbonate dissolution occurs along fault cores in limestones and, to a lesser degree, dolostones and creates superposed high-permeability conduits. On a regional scale, faults of a particular deformation event have to be viewed as forming a network of flow conduits directing recharge more or less rapidly towards the water table and the springs. Sections of impermeable fault cores only very locally have the potential to create barriers.

  4. Mapping the geothermal potential of fault zones in the sedimentary basins of the Belgian and Netherlands border region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Sian; Pluymaekers, Maarten; Lagrou, David; Laenen, Ben; Doornenbal, Hans; De Boever, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Faults often determine the success or failure of low enthalpy geothermal projects. This is due to their prevalence throughout the subsurface and capacity to behave as significant fluid flow pathways or baffles (or both simultaneously). Here we present the methodology and results of an assessment of the capacity of faults in the Belgium and Netherlands border region to impact geothermal potential. This work was completed as part of a crossborder project in the European INTERREG Iva program Flanders-The Netherlands. The geothermal potential of reservoirs and fault zones was mapped across the Belgian provinces of Limburg and Antwerpen, and Dutch provinces of Limburg and Noord-Brabant. The Roer Valley Graben (RVG) and the Campine Basin are the main structural elements within this region. The four most significant reservoir intervals were correlated across the border. These comprise Upper Cretaceous chalk, Lower Triassic sandstones, Upper Carboniferous sandstones and Lower Carboniferous limestones. Mapped faults cutting these intervals were also correlated. Regional-scale maps have been created indicating the likelihood of fault zones to improve geothermal potential in these intervals. The capacity of faults to improve geothermal potential was determined from factors known to increase or decrease fault permeability. Lithology was a primary consideration: Carbonate rocks tend to fracture along fault zones, creating breccia or joints, resulting in an increased permeability. Permeability can be further increased by karst processes, as evidenced at the Venlo geothermal project, Netherlands. Therefore areas with faults in the carbonate reservoirs were considered to have possible potential. Conversely, permeability is likely to decrease in the clastic reservoir units as cataclastic processes dominate. Such faults were not considered to have additional geothermal potential. The timing of fault activity was considered another key variable. Recently deformed faults are more

  5. Concurrent Evolution of Structural Deformation and Carbonate Diagenesis within the Moab Fault, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, K. R.; Crider, J. G.; Huntington, K. W.; Luetkemeyer, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid-driven diagenetic processes within the fault damage zone drive direct feedbacks to mechanical and fluid-permeability properties of the host rock. Because these factors can be of great importance to fault seismicity and reservoir integrity, it is important to constrain their evolution over the lifespan of a fault zone. The Moab Fault, SE Utah, is a prime location to address these questions, representing an exhumed fault system offsetting a package of paleo-reservoir rocks. We return to a well-studied segment linkage zone, Courthouse Junction, building upon detailed earlier work. Here, the fault zone contains multiple phases of structural deformation, expressed as distinct structural elements. Associated carbonate mineralization provides a record of past fluid flow through the fault zone. Earlier bulk and clumped isotope measurements of the carbonate have demonstrated a range of isotopic compositions and precipitation temperatures. In this work, we apply new carbonate isotope and trace element geochemistry, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and fluid inclusion analysis to synthesize the structural and diagenetic histories of the Moab Fault. Carbonate trace element signatures and clumped isotope-based precipitation temperatures allow us to identify variability in parent fluid composition and characterize fluid sources, constraining migration pathways through the fault zone. Distinct phases of carbonate deposition display different cathodoluminescence, allowing us to observe their textural relationships to the host rock and each other, as well as constrain the relative timing of episodes of carbonate deposition and structural deformation. Taken together, these data provide new perspective into the co-evolution of permeability and structural deformation in the Moab Fault by connecting variability in fluid transmission and source to changes in the style of structural deformation.

  6. Wasatch fault zone, Utah - segmentation and history of Holocene earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Personius, Stephen F.; Nelson, Alan R.; Schwartz, David P.; Lund, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) forms the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range province and is the longest continuous, active normal fault (343 km) in the United States. It underlies an urban corridor of 1.6 million people (80% of Utah's population) representing the largest earthquake risk in the interior of the western United States. The authors have used paleoseismological data to identify 10 discrete segments of the WFZ. Five are active, medial segments with Holocene slip rates of 1-2 mm a-1, recurrence intervals of 2000-4000 years and average lengths of about 50 km. Five are less active, distal segments with mostly pre-Holocene surface ruptures, late Quaternary slip rates of <0.5 mm a-1, recurrence intervals of ???10,000 years and average lengths of about 20 km. Surface-faulting events on each of the medial segments of the WFZ formed 2-4-m-high scarps repeatedly during the Holocene. Paleoseismological records for the past 6000 years indicate that a major surface-rupturing earthquake has occurred along one of the medial segments about every 395 ?? 60 years. However, between about 400 and 1500 years ago, the WFZ experienced six major surface-rupturing events, an average of one event every 220 years, or about twice as often as expected from the 6000-year record. Evidence has been found that surface-rupturing events occurred on the WFZ during the past 400 years, a time period which is twice the average intracluster recurrence interval and equal to the average Holocene recurrence interval.

  7. Coupled fragmentation and silicification processes in fault zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, Alison; Seybold, Lina; Hobbs, Bruce; Kruhl, Jörn; Heuss, Soraya; Blenkinsop, Tom

    2015-04-01

    We explore some possible interactions of mechanical and chemical processes which may have led to the patterns of fragmentation and quartz precipitation observed at the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs. Seybold et al. (this session) describe features which indicate a multiphase fragmentation and quartz precipitation history of the Fountain Range Fault (Mt Isa Inlier, Australia). They infer that intense fragmentation, together with fluid infiltration and quartz crystallization in pore space, led to fine-grained cataclastic and silicified masses, followed by numerous events of quartz-vein formation and, again, cataclasis probably leading to flow of particle-fluid suspensions. They proposed the macro- and microstructures to reflect the interaction of repeated processes of fragmentation, fluid flux, quartz precipitation and cataclastic flow during the long-lasting history of the fault zone. We compare and contrast the patterns arising from the modelled interactions with the observed patterns in a quantitative manner through the application of wavelets. There are all sorts of wavelets, each useful for different patterns. The point is that all of them are localised wave packets of some kind the wavelet is scanned across the image with different magnifications and we look to see how closely the wavelet matches the image at a particular scale. It is a "fabric microscope" that enables one to zoom into the details of any deformation fabric and extract information on the ways in which the geometry of every part of the fabric scales with size. This enables a scalogram to be constructed and from that the singularity spectrum with its many measures of features of the geometry. The wavelet analysis enables us to compare in a quantitative manner the results of numerical modeling based on a coupled damage quartz precipitation model with field observations.

  8. Sintered cataclasite of the Archaean Pretorius fault zone, TauTona mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister, M. S.; Heesakkers, V.; Moore, K.; Campher, C.; Reches, Z.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the exposures of the Pretorius fault at depth of ~ 3.5 km in the TauTona gold mine, South Africa, as part of the NELSAM project (earthquakes.ou.edu). The Pretorius fault has been inactive since the Archaean and is a 10 km long fault with 30-60 m of throw and suspected horizontal slip of ~ 200 m (Heesakkers et al, this meeting). Its fault-zone is ~25 m wide with tens of cross-cutting segments that display one distinct fault-rock which was previously classified as a mylonite or pseudotachylite. We refer to this enigmatic rock as `sintered cataclasite', and we present here its structural and mineralogical characteristics and discuss possible mechanisms for its formation. The sintered cataclasite is a highly cohesive and massive rock that ranges in color from grey to green, which appears in veins along the fault segments. These veins range in thickness from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters, and are locally continuous for tens of meters. The veins vary significantly in thickness with common pinching out along a given host segment. Some of the cataclasite veins carry secondary injection veins that penetrated the host blocks at high angles to the segment surface. The sintered cataclasite is composed of a cohesive, fine-grain quartzitic matrix, with abundant angular to sub-rounded fractured quartz and opaque minerals clasts that are 0.01-0.5 m in size. Flow features can be identified in the sintered cataclasite by the presence of injection veins and wall-parallel flow banding. We did not find evidence for vein-parallel shear, e.g. rotated clasts, or evidence of large-scale melting, e.g. microlites or partially melted clasts (these rocks cannot be regarded as pseudotachylites). SEM image analysis revealed "hour glass" contacts between quartz grains that suggest sintering of a granular material after granulation. Multiple slip events were recognized in a few fault segments by the presence of cleavage with kinked micas and cross-cutting cataclasite

  9. A New Paradigm For Modeling Fault Zone Inelasticity: A Multiscale Continuum Framework Incorporating Spontaneous Localization and Grain Fragmentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The brittle portion of the crust contains structural features such as faults, jogs, joints, bends and cataclastic zones that span a wide range of length scales. These features may have a profound effect on earthquake nucleation, propagation and arrest. Incorporating these existing features in modeling and the ability to spontaneously generate new one in response to earthquake loading is crucial for predicting seismicity patterns, distribution of aftershocks and nucleation sites, earthquakes arrest mechanisms, and topological changes in the seismogenic zone structure. Here, we report on our efforts in modeling two important mechanisms contributing to the evolution of fault zone topology: (1) Grain comminution at the submeter scale, and (2) Secondary faulting/plasticity at the scale of few to hundreds of meters. We use the finite element software Abaqus to model the dynamic rupture. The constitutive response of the fault zone is modeled using the Shear Transformation Zone theory, a non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework for modeling plastic deformation and localization in amorphous materials such as fault gouge. The gouge layer is modeled as 2D plane strain region with a finite thickness and heterogeenous distribution of porosity. By coupling the amorphous gouge with the surrounding elastic bulk, the model introduces a set of novel features that go beyond the state of the art. These include: (1) self-consistent rate dependent plasticity with a physically-motivated set of internal variables, (2) non-locality that alleviates mesh dependence of shear band formation, (3) spontaneous evolution of fault roughness and its strike which affects ground motion generation and the local stress fields, and (4) spontaneous evolution of grain size and fault zone fabric.

  10. Size Dependent Fracture Energy; A Derivation from Hierarchical Fault Zone Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, K.

    2006-12-01

    The observations that the ratio of seismic radiation energy to seismic moment is nearly constant with about four orders deviations over the very wide range of seismic moment suggests that fracture energy G is nearly constant if stress drop also is constant. The values of fracture energy estimated from observations of earthquakes are the averaged one over the rupture surface concerned. However, fault zones are very heterogeneous and as well known, fault zones are composed of fault segments and fault jogs. Smaller segment-jog structures are nested in larger segment-jog structures, forming a hierarchical self-similar geometry (e.g. Otsuki and Dilov, 2005). We assume heare that a seismic rupture breaks a fault segment of a hierarchical rank in which segment-jog structures of lower ranks are nested, and that the fracture energy at jogs is much larger than the segments at a given hierarchical rank. Based on the geometrical relationships among the length, width and number of segments, and the length, width, thickness (step over distance) and number of jogs of a given hierarchical rank, we can formulate the fracture energy Gjog of a jog of a given hierarchical rank, as well as a mean fracture energy Gmean averaged over the rupture surface, as a function of these geometrical parameters and surface energy of rocks. A key point for estimation of G is the information on the microfracture distribution inside of jogs. I measured it for fault jogs formed during a rockburst in a South Africa gold mine (Gay and Ortlepp, 1979) and for small faults developed in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone (Ahlgren, 2001; Katz et al., 2004). Microfractures of these fault jogs show a clear nature of fractal with fractal dimension D close to 1.56 (2-D measurements). It is likely to be a universal constant for shock wave fracturing under the constrained boundary conditions. As a result, we obtained some conclusions that both Gmean and Gjog are proportional to the rupture length to the power of D-1, and

  11. KONOCTI BAY FAULT ZONE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA: A REEVALUATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    The Konocti Bay Fault Zone (KBFZ), initially regarded by some as a promising liquid-dominated hydrothermal system, has been a disappointment as a geothermal prospect. Five exploratory wells have been drilled in the vicinity of the KBFZ, but none of them are producing thermal fluids; in fact, three have been abandoned. This may be because hydrothermal fluid discharges along the KBFZ are low. The Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometers indicate that the waters discharging around Howard and Seigler Springs may have equilibrated at temperatures above 200 degree C. If boiling has occurred or is occurring, a chloride-enthalpy diagram may be appropriate. Such a diagram for the KBFZ shows that a water in excess of 250 degree C existed or may exist in the area. However, because currently measured temperatures rarely exceed 50 degree C and magnesium concentration in the water is high, very little deep high temperature water may be present. Refs.

  12. Tectonic evolution of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Insights from analogue experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Schreurs, Guido; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Álvarez-Gómez, José Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) is an active, c. 150 km long and 20 km wide segmented, dextral strike-slip fault zone within the El Salvador Volcanic Arc striking N90°-100°E. Although several studies have investigated the surface expression of the ESFZ, little is known about its structure at depth and its kinematic evolution. Our analysis of structural field data, remote sensing images and morphometric indices reveals a trenchward migration of the volcanic arc and furthermore suggests that not all structures within the ESFZ can be explained within the current tectonic context, but require a phase of extension or an extensional component of deformation at some stage in the evolution of the ESFZ. Such an extension and trenchward migration of the volcanic arc could be related to subduction roll-back of the Cocos Plate beneath the Chortis Block in Mio-Pliocene times. Such a possible evolution leads to open questions that we address in our research: Is the ESFZ a neo-formed fault zone, i.e. did it form during one phase of strike-slip or transtensional deformation, or do the structures in the ESFZ reflect a two-phase evolution, i.e. an early phase of extension overprinted by a later phase of strike-slip or transtension? Did subduction roll-back occur beneath El Salvador? We carried out analogue model experiments to test whether or not an early phase of extension is required to form the present-day fault pattern in the ESFZ. Analogue modeling is an effective tool in testing various hypotheses, as it allows the experimenter to control specific parameters and to test their influence on the resulting structures. Our experiments suggest that a two-phase tectonic evolution best explains the ESFZ: an early pure extensional phase linked to a segmented volcanic arc is necessary to form the main structures of the ESFZ and can explain the shallow geometry of the fault zone. This extensional phase is followed by a strike-slip dominated regime, which results in inter

  13. CO2/Brine transport into shallow aquifers along fault zones.

    PubMed

    Keating, Elizabeth H; Newell, Dennis L; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J W; Zyvoloski, G; Pawar, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Unintended release of CO(2) from carbon sequestration reservoirs poses a well-recognized risk to groundwater quality. Research has largely focused on in situ CO(2)-induced pH depression and subsequent trace metal mobilization. In this paper we focus on a second mechanism: upward intrusion of displaced brine or brackish-water into a shallow aquifer as a result of CO(2) injection. Studies of two natural analog sites provide insights into physical and chemical mechanisms controlling both brackish water and CO(2) intrusion into shallow aquifers along fault zones. At the Chimayó, New Mexico site, shallow groundwater near the fault is enriched in CO(2) and, in some places, salinity is significantly elevated. In contrast, at the Springerville, Arizona site CO(2) is leaking upward through brine aquifers but does not appear to be increasing salinity in the shallow aquifer. Using multiphase transport simulations we show conditions under which significant CO(2) can be transported through deep brine aquifers into shallow layers. Only a subset of these conditions favor entrainment of salinity into the shallow aquifer: high aspect-ratio leakage pathways and viscous coupling between the fluid phases. Recognition of the conditions under which salinity is favored to be cotransported with CO(2) into shallow aquifers will be important in environmental risk assessments. PMID:22799449

  14. The Augusta fault zone as a guide to Alleghanian extension in the Southern Appalachian Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, H.D. Jr. . Geography and Geology Dept.); Secor, D. Jr. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The South Carolina and Georgia eastern Piedmont is in part characterized by rocks of lower metamorphic grade and earlier cooling histories structurally overlying rocks of higher metamorphic grade and later cooling histories. Contacts between these metamorphic terranes are often composed of mylonitic rocks with synkinematic intrusives and compressed metamorphic gradients. A question can be raised as to the role extension played in development of these relationships. One example of such geologic setting is the Augusta fault zone (AFZ), exposed along the SC-GA border, where low grade Belair terrane metavolcanics and metasediments structurally overly migmatitic gneisses and schists of the Savannah R. terrane. Structures and geochronology, previously described, indicate a predominant hanging-wall down movement for the Augusta fault zone, circa and post 274 Ma. The late Alleghanian age is compatible with extension due to gravitational collapse, as described by others for the Himalayas and other orogens. Magmatism could be due to extensional unloading or could trigger collapse and extension by altering the crustal strength profile. As a relatively late Alleghanian feature the AFZ can be expected to truncate earlier faults. Using the AFZ as a guide, contacts with the following characteristics might be investigated for extensional kinematic indicators: (a) inferable crustal section omission with underlying deeper rocks, (b) presence of synkinematic planar intrusions, and (c) a linear aeromag anomaly signature, weaker where the contact is moderately to shallowly dipping. The Modoc fault zone, to the NW of the AFZ, has some of these attributes, and while predominantly dextral has an extensional component, but some 20--30 Ma before that on the AFZ. Speculatively, extension may have been episodic, potentially related to episodic magmatism.

  15. The Honey Lake fault zone, northeastern California: Its nature, age, and displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Grose, T.L.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Honey Lake fault zone of northeastern California is composed of en echelon, northwest trending faults that form the boundary between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin Ranges provinces. As such the Honey Lake fault zone can be considered part of the Sierra Nevada frontal fault system. It is also part of the Walker Lane of Nevada. Faults of the Honey Lake zone are vertical with right-lateral oblique displacements. The cumulative vertical component of displacement along the fault zone is on the order of 800 m and right-lateral displacement is at least 10 km (6 miles) but could be considerably more. Oligocene to Miocene (30 to 22 Ma) age rhyolite tuffs can be correlated across the zone, but mid-Miocene andesites do not appear to be correlative indicating the faulting began in early to mid-Miocene time. Volcanic rocks intruded along faults of the zone, dated at 16 to 8 Ma, further suggest that faulting in the Honey Lake zone was initiated during mid-Miocene time. Late Quaternary to Holocene activity is indicated by offset of the 12,000 year old Lake Lahontan high stand shoreline and the surface rupture associated with the 1950 Fort Sage earthquake.

  16. Imaging the Seattle Fault Zone with high-resolution seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Seattle fault, which trends east-west through the greater Seattle metropolitan area, is a thrust fault that, around 1100 years ago, produced a major earthquake believed to have had a magnitude greater than 7. We present the first high resolution image of the shallow P wave velocity variation across the fault zone obtained by tomographic inversion of first arrivals recorded on a seismic reflection profile shot through Puget Sound adjacent to Seattle. The velocity image shows that above 500 m depth the fault zone extending beneath Seattle comprises three distinct fault splays, the northernmost of which dips to the south at around 60??. The degree of uplift of Tertiary rocks within the fault zone suggests that the slip-rate along the northernmost splay during the Quaternary is 0.5 mm a-1, which is twice the average slip-rate of the Seattle fault over the last 40 Ma.

  17. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  18. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  19. Hydraulic characteristics of fault zones and their impact on groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, E.; Cook, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    An important source of groundwater recharge to sedimentary basin aquifers is from mountain block recharge and in many instances the rate and direction of groundwater flow is controlled by regional scale fault systems. Vertical faults may act as either barriers to horizontal groundwater flow perpendicular to the fault, conduits to horizontal flow along the fault or a combination of both. Faults can also provide conduits for vertical flow. There are very few evaluations of the impact of fault zones on groundwater flow. This study investigated groundwater flow characteristics across a fault zone between a fractured rock and sedimentary aquifer system. Hydrogeological and hydrogeophysical techniques were used to design a drilling program whereby multi-level observation wells were constructed at 3 field sites either side of the Willunga fault in the Willunga Basin, South Australia, up to 300 metres below ground level. The observed hydraulic gradients across the fault zone were very significant (2.5), with a head difference of 80 metres over a horizontal distance of less than 30 metres. Despite the high hydraulic gradient, calculating the groundwater flux across the fault was more complicated. A 3D numerical model was developed to determine the relative proportion of groundwater flow across the fault and flow parallel to the fault. This model was also used to assess the impact of the fault zone permeability on the hydraulic gradients across the fault and evaluate the mechanisms and behaviour of these conduit-barrier systems to groundwater flow. Groundwater age dating and hydrochemical analyses were conducted to examine and constrain the contributing end members of the different aquifer systems and trace groundwater movement and residence time across the fault zone.

  20. The Terminology of Fault Zones in the Brittle Regime: Making Field Observations More Useful to the End User

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipton, Z.; Caine, J. S.; Lunn, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Geologists are tiny creatures living on the 2-and-a-bit-D surface of a sphere who observe essentially 1D vanishingly small portions (boreholes, roadcuts, stream and beach sections) of complex, 4D tectonic-scale structures. Field observations of fault zones are essential to understand the processes of fault growth and to make predictions of fault zone mechanical and hydraulic properties at depth. Here, we argue that a failure of geologists to communicate their knowledge effectively to other scientists/engineers can lead to unrealistic assumptions being made about fault properties, and may result in poor economic performance and a lack of robustness in industrial safety cases. Fault zones are composed of many heterogeneously distributed deformation-related elements. Low permeability features include regions of intense grain-size reduction, pressure solution, cementation and shale smears. Other elements are likely to have enhanced permeability through fractures and breccias. Slip surfaces can have either enhanced or reduced permeability depending on whether they are open or closed, and the local stress state. The highly variable nature of 1) the architecture of faults and 2) the properties of deformation-related elements demonstrates that there are many factors controlling the evolution of fault zone internal structures (fault architecture). The aim of many field studies of faults is to provide data to constrain predictions at depth. For these data to be useful, pooling of data from multiple sites is usually necessary. This effort is frequently hampered by variability in the usage of fault terminologies. In addition, these terms are often used in ways as to make it easy for 'end-users' such as petroleum reservoir engineers, mining geologists, and seismologists to mis-interpret or over-simplify the implications of field studies. Field geologists are comfortable knowing that if you walk along strike or up dip of a fault zone you will find variations in fault rock type

  1. Geomorphic analysis of the Sierra Cabrera, an active pop-up in the constrictional domain of conjugate strike-slip faults: The Palomares and Polopos fault zones (eastern Betics, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, Flavio; Booth-Rea, G.; Martínez-Martínez, J. M.; Azañón, J. M.; Pérez-Peña, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    The NNE-SSW sinistral Palomares and the conjugate dextral WNW-ESE striking Polopos fault zones terminate in the Sierra Cabrera antiform. In order to test the Quaternary activity and topographic relief control in the termination of these fault zones, here we present new qualitative and quantitative geomorphic analyses supported by a new structural map of the region. The main mountain fronts of the Cabrera antiform are formed by the North and South Cabrera reverse faults that merge laterally into the Palomares and Polopos faults, respectively. These faults produce knickpoints, stream deflections, complex basin hypsometric curves, high SLk anomalies and highly eroded basins in their proximity. Furthermore, the drainage network shows an S-shaped pattern reflecting progressive anticlockwise rotation related to the sinistral Palomares fault zone. The estimated uplift rates determined by the integration between mountain front sinuosity index and valley floor width to height ratio are larger than those obtained for strike-slip faults in the eastern Betics. These larger uplift rates with our geomorphic and structural dataset indicate that the topographic relief of the Sierra Cabrera antiform is controlled by reverse faults that form a pop-up structure in the constrictional domain between the larger Palomares-Polopos conjugate strike-slip faults. Existing GPS geodetic data suggest that the North and South Cabrera reverse faults probably accommodate a large part of Africa-Iberia convergence in the region.

  2. Fault zone architecture of a major oblique-slip fault in the Rawil depression, Western Helvetic nappes, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, D.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The Helvetic nappes in the Swiss Alps form a classic fold-and-thrust belt related to overall NNW-directed transport. In western Switzerland, the plunge of nappe fold axes and the regional distribution of units define a broad depression, the Rawil depression, between the culminations of Aiguilles Rouge massif to the SW and Aar massif to the NE. A compilation of data from the literature establishes that, in addition to thrusts related to nappe stacking, the Rawil depression is cross-cut by four sets of brittle faults: (1) SW-NE striking normal faults that strike parallel to the regional fold axis trend, (2) NW-SE striking normal faults and joints that strike perpendicular to the regional fold axis trend, and (3) WNW-ESE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults as well as (4) WSW-ENE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults that both strike oblique to the regional fold axis trend. We studied in detail a beautifully exposed fault from set 3, the Rezli fault zone (RFZ) in the central Wildhorn nappe. The RFZ is a shallow to moderately-dipping (ca. 30-60˚) fault zone with an oblique-slip displacement vector, combining both dextral and normal components. It must have formed in approximately this orientation, because the local orientation of fold axes corresponds to the regional one, as does the generally vertical orientation of extensional joints and veins associated with the regional fault set 2. The fault zone crosscuts four different lithologies: limestone, intercalated marl and limestone, marl and sandstone, and it has a maximum horizontal dextral offset component of ~300 m and a maximum vertical normal offset component of ~200 m. Its internal architecture strongly depends on the lithology in which it developed. In the limestone, it consists of veins, stylolites, cataclasites and cemented gouge, in the intercalated marls and limestones of anastomosing shear zones, brittle fractures, veins and folds, in the marls of anastomosing shear zones, pressure

  3. Deep rock damage in the San Andreas Fault revealed by P- and S-type fault-zone-guided waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.; Malin, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Damage to fault-zone rocks during fault slip results in the formation of a channel of low seismic-wave velocities. Within such channels guided seismic waves, denoted by Fg, can propagate. Here we show with core samples, well logs and Fg-waves that such a channel is crossed by the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at a depth of 2.7 km near Parkfield, California, USA. This laterally extensive channel extends downwards to at least half way through the seismogenic crust, more than about 7 km. The channel supports not only the previously recognized Love-type- (FL) and Rayleigh-type- (FR) guided waves, but also a new fault-guided wave, which we name FF. As recorded 2.7 km underground, FF is normally dispersed, ends in an Airy phase, and arrives between the P- and S-waves. Modelling shows that FF travels as a leaky mode within the core of the fault zone. Combined with the drill core samples, well logs and the two other types of guided waves, FF at SAFOD reveals a zone of profound, deep, rock damage. Originating from damage accumulated over the recent history of fault movement, we suggest it is maintained either by fracturing near the slip surface of earthquakes, such as the 1857 Fort Tejon M 7.9, or is an unexplained part of the fault-creep process known to be active at this site.

  4. Davis Strait and Ungava Fault Zone: First Results From a Recent Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Gohl, K.; Neben, S.; Volkmar, D.; Funck, T.; Gerlings, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Davis Strait is a bathymetric high that separates the southern Baffin Bay and the northern Labrador Sea. These basins are the result of Cretaceous and Paleogene rifting and seafloor spreading between the North American plate and Greenland. Being one of the main tectonic features of the Davis Strait, the Ungava Fault Zone is associated with transform motion related to a northward movement of Greenland relative to North America during rifting and seafloor spreading in Baffin Bay and Labrador Sea. The plate tectonic reconstruction of the Davis Strait contributes significantly to the understanding of the geodynamic history of the North-American - Greenland plates, not only the Davis Strait area but also the area of Lancaster Sound and Nares Strait, where it could shed light into the so-called Nares Strait Conflict. It is still under debate whether the spreading between Greenland and Baffin Island was compensated by sinistral transform motion along the proposed Wegener-Fault. Thus Nares Strait (trace of the Wegener Fault) and Lancaster Sound (failed arm rift) are relicts of this scenario. The lack of evidence for transform motion between Greenland and Ellesmere Island contradicts this model and provokes the conflict. As major compression along the Eurekan Fold Belt overprinted the proposed transform motion along the Wegener Fault, the Ungava Fault Zone in the Davis Strait could give the missing information for the plate tectonic reconstruction. The onshore-offshore geology and structural setting of Baffin Island is analysed by recent publications that show an essentially non-volcanic continental margin at Baffin Island that is interrupted by a volcanic-style margin around Cape Dyer. Intensive magmatic activity during the initial opening phase is indicated by widespread seaward-dipping-reflector sequences (SDRS) north of Cape Dyer. On the other hand, the structural setting of the Greenland margin side is unclear. The identification of the corresponding conjugate

  5. The Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone and its associated geomorphic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Ferreira, H.; Falcão Flor, A. P.; Narciso, J.; Pinheiro, P.; Heleno, S.; Nemser, E. S.; Vilanova, S. P.; Fonseca, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Portugal and the SW Iberian region have experienced moderate to strong earthquakes in the past ( e.g. 1344, 1531, 1858, and 1909 events). These earthquakes are generally linked with the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTV) and its associated splays. However, despite major contention with respect to its activity, the LTV region is one of two regions identified in Portugal with the highest seismic hazard. Thus, to address the very important issues relating to the fault activity of the LTV, several studies were undertaken to identify and characterize the deformation related to this structure, specifically its location and geometry. To ascertain and establish the location of the LTV, topographic maps, aerial photos, and river systems were analyzed together with other remotely-sensed data coupled with numerous field mapping activities. Results from these efforts indicate recent faulting along the LTV with the trace located within the valley that transects major rivers, tributaries and young terraces. The mapped trace is generally very linear, steeply dipping with landforms indicative of left-lateral displacements. Identified geomorphic features include fault scarps, tectonic bulges & depressions and linear valleys. Other field activities include profile measurements across the fault and evaluation of any possible cumulative lateral displacements. Based on the strike changes along the approximately 85km trace under investigation, at least 2 segments have been identified. Thus, considering its location, strike, and sense of displacement, the newly-identified geomorphic features along the Lower Tagus floodplains may be the most probable active trace associated with the LTV. Trench excavations yielded at least one and possibly two earthquake events recorded in the stratigraphic deformations. The new information above about the LTV location together with its possible segments can be essential input for an improved seismic hazards assessment while the data about the extent of

  6. Tectonic controls on fault-zone permeability in a geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen; Zoback, Mark; Benoit, Richard

    1998-01-01

    To determine factors controlling permeability variations within and adjacent to a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada, we conducted borehole televiewer observations of wellbore failure (breakouts and cooling cracks) together with hydraulic fracturing stress measurements in six wells drilled into the Stillwater fault zone at depths of 2 to 3 km. Measurements in highly permeable wells penetrating the main geothermal reservoir indicate that the local orientation of the least horizontal principal stress, Shmin, is nearly optimal for normal faulting on the Stillwater fault. Hydraulic fracturing tests from these wells further show that the magnitude of Shmin is low enough to lead to frictional failure on the Stillwater and nearby subparallel faults, suggesting that fault slip is responsible for the high reservoir productivity. Similar measurements were conducted in two wells penetrating a relatively impermeable segment of the Stillwater fault zone, located approx. 8 and 20 km southwest of the geothermal reservoir (wells 66-21 and 45-14, respectively). The orientation of Shmin in well 66-21 is near optimal for normal faulting on the nearby Stillwater fault, but the magnitude of Shmin is too high to result in incipient frictional failure. In contrast, although the magnitude of Shmin in well 45-14 is low enough to lead to normal faulting on optimally oriented faults, the orientation of the Stillwater fault near this well is rotated by approx. 40?? from the optimal orientation for normal faulting. This misorientation, coupled with an apparent increase in the magnitude of the greatest horizontal principal stress in going from the producing to nonproducing wells, acts to inhibit frictional failure on the Stillwater fault zone in proximity to well 45-14. Taken together, data from the nonproducing and producing wells thus suggest that a necessary condition for high reservoir permeability is that the Stillwater fault zone be critically stressed for

  7. Faults and Shear Zones: Constraints on the Extrapolation of Laboratory Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresen, Georg; Bohnhoff, Marco; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Rybacki, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Geological structures and processes often show strong geometric and physical similarities if observed on different scales. Examples range from fractures, faults and shear zones to seismic characteristics such as b-value or seismic source properties. Laboratory tests on small-scale rock samples allow studying aspects of processes that govern earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation, strain localization in shear zones, and high-temperature rheology. However, upscaling of laboratory results to the field scale requires that dominant deformation processes remain the same on vastly different scales, and that potential effects of changing kinematic and thermodynamic boundary conditions may successfully be accounted for by appropriate constitutive equations. A key observational strategy relies on analysis of deformation processes on different scales. In this presentation we will illustrate the approach with two examples from very different geological environments: 1. Scaling of earthquake mechanisms observed in the laboratory, in mines and along major fault zones and 2. High-temperature creep processes governing the deformation in highly localized shear zones in the lower crust and upper mantle. Our results show that constitutive models capturing fundamental physical processes on the laboratory scale may be successfully applied to model deformation on the field scale.

  8. Fault segment linkage and growth of the Polopos transpressive fault zone and its influence on Pleistocene drainage captures (southeastern Betics).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, F.; Booth-Rea, G.; Martínez-Martínez, J. M.; Azañón, J. M.; Villegas, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Polopos fault zoneis a dextral-reverse fault-system that developed under Neogene to Quaternary N/S to NNW/SSE convergence between Africa and Iberia. This fault zone is formed by three main fault segments, the North and South Gafarillos dextral strike-slip faults, and the North Alhamilla reverse fault. The whole fault zone with an approximate length of 30 km has an E/W to ESE/WNW orientation and helicoidal geometry that permits the transfer of oblique SE-directed shortening in Sierra Cabrera to NW-directed shortening along the North Alhamilla reverse fault via vertical dextral Gafarillos fault segments, in between. The north Alhamilla reverse fault to the west of the system produces a fault-propagation fold in the hangingwall and an overturned fold in the footwall cutting through early Tortonian turbidites and folded Quaternary alluvial fans at the north Alhamilla mountain front. The Quaternary paleo-topographic surface formed by the alluvial fan has been displaced approximately 100 m by reverse faulting after 400 - 70 ky with a slip rate ranging between 0.25 and 1.4 mm yr-1. The South Gafarillos fault includes several N90°-110°E-striking segments with dextral and reverse-dextral kinematics. This fault cuts through the southeastern limb of the Alhamilla anticline by a fault segment that separates the basement from Messinian sediments, meanwhile other segments in the Nijar basin further south cut through Pleistocene river strath-terraces.. During the late Miocene the locus of dextral displacement occurred along the North Gafarillos fault segment that linked to a reverse fault segment at the northeast of the Sierra Alhamilla . The North Gafarillos fault segment and its associated mountain front was sealed by Messinian reefs. Since the Messinian, recent fault activity migrated towards the south forming the South Gafarillos fault segments. Fault segment migration displaced the active oblique strike-slip-related mountain fronts from the north towards the southeast

  9. Mountain front migration and drainage captures related to fault segment linkage and growth: The Polopos transpressive fault zone (southeastern Betics, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaconia, Flavio; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Martínez-Martínez, José Miguel; Azañón, José Miguel; Pérez-Romero, Joaquín; Villegas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The Polopos E-W- to ESE-WNW-oriented dextral-reverse fault zone is formed by the North Alhamilla reverse fault and the North and South Gafarillos dextral faults. It is a conjugate fault system of the sinistral NNE-SSW Palomares fault zone, active from the late most Tortonian (≈7 Ma) up to the late Pleistocene (≥70 ky) in the southeastern Betics. The helicoidal geometry of the fault zone permits to shift SE-directed movement along the South Cabrera reverse fault to NW-directed shortening along the North Alhamilla reverse fault via vertical Gafarillos fault segments, in between. Since the Messinian, fault activity migrated southwards forming the South Gafarillos fault and displacing the active fault-related mountain-front from the north to the south of Sierra de Polopos; whilst recent activity of the North Alhamilla reverse fault migrated westwards. The Polopos fault zone determined the differential uplift between the Sierra Alhamilla and the Tabernas-Sorbas basin promoting the middle Pleistocene capture that occurred in the southern margin of the Sorbas basin. Continued tectonic uplift of the Sierra Alhamilla-Polopos and Cabrera anticlinoria and local subsidence associated to the Palomares fault zone in the Vera basin promoted the headward erosion of the Aguas river drainage that captured the Sorbas basin during the late Pleistocene.

  10. Growth and linkage of the quaternary Ubrique Normal Fault Zone, Western Gibraltar Arc: role on the along-strike relief segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro; Balanya, Juan Carlos; Exposito, Inmaculada; Diaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Barcos, Leticia

    2015-04-01

    Strain partitioning modes within migrating orogenic arcs may result in arc-parallel stretching that produces along-strike structural and topographic discontinuities. In the Western Gibraltar Arc, arc-parallel stretching has operated from the Lower Miocene up to recent times. In this study, we have reviewed the Colmenar Fault, located at the SW end of the Subbetic ranges, previously interpreted as a Middle Miocene low-angle normal fault. Our results allow to identify younger normal fault segments, to analyse their kinematics, growth and segment linkage, and to discuss its role on the structural and relief drop at regional scale. The Colmenar Fault is folded by post-Serravallian NE-SW buckle folds. Both the SW-dipping fault surfaces and the SW-plunging fold axes contribute to the structural relief drop toward the SW. Nevertheless, at the NW tip of the Colmenar Fault, we have identified unfolded normal faults cutting quaternary soils. They are grouped into a N110˚E striking brittle deformation band 15km long and until 3km wide (hereafter Ubrique Normal Fault Zone; UNFZ). The UNFZ is divided into three sectors: (a) The western tip zone is formed by normal faults which usually dip to the SW and whose slip directions vary between N205˚E and N225˚E. These segments are linked to each other by left-lateral oblique faults interpreted as transfer faults. (b) The central part of the UNFZ is composed of a single N115˚E striking fault segment 2,4km long. Slip directions are around N190˚E and the estimated throw is 1,25km. The fault scarp is well-conserved reaching up to 400m in its central part and diminishing to 200m at both segment terminations. This fault segment is linked to the western tip by an overlap zone characterized by tilted blocks limited by high-angle NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE striking faults interpreted as "box faults" [1]. (c) The eastern tip zone is formed by fault segments with oblique slip which also contribute to the downthrown of the SW block. This kinematic

  11. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan Saul; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    ideas regarding the genetic processes associated with ore-deposit formation. The central part of the eastern Front Range has excellent exposures of fault zones and polymetallic fault veins, subsequently resulting in some of the most detailed mapping and associated data sets in the region. Thus, the area was chosen for detailed data compilation, new sample and data collection, and a variety of structural and geochemical analyses. The data presented in this report come from samples of fault-related exposures in the Front Range and include elemental chemistry and mineralogy from the outcrop-scale study localities within the larger CCAP study area.

  12. Preseismic, Postseismic and Slow Faultin