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Sample records for favors cold-adapted species

  1. Cold adaptations.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave

    2009-07-01

    Nowdays, occupational and recreational activities in cold environments are common. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses like changes of behaviour and physiological adjustments to maintain thermal balance either by increasing metabolic heat production by shivering and/or by decreasing heat losses consecutive to peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction. Those physiological responses present a great variability among individuals and depend mainly on biometrical characteristics, age, and general cold adaptation. During severe cold exposure, medical disorders may occur such as accidental hypothermia and/or freezing or non-freezing cold injuries. General cold adaptations have been qualitatively classified by Hammel and quantitatively by Savourey. This last classification takes into account the quantitative changes of the main cold reactions: higher or lower metabolic heat production, higher or lesser heat losses and finally the level of the core temperature observed at the end of a standardized exposure to cold. General cold adaptations observed previously in natives could also be developed in laboratory conditions by continuous or intermittent cold exposures. Beside general cold adaptation, local cold adaptation exists and is characterized by a lesser decrease of skin temperature, a more pronounced cold induced vasodilation, less pain and a higher manual dexterity. Adaptations to cold may reduce the occurrence of accidents and improve human performance as surviving in the cold. The present review describes both general and local cold adaptations in humans and how they are of interest for cold workers.

  2. Metabolic cold adaptation contributes little to the interspecific variation in metabolic rates of 65 species of Drosophilidae.

    PubMed

    Messamah, Branwen; Kellermann, Vanessa; Malte, Hans; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes

    2017-02-11

    Metabolic cold adaptation (MCA) is a controversial hypothesis suggesting that cold adapted species display an elevated metabolic rate (MR) compared to their warm climate relatives. Here we test for the presence of MCA in 65 species of drosophilid flies reared under common garden conditions. MR was measured at both 10 and 20°C for both sexes and data were analyzed in relation to the natural thermal environment of these species. We found considerable interspecific variation in MR ranging from 1.34 to 8.99µWmg(-1) at 10°C. As predicted by Bergmann's rule body mass of fly species correlated negatively with annual mean temperature (AMT), such that larger species were found in colder environments. Because larger flies have a higher total MR we found MR to vary with AMT, however, after inclusion of mass as a co-variate we found no significant effect of AMT. Furthermore, we did not find that thermal sensitivity of MR (Q10) varied with AMT. Based on this broad collection of species we therefore conclude that there is no adaptive pattern of metabolic cold adaptation within drosophilid species ranging from sub-arctic to tropical environments.

  3. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-01-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8–14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8–40%) accompanied by 5–14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella. PMID:26528838

  4. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-05-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8-14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8-40%) accompanied by 5-14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella.

  5. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  6. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  7. Testing phylogeographic hypotheses in a Euro-Siberian cold-adapted leaf beetle with coalescent simulations.

    PubMed

    Mardulyn, Patrick; Mikhailov, Yuri E; Pasteels, Jacques M

    2009-10-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the impact of Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the genetic diversity of cold-adapted species. We focus on the geographic distribution of genetic diversity in a Euro-Siberian boreo-montane leaf beetle, Gonioctena pallida. We present the molecular variation from three independent gene fragments over the entire geographic range of this insect. The observed sequence variation identifies a genetic diversity hot spot in the Carpathian Mountains, in central Europe, which reveals the presence of (1) an ancestral refuge population or (2) a secondary contact zone in this area. Modeling of population evolution in a coalescent framework allowed us to favor the ancestral refuge hypothesis. These analyses suggest that the Carpathian Mountains served as a refuge for G. pallida, whereas the rest of the species distribution, that spans a large portion of Europe and Asia, experienced a dramatic reduction in genetic variation probably associated to bottlenecks and/or founder events. We estimated the time of isolation of the ancestral refuge population, using an approximate Bayesian method, to be larger than 90,000 years. If true, the current pattern of genetic variation in this cold-adapted organism was shaped by a climatic event predating by far the end of the last ice age.

  8. Different types of cold adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Makinen, Tiina Maria

    2010-06-01

    Human adaptation to cold may occur through acclimatization or acclimation and includes genetic, physiologic, morphological or behavioural responses. It has been studied in indigenous populations, during polar or ski expeditions, sporting activities, military training, in urban people, or under controlled conditions involving exposures to cold air or water. Although divergent results exist between the studies, the main cold adaptation responses are either insulative (circulatory adjustments, increase of fat layer) or metabolic (shivering or nonshivering thermogenesis) and may be positive (enhanced) or negative (blunted). The pattern of cold adaptation is dependent on the type (air, water) and intensity (continuous, intermittent) of the cold exposure. In addition, several individual factors like age, sex, body composition, exercise, diet, fitness and health modify the responses to cold. Habituation of thermal sensations to cold develops first, followed by cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrinological responses. If the repeated cold stimulus is discontinued, adaptation will gradually disappear. The functional significance of physiological cold adaptation is unclear, and some of the responses can even be harmful and predispose to cold injuries. The article summarises recent research information concerning with the thermoregulatory responses related to repeated exposures to cold (air or water), and also discusses the determinants of cold adaptation, as well as its functional significance.

  9. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  10. Searching for signatures of cold adaptations in modern and archaic humans: hints from the brown adipose tissue genes.

    PubMed

    Sazzini, M; Schiavo, G; De Fanti, S; Martelli, P L; Casadio, R; Luiselli, D

    2014-09-01

    Adaptation to low temperatures has been reasonably developed in the human species during the colonization of the Eurasian landmass subsequent to Out of Africa migrations of anatomically modern humans. In addition to morphological and cultural changes, also metabolic ones are supposed to have favored human isolation from cold and body heat production and this can be hypothesized also for most Neandertal and at least for some Denisovan populations, which lived in geographical areas that strongly experienced the last glacial period. Modulation of non-shivering thermogenesis, for which adipocytes belonging to the brown adipose tissue are the most specialized cells, might have driven these metabolic adaptations. To perform an exploratory analysis aimed at looking into this hypothesis, variation at 28 genes involved in such functional pathway was investigated in modern populations from different climate zones, as well as in Neandertal and Denisovan genomes. Patterns of variation at the LEPR gene, strongly related to increased heat dissipation by mitochondria, appeared to have been shaped by positive selection in modern East Asians, but not in Europeans. Moreover, a single potentially cold-adapted LEPR allele, different from the supposed adaptive one identified in Homo sapiens, was found also in Neandertal and Denisovan genomes. These findings suggest that independent mechanisms for cold adaptations might have been developed in different non-African human groups, as well as that the evolution of possible enhanced thermal efficiency in Neandertals and in some Denisovan populations has plausibly entailed significant changes also in other functional pathways than in the examined one.

  11. [Cloning and expression of endoglucanase of marine cold-adapted bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1].

    PubMed

    You, Yin-wei; Wang, Tian-hong

    2005-02-01

    The cold-adapted gram-negative rod bacterium MB-1 which could secret cellulase was screened from mud of the bottom of the Huanghai. According to the sequence of 16S rDNA, this bacterium screened was identified as one species of Pseudoalteromonas and was named as Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1. The gene celA encoding cold-adapted endogluanase was cloned and then jointed to pGEX-4T-1 to construct expression plasmid pGEX-celA which was expressed in E. coli BL21. Analysis to the supernatant of E. coli sonicate revealed that the concentration of GST-CelA was about 78.5 mg/L. Properties of the fusion enzyme of GST-CelA including the optimum temperature at 35 degrees C and the optimum pH about 7.2, showed that this fusion enzyme still belonged to cold-adapted enzyme and neutral enzyme. The result lays solid base for the fundamental theory and application research on cold-adapted cellulase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. MB-1.

  12. Cold-adapted tubulins in the glacier ice worm, Mesenchytraeus solifugus.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Shain, Daniel H

    2008-11-01

    Glacier ice worms, Mesenchytraeus solifugus and related species, are the only known annelids that survive obligately in glacier ice and snow. One fundamental component of cold temperature adaptation is the ability to polymerize tubulin, which typically depolymerizes at low physiological temperatures (e.g., <10 degrees C) in most temperate species. In this study, we isolated two alpha-tubulin (Msalpha1, Msalpha2) and two beta-tubulin (Msbeta1, Msbeta2) subunits from an ice worm cDNA library, and compared their predicted amino acid sequences with homologues from other cold-adapted organisms (e.g., Antarctic fish, ciliate) in an effort to identify species-specific amino acid substitutions that contribute to cold temperature-dependent tubulin polymerization. Our comparisons and predicted protein structures suggest that ice worm-specific amino acid substitutions stabilize lateral contact associations, particularly between beta-tubulin protofilaments, but these substitutions occur at different positions in comparison with other cold-adapted tubulins. The ice worm tubulin gene family appears relatively small, comprising one primary alpha- and one primary beta-tubulin monomers, though minor isoforms and pseudogenes were identified. Our analyses suggest that variation occurs in the strategies (i.e., species-specific amino acid substitutions, gene number) by which cold-adapted taxa have evolved the ability to polymerize tubulin at low physiological temperatures.

  13. Could human cold adaptation decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Kralova Lesna, I; Rychlikova, J; Vavrova, L; Vybiral, S

    2015-08-01

    The impact of repeated exposure to cold and cold adaptation on human cardiovascular health is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of cold adaptation on cardiovascular risk factors, thyroid hormones and the capacity of humans to reset the damaging effect of oxidative stress. Ten well cold-adapted winter swimmers (CA) and 16 non-adapted controls (CON) were enroled in this experiment to test whether cold adaptation could influence the parameters of lipoprotein metabolism, cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC), homocysteine, thyroid hormones, antioxidant defence markers (reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1)) and oxidative stress markers (concentration of conjugated dienes (CD)). A decreased apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 (ApoB/ApoA1) ratio was found in the CA group (p<0.05), but other lipoprotein parameters, including CEC, did not differ significantly. Plasma homocysteine was lower in CA subjects in comparison with controls (p<0.05). Higher triiodothyronine (T3) values were observed in the CA compared to the CON (p<0.05) group, but TSH and other thyroid hormones did not differ between both groups. CA subjects had lower activity of GPX1 (p<0.05), lower concentrations of CD (p<0.05) and increased activities of PON1 (p<0.001) compared to CON subjects. A trend for decreased activity of CAT (p=0.06) in CA compared to CON groups was also observed, but GSH levels did not differ significantly. Zn concentration was higher in the CA group than in the CON group (p<0.001). Human cold adaptation can influence oxidative stress markers. Trends towards the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors in cold-adapted subjects also indicate the positive effect of cold adaptation on cardio-protective mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Genetic stability of cold-adapted influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, I V; Larionova, N V; Isakova, I N; Rudenko, L G

    2006-01-01

    The stability of cold adaptation, temperature-sensitivity, and marker mutations that are typical of attenuated influenza A and B viruses--master donor strains and their based reassortant vaccine strains was studied. After 5 sequential passages in chick embryos (CE) at resolving temperatures of 32 and 37 degrees C, the master donor strains and vaccine viruses retained their adaptability and temperature sensitive phenotype. Passage at the temperatures maximally permissible for viral reproduction (39 and 38 degrees C for influenza A and B viruses, respectively, aborted infection just during the second passage. After a series of passages at all study temperatures), there was neither loss or nor substitution of the marker mutations typical of the cold-adapted and temperature-sensitive phenotype of attenuated viruses. The study supports the high genetic stability of attenuated cold-adapted influenza A and B viruses during CE passage not only at the optimum, but also at elevated incubation temperatures.

  15. The spreading front of invasive species in favorable habitat or unfavorable habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chengxia; Lin, Zhigui; Zhang, Qunying

    2014-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity and habitat characteristic are shown to determine the asymptotic profile of the solution to a reaction-diffusion model with free boundary, which describes the moving front of the invasive species. A threshold value R0Fr(D,t) is introduced to determine the spreading and vanishing of the invasive species. We prove that if R0Fr(D,t0)⩾1 for some t0⩾0, the spreading must happen; while if R0Fr(D,0)<1, the spreading is also possible. Our results show that the species in the favorable habitat can establish itself if the diffusion is slow or the occupying habitat is large. In an unfavorable habitat, the species dies out if the initial value of the species is small. However, big initial number of the species is benefit for the species to survive. When the species spreads in the whole habitat, the asymptotic spreading speed is given. Some implications of these theoretical results are also discussed.

  16. Genomic and Expression Analyses of Cold-Adapted Microorganisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakermans, Corien; Bergholz, Peter W.; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Ayala-del-Río, Hector L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Contents 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Ecological evidence of bacterial adaptation to cold 7.2.1 Characteristics of cold environments and implications for microbial ecology 7.2.2 Ecological adaptation in Exiguobacterium spp. and Psychrobacter spp. 7.3 Gene Expression Responses to the Cold 7.3.1 Fundamentals of Gene Expression Responses to Cold 7.3.2 Acclimation for Life in Cold Habitats 7.3.2.1 Translation and Chaperone Proteins: Safeguarding the functional units of cellular physiology 7.3.2.2 Carbon and Energy metabolism: resource efficiency over long generation times 7.3.2.3 Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Species-specific responses to species-specific deficiencies 7.3.2.4 Compatible solutes: a concomitant response in cryoenvironments 7.3.2.5 Membrane fluidity: A major role in the overall metabolic rate at temperature 7.3.2.6 The cell wall at low temperature: A poorly understood growth rate determinant 7.3.2.7 Transporters: The balance between local nutrient uptake and depletion 7.3.2.8 Genome plasticity. The potential role of transposases and repeated sequences. 7.4 Protein adaptations to cold 7.4.1 The low temperature challenge 7.4.2 The stability activity relationship 7.4.3 Structural features of cold adapted enzymes. 7.4.4 Hydrophobic interactions 7.4.5 Electrostatic interactions 7.4.5.1 Arginine 7.4.5.2 Acidic residues 7.4.6 Structural elements 7.4.6.1 -helices and -sheets 7.4.6.2 Proline and Glycine 7.4.6.3 Disordered regions 7.5 Comparison of cold- and warm-adapted Exiguobacterium strains 7.5.1 Phylogeny reflects adaptations to environmental conditions 7.5.2 Genomic comparison of two strains 7.6 Summary and future directions

  17. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L.; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  18. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world's economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  19. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  20. Aquatic pollution may favor the success of the invasive species A. franciscana.

    PubMed

    Varó, I; Redón, S; Garcia-Roger, E M; Amat, F; Guinot, D; Serrano, R; Navarro, J C

    2015-04-01

    The genus Artemia consists of several bisexual and parthenogenetic sibling species. One of them, A. franciscana, originally restricted to the New World, becomes invasive when introduced into ecosystems out of its natural range of distribution. Invasiveness is anthropically favored by the use of cryptobiotic eggs in the aquaculture and pet trade. The mechanisms of out-competition of the autochthonous Artemia by the invader are still poorly understood. Ecological fitness may play a pivotal role, but other underlying biotic and abiotic factors may contribute. Since the presence of toxicants in hypersaline aquatic ecosystems has been documented, our aim here is to study the potential role of an organophosphate pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in a congeneric mechanism of competition between the bisexual A. franciscana (AF), and one of the Old World parthenogenetic siblings, A. parthenogenetica (PD). For this purpose we carried out life table experiments with both species, under different concentrations of the toxicant (0.1, 1 and 5μg/l), and analyzed the cholinesterase inhibition at different developmental stages. The results evidence that both, AF and PD, showed an elevated tolerance to high ranges of chlorpyrifos, but AF survived better and its fecundity was less affected by the exposure to the pesticide than that of PD. The higher fecundity of AF is a selective advantage in colonization processes leading to its establishment as NIS. Besides, under the potential selective pressure of abiotic factors, such as the presence of toxicants, its higher resistance in terms of survival and biological fitness also indicates out-competitive advantages.

  1. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-07-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal-fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  2. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia MA; S Junior, Policarpo A; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal–fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds. PMID:23702515

  3. Fire disturbance disrupts an acacia ant-plant mutualism in favor of a subordinate ant species.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Ryan L; Kimuyu, Duncan K; Ruiz Guajardo, Juan C; Veblen, Kari E; Riginos, Corinna; Young, Truman P

    2017-05-01

    Although disturbance theory has been recognized as a useful framework in examining the stability of ant-plant mutualisms, very few studies have examined the effects of fire disturbance on these mutualisms. In myrmecophyte-dominated savannas, fire and herbivory are key drivers that could influence ant-plant mutualisms by causing complete colony mortality and/or decreasing colony size, which potentially could alter dominance hierarchies if subordinate species are more fire resilient. We used a large-scale, replicated fire experiment to examine long-term effects of fire on acacia-ant community composition. To determine if fire shifted ant occupancy from a competitive dominant to a subordinate ant species, we surveyed the acacia-ant community in 6-7 yr old burn sites and examined how the spatial scale of these burns influenced ant community responses. We then used two short-term fire experiments to explore possible mechanisms for the shifts in community patterns observed. Because survival of ant colonies is largely dependent on their ability to detect and escape an approaching fire, we first tested the evacuation response of all four ant species when exposed to smoke (fire signal). Then to better understand how fire and its interaction with large mammal herbivory affect the density of ants per tree, we quantified ant worker density in small prescribed burns within herbivore exclusion plots. We found clear evidence suggesting that fire disturbance favored the subordinate ant Crematogaster nigriceps more than the dominant and strong mutualist ant C. mimosae, whereby C. nigriceps (1) was the only species to occupy a greater proportion of trees in 6-7 yr old burn sites compared to unburned sites, (2) had higher burn/unburn tree ratios with increasing burn size, and (3) evacuated significantly faster than C. mimosae in the presence of smoke. Fire and herbivory had opposite effects on ant density per meter of branch for both C. nigriceps and C. mimosae, with fire

  4. Metabolic cold adaptation in fishes occurs at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Alton, Lesley A; Frappell, Peter B

    2012-05-07

    Metabolic cold adaptation (MCA), the hypothesis that species from cold climates have relatively higher metabolic rates than those from warm climates, was first proposed nearly 100 years ago and remains one of the most controversial hypotheses in physiological ecology. In the present study, we test the MCA hypothesis in fishes at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme. In support of the MCA hypothesis, we find that when normalized to a common temperature, species with ranges that extend to high latitude (cooler climates) have high aerobic enzyme (citrate synthase) activity, high rates of mitochondrial respiration and high standard metabolic rates. Metabolic compensation for the global temperature gradient is not complete however, so when measured at their habitat temperature species from high latitude have lower absolute rates of metabolism than species from low latitudes. Evolutionary adaptation and thermal plasticity are therefore insufficient to completely overcome the acute thermodynamic effects of temperature, at least in fishes.

  5. Highly phosphorylated core oligosaccharide structures from cold-adapted Psychromonas arctica.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria M; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Lindner, Buko; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria L; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2008-01-01

    Many cold habitats contain plenty of microorganisms that represent the most abundant cold-adapted life forms on earth. These organisms have developed a wide range of adaptations that involve the cell wall of the microorganism. In particular, bacteria enhance the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids of membrane lipids to maintain the membrane fluidity, but very little is known about the adaptational changes in the structure of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the main constituent of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical structure of these LPSs for insight into the temperature-adaptation mechanism. For this objective, the cold-adapted Psychromonas arctica bacterium, which lives in the arctic sea-water near Spitzbergen (Svalbard islands, Arctic) was cultivated at 4 degrees C. The lipooligosaccharides (LOSs) were isolated and analysed by means of chemical analysis and electrospray ionisation high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The LOS was then degraded either by mild hydrazinolysis (O-deacylation) or with hot 4 M KOH (N-deacylation). Both products were investigated in detail by using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The core consists of a mixture of species that differ because of the presence of nonstoichiometric D-fructose and/or D-galacturonic acid units.

  6. The Antarctic Chlamydomonas raudensis: an emerging model for cold adaptation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Maxwell, Denis P; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2013-09-01

    Permanently cold habitats dominate our planet and psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in cold environments. Environmental adaptations unique to psychrophilic microorganisms have been thoroughly described; however, the vast majority of studies to date have focused on cold-adapted bacteria. The combination of low temperatures in the presence of light is one of the most damaging environmental stresses for a photosynthetic organism: in order to survive, photopsychrophiles (i.e. photosynthetic organisms adapted to low temperatures) balance temperature-independent reactions of light energy capture/transduction with downstream temperature-dependent metabolic processes such as carbon fixation. Here, we review research on photopsychrophiles with a focus on an emerging model organism, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241 (UWO241). UWO241 is a psychrophilic green algal species and is a member of the photosynthetic microbial eukaryote community that provides the majority of fixed carbon for ice-covered lake ecosystems located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The water column exerts a range of environmental stressors on the phytoplankton community that inhabits this aquatic ecosystem, including low temperatures, extreme shade of an unusual spectral range (blue-green), high salinity, nutrient deprivation and extremes in seasonal photoperiod. More than two decades of work on UWO241 have produced one of our most comprehensive views of environmental adaptation in a cold-adapted, photosynthetic microbial eukaryote.

  7. Intensive Selective Deer Browsing Favors Success of Asimina triloba (Paw Paw) a Native Tree Species

    Treesearch

    Mitchell A. Slater; Roger C. Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Although white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann) are generalist herbivores, they can have significant effects on species composition and abundance of forest trees, especially when deer densities are high and most plant species are heavily browsed but a few are selectively avoided as browse. We evaluated effects of selective deer...

  8. From genotype to phenotype: unraveling the complexities of cold adaptation in forest trees

    Treesearch

    Glenn T. Howe; Sally N. Aitken; David B. Neale; Kathleen D. Jermstad; Nicholas C. Wheeler; Tony H.H Chen

    2003-01-01

    Adaptation to winter cold in temperate and boreal trees involves complex genetic, physiological, and developmental processes. Genecological studies demonstrate the existence of steep genetic clines for cold adaptation traits in relation to environmental (mostly temperature related) gradients. Population differentiation is generally stronger for cold adaptation traits...

  9. Invasional meltdown in northern lakes: Common carp invasion favors non-native plant species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disturbances can lead to nonrandom changes in community composition due to interactions between the disturbance and the characteristics of species found in the community or available to colonize, producing both winners and losers of disturbance. When the disturbance is a biologic...

  10. Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus.

    PubMed

    Mock, Thomas; Otillar, Robert P; Strauss, Jan; McMullan, Mark; Paajanen, Pirita; Schmutz, Jeremy; Salamov, Asaf; Sanges, Remo; Toseland, Andrew; Ward, Ben J; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Maumus, Florian; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Wu, Taoyang; Barry, Kerrie W; Falciatore, Angela; Ferrante, Maria I; Fortunato, Antonio E; Glöckner, Gernot; Gruber, Ansgar; Hipkin, Rachel; Janech, Michael G; Kroth, Peter G; Leese, Florian; Lindquist, Erika A; Lyon, Barbara R; Martin, Joel; Mayer, Christoph; Parker, Micaela; Quesneville, Hadi; Raymond, James A; Uhlig, Christiane; Valas, Ruben E; Valentin, Klaus U; Worden, Alexandra Z; Armbrust, E Virginia; Clark, Matthew D; Bowler, Chris; Green, Beverley R; Moulton, Vincent; van Oosterhout, Cock; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2017-01-26

    The Southern Ocean houses a diverse and productive community of organisms. Unicellular eukaryotic diatoms are the main primary producers in this environment, where photosynthesis is limited by low concentrations of dissolved iron and large seasonal fluctuations in light, temperature and the extent of sea ice. How diatoms have adapted to this extreme environment is largely unknown. Here we present insights into the genome evolution of a cold-adapted diatom from the Southern Ocean, Fragilariopsis cylindrus, based on a comparison with temperate diatoms. We find that approximately 24.7 per cent of the diploid F. cylindrus genome consists of genetic loci with alleles that are highly divergent (15.1 megabases of the total genome size of 61.1 megabases). These divergent alleles were differentially expressed across environmental conditions, including darkness, low iron, freezing, elevated temperature and increased CO2. Alleles with the largest ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions also show the most pronounced condition-dependent expression, suggesting a correlation between diversifying selection and allelic differentiation. Divergent alleles may be involved in adaptation to environmental fluctuations in the Southern Ocean.

  11. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  12. [New cold-adapted donor strains for live influenza vaccine].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z; Markushin, S G; Tsfasman, T M; Akopova, I I; Akhmatova, N K; Koptiaeva, I B

    2013-01-01

    Cold-adapted (CA) strains A/Krasnodar/35 and B/Victoria/63 were isolated using passages of A/Krasnodar/101/59 and B/Victoria/2/87 wild type strains at low temperatures. The resulting CA strains possessed TS and CA phenotypes and had a reduced ability to reproduce in mouse lungs and nasal turbinates. They displayed a high protective efficacy in experiments on mice. The two CA strains reproduced well in chick embryos and MDCK cell line without change of TS and CA markers. The CA A/Krasnodar/35 strain during passages at low temperature acquired 13 mutations in the 6 internal genes, 8 of those mutations led to amino acid changes. The CA B/Victoria/63 strain acquired 8 mutations in the internal genes, 6 of which led to amino acid changes. The intranasal vaccination of mice with the CA A/Krasnodar/35 strain led to a transitory suppression of various lymphocyte subpopulations, as well as to an increase in the number of some other cell types. The CA strains in question may be used in the future as attenuation donors for live influenza vaccines.

  13. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; Codd, Rachel

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  14. [Selection and Identification of the Biological Characteristics of a Cold-adapted Genotype G1P[8] ZTR-68 Rotavirus by Serial Cold-adapted Passaging].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Mi, Kai; Ye, Jing; Niu, Xianglian; Sun, Xiaoqin; Yi, Shan; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2015-09-01

    We wished to select a cold-adapted genotype G1P[8] ZTR-68 rotavirus (China southwest strain) in MA104 cells for possible use as a live vaccine. ZTR-68 was recovered originally from children with diarrhea. The virus was cultivated at 37 degrees C at the first passage. Then, the cultivation temperature was decreased stepwise by 3 degrees C per eight passages. In total, the virus was passaged 32 times, and cultivation was terminated at 28 degrees C. Biological characteristics of the virus were analyzed during serial passages. There was no difference between the migration patterns of genomic dsRNA segments according to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of original and cold-adapted viruses. Infectious and red cell-agglutination titers of cold-adapted virus were lower than those of the parent virus. Also, the virus formed small-size plaques with irregular shapes at 31 degrees C and 28 degrees C. These results suggested that a genetically stable attenuated virus can be obtained through serial cold-adapted passages. Thus, an alternative strategy is provided by cold-adaption for development of attenuated live rotavirus vaccines.

  15. Plant water use affects competition for nitrogen: why drought favors invasive species in California.

    PubMed

    Everard, Katherine; Seabloom, Eric W; Harpole, W Stanley; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Classic resource competition theory typically treats resource supply rates as independent; however, nutrient supplies can be affected by plants indirectly, with important consequences for model predictions. We demonstrate this general phenomenon by using a model in which competition for nitrogen is mediated by soil moisture, with competitive outcomes including coexistence and multiple stable states as well as competitive exclusion. In the model, soil moisture regulates nitrogen availability through soil moisture dependence of microbial processes, leaching, and plant uptake. By affecting water availability, plants also indirectly affect nitrogen availability and may therefore alter the competitive outcome. Exotic annual species from the Mediterranean have displaced much of the native perennial grasses in California. Nitrogen and water have been shown to be potentially limiting in this system. We parameterize the model for a Californian grassland and show that soil moisture-mediated competition for nitrogen can explain the annual species' dominance in drier areas, with coexistence expected in wetter regions. These results are concordant with larger biogeographic patterns of grassland invasion in the Pacific states of the United States, in which annual grasses have invaded most of the hot, dry grasslands in California but perennial grasses dominate the moister prairies of northern California, Oregon, and Washington.

  16. [Live cold-adapted influenza vaccine: state-of-the-art].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z

    2011-01-01

    The review characterizes the currently used cold-adapted donor strains of influenza virus attenuation to prepare cold-adapted reassortants with actual epidemic influenza virus strains. It considers new procedures for preparing attenuated influenza virus strains for live influenza vaccines, as well as analytical methods and the genome composition of reassortants. Recent data on the safety of live cold-adapted influenza vaccines (LCAIVs), including those on the genetic stability of vaccine reassortants and the immunogenicity and efficacy of these vaccines for different age groups, are discussed. There is evidence for the design of live human vaccines against avian influenza. It is concluded that LCAIVs are highly effective for immunization of children.

  17. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation. PMID:27482926

  18. Cold-adapted poliovirus mutants bypass a postentry replication block.

    PubMed

    Dove, A W; Racaniello, V R

    1997-06-01

    In the current model of poliovirus entry, the initial interaction of the native virion with its cellular receptor is followed by a transition to an altered form, which then acts as an intermediate in viral entry. While the native virion sediments at 160S in a sucrose gradient, the altered particle sediments at 135S, has lost the coat protein VP4, and has become more hydrophobic. Altered particles can be found both associated with cells and in the culture medium. It has been hypothesized that the cell-associated 135S particle releases the viral genome into the cell cytoplasm and that nonproductive transitions to the 135S form are responsible for the high particle-to-PFU ratio observed for polioviruses. At 25 degrees C, a temperature at which the transition to 135S particles does not occur, the P1/Mahoney strain of poliovirus was unable to replicate, and cold-adapted (ca) mutants were selected from the population. These mutants have not gained the ability to convert to 135S particles at 25 degrees C, and the block to wild-type (wt) infection at low temperatures is not at the level of cellular entry. The particle-to-PFU ratio of poliovirus does not change at 25 degrees C in the absence of alteration. Three independent amino acid changes in the 2C coding region were identified in ca mutants, at positions 218 (Val to Ile), 241 (Arg to Ala), and 309 (Met to Val). Introduction of any of these mutations individually into wt poliovirus by site-directed mutagenesis confers the ca phenotype. All three serotypes of the Sabin vaccine strains and the P3/Leon strain of poliovirus also exhibit the ca phenotype. These results do not support a model of poliovirus entry into cells that includes an obligatory transition to the 135S particle.

  19. Cold adaptation regulated by cryptic prophage excision in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Li, Baiyuan; Li, Yangmei; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-12-01

    Among the environmental stresses experienced by bacteria, temperature shifts are one of the most important. In this study, we discovered a novel cold adaptation mechanism in Shewanella oneidensis that occurs at the DNA level and is regulated by cryptic prophage excision. Previous studies on bacterial cold tolerance mainly focus on the structural change of cell membrane and changes at the RNA and protein levels. Whether or not genomic change can also contribute to this process has not been explored. Here we employed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method to probe the changes at DNA level in a model psychrotrophic bacteria strain. We found that temperature downshift induced a 10 000-fold increase of the excision of a novel P4-like cryptic prophage. Importantly, although prophage excision only occurred in a relatively small population of bacteria, it was able to facilitate biofilm formation and promote the survival of the entire population. This prophage excision affected cell physiology by disrupting a critical gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In addition, we found that the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) could silence prophage excision via binding to the promoter of the putative excisionase gene at warm temperatures. H-NS level was reduced at cold temperatures, leading to de-repression of prophage excision. Collectively, our results reveal that cryptic prophage excision acts as a regulatory switch to enable the survival of the host at low temperature by controlling the activity of tmRNA and biofilm formation.

  20. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    PubMed

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9-29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1-34.5 °C). In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87) than I. galani (0.80). Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards.

  1. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    PubMed Central

    Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9–29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1–34.5 °C). In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87) than I. galani (0.80). Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards. PMID:27280076

  2. Comparative genomics of the marine bacterial genus Glaciecola reveals the high degree of genomic diversity and genomic characteristic for cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qi-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yu, Yong; Shu, Yan-Li; Rong, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Zhao, Dian-Li; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-06-01

    To what extent the genomes of different species belonging to one genus can be diverse and the relationship between genomic differentiation and environmental factor remain unclear for oceanic bacteria. With many new bacterial genera and species being isolated from marine environments, this question warrants attention. In this study, we sequenced all the type strains of the published species of Glaciecola, a recently defined cold-adapted genus with species from diverse marine locations, to study the genomic diversity and cold-adaptation strategy in this genus.The genome size diverged widely from 3.08 to 5.96 Mb, which can be explained by massive gene gain and loss events. Horizontal gene transfer and new gene emergence contributed substantially to the genome size expansion. The genus Glaciecola had an open pan-genome. Comparative genomic research indicated that species of the genus Glaciecola had high diversity in genome size, gene content and genetic relatedness. This may be prevalent in marine bacterial genera considering the dynamic and complex environments of the ocean. Species of Glaciecola had some common genomic features related to cold adaptation, which enable them to thrive and play a role in biogeochemical cycle in the cold marine environments.

  3. [Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms: research advance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-jie; Wang, Xiang; Lu, Gui-lan; Wang, Qun-hui; Li, Fa-sheng; Guo, Guan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms, bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g., inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants, and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field, aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

  4. Cold adaptation of the Antarctic haloarchaea Halohasta litchfieldiae and Halorubrum lacusprofundi.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Liao, Yan; Ye, Jun; Kuchel, Rhiannon P; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2017-02-20

    Halohasta litchfieldiae represents ∼ 44% and Halorubrum lacusprofundi ∼ 10% of the hypersaline, perennially cold (≥ -20°C) Deep Lake community in Antarctica. We used proteomics and microscopy to define physiological responses of these haloarchaea to growth at high (30°C) and low (10 and 4°C) temperatures. The proteomic data indicate that both species responded to low temperature by modifying their cell envelope including protein N-glycosylation, maintaining osmotic balance and translation initiation, and modifying RNA turnover and tRNA modification. Distinctions between the two species included DNA protection and repair strategies (e.g. roles of UspA and Rad50), and metabolism of glycerol and pyruvate. For Hrr. lacusprofundi, low temperature led to the formation of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) as a storage compound with the process of PHA granule formation occurring by an unknown mechanism. Hrr. lacusprofundi also formed biofilms and synthesized high levels of Hsp20 chaperones. Hht. litchfieldiae was characterized by an active CRISPR system, and elevated levels of the core gene expression machinery, which contrasted markedly to the decreased levels of Hrr. lacusprofundi. These findings greatly expand the understanding of cellular mechanisms of cold adaptation in psychrophilic archaea, and provide insight into how Hht. litchfieldiae gains dominance in Deep Lake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Total lactate dehydrogenase activity of tail muscle is not cold-adapted in nocturnal lizards from cool-temperate habitats.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Miller, J H; Clark, A G; Daugherty, C H

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of metabolic processes on temperature constrains the behavior, physiology and ecology of many ectothermic animals. The evolution of nocturnality in lizards, especially in temperate regions, requires adaptations for activity at low temperatures when optimal body temperatures are unlikely to be obtained. We examined whether nocturnal lizards have cold-adapted lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH was chosen as a representative metabolic enzyme. We measured LDH activity of tail muscle in six lizard species (n=123: three nocturnal, two diurnal and one crepuscular) between 5 and 35 degrees C and found no differences in LDH-specific activity or thermal sensitivity among the species. Similarly, the specific activity and thermal sensitivity of LDH were similar between skinks and geckos. Similar enzyme activities among nocturnal and diurnal lizards indicate that there is no selection of temperature specific LDH enzyme activity at any temperature. As many nocturnal lizards actively thermoregulate during the day, LDH may be adapted for a broad range of temperatures rather than adapted specifically for the low temperatures encountered when the animals are active. The total activity of LDH in tropical and temperate lizards is not cold-adapted. More data are required on biochemical adaptations and whole animal thermal preferences before trends can be established.

  6. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7.

    PubMed

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-03-31

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes.

  7. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-03-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes.

  8. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    PubMed Central

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-01-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes. PMID:27029646

  9. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  10. Expression and purification of a cold-adapted group III trypsin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pálsdóttir, Helga Margrét; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2007-02-01

    The recently classified group III trypsins include members like Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin Y as well as seven analogues from other cold-adapted fish species. The eight group III trypsins have been characterized from their cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequences but none of the enzymes have been isolated from their native sources. This study describes the successful expression and purification of a recombinant HP-thioredoxin-trypsin Y fusion protein in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system and its purification by chromatographic methods. The recombinant form of trypsin Y was previously expressed in Pichia pastoris making it the first biochemically characterized group III trypsin. It has dual substrate specificity towards trypsin and chymotrypsin substrates and demonstrates an increasing activity at temperatures between 2 and 21 degrees C with a complete inactivation at 30 degrees C. The aim of the study was to facilitate further studies of recombinant trypsin Y by finding an expression system yielding higher amounts of the enzyme than possible in our hands in the P. pastoris system. Also, commercial production of trypsin Y will require an efficient and inexpensive expression system like the His-Patch ThioFusion E. coli expression system described here as the enzyme is produced in very low amounts in the Atlantic cod.

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Cold-Adapted Lipase from Oceanobacillus Strain PT-11

    PubMed Central

    Jiewei, Tian; Zuchao, Lei; Peng, Qiu; Lei, Wang; Yongqiang, Tian

    2014-01-01

    We isolated a moderately halophilic lipase-producing bacterium from the saline soil. Based on the morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analysis, the isolate PT-11 was postulated to be a novel species identified as Oceanobacillus rekensis PT-11. The lipase was purified 2.50-fold by Q-Sepharose FF and SP-Sepharose FF chromatography and its molecular mass was estimated to be 23.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. It was highly active over the broad temperature ranging from 10 to 35°C and showed up to 80% of the maximum activity at 10°C indicating the lipase to be a typical cold-adapted enzyme. The enzyme activity was slightly enhanced by Na+, Li+ and K+. Incubation with detergents, such as Tween-20 and Tween-80, slightly inhibited the enzyme activity; while Triton X-100decreased the enzyme activity. The enzyme was fairly stable in the presence of long-chain alcohols but was highly denatured in hydrophilic solvents such as acetone or short-chain alcohols (C1–C3). PMID:24984141

  12. Genome-wide analysis of cold adaptation in indigenous Siberian populations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Alexia; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Lawson, Daniel J; Eichstaedt, Christina A; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Shwe, Ma Than Than; Wee, Joseph; Romero, Irene Gallego; Raj, Srilakshmi; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard; Willerslev, Eske; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Following the dispersal out of Africa, where hominins evolved in warm environments for millions of years, our species has colonised different climate zones of the world, including high latitudes and cold environments. The extent to which human habitation in (sub-)Arctic regions has been enabled by cultural buffering, short-term acclimatization and genetic adaptations is not clearly understood. Present day indigenous populations of Siberia show a number of phenotypic features, such as increased basal metabolic rate, low serum lipid levels and increased blood pressure that have been attributed to adaptation to the extreme cold climate. In this study we introduce a dataset of 200 individuals from ten indigenous Siberian populations that were genotyped for 730,525 SNPs across the genome to identify genes and non-coding regions that have undergone unusually rapid allele frequency and long-range haplotype homozygosity change in the recent past. At least three distinct population clusters could be identified among the Siberians, each of which showed a number of unique signals of selection. A region on chromosome 11 (chr11:66-69 Mb) contained the largest amount of clustering of significant signals and also the strongest signals in all the different selection tests performed. We present a list of candidate cold adaption genes that showed significant signals of positive selection with our strongest signals associated with genes involved in energy regulation and metabolism (CPT1A, LRP5, THADA) and vascular smooth muscle contraction (PRKG1). By employing a new method that paints phased chromosome chunks by their ancestry we distinguish local Siberian-specific long-range haplotype signals from those introduced by admixture.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Cold Adaptation in Indigenous Siberian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Alexia; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Lawson, Daniel J.; Eichstaedt, Christina A.; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Shwe, Ma Than Than; Wee, Joseph; Romero, Irene Gallego; Raj, Srilakshmi; Metspalu, Mait; Villems, Richard; Willerslev, Eske; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Malyarchuk, Boris A.; Derenko, Miroslava V.; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Following the dispersal out of Africa, where hominins evolved in warm environments for millions of years, our species has colonised different climate zones of the world, including high latitudes and cold environments. The extent to which human habitation in (sub-)Arctic regions has been enabled by cultural buffering, short-term acclimatization and genetic adaptations is not clearly understood. Present day indigenous populations of Siberia show a number of phenotypic features, such as increased basal metabolic rate, low serum lipid levels and increased blood pressure that have been attributed to adaptation to the extreme cold climate. In this study we introduce a dataset of 200 individuals from ten indigenous Siberian populations that were genotyped for 730,525 SNPs across the genome to identify genes and non-coding regions that have undergone unusually rapid allele frequency and long-range haplotype homozygosity change in the recent past. At least three distinct population clusters could be identified among the Siberians, each of which showed a number of unique signals of selection. A region on chromosome 11 (chr11:66–69 Mb) contained the largest amount of clustering of significant signals and also the strongest signals in all the different selection tests performed. We present a list of candidate cold adaption genes that showed significant signals of positive selection with our strongest signals associated with genes involved in energy regulation and metabolism (CPT1A, LRP5, THADA) and vascular smooth muscle contraction (PRKG1). By employing a new method that paints phased chromosome chunks by their ancestry we distinguish local Siberian-specific long-range haplotype signals from those introduced by admixture. PMID:24847810

  14. Cold adaptation mechanisms in the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis: Metabolic regulation and thermal compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xuan; Meng, Qian; Shu, Ruihao; Wang, Menglong; Zhou, Guiling; Wang, Hongtuo; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Jihong; Qin, Qilian

    2016-02-01

    Ghost moths (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) are cold-adapted stenothermal species inhabiting alpine meadows on the Tibetan Plateau. They have an optimal developmental temperature of 12-16 °C but can maintain feeding and growth at 0 °C. Their survival strategies have received little attention, but these insects are a promising model for environmental adaptation. Here, biochemical adaptations and energy metabolism in response to cold were investigated in larvae of the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient decreased dramatically with decreasing temperature (15-4 °C), suggesting that the energy metabolism of ghost moths, especially glycometabolism, was sensitive to cold. However, the metabolic rate at 4 °C increased with the duration of cold exposure, indicating thermal compensation to sustain energy budgets under cold conditions. Underlying regulation strategies were studied by analyzing metabolic differences between cold-acclimated (4 °C for 48 h) and control larvae (15 °C). In cold-acclimated larvae, the energy generating pathways of carbohydrates, instead of the overall consumption of carbohydrates, was compensated in the fat body by improving the transcription of related enzymes. The mobilization of lipids was also promoted, with higher diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol and free fatty acid content in hemolymph. These results indicated that cold acclimation induced a reorganization on metabolic structure to prioritise energy metabolism. Within the aerobic process, flux throughout the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was encouraged in the fat body, and the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was the likely compensation target. Increased mitochondrial cristae density was observed in the midgut of cold-acclimated larvae. The thermal compensation strategies in this ghost moth span the entire process of energy metabolism, including degration of metabolic substrate, TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, and from an energy budget

  15. The lysozyme from insect (Manduca sexta) is a cold-adapted enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F.; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa M.; Rojo-Dominguez, Arturo; Kanost, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymatic activity is dependent on temperature, although some proteins have evolved to retain activity at low temperatures at the expense of stability. Cold adapted enzymes are present in a variety of organisms and there is ample interest in their structure-function relationships. Lysozyme (E.C. 3.2.1.17) is one of the most studied enzymes due to its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria and is also a cold adapted protein. In this work the characterization of lysozyme from the insect Manduca sexta and its activity at low temperatures is presented. Both M. sexta lysozymes natural and recombinant showed a higher content of α-helix secondary structure compared to that of hen egg white lysozyme and a higher specific enzymatic activity in the range of 5−30 °C. These results together with measured thermodynamical activation parameters support the designation of M. sexta lysozyme as a cold adapted enzyme. Therefore, the insect recombinant lysozyme is feasible as a model for structure-function studies for cold-adapted proteins. PMID:17979817

  16. The Lysozyme from Insect (Manduca sexta) is a Cold-Adapted Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Sotelo-Mundo,R.; Lopez-Zavala, A.; Garcia-Orozco, K.; Arvizu-Flores, A.; Velazquez-Contreras, E.; Valenzuela-Soto, E.; Rojo-Dominguez, A.; Kanost, M.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic activity is dependent on temperature, although some proteins have evolved to retain activity at low temperatures at the expense of stability. Cold adapted enzymes are present in a variety of organisms and there is ample interest in their structure-function relationships. Lysozyme (E.C. 3.2.1.17) is one of the most studied enzymes due to its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria and is also a cold adapted protein. In this work the characterization of lysozyme from the insect Manduca sexta and its activity at low temperatures is presented. Both M. sexta lysozymes natural and recombinant showed a higher content of {alpha}-helix secondary structure compared to that of hen egg white lysozyme and a higher specific enzymatic activity in the range of 5-30 {sup o}C. These results together with measured thermodynamic activation parameters support the designation of M. sexta lysozyme as a cold adapted enzyme. Therefore, the insect recombinant lysozyme is feasible as a model for structure-function studies for cold-adapted proteins.

  17. Biophysics of Cold Adaptation and Acclimatization: Microbial Decomposition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    L - A -I. 3 1983 Field Work Fall (pre abscission) leaf litter of seven vascular plant species native to Alaskan Arctic north slope tundra habitats was...Five hundred prepared litter bags were placed in the field at three sites near Barrow, Atquasuk and Driftwood, all within arctic tundra habitats . One...plateau marked with an expanse of obligotrophic lakes, ponds and aquatic habitats , which cover 50% to 85% of the land’s surface area and polygonally

  18. [Cold adaptation strategy in insects inhabiting central Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Li, N G; Averenskiĭ, A I

    2007-01-01

    Cold hardiness in 20 insect species living in extremely cold climate of Yakutia has been investigated for the first time. It was shown that the Yakutian insects prefer to use the strategy of freeze tolerance according to which they produce special substances initiating the freezing of hemolymph at high subzero temperatures. The presence of ice-nucleating agents in the haemolymph of insects belonging to the phylogenetic group of Lepidopteran was shown. We postulate that Pieris rapae may shift between the different cold hardiness strategies when they move from moderately cold regions to a more severe environment.

  19. Development of an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for the cold-adapted fungi Pseudogymnoascus destructans and P. pannorum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Ren, Ping; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of cold adaptation by fungi remain unknown. This topic is of high interest due to the emergence of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a skin infection of hibernating bats caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Recent studies indicated that apart from Pd, there is an abundance of other Pseudogymnoascus species in the hibernacula soil. We developed an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) system for Pd and a related fungus Pseudogymnoascus pannorum (Pp) to advance experimental studies. URE1 gene encoding the enzyme urease was used as an easy to screen marker to facilitate molecular genetic analyses. A Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER) Friendly pRF-HU2 vector containing Pd or Pp ure1::hygromycin (HYG) disruption cassette was introduced into A. tumefaciens AGL-1 cells by electroporation and the resulting strains were co-cultivated with conidia of Pd or Pp for various durations and temperatures to optimize the ATMT system. Overall, 680 Pd (0.006%) and 1800 Pp (0.018%) transformants were obtained from plating of 10(7) conidia; their recoveries were strongly correlated with the length of the incubation period (96h for Pd; 72h for Pp) and with temperature (15-18°C for Pd; 25°C for Pp). The homologous recombination in transformants was 3.1% for Pd and 16.7% for Pp. The availability of a standardized ATMT system would allow future molecular genetic analyses of Pd and related cold-adapted fungi. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Cold adaptive thermogenesis in small mammals from different geographical zones of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Sun, R; Huang, C; Wang, Z; Liu, X; Hou, J; Liu, J; Cai, L; Li, N; Zhang, S; Wang, Y

    2001-07-01

    in the north; (4) a low RMR in warm environments and peak RMR and NST in cold environments enabled M. unguiculatus to tolerate a semi-desert climate; (5) O. curzoniae has unusually high RMR and high NST, acting mainly via increasing NST to adapt to extreme cold of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau; (6) the adaptation of euthermic S. dauricus to cold is due to an increase in NST and a relaxed homeothermia; and lastly (7) the thyroid hormone is involved in the regulation of cold adaptive thermogenesis in all the species studied.

  1. Protein cold adaptation: Role of physico-chemical parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahzade, Soheila; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Vaseghi, Akbar; Faridounnia, Maryam; Jahandideh, Samad

    2015-10-21

    During years 2007 and 2008, we published three papers (Jahandideh, 2007a, JTB, 246, 159-166; Jahandideh, 2007b, JTB, 248, 721-726; Jahandideh, 2008, JTB, 255, 113-118) investigating sequence and structural parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures. Our studies revealed important features in cold-adaptation of proteins. Here, we calculate values of a new set of physico-chemical parameters and perform a comparative systematic analysis on a more comprehensive database of psychrophilic-mesophilic homologous protein pairs. Our obtained results confirm that psychrophilicity rules are not merely the inverse rules of thermostability; for instance, although contact order is reported as a key feature in thermostability, our results have shown no significant difference between contact orders of psychrophilic proteins compared to mesophilic proteins. We are optimistic that these findings would help future efforts to propose a strategy for designing cold-adapted proteins.

  2. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  3. Recombinant cold-adapted trypsin I from Atlantic cod-expression, purification, and identification.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, Gudrún; Bjarnason, Jón Bragi; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic cod trypsin I is a cold-adapted proteolytic enzyme exhibiting approximately 20 times higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) than its mesophilic bovine counterpart for the simple amide substrate BAPNA. In general, cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes are sensitive to autolytic degradation, thermal inactivation as well as molecular aggregation, even at temperatures as low as 18-25 degrees C which may explain the problems observed with their expression, activation, and purification. Prior to the data presented here, there have been no reports in the literature on the expression of psychrophilic or cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes from fish. Nevertheless, numerous cold-adapted proteolytic microbial enzymes have been successfully expressed in bacteria and yeast. This report describes successful expression, activation, and purification of the recombinant cod trypsin I in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system. The E. coli pThioHis expression vector used in the study enabled the formation of a fusion protein between a highly soluble fraction of HP-thioredoxin contained in the vector and the N-terminal end of the precursor form of cod trypsin I. The HP-thioredoxin part of the fusion protein binds to a metal-chelating ProBond column, which facilitated its purification. The cod trypsin I part of the purified fusion protein was released by proteolytic cleavage, resulting in concomitant activation of the recombinant enzyme. The recombinant cod trypsin I was purified to homogeneity on a trypsin-specific benzamidine affinity column. The identity of the recombinant enzyme was demonstrated by electrophoresis and chromatography.

  4. Cold-adapted organic solvent tolerant alkalophilic family I.3 lipase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, Menega; Yaacob, Norhayati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with cold adaptation are gaining increasing interest due to their biotechnological prospective. Previously, a cold adapted family I.3 lipase (AMS8 lipase) was isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas. AMS8 lipase was largely expressed in insoluble form. The refolded His-tagged recombinant AMS8 lipase was purified with 23.0% total recovery and purification factor of 9.7. The purified AMS8 lipase migrated as a single band with a molecular weight approximately 65kDa via electrophoresis. AMS8 lipase was highly active at 30°C at pH 10. The half-life of AMS8 lipase was reported at 4 and 2h under the incubation of 30 and 40°C, respectively. The lipase was stable over a broad range of pH. It showed enhancement effect in its relative activity under the presence of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) after 30min treatment. Heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) inhibited AMS8 activity. This cold adapted alkalophilic AMS lipase was also active in various organic solvent of different polarity. These unique properties of this biological macromolecule will provide considerable potential for many biotechnological applications and organic synthesis at low temperature.

  5. Genetic analysis of attenuation markers of cold-adapted X-31 influenza live vaccine donor strain.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Jung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Byun, Young Ho; Yang, Seung Won; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-03-08

    Cold-adapted live attenuated influenza vaccines (CAIVs) have been considered as a safe prophylactic measure to prevent influenza virus infections. The safety of a CAIV depends largely on genetic markers that confer specific attenuation phenotypes. Previous studies with other CAIVs reported that polymerase genes were primarily responsible for the attenuation. Here, we analyzed the genetic mutations and their phenotypic contribution in the X-31 ca strain, a recently developed alternative CAIV donor strain. During the cold-adaptation of its parental X-31 virus, various numbers of sequence changes were accumulated in all six internal genes. Phenotypic analysis with single-gene and multiple-gene reassortant viruses suggests that NP gene makes the largest contribution to the cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) characters, while the remaining other internal genes also impart attenuation characters with varying degrees. A balanced contribution of all internal genes to the attenuation suggests that X-31 ca could serve as an ideal master donor strain for CAIVs preventing influenza epidemics and pandemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attenuated temperature-sensitive respiratory syncytial virus mutants generated by cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Randolph, V B; Kandis, M; Stemler-Higgins, P; Kennelly, M S; McMullen, Y M; Speelman, D J; Weeks-Levy, C

    1994-09-01

    Two strains of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), RSV 2B and RSV 3A (representing subgroup B and A virus respectively) were cold-adapted by passaging in Vero cells for up to 42 weeks at successively lower temperatures down to 20 degrees C. Successful cold adaptation of the virus population was dependent on the amount of time the cultures were maintained at the various low temperatures, as well as on the strain of virus used. Temperature-sensitive (TS) mutants appeared in the cold passaged virus populations; however, the majority of the virus variants remained predominantly non-TS. Four RSV 2B and three RSV 3A TS mutants were selected for further characterization. These seven TS mutants retained their fusion phenotype and two major neutralizing antibody epitopes, and displayed varying levels of temperature sensitivity. Six of the seven mutants had a cold-adapted (CA) phenotype. All of the RSV 2B mutants were highly attenuated in cotton rats and two of the mutants elicited relatively high levels of neutralizing antibody and were able to protect rats against virus challenge. The RSV 3A TS mutants grew well in the nose but poorly in the cotton rat lungs, as did the parental 3A virus. All 3A mutants elicited high titers of neutralizing antibody and provided complete protection against virus challenge. These mutants showed varying levels of temperature sensitivity in vitro and attenuation in vivo and represent potential vaccine candidates.

  8. Cold adaptation of parainfluenza virus type 3: induction of three phenotypic markers.

    PubMed

    Belshe, R B; Hissom, F K

    1982-01-01

    In order to attenuate parainfluenza type 3 virus, a wild type strain that was isolated from a child with respiratory disease was adapted to replicate in African green monkey kidney cells at 20 degrees C. Replication at 20 degrees C was not a property of the wild type virus. The virus was serially passaged 45 times in the cold, and clones were selected following passage levels 7, 12, 18, and 45. The population of cold-adapted virus was found to be progressively enriched with temperature sensitive (ts) mutants. After 7 passages in the cold, 1 of 9, and after 12 passages in the cold, 3 of 12 clones were temperature sensitive. Following 18 passages in the cold, 80% of the clones were temperature sensitive and after 45 passages in the cold, all clones were temperature sensitive. In addition to being temperature sensitive each ts clone manifested the tiny plaque morphology. Each temperature-sensitive clone was also cold adapted. Some clones were cold adapted but were not temperature sensitive. The mutants were found to be genetically stable when serially passaged at 32 degrees, 35 degrees, or 39 degrees C. The mutants may possess the necessary degree of attenuation for use as live attenuated intranasal vaccines.

  9. Reciprocal sign epistasis and truncation selection: When is recombination favorable in a pre-breeding program with a selfing species?

    PubMed

    Vagne, Constance; David, Jacques; Tavaud, Muriel; Fontez, Bénédicte

    2015-12-07

    Since the dawn of agriculture, humans have applied artificial selection on traits of interest, regardless of their genetic architecture. Yet, still today, most models used to study and streamline this process overlook genetic interactions. In this study, we determined the conditions in which a target genotype can be fixed when truncation selection is applied on an epistatic trait. Previous studies have shown that reciprocal sign epistasis with two fitness peaks of unequal height involves multiple equilibrium states, i.e. below one critical parameter value, such as a critical recombination rate, one genotype may be fixed, and above it, another one may be fixed. Using a haploid bi-locus model, we identified which genotype would be fixed, and how quickly, in an infinite population selected for a phenotypic trait subject to reciprocal sign epistasis with unequal peak heights, depending on two criteria: the recombination rate and percentage of selected individuals. The critical parameter values at which bistability sets in, were also calculated. These results were complemented by stochastic simulations in finite populations. Our results confirmed that, in the case of fitness under reciprocal sign epistasis, high recombination rates induce blockage at the local optimum or attainment of an equilibrium state between the two peaks. However, if linkage disequilibrium is negative in the initial population, recombination is necessary to create the most favorable genotype. Therefore, in this case, reciprocal sign epistasis favors non-null recombination rates, particularly if selection is intense. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cold Adaptation, Ca2+ Dependency and Autolytic Stability Are Related Features in a Highly Active Cold-Adapted Trypsin Resistant to Autoproteolysis Engineered for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Nappa, Alvaro; Reyes, Fernando; Andrews, Barbara A.; Asenjo, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Pig trypsin is routinely used as a biotechnological tool, due to its high specificity and ability to be stored as an inactive stable zymogen. However, it is not an optimum enzyme for conditions found in wound debriding for medical uses and trypsinization processes for protein analysis and animal cell culturing, where low Ca2+ dependency, high activity in mild conditions and easy inactivation are crucial. We isolated and thermodynamically characterized a highly active cold-adapted trypsin for medical and laboratory use that is four times more active than pig trypsin at 10° C and at least 50% more active than pig trypsin up to 50° C. Contrary to pig trypsin, this enzyme has a broad optimum pH between 7 and 10 and is very insensitive to Ca2+ concentration. The enzyme is only distantly related to previously described cryophilic trypsins. We built and studied molecular structure models of this trypsin and performed molecular dynamic calculations. Key residues and structures associated with calcium dependency and cryophilicity were identified. Experiments indicated that the protein is unstable and susceptible to autoproteolysis. Correlating experimental results and structural predictions, we designed mutations to improve the resistance to autoproteolysis and conserve activity for longer periods after activation. One single mutation provided around 25 times more proteolytic stability. Due to its cryophilic nature, this trypsin is easily inactivated by mild denaturation conditions, which is ideal for controlled proteolysis processes without requiring inhibitors or dilution. We clearly show that cold adaptation, Ca2+ dependency and autolytic stability in trypsins are related phenomena that are linked to shared structural features and evolve in a concerted fashion. Hence, both structurally and evolutionarily they cannot be interpreted and studied separately as previously done. PMID:23951314

  11. Litter mixture dominated by leaf litter of the invasive species, Flaveria bidentis, accelerates decomposition and favors nitrogen release.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyan; Wei, Zishang; Huangfu, Chaohe; Chen, Xinwei; Yang, Dianlin

    2017-01-01

    In natural ecosystems, invasive plant litter is often mixed with that of native species, yet few studies have examined the decomposition dynamics of such mixtures, especially across different degrees of invasion. We conducted a 1-year litterbag experiment using leaf litters from the invasive species Flaveria bidentis (L.) and the dominant co-occurring native species, Setaria viridis (L.). Litters were allowed to decompose either separately or together at different ratios in a mothproof screen house. The mass loss of all litter mixtures was non-additive, and the direction and strength of effects varied with species ratio and decomposition stage. During the initial stages of decomposition, all mixtures had a neutral effect on the mass loss; however, at later stages of decomposition, mixtures containing more invasive litter had synergistic effects on mass loss. Importantly, an increase in F. bidentis litter with a lower C:N ratio in mixtures led to greater net release of N over time. These results highlight the importance of trait dissimilarity in determining the decomposition rates of litter mixtures and suggest that F. bidentis could further synchronize N release from litter as an invasion proceeds, potentially creating a positive feedback linked through invasion as the invader outcompetes the natives for nutrients. Our findings also demonstrate the importance of species composition as well as the identity of dominant species when considering how changes in plant community structure influence plant invasion.

  12. Species Selection Favors Dispersive Life Histories in Sea Slugs, but Higher Per-Offspring Investment Drives Shifts to Short-Lived Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Patrick J.; Vendetti, Jann E.; Ellingson, Ryan A.; Trowbridge, Cynthia D.; Hirano, Yayoi M.; Trathen, Danielle Y.; Rodriguez, Albert K.; Swennen, Cornelis; Wilson, Nerida G.; Valdés, Ángel A.

    2015-01-01

    For 40 years, paleontological studies of marine gastropods have suggested that species selection favors lineages with short-lived (lecithotrophic) larvae, which are less dispersive than long-lived (planktotrophic) larvae. Although lecithotrophs appeared to speciate more often and accumulate over time in some groups, lecithotrophy also increased extinction rates, and tests for state-dependent diversification were never performed. Molecular phylogenies of diverse groups instead suggested lecithotrophs accumulate without diversifying due to frequent, unidirectional character change. Although lecithotrophy has repeatedly originated in most phyla, no adult trait has been correlated with shifts in larval type. Thus, both the evolutionary origins of lecithotrophy and its consequences for patterns of species richness remain poorly understood. Here, we test hypothesized links between development mode and evolutionary rates using likelihood-based methods and a phylogeny of 202 species of gastropod molluscs in Sacoglossa, a clade of herbivorous sea slugs. Evolutionary quantitative genetics modeling and stochastic character mapping supported 27 origins of lecithotrophy. Tests for correlated evolution revealed lecithotrophy evolved more often in lineages investing in extra-embryonic yolk, the first adult trait associated with shifts in development mode across a group. However, contrary to predictions from paleontological studies, species selection actually favored planktotrophy; most extant lecithotrophs originated through recent character change, and did not subsequently diversify. Increased offspring provisioning in planktotrophs thus favored shifts to short-lived larvae, which led to short-lived lineages over macroevolutionary time scales. These findings challenge long-standing assumptions about the effects of alternative life histories in the sea. Species selection can explain the long-term persistence of planktotrophy, the ancestral state in most clades, despite frequent

  13. Species Selection Favors Dispersive Life Histories in Sea Slugs, but Higher Per-Offspring Investment Drives Shifts to Short-Lived Larvae.

    PubMed

    Krug, Patrick J; Vendetti, Jann E; Ellingson, Ryan A; Trowbridge, Cynthia D; Hirano, Yayoi M; Trathen, Danielle Y; Rodriguez, Albert K; Swennen, Cornelis; Wilson, Nerida G; Valdés, Ángel A

    2015-11-01

    For 40 years, paleontological studies of marine gastropods have suggested that species selection favors lineages with short-lived (lecithotrophic) larvae, which are less dispersive than long-lived (planktotrophic) larvae. Although lecithotrophs appeared to speciate more often and accumulate over time in some groups, lecithotrophy also increased extinction rates, and tests for state-dependent diversification were never performed. Molecular phylogenies of diverse groups instead suggested lecithotrophs accumulate without diversifying due to frequent, unidirectional character change. Although lecithotrophy has repeatedly originated in most phyla, no adult trait has been correlated with shifts in larval type. Thus, both the evolutionary origins of lecithotrophy and its consequences for patterns of species richness remain poorly understood. Here, we test hypothesized links between development mode and evolutionary rates using likelihood-based methods and a phylogeny of 202 species of gastropod molluscs in Sacoglossa, a clade of herbivorous sea slugs. Evolutionary quantitative genetics modeling and stochastic character mapping supported 27 origins of lecithotrophy. Tests for correlated evolution revealed lecithotrophy evolved more often in lineages investing in extra-embryonic yolk, the first adult trait associated with shifts in development mode across a group. However, contrary to predictions from paleontological studies, species selection actually favored planktotrophy; most extant lecithotrophs originated through recent character change, and did not subsequently diversify. Increased offspring provisioning in planktotrophs thus favored shifts to short-lived larvae, which led to short-lived lineages over macroevolutionary time scales. These findings challenge long-standing assumptions about the effects of alternative life histories in the sea. Species selection can explain the long-term persistence of planktotrophy, the ancestral state in most clades, despite frequent

  14. Climate warming increases biodiversity of small rodents by favoring rare or less abundant species in a grassland ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangshun; Liu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Yu, Guirui; He, Honglin; Zhang, Zhibin

    2013-06-01

    Our Earth is facing the challenge of accelerating climate change, which imposes a great threat to biodiversity. Many published studies suggest that climate warming may cause a dramatic decline in biodiversity, especially in colder and drier regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature, precipitation and a normalized difference vegetation index on biodiversity indices of rodent communities in the current or previous year for both detrended and nondetrended data in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia during 1982-2006. Our results demonstrate that temperature showed predominantly positive effects on the biodiversity of small rodents; precipitation showed both positive and negative effects; a normalized difference vegetation index showed positive effects; and cross-correlation function values between rodent abundance and temperature were negatively correlated with rodent abundance. Our results suggest that recent climate warming increased the biodiversity of small rodents by providing more benefits to population growth of rare or less abundant species than that of more abundant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, which does not support the popular view that global warming would decrease biodiversity in colder and drier regions. We hypothesized that higher temperatures might benefit rare or less abundant species (with smaller populations and more folivorous diets) by reducing the probability of local extinction and/or by increasing herbaceous food resources.

  15. Cold adaptation: structural and functional characterizations of psychrophilic and mesophilic acetate kinase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Md Abul Kashem; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    Acetate kinase catalyzes the reversible magnesium-dependent phosphoryl transfer from ATP to acetate to form acetyl phosphate and ADP. Here, we report functional and some structural properties of cold-adapted psychrotrophic enzyme; acetate kinase with those from mesophilic counterpart in Escherichia coli K-12. Recombinant acetate kinase from Shewanella sp. AS-11 (SAK) and E. coli K-12 (EAK) were purified to homogeneity following affinity chromatography and followed by Super Q column chromatography as reported before [44]. Both purified enzymes are shared some of the common properties such as (similar molecular mass, amino acid sequence and similar optimum pH), but characterized shift in the apparent optimum temperature of specific activity to lower temperature as well as by a lower thermal stability compared with EAK. The functional comparisons reveal that SAK is a cold adapted enzyme, having a higher affinity to acetate than EAK. In the acetyl phosphate and ADP-forming direction, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for acetate was 8.0 times higher for SAK than EAK at 10 °C. The activity ratio of SAK to EAK was increased with decreasing temperature in both of the forward and backward reactions. Furthermore, the activation energy, enthalpy and entropy in both reaction directions that catalyzed by SAK were lower than those catalyzed by EAK. The model structure of SAK showed the significantly reduced numbers of salt bridges and cation-pi interactions as compared with EAK. These results suggest that weakening of intramolecular electrostatic interactions of SAK is involved in a more flexible structure which is likely to be responsible for its cold adaptation.

  16. Cold adaptation improves the growth of seasonal influenza B vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Schoofs, Peter; Anderson, David A; Tannock, Gregory A; Rockman, Steven P

    2014-05-01

    Gene reassortment has proved useful in improving yields of influenza A antigens of egg-based inactivated vaccines, but similar approaches have been difficult with influenza B antigens. Current regulations for influenza vaccine seed viruses limit the number of egg passages and as a result resultant yields from influenza B vaccine seed viruses are frequently inconsistent. Therefore, reliable approaches to enhance yields of influenza B vaccine seed viruses are required for efficient vaccine manufacture. In the present study three stable cold-adapted (ca) mutants, caF, caM and caB derived from seasonal epidemic strains, B/Florida/4/2006, B/Malaysia/2506/2004 and B/Brisbane/60/2008 were prepared, which produced high hemagglutinin antigen yields and also increased viral yields of reassortants possessing the desired 6:2 gene constellation. The results demonstrate that consistent improvements in yields of influenza B viruses can be obtained by cold adaptation following extended passage. Taken together, the three ca viruses were shown to have potential as donor viruses for the preparation of high-yielding influenza B vaccine viruses by reassortment.

  17. Iron Overload Favors the Elimination of Leishmania infantum from Mouse Tissues through Interaction with Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Gomes-Pereira, Sandra; Teixeira, Carlos Miguel; Rosa, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Pedro Nuno; Tomás, Ana; Appelberg, Rui; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2013-01-01

    Iron plays a central role in host-parasite interactions, since both intervenients need iron for survival and growth, but are sensitive to iron-mediated toxicity. The host's iron overload is often associated with susceptibility to infection. However, it has been previously reported that iron overload prevented the growth of Leishmania major, an agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis, in BALB/c mice. In order to further clarify the impact of iron modulation on the growth of Leishmania in vivo, we studied the effects of iron supplementation or deprivation on the growth of L. infantum, the causative agent of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, in the mouse model. We found that dietary iron deficiency did not affect the protozoan growth, whereas iron overload decreased its replication in the liver and spleen of a susceptible mouse strain. The fact that the iron-induced inhibitory effect could not be seen in mice deficient in NADPH dependent oxidase or nitric oxide synthase 2 suggests that iron eliminates L. infantum in vivo through the interaction with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Iron overload did not significantly alter the mouse adaptive immune response against L. infantum. Furthermore, the inhibitory action of iron towards L. infantum was also observed, in a dose dependent manner, in axenic cultures of promastigotes and amastigotes. Importantly, high iron concentrations were needed to achieve such effects. In conclusion, externally added iron synergizes with the host's oxidative mechanisms of defense in eliminating L. infantum from mouse tissues. Additionally, the direct toxicity of iron against Leishmania suggests a potential use of this metal as a therapeutic tool or the further exploration of iron anti-parasitic mechanisms for the design of new drugs. PMID:23459556

  18. Genetic characterization and protective immunity of cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Sub; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2008-12-02

    H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic in many Asian countries including China and Korea, and cause a considerable economic loss to chicken industry by reduction in egg production and about 30% mortality. Here we developed live cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 influenza vaccine by adaptation of viruses in hen's eggs at 25 degrees C. Genetic analysis shows that the cold-adapted H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) viruses contain a total of 44 amino acid substitutions, of which 7 amino acids are identical to the loci identified in the cold-adapted H2N2 (A/Ann Arbor/6/60) vaccine strain compared to genes in wild-type H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses. When cold-adapted H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses were inoculated in layers viruses were detectable in the tracheas, not in the lungs, no reduction of egg production and mortality was observed in contrast to the infection of wild-type H9N2 influenza viruses, and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressing IFN-gamma were induced. When layers vaccinated with cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/S1/03) influenza viruses were challenged with wild-type H9N2 (A/Chicken/Korea/521/04) influenza viruses, they were protected from the loss of egg production and mortality. Our results suggest that cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 vaccine can be used for controlling the infection of H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens.

  19. Hot spots in cold adaptation: Localized increases in conformational flexibility in lactate dehydrogenase A4 orthologs of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter A.; Somero, George N.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of enzymatic adaptation to extreme cold, we determined kinetic properties, thermal stabilities, and deduced amino acid sequences of lactate dehydrogenase A4 (A4-LDH) from nine Antarctic (−1.86 to 1°C) and three South American (4 to 10°C) notothenioid teleosts. Higher Michaelis–Menten constants (Km) and catalytic rate constants (kcat) distinguish orthologs of Antarctic from those of South American species, but no relationship exists between adaptation temperature and the rate at which activity is lost because of heat denaturation. In all species, active site residues are conserved fully, and differences in kcat and Km are caused by substitutions elsewhere in the molecule. Within geographic groups, identical kinetic properties are generated by different substitutions. By combining our data with A4-LDH sequences for other vertebrates and information on roles played by localized conformational changes in setting kcat, we conclude that notothenioid A4-LDHs have adapted to cold temperatures by increases in flexibility in small areas of the molecule that affect the mobility of adjacent active-site structures. Using these findings, we propose a model that explains linked temperature-adaptive variation in Km and kcat. Changes in sequence that increase flexibility of regions of the enzyme involved in catalytic conformational changes may reduce energy (enthalpy) barriers to these rate-governing shifts in conformation and, thereby, increase kcat. However, at a common temperature of measurement, the higher configurational entropy of a cold-adapted enzyme may foster conformations that bind ligands poorly, leading to high Km values relative to warm-adapted orthologs. PMID:9736762

  20. Cold adaptation of a psychrophilic chaperonin from Psychrobacter sp. and its application for heterologous protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Woo; Wi, Ah Ram; Jeon, Byoung Wook; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Shin, Seung Chul; Park, Hyun; Jeon, Sung-Jong

    2015-09-01

    A chaperonin, PsyGroELS, from the Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium Psychrobacter sp. PAMC21119, was examined for its role in cold adaptation when expressed in a mesophilic Escherichia coli strain. Growth of E. coli harboring PsyGroELS at 10 °C was increased compared to the control strain. A co-expression system using PsyGroELS was developed to increase productivity of the psychrophilic enzyme PsyEst9. PsyEst9 was cloned and expressed using three E. coli variants that co-expressed GroELS from PAMC21119, E. coli, or Oleispira antarctica RB8(T). Co-expression with PsyGroELS was more effective for the production of PsyEst9 compared tothe other chaperonins. PsyGroELS confers cold tolerance to E. coli, and shows potential as an effective co-expression system for the stable production of psychrophilic proteins.

  1. Factors affecting the yield of cold-adapted influenza virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yannarell, D A; Hjorth, R N

    1997-03-01

    Various manipulations to production procedures have been investigated in order to discover methods to attain adequate or augmented titers of cold-adapted influenza virus (CAIV) vaccine. The methods modified include those used for reassortant selection and the determination of virus growth parameters. Increased infectivity titers were achieved through selection of high-yielding mutants by isolating multiple plaques during plaque purification of reassortant clones, as well as through optimization of egg incubation times, age, and lot for individual strains. Up to 6-fold increases in virus yield were obtained by selecting high yielding mutants, up to 9-fold increases were achieved by modifying egg incubation times, and a nearly 1 log increase was realized by determining the ideal egg age for individual strains.

  2. The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source in activated sludge treating synthetical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chuan; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2012-11-01

    The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source under 5°C was studied in activated sludge for treating synthetical wastewater. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis indicated contents of unsaturated fatty acids in cell membrane at 5°C were 13.66% and 24.96% higher for glucose and sodium acetate source than that at 25°C. PLFA biomarkers showed more Gram-negative bacteria enriched than Gram-positive bacteria in low-temperature activated sludge. The Shannon-Wiener diversity analysis demonstrated glucose fed reactor in low temperature had lower PLFA diversity index (1.21-1.30) than that at 25°C and sodium acetate source was reverse (1.08-0.69). The 16S rRNA analysis manifested certain microbes were considerably suitable for existence under cold environment, most of which belong to Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. [Structural and functional reorganization of photosynthetic apparatus in cold adaptation of wheat plants].

    PubMed

    Venzhik, Ju V; Titov, D F; Talanova, V V; Miroslavov, E D; Koteeva, N K

    2012-01-01

    The structural and functional characteristics of the photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) and the cold resistance of wheat seedlings were studied during low-temperature adaptation. It has been established that large chloroplasts with thylakoid system of "sun type" forme in the mesophyll cells in the early hours of plants hardening. At the same time the functional reorganization of the PSA in the leaves of wheat occurs: content of pigments changes, stabilization of the pigment-protein complexes is observed, non-photochemical quenching of excess energy increases. The stabilization of photosynthesis during cold adaptation occurs due to structural and functional reorganization of the PSA. It is assumed that the reorganization of the PSA is a prerequisite for formation of increased cold resistance of leaf cells, and this, along with other physiological and biochemical changes occurring in cells and tissues of plants, allows the plants to survive in chilling.

  4. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. A bacterial acyl aminoacyl peptidase couples flexibility and stability as a result of cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brocca, Stefania; Ferrari, Cristian; Barbiroli, Alberto; Pesce, Alessandra; Lotti, Marina; Nardini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Life in cold environments requires an overall increase in the flexibility of macromolecular and supramolecular structures to allow biological processes to take place at low temperature. Conformational flexibility supports high catalytic rates of enzymes in the cold but in several cases is also a cause of instability. The three-dimensional structure of the psychrophilic acyl aminoacyl peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) reported in this paper highlights adaptive molecular changes resulting in a fine-tuned trade-off between flexibility and stability. In its functional form SpAAP is a dimer, and an increase in flexibility is achieved through loosening of intersubunit hydrophobic interactions. The release of subunits from the quaternary structure is hindered by an 'arm exchange' mechanism, in which a tiny structural element at the N terminus of one subunit inserts into the other subunit. Mutants lacking the 'arm' are monomeric, inactive and highly prone to aggregation. Another feature of SpAAP cold adaptation is the enlargement of the tunnel connecting the exterior of the protein with the active site. Such a wide channel might compensate for the reduced molecular motions occurring in the cold and allow easy and direct access of substrates to the catalytic site, rendering transient movements between domains unnecessary. Thus, cold-adapted SpAAP has developed a molecular strategy unique within this group of proteins: it is able to enhance the flexibility of each functional unit while still preserving sufficient stability. Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession number 5L8S. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes.

  7. Cloning, expression and structural stability of a cold-adapted ß-Galactosidase from Rahnella sp.R3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel gene was isolated for the first time from a psychrophilic gram-negative bacterium Rahnella sp.R3. It encoded a cold-adapted ß-galactosidase (R-ß-Gal). Recombinant R-ß-Gal was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), purified, and characterized. R-ß-Gal belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase fami...

  8. Structural insights into the cold adaptation of the photosynthetic pigment-protein C-phycocyanin from an Arctic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Nan; Wang, Qian-Min; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Kang; Luo, Wei; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2017-04-01

    The cold adaptation mechanism of phycobiliproteins, the major photosynthetic pigment-proteins in cyanobacteria and red algae, has rarely been studied. Here we reported the biochemical, structural, and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-phycocyanin from Arctic cyanobacterial strain Pseudanabaena sp. LW0831. We characterized the phycobilisome components of LW0831 and obtained their gene sequences. Compared to the mesophilic counterpart from Arthrospira platensis (Ar-C-PC), LW0831 C-phycocyanin (Ps-C-PC) has a decreased thermostability (∆Tm of -16°C), one of the typical features of cold-adapted enzymes. To uncover its structural basis, we resolved the crystal structure of Ps-C-PC 1 at 2.04Å. Consistent with the decrease in thermostability, comparative structural analyses revealed decreased intra-trimer and inter-trimer interactions in Ps-C-PC 1, compared to Ar-C-PC. However, comparative molecular dynamics simulations indicated that Ps-C-PC 1 shows similar flexibilities to Ar-C-PC for both the (αβ)3 trimer and (αβ)6 hexamer. Therefore, the optimization mode is clearly different from cold-adapted enzymes, which usually have increased flexibilities. Detailed analyses demonstrated different optimization modes for the α and β subunits and it was revealed that hydrophobic interactions are key to this difference, though salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, and surface hydrophobicity are also involved. This study is the first report of the structure of cold-adapted phycobiliproteins and provides insights into the cold-adaptation strategies of non-enzyme proteins.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel cold-adapted modified-live equine influenza virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, K; Kydyrbayev, Z; Ryskeldinova, S; Assanzhanova, N; Kozhamkulov, Y; Inkarbekov, D; Sansyzbay, A

    2014-11-01

    To design and evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a modified-live vaccine to prevent equine influenza virus (EIV) infection based on the novel reassortant cold-adapted strain A/HK/Otar/6:2/2010. Surface proteins (HA, NA) from the wild-type strain A/equine/Otar/764/2007 (H3N8) and internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, NS) from the attenuated cold-adapted donor strain A/Hong Kong/1/68/162/35CA (H3N2) were included in the vaccine. Horses were administered 10(9.2) EID50 /mL of the modified-live vaccine or saline solution using a nasal spray. The clinical condition of the animals was assessed throughout the study and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected for virus titration. Two yearlings in each group were euthanased on day 5 post vaccination (PV) for histological examination and measurement of viral titres in the organs. Serum samples and nasal secretions were collected to evaluate serological response. Lymphoproliferation after restimulation in vitro was determined to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. To evaluate the protective capacity of the vaccine, the yearlings in both groups were challenged with the wild-type virus at 28 days PV and their clinical condition and serological response was evaluated. Nasal swabs were collected to assess viral shedding from the upper respiratory tract. Single intranasal administration of a modified-live EIV vaccine caused no adverse effects and vaccinated yearlings and pregnant mares did not form detectable levels of antibodies by days 7, 14 and 28 PV, as indicated by the HI reaction and ELISA. Secretory antibodies could be detected on day 7 and reached maximal levels on day 14 PV. In vitro studies showed that the yearlings and pregnant mares both formed a cell-mediated immune response by day 14 PV. The vaccine protected yearlings against challenge with wild-type virus. We conclude that single intranasal administration of the modified-live EIV vaccine was safe in the yearlings and pregnant mares that we treated, and was

  10. Hot experience for cold-adapted microorganisms: temperature sensitivity of soil enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibin; Razavidezfuly, Baharsadat; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in cold environment soil, where warming is expected to be greatest is crucial. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Arrhenius function, we hypothesized that cold-adapted microorganisms will produce high efficient enzymes at cold temperatures (enzymes with lower apparent activation energy (Ea) at cold temperature ranges). To test our hypothesis, 30 g soil of Tibetan Plateau (4100 m a.s.l., annual temperature 2.4 °C) in 4 replicates were incubated for one month over a temperature range of 0-40 °C (with 5 °C steps) and determined the kinetic parameters of six enzymes involved in decomposing organics: cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase, which are commonly measured as enzymes responsible for consecutive stages of cellulose degradation; xylanase, which is responsible for breaking down hemicelluloses; acid phosphatase, which mineralizes organic P to phosphate by hydrolyzing phosphoric (mono) ester bonds under acidic conditions. Activities of leucine aminopeptidase and tyrosine aminopeptidase were analyzed to assess the hydrolysis of L-peptide bonds. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 42 (phosphatase) to 54 (cellobiohydrolase) kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme reactions of 1.8-2.3. The increase of substrate affinity (Km) with temperature was gradual for most tested enzymes from 0-20 °C (enzymes involved in C cycle), (proteases) and 0-40 °C (phosphatase). However, within a high range of temperatures (25-40 °C) the hydrolytic activity was governed by enzymes with nearly constant substrate affinity. Overall, for enzymes involved in C cycle and proteases, a strong increase (30-40%) in Km at high temperatures (25 °C) reflects an expression of multiple isoenzymes each with different temperature optima and probable shift of microbial community. The general trend of catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) demonstrated a gradual increase with

  11. Reversion of Cold-Adapted Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine into a Pathogenic Virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Meliopoulos, Victoria A; Wang, Wei; Lin, Xudong; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Stockwell, Timothy B; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wentworth, David E

    2016-10-01

    The only licensed live attenuated influenza A virus vaccines (LAIVs) in the United States (FluMist) are created using internal protein-coding gene segments from the cold-adapted temperature-sensitive master donor virus A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 and HA/NA gene segments from circulating viruses. During serial passage of A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 at low temperatures to select the desired attenuating phenotypes, multiple cold-adaptive mutations and temperature-sensitive mutations arose. A substantial amount of scientific and clinical evidence has proven that FluMist is safe and effective. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted specifically to determine if the attenuating temperature-sensitive phenotype can revert and, if so, the types of substitutions that will emerge (i.e., compensatory substitutions versus reversion of existing attenuating mutations). Serial passage of the monovalent FluMist 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine at increasing temperatures in vitro generated a variant that replicated efficiently at higher temperatures. Sequencing of the variant identified seven nonsynonymous mutations, PB1-E51K, PB1-I171V, PA-N350K, PA-L366I, NP-N125Y, NP-V186I, and NS2-G63E. None occurred at positions previously reported to affect the temperature sensitivity of influenza A viruses. Synthetic genomics technology was used to synthesize the whole genome of the virus, and the roles of individual mutations were characterized by assessing their effects on RNA polymerase activity and virus replication kinetics at various temperatures. The revertant also regained virulence and caused significant disease in mice, with severity comparable to that caused by a wild-type 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. The live attenuated influenza vaccine FluMist has been proven safe and effective and is widely used in the United States. The phenotype and genotype of the vaccine virus are believed to be very stable, and mutants that cause disease in animals or humans have never been reported. By propagating the virus under

  12. Reversion of Cold-Adapted Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine into a Pathogenic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Meliopoulos, Victoria A.; Wang, Wei; Lin, Xudong; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The only licensed live attenuated influenza A virus vaccines (LAIVs) in the United States (FluMist) are created using internal protein-coding gene segments from the cold-adapted temperature-sensitive master donor virus A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 and HA/NA gene segments from circulating viruses. During serial passage of A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 at low temperatures to select the desired attenuating phenotypes, multiple cold-adaptive mutations and temperature-sensitive mutations arose. A substantial amount of scientific and clinical evidence has proven that FluMist is safe and effective. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted specifically to determine if the attenuating temperature-sensitive phenotype can revert and, if so, the types of substitutions that will emerge (i.e., compensatory substitutions versus reversion of existing attenuating mutations). Serial passage of the monovalent FluMist 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine at increasing temperatures in vitro generated a variant that replicated efficiently at higher temperatures. Sequencing of the variant identified seven nonsynonymous mutations, PB1-E51K, PB1-I171V, PA-N350K, PA-L366I, NP-N125Y, NP-V186I, and NS2-G63E. None occurred at positions previously reported to affect the temperature sensitivity of influenza A viruses. Synthetic genomics technology was used to synthesize the whole genome of the virus, and the roles of individual mutations were characterized by assessing their effects on RNA polymerase activity and virus replication kinetics at various temperatures. The revertant also regained virulence and caused significant disease in mice, with severity comparable to that caused by a wild-type 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated influenza vaccine FluMist has been proven safe and effective and is widely used in the United States. The phenotype and genotype of the vaccine virus are believed to be very stable, and mutants that cause disease in animals or humans have never been reported. By

  13. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation.

  14. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Andrew J.; Santos, Celia P.; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25444799

  15. Biotechnological Potential of Cold Adapted Pseudoalteromonas spp. Isolated from 'Deep Sea' Sponges.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Erik; Knobloch, Stephen; Dwyer, Emilie; Flynn, Sinéad; Jackson, Stephen A; Jóhannsson, Ragnar; Marteinsson, Viggó T; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2017-06-19

    The marine genus Pseudoalteromonas is known for its versatile biotechnological potential with respect to the production of antimicrobials and enzymes of industrial interest. We have sequenced the genomes of three Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains isolated from different deep sea sponges on the Illumina MiSeq platform. The isolates have been screened for various industrially important enzymes and comparative genomics has been applied to investigate potential relationships between the isolates and their host organisms, while comparing them to free-living Pseudoalteromonas spp. from shallow and deep sea environments. The genomes of the sponge associated Pseudoalteromonas strains contained much lower levels of potential eukaryotic-like proteins which are known to be enriched in symbiotic sponge associated microorganisms, than might be expected for true sponge symbionts. While all the Pseudoalteromonas shared a large distinct subset of genes, nonetheless the number of unique and accessory genes is quite large and defines the pan-genome as open. Enzymatic screens indicate that a vast array of enzyme activities is expressed by the isolates, including β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, and protease activities. A β-glucosidase gene from one of the Pseudoalteromonas isolates, strain EB27 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and, following biochemical characterization, the recombinant enzyme was found to be cold-adapted, thermolabile, halotolerant, and alkaline active.

  16. Purification and characterization of cold-adapted beta-agarase from an Antarctic psychrophilic strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Yuquan; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular β-agarase was purified from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, a Psychrophilic agar-degrading bacterium isolated from Antarctic Prydz Bay sediments. The purified agarase (Aga21) revealed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular weight of 80 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the agarase were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. However, it maintained as much as 85% of the maximum activities at 10 °C. Significant activation of the agarase was observed in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, K+; Ca2+, Na+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Sr2+ and EDTA inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic hydrolyzed product of agar was characterized as neoagarobiose. Furthermore, this work is the first evidence of cold-adapted agarase in Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries. PMID:26413048

  17. Expression, purification, and characterization of cold-adapted inorganic pyrophosphatase from psychrophilic Shewanella sp. AS-11.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Elvy Like; Iwasaki, Syouhei; Maeganeku, Chihiro; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of divalent cations, inorganic pyrophosphatase is activated to hydrolyze inorganic pyrophosphate to inorganic phosphate. Here, we clone, express, purify, and characterize inorganic pyrophosphatase from the psychrophilic Shewanella sp. AS-11 (Sh-PPase). The recombinant Sh-PPase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) at 20°C using pET16b as an expression vector and purified from the cell extracts by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation and anion-exchange chromatography. Sh-PPase was found to be a family II PPase with a subunit molecular mass of 34 kD that preferentially utilizes Mn²⁺ over Mg²⁺ ions for activity. The functional characteristics of Sh-PPase, such as activity, temperature dependency, and thermal inactivation, were greatly influenced by manganese ions. Manganese ion activation increased the enzyme's activity at low temperatures; therefore, it was required to gain the cold-adapted characteristics of Sh-PPase.

  18. Structural characterization of metal binding to a cold-adapted frataxin.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Martín E; Roman, Ernesto A; Rigal, Juan B; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Frataxin is an evolutionary conserved protein that participates in iron metabolism. Deficiency of this small protein in humans causes a severe neurodegenerative disease known as Friedreich's ataxia. A number of studies indicate that frataxin binds iron and regulates Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Previous structural studies showed that metal binding occurs mainly in a region of high density of negative charge. However, a comprehensive characterization of the binding sites is required to gain further insights into the mechanistic details of frataxin function. In this work, we have solved the X-ray crystal structures of a cold-adapted frataxin from a psychrophilic bacterium in the presence of cobalt or europium ions. We have identified a number of metal-binding sites, mainly solvent exposed, several of which had not been observed in previous studies on mesophilic homologues. No major structural changes were detected upon metal binding, although the structures exhibit significant changes in crystallographic B-factors. The analysis of these B-factors, in combination with crystal packing and RMSD among structures, suggests the existence of localized changes in the internal motions. Based on these results, we propose that bacterial frataxins possess binding sites of moderate affinity for a quick capture and transfer of iron to other proteins and for the regulation of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, modulating interactions with partner proteins.

  19. Unusual Lipid A from a Cold-Adapted Bacterium: Detailed Structural Characterization.

    PubMed

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Schwudke, Dominik; Holgado, Aurora; Verstrepen, Lynn; Sannino, Filomena; Beyaert, Rudi; Lanzetta, Rosa; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-06-26

    Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H is a Gram-negative cold-adapted microorganism that adopts many strategies to cope with the limitations associated with the low temperatures of its habitat. In this study, we report the complete characterization of the lipid A moiety from the lipopolysaccharide of Colwellia. Lipid A and its partially deacylated derivative were completely characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. An unusual structure with a 3-hydroxy unsaturated tetradecenoic acid as a component of the primary acylation pattern was identified. In addition, the presence of a partially acylated phosphoglycerol moiety on the secondary acylation site at the 3-position of the reducing 2-amino-2-deoxyglucopyranose unit caused tremendous natural heterogeneity in the structure of lipid A. Biological-activity assays indicated that C. psychrerythraea 34H lipid A did not show an agonistic or antagonistic effect upon testing in human macrophages. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Reciprocal Influence of Protein Domains in the Cold-Adapted Acyl Aminoacyl Peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Parravicini, Federica; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina; Brocca, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Acyl aminoacyl peptidases are two-domain proteins composed by a C-terminal catalytic α/β-hydrolase domain and by an N-terminal β-propeller domain connected through a structural element that is at the N-terminus in sequence but participates in the 3D structure of the C-domain. We investigated about the structural and functional interplay between the two domains and the bridge structure (in this case a single helix named α1-helix) in the cold-adapted enzyme from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) using both protein variants in which entire domains were deleted and proteins carrying substitutions in the α1-helix. We found that in this enzyme the inter-domain connection dramatically affects the stability of both the whole enzyme and the β-propeller. The α1-helix is required for the stability of the intact protein, as in other enzymes of the same family; however in this psychrophilic enzyme only, it destabilizes the isolated β-propeller. A single charged residue (E10) in the α1-helix plays a major role for the stability of the whole structure. Overall, a strict interaction of the SpAAP domains seems to be mandatory for the preservation of their reciprocal structural integrity and may witness their co-evolution. PMID:23457536

  1. Biotechnological Potential of Cold Adapted Pseudoalteromonas spp. Isolated from ‘Deep Sea’ Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Erik; Knobloch, Stephen; Dwyer, Emilie; Flynn, Sinéad; Jackson, Stephen A.; Jóhannsson, Ragnar; Marteinsson, Viggó T.; O’Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The marine genus Pseudoalteromonas is known for its versatile biotechnological potential with respect to the production of antimicrobials and enzymes of industrial interest. We have sequenced the genomes of three Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains isolated from different deep sea sponges on the Illumina MiSeq platform. The isolates have been screened for various industrially important enzymes and comparative genomics has been applied to investigate potential relationships between the isolates and their host organisms, while comparing them to free-living Pseudoalteromonas spp. from shallow and deep sea environments. The genomes of the sponge associated Pseudoalteromonas strains contained much lower levels of potential eukaryotic-like proteins which are known to be enriched in symbiotic sponge associated microorganisms, than might be expected for true sponge symbionts. While all the Pseudoalteromonas shared a large distinct subset of genes, nonetheless the number of unique and accessory genes is quite large and defines the pan-genome as open. Enzymatic screens indicate that a vast array of enzyme activities is expressed by the isolates, including β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, and protease activities. A β-glucosidase gene from one of the Pseudoalteromonas isolates, strain EB27 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and, following biochemical characterization, the recombinant enzyme was found to be cold-adapted, thermolabile, halotolerant, and alkaline active. PMID:28629190

  2. Cultivation of a novel cold-adapted nitrite oxidizing betaproteobacterium from the Siberian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Alawi, Mashal; Lipski, André; Sanders, Tina; Pfeiffer, Eva Maria; Spieck, Eva

    2007-07-01

    Permafrost-affected soils of the Siberian Arctic were investigated with regard to identification of nitrite oxidizing bacteria active at low temperature. Analysis of the fatty acid profiles of enrichment cultures grown at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C revealed a pattern that was different from that of known nitrite oxidizers but was similar to fatty acid profiles of Betaproteobacteria. Electron microscopy of two enrichment cultures grown at 10 degrees C showed prevalent cells with a conspicuous ultrastructure. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes allocated the organisms to a so far uncultivated cluster of the Betaproteobacteria, with Gallionella ferruginea as next related taxonomically described organism. The results demonstrate that a novel genus of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizing bacteria is present in polygonal tundra soils and can be enriched at low temperatures up to 17 degrees C. Cloned sequences with high sequence similarities were previously reported from mesophilic habitats like activated sludge and therefore an involvement of this taxon in nitrite oxidation in nonarctic habitats is suggested. The presented culture will provide an opportunity to correlate nitrification with nonidentified environmental clones in moderate habitats and give insights into mechanisms of cold adaptation. We propose provisional classification of the novel nitrite oxidizing bacterium as 'Candidatus Nitrotoga arctica'.

  3. Expression of a cold-adapted fish trypsin in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Macouzet, Martin; Simpson, Benjamin K; Lee, Byong H

    2005-06-01

    Trypsin is a highly valuable protease that has many industrial and biomedical applications. The growing demand for non-animal sources of the enzyme and for trypsins with special properties has driven the interest to clone and express this protease in microorganisms. Reports about expression of recombinant trypsins show wide differences in the degree of success and are contained mainly in patent applications, which disregard the difficulties associated with the developments. Although the yeast Pichia pastoris appears to be the microbial host with the greatest potential for the production of trypsin, it has shown problems when expressing cold-adapted fish trypsins (CAFTs). CAFTs are considered of immense value for their comparative advantage over other trypsins in a number of food-processing and biotechnological applications. Thus, to investigate potential obstacles related to the production of CAFTs in P. pastoris, the cunner fish trypsin (CFT) was cloned in different Pichia expression vectors. The vectors were constructed targeting both internal and secreted expression and keeping the CFT native signal peptide. Western-blotting analysis confirmed the expression with evident differences for each construct, observing a major effect of the leader peptide sequence on the expression patterns. Immobilized nickel affinity chromatography yielded a partially purified recombinant CFT, which exhibited trypsin-specific activity after activation with bovine enterokinase.

  4. Cold adaptation generates mutations associated with the growth of influenza B vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuh; Velkov, Tony; Camuglia, Sarina; Rockman, Steven P; Tannock, Gregory A

    2015-10-26

    Seasonal inactivated influenza vaccines are usually trivalent or quadrivalent and are prepared from accredited seed viruses. Yields of influenza A seed viruses can be enhanced by gene reassortment with high-yielding donor strains, but similar approaches for influenza B seed viruses have been largely unsuccessful. For vaccine manufacture influenza B seed viruses are usually adapted for high-growth by serial passage. Influenza B antigen yields so obtained are often unpredictable and selection of influenza B seed viruses by this method can be a rate-limiting step in seasonal influenza vaccine manufacture. We recently have shown that selection of stable cold-adapted mutants from seasonal epidemic influenza B viruses is associated with improved growth. In this study, specific mutations were identified that were responsible for growth enhancement as a consequence of adaptation to growth at lower temperatures. Molecular analysis revealed that the following mutations in the HA, NP and NA genes are required for enhanced viral growth: G156/N160 in the HA, E253, G375 in the NP and T146 in the NA genes. These results demonstrate that the growth of seasonal influenza B viruses can be optimized or improved significantly by specific gene modifications.

  5. Range shifts or extinction? Ancient DNA and distribution modelling reveal past and future responses to climate warming in cold-adapted birds.

    PubMed

    Lagerholm, Vendela K; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson; Vaniscotte, Amélie; Potapova, Olga R; Tomek, Teresa; Bochenski, Zbigniew M; Shepherd, Paul; Barton, Nick; Van Dyck, Marie-Claire; Miller, Rebecca; Höglund, Jacob; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Dalén, Love; Stewart, John R

    2017-04-01

    Global warming is predicted to cause substantial habitat rearrangements, with the most severe effects expected to occur in high-latitude biomes. However, one major uncertainty is whether species will be able to shift their ranges to keep pace with climate-driven environmental changes. Many recent studies on mammals have shown that past range contractions have been associated with local extinctions rather than survival by habitat tracking. Here, we have used an interdisciplinary approach that combines ancient DNA techniques, coalescent simulations and species distribution modelling, to investigate how two common cold-adapted bird species, willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and Lagopus muta), respond to long-term climate warming. Contrary to previous findings in mammals, we demonstrate a genetic continuity in Europe over the last 20 millennia. Results from back-casted species distribution models suggest that this continuity may have been facilitated by uninterrupted habitat availability and potentially also the greater dispersal ability of birds. However, our predictions show that in the near future, some isolated regions will have little suitable habitat left, implying a future decrease in local populations at a scale unprecedented since the last glacial maximum.

  6. Selection of cold-adapted mutants of human rotaviruses that exhibit various degrees of growth restriction in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1994-01-01

    Group A human rotavirus strains D, Wa, DS-1, and P were originally recovered from children with diarrhea. In an attempt to attenuate virulent, wild-type human rotaviruses of major epidemiological importance for use in a live oral vaccine, two reference rotavirus strains, D and DS-1, and two laboratory-generated reassortants, Wa x DS-1 and Wa x P, were subjected to cold adaptation. Collectively, these viruses provide antigenic coverage for both of the clinically important rotavirus VP4 antigens and three of the four important rotavirus VP7 antigens. Mutants of each of these rotaviruses were selected during successive serial passage in primary African green monkey kidney cells at progressively lower suboptimal temperatures (30, 28, and 26 degrees C). The genotype of each mutant appeared to be indistinguishable from that of its wild-type, parental virus. The mutants recovered after 10 serial passages at 30 degrees C exhibited both temperature sensitivity of plaque formation (i.e., a ts phenotype) and the ability to form plaques efficiently at suboptimal temperature (i.e., a cold adaptation [ca] phenotype), in contrast to parental wild-type rotavirus. The succeeding set of 10 serial passages at 28 degrees C selected mutants that exhibited an increased degree of cold adaptation, and three of the mutants exhibited an associated increase in temperature sensitivity. Finally, in the case of three of the strains, the third successive serial passage series, which was performed at 26 degrees C, selected for mutants with an even greater degree of cold adaptation than the previous series and was associated with greater temperature sensitivity in one instance. It appeared that each of the viruses sustained a minimum of four to five mutations during the total selection procedure. The ultimate identification of candidate vaccine viruses that exhibit the desired level of attenuation, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy needed for immunoprophylaxis will require evaluation of

  7. Selection of cold-adapted mutants of human rotaviruses that exhibit various degrees of growth restriction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1994-11-01

    Group A human rotavirus strains D, Wa, DS-1, and P were originally recovered from children with diarrhea. In an attempt to attenuate virulent, wild-type human rotaviruses of major epidemiological importance for use in a live oral vaccine, two reference rotavirus strains, D and DS-1, and two laboratory-generated reassortants, Wa x DS-1 and Wa x P, were subjected to cold adaptation. Collectively, these viruses provide antigenic coverage for both of the clinically important rotavirus VP4 antigens and three of the four important rotavirus VP7 antigens. Mutants of each of these rotaviruses were selected during successive serial passage in primary African green monkey kidney cells at progressively lower suboptimal temperatures (30, 28, and 26 degrees C). The genotype of each mutant appeared to be indistinguishable from that of its wild-type, parental virus. The mutants recovered after 10 serial passages at 30 degrees C exhibited both temperature sensitivity of plaque formation (i.e., a ts phenotype) and the ability to form plaques efficiently at suboptimal temperature (i.e., a cold adaptation [ca] phenotype), in contrast to parental wild-type rotavirus. The succeeding set of 10 serial passages at 28 degrees C selected mutants that exhibited an increased degree of cold adaptation, and three of the mutants exhibited an associated increase in temperature sensitivity. Finally, in the case of three of the strains, the third successive serial passage series, which was performed at 26 degrees C, selected for mutants with an even greater degree of cold adaptation than the previous series and was associated with greater temperature sensitivity in one instance. It appeared that each of the viruses sustained a minimum of four to five mutations during the total selection procedure. The ultimate identification of candidate vaccine viruses that exhibit the desired level of attenuation, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy needed for immunoprophylaxis will require evaluation of

  8. Generation and protective efficacy of a cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yandi; Qi, Lu; Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To prevent H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in chickens, a long-term vaccination program using inactivated vaccines has been implemented in China. However, the protective efficacy of inactivated vaccines against antigenic drift variants is limited, and H9N2 influenza virus continues to circulate in vaccinated chicken flocks in China. Therefore, developing a cross-reactive vaccine to control the impact of H9N2 influenza in the poultry industry remains a high priority. In the present study, we developed a live cold-adapted H9N2 influenza vaccine candidate (SD/01/10-ca) by serial passages in embryonated eggs at successively lower temperatures. A total of 13 amino acid mutations occurred during the cold-adaptation of this H9N2 virus. The candidate was safe in chickens and induced robust hemagglutination-inhibition antibody responses and influenza virus–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses in chickens immunized intranasally. Importantly, the candidate could confer protection of chickens from homologous and heterogenous H9N2 viruses. These results demonstrated that the cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 virus would be selected as a vaccine to control the infection of prevalent H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens. PMID:27457755

  9. Optimization of cold-adapted lysozyme production from the psychrophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii using statistical experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanfu; Hou, Yanhua; Yan, Peisheng

    2012-06-01

    Statistical experimental designs were employed to optimize culture conditions for cold-adapted lysozyme production of a psychrophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii. In the first step of optimization using Plackett-Burman design (PBD), peptone, glucose, temperature, and NaCl were identified as significant variables that affected lysozyme production, the formula was further optimized using a four factor central composite design (CCD) to understand their interaction and to determine their optimal levels. A quadratic model was developed and validated. Compared to the initial level (18.8 U/mL), the maximum lysozyme production (65.8 U/mL) observed was approximately increased by 3.5-fold under the optimized conditions. Cold-adapted lysozymes production was first optimized using statistical experimental methods. A 3.5-fold enhancement of microbial lysozyme was gained after optimization. Such an improved production will facilitate the application of microbial lysozyme. Thus, D. hansenii lysozyme may be a good and new resource for the industrial production of cold-adapted lysozymes. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Novel cold-adaptive Penicillium strain FS010 secreting thermo-labile xylanase isolated from Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yun-Hua; Wang, Tian-Hong; Long, Hao; Zhu, Hui-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    A novel cold-adaptive xylanolytic Penicillium strain FS010 was isolated from Yellow sea sediments. The marine fungus grew well from 4 to 20 degrees; a lower (0 degrees) or higher (37 degrees) temperature limits its growth. The strain was identified as Penicillium chrysogenum. Compared with mesophilic P. chrysogenum, the cold-adaptive fungus secreted the cold-active xylanase (XYL) showing high hydrolytic activities at low temperature (2-15 degrees) and high sensitivity to high temperature (>50 degrees). The XYL gene was isolated from the cold-adaptive P. chrysogenum FS010 and designated as xyl. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by xyl showed high homology with the sequence of glycoside hydrolase family 10. The gene was subcloned into an expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and the encoded protein was overexpressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase in Escherichia coli BL21. The expression product was purified and subjected to enzymatic characterization. The optimal temperature and pH for recombinant XYL was 25 degrees and 5.5, respectively. Recombinant XYL showed nearly 80% of its maximal activity at 4 degrees and was active in the pH range 3.0-9.5.

  11. Molecular determinants of enzyme cold adaptation: comparative structural and computational studies of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena; Tiberti, Matteo; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Pasi, Marco; Ranzani, Valeria

    2011-11-01

    The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying enzyme cold adaptation is a hot-topic both for fundamental research and industrial applications. In the present contribution, we review the last decades of structural computational investigations on cold-adapted enzymes in comparison to their warm-adapted counterparts. Comparative sequence and structural studies allow the definition of a multitude of adaptation strategies. Different enzymes carried out diverse mechanisms to adapt to low temperatures, so that a general theory for enzyme cold adaptation cannot be formulated. However, some common features can be traced in dynamic and flexibility properties of these enzymes, as well as in their intra- and inter-molecular interaction networks. Interestingly, the current data suggest that a family-centered point of view is necessary in the comparative analyses of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. In fact, enzymes belonging to the same family or superfamily, thus sharing at least the three-dimensional fold and common features of the functional sites, have evolved similar structural and dynamic patterns to overcome the detrimental effects of low temperatures.

  12. Promoters from a cold-adapted bacterium: definition of a consensus motif and molecular characterization of UP regulative elements.

    PubMed

    Duilio, Angela; Madonna, Stefania; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Pirozzi, Marinella; Sannia, Giovanni; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-04-01

    Although low-temperature tolerant micro-organisms were discovered long ago, limited information is still available on the transcription machinery in cold-adapted bacteria. This knowledge represents a necessary background for the investigation of the adaptation of gene-expression mechanisms at low temperatures. The recent development of a shuttle genetic system for the transformation of the cold-adapted Gram-negative bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis strain TAC125 has made possible the isolation of the psychrophilic promoters described in this paper. TAC125 genomic DNA fragments were cloned in the shuttle vector and the promoter-containing recombinant clones were selected for their ability to express a promoter-less lacZ gene. The nucleotide sequence of several selected inserts and the transcription start points of the transcribed m-RNAs were determined. A promoter consensus sequence for Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 was proposed on the basis of a sequence comparison between the various active promoters. Furthermore, the identification and the functional characterization of two UP elements from this cold-adapted bacterium are also reported.

  13. Biogenesis of thermogenic mitochondria in brown adipose tissue of Djungarian hamsters during cold adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Klingenspor, M; Ivemeyer, M; Wiesinger, H; Haas, K; Heldmaier, G; Wiesner, R J

    1996-01-01

    After cold exposure, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity increased about 2.5-fold within 2 weeks in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of Djungarian hamsters. The mRNAs for COX subunits I and III and the 12 S rRNA, encoded on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as well as mRNAs for COX subunits IV, Va and mitochondrial transcription factor A, encoded in the nucleus, were unchanged when expressed per unit of total tissue RNA. However, since total tissue RNA doubled per BAT depot, while total DNA remained unchanged, the actual levels of these transcripts were increased within BAT cells. In contrast, the abundance of mRNA for uncoupling protein was increased 10-fold, indicating specific activation of this gene. In addition, the maximal rate of protein synthesis analysed in a faithful in organello system was increased 2.5-fold in mitochondria isolated from BAT after 7 days of cold exposure. We conclude from these data that the biogenesis of thermogenic mitochondria in BAT following cold adaptation is achieved by increasing the overall capacity for synthesis of mitochondrial proteins in both compartments, by increasing their mRNAs as well as the ribosomes needed for their translation. In addition, the translational rate for COX subunits as well as all other proteins encoded on mtDNA is increased. Thus the pool of subunits encoded on mtDNA required for assembly of respiratory chain complexes is provided. By comparison with other models of increased mitochondrial biogenesis, we propose that thyroid hormone (generated within BAT cells by 5'-deiodinase, and induced upon sympathetic stimulation), which is a well known regulator of the biogenesis of mitochondria in many tissues, is also the major effector of these adaptive changes in BAT. PMID:8687407

  14. Role of fatty acids in cold adaptation of Antarctic psychrophilic Flavobacterium spp.

    PubMed

    Králová, Stanislava

    2017-09-01

    Cold-loving microorganisms developed numerous adaptation mechanisms allowing them to survive in extremely cold habitats, such as adaptation of the cell membrane. The focus of this study was on the membrane fatty acids of Antarctic Flavobacterium spp., and their adaptation response to cold-stress. Fatty acids and cold-response of Antarctic flavobacteria was also compared to mesophilic and thermophilic members of the genus Flavobacterium. The results showed that the psychrophiles produced more types of major fatty acids than meso- and thermophilic members of this genus, namely C15:1 iso G, C15:0 iso, C15:0 anteiso, C15:1ω6c, C15:0 iso 3OH, C17:1ω6c, C16:0 iso 3OH and C17:0 iso 3OH, summed features 3 (C16:1ω7cand/or C16:1ω6c) and 9 (C16:0 10-methyl and/or C17:1 iso ω9c). It was shown that the cell membrane of psychrophiles was composed mainly of branched and unsaturated fatty acids. The results also implied that Antarctic flavobacteria mainly used two mechanisms of membrane fluidity alteration in their cold-adaptive response. The first mechanism was based on unsaturation of fatty acids, and the second mechanism on de novo synthesis of branched fatty acids. The alteration of the cell membrane was shown to be similar for all thermotypes of members of the genus Flavobacterium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavioral buffering of global warming in a cold-adapted lizard.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    Alpine lizards living in restricted areas might be particularly sensitive to climate change. We studied thermal biology of Iberolacerta cyreni in high mountains of central Spain. Our results suggest that I. cyreni is a cold-adapted thermal specialist and an effective thermoregulator. Among ectotherms, thermal specialists are more threatened by global warming than generalists. Alpine lizards have no chance to disperse to new suitable habitats. In addition, physiological plasticity is unlikely to keep pace with the expected rates of environmental warming. Thus, lizards might rely on their behavior in order to deal with ongoing climate warming. Plasticity of thermoregulatory behavior has been proposed to buffer the rise of environmental temperatures. Therefore, we studied the change in body and environmental temperatures, as well as their relationships, for I. cyreni between the 1980s and 2012. Air temperatures have increased more than 3.5°C and substrate temperatures have increased by 6°C in the habitat of I. cyreni over the last 25 years. However, body temperatures of lizards have increased less than 2°C in the same period, and the linear relationship between body and environmental temperatures remains similar. These results show that alpine lizards are buffering the potential impact of the increase in their environmental temperatures, most probably by means of their behavior. Body temperatures of I. cyreni are still cold enough to avoid any drop in fitness. Nonetheless, if warming continues, behavioral buffering might eventually become useless, as it would imply spending too much time in shelter, losing feeding, and mating opportunities. Eventually, if body temperature exceeds the thermal optimum in the near future, fitness would decrease abruptly.

  16. Expression and biochemical characterization of cold-adapted lipases from Antarctic Bacillus pumilus strains.

    PubMed

    Litantra, Ribka; Lobionda, Stefani; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2013-09-28

    Two lipase genes (bpl1 and bpl3) from Antarctic Bacillus pumilus strains were expressed in Bacillus subtilis. Both recombinant lipases BPL1 and BPL2 were secreted to the culture medium and their activities reached 3.5 U/ml and 5.0 U/ml, respectively. Their molecular masses apparent using SDS-PAGE were 23 kDa for BPL1 and 19 kDa for BPL3. Both lipases were purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation and HiTrap SP FF column and Superose 12 column chromatographies. The final specific activities were estimated to be 328 U/mg for BPL1 and 310 U/mg for BPL3. Both lipases displayed an optimum temperature of 35°C, similar to other mesophilic enzymes. However, they maintained as much as 70% and 80% of the maximum activities at 10°C. Accordingly, their calculated activation energy at a temperature range of 10-35°C was 5.32 kcal/mol for BPL1 and 4.26 kcal/mol for BPL3, typical of cold-adapted enzymes. The optimum pH of BPL1 and BPL3 was 8.5 and 8.0, respectively, and they were quite stable at pH 7.0-11.0, showing their strong alkaline tolerance. Both lipases had a preference toward medium chain length (C6-C10) fatty acid substrates. These results indicate the potential for the two Antarctic B. pumilus lipases as catalysts in bioorganic synthesis, food, and detergent industries.

  17. Diversity and cold adaptation of microorganisms isolated from the Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojib, Nazia; Bej, Asim K.; Hoover, Richard

    2008-08-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of the PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from eubacteria and Archea on samples collected on Whatman FTA filters from Schirmacher Oasis for the study of culture-independent analysis of the microbial diversity. Both conventional PCR and real-time TaqmaTM PCR successfully amplified the targeted genes. A number of diverse groups of psychrotolerant microorganisms with various pigments have been isolated when cultured on agar medium. 16S rRNA gene analysis of these isolates helped us to identify closest taxonomic genus Pseudomonas, Frigoribacterium, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, and Janthinobacterium. It is possible that the pigments play protective role from solar UV radiation, which is prevalent in Antarctic continent especially during Austral summer months. Study of the expression of cold adaptive protein CapB and ice-binding protein IBP using western blots showed positive detection of both or either of these proteins in 6 out of 8 isolates. Since the CapB and IBP protein structure greatly varies in microorganisms, it is possible that the 2 isolates with negative results could have a different class of these proteins. The expression of the CapB and the IBP in these isolates suggest that these proteins are essential for the survival in the Antarctic cold and subzero temperatures and protect themselves from freeze-damage. The current study provided sufficient data to further investigate the rich and diverse biota of psychrotolerant extremophiles in the Antarctic Schirmacher Oasis using both culture-independent and culture-based approaches; and understand the mechanisms of cold tolerance.

  18. Efficacy of a cold-adapted, intranasal, equine influenza vaccine: challenge trials.

    PubMed

    Townsend, H G; Penner, S J; Watts, T C; Cook, A; Bogdan, J; Haines, D M; Griffin, S; Chambers, T; Holland, R E; Whitaker-Dowling, P; Youngner, J S; Sebring, R W

    2001-11-01

    A randomised, controlled, double-blind, influenza virus, aerosol challenge of horses was undertaken to determine the efficacy of a cold-adapted, temperature sensitive, modified-live virus, intranasal, equine influenza vaccine. Ninety 11-month-old influenza-naïve foals were assigned randomly to 3 groups (20 vaccinates and 10 controls per group) and challenged 5 weeks, 6 and 12 months after a single vaccination. Challenges were performed on Day 0 in a plastic-lined chamber. Between Days 1 and 10, animals were examined daily for evidence of clinical signs of influenza. Nasal swabs for virus isolation were obtained on Day 1 and Days 1 to 8 and blood samples for serology were collected on Days 1, 7 and 14. There was no adverse response to vaccination in any animal. Following challenge at 5 weeks and 6 months, vaccinates had significantly lower clinical scores (P = 0.0001 and 0.005, respectively), experienced smaller increases in rectal temperature (P = 0.0008 and 0.0007, respectively) and shed less virus (P<0.0001 and P = 0.03, respectively) over fewer days (P<0.0001 and P = 0.002, respectively) than did the controls. After the 12 month challenge, rectal temperatures (P = 0.006) as well as the duration (P = 0.03) and concentration of virus shed (P = 0.04) were significantly reduced among vaccinated animals. The results of this study showed that 6 months after a single dose of vaccine the duration and severity of clinical signs were markedly reduced amongst vaccinated animals exposed to a severe live-virus challenge. Appropriate use of this vaccine should lead to a marked reduction in the frequency, severity and duration of outbreaks of equine influenza in North America.

  19. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O32−), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O32− that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO42−) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O32−. Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O32−, CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O32− as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O32−-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O32− by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment. PMID:26712544

  20. Elucidation of different cold-adapted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin X isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Bjarki; Sandholt, Gunnar B; Gudmundsdottir, Ágústa

    2017-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed. Anion exchange chromatography revealed eight peaks containing proteins around 24kDa with tryptic activity. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, one isoenzyme gave the best match to cod trypsin I and six isoenzymes gave the best match to cod trypsin X. Amino terminal sequencing of two of these six trypsin isoenzymes showed identity to cod trypsin X. Three sequence variants of trypsin X were identified by cDNA analysis demonstrating that various forms of this enzyme exist. One trypsin X isoenzyme was selected for further characterization based on abundance and stability. Stepwise increase in catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of this trypsin X isoenzyme was obtained with substrates containing one to three amino acid residues. The study demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of this trypsin X isoenzyme is comparable to that of cod trypsin I, the most abundant and highly active isoenzyme in the benzamidine cod trypsin isolate. Differences in pH stability and sensitivity to inhibitors of the trypsin X isoenzyme compared to cod trypsin I were detected that may be important for practical use.

  1. Structural and functional characterization of a cold adapted TPM-domain with ATPase/ADPase activity.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, María L; Otero, Lisandro H; Smal, Clara; Pellizza, Leonardo; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Klinke, Sebastián; Aran, Martín

    2016-11-01

    The Pfam PF04536 TPM_phosphatase family is a broadly conserved family of domains found across prokaryotes, plants and invertebrates. Despite having a similar protein fold, members of this family have been implicated in diverse cellular processes and found in varied subcellular localizations. Very recently, the biochemical characterization of two evolutionary divergent TPM domains has shown that they are able to hydrolyze phosphate groups from different substrates. However, there are still incorrect functional annotations and uncertain relationships between the structure and function of this family of domains. BA41 is an uncharacterized single-pass transmembrane protein from the Antarctic psychrotolerant bacterium Bizionia argentinensis with a predicted compact extracytoplasmic TPM domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic low complexity region. To shed light on the structural properties that enable TPM domains to adopt divergent roles, we here accomplish a comprehensive structural and functional characterization of the central TPM domain of BA41 (BA41-TPM). Contrary to its predicted function as a beta-propeller methanol dehydrogenase, light scattering and crystallographic studies showed that BA41-TPM behaves as a globular monomeric protein and adopts a conserved Rossmann fold, typically observed in other TPM domain structures. Although the crystal structure reveals the conservation of residues involved in substrate binding, no putative catalytic or intramolecular metal ions were detected. Most important, however, extensive biochemical studies demonstrated that BA41-TPM has hydrolase activity against ADP, ATP, and other di- and triphosphate nucleotides and shares properties of cold-adapted enzymes. The role of BA41 in extracellular ATP-mediated signaling pathways and its occurrence in environmental and pathogenic microorganisms is discussed.

  2. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Zoë R; Skidmore, Mark L; Hamilton, Trinity L; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2015-12-28

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O3 (2-)), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O3 (2-) that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO4 (2-)) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O3 (2-). Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O3 (2-), CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O3 (2-) as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O3 (2-)-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O3 (2-) by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 : Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 family in heat- and cold-adapted goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Dipak; Upadhyay, Ramesh C; Chaudhary, Umesh B; Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Sohanvir; Ashutosh; G, Jagan Mohanarao; Polley, Shamik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Das, Tapan K; De, Sachinandan

    2014-05-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is one of the most abundant and best characterized heat shock protein family that consists of highly conserved stress proteins, expressed in response to stress, and plays crucial roles in environmental stress tolerance and adaptation. The present study was conducted to identify major types of genes under the HSP70 family and to quantify their expression pattern in heat- and cold-adapted Indian goats (Capra hircus) with respect to different seasons. Five HSP70 gene homologues to HSPA8, HSPA6, HSPA1A, HSPA1L, and HSPA2 were identified by gene-specific primers. The cDNA sequences showed high similarity to other mammals, and proteins have an estimated molecular weight of around 70 kDa. The expression of HSP70 genes was observed during summer and winter. During summer, the higher expression of HSPA8, HSPA6, and HSPA1A was observed, whereas the expression levels of HSPA1L and HSPA2 were found to be lower. It was also observed that the expression of HSPA1A and HSPA8 was higher during winter in both heat- and cold-adapted goats but downregulates in case of other HSPs. Therefore, both heat and cold stress induced the overexpression of HSP70 genes. An interesting finding that emerged from the study is the higher expression of HSP70 genes in cold-adapted goats during summer and in heat-adapted goats during winter. Altogether, the results indicate that the expression pattern of HSP70 genes is species- and breed-specific, most likely due to variations in thermal tolerance and adaptation to different climatic conditions.

  4. Safety of the trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2002-04-01

    The trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T, FluMist, Aviron, Mountain View, CA) is a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine that is administered by nasal spray. CAIV-T is efficacious in preventing influenza virus infection. The vaccine was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for licensure in healthy children and adults. Universal immunization is being considered in children, and an effective vaccine with minimal adverse reactions is thus required. The published studies on the safety of CAIV-T in children reviewed in this article were clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted in children from 1975 to 1991, clinical trials from 1991 to 1993 sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Wyeth-Ayerst Research, and clinical trials from 1995 to the present sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Aviron. Safety assessments included the occurrence of: 1) specific influenza-like symptoms, unexpected symptoms, and use of medications within the first 10 days after vaccination; 2) acute illness and use of medication within 11 to 42 days postvaccination; 3) serious adverse events and rare events within 42 days after vaccination; 4) healthcare utilization within 14 days after vaccination; and 5) acute respiratory symptoms with annual sequential vaccine doses. CAIV-T was safe and well-tolerated. Transient, mild respiratory symptoms were observed in a minority (10%-15%) of children and primarily with the first CAIV-T dose. Vomiting and abdominal pain occurred in fewer than 2 percent of CAIV-T recipients. The gastrointestinal symptoms were mild and of short duration. An excess of illness or use of medication was not observed after the 10th day of vaccination. Sequential annual doses of CAIV-T were well-tolerated and not associated with increased reactogenicity. CAIV-T did not cause an increase in healthcare utilization. Thus CAIV-T is safe in healthy children and should complement the use of inactivated

  5. Evaluation of replication, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted pandemic H1N1 influenza virus vaccine in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Vogel, Leatrice; Subbarao, Kanta

    2012-08-17

    We studied the replication of influenza A/California/07/09 (H1N1) wild type (CA09wt) virus in two non-human primate species and used one of these models to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted vaccine, which contains the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase from the H1N1 wild type (wt) virus and six internal protein gene segments of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted (ca) master donor virus. We infected African green monkeys (AGMs) and rhesus macaques with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of CA09wt and CA09ca influenza viruses. The virus CA09wt replicated in the upper respiratory tract of all animals but the titers in upper respiratory tract tissues of rhesus macaques were significant higher than in AGMs (mean peak titers 10(4.5) TCID(50)/g and 10(2.0) TCID(50)/g on days 4 and 2 post-infection, respectively; p<0.01). Virus replication was observed in the lungs of all rhesus macaques (10(2.0)-10(5.4) TCID(50)/g) whereas only 2 out of 4 AGMs had virus recovered from the lungs (10(2.5)-10(3.5) TCID(50)/g). The CA09ca vaccine virus was attenuated and highly restricted in replication in both AGMs and rhesus macaques. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the CA09ca vaccine in rhesus macaques because CA09wt virus replicated more efficiently in this species. One or two doses of vaccine were administered intranasally and intratracheally to rhesus macaques. For the two-dose group, the vaccine was administered 4-weeks apart. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibodies in the serum and specific IgA antibodies to CA09wt virus in the nasal wash. One or two doses of the vaccine elicited a significant rise in HAI titers (range 40-320). Two doses of CA09ca elicited higher pH1N1-specific IgA titers than in the mock-immunized group (p<0.01). Vaccine efficacy was assessed by comparing titers of CA09wt challenge virus in the respiratory tract of mock-immunized and CA09ca vaccinated monkeys

  6. [Further development (MDCK) of live cold-adapted influenza vaccine: cultivation of vaccine strains in production fermenters].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z; Markushin, S G; Akopova, I I; Koptiaeva, I B; Nechaeva, E A; Mazurkova, I A; Radaeva, I F; Kolokol'tsova, T D

    2005-01-01

    Optimal conditions were developed for cultivating the cold-adapted reassortant live influenza vaccine (CARLIV) in MDCK cells, which were in their turn cultivated in fermenters with serum-free medium and microcarrier. The use of MDCK cells meets all national and WHO requirements to continuous cells used in the production of biological preparations. CARLIV cultivated under such conditions well preserve their ts-mutations and mutation, which entail substitutions of amino acids, in all CARLIV genome segments. Provided the cultivation conditions are optimal, the output of multivalent CARLIV in a 101 fermenter can reach 100000 doses.

  7. Effect of simultaneous administration of cold-adapted and wild-type influenza A viruses on experimental wild-type influenza infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Youngner, J S; Treanor, J J; Betts, R F; Whitaker-Dowling, P

    1994-03-01

    On the basis of the ability of the attenuated cold-adapted strain of influenza A virus to suppress disease production in ferrets simultaneously infected with epidemic influenza virus (P. Whitaker-Dowling, H.F. Maassab, and J.S. Youngner, J. Infect. Dis. 164:1200-1202, 1991), an evaluation of the ability of the cold-adapted virus to modify clinical disease in humans was made. Adult volunteers with prechallenge serum hemagglutination-inhibition titers to the influenza A/Kawasaki/86 (H1N1) virus of < or = 1:8 received either 10(7) 50% tissue culture infective doses of the wild-type A/Kawasaki virus or a mixture of 10(7) 50% tissue culture infective doses of each of the wild-type virus and a cold-adapted A/Kawasaki reassortant virus by intranasal drops in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Symptoms and wild-type virus shedding were assessed daily for 6 days following challenge. Results were compared with those derived from another group of volunteers who received only cold-adapted virus. Volunteers who received the mixed inoculum of cold-adapted and wild-type viruses had lower symptom scores than those who received wild-type virus alone, suggesting that coinfection with the cold-adapted virus may modify wild-type virus infection, but the differences were not statistically significant in this small study. The data demonstrate that administration of cold-adapted influenza A virus to humans at the time of wild-type virus infection is a safe procedure.

  8. Sequence and structural investigation of a novel psychrophilic α-amylase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 for cold-adaptation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Azhar, Mohd Akmal; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Rabu, Amir; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2013-08-01

    A novel α-amylase was isolated successfully from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 using DNA walking and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. The structure of this psychrophilic α-amylase (AmyPI12) from G. antarctica PI12 has yet to be studied in detail. A 3D model of AmyPI12 was built using a homology modelling approach to search for a suitable template and to generate an optimum target-template alignment, followed by model building using MODELLER9.9. Analysis of the AmyPI12 model revealed the presence of binding sites for a conserved calcium ion (CaI), non-conserved calcium ions (CaII and CaIII) and a sodium ion (Na). Compared with its template-the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BSTA)-the binding of CaII, CaIII and Na ions in AmyPI12 was observed to be looser, which suggests that the low stability of AmyPI12 allows the protein to work at different temperature scales. The AmyPI12 amino acid sequence and model were compared with thermophilic α-amylases from Bacillus species that provided the highest structural similarities with AmyPI12. These comparative studies will enable identification of possible determinants of cold adaptation.

  9. Cold adaptation of eicosapentaenoic acid-less mutant of Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 involving uptake and remodeling of synthetic phospholipids containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sho; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Kawamoto, Jun; Hosokawa, Masashi; Sato, Satoshi B; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2008-11-01

    An Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium, Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10, produces cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LPUFA), as a component of membrane phospholipids at low temperatures. The EPA-less mutant generated by disruption of the EPA synthesis gene becomes cold-sensitive. We studied whether the cold sensitivity could be suppressed by supplementation of various LPUFAs. The EPA-less mutant was cultured at 6 degrees C in the presence of synthetic phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) that contained oleic acid at the sn-1 position and various C20 fatty acids with different numbers of double bonds from zero to five or cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) at the sn-2 position. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that all these fatty acids became components of various PE and phosphatidylglycerol species together with shorter partner fatty acids, indicating that large-scale remodeling followed the incorporation of synthetic PEs. As the number of double bonds in the sn-2 acyl chain decreased, the growth rate decreased and the cells became filamentous. The growth was restored to the wild-type level only when the medium was supplemented with phospholipids containing EPA or DHA. We found that about a half of DHA was converted into EPA. The results suggest that intact EPA is best required for cold adaptation of this bacterium.

  10. Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Analysis Provide Insights Into the Cold Adaptation Mechanism of the Obligate Psychrophilic Fungus Mrakia psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yao; Jiang, Xianzhi; Wu, Wenping; Wang, Manman; Hamid, M. Imran; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Mrakia psychrophila is an obligate psychrophilic fungus. The cold adaptation mechanism of psychrophilic fungi remains unknown. Comparative genomics analysis indicated that M. psychrophila had a specific codon usage preference, especially for codons of Gly and Arg and its major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene family was expanded. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes involved in ribosome and energy metabolism were upregulated at 4°, while genes involved in unfolded protein binding, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, proteasome, spliceosome, and mRNA surveillance were upregulated at 20°. In addition, genes related to unfolded protein binding were alternatively spliced. Consistent with other psychrophiles, desaturase and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are involved in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid and glycerol respectively, were upregulated at 4°. Cold adaptation of M. psychrophila is mediated by synthesizing unsaturated fatty acids to maintain membrane fluidity and accumulating glycerol as a cryoprotectant. The proteomic analysis indicated that the correlations between the dynamic patterns between transcript level changes and protein level changes for some pathways were positive at 4°, but negative at 20°. The death of M. psychrophila above 20° might be caused by an unfolded protein response. PMID:27633791

  11. Biocontrol activity of a cold-adapted yeast from Tibet against gray mold in cherry tomato and its action mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Wisniewski, Michael E; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    Cold-adapted biocontrol yeast was selected from four yeast isolates from Tibet against gray mold of cherry tomato in cold storage. The strain numbered LB2 showed the best biocontrol activity and identified as Cryptococcus laurentii. Competition for nutrient, space, and induced fruit resistance was also its antagonistic mechanism. Compared with C. laurentii from sea-level place, the reason why LB2 had a better biocontrol activity was studied. More trehalose and proline in cell of LB2 made it exhibit a better cellular activity at low temperature, such as higher population dynamics in the wounds of cherry tomato and more biocontrol-related enzyme secretion, chitinase and β-glucanase. The better oxidative stress tolerance was another characteristic of LB2. Maybe because of the ideal culture condition, there was no obvious difference between these two yeasts in the growth in vitro test at low temperature. Although the same phenomenon existed in the low pH stress test, LB2 still had higher cell concentration under this stress. Comparative transcriptomics method was also applied to analyze the cell activity of LB2 and C. laurentii at different temperatures. The results showed that more active response in the intracellular structure and intracellular metabolic process to cold temperature made LB2 had a better activity. The present study indicated a possibility to select cold-adapted biocontrol yeast from Tibet and also showed its primary action mechanism.

  12. Purification and characterization of an extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase produced by psychrotrophic bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Chen, Guiyuan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Wei, Yunlin

    2015-06-01

    An extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase from the psychrotrophic Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1 was purified 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme was active over a broad range spanning 0-60 °C with an optimum activity at 37 °C, and it was found to be alkaline-preferring with an optimum activity at pH 9.0. The molecular weight was estimated to be 34.3 KDa and monomeric. The lipase could be activated by Ca(2+) and low concentration (10%) of ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, and acetonitrile, whereas it was strongly inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, EDTA, and PMSF. Using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as a substrate at 37 °C, the Km and Vmax of the enzyme were found to be 16.58 mM and 5.24 × 10(5)  μM · min(-1), respectively. This extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase may be a good candidate for detergents and biocatalysts at low temperature.

  13. A new cold-adapted serine peptidase from Antarctic Lysobacter sp. A03: Insights about enzyme activity at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane Maria Pereira; Brandelli, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is a great interest for customized biocatalysts that can supply the ongoing demand of industrial processes, but also deal with the growing concern about the environment. In this scenario, cold-adapted enzymes have features that make them very attractive for industrial and biotechnological purposes. Here, we describe A03Pep1, a new cold-adapted serine peptidase isolated from Lysobacter sp. A03 by screening a genomic library. The enzyme is synthesized as a large inactive prepropeptidase that, after intramolecular processing, gives rise to the active form, of 35kDa. The heterologous expression of A03Pep1 was carried out in E. coli cells harboring the vector pGEX-4T-2-a0301. Its activity was optimal at pH 9.0 and 40°C, in the presence of 25mM Ca(2+), which may contribute to the thermal stability of the enzyme. The 3D structure modelling predicted a less deep and more open binding pocket in A03Pep1 than that observed in the crystal structure of its mesophilic homologous AprV2, presumably as a way to enhance the probability of substrate binding at low temperatures. These results provide possible approaches in developing new biotechnologically relevant peptidases active at low to moderate temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of cold-adapted and temperature-sensitive mutants of parainfluenza virus type 3 in weanling hamsters.

    PubMed

    Crookshanks, F K; Belshe, R B

    1984-01-01

    Cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of parainfluenza virus 3 were produced by serially passaging wild type (wt) parainfluenza virus 3 at 20 degrees C 45 times. Previously, plaque-purified viruses (clones) were selected from the wt parent and from cold passage levels 7, 12, 18, and 45 and characterized in vitro. In the present study, we evaluated at least one mutant from each cold passage level for attenuation in hamsters. Four of the five mutants tested were ts and ca (one each from cold passage levels 7, 12, 18, and 45) and one was ca but not ts (from cold passage 18). Groups of hamsters were inoculated intranasally with either parent wt or mutant virus. Four or five hamsters from each group were sacrificed prior to inoculation and daily on the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth or seventh day postinoculation and the amount of virus in nasal turbinates and lungs was quantitated. The quantity of virus recovered from the hamsters and the parainfluenza virus 3 antibody titers were inversely related to the cold passage level. Two of the mutants did not replicate in hamsters. Cold adaptation of parainfluenza virus 3 resulted in progressive attenuation of the virus in weanling hamsters. These highly attenuated mutants are suitable for evaluation in children as live virus vaccines.

  15. The peculiar heme pocket of the 2/2 hemoglobin of cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Howes, Barry D; Giordano, Daniela; Boechi, Leonardo; Russo, Roberta; Mucciacciaro, Simona; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sinibaldi, Federica; Fittipaldi, Maria; Martí, Marcelo A; Estrin, Darío A; di Prisco, Guido; Coletta, Massimo; Verde, Cinzia; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2011-02-01

    The genome of the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 contains multiple genes encoding three distinct monomeric hemoglobins exhibiting a 2/2 α-helical fold. In the present work, one of these hemoglobins is studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies, kinetic measurements, and different bioinformatic approaches. It is the first cold-adapted bacterial hemoglobin to be characterized. The results indicate that this protein belongs to the 2/2 hemoglobin family, Group II, characterized by the presence of a tryptophanyl residue on the bottom of the heme distal pocket in position G8 and two tyrosyl residues (TyrCD1 and TyrB10). However, unlike other bacterial hemoglobins, the ferric state, in addition to the aquo hexacoordinated high-spin form, shows multiple hexacoordinated low-spin forms, where either TyrCD1 or TyrB10 can likely coordinate the iron. This is the first example in which both TyrCD1 and TyrB10 are proposed to be the residues that are alternatively involved in heme hexacoordination by endogenous ligands.

  16. The ability of a cold-adapted Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain from Tibet to control blue mold in pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Yan, Fujie; Wilson, Charles; Shen, Qing; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Cold-adapted yeasts were isolated from soil samples collected in Tibet and evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against blue mold (Penicillium expansum) of pear fruit in cold storage. YC1, an isolate identified as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, was found to exhibit the greatest biocontrol activity among the different isolates that were screened. A washed cell suspension of YC1 exhibited the best biocontrol activity among three different preparations that were used in the current study. A concentration of 10(8) cells/ml reduced the incidence of decay to 35 %, compared to the control where decay incidence was 100 %. A higher intracellular level of trehalose and a higher proportion of polyunsaturated acids present in YC1, was associated with increased the tolerance of this strain to low temperatures, relative to the other strains that were evaluated. The increased tolerance to low temperature allowed the YC1 strain of yeast to more effectively compete for nutrients and space in wounded pear fruit that had been inoculated with spores of P. expansum and placed in cold storage. The present study demonstrated the ability to select cold-adapted yeasts from cold climates and use them as biocontrol agents of postharvest diseases of fruit placed in cold storage.

  17. Cold-adapted vaccine strains of influenza A virus act as dominant negative mutants in mixed infections with wild-type influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Whitaker-Dowling, P; Lucas, W; Youngner, J S

    1990-04-01

    The cold-adapted reassortant of influenza A, which is a candidate live virus vaccine, interfered with the replication of parental wild-type virus in mixed infections of either MDCK cells or embryonated eggs. The interference occurred at either the permissive or nonpermissive temperature for the cold-adapted virus. In doubly infected cells, the yield of the wild-type virus was reduced by as much as 3000-fold and the protein synthesis phenotype expressed was that of the cold-adapted virus. The interference was detected even when infection with wild-type virus was carried out at a 9-fold excess or 2 hr before infection with the cold-adapted virus. As well as interfering with its wild-type parental virus, the cold-adapted virus also inhibited the replication of a heterologous influenza A subtype. In addition to its immunogenic potential, the ability to interfere with the replication of wild-type viruses is a desirable trait for any live, attenuated virus vaccine.

  18. Mechanism for Stabilizing mRNAs Involved in Methanol-Dependent Methanogenesis of Cold-Adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5′ UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5′ UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5′ UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5′ UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15. PMID:24317083

  19. Differential cold-adaptation among protein components of the thioredoxin system in the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125.

    PubMed

    Cotugno, Roberta; Rosaria Ruocco, Maria; Marco, Salvatore; Falasca, Patrizia; Evangelista, Giovanna; Raimo, Gennaro; Chambery, Angela; Di Maro, Antimo; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele

    2009-05-01

    Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase from the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were obtained as recombinant His-tagged proteins (rPhTrx and rPhTrxR, respectively). rPhTrxR is organised as a homodimeric flavoenzyme, whereas rPhTrx is a small monomeric protein, both containing a functional disulfide bridge. However, three additional cysteines are present as free thiols in purified rPhTrxR. When individually tested in specific assays, rPhTrxR and rPhTrx display a full activity at low temperatures, an indispensable requirement for cold-adapted proteins. In particular, rPhTrxR catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of DTNB and rPhTrx provokes the insulin precipitation in the presence of DTT. The analysis of the effect of temperature on these reactions indicates that rPhTrxR is more cold-adapted than rPhTrx, having a higher psychrophilicity. The combined activity of rPhTrxR and rPhTrx, tested in a reconstituted assay containing NADPH as electrons donor and human insulin as the thioredoxin substrate, demonstrates a direct functional interaction between the purified recombinant components of the thioredoxin system of P. haloplanktis. Furthermore, the NADPH-dependent reduction of rPhTrx catalysed by rPhTrxR is fully reversible and allows the determination of its redox potential, whose value is in the range of other bacterial and archaeal thioredoxins. The analysis of the thermostability of rPhTrxR points to its discrete heat resistance. However, rPhTrx is much more heat resistant, with a half inactivation time of about 4 h at 95 degrees C. This exceptional heat resistance for a psychrophilic protein is significantly decreased by the reduction of the disulfide bridge of rPhTrx. Functionality, thermodependence and thermostability of the P. haloplanktis thioredoxin system point to the relevance of this key mechanism for the preservation of the reduced state of cytoplasmic proteins even in a cold-adapted source.

  20. Molecular cloning, expression and biochemical characterisation of a cold-adapted novel recombinant chitinase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cold-adapted enzymes are proteins produced by psychrophilic organisms that display a high catalytic efficiency at extremely low temperatures. Chitin consists of the insoluble homopolysaccharide β-(1, 4)-linked N-acetylglucosamine, which is the second most abundant biopolymer found in nature. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) play an important role in chitin recycling in nature. Biodegradation of chitin by the action of cold-adapted chitinases offers significant advantages in industrial applications such as the treatment of chitin-rich waste at low temperatures, the biocontrol of phytopathogens in cold environments and the biocontrol of microbial spoilage of refrigerated food. Results A gene encoding a cold-adapted chitinase (CHI II) from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 was isolated using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RT-PCR techniques. The isolated gene was successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris expression system. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed the presence of an open reading frame of 1,215 bp, which encodes a 404 amino acid protein. The recombinant chitinase was secreted into the medium when induced with 1% methanol in BMMY medium at 25°C. The purified recombinant chitinase exhibited two bands, corresponding to the non-glycosylated and glycosylated proteins, by SDS-PAGE with molecular masses of approximately 39 and 50 kDa, respectively. The enzyme displayed an acidic pH characteristic with an optimum pH at 4.0 and an optimum temperature at 15°C. The enzyme was stable between pH 3.0-4.5 and was able to retain its activity from 5 to 25°C. The presence of K+, Mn2+ and Co2+ ions increased the enzyme activity up to 20%. Analysis of the insoluble substrates showed that the purified recombinant chitinase had a strong affinity towards colloidal chitin and little effect on glycol chitosan. CHI II recombinant chitinase exhibited higher Vmax and Kcat values toward colloidal chitin than other substrates at low temperatures. Conclusion By

  1. Mechanism for stabilizing mRNAs involved in methanol-dependent methanogenesis of cold-adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-02-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5' UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5' UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5' UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5' UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15.

  2. Metabolic activity and behavior of the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and two common Central European gammarid species (Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus roeselii): Low metabolic rates may favor the invader.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jochen; Ortmann, Christian; Wetzel, Markus A; Koop, Jochen H E

    2016-01-01

    The Ponto-Caspian amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus is one of the most successful invaders in Central European rivers. Contrary to studies on its ecology, ecophysiological studies comparing the species' physiological traits are scarce. In this context, in particular the metabolic activity of the invasive species has rarely been considered and, moreover, the few existing studies on this species report strongly deviating results. The purpose of this study was to assess the metabolic activity and behavior of D. villosus and other common European amphipod species (Gammarus fossarum, Gammarus roeselii) in relation to temperatures covering the thermal regime of the invaded habitats. Based on direct calorimetric measurements of metabolic heat dissipation at three temperature levels (5°C, 15°C and 25°C), we found the routine metabolic rate of D. villosus to be significantly lower than that of the other studied gammarid species at the medium temperature level. The estimated resting metabolic rate indicated a similar trend. At 5°C and 25°C, both routine and resting metabolic rate did not differ between species. Compared to G. fossarum and G. roeselii, D. villosus exhibited lower locomotor activity at the low and medium temperatures (5°C and 15°C). In contrast, its locomotor activity increased at the high experimental temperature (25°C). G. fossarum and G. roeselii were apparently more active than D. villosus at all studied temperatures. We conclude that D. villosus has both physiological and behavioral adaptations that lead to a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure, which is assumed to be beneficial and might contribute to its invasive success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of the hydrographic conditions and cyst beds in the San Jorge Gulf, Argentina, that favor dinoflagellate population development including toxigenic species and their toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krock, Bernd; Borel, C. Marcela; Barrera, Facundo; Tillmann, Urban; Fabro, Elena; Almandoz, Gastón O.; Ferrario, Martha; Garzón Cardona, John E.; Koch, Boris P.; Alonso, Cecilia; Lara, Rubén

    2015-08-01

    The overlay of cooler nutrient enriched Beagle-Magellan water with warmer nutrient depleted shelf water and a strong stratification of the water column in the San Jorge Gulf region, Argentina, coincided with relatively high dinoflagellate abundances in April 2012, up to 34,000 cells L- 1. This dinoflagellate proliferation was dominated by Ceratium spp., but environmental conditions also favored to a lesser amount the occurrence of toxigenic dinoflagellates, such as Alexandrium tamarense and Protoceratium reticulatum, whose toxins were hardly detected in any other areas along the expedition transect of the R/V Puerto Deseado between 38 and 56°S (Ushuaia-Mar del Plata) in March/April 2012. Generally vegetative cells of A. tamarense and P. reticulatum co-occurred with their respective phycotoxins in the water column and their cysts in the upper sediment layers. Two strains of A. tamarense were isolated from the bloom sample and morphologically characterized. Their PSP toxin profiles consisted of C1/2, gonyautoxins 1/4 and to a lesser amount of neosaxitoxin and confirmed earlier data from this region. The ratios between autotrophic picoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were higher in shelf waters in the north than in Beagle-Magellan waters in the south of San Jorge Gulf.

  4. Purification and characterization of novel raw-starch-digesting and cold-adapted alpha-amylases from Eisenia foetida.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Asano, Tomohiko; Nakazawa, Masami; Miyatake, Kazutaka; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2008-05-01

    Novel raw-starch-digesting and cold-adapted alpha-amylases (Amy I and Amy II) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida were purified to electrophoretically homogeneous states. The molecular weights of both purified enzymes were estimated to be 60,000 by SDS-PAGE. The enzymes were most active at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C and stable at pH 7.0-9.0 and 50-60 degrees C. Both Amy I and II exhibited activities at 10 degrees C. The enzymes were inhibited by metal ions Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Hg(2+), and hydrolyzed raw starch into glucose, maltose and maltotriose as end products.

  5. Cold adaptation overrides developmental regulation of sarcolipin expression in mice skeletal muscle: SOS for muscle-based thermogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Bal, Naresh C; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal mice have a greater thermogenic need than adult mice and may require additional means of heat production, other than the established mechanism of brown adipose tissue (BAT). We and others recently discovered a novel mediator of skeletal muscle-based thermogenesis called sarcolipin (SLN) that acts by uncoupling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). In addition, we have shown that SLN expression is downregulated during neonatal development in rats. In this study we probed two questions: (1) is SLN expression developmentally regulated in neonatal mice?; and (2) if so, will cold adaptation override this? Our data show that SLN expression is higher during early neonatal stages and is gradually downregulated in fast twitch skeletal muscles. Interestingly, we demonstrate that cold acclimation of neonatal mice can prevent downregulation of SLN expression. This observation suggests that SLN-mediated thermogenesis can be recruited to a greater extent during extreme physiological need, in addition to BAT.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    SciTech Connect

    Riise, Ellen Kristin; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Helland, Ronny; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  7. Use of temperature-sensitive and cold-adapted mutant viruses in immunoprophylaxis of acute respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Chanock, R M; Murphy, B R

    1980-01-01

    Efforts currently are underway to develop mutations in the influenza A viral genome that will bring about a satisfactory level of attenuation and that can be identified by simple in vitro techniques. Two types of donor viruses that bear such mutations are being evaluated. One donor virus possesses temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations on the P1 and P3 genes, while the other donor bears both ts and cold-adaptation (ca) mutations. The mutant genes from these donors were transferred by gene reassortment to recombinant viruses bearing the surface antigens of new epidemic or pandemic viruses, and in every instance a satisfactory level of attenuation was achieved. However, genetic instability remains a formidable problem. Temperature-sensitive mutants of respiratory syncytial virus also have been evaluated for their usefulness in immunoprophylaxis of respiratory tract disease. Although the desired mutant has not been identified, some progress has been made.

  8. The Physarum polycephalum php gene encodes a unique cold-adapted serine-carboxyl peptidase, physarolisin II.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Wataru; Kuriyama, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji

    2003-07-10

    The php gene from a true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, is a late-replicating and transcriptionally active gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product is homologous to those of the serine-carboxyl peptidase family, including physarolisin I from the same organism, but lacks the propeptide region. In this study, the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to possess endopeptidase activity with unique substrate specificity. Thus, we named it physarolisin II. The enzyme was revealed to be a kind of cold-adapted enzyme since it was maximally active at 16-22 degrees C. The active enzyme was markedly unstable due to rapid autolysis (t(1/2)= approximately 5 min, at 18 degrees C). At higher temperature, the enzyme was less active but more stable, despite the fact that no gross conformational change was observed by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  9. Effect of cold-adapted microbial agent inoculation on enzyme activities during composting start-up at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinghong; Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhechao; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xinyu; Wu, Junqiu; Lu, Qian; Wei, Zimin

    2017-11-01

    In order to put forward a method to promote composting start-up at low ambient temperature, the cold-adapted microbial agent (CAMA) was inoculated in chicken manure (CM), and compared the enzymes activities, including urease, proteases, β-glucosidase and invertase, with no CAMA group (CK). In this study, the temperature of CM reached 50°C in 53h, but it in CK was only around 30°C during the composting process. Moreover, the enzymes exhibited higher activity in CM than CK, indicating the effectiveness of CAMA. Furthermore, redundancy analysis was conducted to study the relationships of CAMA, with enzymes activities and temperature. Results showed that the positive effect of CAMA on the enzyme activities were achieved by affecting the bacterial community structure. Accordingly, we provide a method to guide CAMA inoculation for promoting compost start-up in cold area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using occupancy modeling and logistic regression to assess the distribution of shrimp species in lowland streams, Costa Rica: Does regional groundwater create favorable habitat?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Marcia; Freeman, Mary C.; Purucker, S. Thomas; Pringle, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater shrimps are an important biotic component of tropical ecosystems. However, they can have a low probability of detection when abundances are low. We sampled 3 of the most common freshwater shrimp species, Macrobrachium olfersii, Macrobrachium carcinus, and Macrobrachium heterochirus, and used occupancy modeling and logistic regression models to improve our limited knowledge of distribution of these cryptic species by investigating both local- and landscape-scale effects at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Local-scale factors included substrate type and stream size, and landscape-scale factors included presence or absence of regional groundwater inputs. Capture rates for 2 of the sampled species (M. olfersii and M. carcinus) were sufficient to compare the fit of occupancy models. Occupancy models did not converge for M. heterochirus, but M. heterochirus had high enough occupancy rates that logistic regression could be used to model the relationship between occupancy rates and predictors. The best-supported models for M. olfersii and M. carcinus included conductivity, discharge, and substrate parameters. Stream size was positively correlated with occupancy rates of all 3 species. High stream conductivity, which reflects the quantity of regional groundwater input into the stream, was positively correlated with M. olfersii occupancy rates. Boulder substrates increased occupancy rate of M. carcinus and decreased the detection probability of M. olfersii. Our models suggest that shrimp distribution is driven by factors that function at local (substrate and discharge) and landscape (conductivity) scales.

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel cold-adapted esterase from a metagenomic library of mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyong-Cheol; Rim, Soon-Ok; Han, Yunjon; Shin, Bong Seok; Kim, Geun-Joong; Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Jae Jun

    2012-05-01

    A novel lipolytic enzyme was isolated from a metagenomic library after demonstration of lipolytic activity on an LB agar plate containing 1% (w/v) tributyrin. A novel esterase gene (estIM1), encoding a lipolytic enzyme (EstIM1), was cloned using a shotgun method from a pFosEstIM1 clone of the metagenomic library, and the enzyme was characterized. The estIM1 gene had an open reading frame (ORF) of 936 base pairs and encoded a protein of 311 amino acids with a molecular mass 34 kDa and a pI value of 4.32. The deduced amino acid sequence was 62% identical to that of an esterase from an uncultured bacterium (ABQ11271). The amino acid sequence indicated that EstIM1 was a member of the family IV of lipolytic enzymes, all of which contain a GDSAG motif shared with similar enzymes of lactic acid microorganisms. EstIM1 was active over a temperature range of 1-50°C, at alkaline pH. The activation energy for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl propionate was 1.04 kcal/mol, within a temperature range of 1-40°C. The activity of EstIM1 was about 60% of maximal even at 1°C, suggesting that EstIM1 is efficiently cold-adapted. Further characterization of this cold-adapted enzyme indicated that the esterase may be very valuable in industrial applications.

  12. Exploring the Antarctic soil metagenome as a source of novel cold-adapted enzymes and genetic mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Berlemont, Renaud; Pipers, Delphine; Delsaute, Maud; Angiono, Federico; Feller, Georges; Galleni, Moreno; Power, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic library PP1 was obtained from Antarctic soil samples. Both functional and genotypic metagenomic screening were used for the isolation of novel cold-adapted enzymes with potential applications, and for the detection of genetic elements associated with gene mobilization, respectively. Fourteen lipase/esterase-, 14 amylase-, 3 protease-, and 11 cellulase-producing clones were detected by activity-driven screening, with apparent maximum activities around 35 °C for both amylolytic and lipolytic enzymes, and 35-55 °C for cellulases, as observed for other cold-adapted enzymes. However, the behavior of at least one of the studied cellulases is more compatible to that observed for mesophilic enzymes. These enzymes are usually still active at temperatures above 60 °C, probably resulting in a psychrotolerant behavior in Antarctic soils. Metagenomics allows to access novel genes encoding for enzymatic and biophysic properties from almost every environment with potential benefits for biotechnological and industrial applications. Only intI- and tnp-like genes were detected by PCR, encoding for proteins with 58-86 %, and 58-73 % amino acid identity with known entries, respectively. Two clones, BAC 27A-9 and BAC 14A-5, seem to present unique syntenic organizations, suggesting the occurrence of gene rearrangements that were probably due to evolutionary divergences within the genus or facilitated by the association with transposable elements. The evidence for genetic elements related to recruitment and mobilization of genes (transposons/integrons) in an extreme environment like Antarctica reinforces the hypothesis of the origin of some of the genes disseminated by mobile elements among "human-associated" microorganisms.

  13. A New Synthetic Allotetraploid (A1A1G2G2) between Gossypium herbaceum and G. australe: Bridging for Simultaneously Transferring Favorable Genes from These Two Diploid Species into Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Yingying; Chen, Jinjin; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhou, Baoliang

    2015-01-01

    Gossypium herbaceum, a cultivated diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, A1A1), has favorable traits such as excellent drought tolerance and resistance to sucking insects and leaf curl virus. G. australe, a wild diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, G2G2), possesses numerous economically valuable characteristics such as delayed pigment gland morphogenesis (which is conducive to the production of seeds with very low levels of gossypol as a potential food source for humans and animals) and resistance to insects, wilt diseases and abiotic stress. Creating synthetic allotetraploid cotton from these two species would lay the foundation for simultaneously transferring favorable genes into cultivated tetraploid cotton. Here, we crossed G. herbaceum (as the maternal parent) with G. australe to produce an F1 interspecific hybrid and doubled its chromosome complement with colchicine, successfully generating a synthetic tetraploid. The obtained tetraploid was confirmed by morphology, cytology and molecular markers and then self-pollinated. The S1 seedlings derived from this tetraploid gradually became flavescent after emergence of the fifth true leaf, but they were rescued by grafting and produced S2 seeds. The rescued S1 plants were partially fertile due to the existence of univalents at Metaphase I of meiosis, leading to the formation of unbalanced, nonviable gametes lacking complete sets of chromosomes. The S2 plants grew well and no flavescence was observed, implying that interspecific incompatibility, to some extent, had been alleviated in the S2 generation. The synthetic allotetraploid will be quite useful for polyploidy evolutionary studies and as a bridge for transferring favorable genes from these two diploid species into Upland cotton through hybridization. PMID:25879660

  14. A new synthetic allotetraploid (A1A1G2G2) between Gossypium herbaceum and G. australe: bridging for simultaneously transferring favorable genes from these two diploid species into upland cotton.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Yu; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yingying; Chen, Jinjin; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhou, Baoliang

    2015-01-01

    Gossypium herbaceum, a cultivated diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, A1A1), has favorable traits such as excellent drought tolerance and resistance to sucking insects and leaf curl virus. G. australe, a wild diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, G2G2), possesses numerous economically valuable characteristics such as delayed pigment gland morphogenesis (which is conducive to the production of seeds with very low levels of gossypol as a potential food source for humans and animals) and resistance to insects, wilt diseases and abiotic stress. Creating synthetic allotetraploid cotton from these two species would lay the foundation for simultaneously transferring favorable genes into cultivated tetraploid cotton. Here, we crossed G. herbaceum (as the maternal parent) with G. australe to produce an F1 interspecific hybrid and doubled its chromosome complement with colchicine, successfully generating a synthetic tetraploid. The obtained tetraploid was confirmed by morphology, cytology and molecular markers and then self-pollinated. The S1 seedlings derived from this tetraploid gradually became flavescent after emergence of the fifth true leaf, but they were rescued by grafting and produced S2 seeds. The rescued S1 plants were partially fertile due to the existence of univalents at Metaphase I of meiosis, leading to the formation of unbalanced, nonviable gametes lacking complete sets of chromosomes. The S2 plants grew well and no flavescence was observed, implying that interspecific incompatibility, to some extent, had been alleviated in the S2 generation. The synthetic allotetraploid will be quite useful for polyploidy evolutionary studies and as a bridge for transferring favorable genes from these two diploid species into Upland cotton through hybridization.

  15. Parallel molecular routes to cold adaptation in eight genera of New Zealand stick insects

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Alice B.; Dunning, Luke T.; Sinclair, Brent J.; Buckley, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of physiological strategies to tolerate novel thermal conditions allows organisms to exploit new environments. As a result, thermal tolerance is a key determinant of the global distribution of biodiversity, yet the constraints on its evolution are not well understood. Here we investigate parallel evolution of cold tolerance in New Zealand stick insects, an endemic radiation containing three montane-occurring species. Using a phylogeny constructed from 274 orthologous genes, we show that stick insects have independently colonized montane environments at least twice. We compare supercooling point and survival of internal ice formation among ten species from eight genera, and identify both freeze tolerance and freeze avoidance in separate montane lineages. Freeze tolerance is also verified in both lowland and montane populations of a single, geographically widespread, species. Transcriptome sequencing following cold shock identifies a set of structural cuticular genes that are both differentially regulated and under positive sequence selection in each species. However, while cuticular proteins in general are associated with cold shock across the phylogeny, the specific genes at play differ among species. Thus, while processes related to cuticular structure are consistently associated with adaptation for cold, this may not be the consequence of shared ancestral genetic constraints. PMID:26355841

  16. Structural flexibility of the heme cavity in the cold-adapted truncated hemoglobin from the Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Daniela; Pesce, Alessandra; Boechi, Leonardo; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Caldelli, Elena; Howes, Barry D; Riccio, Alessia; di Prisco, Guido; Nardini, Marco; Estrin, Dario; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bolognesi, Martino; Verde, Cinzia

    2015-08-01

    Truncated hemoglobins build one of the three branches of the globin protein superfamily. They display a characteristic two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold and are clustered into three groups (I, II and III) based on distinct structural features. Truncated hemoglobins are present in eubacteria, cyanobacteria, protozoa and plants. Here we present a structural, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics characterization of a group-II truncated hemoglobin, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (Ph-2/2HbO), a cold-adapted Antarctic marine bacterium hosting one flavohemoglobin and three distinct truncated hemoglobins. The Ph-2/2HbO aquo-met crystal structure (at 2.21 Å resolution) shows typical features of group-II truncated hemoglobins, namely the two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold, a helix Φ preceding the proximal helix F, and a heme distal-site hydrogen-bonded network that includes water molecules and several distal-site residues, including His(58)CD1. Analysis of Ph-2/2HbO by electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra, under varied solution conditions, shows that Ph-2/2HbO can access diverse heme ligation states. Among these, detection of a low-spin heme hexa-coordinated species suggests that residue Tyr(42)B10 can undergo large conformational changes in order to act as the sixth heme-Fe ligand. Altogether, the results show that Ph-2/2HbO maintains the general structural features of group-II truncated hemoglobins but displays enhanced conformational flexibility in the proximity of the heme cavity, a property probably related to the functional challenges, such as low temperature, high O2 concentration and low kinetic energy of molecules, experienced by organisms living in the Antarctic environment.

  17. Molecular and biological changes in the cold-adapted "master strain" A/AA/6/60 (H2N2) influenza virus.

    PubMed Central

    Herlocher, M L; Maassab, H F; Webster, R G

    1993-01-01

    The live cold-adapted (ca) A/AA/6/60 influenza vaccine is being commercially developed for worldwide use in children and is being used as a model for other live vaccines. Although it has been proven safe and immunogenic, the molecular basis of cold adaptation has never been determined. To identify sequence changes responsible for cold adaptation, we have compared the sequence of the master ca vaccine strain to its progenitor wild-type virus, wt A/AA/6/60 E2 (wt2). Only 4 nt differences encoding 2 aa differences were found in three gene segments. Computer-predicted RNA folds project different secondary structures between the ca and wt2 molecules based on the two silent differences between them. Genes coding for the acidic polymerase, matrix, and nonstructural proteins are identical between the two viruses. The few differences found in the ca A/AA/6/60 virus after its long stepwise passage at 25 degrees C in primary chicken kidney cells suggest that cold adaptation resulted in greater genetic stability for the highly variable RNA genome. PMID:8327480

  18. Predictive modeling for growth of non- and cold-adapted Listeria Monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different storage temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this study was to determine the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, with and without cold-adaption, on fresh-cut cantaloupe under different storage temperatures. Fresh-cut samples, spot inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (about 3.2 log CFU/g), were exposed t...

  19. Molecular and biological changes in the cold-adapted "master strain" A/AA/6/60 (H2N2) influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Herlocher, M L; Maassab, H F; Webster, R G

    1993-07-01

    The live cold-adapted (ca) A/AA/6/60 influenza vaccine is being commercially developed for worldwide use in children and is being used as a model for other live vaccines. Although it has been proven safe and immunogenic, the molecular basis of cold adaptation has never been determined. To identify sequence changes responsible for cold adaptation, we have compared the sequence of the master ca vaccine strain to its progenitor wild-type virus, wt A/AA/6/60 E2 (wt2). Only 4 nt differences encoding 2 aa differences were found in three gene segments. Computer-predicted RNA folds project different secondary structures between the ca and wt2 molecules based on the two silent differences between them. Genes coding for the acidic polymerase, matrix, and nonstructural proteins are identical between the two viruses. The few differences found in the ca A/AA/6/60 virus after its long stepwise passage at 25 degrees C in primary chicken kidney cells suggest that cold adaptation resulted in greater genetic stability for the highly variable RNA genome.

  20. The hemoglobins of the cold-adapted Antarctic teleost Cygnodraco mawsoni.

    PubMed

    Caruso, C; Rutigliano, B; Romano, M; di Prisco, G

    1991-06-24

    The blood of the teleost Cygnodraco mawsoni, of the endemic Antarctic family Bathydraconidae, contains a major hemoglobin (Hb 1), accompanied by a minor component (Hb 2, about 5% of total). The two hemoglobins have identical alpha chains and differ by the beta chain. The complete amino acid sequence of the three chains has been elucidated, thus establishing the primary structure of both hemoglobins. The sequences show a 53-65% identity with non-Antarctic poikilotherm fish species; on the other hand, a very high degree of similarity (83-88%) has been found between Hb 1 and the major component of another Antarctic species of a different family. The hemoglobin functional properties relative to oxygen binding have been investigated in intact erythrocytes, 'stripped' hemolysate and purified components of C. mawsoni. The hemoglobins display the Bohr and Root effects, indicating fine regulation of oxygen binding by pH and by the physiological effectors organic phosphates.

  1. Identification and immobilization of a novel cold-adapted esterase, and its potential for bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinjiong; Liang, Weiqu; Li, Yanfang; Li, He; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-09-11

    Pyrethroids are potentially harmful to living organisms and ecosystems. Thus, concerns have been raised about pyrethroid residues and their persistence in agricultural products. To date, although several pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzymes have been cloned, very few reports are available on pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzymes with cold adaptation, high hydrolytic activity and good reusability, indispensable properties in practical bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated vegetables. Here, a novel gene (est684) encoding pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase was isolated from the Mao-tofu metagenome for the first time. Est684 encoded a protein of 227 amino acids and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in soluble form. The optimum temperature was 18 °C. It maintained 46.1% of activity at 0 °C and over 50% of its maximal activity at 4-35 °C. With the goal of enhancing stability and recycling biocatalysts, we used mesoporous silica SBA-15 as a nanometer carrier for the efficient immobilization of Est684 by the absorption method. The best conditions were an esterase-to-silica ratio of 0.96 mg/g (w/w) and an adsorption time of 30 min at 10 °C. Under these conditions, the recovery of enzyme activity was 81.3%. A large improvement in the thermostability of Est684 was achieved. The half-life (T1/2) of the immobilized enzyme at 35 °C was 6 h, 4 times longer than the soluble enzyme. Interestingly, the immobilized Est684 had less loss in enzyme activity up to 12 consecutive cycles, and it retained nearly 54% of its activity after 28 cycles, indicating excellent operational stability. Another noteworthy characteristic was its high catalytic activity. It efficiently hydrolyzed cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, and fenvalreate in pyrethroid-contaminated cucumber within 5 min, reaching over 85% degradation efficiency after four cycles. A novel cold-adapted pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase was screened from the Mao-tofu metagenome. This report is the first on immobilizing pyrethroid

  2. Psychrobacter proteolyticus sp. nov., a psychrotrophic, halotolerant bacterium isolated from the Antarctic krill Euphausia superba Dana, excreting a cold-adapted metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Denner, E B; Mark, B; Busse, H J; Turkiewicz, M; Lubitz, W

    2001-04-01

    An Antarctic marine bacterium (strain 116) excreting an extracellular cold-adapted metalloprotease was subjected to a detailed polyphasic taxonomic investigation. Strain 116 was previously isolated from the stomach of a specimen of the Antarctic krill Euphasia superba Dana and tentatively characterized as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the strain is in fact related to species of the genus Psychrobacter, next to Psychrobacter glacincola (97.4% similarity). Sequence similarities between strain 116 and other Psychrobacter species ranged from 96.9% (with P. urativorans) to 95.4% (with P. immobilis). Key phenotypic characteristics as well as chemotaxonomic features of the bacterium were congruent with the description of the genus Psychrobacter i.e. cells were strictly aerobic, strongly oxidase-positive, psychrotrophic, halotolerant, gram-negative non-motile coccobacilli, with ubiquinone-8 as the main respiratory lipoquinone and 18:1 cis 9, 16:1 cis and 17:1 (omega8c being the predominant cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the DNA was 43.6 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed that the relatedness between strain 116 and Psychrobacter glacinola is only 62.2%. Further differences were apparent in whole-cell SDS-PAGE protein pattern, cellular fatty acid profile and in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as in enzymatic activities. Tolerance to 5% bile salts, nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, acid production from carbohydrates, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, C4 esterase, C14 lipase and valine arylamidase were found to differentiate strain 116 from Psychrobacter glacincola. On the basis of this phenotypic and molecular evidences, strain 116, previously known as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116, was recognized as a new species of the genus Psychrobacter for which the name Psychrobacter proteolyticus is proposed. Strain 116 has been deposited in the Collection de l'Institut Pasteur

  3. Engineered disulfide bonds increase active-site local stability and reduce catalytic activity of a cold-adapted alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Adalbjörnsson, Björn Vidar; Gylfason, Gudjón Andri

    2007-06-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an extracellular enzyme that is membrane-bound in eukaryotes but resides in the periplasmic space of bacteria. It normally carries four cysteine residues that form two disulfide bonds, for instance in the APs of Escherichia coli and vertebrates. An AP variant from a Vibrio sp. has only one cysteine residue. This cysteine is second next to the nucleophilic serine in the active site. We have individually modified seven residues to cysteine that are on two loops predicted to be within a 5 A radius. Four of them formed a disulfide bond to the endogenous cysteine. Thermal stability was monitored by circular dichroism and activity measurements. Global stability was similar to the wild-type enzyme. However, a significant increase in heat-stability was observed for the disulfide-containing variants using activity as a measure, together with a large reduction in catalytic rates (k(cat)) and a general decrease in Km values. The results suggest that a high degree of mobility near the active site and in the helix carrying the endogenous cysteine is essential for full catalytic efficiency in the cold-adapted AP.

  4. Growth promotory potential of the cold adapted diazotroph Pseudomonas migulae S10724 against native green gram (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek).

    PubMed

    Suyal, Deep Chandra; Shukla, Anjana; Goel, Reeta

    2014-12-01

    It is being confirmed previously the atmospheric nitrogen fixing ability of the cold adapted Pseudomonas migulae S10724 strain at the fluctuating temperatures. Therefore, net house bioinoculation experiment was performed to determine the effectiveness of inoculation of strain S10724 on the growth enhancement of native green gram (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The strain significantly (p < 0.05) stimulated the growth of roots (45.3 %) and shoots (45.6 %) of green gram plants. Furthermore, other growth related parameters viz. fresh and dry weight was also found to be increased significantly. Treated plants typically showed more obvious modifications in their biochemical status also. The total chlorophyll and nitrate reductase activity was increased in S10724 inoculated plant as compared to the control one. Moreover, in vitro seed germination assay revealed that the germination was increased in S10724 strain treated seeds by 22 % at 25 °C while 25 % at 12 °C unlikely to respective controls. The results suggest that P.migulae S10724 strain is a potential plant growth promoting bacterium for legume under fluctuating temperature ranges and therefore, could be used effectively as a low cost bioinoculant in Himalayan agricultural belt successfully.

  5. New cold-adapted lipase from Photobacterium lipolyticum sp. nov. that is closely related to filamentous fungal lipases.

    PubMed

    Ryu, H S; Kim, H K; Choi, W C; Kim, M H; Park, S Y; Han, N S; Oh, T K; Lee, J K

    2006-04-01

    A Photobacterium strain, M37, showing lipolytic activity, was previously isolated from an intertidal flat of the Yellow Sea in Korea and identified as Photobacterium lipolyticum sp. nov. In the present study, the corresponding gene was cloned using the shotgun method. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence (1,023 bp) corresponded to a protein of 340 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 38,026. No sequence similarity was found with any known bacterial lipases/esterases; instead, the most similar enzymes were several filamentous fungal lipases. Although the similarity was very low (less than 16%), there were many conserved regions over the entire sequence and N-terminal oxyanion hole (RG) region, a signature sequence of filamentous fungal lipases. The novel protein M37 was produced in both a soluble and insoluble form when the Escherichia coli cells harboring the gene were cultured at 18 degrees C. The soluble protein exhibited lipase activity in a pH-stat assay using an olive oil emulsion. The M37 lipase also displayed a maximum activity at 25 degrees C and maintained its activity at a low temperature range (5-25 degrees C) with an activation energy (E(a)) of 2.07 kcal/mol. Accordingly, these results indicate that the M37 lipase from P. lipolyticum sp. nov. is a new cold-adapted enzyme.

  6. A novel cold-adapted and glucose-tolerant GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7.

    PubMed

    Crespim, Elaine; Zanphorlin, Letícia M; de Souza, Flavio H M; Diogo, José A; Gazolla, Alex C; Machado, Carla B; Figueiredo, Fernanda; Sousa, Amanda S; Nóbrega, Felipe; Pellizari, Vivian H; Murakami, Mário T; Ruller, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A novel GH1 β-glucosidase (EaBgl1A) from a bacterium isolated from Antarctica soil samples was recombinantly overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and characterized. The enzyme showed unusual pH dependence with maximum activity at neutral pH and retention of high catalytic activity in the pH range 6 to 9, indicating a catalytic machinery compatible with alkaline conditions. EaBgl1A is also a cold-adapted enzyme, exhibiting activity in the temperature range from 10 to 40°C with optimal activity at 30°C, which allows its application in industrial processes using low temperatures. Kinetic characterization revealed an enzymatic turnover (Kcat) of 6.92s(-1) (cellobiose) and 32.98s(-1) (pNPG) and a high tolerance for product inhibition, which is an extremely desirable feature for biotechnological purposes. Interestingly, the enzyme was stimulated by up to 200 mM glucose, whereas the commercial cocktails tested were found fully inhibited at this concentration. These properties indicate EaBgl1A as a promising biocatalyst for biotechnological applications where low temperatures are required.

  7. Cold-adapted and rhizosphere-competent strain of Rahnella sp. with broad-spectrum plant growth-promotion potential.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pratibha; Joshi, Robin; Sharma, K C; Rahi, Praveen; Gulati, Ashu; Gulati, Arvind

    2010-12-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain isolated from Hippophae rhamnoides rhizosphere was identified as Rahnella sp. based on its phenotypic features and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The bacterial strain showed the growth characteristics of a cold-adapted psychrotroph, with the multiple plant growth-promoting traits of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1- carboxylate-deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. The strain also produced indole- 3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole-3-lactic acid, and indole-3- pyruvic acid in tryptophan-supplemented nutrient broth. Gluconic, citric and isocitric acids were the major organic acids detected during tricalcium phosphate solubilization. A rifampicin-resistant mutant of the strain exhibited high rhizosphere competence without disturbance to the resident microbial populations in pea rhizosphere. Seed bacterization with a charcoal-based inoculum significantly increased growth in barley, chickpea, pea, and maize under the controlled environment. Microplot testing of the inoculum at two different locations in pea also showed significant increase in growth and yield. The attributes of coldtolerance, high rhizosphere competence, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting activity exhibited the potential of Rahnella sp. BIHB 783 for increasing agriculture productivity.

  8. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  9. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of cold-adapted α-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas arctica GS230.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingsheng; Wang, Shujun; Fang, Yaowei; Li, Huangzhong; Liu, Shu; Liu, Hongfei

    2010-11-01

    A cold-adapted α-amylase (ParAmy) gene from Pseudoalteromonas arctica GS230 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed as an N-terminus His-tag fusion protein in E. coli. A recombinant protein was produced and purified with DEAE-sepherose ion exchange chromatography and Ni affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of ParAmy was estimated to be 55 KDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). With an optimum temperature for activity 30 °C, ParAmy showed 34.5% of maximum activity at 0 °C and its activity decreased sharply at above 40 °C. ParAmy was stable in the range of pH 7-8.5 at 30 °C for 1 h. ParAmy was activated by Mn(2+), K(+) and Na(+), and inhibited by Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+). N-Bromosuccinimid showed a significant repressive effect on enzyme activity. The K (m) and V (max) values of the α-amylase for soluble starch were 7.28 mg/mL and 13.07 mg/mL min, respectively. This research suggests that Paramy has a good potential to be a cold-stable and alkalitolerant amylase in detergent industry.

  10. Cold adapted features of Vibrio salmonicida catalase: characterisation and comparison to the mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Moe, Elin; Jouve, Hélène Marie; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-10-01

    The gene encoding catalase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio salmonicida LFI1238 was identified, cloned and expressed in the catalase-deficient Escherichia coli UM2. Recombinant catalase from V. salmonicida (VSC) was purified to apparent homogeneity as a tetramer with a molecular mass of 235 kDa. VSC contained 67% heme b and 25% protoporphyrin IX. VSC was able to bind NADPH, react with cyanide and form compounds I and II as other monofunctional small subunit heme catalases. Amino acid sequence alignment of VSC and catalase from the mesophilic Proteus mirabilis (PMC) revealed 71% identity. As for cold adapted enzymes in general, VSC possessed a lower temperature optimum and higher catalytic efficiency (k (cat)/K (m)) compared to PMC. VSC have higher affinity for hydrogen peroxide (apparent K (m)) at all temperatures. For VSC the turnover rate (k (cat)) is slightly lower while the catalytic efficiency is slightly higher compared to PMC over the temperature range measured, except at 4 degrees C. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency of VSC and PMC is almost temperature independent, except at 4 degrees C where PMC has a twofold lower efficiency compared to VSC. This may indicate that VSC has evolved to maintain a high efficiency at low temperatures.

  11. Is there metabolic cold adaptation in terrestrial ectotherms? Exploring latitudinal compensation in the invasive snail Cornu aspersum.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Nespolo, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    Lower temperatures, extreme seasonality and shorter growing seasons at higher latitudes are expected to cause a decline in metabolic rates and annual growth rates of ectotherms. If a reduction in the rates of these biological processes involves a reduction in fitness, then organisms may evolve compensatory responses for the constraints imposed by high-latitude habitats. To test the existence of a latitudinal compensation in ectotherms, we used a common-garden experiment to investigate the extent to which the level of energy turnover (measured as standard metabolic rate, SMR) and the energy budget (energy allocation to growth) are affected by climatic constraints in three populations of the land snail Cornu aspersum, distributed across a latitudinal gradient of 1300 km in Chile. Our results did not support the existence of a latitudinal compensation in metabolic rates (metabolic cold adaptation). However, there was a countergradient variation (CnGV) for growth rate in which the highest latitudinal population exhibited greater growth rates than their counterparts from lower latitudes. Surprisingly, this CnGV pattern was accompanied by a lower apparent dry-matter digestibility, which could highlight a differential assimilation of ingested nutrients into somatic tissue, revealing enhanced growth efficiency in snails from the highest latitudinal habitat. Our evidence highlights that adjustments in energy allocation to the digestive machinery and to protein storage could act as a latitudinal compensation for enhanced growth efficiency in snails from the highest latitudinal population. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Distribution of cold adaptation proteins in microbial mats in Lake Joyce, Antarctica: Analysis of metagenomic data by using two bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmin; Hakim, Joseph A; Fisher, Phillip R E; Grueneberg, Alexander; Andersen, Dale T; Bej, Asim K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the distribution and abundance of cold-adaptation proteins in microbial mat communities in the perennially ice-covered Lake Joyce, located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. We have used MG-RAST and R code bioinformatics tools on Illumina HiSeq2000 shotgun metagenomic data and compared the filtering efficacy of these two methods on cold-adaptation proteins. Overall, the abundance of cold-shock DEAD-box protein A (CSDA), antifreeze proteins (AFPs), fatty acid desaturase (FAD), trehalose synthase (TS), and cold-shock family of proteins (CSPs) were present in all mat samples at high, moderate, or low levels, whereas the ice nucleation protein (INP) was present only in the ice and bulbous mat samples at insignificant levels. Considering the near homogeneous temperature profile of Lake Joyce (0.08-0.29 °C), the distribution and abundance of these proteins across various mat samples predictively correlated with known functional attributes necessary for microbial communities to thrive in this ecosystem. The comparison of the MG-RAST and the R code methods showed dissimilar occurrences of the cold-adaptation protein sequences, though with insignificant ANOSIM (R = 0.357; p-value = 0.012), ADONIS (R(2) = 0.274; p-value = 0.03) and STAMP (p-values = 0.521-0.984) statistical analyses. Furthermore, filtering targeted sequences using the R code accounted for taxonomic groups by avoiding sequence redundancies, whereas the MG-RAST provided total counts resulting in a higher sequence output. The results from this study revealed for the first time the distribution of cold-adaptation proteins in six different types of microbial mats in Lake Joyce, while suggesting a simpler and more manageable user-defined method of R code, as compared to a web-based MG-RAST pipeline.

  13. Study of live recombinant cold-adapted influenza bivalent vaccine of type A for use in children: an epidemiological control trial.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, G I; Budilovsky, G N; Koval, T A; Polezhaev, F I; Garmashova, L M; Ghendon YuZ; Romanova, Y R; Smorodintsev, A A

    1986-06-01

    Live cold-adapted recombinant bivalent vaccine of influenza type A was studied in a controlled field trial in 1982-1983 among nearly 30,000 children 3-15 years old. The bivalent vaccine consisted of recombinants 47/25/1 (H1N1) and 47/7/2 (H3N2) of wild-type viruses A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1) and A/Bangkok/1/79 (H3N2) with cold-adapted donor A/Leningrad/134/47/57 (H2N2). The recombinants which received mutant nonglycoprotein genes from cold-adapted donor did not suppress each other after simultaneous inoculation of children and stimulated antibody response to both strains. The bivalent vaccine was completely attenuated for children. It caused less than 1% transient febrile reactions during five days after the first vaccination, including double seronegative individuals with low antibody titres to both vaccinal strains. The cold-adapted bivalent vaccine tested proved to be safe for children according to the analysis of morbidity studies among vaccines and a control group performed during the five days and the following six months after the first immunization. There is a similar distribution of non-influenza illnesses and a statistically significant decrease in influenza-like diseases among vaccines compared to the control group. In the four months after the immunization programme was completed, epidemics of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 occurred. The incidence of influenza-like diseases was approximately 50% less in the vaccinated than in the control groups. This is the first evidence of safety and protective efficacy of recombinant live influenza vaccine for children 3-15 years of age.

  14. Elucidation of the molecular basis for the attenuation of a live, attenuated influenza A H5N1 cold-adapted vaccine virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recombinant, live influenza A H5N1 vaccine candidate with the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from A/VietNam/1203/04 (H5N1) (H5N1 2004 wt) and the internal protein genes from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA) (H2N2) cold-adapted (ca) virus has been previously shown to be attenuated in ...

  15. Specific temperature-induced perturbations of secondary mRNA structures are associated with the cold-adapted temperature-sensitive phenotype of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Chursov, Andrey; Kopetzky, Sebastian J; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Kondofersky, Ivan; Theis, Fabian J; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    For decades, cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive (ca/ts) strains of influenza A virus have been used as live attenuated vaccines. Due to their great public health importance it is crucial to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of cold adaptation and temperature sensitivity that are currently unknown. For instance, secondary RNA structures play important roles in influenza biology. Thus, we hypothesized that a relatively minor change in temperature (32-39°C) can lead to perturbations in influenza RNA structures and, that these structural perturbations may be different for mRNAs of the wild type (wt) and ca/ts strains. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel in silico method that enables assessing whether two related RNA molecules would undergo (dis)similar structural perturbations upon temperature change. The proposed method allows identifying those areas within an RNA chain where dissimilarities of RNA secondary structures at two different temperatures are particularly pronounced, without knowing particular RNA shapes at either temperature. We identified such areas in the NS2, PA, PB2 and NP mRNAs. However, these areas are not identical for the wt and ca/ts mutants. Differences in temperature-induced structural changes of wt and ca/ts mRNA structures may constitute a yet unappreciated molecular mechanism of the cold adaptation/temperature sensitivity phenomena.

  16. Global mapping transcriptional start sites revealed both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of cold adaptation in the methanogenic archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Lei; Guo, Yang; Yue, Lei; Li, Yanping; Ge, Weizhen; Wu, Jun; Shi, Wenyuan; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2015-03-18

    Psychrophilic methanogenic Archaea contribute significantly to global methane emissions, but archaeal cold adaptation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Hinted by that mRNA architecture determined secondary structure respond to cold more promptly than proteins, differential RNA-seq was used in this work to examine the genome-wide transcription start sites (TSSs) of the psychrophilic methanogen Methanolobus psychrophilus R15 and its response to cold. Unlike most prokaryotic mRNAs with short 5' untranslated regions (5' UTR, median lengths of 20-40 nt), 51% mRNAs of this methanogen have large 5' UTR (>50 nt). For 24% of the mRNAs, the 5' UTR is >150 nt. This implies that post-transcriptional regulation may be significance in the psychrophile. Remarkably, 219 (14%) genes possessed multiple gene TSSs (gTSSs), and 84 genes exhibited temperature-regulated gTSS selection to express alternative 5' UTR. Primer extension studies confirmed the temperature-dependent TSS selection and a stem-loop masking of ribosome binding sites was predicted from the longer 5' UTRs, suggesting alternative 5' UTRs-mediated translation regulation in the cold adaptation as well. In addition, 195 small RNAs (sRNAs) were detected, and Northern blots confirmed that many sRNAs were induced by cold. Thus, this study revealed an integrated transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation for cold adaptation in a psychrophilic methanogen.

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation Is Required for Cold Adaptation and Regulation of Sterol Biosynthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Larson, Lynnelle L.; Matson, Clinton K.; Parrish, Mark L.; Felthauser, Alicia; Sturm, Aaron; Tachibana, Christine; Bard, Martin; Wright, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) mediates the turnover of short-lived and misfolded proteins in the ER membrane or lumen. In spite of its important role, only subtle growth phenotypes have been associated with defects in ERAD. We have discovered that the ERAD proteins Ubc7 (Qri8), Cue1, and Doa10 (Ssm4) are required for growth of yeast that express high levels of the sterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR). Interestingly, the observed growth defect was exacerbated at low temperatures, producing an HMGR-dependent cold sensitivity. Yeast strains lacking UBC7, CUE1, or DOA10 also assembled aberrant karmellae (ordered arrays of membranes surrounding the nucleus that assemble when HMGR is expressed at high levels). However, rather than reflecting the accumulation of abnormal karmellae, the cold sensitivity of these ERAD mutants was due to increased HMGR catalytic activity. Mutations that compromise proteasomal function also resulted in cold-sensitive growth of yeast with elevated HMGR, suggesting that improper degradation of ERAD targets might be responsible for the observed cold-sensitive phenotype. However, the essential ERAD targets were not the yeast HMGR enzymes themselves. The sterol metabolite profile of ubc7Δ cells was altered relative to that of wild-type cells. Since sterol levels are known to regulate membrane fluidity, the viability of ERAD mutants expressing normal levels of HMGR was examined at low temperatures. Cells lacking UBC7, CUE1, or DOA10 were cold sensitive, suggesting that these ERAD proteins have a role in cold adaptation, perhaps through effects on sterol biosynthesis. PMID:16607018

  18. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the

  19. Purification and characterization of a novel cold-adapted phytase from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 isolated from Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Ting; Liu, Jing-Wen

    2015-08-01

    A yeast producing a cold-adapted phytase was isolated from Antarctic deep-sea sediment and identified as a Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 of basidiomycetous yeasts. It was cultured in fermentation optimized by a response surface methodology based on the Box-Behnken design. The maximum activity of phytase reached 205.447 U ml(-1), which was close to the predicted value of 201.948 U ml(-1) and approximately 3.4 times higher than its initial activity. The extracellular phytase was purified by 15.2-fold to homogeneity with a specific activity of 31,635 U mg(-1) by (NH4 )2 SO4 precipitation, and a combination of DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, SP Sepharose Fast Flow, and Sephadex G-100. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 63 kDa and its pI was 4.33. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50 °C and 5.0, respectively. Its activity was 85% at 37 °C, and showed good stability at pH 3.0 ∼ 7.0. When compared with mesophilic counterparts, the phytase not only exhibited a higher activity during 20 ∼ 30 °C but also had a low Km (247 µM) and high kcat (1394 s(-1)). The phytase activity was slightly stimulated in the presence of Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), EDTA, and EGTA and moderately inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Ag(+), PMSF, SDS, and phenylgloxal hydrate. It was resistant to both pepsin and trypsin. Since the phytase produced by the R. mucilaginosa JMUY14 showed a high specific activity, good pH stability, strong protease resistance, and high activity at low temperature, it has great potential for feed applications, especially in aquaculture.

  20. The genome sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the role of genome evolution in cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michele A; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S; DeFrancisci, Davide; Chong, Kevin WY; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, N; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michele; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five-tiered evidence rating (ER) system that ranked annotations from ER1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea, which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino-acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis COG genes are overrepresented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are overrepresented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two overrepresented COG categories appear to have been acquired from - and -Proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they have an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years as it

  1. Optimization of electrostatics as a strategy for cold-adaptation: a case study of cold- and warm-active elastases.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena; Olufsen, Magne; De Gioia, Luca; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2007-07-01

    Adaptation to both high and low temperatures requires proteins with special properties. While organisms living at or close to the boiling point of water need to have proteins with increased stability, other properties are required at temperatures close to the freezing point of water. Indeed, it has been shown that enzymes adapted to cold environments are less resistant to heat with a concomitant increased activity as compared to their warm-active counter-parts. Several recent studies have pointed in the direction that electrostatic interactions play a central role in temperature adaptation, and in this study we investigate the role such interactions have in adaptation of elastase from Atlantic salmon and pig. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to generate structural ensembles at 283 and 310 K of the psychrophilic and mesophilic elastase, and a total of eight 12 ns simulations have been carried out. Even though the two homologues have a highly similar three-dimensional structure, the location and number of charged amino acids are very different. Based on the simulated structures we find that very few salt-bridges are stable throughout the simulations, and provide little stabilization/destabilization of the proteins as judged by continuum electrostatic calculations. However, the mesophilic elastase is characterized by a greater number of salt-bridges as well as a putative salt-bridge network close to the catalytic site, indicating a higher rigidity of the components involved in the catalytic cycle. In addition, subtle differences are also found in the electrostatic potentials in the vicinity of the catalytic residues, which may explain the increased catalytic efficiency of the cold-adapted elastase.

  2. [MECHANISMS OF ATTENUATION OF COLD-ADAPTED STRAIN A/KRASNO- DAR/101/35/59 (H2N2)].

    PubMed

    Markushin, S G; Svitich, O A; Kinkulkina, A R; Koptyaeva, I B; Lisovskaya, K V

    2016-01-01

    Study of mechanisms of attenuation of cold-adapted (ca) influenza virus strain A/ Krasnodar/101/35/59 (H2N2), associated with disruption of NS1 protein functions. Study of interferonogenic activity of ca strain A/Krasnodar/101/35/59 (H2N2), its parent variant A/Krasnodar/101/59 (H2N2), virulent strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and a number of single gene and multiple gene reassortants between these strains, obtained using reverse genetics, was carried out. Study of dynamics of IFNβ gene expression was carried out by using a methodical approach of RT-PCR in real time mode. Inclusion of PB-1 gene of ca strain A/ Krasnodar/101/35/59 (H2N2) with reversion to wild type into genome composition of virulent strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1) does not result in a sharp change of interferonogenic activity of the reassortant. At the same time, similar inclusion of PB-1 gene of ca strain resulted in an incredible growth of interferonogenic activity of the reassortant. On the other hand, inclusion of NP-gene of wild type strain A/Krasnodar/101/59 (H2N2) into genome composition of the wild type strain A/WSN/33 did not differ by effect on interferonogenicity of the reassortant from inclusion of NP-gene of ca strain. Both constellations of genes of parent variants and mutations localized in these genes could affect formation of attenuation phenotype of reassortants. The data obtained allow to assume possible mechanisms of attenuation of ca strains, associated with disruption.of NS gene function.

  3. A novel cold-adapted lipase from Sorangium cellulosum strain So0157-2: gene cloning, expression, and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Qian, Yun-Kai; Li, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequencing of cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum reveals many open-reading frames (ORFs) encoding various degradation enzymes with low sequence similarity to those reported, but none of them has been characterized. In this paper, a predicted lipase gene (lipA) was cloned from S. cellulosum strain So0157-2 and characterized. lipA is 981-bp in size, encoding a polypeptide of 326 amino acids that contains the pentapeptide (GHSMG) and catalytic triad residues (Ser114, Asp250 and His284). Searching in the GenBank database shows that the LipA protein has only the 30% maximal identity to a human monoglyceride lipase. The novel lipA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the recombinant protein (r-LipA) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed the p-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters of short or medium chain fatty acids (≤C(10)), and the maximal activity was on pNP acetate. The r- LipA is a cold-adapted lipase, with high enzymatic activity in a wide range of temperature and pH values. At 4 °C and 30 °C, the K(m) values of r-LipA on pNP acetate are 0.037 ± 0.001 and 0.174 ± 0.006 mM, respectively. Higher pH and temperature conditions promoted hydrolytic activity toward the pNP esters with longer chain fatty acids. Remarkably, this lipase retained much of its activity in the presence of commercial detergents and organic solvents. The results suggest that the r-LipA protein has some new characteristics potentially promising for industrial applications and S. cellulosum is an intriguing resource for lipase screening.

  4. Favor referential representations.

    PubMed

    Frazier, L; McNamara, P

    1995-06-01

    Avrutin and Hickok (1993) argue that agrammatic patients have the ability to represent nonreferential or "government" chains ("who ... e") but not referential or "binding" chains ("which girl ... e"). By contrast, we propose the "referential representation hypothesis," which suggests that agrammatics attempt to cope with their well-known capacity limitations by favoring referential or content-based representations. This predicts that agrammatic patients' performance should degrade noticeably as task demands increase, and referential demands should take priority over computational ones. In a semantic task, referential phrases should lead to better or more accurate performances. In syntactic tasks, the availability of a referential or content-based representation will interfere with the development of a syntactic representation, resulting in worse syntactic performance on the referential phrases than on nonreferential ones. This predicts that agrammatic patients should incorrectly accept (resumptive) pronoun sentences with a referential wh-phrase because the pronouns will find the semantic or discourse referent of the referential wh-phrase and take it as an antecedent for the pronoun. However, they should reject a (resumptive) pronoun in a sentence with the nonreferential question constituent "who" or "what." "Who" and "what" will remain in syntactic form, since they have only grammatical content and therefore will have only a "nonreferential" syntactic representation. Consequently, they cannot serve as the antecedent of the pronoun. These predictions were largely confirmed by the results of a grammaticality judgement study. Agrammatics performed well on questions with pragmatic biases but failed to distinguish reliably between grammatical and ungrammatical questions where pragmatic biases were neutralized. They assigned especially low ratings to object gap sentences with referential wh-constituents, as predicted. They assigned relatively high ratings to

  5. Evaluation of two live attenuated cold-adapted H5N1 influenza virus vaccines in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Karron, Ruth A.; Talaat, Kawsar; Luke, Catherine; Callahan, Karen; Thumar, Bhagvanji; DiLorenzo, Susan; McAuliffe, Josephine; Schappell, Elizabeth; Suguitan, Amorsolo; Mills, Kimberly; Chen, Grace; Lamirande, Elaine; Coelingh, Kathleen; Jin, Hong; Murphy, Brian R.; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) against avian viruses with pandemic potential is an important public health strategy. Methods and Findings We performed open-label trials to evaluate the safety, infectivity, and immunogenicity of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca and H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca. Each of these vaccines contains a modified H5 hemagglutinin and unmodified N1 neuraminidase from the respective wild-type (wt) parent virus and the six internal protein gene segments of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted (ca) master donor virus. The H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca vaccine virus was evaluated at dosages of 106.7 TCID50 and 107.5 TCID50, and the H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca vaccine was evaluated at a dosage of 107.5 TCID50. Two doses were administered intranasally to healthy adults in isolation at 4 to 8 week intervals. Vaccine safety was assessed through daily examinations and infectivity was assessed by viral culture and by realtime reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing of nasal wash (NW) specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and IgG or IgA antibodies to recombinant (r)H5 VN 2004 hemagglutinin (HA) in serum or NW. Fifty-nine participants were enrolled: 21 received 106.7 TCID50 and 21 received 107.5 TCID50 of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca and 17 received H5N1 HK 2003 AA ca. Shedding of vaccine virus was minimal, as were HI and neutralizing antibody responses. Fifty-two percent of recipients of 107.5 TCID50 of H5N1 VN 2004 AA ca developed a serum IgA response to rH5 VN 2004 HA. Conclusions The live attenuated H5N1 VN 2004 and HK 2003 AA ca vaccines bearing avian H5 HA antigens were very restricted in replication and were more attenuated than seasonal LAIV bearing human H1, H3 or B HA antigens. The H5N1 AA ca LAIV elicited serum ELISA antibody but not HI or neutralizing antibody responses in healthy adults. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00347672 and NCT00488046). PMID:19540952

  6. Efficacy of trivalent, cold-adapted, influenza virus vaccine against influenza A (Fujian), a drift variant, during 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Halloran, M Elizabeth; Piedra, Pedro A; Longini, Ira M; Gaglani, Manjusha J; Schmotzer, Brian; Fewlass, Charles; Herschler, Gayla B; Glezen, W Paul

    2007-05-16

    In the 2003-2004 influenza season, the predominant circulating influenza A (H3N2) virus in the United States was similar antigenically to A/Fujian/411/2002 (H3N2), a drift variant of A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2), the vaccine strain. That year, a field study of trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV-T) was conducted in Temple-Belton, Texas, as part of a larger community-based, non-randomized, open-label study in three communities that began in August 1998 [Gaglani MJ, Piedra PA, Herschler GB, Griffith ME, Kozinetz CA, Riggs MW, et al. Direct effectiveness of the trivalent, cold-adapted, influenza virus vaccine (CAIV-T) against the 2000-2001 influenza A (H1N1) and B epidemic in healthy children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004;158:65-73; Piedra PA, Gaglani MJ, Kozinetz CA, Herschler G, Riggs M, Griffith M, et al. Herd immunity in adults against influenza-related illnesses with use of the trivalent-live attenuated influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children. Vaccine 2005;23:1540-8; Piedra PA, Gaglani MJ, Riggs M, Herschler G, Fewlass C, Watts M, et al. Live attenuated influenza vaccine, trivalent, is safe in healthy children 18 months to 4 years, 5 to 9 years, and 10 to 18 years of age in a community-based, nonrandomized, open-label trial. Pediatrics 2005;116:397-407]. Participants were healthy children aged 5-18 years. The analysis here concerns 6403 children in the Scott & White Health Plan (SWHP) database living within zip codes of the Temple-Belton area, of whom 1706 received LAIV-T and 548 received trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) in 2003, 983 had been previously vaccinated in 1998-2001, but not in 2002-2003 or 2003, and 3166 had never been vaccinated. The main outcome measure was medically-attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Surveillance culture results were incorporated into the analysis to estimate efficacy against culture-confirmed influenza illness. Vaccine effectiveness of LAIV-T against MAARI was 26% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11, 39). Vaccine

  7. [Phylogenetic diversity and cold-adaptive hydrolytic enzymes of culturable psychrophilic bacteria associated with sea ice from high latitude ocean, Artic].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Yin-Xin; He, Jian-Feng

    2006-04-01

    showing 100% similarity each other are retrieved from the database, eleven from Antarctic seawater bacteria, three from Antarctic sea-ice bacteria, one from Spitzbergen sea-ice bacteria, two from Chukchi Sea sea-ice bacteria, two from Canadian Basin sea-ice bacteria (in this study) and one from uncultured bacterium clone PDA-OTU11 associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis from the Great Barrier Reef. These may indicate that the physiological and geographic barriers appear to be permeable and some bacterial species can survive in different environment. The majority of the bacterial strains are able to secrete diversity cold-adaptive hydrolytic enzymes into the medium at 4 degrees C. The isolates that are able to degrade Tween-80, glutin, and starch account for, respectively, 62.6%, 51.4% and 40.5%.

  8. Cloning, expression and characterization of a cold-adapted endo-1, 4-β-glucanase from Citrobacter farmeri A1, a symbiotic bacterium of Reticulitermes labralis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xi; Yuan, Xianjun; Wen, Aiyou; Li, Junfeng; Bai, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Many biotechnological and industrial applications can benefit from cold-adapted EglCs through increased efficiency of catalytic processes at low temperature. In our previous study, Citrobacter farmeri A1 which was isolated from a wood-inhabiting termite Reticulitermes labralis could secrete a cold-adapted EglC. However, its EglC was difficult to purify for enzymatic properties detection because of its low activity (0.8 U/ml). The objective of the present study was to clone and express the C. farmeri EglC gene in Escherichia coli to improve production level and determine the enzymatic properties of the recombinant enzyme. Methods The EglC gene was cloned from C. farmeri A1 by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. EglC was transformed into vector pET22b and functionally expressed in E. coli. The recombination protein EglC22b was purified for properties detection. Results SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular mass of the recombinant endoglucanase was approximately 42 kDa. The activity of the E. coli pET22b-EglC crude extract was 9.5 U/ml. Additionally, it was active at pH 6.5–8.0 with an optimum pH of 7.0. The recombinant enzyme had an optimal temperature of 30–40 °C and exhibited >50% relative activity even at 5 °C, whereas it lost approximately 90% of its activity after incubation at 60 °C for 30 min. Its activity was enhanced by Co2+ and Fe3+, but inhibited by Cd2+, Zn2+, Li+, Triton X-100, DMSO, acetonitrile, Tween 80, SDS, and EDTA. Conclusion These biochemical properties indicate that the recombinant enzyme is a cold-adapted endoglucanase that can be used for various industrial applications. PMID:27843715

  9. Predictive modeling for growth of non- and cold-adapted Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoon-Ki; Yoon, Won Byong; Huang, Lihan; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, with and without cold-adaption, on fresh-cut cantaloupe under different storage temperatures. Fresh-cut samples, spot inoculated with a 4-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (∼3.2 log CFU/g), were exposed to constant storage temperatures held at 10, 15, 20, 25, or 30 °C. All growth curves of L. monocytogenes were fitted to the Baranyi, modified Gompertz, and Huang models. Regardless of conditions under which cells grew, the time needed to reach 5 log CFU/g decreased with the elevated storage temperature. Experimental results showed that there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the maximum growth rate k (log CFU/g h(-1) ) and lag phase duration λ (h) between the cultures of L. monocytogenes with or without previous cold-adaption treatments. No distinct difference was observed in the growth pattern among 3 primary models at various storage temperatures. The growth curves of secondary modeling were fitted on an Arrhenius-type model for describing the relationship between k and temperature of the L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe from 10 to 30 °C. The root mean square error values of secondary models for non- and cold-adapted cells were 0.018, 0.021, and 0.024, and 0.039, 0.026, and 0.017 at the modified Gompertz, Baranyi, and Huang model, respectively, indicating that these 3 models presented the good statistical fit. This study may provide valuable information to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupes at different storage conditions. Listeriosis has occurred and increased along with the increased demand of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. This study was conducted to predict the growth of non- and cold-adapted L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different temperature using mathematical model. These results can be helpful for risk assessments of L. monocytogenes in fresh-cut cantaloupe. This study provides valuable

  10. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of the heterogeneous population present in the cold-adapted master donor strain: A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2).

    PubMed

    Youil, R; Kiseleva, I; Kwan, W-S; Szymkowiak, C; Toner, T J; Su, Q; Klimov, A; Rudenko, L; Shaw, A R

    2004-06-15

    For the past three decades the cold-adapted (ca) and temperature sensitive (ts) master donor strain, A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) has been successfully used as the basis for the live attenuated reassortant influenza A vaccine. This donor strain was developed from A/Leningrad/134/57 (H2N2) wild-type (wt) virus following 17 passages in eggs at 25 degrees C. Our detailed investigation has revealed that the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (Len/17) master donor stock is a mixed population comprised of numerous variants of the ca/ts Len/17 influenza virus. We have identified these variants to exhibit a broad range in their temperature sensitive phenotype when assayed on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at 37 degrees C. A selection of these variant clones has been fully characterized by sequencing in order to understand the variability in the ts phenotype. This study has also addressed the feasibility of using cell culture technology for the propagation and subsequent manufacturing of the cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV), particularly with respect to retaining the defined mutations that contribute toward the ca/ts phenotype.

  11. [Analysis of mutations in the genome of cold-adapted strains of influenza A virus using extended modification of polymerase chain restriction method].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, I V; Klimov, A I

    2002-01-01

    Cold-adapted influenza viruses A/Leningrad/13 4/17/5 7 (H2N2) (Len/17) and A/Leningrad/I 34/4 7/57 (H2N2) (Len/47) are used in Russia to prepare live reassortant cold-adapted influenza vaccines (LIV) for adults and children, respectively. Comparison between the nucleotide sequences of the Len/17 strain and the initial wild-type strain A/Leningrad/13 4/5 7 (H2N2) revealed ten nucleotide substitutions (eight of them encoding). Four additional substitutions (three encoding) were found in the genome of the Len/47 virus. Gene segment restriction site (PCR-restriction) analysis was used for identification of the genotype of reassortant influenza viruses. Conventional methods of PCR-restriction analysis detect only five encoding nucleotides substitutions in the internal genes of the Len/17 and seven substitutions in the internal genes of the Len/47 virus. An extended modification of the PCR-restriction method detect all encoding mutations in the internal genes of the Len/17 and Len/47 viruses (eight and eleven encoding substitutions, respectively). This method is advantageous for genome composition analysis of reassortant influenza vaccine strains and for investigating the genetic stability of LIV during replication in vaccines.

  12. [Identification of psychrotrophs SYP-A2-3 producing cold-adapted protease from the No. 1 Glacier of China and study on its fermentation conditions].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin-song; Wu, Qi-fan; Xu, Zheng-hong; Tao, Wen-yi

    2005-04-01

    The psychrotrophs SYP-A2-3 producing the cold-adapted protease has been isolated from the bacterial samples collected from the No. 1 Glacier of China and identified as Bacillus cereus according to its morphological and physiochemical characteristics and 16s rDNA gene sequence analysis. It could grow between 0 degree C and 38 degrees C while its optimal growth temperature was 25 degrees C and the optimal temperature for its protease production was 15 degrees C. The cold-adapted protease was identified as neutral metallo-protease, the molecular weight was 34.2 kD shown by SDS-PAGE, the optimal pH and temperature for activity was 7.0-8.5 and 42 degrees C, respectively. Various fermentation conditions of its protease production were also investigated. The results showed that casein was the best nitrogen source while glucose and starch were suitable carbon source for its protease production. The initial pH of fermentation broth ranged from 6.5 to 7.0 was optimal. Under optimized conditions, the protease activity produced by SYP-A2-3 could reach 3800 U/mL and 4800 U/mL conducted in shaking flask and 5 L stirred jar experiment, respectively.

  13. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study.

  14. Functional annotation of the mesophilic-like character of mutants in a cold-adapted enzyme by self-organising map analysis of their molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Tiberti, Matteo; Pandini, Alessandro; Bonati, Laura; Papaleo, Elena

    2012-10-01

    Multiple comparison of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectories of mutants in a cold-adapted α-amylase (AHA) could be used to elucidate functional features required to restore mesophilic-like activity. Unfortunately it is challenging to identify the different dynamic behaviors and correctly relate them to functional activity by routine analysis. We here employed a previously developed and robust two-stage approach that combines Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) and hierarchical clustering to compare conformational ensembles of proteins. Moreover, we designed a novel strategy to identify the specific mutations that more efficiently convert the dynamic signature of the psychrophilic enzyme (AHA) to that of the mesophilic counterpart (PPA). The SOM trained on AHA and its variants was used to classify a PPA MD ensemble and successfully highlighted the relationships between the flexibilities of the target enzyme and of the different mutants. Moreover the local features of the mutants that mostly influence their global flexibility in a mesophilic-like direction were detected. It turns out that mutations of the cold-adapted enzyme to hydrophobic and aromatic residues are the most effective in restoring the PPA dynamic features and could guide the design of more mesophilic-like mutants. In conclusion, our strategy can efficiently extract specific dynamic signatures related to function from multiple comparisons of MD conformational ensembles. Therefore, it can be a promising tool for protein engineering.

  15. Rational Engineering of a Cold-Adapted α-Amylase from the Antarctic Ciliate Euplotes focardii for Simultaneous Improvement of Thermostability and Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Yao, Hua; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ballarini, Patrizia; Pucciarelli, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The α-amylases are endo-acting enzymes that hydrolyze starch by randomly cleaving the 1,4-α-d-glucosidic linkages between the adjacent glucose units in a linear amylose chain. They have significant advantages in a wide range of applications, particularly in the food industry. The eukaryotic α-amylase isolated from the Antarctic ciliated protozoon Euplotes focardii (EfAmy) is an alkaline enzyme, different from most of the α-amylases characterized so far. Furthermore, EfAmy has the characteristics of a psychrophilic α-amylase, such as the highest hydrolytic activity at a low temperature and high thermolability, which is the major drawback of cold-active enzymes in industrial applications. In this work, we applied site-directed mutagenesis combined with rational design to generate a cold-active EfAmy with improved thermostability and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. We engineered two EfAmy mutants. In one mutant, we introduced Pro residues on the A and B domains in surface loops. In the second mutant, we changed Val residues to Thr close to the catalytic site. The aim of these substitutions was to rigidify the molecular structure of the enzyme. Furthermore, we also analyzed mutants containing these combined substitutions. Biochemical enzymatic assays of engineered versions of EfAmy revealed that the combination of mutations at the surface loops increased the thermostability and catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The possible mechanisms responsible for the changes in the biochemical properties are discussed by analyzing the three-dimensional structural model. IMPORTANCE Cold-adapted enzymes have high specific activity at low and moderate temperatures, a property that can be extremely useful in various applications as it implies a reduction in energy consumption during the catalyzed reaction. However, the concurrent high thermolability of cold-adapted enzymes often limits their applications in industrial processes. The α-amylase from the

  16. Molecular mechanisms of reversion to the ts+ (non-temperature-sensitive) phenotype of influenza A cold-adapted (ca) virus strains.

    PubMed

    Tsfasman, T M; Markushin, S G; Akopova, I I; Ghendon, Y Z

    2007-10-01

    A ts+ ca- (non-temperature-sensitive, non-cold-adapted) revertant of the A/Leningrad/134/47/57 ca strain influenza virus [A/Leningrad/134/47/ts+18/1957(H2N2)], obtained in our previous study, lost phenotypic manifestation of ts mutations by the PB2, NP and NS genes, although, according to sequencing data, it acquired only two true reversions of a mutation in the PB2 and PB1 genes. Direct sequencing showed the appearance of 27 additional mutations (13 coding) in the genes encoding the PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M and NS proteins of the revertant, along with the above-mentioned two true reversions. We conjecture that some of these mutations suppressed phenotypic manifestation of ts mutations in the NS and NP genes.

  17. Contributions of two-component regulatory systems, alternative sigma factors, and negative regulators to Listeria monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D; Bowen, Barbara M; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-02-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative sigma factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of sigmaB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4 degrees C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (10(8) CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 10(8) CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative sigma factors (DeltasigH, DeltasigC, and DeltasigL), a negative regulator (DeltactsR), regulators of sigmaB (DeltarsbT and DeltarsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (DeltalisR, Deltalmo1172, and Deltalmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4 degrees C. The growth defect for DeltasigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4 degrees C over 84 days, only the DeltactsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (DeltasigB, DeltasigC, and Deltalmo1172). With a 10(8) CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37 degrees C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4

  18. A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase from the oil-degrading marine Bacterium Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221: gene cloning, purification, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Suk; Heo, Jae Bok; Lee, Je-Hoon; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2014-07-01

    A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase, CEST, belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 6, was cloned from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. CEST was composed of 307 amino acids with the first 22 serving as a secretion signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point of the mature enzyme were 31,244 Da and pH 5.89, respectively. The catalytic triad consisted of residues Ser37, Glu192, and His281 in the conserved regions: GQSNMXG, QGEX(D/N), and DXXH. The three-dimensional structure of CEST revealed that CEST belongs to the α/β-class of protein consisted of a central six-stranded β-sheet flanked by eight α-helices. The recombinant CEST was purified by His-tag affinity chromatography and the characterization showed its optimal temperature and pH were 15°C and 8.0, respectively. Specifically, CEST maintained up to 70% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 50°C or 60°C for 6 h, and 89% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 70°C for 1h . The results suggest CEST belongs to group 3 of the cold-adapted enzymes. The enzyme activity was increased by Na(+) and Mg(2+) ions but was strongly inhibited by Cu(+) and Hg(2+) ions, at all ion concentrations. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.278 mM and a kcat of 1.9 s(-1). Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the catalytic triad (Ser37, Glu192, and His281) and Asp278 were essential for the enzyme activity.

  19. Structure Prediction of a Novel Exo-β-1,3-Glucanase: Insights into the Cold Adaptation of Psychrophilic Yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Salimeh; Parvizpour, Sepideh; Razmara, Jafar; Abu Bakar, Farah Diba; Illias, Rosli Md; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul MunirAbdul

    2016-07-30

    We report a detailed structural analysis of the psychrophilic exo-β-1,3-glucanase (GaExg55) from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12. This study elucidates the structural basis of exo-1,3-β-1,3-glucanase from this psychrophilic yeast. The structural prediction of GaExg55 remains a challenge because of its low sequence identity (37 %). A 3D model was constructed for GaExg55. Threading approach was employed to determine a suitable template and generate optimal target-template alignment for establishing the model using MODELLER9v15. The primary sequence analysis of GaExg55 with other mesophilic exo-1,3-β-glucanases indicated that an increased flexibility conferred to the enzyme by a set of amino acids substitutions in the surface and loop regions of GaExg55, thereby facilitating its structure to cold adaptation. A comparison of GaExg55 with other mesophilic exo-β-1,3-glucanases proposed that the catalytic activity and structural flexibility at cold environment were attained through a reduced amount of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, as well as an increased exposure of the hydrophobic side chains to the solvent. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed using GROMACS software to evaluate the stability of the GaExg55 structure at varying low temperatures. The simulation result confirmed the above findings for cold adaptation of the psychrophilic GaExg55. Furthermore, the structural analysis of GaExg55 with large catalytic cleft and wide active site pocket confirmed the high activity of GaExg55 to hydrolyze polysaccharide substrates.

  20. PB2 and PA genes control the expression of the temperature-sensitive phenotype of cold-adapted B/USSR/60/69 influenza master donor virus.

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, Irina V; Voeten, J Theo M; Teley, Lisette C P; Larionova, Natalia V; Drieszen-van der Cruijsen, Sandra K M; Basten, Stephanie M C; Heldens, Jacco G M; van den Bosch, Han; Rudenko, Larisa G

    2010-04-01

    The cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) influenza master donor virus (MDV) B/USSR/60/69 was derived from its wild-type parental virus after successive passages in eggs at 32 degrees C and 25 degrees C. This strain is currently in use for preparing reassortant influenza B vaccine viruses which are used in the Russian trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine. Vaccine viruses are obtained by classical reassortment of MDV and a currently circulating wild-type virus. The phenotypic properties cold adaptation and temperature sensitivity are inherited from the six genes encoding the internal proteins of the MDV. However, the role of the individual gene segments in temperature sensitivity and thus attenuation is not known. In this study, 35 reassortant viruses of B/USSR/60/69 MDV with current wild-type non-ts influenza B viruses were generated in eggs or MDCK cells and studied in order to identify the genes responsible for their ts phenotype. For each virus the exact genome composition was determined as well as its ts phenotype. The results demonstrated that the polymerase PB2 and PA gene segments of B/USSR/60/69 MDV independently controlled expression of the ts phenotype of B/USSR/60/69 MDV-based reassortant viruses. The other genes coding for internal proteins played no role in this respect. This suggests that mutations in the polymerase genes PB2 and PA play an essential role in attenuation of B/USSR/60/69 MDV-based reassortant influenza B vaccine viruses.

  1. Protection of weanling hamsters from experimental infection with wild-type parainfluenza virus type 3 (para 3) by cold-adapted mutants of para 3.

    PubMed

    Crookshanks-Newman, F K; Belshe, R B

    1986-02-01

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (para 3) was adapted to replicate at 20 degrees C, a nonpermissive temperature for wild-type (wt) para 3. Serial passage at 20 degrees C resulted in the generation of cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. These mutant viruses have been characterized both in vitro and in vivo [Belshe and Hissom (1982): Journal of Medical Virology 10:235-242; Crookshanks and Belshe (1984): Journal of Medical Virology 13:243-249]. We now report the evaluation of three mutants (clone 1150, passaged 12 times in the cold [cp12], clone 1146, passaged 18 times in the cold [cp18], and clone 1328, passaged 45 times in the cold [cp45]) for their ability to protect hamsters from infection by wild-type para 3. Ether-anesthetized male syrian hamsters were intranasally vaccinated with either wt para 3 (clone 127) or one of the ca para 3 mutants and on day 28 post-vaccination; each animal was intranasally challenged with 10(5.0) pfu of wt para 3. On days 1, 2, 3, and 4 post-challenge, 4 to 13 hamsters from each group were sacrificed, and the quantity of para 3 in the nasal turbinates and lungs was determined. Wt virus induced protection from challenge. cp12, cp18, and cp45 reduced the peak titer of wt replication in the lungs by greater than 100-fold, tenfold, and tenfold, respectively. The duration of virus replication was shortened also by intranasal vaccination with the mutants. These data give evidence of an inverse relationship between the degree of protection induced by vaccination with cold-adapted mutants and the number of passages of the virus in the cold.

  2. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  3. Mutualism fails when climate response differs between interacting species.

    PubMed

    Warren, Robert J; Bradford, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Successful species interactions require that both partners share a similar cue. For many species, spring warming acts as a shared signal to synchronize mutualist behaviors. Spring flowering plants and the ants that disperse their seeds respond to warming temperatures so that ants forage when plants drop seeds. However, where warm-adapted ants replace cold-adapted ants, changes in this timing might leave early seeds stranded without a disperser. We investigate plant seed dispersal south and north of a distinct boundary between warm- and cold-adapted ants to determine if changes in the ant species influence local plant dispersal. The warm-adapted ants forage much later than the cold-adapted ants, and so we first assess natural populations of early and late blooming plants. We then transplant these plants south and north of the ant boundary to test whether distinct ant climate requirements disrupt the ant-plant mutualism. Whereas the early blooming plant's inability to synchronize with the warm-adapted ant leaves its populations clumped and patchy and its seedlings clustered around the parents in natural populations, when transplanted into the range of the cold-adapted ant, effective seed dispersal recovers. In contrast, the mutualism persists for the later blooming plant regardless of location because it sets seed later in spring when both warm- and cold-adapted ant species forage, resulting in effective seed dispersal. These results indicate that the climate response of species interactions, not just the species themselves, is integral in understanding ecological responses to a changing climate. Data linking phenological synchrony and dispersal are rare, and these results suggest a viable mechanism by which a species' range is limited more by biotic than abiotic interactions - despite the general assumption that biotic influences are buried within larger climate drivers. These results show that biotic partner can be as fundamental a niche requirement as abiotic

  4. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica.

  5. Diversification of the cold-adapted butterfly genus Oeneis related to Holarctic biogeography and climatic niche shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleckova, I; Cesanek, M; Fric, Z; Pellissier, L

    2015-11-01

    Both geographical and ecological speciation interact during the evolution of a clade, but the relative contribution of these processes is rarely assessed for cold-dwelling biota. Here, we investigate the role of biogeography and the evolution of ecological traits on the diversification of the Holarctic arcto-alpine butterfly genus Oeneis (Lepidoptera: Satyrinae). We reconstructed the molecular phylogeny of the genus based on one mitochondrial (COI) and three nuclear (GAPDH, RpS5, wingless) genes. We inferred the biogeographical scenario and the ancestral state reconstructions of climatic and habitat requirements. Within the genus, we detected five main species groups corresponding to the taxonomic division and further paraphyletic position of Neominois (syn. n.). Next, we transferred O. aktashi from the hora to the polixenes species group on the bases of molecular relationships. We found that the genus originated in the dry grasslands of the mountains of Central Asia and dispersed over the Beringian Land Bridges to North America several times independently. Holarctic mountains, in particular the Asian Altai Mts. and Sayan Mts., host the oldest lineages and most of the species diversity. Arctic species are more recent, with Pliocene or Pleistocene origin. We detected a strong phylogenetic signal for the climatic niche, where one lineage diversified towards colder conditions. Altogether, our results indicate that both dispersal across geographical areas and occupation of distinct climatic niches promoted the diversification of the Oeneis genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-03

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility.

  7. A cold-adapted lipase of an Alaskan psychrotroph, Pseudomonas sp. strain B11-1: gene cloning and enzyme purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Choo, D W; Kurihara, T; Suzuki, T; Soda, K; Esaki, N

    1998-02-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium producing a cold-adapted lipase upon growth at low temperatures was isolated from Alaskan soil and identified as a Pseudomonas strain. The lipase gene (lipP) was cloned from the strain and sequenced. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene (924 bp) corresponded to a protein of 308 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 33,714. LipP also has consensus motifs conserved in other cold-adapted lipases, i.e., Lipase 2 from Antarctic Moraxella TA144 (G. Feller, M. Thirty, J. L. Arpigny, and C. Gerday, DNA Cell Biol. 10:381-388, 1991) and the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (D. Langin, H. Laurell, L. S. Holst, P. Belfrage, and C. Holm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:4897-4901, 1993): a pentapeptide, GDSAG, containing the putative active-site serine and an HG dipeptide. LipP was purified from an extract of recombinant Escherichia coli C600 cells harboring a plasmid coding for the lipP gene. The enzyme showed a 1,3-positional specificity toward triolein. p-Nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids with short to medium chains (C4 and C6) served as good substrates. The enzyme was stable between pH 6 and 9, and the optimal pH for the enzymatic hydrolysis of tributyrin was around 8. The activation energies for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate and p-nitrophenyl laurate were determined to be 11.2 and 7.7 kcal/mol, respectively, in the temperature range 5 to 35 degrees C. The enzyme was unstable at temperatures higher than 45 degrees C. The Km of the enzyme for p-nitrophenyl butyrate increased with increases in the assay temperature. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, and Hg2+ but was not affected by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and bisnitrophenyl phosphate. Various water-miscible organic solvents, such as methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide, at concentrations of 0 to 30% (vol/vol) activated the enzyme.

  8. Biochemical characterization of a novel cold-adapted GH39 β-agarase, AgaJ9, from an agar-degrading marine bacterium Gayadomonas joobiniege G7.

    PubMed

    Jung, Subin; Lee, Chang-Ro; Chi, Won-Jae; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2017-03-01

    Gayadomonas joobiniege G7 is an agar-degrading marine bacterium belonging to a novel genus. Genomic sequencing of G. joobiniege revealed that AgaJ9 (formerly YjdB) belonging to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) 39 family. It showed the highest similarity (47% identity) to a putative β-agarase from Catenovulum agarivorans DS-2, an agar-degrading marine bacterium sharing the highest similarity in the nucleotide sequence of 16s rRNA gene with G. joobiniege G7. The agaJ9 gene encodes a protein (134 kDa) of 1205 amino acids, including a 23-amino acid signal peptide. The agarase activity of purified AgaJ9 was confirmed by zymogram analysis. The optimum pH and temperature for AgaJ9 activity were determined as 5 and 25 °C, respectively. Notably, AgaJ9 is a cold-adapted β-agarase retaining more than 80% of its activity even at a temperature of 5 °C. In addition, gel filtration chromatography revealed that AgaJ9 exists as two forms, dimer and monomer. Although the two forms had similar enzymatic properties, their kinetic parameters were different. The K m and V max of dimeric AgaJ9 for agarose was 0.68 mg/ml (5.7 × 10(-6) M) and 17.2 U/mg, respectively, whereas the monomeric form had a K m of 1.43 mg/ml (1.2 × 10(-5) M) and V max of 10.7 U/mg. Thin-layer chromatography and agarose-liquefying analyses revealed that AgaJ9 is an endo-type β-agarase that hydrolyzes agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarobiose. This study is the first report of a GH39 β-agarase with a cold-adapted enzymatic feature, a unique attribute, which may be useful for industrial applications.

  9. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  10. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  11. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Ng, Tzi Bun; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-02-26

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications.

  12. Genetic stability of live, cold-adapted influenza virus components of the FluMist/CAIV-T vaccine throughout the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Buonagurio, Deborah A; Bechert, Thomas M; Yang, Chin-Fen; Shutyak, Leonid; D'Arco, Gail A; Kazachkov, Yuriy; Wang, Hai-Ping; Rojas, Eduardo A; O'Neill, Robert E; Spaete, Richard R; Coelingh, Kathleen L; Zamb, Timothy J; Sidhu, Mohinder S; Udem, Stephen A

    2006-03-15

    FluMist is a live-attenuated, trivalent influenza vaccine (LAIV) recently approved for intranasal administration. To demonstrate genetic stability during manufacture of the vaccine viruses in LAIV and a similar vaccine in development (CAIV-T), full genome consensus sequences were determined at multiple manufacturing stages for four influenza type A and five type B strains. The critical cold-adapted (ca), temperature-sensitive (ts) and attenuated (att) mutations were preserved in the virus manufacturing intermediates. Moreover, sequence identity was observed for all vaccine intermediates of the same strain. Minor sequence differences were noted in the shared gene segments of the vaccine viruses and their common progenitor master donor virus (MDV) and several of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes contained nucleotide differences when compared to the wild-type parent. Nonetheless, all vaccine viruses retained the ca, ts, and att phenotypes. Thus, genetic and phenotypic stability of the vaccine viruses is maintained during the manufacture of LAIV/CAIV-T vaccines.

  13. Gene cloning and catalytic characterization of cold-adapted lipase of Photobacterium sp. MA1-3 isolated from blood clam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Khosasih, Vivia; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Sang-Jun; Suwanto, Antonius; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2012-12-01

    A lipase-producing Photobacterium strain (MA1-3) was isolated from the intestine of a blood clam caught at Namhae, Korea. The lipase gene was cloned by shotgun cloning and encoded 340 amino acids with a molecular mass of 38,015 Da. It had a very low sequence identity with other bacterial lipases, with the exception of that of Photobacterium lipolyticum M37 (83.2%). The MA1-3 lipase was produced in soluble form when Escherichia coli cells harboring the gene were cultured at 18°C. Its optimum temperature and pH were 45°C and pH 8.5, respectively. Its activation energy was calculated to be 2.69 kcal/mol, suggesting it to be a cold-adapted lipase. Its optimum temperature, temperature stability, and substrate specificity were quite different from those of M37 lipase, despite the considerable sequence similarities. Meanwhile, MA1-3 lipase performed a transesterification reaction using olive oil and various alcohols including methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. In the presence of t-butanol as a co-solvent, this lipase produced biodiesel using methanol and plant or waste oils. The highest biodiesel conversion yield (73%) was achieved using waste soybean oil and methanol at a molar ratio of 1:5 after 12 h using 5 units of lipase.

  14. Cold-adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus live vaccine elicits cross-reactive immune responses against seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik Lin

    2012-05-01

    The rapid transmission of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (pH1N1) among humans has raised the concern of a potential emergence of reassortment between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic influenza strains, especially the avian H5N1 influenza virus. Here, we report that the cold-adapted pH1N1 live attenuated vaccine (CApH1N1) elicits cross-reactive immunity to seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses in the mouse model. Immunization with CApH1N1 induced both systemic and mucosal antibodies with broad reactivity to seasonal and H5 strains, including HAPI H5N1 and the avian H5N2 virus, providing complete protection against heterologous and heterosubtypic lethal challenges. Our results not only accentuate the merit of using live attenuated influenza virus vaccines in view of cross-reactivity but also represent the potential of CApH1N1 live vaccine for mitigating the clinical severity of infections that arise from reassortments between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic H5 subtype viruses.

  15. A live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A H7N3 virus vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H7 viruses in mice and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Tomy; McAuliffe, Josephine; Lu, Bin; Vogel, Leatrice; Swayne, David; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2008-08-15

    The appearance of human infections caused by avian influenza A H7 subtype viruses underscores their pandemic potential and the need to develop vaccines to protect humans from viruses of this subtype. A live attenuated H7N3 virus vaccine was generated by reverse genetics using the HA and NA genes of a low pathogenicity A/chicken/BC/CN-6/04 (H7N3) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2) virus. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus was temperature sensitive and showed attenuation in mice and ferrets. Intranasal immunization with one dose of the vaccine protected mice and ferrets when challenged with homologous and heterologous H7 viruses. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus showed comparable levels of attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and ferret models. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this vaccine in mice and ferrets support the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials.

  16. Safety, immunogencity, and efficacy of a cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) vaccine in mice and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Grace L.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Jin Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-03-01

    We studied the attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) (H2N2) virus in mice and ferrets to evaluate its use in the event of an H2 influenza pandemic. The AA ca virus was restricted in replication in the respiratory tract of mice and ferrets. In mice, 2 doses of vaccine elicited a > 4-fold rise in hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) titer and resulted in complete inhibition of viral replication following lethal homologous wild-type virus challenge. In ferrets, a single dose of the vaccine elicited a > 4-fold rise in HAI titer and conferred complete protection against homologous wild-type virus challenge in the upper respiratory tract. In both mice and ferrets, the AA ca virus provided significant protection from challenge with heterologous H2 virus challenge in the respiratory tract. The AA ca vaccine is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious against homologous and heterologous challenge in mice and ferrets, supporting the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials.

  17. A live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A H7N3 virus vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H7 viruses in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Tomy; McAuliffe, Josephine; Lu, Bin; Vogel, Leatrice; Swayne, David; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2008-08-15

    The appearance of human infections caused by avian influenza A H7 subtype viruses underscores their pandemic potential and the need to develop vaccines to protect humans from viruses of this subtype. A live attenuated H7N3 virus vaccine was generated by reverse genetics using the HA and NA genes of a low pathogenicity A/chicken/BC/CN-6/04 (H7N3) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2) virus. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus was temperature sensitive and showed attenuation in mice and ferrets. Intranasal immunization with one dose of the vaccine protected mice and ferrets when challenged with homologous and heterologous H7 viruses. The reassortant H7N3 BC 04 ca vaccine virus showed comparable levels of attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and ferret models. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this vaccine in mice and ferrets support the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials.

  18. [Characterization of cold-adapted influenza strain A/HongKong/1/68/162/35 as a potential donor of attenuation and high reproduction].

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, L M; Gorev, N E; Potapchuk, M V; Repko, I A; Korotkov, A V; Sergeeva, M V; Komissarov, A B; Pisareva, M M; Kuznetsov, V V; Grudinin, M P; Kiselev, O I

    2012-01-01

    Live and inactivated vaccines are currently produced using virus reassortants originating from various gene donors of internal proteins. Based on the pandemic virus A/Hong Kong/1/68 (H3N2), a cold-adapted thermo-sensitive strain A/Hong Kong/1/68/162/35 was generated. It is distinguished for its high reproductive capacity (9-9.5 lg EID50), and hemagglutinating activity (1:1024-1:2048). The strain has ts and ca phenotype: reproductive capacity at t = 39 degrees C is 1.0 lg EID50; at t = 26 degrees C, 8.5 lg EID50. A total of 16 mutations have emerged from comprehensive sequencing of the virus genome. Among them 10 mutations were located in the genes of polymerase complex and NP, with respective amino-acid substitutions. The stability of strain characteristics, such as attenuation to humans and high reproductive capacity, were confirmed by repeated sequencing of the genome after tenfold passing of the virus in chicken embryos. Reassortants of the strain A/Hong Kong/1/68/162/35 with the wild-type viruses have inherited useful features of donor virus.

  19. [Molecular mechanisms of reversions to the ts+ -phenotype of cold-adapted influenza virus A strains--attenuation donors for live influenza reassortant vaccines].

    PubMed

    Markushin, S G; Akopova, I I; Koptiaeva, I B; Tsfasman, T M; Gendon, Iu Z

    2006-01-01

    A ts+ revertant of cold-adapted (ca) strain A/Leningrad/134/47/57--the attenuation donor for live influenza reassortant vaccines--was obtained by passages of the ca strain in chick embryos at nonpermissive temperatures. The ts+ revertant acquired the ability to grow in chick embryos at 40 degrees C and lost the capacity to reproduce there at 25 degrees C. A complementation-recombination test using the fowl plague virus (FPV0 ts-mutants showed the loss of the ts-phenotype in the RNA-segments of ts+ revertants' genome coding for PB2, NP, and NS (NS2) proteins. However, PCR-restriction analysis revealed a true reversion in RNA-segment coding for PB2 protein only. All the investigated mutations in the ts+ revertant genome were preserved. This phenomenon could be explained by the appearance of intragenic and extragenic suppression mutations in the ts+ revertant genome. The data of the complementation-recombination test suggest that reversion of ts-phenotype occurs more frequently due to extra- or intragenic suppression rather than as a result of a true mutation loss. Estimation of the genetic stability of vaccine ca strains of influenza virus should be based on the combined use of PCR-restriction and complementation tests.

  20. Safety, immunogencity, and efficacy of a cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) vaccine in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Grace L; Lamirande, Elaine W; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-03-01

    We studied the attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of the cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) (H2N2) virus in mice and ferrets to evaluate its use in the event of an H2 influenza pandemic. The AA ca virus was restricted in replication in the respiratory tract of mice and ferrets. In mice, 2 doses of vaccine elicited a >4-fold rise in hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) titer and resulted in complete inhibition of viral replication following lethal homologous wild-type virus challenge. In ferrets, a single dose of the vaccine elicited a >4-fold rise in HAI titer and conferred complete protection against homologous wild-type virus challenge in the upper respiratory tract. In both mice and ferrets, the AA ca virus provided significant protection from challenge with heterologous H2 virus challenge in the respiratory tract. The AA ca vaccine is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious against homologous and heterologous challenge in mice and ferrets, supporting the evaluation of this vaccine in clinical trials. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Advantage of live attenuated cold-adapted influenza A virus over inactivated vaccine for A/Washington/80 (H3N2) wild-type virus infection.

    PubMed

    Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Murphy, B R

    1984-03-31

    The efficacy of live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant influenza virus vaccine against experimental challenge with homologous wild-type virus 5 to 8 weeks after vaccination was compared with that of licensed inactivated vaccine in 81 seronegative (haemagglutination-inhibition antibody titre less than or equal to 1:8) college students. At a dose of 10(7.5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) (70 HID50, human 50% infectious doses) the live virus vaccine, given intranasally, completely protected against illness caused by wild-type virus, whereas the inactivated vaccine, administered intramuscularly, provided 72% protection. Wild-type virus was recovered from only 13% of live virus vaccinees (10(7.5) TCID50 dose of ca virus) compared with 63% of inactivated virus vaccinees and the few infected live virus vaccinees shed 1000 times less wild-type virus than did infected inactivated virus vaccinees or unvaccinated controls. This striking reduction in virus shedding suggests that influenza transmission may be more efficiently interrupted with live than with inactivated virus vaccination.

  2. Proteomic analysis of cold adaptation in a Siberian permafrost bacterium--Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 by two-dimensional liquid separation coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinghua; Kathariou, Sophia; Lubman, David M

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial cold adaptation in Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 was studied on a proteomic scale using a 2-D liquid phase separation coupled with MS technology. Whole-cell lysates of E. sibiricum 255-15 grown at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C were first fractionated according to pI by chromatofocusing (CF), and further separated based on hydrophobicity by nonporous silica RP HPLC (NPS-RP-HPLC) which was on-line coupled with an ESI-TOF MS for intact protein M(r) measurement and quantitative interlysate comparison. Mass maps were created to visualize the differences in protein expression between different growth temperatures. The differentially expressed proteins were then identified by PMF using a MALDI-TOF MS and peptide sequencing by MS/MS with a MALDI quadrupole IT TOF mass spectrometer (MALDI-QIT-TOF MS). A total of over 500 proteins were detected in this study, of which 256 were identified. Among these proteins 39 were cold acclimation proteins (Caps) that were preferentially or uniquely expressed at 4 degrees C and three were homologous cold shock proteins (Csps). The homologous Csps were found to be similarly expressed at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C, where these three homologous Csps represent about 10% of the total soluble proteins at both 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C.

  3. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Bun Ng, Tzi; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:26915906

  4. Cloning, sequencing and expression analysis of the first cellulase gene encoding cellobiohydrolase 1 from a cold-adaptive Penicillium chrysogenum FS010.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yunhua; Wang, Tianhong; Long, Hao; Zhu, Huiyuan

    2007-02-01

    A cellobiohydrolase 1 gene (cbh1) was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum FS010 by a modified thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR). DNA sequencing shows that cbh1 has an open reading frame of 1590 bp, encoding a putative protein of 529 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that CBHI has a modular structure with a predicted molecular mass of 56 kDa and consists of a fungal type carbohydrate binding module separated from a catalytic domain by a threonine rich linker region. The putative gene product is homologous to fungal cellobiohydrolases in Family 7 of the glycosyl hydrolases. A novel cbh1 promoter (1.3 kb) was also cloned and sequenced, which contains seven putative binding sites (5'-SYGGRG-3') for the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1. Effect of various carbon sources to the cbh1 transcription of P. chrysogenum was examined by Northern analysis, suggesting that the expression of cbh1 is regulated at transcriptional level. The cbh1 gene in cold-adaptive fungus P. chysogenum was expressed as an active enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae H158. The recombinant CBHI accumulated intracellularly and could not be secreted into the medium.

  5. Cold adaptation of fungi obtained from soil and lake sediment in the Skarvsnes ice-free area, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masaharu; Fujiu, Seiichi; Xiao, Nan; Hanada, Yuichi; Kudoh, Sakae; Kondo, Hidemasa; Tsuda, Sakae; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-09-01

    A total of 71 isolates were collected from lake sediment and soil surrounding lakes in the Skarvsnes area, Antarctica. Based on ITS region sequence similarity, these isolates were classified to 10 genera. Twenty-three isolates were categorized as ascomycetous fungi from five genera (Embellisia, Phoma, Geomyces, Tetracladium or Thelebolus) and 48 isolates were categorized as basidiomycetous fungi in five genera (Mrakia, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Rhodotorula or Leucosporidium). Thirty-five percent of culturable fungi were of the genus Mrakia. Eighteen isolates from eight genera were selected and tested for both antifreeze activity and capacity for growth under temperatures ranging from -1 to 25 °C. Rhodotorula sp. NHT-2 possessed a high degree of sequence homology with R. gracialis, while Leucosporidium sp. BSS-1 possessed a high degree of sequence homology with Leu. antarcticum (Glaciozyma antarctica), and these two isolates demonstrated antifreeze activity. All isolates examined were capable of growth at -1 °C. Mrakia spp., while capable of growth at -1 °C, did not demonstrate any antifreeze activity and exhibited only limited secretion of extracellular polysaccharides. Species of the genus Mrakia possessed high amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that members of this genus have adapted to cold environments by increasing their membrane fluidity.

  6. Where do adaptive shifts occur during invasion A multidisciplinary approach to unravel cold adaptation in a tropical ant species invading the Mediterranean zone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although evolution is now recognized as improving the invasive success of populations, where and when key adaptation event(s) occur often remains unclear. Here we used a multidisciplinary approach to disentangle the eco-evolutionary scenario of invasion of a Mediterranean zone (i.e. Israel) by the t...

  7. The influence of the multi-basic cleavage site of the H5 hemagglutinin on the attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of a live attenuated influenza A h5N1 cold-adapted vaccine virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recombinant live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) deltaH5N1 vaccine with a modified hemagglutinin (HA) and intact neuraminidase genes from A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) and the six remaining genome segments from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) cold-adapted (AA ca) virus was attenuated in chickens, mice and fe...

  8. Evaluation of bovine, cold-adapted human, and wild-type human parainfluenza type 3 viruses in adult volunteers and in chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, M L; Belshe, R B; King, J; Newman, F; Westblom, T U; Tierney, E L; London, W T; Murphy, B R

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the level of attenuation of live parainfluenza type 3 virus (PIV3) vaccine candidates, we compared the responses of partially immune adult volunteers inoculated intranasally with 10(6) to 10(7) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of bovine PIV3 (n = 18) or cold-adapted (ca) PIV3 (n = 37) with those of 28 adults administered 10(6) to 10(7) TCID50 of wild-type PIV3. The candidate vaccine viruses and the wild-type virus were avirulent and poorly infectious for these adults even though all of them had a low level of nasal antibodies to PIV3. To determine whether the ca PIV3 was attenuated, we then administered 10(4) TCID50 of ca PIV3 (cold-passage 12) or wild-type PIV3 intranasally and intratracheally to two fully susceptible chimpanzees, respectively, and challenged the four primates with wild-type virus 1 month later. Compared with wild-type virus, which caused upper respiratory tract illness, the ca PIV3 was highly attenuated and manifested a 500-fold reduction in virus replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts of the two immunized animals. Despite restriction of virus replication, infection with ca PIV3 conferred a high level of protective immunity against challenge with wild-type virus. The ca PIV3 which had been passaged 12 times at 20 degrees C did not retain its ts phenotype. These findings indicate that ca PIV3 may be a promising vaccine candidate for human beings if a passage level can be identified that is genetically stable, satisfactorily attenuated, and immunogenic. PMID:1650789

  9. Characterization of a New Cold-Adapted and Salt-Activated Polysaccharide Lyase Family 7 Alginate Lyase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dong, Sheng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Fang; Li, Ping-Yi; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Marine bacterial alginate lyases play a role in marine alginate degradation and carbon cycling. Although a large number of alginate lyases have been characterized, reports on alginate lyases with special characteristics are still rather less. Here, a gene alyPM encoding an alginate lyase of polysaccharide lyase family 7 (PL7) was cloned from marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524 and expressed in Escherichia coli. AlyPM shows 41% sequence identity to characterized alginate lyases, indicating that AlyPM is a new PL7 enzyme. The optimal pH for AlyPM activity was 8.5. AlyPM showed the highest activity at 30°C and remained 19% of the highest activity at 5°C. AlyPM was unstable at temperatures above 30°C and had a low Tm of 37°C. These data indicate that AlyPM is a cold-adapted enzyme. Moreover, AlyPM is a salt-activated enzyme. AlyPM activity in 0.5–1.2 M NaCl was sixfolds higher than that in 0 M NaCl, probably caused by a significant increase in substrate affinity, because the Km of AlyPM in 0.5 M NaCl decreased more than 20-folds than that in 0 M NaCl. AlyPM preferably degraded polymannuronate and mainly released dimers and trimers. These data indicate that AlyPM is a new PL7 endo-alginate lyase with special characteristics. PMID:27486451

  10. Two cold-induced family 19 glycosyl hydrolases from cherimoya (Annona cherimola) fruit: an antifungal chitinase and a cold-adapted chitinase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Oscar; Sanchez-Ballesta, María T; Merodio, Carmen; Escribano, María I

    2013-11-01

    Two cold-induced chitinases were isolated and purified from the mesocarp cherimoyas (Annona cherimola Mill.) and they were characterised as acidic endochitinases with a Mr of 24.79 and 47.77kDa (AChi24 and AChi48, respectively), both family 19 glycosyl hydrolases. These purified chitinases differed significantly in their biochemical and biophysical properties. While both enzymes had similar optimal acidic pH values, AChi24 was enzymatically active and stable at alkaline pH values, as well as displaying an optimal temperature of 45°C and moderate thermostability. Kinetic studies revealed a great catalytic efficiency of AChi24 for oligomeric and polymeric substrates. Conversely, AChi48 hydrolysis showed positive co-operativity that was associated to a mixture of different functional oligomeric states through weak transient protein interactions. The rise in the AChi48 kcat at increasing enzyme concentrations provided evidence of its oligomerisation. AChi48 chitinase was active and stable in a broad acidic pH range, and while it was relatively labile as temperatures increased, with an optimal temperature of 35°C, it retained about 50% of its maximal activity from 5 to 50°C. Thermodynamic characterisation reflected the high kcat of AChi48 and the remarkably lower ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡) and ΔG(‡) values at 5°C compared to AChi24, indicating that the hydrolytic activity of AChi48 was less thermodependent. In vitro functional studies revealed that AChi24 had a strong antifungal defence potential against Botrytis cinerea, whereas they displayed no cryoprotective or antifreeze activity. Hence, based on biochemical, thermodynamic and functional data, this study demonstrates that two acidic endochitinases are induced at low temperatures in a subtropical fruit, and that one of them acts in an oligomeric cold-adapted manner.

  11. Duration of the protective immune response after prime and booster vaccination of yearlings with a live modified cold-adapted viral vaccine against equine influenza.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, K; Kydyrbayev, Zh; Ryskeldinova, Sh; Assanzhanova, N; Sansyzbay, A

    2014-05-23

    We previously created a live vaccine against equine influenza based the new reassortant cold-adapted (Ca) strain A/HK/Otar/6:2/2010. The live vaccine contains surface proteins (HA, NA) from the wild-type virus A/equine/Otar/764/2007 (Н3N8; American Lineage Florida Clade 2), and internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, NS) from the attenuated Ca donor virus A/Hong Kong/1/68/162/35CA (H3N2). To determine the safety and duration of the protective immune responses, 90 yearlings were intranasally vaccinated in single mode, double mode at an interval of 42 days (10(7.0) EID50/animal for both vaccinations), or with PBS (control group). Ten animals from each group were challenged with the homologous wild-type virus A/equine/Otar/764/07 (Н3N8) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 months after vaccination. Similarly, 10 animals from each group were challenged with the heterologous wild-type virus A/equine/Sydney/2888-8/07 (Н3N8; American Lineage Florida Clade 1) 12 months after vaccination. The vaccine was completely safe, and single intranasal vaccination of yearlings was capable of inducing statistically significant (from P=0.03 to P<0.0001) clinical and virological protection against the homologous virus; however, only double mode vaccination generated significant (from P=0.02 to P<0.0001) protection against the heterologous virus at 12 months (observation period). Interestingly, this vaccine enables the differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. On this basis of this study, we recommend double intranasal administration of this vaccine at an interval of 42 days in veterinary practice.

  12. Parallel N- and C-Terminal Truncations Facilitate Purification and Analysis of a 155-kDa Cold-Adapted Type-I Pullulanase.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Krull, Alina; Lorenz, Ute; Antranikian, Garabed

    2017-02-01

    The cold-adapted pullulanase Pul13A is an industrial useful amylolytic enzyme, but its low solubility is the major bottleneck to produce the protein in recombinant form. In a previous approach, a complex and time-consuming purification strategy including a step-wise dialysis procedure using decreasing concentrations of urea to renature the insoluble protein from inclusion bodies had been established. In this study, a truncation strategy was developed to facilitate the purification and handling of the type-I pullulanase. Pul13A has a size of 155-kDa with a multidomain architecture that is composed of the following predicted modules: CBM41/E-set/Amy-Pul/DUF3372/E-set/E-set/E-set, with CBM and E-set domains being putative carbohydrate-binding modules, Amy-Pul is the catalytic region and DUF is a domain of unknown function. Consecutive N- and C-terminal deletions of domains were applied to construct minimized enzyme variants retaining pullulanase activity and exhibiting improved renaturation efficiencies. A total of seven truncation constructs were generated and tested, which still led to the production of inclusion bodies. However, the parallel deletion of the exterior CBM41 and E-set domain enabled the direct refolding of active enzymes during one-step dialysis in urea-free buffer. Catalytic properties of truncation construct Pul13A-N1/C1 were not impaired indicating that this enzyme variant may be superior for industrial applications over the full-length pullulanase.

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of cold-adapted X-31 live attenuated pre-pandemic H5N1 influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Jung, Eun-Ju; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Eun-Young; Lee, Yoon Jae; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-07-18

    Despite global efforts to control influenza viruses, they have taken a heavy toll on human public health worldwide. Among particular threats is highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus (HPAI) due to not only its high mortality in humans but also possible human-to-human transmission either through reassortment with other human influenza viruses such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, or by genetic mutations. With the aim of developing effective vaccines against the H5N1 viruses, we generated two live attenuated H5N1 vaccine candidates against A/Indonesia/05/2005 (clade 2.1) and A/chicken/Korea/ES/2003 (clade 2.5) strains, in the genetic background of the cold-adapted donor strain of X-31. In mice, a single dose of immunization with each of the two vaccines was highly immunogenic inducing high titers of serum viral-neutralizing and hemagglutinin-inhibiting antibodies against the homologous H5N1 strain. Furthermore, significant levels of cross-clade antibody responses were induced by the vaccines, suggesting a broad-spectrum cross-reactivity against the heterologous H5N1 strains. The immunizations provided solid protections against heterologous lethal challenges with H5N2 virus, significantly reducing the morbidity and challenge virus replications in the respiratory tracts. The robustness of the antibody responses against both the homologous and heterologous strains, together with efficient protection against the lethal H5N2 challenge, strongly support the protection against wild type H5N1 infections. These results could serve as an experimental basis for the development of safe and effective H5N1 pre-pandemic vaccines while further addressing the biosecurity concerns associated with H5N1 HPAI.

  14. GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Terry L; Williams, Paul T; Yin, Shengjun; Klasky, Hilda B; Tadinada, Sashi; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the objective of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface project is to create the capability to apply GRIZZLY 3-D finite element (thermal and stress) analysis results as input to FAVOR probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses. The one benefit of FAVOR to Grizzly is the PROBABILISTIC capability. This document describes the implementation of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface, the preliminary verification and tests results and a user guide that provides detailed step-by-step instructions to run the program.

  15. Imparting temperature sensitivity and attenuation in ferrets to A/Puerto Rico/8/34 influenza virus by transferring the genetic signature for temperature sensitivity from cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong; Zhou, Helen; Lu, Bin; Kemble, George

    2004-01-01

    The four temperature-sensitive (ts) loci identified in the PB1 and PB2 gene segments of cold-adapted A/Ann Arbor/6/60 influenza virus, the master donor virus for influenza A virus (MDV-A) FluMist vaccines, were introduced into a divergent A/Puerto Rico/8/34 influenza virus strain. Recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus with these four introduced ts loci exhibited both ts and att phenotypes similar to those of MDV-A, which could be used as a donor virus for manufacturing large quantities of inactivated influenza virus vaccine against potential pandemic strains.

  16. Comparative studies of wild-type and 'cold-mutant' (temperature sensitive) influenza viruses: geneology of the matrix (M) and non-structural (NS) proteins in recombinant cold-adapted H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P; Cox, N J; Murphy, B R; Spring, S B; Maassab, H F

    1977-10-01

    The matrix (M) protein of the H2N2 virus A/Ann Arbor/6/60 may be distinguished from M protein of several H3N2 viruses and A/New Jersey/76 (HSWINI) by SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis using a discontinuous buffer system. The smallest RNA (RNA 8) of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus may be distinguished from RNA 8 of several H3N2 viruses by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in 3% or 3-6% gels in the absence of urea, if electrophoresis is done at 30 to 36 degrees C or 20 degrees C respectively. Ten clones of conditionally-lethal temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants were studied, which derived their cold-adaption and ts genes from mutant A/Ann Arbor/6/60, and their haemagglutinin from the H3N2 virus A/Scotland/840/74. Each clone was found to derive its M protein from A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant, and its RNA 8 from A/Scotland/840/74. The only assignment of genes 7 and 8 consistent with these findings for the recombinants is that in each parent virus (and in the recombinants) gene 7 codes for M protein, and gene 8 for NS protein. Furthermore, it may be concluded from the results that the biologically important ts lesions in the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant parent are not present in the NS gene. In addition to the recombinants of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 and A/Scotland/840/74, five independent ts/cold-adapted recombinants of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant with H3N2 and HSWINI wild-type viruses were examined, and all were found to contain the M protein of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant parent. This is suggestive that M protein may be at least partially responsible for the cold-adaptation and/or ts properties of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant and the recombinants.

  17. Phenotypic selection favors missing trait combinations in coexisting annual plants.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Sarah; Gremer, Jennifer R; Huxman, Travis E; Lawrence Venable, D; Angert, Amy L

    2013-08-01

    Trade-offs among traits are important for maintaining biodiversity, but the role of natural selection in their construction is not often known. It is possible that trade-offs reflect fundamental constraints, negative correlational selection, or directional selection operating on costly, redundant traits. In a Sonoran Desert community of winter annual plants, we have identified a trade-off between relative growth rate and water-use efficiency among species, such that species with high relative growth rate have low water-use efficiency and vice versa. We measured selection on water-use efficiency, relative growth rate, and underlying traits within populations of four species at two study sites with different average climates. Phenotypic trait correlations within species did not match the among-species trade-off. In fact, for two species with high water-use efficiency, individuals with high relative growth rate also had high water-use efficiency. All populations experienced positive directional selection for water-use efficiency and relative growth rate. Selection tended to be stronger on water-use efficiency at the warmer and drier site, and selection on relative growth rate tended to be stronger at the cooler and wetter site. Our results indicate that directional natural selection favors a phenotype not observed among species in the community, suggesting that the among-species trade-off could be due to pervasive genetic constraints, perhaps acting in concert with processes of community assembly.

  18. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  19. New Study Says CAI May Favor Introverts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopmeier, George

    1981-01-01

    A personality research study using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator indicates that computer-assisted instruction programs favor introverts, i.e., those learners who can concentrate on details, memorize facts, and stay with a task until it is completed. (JJD)

  20. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  1. Evaluation of the genetic stability of the temperature-sensitive PB2 gene mutation of the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted vaccine virus.

    PubMed

    Treanor, J; Perkins, M; Battaglia, R; Murphy, B R

    1994-12-01

    A single-gene reassortant bearing the PB2 gene of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted virus in the background of the A/Korea/82 (H3N2) wild-type virus is a temperature-sensitive (ts) virus with an in vitro shutoff temperature of 38 degrees C. A single mutation at amino acid (aa) at 265 (Asp-Ser) of the PB2 protein is responsible for the ts phenotype. This ts single-gene PB2 reassortant virus was serially passaged at elevated temperatures in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to generate ts+ phenotypic revertant viruses. Four ts+ phenotypically revertant viruses were derived independently, and each possessed a shutoff temperature for replication in vitro of > 40 degrees C. Each of the four phenotypically revertant viruses replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of mice and hamsters, unlike the PB2 single-gene reassortant virus, confirming that the ts phenotype was responsible for the attenuation of this virus in rodents. Mating the ts+ revertants with wild-type virus yielded ts progeny in high frequency, indicating that the loss of ts phenotype was due to a suppressor mutation which was mapped to the PA gene in each of the four independently derived ts phenotypic revertants. Nucleotide sequence analysis confirmed the absence of new mutations on the PB2 gene and the presence of predicted amino acid changes in the PA proteins of the revertant viruses. These studies suggest that single amino acid changes at aa 245 (Glu-Lys) or 347 (Asp-Asn) of the PA protein can completely suppress the ts and attenuation phenotypes specified by the Asp-Ser mutation at aa 265 of the PB2 protein of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted virus.

  2. Familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset.

    PubMed

    Zimić, Jadranka Ivandić; Jukić, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development and favoring drug addiction onset had been statistically more frequently encountered during childhood and adolescence as compared to the controls. The results also indicated the need for further research into familial interrelations and the structure of the families addicts were born into, as well as the need for the implementation of family-based approaches to both drug addiction prevention and therapy.

  3. Favorable Progress of English Education in Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    be a marvelous trigger for young children. Second, elementary school days are the right time to acquire proper pronunciation and better...listening capability. Some researchers say that below 12 or 13 years old is a favorable time to master natural pronunciation . They call this time...critical period”2. If they start to study English early, they will be able to acquire clear pronunciation and proper intonation. This time change

  4. Distribution, diversity and bioprospecting of bioactive compounds from cryptic fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates identified using molecular methods into 21 genera and 43 species. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces...

  5. Endophytic bacterial communities in three arctic plants from low arctic fell tundra are cold-adapted and host-plant specific.

    PubMed

    Nissinen, Riitta M; Männistö, Minna K; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Endophytic bacteria inhabit internal plant tissues, and have been isolated from a large diversity of plants, where they form nonpathogenic relationships with their hosts. This study combines molecular and culture-dependent approaches to characterize endophytic bacterial communities of three arcto-alpine plant species (Oxyria digyna, Diapensia lapponica and Juncus trifidus) sampled in the low Arctic (69°03'N). Analyses of a 325 bacterial endophyte isolates, as well as seven clone libraries, revealed a high diversity. In particular, members of the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were found. The compositions of the endophytic bacterial communities were dependent on host-plant species as well as on snow cover at sampling sites. Several bacterial genera were found to be associated tightly with specific host-plant species. In particular, Sphingomonas spp. were characteristic for D. lapponica and O. digyna, and their phylogenetic grouping corresponded to the host plant. Most of the endophyte isolates grew well and retained activity at +4 °C, and isolate as well as clone library sequences were often highly similar to sequences from bacteria from cold environments. Taken together, this study shows that arctic plants harbour a diverse community of bacterial endophytes, a portion of which seems to be tightly associated with specific plant species. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of mutations contributing to the temperature-sensitive, cold-adapted, and attenuation phenotypes of the live-attenuated cold-passage 45 (cp45) human parainfluenza virus 3 candidate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; Surman, S; Tatem, J M; Paschalis, M; Wu, S L; Udem, S A; Durbin, A P; Collins, P L; Murphy, B R

    1999-02-01

    The live-attenuated human parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV3) cold-passage 45 (cp45) candidate vaccine was shown previously to be safe, immunogenic, and phenotypically stable in seronegative human infants. Previous findings indicated that each of the three amino acid substitutions in the L polymerase protein of cp45 independently confers the temperature-sensitive (ts) and attenuation (att) phenotypes but not the cold-adaptation (ca) phenotype (29). cp45 contains 12 additional potentially important point mutations in other proteins (N, C, M, F, and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN]) or in cis-acting sequences (the leader region and the transcription gene start [GS] signal of the N gene), and their contribution to these phenotypes was undefined. To further characterize the genetic basis for the ts, ca, and att phenotypes of this promising vaccine candidate, we constructed, using a reverse genetics system, a recombinant cp45 virus that contained all 15 cp45-specific mutations mentioned above, and found that it was essentially indistinguishable from the biologically derived cp45 on the basis of plaque size, level of temperature sensitivity, cold adaptation, level of replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of hamsters, and ability to protect hamsters from subsequent wild-type PIV3 challenge. We then constructed recombinant viruses containing the cp45 mutations in individual proteins as well as several combinations of mutations. Analysis of these recombinant viruses revealed that multiple cp45 mutations distributed throughout the genome contribute to the ts, ca, and att phenotypes. In addition to the mutations in the L gene, at least one other mutation in the 3' N region (i.e., including the leader, N GS, and N coding changes) contributes to the ts phenotype. A recombinant virus containing all the cp45 mutations except those in L was more ts than cp45, illustrating the complex nature of this phenotype. The ca phenotype of cp45 also is a complex composite phenotype

  7. Identification of Mutations Contributing to the Temperature-Sensitive, Cold-Adapted, and Attenuation Phenotypes of the Live-Attenuated Cold-Passage 45 (cp45) Human Parainfluenza Virus 3 Candidate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Surman, Sonja; Tatem, Joanne M.; Paschalis, Maribel; Wu, Shin-Lu; Udem, Stephen A.; Durbin, Anna P.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    1999-01-01

    The live-attenuated human parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV3) cold-passage 45 (cp45) candidate vaccine was shown previously to be safe, immunogenic, and phenotypically stable in seronegative human infants. Previous findings indicated that each of the three amino acid substitutions in the L polymerase protein of cp45 independently confers the temperature-sensitive (ts) and attenuation (att) phenotypes but not the cold-adaptation (ca) phenotype (29). cp45 contains 12 additional potentially important point mutations in other proteins (N, C, M, F, and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN]) or in cis-acting sequences (the leader region and the transcription gene start [GS] signal of the N gene), and their contribution to these phenotypes was undefined. To further characterize the genetic basis for the ts, ca, and att phenotypes of this promising vaccine candidate, we constructed, using a reverse genetics system, a recombinant cp45 virus that contained all 15 cp45-specific mutations mentioned above, and found that it was essentially indistinguishable from the biologically derived cp45 on the basis of plaque size, level of temperature sensitivity, cold adaptation, level of replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of hamsters, and ability to protect hamsters from subsequent wild-type PIV3 challenge. We then constructed recombinant viruses containing the cp45 mutations in individual proteins as well as several combinations of mutations. Analysis of these recombinant viruses revealed that multiple cp45 mutations distributed throughout the genome contribute to the ts, ca, and att phenotypes. In addition to the mutations in the L gene, at least one other mutation in the 3′ N region (i.e., including the leader, N GS, and N coding changes) contributes to the ts phenotype. A recombinant virus containing all the cp45 mutations except those in L was more ts than cp45, illustrating the complex nature of this phenotype. The ca phenotype of cp45 also is a complex composite phenotype

  8. Paenibacillus ihbetae sp. nov., a cold-adapted antimicrobial producing bacterium isolated from high altitude Suraj Tal Lake in the Indian trans-Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Shashi; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Tewari, Rupinder; Gulati, Arvind

    2017-08-16

    The assessment of bacterial diversity and bioprospection of the high-altitude lake Suraj Tal microorganisms for potent antimicrobial activities revealed the presence of two Gram-stain-variable, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria, namely IHBB 9852(T) and IHBB 9951. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the affiliation of strains IHBB 9852(T) and IHBB 9951 within the genus Paenibacillus, exhibiting the highest sequence similarity to Paenibacillus lactis DSM 15596(T) (97.8% and 97.7%) and less than 95.9% similarity to other species of the genus Paenibacillus. DNA-DNA relatedness among strains IHBB 9852(T) and IHBB 9951 was 90.2%, and with P. lactis DSM 15596(T), was 52.7% and 52.4%, respectively. The novel strains contain anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, C16:0 and iso-C16:0 as major fatty acids, and phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol were predominant polar lipids. The DNA G+C content for IHBB 9852T and IHBB 9951 was 52.1 and 52.2mol%. Based on the results of phenotypic and genomic characterisations, we concluded that strains IHBB 9852(T) and IHBB 9951 belong to a novel Paenibacillus species, for which the name Paenibacillus ihbetae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IHBB 9852(T) (=MTCC 12459(T)=MCC 2795(T)=JCM 31131(T)=KACC 19072(T); DPD TaxonNumber TA00046) and IHBB 9951 (=MTCC 12458=MCC 2794=JCM 31132=KACC 19073) is a reference strain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. [Genetic and phenotypic analysis of heterogeneous population of a cold-adapted donor of the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) attenuation and of the donor-based reassortant influenza vaccine strains].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, I V; Klimov, A I; Grigor'eva, E P; Larionova, N V; Aleksandrova, G I; Rudenko, L G

    2005-01-01

    Cold-adapted (CA) temperature sensitive and attenuated virus A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) (Len/17) has been recently used in Russia as a donor of internal genes in the preparation of reassortant vaccine strains of CA live influenza vaccine (LIV) for all age groups. The Len/17 population was found to be heterogeneous and to be made up of clones, which differ by combinations of mutations in internal genes. Around 50% of the Len/17 population had clones with all 8 coding mutations in internal genes. The others were made up of clones with mutation combinations, which were different from the original Len/17. The PCR restriction method was used to analyze 5 clones of Len/17 and 8 LIV vaccine strains. There were no Ala-86-Thr mutation in the M2 protein in 4 clones and 3 vaccine strains. The PB-1 gene of 4 clones and 3 vaccine strains had a mutation encoding Met-317-IIe more typical of a more attenuated virus A/Leningrad/134/47/57 (H2N2) (Len/47). The NP protein of a clone had a mutation Leu-341-IIe also typical of Len/47. However, neither the absence of mutation in the M2 gene nor an extra mutation in the PB1 gene affected the attenuation extent of reassortant CALIV.

  10. Comparative studies of wild-type and "cold-mutant" (temperature-sensitive) influenza viruses: polypeptide synthesis by an Asian (H2N2) strain and its cold-adapted variant.

    PubMed

    Kendal, A P; Kiley, M P; Maassab, H F

    1973-12-01

    The structure and replication of a cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of an Asian (H2N2) influenza virus was compared with that of its wild-type (WT) parent. Viruses were grown in a chicken kidney cell system, and at the nonpermissive temperature of 40 C, production of infectious TS virus was about 100,000-fold less than at 35 C, in contrast to WT virus. Major structural polypeptides of each virus grown at 35 C were similar, except that the hemagglutinin glycopolypeptide (HA) of the TS virions was slightly more heterogenous than that of WT virions. Synthesis of viral polypeptides was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate acrylamide gel electrophoresis of pulse-labeled infected cells. This revealed a defect in the synthesis of TS viral hemagglutinin that was most pronounced at the nonpermissive temperature. Other TS viral polypeptides appeared to be synthesized normally at 40 C. A defect in the TS virus hemagglutinin was also indicated by serological studies that demonstrated that TS virus hemagglutinin had lost antigenic sites present on the WT virus. Thus, it is concluded that the virus mutant examined contains lesions in the hemagglutinin gene, although the possibility of additional unrecognized lesions is not excluded.

  11. Comparison of live, attenuated H1N1 and H3N2 cold-adapted and avian-human influenza A reassortant viruses and inactivated virus vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Maassab, H F; Murphy, B R; Snyder, M H

    1988-12-01

    The infectivity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live, attenuated influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) and A/Bethesda/1/85 (H3N2) avian-human (ah) and cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccines were compared in 252 seronegative adult volunteers. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the H1N1 reassortant vaccine were also compared with those of the trivalent inactivated virus vaccine. Each reassortant vaccine was satisfactorily attenuated. The 50% human infectious dose was 10(4.9) for ca H1N1, 10(5.4) for ah H1N1, 10(6.4) for ca H3N2, and 10(6.5) TCID50 for ah H3N2 reassortant virus. Within a subtype, the immunogenicities of ah and ca vaccines were comparable. Five to seven weeks after vaccination, volunteers were challenged with homologous wild-type influenza A virus. The magnitude of shedding of virus after challenge was greater than 100-fold less in H1N1 vaccinees and greater than 10-fold less in H3N2 vaccinees compared with unimmunized controls. The vaccines were equally efficacious, as indicated by an 86%-100% reduction in illness. Thus, the ah A/Mallard/New York/6750/78 and the ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 reassortant viruses are comparable.

  12. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2003-10-01

    Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

  13. Favorable outcome of epileptic blindness in children.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Barak, Shai

    2003-01-01

    Acute blindness is a rare presentation of epileptic seizures, referring to loss of sight without loss of consciousness associated with electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic discharges, mainly representing an ictal phase but also either pre- or postictal. We report a series of 14 children with documented epileptic blindness, describing the accompanying fits and thereafter the response to therapy to resolve the blindness and control associated seizures. All patients experienced episodes of acute complete visual obscuration lasting for 1 to 10 minutes. Seven patients hadaccompanying generalized seizures, with a photosensitive response recorded in three of them. All of these seven children were treated with valproic acid, regaining full vision, and six of them became seizure free. Three patients with acute blindness who had accompanying focal motor seizures and unilateral temporooccipital posterior epileptic discharges were treated with carbamazepine regained full vision and complete seizure control. Four additional children had the constellation of migrainous headaches, focal motor phenomena, and complete blindness, along with occipital discharges compatible with Gastaut syndrome, benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. All four patients were started on carbamazepine and became asymptomatic. Our overall experience suggests that epileptic blindness in children is associated with a favorable outcome when promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately, resulting in complete resolution of blindness in all children and satisfactory control of seizures in most of them. We therefore recommend performing a prompt EEG in any child presenting with acute visual obscuration, even in the absence of other epileptic phenomena.

  14. Methylovulum psychrotolerans sp. nov., a cold-adapted methanotroph from low-temperature terrestrial environments, and emended description of the genus Methylovulum.

    PubMed

    Oshkin, Igor Y; Belova, Svetlana E; Danilova, Olga V; Miroshnikov, Kirill K; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2016-06-01

    Two isolates of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, strains Sph1T and Sph2, were obtained from cold methane seeps in a floodplain of the river Mukhrinskaya, Irtysh basin, West Siberia. Another morphologically and phenotypically similar methanotroph, strain OZ2, was isolated from a sediment of a subarctic freshwater lake, Archangelsk region, northern Russia. Cells of these three strains were Gram-stain-negative, light-pink-pigmented, non-motile, encapsulated, large cocci that contained an intracytoplasmic membrane system typical of type I methanotrophs. They possessed a particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme and utilized only methane and methanol. Strains Sph1T, Sph2 and OZ2 were able to grow at a pH range of 4.0-8.9 (optimum at pH 6.0-7.0) and at temperatures between 2 and 36 °C. Although their temperature optimum was at 20-25 °C, these methanotrophs grew well at lower temperatures, down to 4 °C. The major cellular fatty acids were C16 : 1ω5c, C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 1ω8c, C16 : 0 and C14 : 0; the DNA G+C content was 51.4-51.9 mol%. Strains Sph1T, Sph2 and OZ2 displayed nearly identical (99.1-99.7 % similarity) 16S rRNA gene sequences and belonged to the family Methylococcaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria. The most closely related organism was Methylovulum miyakonense HT12T (96.0-96.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 90 % pmoA sequence similarity). The novel isolates, however, differed from Methylovulum miyakonense HT12T by cell morphology, pigmentation, absence of soluble methane monooxygenase, more active growth at low temperatures, growth over a broader pH range and higher DNA G+C content. On the basis of these differences, we propose a novel species, Methylovulum psychrotolerans sp. nov., to accommodate these methanotrophs. Strain Sph1T (=LMG 29227T=VKM B-3018T) is the type strain.

  15. Reticulate evolution is favored in influenza niche switching

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nichola J.; Zabilansky, Justin; Yuan, Kyle; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Reticulate evolution is thought to accelerate the process of evolution beyond simple genetic drift and selection, helping to rapidly generate novel hybrids with combinations of adaptive traits. However, the long-standing dogma that reticulate evolutionary processes are likewise advantageous for switching ecological niches, as in microbial pathogen host switch events, has not been explicitly tested. We use data from the influenza genome sequencing project and a phylogenetic heuristic approach to show that reassortment, a reticulate evolutionary mechanism, predominates over mutational drift in transmission between different host species. Moreover, as host evolutionary distance increases, reassortment is increasingly favored. We conclude that the greater the quantitative difference between ecological niches, the greater the importance of reticulate evolutionary processes in overcoming niche barriers. PMID:27114508

  16. The cold adapted and temperature sensitive influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus, the master donor virus for live attenuated influenza vaccines, has multiple defects in replication at the restrictive temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Winnie; Zhou, Helen; Kemble, George; Jin Hong

    2008-10-25

    We have previously determined that the temperature sensitive (ts) and attenuated (att) phenotypes of the cold adapted influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 strain (MDV-A), the master donor virus for the live attenuated influenza A vaccines (FluMist), are specified by the five amino acids in the PB1, PB2 and NP gene segments. To understand how these loci control the ts phenotype of MDV-A, replication of MDV-A at the non-permissive temperature (39 deg. C) was compared with recombinant wild-type A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (rWt). The mRNA and protein synthesis of MDV-A in the infected MDCK cells were not significantly reduced at 39 deg. C during a single-step replication, however, vRNA synthesis was reduced and the nuclear-cytoplasmic export of viral RNP (vRNP) was blocked. In addition, the virions released from MDV-A infected cells at 39 deg. C exhibited irregular morphology and had a greatly reduced amount of the M1 protein incorporated. The reduced M1 protein incorporation and vRNP export blockage correlated well with the virus ts phenotype because these defects could be partially alleviated by removing the three ts loci from the PB1 gene. The virions and vRNPs isolated from the MDV-A infected cells contained a higher level of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) than those of rWt, however, whether Hsp70 is involved in thermal inhibition of MDV-A replication remains to be determined. Our studies demonstrate that restrictive replication of MDV-A at the non-permissive temperature occurs in multiple steps of the virus replication cycle.

  17. Characterization of Reverse Genetics-Derived Cold-Adapted Master Donor Virus A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) and Reassortants with H5N1 Surface Genes in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Chen, Li-Mei; Bourgeois, Melissa; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Voeten, J. Theo M.; Heldens, Jacco G. M.; van den Bosch, Han; Klimov, Alexander; Rudenko, Larisa; Cox, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) offer significant advantages over subunit or split inactivated vaccines to mitigate an eventual influenza pandemic, including simpler manufacturing processes and more cross-protective immune responses. Using an established reverse genetics (rg) system for wild-type (wt) A/Leningrad/134/1957 and cold-adapted (ca) A/Leningrad/134/17/1957 (Len17) master donor virus (MDV), we produced and characterized three rg H5N1 reassortant viruses carrying modified HA and intact NA genes from either A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1, VN1203, clade 1) or A/Egypt/321/2007 (H5N1, EG321, clade 2) virus. A mouse model of infection was used to determine the infectivity and tissue tropism of the parental wt viruses compared to the ca master donor viruses as well as the H5N1 reassortants. All ca viruses showed reduced replication in lungs and enhanced replication in nasal epithelium. In addition, the H5N1 HA and NA enhanced replication in lungs unless it was restricted by the internal genes of the ca MDV. Mice inoculated twice 4 weeks apart with the H5N1 reassortant LAIV candidate viruses developed serum hemagglutination inhibition HI and IgA antibody titers to the homologous and heterologous viruses consistent with protective immunity. These animals remained healthy after challenge inoculation with a lethal dose with homologous or heterologous wt H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The profiles of viral replication in respiratory tissues and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy characteristics of the two ca H5N1 candidate LAIV viruses warrant further development into a vaccine for human use. PMID:24648485

  18. [ts-Mutations in the genomes of cold-adapted variants of influenza A/Hong Kong/1/68(H3N2) and A/Victoria/35/72(H3N2) viruses].

    PubMed

    Zhikhareva, I V; Medvedeva, T E; Aleksandrova, G I; Klimov, A I

    1993-05-01

    The phenotype and localization of ts mutations in genomes of the influenza A/Victoria/30-ir (A/Vic/30-ir) and A/Hong Kong/17-ir (A/HK/17-ir) cold-adapted (ca) viruses were studied. Using the recombination analysis in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) we determined that influenza A/HK/17-ir ca virus carries ts mutations in three "internal" genes, i.e., PB1, NP and M, and influenza A/Vic/30-ir ca virus carries ones in four genes, i.e., PA, NP, M and NS. We have revealed ts mutations for NA gene in none of these viruses. Prior to the analysis of ts mutations in HA gene of influenza A/HK/17-ir and A/Vic/30-ir ca viruses, three cloning steps were performed in chick embryos (CE) by the method of limiting dilutions at 34 degrees C followed by selection of some strains with the most prominent ts phenotype. The cloned strains with such phenotypes were shown to repeat stable results within the recombination analysis in CE, i.e., none from the cloned strains of A/HK/17-ir ca virus recombined in CE at 40 degrees C with the 46 ts mutant, while recombination of this mutant with the cloned A/Vic/30-ir ca strains led to formation of the ts progeny. Thereafter our data result in conclusion that ts mutations in the PA gene must lead to some insignificant contribution for the expression of general ts phenotype among the ca strains as far as this sign is clearly displayed by both viruses, although only one of them, i.e., A/HK/17-ir carries ts mutation in the HA gene.

  19. The complete nucleotide sequence of two cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive attenuated mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3).

    PubMed

    Stokes, A; Tierney, E L; Sarris, C M; Murphy, B R; Hall, S L

    1993-10-01

    Two cold-passaged mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS wild-type (wt) strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) have been sequenced. These mutant viruses display the cold-adapted (ca), temperature-sensitive (ts), and attenuation (att) phenotypes. Sequence data indicate that both cp12 and cp45 sustained nucleotide substitutions during cold passage and subsequent cloning. Fifteen nucleotide changes were present in cp12 and 18 in cp45. Of these changes, some were present in the sequence of the prototype wt strain (Wash/47885/57) or were non-coding changes present in the open reading frames (ORFs). These were considered unlikely to be of significance in contributing to phenotypic differences between the mutants and the JS wt. There were nine remaining changes in cp12 and eight in cp45 that would most likely contribute to their phenotypes. For cp12, two were non-coding changes in regulatory regions, one in the 3' genome leader and one in the NP gene transcription start signal. The remaining seven changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in NP, F, HN, and L. For cp45, two mutations were in a non-coding regulatory region, the 3' genome leader. The remaining six changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in F, HN, and L. Only one amino acid substitution was conserved between cp12 and cp45 (a valine to alanine change at position 384 of the HN gene). These results should prove useful in the future in understanding the genetic basis of attenuation of the cold-passaged PIV3 candidate vaccine viruses.

  20. Tracking adaptive evolution in the structure, function and molecular phylogeny of haemoglobin in non-Antarctic notothenioid fish species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, Cinzia; Parisi, Elio; di Prisco, Guido

    2006-04-01

    With the notable exception of Antarctic icefishes, haemoglobin (Hb) is present in all vertebrates. In polar fish, Hb evolution has included adaptations with implications at the biochemical, physiological and molecular levels. Cold adaptation has been shown to be also linked to small changes in primary structure and post-translational modifications in proteins, including hydrophobic remodelling and increased flexibility. A wealth of knowledge is available on the oxygen-transport system of fish inhabiting Antarctic waters, but very little is known on the structure and function of Hb of non-Antarctic notothenioid fishes. The comparison of the biochemical and physiological adaptations between cold-adapted and non-cold-adapted species is a powerful tool to understand whether (and to what extent) extreme environments require specific adaptations or simply select for phenotypically different life styles. This study focuses on structure, function and molecular phylogeny of Hb in Antarctic and non-Antarctic notothenioid fishes. The rationale is to use the primary structure of Hb as tool of choice to gain insight into the pathways of the evolution history of α and β globins of notothenioids and also as a basis for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships among Antarctic and non-Antarctic species.

  1. Photosynthetic temperature responses of tree species in Rwanda: evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in montane rainforest climax species.

    PubMed

    Vårhammar, Angelica; Wallin, Göran; McLean, Christopher M; Dusenge, Mirindi Eric; Medlyn, Belinda E; Hasper, Thomas B; Nsabimana, Donat; Uddling, Johan

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthetic metabolism to temperature has been identified as a key uncertainty for projecting the magnitude of the terrestrial feedback on future climate change. While temperature responses of photosynthetic capacities have been comparatively well investigated in temperate species, the responses of tropical tree species remain unexplored. We compared the responses of seedlings of native cold-adapted tropical montane rainforest tree species with those of exotic warm-adapted plantation species, all growing in an intermediate temperature common garden in Rwanda. Leaf gas exchange responses to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) at different temperatures (20-40°C) were used to assess the temperature responses of biochemical photosynthetic capacities. Analyses revealed a lower optimum temperature for photosynthetic electron transport rates than for Rubisco carboxylation rates, along with lower electron transport optima in the native cold-adapted than in the exotic warm-adapted species. The photosynthetic optimum temperatures were generally exceeded by daytime peak leaf temperatures, in particular in the native montane rainforest climax species. This study thus provides evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in tropical trees and indicates high susceptibility of montane rainforest climax species to future global warming. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Photosynthetic temperature responses of tree species in Rwanda: evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in montane rainforest climax species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vårhammar, Angelica; Wallin, Göran; McLean, Christopher M.; Dusenge, Mirindi Eric; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Hasper, Thomas B.; Nsabimana, Donat; Uddling, Johan

    2015-04-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthetic metabolism to temperature has been identified as a key uncertainty for projecting the magnitude of the terrestrial feedback on future climate change. While temperature responses of photosynthetic capacities have been comparatively well investigated in temperate species, the responses of tropical tree species remain unexplored. We compared the responses of seedlings of native cold-adapted tropical montane rainforest tree species to exotic warm-adapted plantation species, all growing in an intermediate temperature common garden in Rwanda. Leaf gas exchange responses to CO2 at different temperatures (20 - 40 C) were used to assess the temperature responses of biochemical photosynthetic capacities. Analyses revealed a lower optimum temperature for photosynthetic electron transport rates than for Rubisco carboxylation rates, along with lower electron transport optima in the native cold-adapted than in the exotic warm-adapted species. The photosynthetic optimum temperatures were generally exceeded by daytime peak leaf temperatures, in particular in the native montane rainforest climax species. This study thus provides evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in tropical trees and indicates high susceptibility of montane rainforest climax species to future global warming. (Reference: New Phytologist, in press)

  3. Cold-active and NaCl-tolerant exo-inulinase from a cold-adapted Arthrobacter sp. MN8 and its potential for use in the production of fructose at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Lu, Qian; Peng, Mozhen; Zhang, Rui; Mo, Minghe; Tang, Xianghua; Li, Junjun; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2015-03-01

    An exo-inulinase gene was cloned from Arthrobacter sp. MN8, a cold-adapted bacterium isolated from lead-zinc-rich soil. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The resultant 505-residue polypeptide (InuAMN8) showed the highest identity (81.1%) with the putative levanase from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans Sphe3 (ADX73279) and shared 57.8% identity with the exo-inulinase from Bacillus sp. snu-7 (AAK00768). The purified recombinant InuAMN8 (rInuAMN8) showed an apparently optimal activity at 35°C, and 75.3%, 39.4%, and 15.8% of its maximum activity at 20°C, 10°C, and 0°C, respectively. After pre-incubation for 60 min at 50°C and 55°C, the rInuAMN8 exhibited 69.8% and 17.7% of its initial activity, respectively. The apparent Km values of rInuAMN8 towards inulin were 2.8, 1.5, 1.2, 5.3, and 8.2 mM at 0°C, 10°C, 20°C, 30°C, and 35°C, respectively. Inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tubers were effectively hydrolyzed to release fructose by rInuAMN8 at 0°C, 10°C, and 35°C. Compared with its hyperthermophilic and thermophilic counterparts, the exo-inulinase had less aromatic amino acid F and more hydrophobic amino acid A. In addition, the purified rInuAMN8 retained 127.9%-88.4% inulinase activity at 3.5%-15.0% (w/v) NaCl concentrations. Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) at 10 mM exhibited little or no effect on the enzyme activity. This paper is the first to report a cold-active and/or NaCl-tolerant exo-inulinase from the genus Arthrobacter. The exo-inulinase rInuAMN8 shows a potential for use in the production of fructose at low temperatures. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Historical species losses in bumblebee evolution.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Fabien L; Hines, Heather M

    2015-03-01

    Investigating how species coped with past environmental changes informs how modern species might face human-induced global changes, notably via the study of historical extinction, a dominant feature that has shaped current biodiversity patterns. The genus Bombus, which comprises 250 mostly cold-adapted species, is an iconic insect group sensitive to current global changes. Through a combination of habitat loss, pathogens and climate change, bumblebees have experienced major population declines, and several species are threatened with extinction. Using a time-calibrated tree of Bombus, we analyse their diversification dynamics and test hypotheses about the role of extinction during major environmental changes in their evolutionary history. These analyses support a history of fluctuating species dynamics with two periods of historical species loss in bumblebees. Dating estimates gauge that one of these events started after the middle Miocene climatic optimum and one during the early Pliocene. Both periods are coincident with global climate change that may have extirpated Bombus species. Interestingly, bumblebees experienced high diversification rates during the Plio-Pleistocene glaciations. We also found evidence for a major species loss in the past one million years that may be continuing today.

  5. In defense of species.

    PubMed

    LaPorte, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, I address the charge that the category species should be abandoned in biological work. The widespread appeal to species in scientific discourse provides a presumption in favor of the category's usefulness, but a defeasible presumption. Widely acknowledged troubles attend species: these troubles might render the concept unusable by showing that 'species' is equivocal or meaningless or in some similar way fatally flawed. Further, there might be better alternatives to species. I argue that the presumption in favor of species is not defeated on these scores. Troubles attending species, which arise on account of contextual variation attending the use of 'species', do not indicate that the concept is unusable. And alternatives to the use of 'species', which have been proposed in connection with rank-free systematics and in connection with conservation efforts, fail to provide a proper replacement for species.

  6. Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs Even many smokers think these warnings should ... 31, 2017 FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette packs carry health warnings, but many Americans think ...

  7. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... solicit from a person having business with the Council anything of value as a gift, gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for himself or another person, particularly one with whom he has family, business,...

  8. Promising reciprocity: When proposing a favor for a request increases compliance even if the favor is not accepted.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas; Meineri, Sébastien; Ruiz, Clément; Pascual, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Research has reported that reciprocity is an important social norm in relationships. In previous studies on reciprocity, participants' behavior was examined after receiving a favor from someone. In a series of field studies, we examined the effect of a statement that proved that a solicitor was someone who respected this principle. Confederates solicited participants for money or a cigarette in exchange for stamps or money, respectively. It was found that the participants complied more readily with the request in the promised favor condition, but most of them refused to take the promised favor. We conclude that individuals were led to help those who respected the putative norm of reciprocity in their social interaction.

  9. Charcoal kiln relicts - a favorable site for tree growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Allan; Hirsch, Florian; van der Maaten, Ernst; Takla, Melanie; Räbiger, Christin; Cruz Garcia, Roberto; Schneider, Anna; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soils with incompletely combusted organic material (aka 'black carbon') are considered fertile for plant growth. Considerable enrichment of soils with black carbon is known from Chernozems, from anthropogenic induced altering of soils like the 'Terra Preta' in South America (e.g. Glaser, 2001), and from charcoal kiln relicts. Recent studies have reported a high spatial frequency of charcoal kiln relicts in the Northeastern German lowlands (Raab et al., 2015), which today are often overgrown by forest plantations. In this context the question arises whether these sites are favorable for tree growth. Here we compare the performance of 22 Pinus sylvestris individuals - a commonly used tree species in forestry - growing on charcoal kiln relicts with 22 control trees. Growth performance (height growth and diameter growth) of the trees was determined using dendrochronological techniques, i.e. standard ring-width measurements were undertaken on each two cores per tree and tree height was measured in the field. Several other wood properties such as annual wood density, average resin content, as well as wood chemistry were analyzed. Our results indicate that trees growing on charcoal kiln relicts grow significantly less and have a significantly lower wood density in comparison with control trees. Specific chemical components such as Manganese as well as resin contents were significantly higher in kiln trees. These results highlight that tree growth on charcoal kiln relicts is actually hampered instead of enhanced. Possibly this is a combined effect of differing physical soil properties which alter soil water accessibility for plants and differing chemical soil properties which may negatively affect tree growth either if toxic limits are surpassed or if soil nutrient availability is decreased. Additional soil analyses with respect to soil texture and soil chemistry shall reveal further insight into this hypothesis. Given the frequent distribution of charcoal kiln relicts in

  10. Conservatism in least favorable response analysis and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T L

    1980-01-01

    In order to assure that mechanical structures can meet design requirements it is desirable to test a structure using an input which is conservative but not a severe overtest. One method available for the specification of shock tests is the method of least favorable response. This method can be used analytically or in the laboratory and is guaranteed to provide tests which are conservative, at least in one sense. When the impulse response function, or equivalently the frequency response function, is available between a point of interest on a structure and the input point of the structure, and when we know the real function which envelops the modulus of the Fourier transform of all possible inputs which might excite the structure, then the method of least favorable response can be used to find an upper bound on the response which the point of interest on the structure can realize. We use this in the analysis of structural peak response. In the laboratory the least favorable response is generated experimentally, for example, by testing the structural unit on a shake table. If the structure survives the laboratory test, then we assume that it could survive any input in the class of inputs whose Fourier transform moduli are enveloped by the function used in the analysis. The objective of this study was to analyze the inherent conservatism of the method of least favorable response. A technique that can be used to do this is demonstrated. First, the method of least favorable response is reviewed and how it is used analytically and experimentally is demonstrated. Next the technique used to measure the conservatism in a least favorable response test is developed. Finally, the method is applied in some numerical examples where the degree of conservatism in the tests of some specific structures is measured. (LCL)

  11. 19 CFR 200.735-105 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 200.735-105 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Provisions Governing Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 200.735... employee may solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan,...

  12. 19 CFR 200.735-105 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 200.735-105 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Provisions Governing Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 200.735... employee may solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan,...

  13. 19 CFR 200.735-105 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 200.735-105 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Provisions Governing Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 200.735... employee may solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan,...

  14. 11 CFR 7.8 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Employees or Commissioners § 7.8 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) A Commissioner or employee of the... affected by the performance or nonperformance of the Commissioner or employee's official duty. (b... persons concerned which are the motivating factors; (2) To the acceptance of food, refreshments,...

  15. 19 CFR 200.735-105 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 200.735-105 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Provisions Governing Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 200.735... employee may solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment, loan,...

  16. 18 CFR 706.202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 706.202 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an employee shall... to: (1) Obvious family or personal relationships, such as those between the employee and his...

  17. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305 Section 1203.735-305 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees § 1203...

  18. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  19. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305 Section 1203.735-305 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE... the Constitution and in 5 U.S.C. 7342, and the regulations promulgated thereunder pursuant to...

  20. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305 Section 1203.735-305 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE... the Constitution and in 5 U.S.C. 7342, and the regulations promulgated thereunder pursuant to...

  1. Preschoolers Reduce Inequality While Favoring Individuals with More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Vivian; Spitzer, Brian; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Inequalities are everywhere, yet little is known about how children respond to people affected by inequalities. This article explores two responses--minimizing inequalities and favoring those who are advantaged by them. In Studies 1a (N = 37) and 1b (N = 38), 4- and 5-year-olds allocated a resource to a disadvantaged recipient, but judged…

  2. An Evaluation of the Favorable Alternate Sites Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Vencill, Mary

    This final report describes and evaluates the Favorable Alternate Sites Project (FASP), developed in response to the oversettlement of refugees (particularly Southeast Asian refugees) in particular areas of the country. The project's goals were to reduce welfare dependency, increase the ability of FASP refugees to be self-supporting, and reduce…

  3. 12 CFR 560.110 - Most favored lender usury preemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 560.110 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LENDING AND INVESTMENT Lending and Investment Provisions Applicable to all Savings Associations § 560.110 Most favored... lending institution by the law of that state. If state law permits different interest charges on specified...

  4. Filtering the Net in Libraries: The Case (Mostly) in Favor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues and decision-making involved in restricting Internet access in libraries, for the most part favoring filtering devices. Questions to consider when selecting a filtering program are provided. Some of the better filtering programs are described, and Web addresses are included for each. Security risks associated with Java and…

  5. Filtering the Net in Libraries: The Case (Mostly) in Favor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues and decision-making involved in restricting Internet access in libraries, for the most part favoring filtering devices. Questions to consider when selecting a filtering program are provided. Some of the better filtering programs are described, and Web addresses are included for each. Security risks associated with Java and…

  6. 25 CFR 700.519 - Gifts, entertainment and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.519 Gifts, entertainment and favors. (a) Acceptance of gratuities... individuals with whom Commission employees do business. This prohibition extends to the acceptance of meals and refreshments offered by individuals conducting or seeking business with the Commission...

  7. Multimodality therapy of favorable prognosis non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Corder, M.P.; Leimert, J.T.; Tewfik, H.H.; Lovett, J.M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-seven previously untreated patients with favorable prognosis non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with a combination of total body irradiation followed by cyclophosphamide - vincristine - prednisone (CVP). The dose of total body irradiation was planned to be 150 rad followed by 6 cycles of chemotherapy. The complete response rate was 59%; the complete plus partial response rate, 93%. The 50% disease-free survival was 8 months. The actuarial projected 5 year survival was 60% and the disease-free survival at 5 years was 27%. The program was well tolerated by the majority of patients. It is possible for some patients with favorable non-Hodgkin's lymphomas to achieve prolonged periods of disesase-free survival when treated with combinations of irradiation plus chemotherapy.

  8. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, J.A.; McGehee, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment.

  9. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, J.A.; McGehee, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment.

  10. Contact line pinning favors the mass production of monodisperse microbubbles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Riboux, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A robust method for the generation of phospholipid covered monodisperse microbubbles of diameters ~10 microns at production rates exceeding 0.1 MHz, is presented here. We show that bubbles are periodically formed from the tip of a long and thin gas ligament stabilized thanks to both the strong favorable pressure gradient existing at the entrance region of a long rectangular PDMS-PDMS channel and to the pinning of the gas-liquid interface at a centered groove of several microns width placed on one of its walls. Moreover, the long exit channel incorporated in our design, favors the transport of phospholipid molecules towards the gas-liquid interface. Our experiments show that the resulting phospholipid shell inhibit both the diffusion of the gas in the surrounding liquid as well as the coalescence between contacting bubbles. These evidences indicate that the proposed method is suitable for the generation of monodisperse microbubbles for diagnosis or therapeutical applications.

  11. Autophagy favors Brucella melitensis survival in infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuangfu; Hu, Shengwei; Wang, Yuanzhi; Qiao, Jun; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Yong; Du, Guoqing

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the role of autophagy in the survival of the invasive bacterium Brucella melitensis strain 16M in murine macrophages. Here, Brucella melitensis 16M was found to trigger autophagosome formation, enhance autophagy flux and increase the expression level of the autophagy marker protein LC3-II. When autophagy was pharmacologically inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), Brucella replication efficiency was significantly decreased (p < 0.05). These results suggest that autophagy favors Brucella melitensis 16M survival in murine macrophages.

  12. Structured mixed phase is favored in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Michael B.; Glendenning, Norman K.

    2003-01-01

    We give a general thermodynamical argument showing that in neutron stars, the Coulomb structured mixed phase is always favored for any first order phase transition involving systems in equilibrium with baryon number and electric charge as the two independent components. This finding is likely to have important consequences for many neutron star properties, e.g., glitch phenomena, transport and superfluid properties, r-mode instabilities, and the braking index.

  13. Bioactive, mechanically favorable, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis of mechanically favorable, bioactive, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for potential bone applications. The nanocomposites consist of in situ polymerized biodegradable copolyester with hydroxyapatite (HA). Biodegradable copolyesters comprise carboxy terminated poly(propylene fumarate) (CT-PPF) and poly(trimethylol propane fumarate co mannitol sebacate) (TF-Co-MS). Raman spectral imaging clearly reveals a uniform homogenous distribution of HA in the copolymer matrix. The mechanical studies reveal that improved mechanical properties formed when crosslinked with methyl methacrylate (MMA) when compared to N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP). The SEM micrographs of the copolymer nanocomposites reveal a serrated structure reflecting higher mechanical strength, good dispersion, and good interfacial bonding of HA in the polymer matrix. In vitro degradation of the copolymer crosslinked with MMA is relatively more than that of NVP and the degradation decreases with an increase in the amount of the HA filler. The mechanically favorable and degradable MMA based nanocomposites also have favorable bioactivity, blood compatibility, cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. The present nanocomposite is a more promising material for orthopedic applications.

  14. A Favorability Score for Vaginal Hysterectomy in a Statewide Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Bethany D; Kamdar, Neil S; Mahnert, Nichole; Lim, Courtney S; Mullard, Andrew J; Campbell, Darrell A; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Morgan, Daniel M

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Because it is associated with fewer complications and more rapid recovery, the vaginal approach is preferred for benign hysterectomy. Patient characteristics that traditionally favor a vaginal approach include adequate vaginal access, small uterine size, and low suspicion for extrauterine disease. However, the low proportion of hysterectomies performed vaginally in the United States suggests that these data are not routinely applied in clinical practice. We sought to analyze the association of parity, prior pelvic surgery, and uterine weight with the use of the vaginal, laparoscopic, robotic, and abdominal approaches to hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). The Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative is a statewide organization of 52 academic and community hospitals in Michigan funded by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan/Blue Care Network, including patients from all insurance payers. Five thousand six hundred eight women undergoing hysterectomy for benign gynecologic conditions from January 1, 2013, through December 8, 2013, and included in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. To assess potential for vaginal hysterectomy, a favorability score of 0, 1, 2, or 3 was calculated by summing 1 point each for parity ≥1, no prior pelvic surgery, and uterine weight <250 g. Frequencies of surgical approaches to hysterectomy were compared using chi-square tests across favorability scores. The use of robotic hysterectomy was most frequent (41.9%, n = 2349/5608) followed by abdominal (19.7%, n = 1103/5608), laparoscopic (14.4%, n = 809/5608), vaginal (13.5%, n = 758/5608), and laparoscopic-assisted vaginal (10.5%, n = 589/5608) hysterectomy. With favorability scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3, vaginal hysterectomy was performed in 0.6% (n = 1/167), 5% (n = 66/1324), 13.7% (n = 415/3036), and 25.5% (n = 276/1081) of cases and abdominal hysterectomy in 41.9% (n = 70/167), 30.8% (n = 408

  15. Clinical quality is independently associated with favorable bond ratings.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Ziad; Nicewander, David; Convery, Paul; Black, Michael; Ballard, David

    2010-01-01

    The relation between clinical quality and bond rating for nonprofit hospitals has been proposed but never fully studied. We analyzed the relation between bond rating, clinical quality measures (The Joint Commission/Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS] core measures), and balance sheet and income statement financial measures of 236 hospitals across the United States that are rated by Moody's Investors Service and that reported clinical quality measures to CMS during the study period. We found a statistically significant relation between higher quality measures and more favorable bond ratings. This association remained significant after controlling for traditional financial parameters.

  16. Salinity inversions in the thermocline under upwelling favorable winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, Hans; Basdurak, N. Berkay; Gräwe, Ulf; Knoll, Michaela; Mohrholz, Volker; Müller, Selina

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses and explains the phenomenon of salinity inversions in the thermocline offshore from an upwelling region during upwelling favorable winds. Using the nontidal central Baltic Sea as an easily accessible natural laboratory, high-resolution transect and station observations in the upper layers are analyzed. The data show local salinity minima in the strongly stratified seasonal thermocline during summer conditions under the influence of upwelling favorable wind. A simple analytical box model using parameters (including variation by means of a Monte Carlo method) estimated from a hindcast model for the Baltic Sea is constructed to explain the observations. As a result, upwelled water with high salinity and low temperature is warmed up due to downward surface heat fluxes while it is transported offshore by the Ekman transport. The warming of upwelled surface water allows maintenance of stable stratification despite the destabilizing salinity stratification, such that local salinity minima in the thermocline can be generated. Inspection of published observations from the Benguela, Peruvian, and eastern tropical North Atlantic upwelling systems shows that also there salinity inversions occur in the thermocline, but in these cases thermocline salinity shows local maxima, since upwelled water has a lower salinity than the surface water. It is hypothesized that thermocline salinity inversions should generally occur offshore from upwelling regions whenever winds are steady enough and surface warming is sufficiently strong.

  17. HOW MUCH FAVORABLE SELECTION IS LEFT IN MEDICARE ADVANTAGE?

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Joseph P; Price, Mary; McWilliams, J Michael; Hsu, John; McGuire, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    The health economics literature contains two models of selection, one with endogenous plan characteristics to attract good risks and one with fixed plan characteristics; neither model contains a regulator. Medicare Advantage, a principal example of selection in the literature, is, however, subject to anti-selection regulations. Because selection causes economic inefficiency and because the historically favorable selection into Medicare Advantage plans increased government cost, the effectiveness of the anti-selection regulations is an important policy question, especially since the Medicare Advantage program has grown to comprise 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries. Moreover, similar anti-selection regulations are being used in health insurance exchanges for those under 65. Contrary to earlier work, we show that the strengthened anti-selection regulations that Medicare introduced starting in 2004 markedly reduced government overpayment attributable to favorable selection in Medicare Advantage. At least some of the remaining selection is plausibly related to fixed plan characteristics of Traditional Medicare versus Medicare Advantage rather than changed selection strategies by Medicare Advantage plans.

  18. Donepezil regulates energy metabolism and favors bone mass accrual.

    PubMed

    Eimar, Hazem; Alebrahim, Sharifa; Manickam, Garthiga; Al-Subaie, Ahmed; Abu-Nada, Lina; Murshed, Monzur; Tamimi, Faleh

    2016-03-01

    The autonomous nervous system regulates bone mass through the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) favors bone loss whereas the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) promotes bone mass accrual. Donepezil, a central-acting cholinergic agonist, has been shown to down-regulate SNS and up-regulate PNS signaling tones. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of donepezil could have beneficial effects in regulating bone mass. To test our hypothesis, two groups of healthy female mice were treated either with donepezil or saline. Differences in body metabolism and bone mass of the treated groups were compared. Body and visceral fat weights as well as serum leptin level were increased in donepezil-treated mice compared to control, suggesting that donepezil effects on SNS influenced metabolic activity. Donepezil-treated mice had better bone quality than controls due to a decrease in osteoclasts number. These results indicate that donepezil is able to affect whole body energy metabolism and favors bone mass in young female WT mice.

  19. HOW MUCH FAVORABLE SELECTION IS LEFT IN MEDICARE ADVANTAGE?

    PubMed Central

    PRICE, MARY; MCWILLIAMS, J. MICHAEL; HSU, JOHN; MCGUIRE, THOMAS G.

    2015-01-01

    The health economics literature contains two models of selection, one with endogenous plan characteristics to attract good risks and one with fixed plan characteristics; neither model contains a regulator. Medicare Advantage, a principal example of selection in the literature, is, however, subject to anti-selection regulations. Because selection causes economic inefficiency and because the historically favorable selection into Medicare Advantage plans increased government cost, the effectiveness of the anti-selection regulations is an important policy question, especially since the Medicare Advantage program has grown to comprise 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries. Moreover, similar anti-selection regulations are being used in health insurance exchanges for those under 65. Contrary to earlier work, we show that the strengthened anti-selection regulations that Medicare introduced starting in 2004 markedly reduced government overpayment attributable to favorable selection in Medicare Advantage. At least some of the remaining selection is plausibly related to fixed plan characteristics of Traditional Medicare versus Medicare Advantage rather than changed selection strategies by Medicare Advantage plans. PMID:26389127

  20. Habitat heterogeneity favors asexual reproduction in natural populations of grassthrips

    PubMed Central

    Lavanchy, Guillaume; Strehler, Marie; Llanos Roman, Maria Noemi; Lessard‐Therrien, Malie; Humbert, Jean‐Yves; Dumas, Zoé; Jalvingh, Kirsten; Ghali, Karim; Fontcuberta García‐Cuenca, Amaranta; Zijlstra, Bart; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Schwander, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the overwhelming success of sex among eukaryotes is difficult given the obvious costs of sex relative to asexuality. Different studies have shown that sex can provide benefits in spatially heterogeneous environments under specific conditions, but whether spatial heterogeneity commonly contributes to the maintenance of sex in natural populations remains unknown. We experimentally manipulated habitat heterogeneity for sexual and asexual thrips lineages in natural populations and under seminatural mesocosm conditions by varying the number of hostplants available to these herbivorous insects. Asexual lineages rapidly replaced the sexual ones, independently of the level of habitat heterogeneity in mesocosms. In natural populations, the success of sexual thrips decreased with increasing habitat heterogeneity, with sexual thrips apparently only persisting in certain types of hostplant communities. Our results illustrate how genetic diversity‐based mechanisms can favor asexuality instead of sex when sexual lineages co‐occur with genetically variable asexual lineages. PMID:27346066

  1. Second octant favored for non-maximal 𝜃23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2017-06-01

    One of the most robust relationships predicted by binary tetrahedral (T‧) flavor symmetry relates the reactor neutrino angle 𝜃13 to the atmospheric neutrino angle 𝜃23, independently of 𝜃12. It has the form 𝜃13 = 2|π 4 - 𝜃23|. When this prediction first appeared in 2008, 𝜃13 was consistent with zero and 𝜃23 with π/4. Nonzero 𝜃13 was established by Daya Bay in 2012. Nonzero |π 4 - 𝜃23| is now favored by the NOνA experiment and, for 𝜃23, the aforementioned T‧ relation selects the second octant (𝜃23 > π 4 ) over the first octant (𝜃23 < π 4 ). This analysis initially assumes CP conservation in the lepton sector, but leptonic CP violation is discussed and it is shown that this specific T‧ relationship is invariant.

  2. On Favorable Thermal Fields for Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelian, Carmen; Volz, Martin P.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal fields of two Bridgman-like configurations, representative of real systems used in prior experiments for the detached growth of CdTe and Ge crystals, are studied. These detailed heat transfer computations are performed using the CrysMAS code and expand upon our previous analyses [14] that posited a new mechanism involving the thermal field and meniscus position to explain stable conditions for dewetted Bridgman growth. Computational results indicate that heat transfer conditions that led to successful detached growth in both of these systems are in accordance with our prior assertion, namely that the prevention of crystal reattachment to the crucible wall requires the avoidance of any undercooling of the melt meniscus during the growth run. Significantly, relatively simple process modifications that promote favorable thermal conditions for detached growth may overcome detrimental factors associated with meniscus shape and crucible wetting. Thus, these ideas may be important to advance the practice of detached growth for many materials.

  3. Structures of Neural Correlation and How They Favor Coding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Felix; Fiscella, Michele; Sevelev, Maksim; Roska, Botond; Hierlemann, Andreas; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo

    2017-01-01

    Summary The neural representation of information suffers from “noise”—the trial-to-trial variability in the response of neurons. The impact of correlated noise upon population coding has been debated, but a direct connection between theory and experiment remains tenuous. Here, we substantiate this connection and propose a refined theoretical picture. Using simultaneous recordings from a population of direction-selective retinal ganglion cells, we demonstrate that coding benefits from noise correlations. The effect is appreciable already in small populations, yet it is a collective phenomenon. Furthermore, the stimulus-dependent structure of correlation is key. We develop simple functional models that capture the stimulus-dependent statistics. We then use them to quantify the performance of population coding, which depends upon interplays of feature sensitivities and noise correlations in the population. Because favorable structures of correlation emerge robustly in circuits with noisy, nonlinear elements, they will arise and benefit coding beyond the confines of retina. PMID:26796692

  4. Does a Favor Request Increase Liking Toward the Requester?

    PubMed

    Niiya, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although a request for help can impose a burden on the provider and has the potential of harming a relationship, the theory of amae suggests that in fact it could help promote a stronger relationship. In an experiment, both Japanese and American participants who were asked for help from a confederate increased their liking of the confederate relative to the baseline. Sociable impression of the confederate and perceived closeness of the relationship also increased relative to the baseline. There was, however, no such increase when participants helped the confederate without receiving a direct request. This study suggests that despite the potential risks to relationships, asking favors can provide opportunities for requesters to build and promote relationships.

  5. White House Budget Proposal Favorable Overall for Federal Science Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-02-01

    President Barack Obama's proposed federal budget of 3.8 trillion for fiscal year (FY) 2013, released on 13 February, provides an overall favorable funding picture for federal science agencies in a tight economic environment. However, there are also a number of proposed decreases, including a sharp cut to NASA's Planetary Science account. Overall, the budget proposal includes 140.8 billion for the federal investment in research and development, a 1.4% increase above the FY 2012 enacted level. Funding for federal basic and applied research would be 64 billion, 3.3% above FY 2012 enacted levels. Funding for defense research and development (R&D) would decrease to 75.9 billion, a drop of 1.5%; nondefense R&D would increase 5% to $64.9 billion.

  6. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  7. High nevus counts confer a favorable prognosis in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Ribero, Simone; Davies, John R; Requena, Celia; Carrera, Cristina; Glass, Daniel; Rull, Ramon; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Vilalta, Antonio; Alos, Lucia; Soriano, Virtudes; Quaglino, Pietro; Traves, Victor; Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Nagore, Eduardo; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Bataille, Veronique

    2015-10-01

    A high number of nevi is the most significant phenotypic risk factor for melanoma and is in part genetically determined. The number of nevi decreases from middle age onward but this senescence can be delayed in patients with melanoma. We investigated the effects of nevus number count on sentinel node status and melanoma survival in a large cohort of melanoma cases. Out of 2,184 melanoma cases, 684 (31.3%) had a high nevus count (>50). High nevus counts were associated with favorable prognostic factors such as lower Breslow thickness, less ulceration and lower mitotic rate, despite adjustment for age. Nevus count was not predictive of sentinel node status. The crude 5- and 10-year melanoma-specific survival rate was higher in melanomas cases with a high nevus count compared to those with a low nevus count (91.2 vs. 86.4% and 87.2 vs. 79%, respectively). The difference in survival remained significant after adjusting for all known melanoma prognostic factors (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.43, confidence interval [CI] = 0.21-0.89). The favorable prognostic value of a high nevus count was also seen within the positive sentinel node subgroup of patients (HR = 0.22, CI = 0.08-0.60). High nevus count is associated with a better melanoma survival, even in the subgroup of patients with positive sentinel lymph node. This suggests a different biological behavior of melanoma tumors in patients with an excess of nevi. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  8. Heightened exposure to parasites favors the evolution of immunity in brood parasitic cowbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, Caldwell; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunologists and evolutionary biologists are interested in how the immune system evolves to fit an ecological niche. We studied the relationship between exposure to parasites and strength of immunity by investigating the response of two species of New World cowbirds (genus Molothrus, Icteridae), obligate brood parasites with contrasting life history strategies, to experimental arboviral infection. The South American shiny cowbird (M. bonariensis) is an extreme host-generalist that lays its eggs in the nests of >225 different avian species. The Central American bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus) is a relative host-specialist that lays its eggs preferentially in the nests of approximately 12 orioles in a single sister genus. West Nile virus provided a strong challenge and delineated immune differences between these species. The extreme host-generalist shiny cowbird, like the North American host-generalist, the brown-headed cowbird, showed significantly lower viremia to three arboviruses than related icterid species that were not brood parasites. The bronzed cowbird showed intermediate viremia. These findings support the interpretation that repeated exposure to a high diversity of parasites favors the evolution of enhanced immunity in brood parasitic cowbirds and makes them useful models for future studies of innate immunity.

  9. Refugia revisited: individualistic responses of species in space and time.

    PubMed

    Stewart, John R; Lister, Adrian M; Barnes, Ian; Dalén, Love

    2010-03-07

    Climate change in the past has led to significant changes in species' distributions. However, how individual species respond to climate change depends largely on their adaptations and environmental tolerances. In the Quaternary, temperate-adapted taxa are in general confined to refugia during glacials while cold-adapted taxa are in refugia during interglacials. In the Northern Hemisphere, evidence appears to be mounting that in addition to traditional southern refugia for temperate species, cryptic refugia existed in the North during glacials. Equivalent cryptic southern refugia, to the south of the more conventional high-latitude polar refugia, exist in montane areas during periods of warm climate, such as the current interglacial. There is also a continental/oceanic longitudinal gradient, which should be included in a more complete consideration of the interaction between species ranges and climates. Overall, it seems clear that there is large variation in both the size of refugia and the duration during which species are confined to them. This has implications for the role of refugia in the evolution of species and their genetic diversity.

  10. Invariant natural killer T infiltration in neuroblastoma with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Hishiki, Tomoro; Mise, Naoko; Harada, Kazuaki; Ihara, Fumie; Takami, Mariko; Saito, Takeshi; Terui, Keita; Nakata, Mitsuyuki; Komatsu, Shugo; Yoshida, Hideo; Motohashi, Shinichiro

    2017-10-10

    Tumor immunity has been suggested to play a key role in clinical and biological behavior of neuroblastomas. Given that CD1-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells enhance both innate and acquired tumor immunity, we investigated the expression of the iNKT-cell-specific T-cell receptor Vα24-Jα18 in neuroblastoma tissues and its correlation with clinical and biological characteristics. Using real- time quantitative PCR, we quantified the expression of Vα24-Jα18 in untreated tumor samples from 107 neuroblastoma cases followed in our institution and analyzed the correlation between the presence of infiltrated iNKT cells and clinical characteristics or patients' outcome. Vα24-Jα18 receptor was detected in 62 untreated cases (57.9%). The expression was significantly higher in stages 1, 2, 3, or 4S (P = 0.0099), in tumors with low or intermediate risk (P = 0.0050), with high TrkA expression (P = 0.0229), with favorable histology (P = 0.0026), with aneuploidy (P = 0.0348), and in younger patients (P = 0.0036). The overall survival rate was significantly higher in patients with iNKT-cell infiltration (log-rank; P = 0.0089). Since tumor-infiltrating iNKT cells were predominantly observed in neuroblastomas undergoing spontaneous differentiation and/or regression, we suggest that iNKT cells might play a key role in these processes.

  11. Competition favors elk over beaver in a riparian willow ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, B.W.; Peinetti, H.R.; Coughenour, M.C.; Johnson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Beaver (Castor spp.) conservation requires an understanding of their complex interactions with competing herbivores. Simulation modeling offers a controlled environment to examine long-term dynamics in ecosystems driven by uncontrollable variables. We used a new version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model to investigate beaver (C. Canadensis) and elk (Cervus elapses) competition for willow (Salix spp.). We initialized the model with field data from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, to simulate a 4-ha riparian ecosystem containing beaver, elk, and willow. We found beaver persisted indefinitely when elk density was or = 30 elk km_2. The loss of tall willow preceded rapid beaver declines, thus willow condition may predict beaver population trajectory in natural environments. Beaver were able to persist with slightly higher elk densities if beaver alternated their use of foraging sites in a rest-rotation pattern rather than maintained continuous use. Thus, we found asymmetrical competition for willow strongly favored elk over beaver in a simulated montane ecosystem. Finally, we discuss application of the SAVANNA model and mechanisms of competition relative to beaver persistence as metapopulations, ecological resistance and alternative state models, and ecosystem regulation.

  12. Favorable selection, risk adjustment, and the Medicare Advantage program.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Becker, David J; Smith, Wilson; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    To examine the effects of changes in payment and risk adjustment on (1) the annual enrollment and switching behavior of Medicare Advantage (MA) beneficiaries, and (2) the relative costliness of MA enrollees and disenrollees. From 1999 through 2008 national Medicare claims data from the 5 percent longitudinal sample of Parts A and B expenditures. Retrospective, fixed effects regression analysis of July enrollment and year-long switching into and out of MA. Similar regression analysis of the costliness of those switching into (out of) MA in the 6 months prior to enrollment (after disenrollment) relative to nonswitchers in the same county over the same period. Payment generosity and more sophisticated risk adjustment were associated with substantial increases in MA enrollment and decreases in disenrollment. Claims experience of those newly switching into MA was not affected by any of the policy reforms, but disenrollment became increasingly concentrated among high-cost beneficiaries. Enrollment is very sensitive to payment levels. The use of more sophisticated risk adjustment did not alter favorable selection into MA, but it did affect the costliness of disenrollees. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Habitat heterogeneity favors asexual reproduction in natural populations of grassthrips.

    PubMed

    Lavanchy, Guillaume; Strehler, Marie; Llanos Roman, Maria Noemi; Lessard-Therrien, Malie; Humbert, Jean-Yves; Dumas, Zoé; Jalvingh, Kirsten; Ghali, Karim; Fontcuberta García-Cuenca, Amaranta; Zijlstra, Bart; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Schwander, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    Explaining the overwhelming success of sex among eukaryotes is difficult given the obvious costs of sex relative to asexuality. Different studies have shown that sex can provide benefits in spatially heterogeneous environments under specific conditions, but whether spatial heterogeneity commonly contributes to the maintenance of sex in natural populations remains unknown. We experimentally manipulated habitat heterogeneity for sexual and asexual thrips lineages in natural populations and under seminatural mesocosm conditions by varying the number of hostplants available to these herbivorous insects. Asexual lineages rapidly replaced the sexual ones, independently of the level of habitat heterogeneity in mesocosms. In natural populations, the success of sexual thrips decreased with increasing habitat heterogeneity, with sexual thrips apparently only persisting in certain types of hostplant communities. Our results illustrate how genetic diversity-based mechanisms can favor asexuality instead of sex when sexual lineages co-occur with genetically variable asexual lineages. © 2016 The Author(s) Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-07-31

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothesis, we introduce a finite population evolutionary process that combines a recombination modifier formalism with a gene-regulatory network model. We demonstrate that when reproductive mode and epistasis are allowed to coevolve, asexual reproduction outcompetes sexual reproduction. In addition, no correlation is found between the level of synergistic epistasis and the fixation time of the asexual mode. However, a significant correlation is found between the level of antagonistic epistasis and asexual mode fixation time. This asymmetry can be explained by the greater reduction in fitness imposed by sexual reproduction as compared with asexual reproduction. Our findings present evidence and suggest plausible explanations that challenge both the deterministic mutation hypothesis and recent arguments asserting the importance of emergent synergistic epistasis in the maintenance of sexual reproduction.

  15. Adaptation of Cupriavidus necator to conditions favoring polyhydroxyalkanoate production.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, João M B T; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; da Fonseca, M Manuela R; de Carvalho, Carla C C R

    2012-12-15

    The fatty acid (FA) composition of the bacterial membrane of Cupriavidus necator DSM 545 was assessed during the time course of two-stage fed-batch cultivations for the production of short-chain polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Changes in the relative proportion of straight, methyl and cyclopropyl saturated, unsaturated, hydroxy substituted and polyunsaturated FA were observed, depending on the C sources and cultivation conditions used to favor the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB-co-4HB)) or poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-4-hydroxybutyrate-3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HB-4HB-3HV)), under N limiting conditions. The relative percentage of each FA class was studied using glucose or waste glycerol (GRP), as main C source for P(3HB) production. The FA profile was also assessed when GRP was used together with i) γ-butyrolactone (GBL) (precursor of 4HB monomers) for P(3HB-4HB) synthesis and ii) GBL and propionic acid (PA) (3HV precursor) to yield P(3HB-4HB-3HV). The effect of GBL and PA utilization as PHA monomer precursors on the FA profile of the cell membrane was studied under two different dissolved oxygen concentrations (DOC). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion.

  17. Favorable Selection, Risk Adjustment, and the Medicare Advantage Program

    PubMed Central

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Becker, David J; Smith, Wilson; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of changes in payment and risk adjustment on (1) the annual enrollment and switching behavior of Medicare Advantage (MA) beneficiaries, and (2) the relative costliness of MA enrollees and disenrollees. Data From 1999 through 2008 national Medicare claims data from the 5 percent longitudinal sample of Parts A and B expenditures. Study Design Retrospective, fixed effects regression analysis of July enrollment and year-long switching into and out of MA. Similar regression analysis of the costliness of those switching into (out of) MA in the 6 months prior to enrollment (after disenrollment) relative to nonswitchers in the same county over the same period. Findings Payment generosity and more sophisticated risk adjustment were associated with substantial increases in MA enrollment and decreases in disenrollment. Claims experience of those newly switching into MA was not affected by any of the policy reforms, but disenrollment became increasingly concentrated among high-cost beneficiaries. Conclusions Enrollment is very sensitive to payment levels. The use of more sophisticated risk adjustment did not alter favorable selection into MA, but it did affect the costliness of disenrollees. PMID:23088500

  18. Increasing Spring temperature favors oak seed production in temperate areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caignard, Thomas; Kremer, Antoine; Firmat, Cyril; Nicolas, Manuel; Venner, Samuel; Delzon, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Although changes in vegetative phenology have considerable consequences for ecosystem functioning, little is known about how tree reproduction responds to climate change, while reproductive traits are key determinants of plant fitness. Assessing the response of tree reproduction to climate variations is needed for understanding tree and forest adaptation to environmental changes. We analyzed an extensive dataset of tree reproduction in 28 temperate oak forests distributed throughout France and examined how seed production responded to temperature variations over 14 years In addition, a "space-for-time" substitution experiment has been used to quantify the temperature sensitivity of acorn production. The amount of acorn produced in 10 Q. petraea populations along two parallel elevation gradients in Southern France were quantified from 2012 to 2015. During the past two decades, we observed a significant increase in reproductive effort for Q. petraea that correlates with a rise in spring temperature. Although no significant trend over time has been observed for Q. robur, a significant increase in seed production was also found with spring temperature. Such sensitivity to temperature of seed production has been confirmed along the elevational gradients. Our findings show that increasing spring temperature favors oak reproductive effort in temperate ecosystems. Nevertheless, while fitness can be enhanced by higher seed production, it also depends on the frequency and on the synchronization of mast seeding production that climate change may influence too.

  19. Gender bias in food intake favors male preschool Guatemalan children.

    PubMed

    Frongillo, E A; Bégin, F

    1993-02-01

    Gender bias in food intake and its subsequent effects on growth and illness were examined using data from rural Guatemalan children. Multiple regression controlled for energy requirements, illness, and maternal and economic factors. Gender bias in energy and protein intake favored boys; the magnitude for ages 2-5 y was 247 kJ/d. Analysis of subsequent effects showed that boys had higher rates of weight gain due to gender bias in energy intake than did girls for ages 1-2 y (0.27-0.97 kg/y), when there were no differences in illness rates due to gender bias in energy intake. For age 3-5 y, boys and girls did not differ in weight gain due to gender bias in energy intake. For ages 1-2 y for weight and stature, the growth rate for boys was faster than that of girls by 6-49% due to gender bias. This study provides evidence of gender bias in food intake in a Latin American population, but more work on the existence of and reasons for gender bias in food intake is needed before advocating that education or health programs should focus on this issue.

  20. Cardiac arrest at high elevation with a favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Omori, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Kando, Yumi; Fukata, Mutsumu; Ohsaka, Hiromichi

    2017-04-01

    A 36-year-old man started to climb Mount Fuji (3776m above sea level: ASL), from the Gotemba new fifth station (2400m ASL). He had no significant medical history, and this was his first attempt to climb such a high mountain. He began feeling chest discomfort but continued to climb. When he reached the ninth station of the mountain (3600mASL), he lost consciousness. One individual immediately provided basic life support using an automated external defibrillator (AED) that was located in the station. After electroshocks, he regained consciousness. He was transported to the fifth station, where an ambulance could approach, in a large crawler. When the medical staff, who were transported via helicopter and ambulance, examined him near the fifth station, he still complained of chest discomfort. A single spray of nitroglycerin and aspirin (200mg) was administered. He was transported to the Cardiac Care Unit via ambulance and helicopter under escort by a physician. A chest computed tomography angiogram indicated triple-vessel disease. He was discharged without any neurological deficits after undergoing bypass surgery. In high mountains that can be easily accessed by amateur climbers who may have cardiac disease, the placement of AED devices and the establishment of the chain of survival from the scene to the intensive care unit are essential for obtaining a favorable outcome when a climber suffers cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed.

  2. Favorable outcome in open globe injuries with low OTS score.

    PubMed

    Cillino, Giovanni; Ferraro, Lucia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cillino Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Open globe eye injuries can have profound social and economic consequences. Here, we describe two cases of war and outdoor activity open globe eye injury where, despite a low OTS score, current microsurgical technology allowed for a favorable outcome. A 33-year-old Libyan soldier had been treated for an open-globe grenade blast trauma to his left eye, which showed light perception and OTS score 2. He had undergone a lensectomy and PPV with silicone oil tamponade. Surgical treatment included scleral buckling, cornea trephination, temporary Eckardt keratoprosthesis, PPV revision, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and corneal grafting. Six months later, his VA was improved to 20/70. CASE REPORT 2: A 35-year-old man presented with a corneal laceration in his left eye from a meat skewer, with marked hypotony and LP. After primary corneal wound closure, B-scan ultrasonography revealed massive vitreous hemorrhage (OTS score 2). The patient underwent open cataract extraction with IOL implantation, 23 gauge PPV, laser photocoagulation of the retinochoroidal laceration, and a gas tamponade. After three weeks, the patient underwent a 2nd 23G PPV due to a fibrinous reaction. Six month later, the patients exhibited 20/25 VA. These cases confirm that even for patients with a low OTS and poor visual prognosis, an up-to-date surgery protocol may achieve visual results adequate for leading an autonomous daily life.

  3. Sperm competition favors harmful males in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Hotzy, Cosima; Arnqvist, Göran

    2009-03-10

    One of the most enigmatic observations in evolutionary biology is the evolution of morphological or physiological traits in one sex that physically injure members of the other sex. Such traits occur in a wide range of taxa and range from toxic ejaculate substances to genital or external spines that wound females during copulation. Current hypotheses for the adaptive evolution of such injurious traits rest entirely on the assumption that they are beneficial to their bearer by aiding in reproductive competition. Here, we assess this key assumption in seed beetles where genital spines in males physically injure females. We demonstrate that male spine length is positively correlated with harm to females during mating but also that males with longer spines are more successful in sperm competition. This is the first complete support for the proposal that sexual selection by sperm competition can favor morphological traits in males that inflict injury upon females. However, our results suggest that harm to females is a pleiotropic by-product, such that genital spines in males elevate success in sperm competition by means other than by causing harm.

  4. Spatial heterogeneity in human activities favors the persistence of wolves in agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mohsen; López-Bao, José Vicente; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province), a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use) to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people.

  5. High Concentrations of H2O2 Make Aerobic Glycolysis Energetically More Favorable for Cellular Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Molavian, Hamid R.; Kohandel, Mohammad; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2016-01-01

    Since the original observation of the Warburg Effect in cancer cells, over 8 decades ago, the major question of why aerobic glycolysis is favored over oxidative phosphorylation has remained unresolved. An understanding of this phenomenon may well be the key to the development of more effective cancer therapies. In this paper, we use a semi-empirical method to throw light on this puzzle. We show that aerobic glycolysis is in fact energetically more favorable than oxidative phosphorylation for concentrations of peroxide (H2O2) above some critical threshold value. The fundamental reason for this is the activation and high engagement of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in response to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) H2O2 by mitochondria and the high concentration of H2O2 (produced by mitochondria and other sources). This makes oxidative phosphorylation an inefficient source of energy since it leads (despite high levels of ATP production) to a concomitant high energy consumption in order to respond to the hazardous waste products resulting from cellular processes associated with this metabolic pathway. We also demonstrate that the high concentration of H2O2 results in an increased glucose consumption, and also increases the lactate production in the case of glycolysis. PMID:27601999

  6. Spatial Heterogeneity in Human Activities Favors the Persistence of Wolves in Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mohsen; López-Bao, José Vicente; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province), a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use) to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people. PMID:25251567

  7. What favors the occurrence of subduction mega-earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Sandri, Laura; van Zelst, Iris; Heuret, Arnauld; Piromallo, Claudia; van Dinther, Ylona

    2017-04-01

    Most of mega-earthquakes (MEqs; Mw > 8.5) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF). The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogenous, as well as the maximum recorded magnitude MMax. Highlighting the ingredients likely responsible for MEqs nucleation has great implications for hazard assessment. In this work, we investigate the conditions favoring the occurrence of MEqs with a multi-disciplinary approach based on: i) multivariate statistics, ii) analogue- and iii) numerical modelling. Previous works have investigated the potential dependence between STF seismicity and various subduction zone parameters using simple regression models. Correlations are generally weak due to the limited instrumental seismic record and multi-parameter influence, which make the forecasting of the potential MMax rather difficult. To unravel the multi-parameter influence, we perform a multivariate statistical study (i.e., Pattern Recognition, PR) of the global database on convergent margins (Heuret et al., 2011), which includes seismological, geometrical, kinematic and physical parameters of 62 subduction segments. PR is based on the classification of objects (i.e., subduction segments) belonging to different classes through the identification of possible repetitive patterns. Tests have been performed using different MMax datasets and combination of inputs to indirectly test the stability of the identified patterns. Results show that the trench-parallel width of the subducting slab (Wtrench) and the sediment thickness at the trench (Tsed) are the most recurring parameters for MEqs occurrence. These features are mostly consistent, independently of the MMax dataset and combination of inputs used for the analysis. MEqs thus seem to be promoted for high Wtrench and Tsed, as their combination may potentially favor extreme (i.e., in the order of thousands of km) trench-parallel rupture propagation. To tackle the

  8. Ground states of stealthy hyperuniform potentials: I. Entropically favored configurations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Stillinger, F H; Torquato, S

    2015-08-01

    Systems of particles interacting with "stealthy" pair potentials have been shown to possess infinitely degenerate disordered hyperuniform classical ground states with novel physical properties. Previous attempts to sample the infinitely degenerate ground states used energy minimization techniques, introducing algorithmic dependence that is artificial in nature. Recently, an ensemble theory of stealthy hyperuniform ground states was formulated to predict the structure and thermodynamics that was shown to be in excellent agreement with corresponding computer simulation results in the canonical ensemble (in the zero-temperature limit). In this paper, we provide details and justifications of the simulation procedure, which involves performing molecular dynamics simulations at sufficiently low temperatures and minimizing the energy of the snapshots for both the high-density disordered regime, where the theory applies, as well as lower densities. We also use numerical simulations to extend our study to the lower-density regime. We report results for the pair correlation functions, structure factors, and Voronoi cell statistics. In the high-density regime, we verify the theoretical ansatz that stealthy disordered ground states behave like "pseudo" disordered equilibrium hard-sphere systems in Fourier space. The pair statistics obey certain exact integral conditions with very high accuracy. These results show that as the density decreases from the high-density limit, the disordered ground states in the canonical ensemble are characterized by an increasing degree of short-range order and eventually the system undergoes a phase transition to crystalline ground states. In the crystalline regime (low densities), there exist aperiodic structures that are part of the ground-state manifold but yet are not entropically favored. We also provide numerical evidence suggesting that different forms of stealthy pair potentials produce the same ground-state ensemble in the zero

  9. Evoked and spontaneous transmission favored by distinct sets of synapses.

    PubMed

    Peled, Einat S; Newman, Zachary L; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2014-03-03

    Spontaneous "miniature" transmitter release takes place at low rates at all synapses. Long thought of as an unavoidable leak, spontaneous release has recently been suggested to be mediated by distinct pre- and postsynaptic molecular machineries and to have a specialized role in setting up and adjusting neuronal circuits. It remains unclear how spontaneous and evoked transmission are related at individual synapses, how they are distributed spatially when an axon makes multiple contacts with a target, and whether they are commonly regulated. Electrophysiological recordings in the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, in the presence of the use-dependent glutamate receptor (GluR) blocker philanthotoxin, indicated that spontaneous and evoked transmission employ distinct sets of GluRs. In vivo imaging of transmission using synaptically targeted GCaMP3 to detect Ca(2+) influx through the GluRs revealed little spatial overlap between synapses participating in spontaneous and evoked transmission. Spontaneous and evoked transmission were oppositely correlated with presynaptic levels of the protein Brp: synapses with high Brp favored evoked transmission, whereas synapses with low Brp were more active spontaneously. High-frequency stimulation did not increase the overlap between evoked and spontaneous transmission, and instead decreased the rate of spontaneous release from synapses that were highly active in evoked transmission. Although individual synapses can participate in both evoked and spontaneous transmission, highly active synapses show a preference for one mode of transmission. The presynaptic protein Brp promotes evoked transmission and suppresses spontaneous release. These findings suggest the existence of presynaptic mechanisms that promote synaptic specialization to either evoked or spontaneous transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evoked and spontaneous transmission favored by distinct sets of synapses

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Einat S.; Newman, Zachary L.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Spontaneous “miniature” transmitter release takes place at low rates at all synapses. Long thought as an unavoidable leak, spontaneous release has recently been suggested to be mediated by distinct pre- and post-synaptic molecular machineries and to have a specialized role in setting up and adjusting neuronal circuits. It remains unclear how spontaneous and evoked transmission are related at individual synapses, how they are distributed spatially when an axon makes multiple contacts with a target and whether they are commonly regulated. Results Electrophysiological recordings in the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, in the presence of the use-dependent glutamate receptor (GluR) blocker Philanthotoxin, indicated that spontaneous and evoked transmission employ distinct sets of GluRs. In vivo imaging of transmission using synaptically-targeted GCaMP3 to detect Ca2+ influx through the GluRs revealed little spatial overlap between synapses participating in spontaneous and evoked transmission. Spontaneous and evoked transmission were oppositely correlated with presynaptic levels of the protein Brp: synapses with high Brp favored evoked transmission, whereas synapses with low Brp were more active spontaneously. High frequency stimulation did not increase the overlap between evoked and spontaneous transmission, and instead decreased the rate of spontaneous release from synapses that were highly active in evoked transmission. Conclusions While individual synapses can participate in both evoked and spontaneous transmission, highly-active synapses show a preference for one mode of transmission. The presynaptic protein Brp promotes evoked transmission and suppresses spontaneous release. These findings suggest the existence of presynaptic mechanisms that promote synaptic specialization to either evoked or spontaneous transmission. PMID:24560571

  11. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Ceglia, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Background Maintaining muscle mass while aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. Metabolic acidosis promotes muscle wasting, and the net acid load from diets that are rich in net acid–producing protein and cereal grains relative to their content of net alkali–producing fruit and vegetables may therefore contribute to a reduction in lean tissue mass in older adults. Objective We aimed to determine whether there was an association of 24-h urinary potassium and an index of fruit and vegetable content of the diet with the percentage lean body mass (%LBM) or change in %LBM in older subjects. Design Subjects were 384 men and women ≥65 y old who participated in a 3-y trial comparing calcium and vitamin D with placebo. Potassium was measured in 24-h urine collections at baseline. The %LBM, defined as total body nonfat, nonbone tissue weight ÷ weight × 100, was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and at 3 y. Physical activity, height, and weight were assessed at baseline and at 3 y. Results At baseline, the mean urinary potassium excretion was 67.0 ± 21.1 mmol/d. Urinary potassium (mmol/d) was significantly positively associated with %LBM at baseline (β = 0.033, P = 0.006; adjusted for sex, weight, and nitrogen excretion) but not with 3-y change in %LBM. Over the 3-y study, %LBM increased by 2.6 ± 3.6%. Conclusion Higher intake of foods rich in potassium, such as fruit and vegetables, may favor the preservation of muscle mass in older men and women. PMID:18326605

  12. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Ceglia, Lisa

    2008-03-01

    Maintaining muscle mass while aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. Metabolic acidosis promotes muscle wasting, and the net acid load from diets that are rich in net acid-producing protein and cereal grains relative to their content of net alkali-producing fruit and vegetables may therefore contribute to a reduction in lean tissue mass in older adults. We aimed to determine whether there was an association of 24-h urinary potassium and an index of fruit and vegetable content of the diet with the percentage lean body mass (%LBM) or change in %LBM in older subjects. Subjects were 384 men and women > or =65 y old who participated in a 3-y trial comparing calcium and vitamin D with placebo. Potassium was measured in 24-h urine collections at baseline. The %LBM, defined as total body nonfat, nonbone tissue weight/weight x 100, was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and at 3 y. Physical activity, height, and weight were assessed at baseline and at 3 y. At baseline, the mean urinary potassium excretion was 67.0 +/- 21.1 mmol/d. Urinary potassium (mmol/d) was significantly positively associated with %LBM at baseline (beta = 0.033, P = 0.006; adjusted for sex, weight, and nitrogen excretion) but not with 3-y change in %LBM. Over the 3-y study, %LBM increased by 2.6 +/- 3.6%. Higher intake of foods rich in potassium, such as fruit and vegetables, may favor the preservation of muscle mass in older men and women.

  13. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Rosenbluth, Jeffrey; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients’ neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were ‘very important’ to them (p<0.0001). Patients had ‘little concern’ for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001). Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001). This is the first study to report SCI patients’ preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate. PMID:26789007

  14. Mechanical Heterogeneity Favors Fragmentation of Strained Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  15. Mechanical heterogeneity favors fragmentation of strained actin filaments.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Enrique M; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-05-05

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  16. No synergy needed: ecological constraints favor the evolution of eusociality.

    PubMed

    Avila, Piret; Fromhage, Lutz

    2015-07-01

    In eusocial species, some individuals sacrifice their own reproduction for the benefit of others. It has been argued that the evolution of sterile helpers in eusocial insects requires synergistic efficiency gains through cooperation that are uncommon in cooperatively breeding vertebrates and that this precludes a universal ecological explanation of social systems with alloparental care. In contrast, using a model that incorporates realistic ecological mechanisms of population regulation, we show here that constraints on independent breeding (through nest-site limitation and dispersal mortality) eliminate any need for synergistic efficiency gains: sterile helpers may evolve even if they are relatively inefficient at rearing siblings, reducing their colony's per-capita productivity. Our approach connects research fields by using hypotheses developed for cooperative breeding to explain the evolution of eusociality. The results suggest that these hypotheses may apply more generally than previously thought.

  17. Intensified agriculture favors evolved resistance to biological control.

    PubMed

    Tomasetto, Federico; Tylianakis, Jason M; Reale, Marco; Wratten, Steve; Goldson, Stephen L

    2017-03-13

    Increased regulation of chemical pesticides and rapid evolution of pesticide resistance have increased calls for sustainable pest management. Biological control offers sustainable pest suppression, partly because evolution of resistance to predators and parasitoids is prevented by several factors (e.g., spatial or temporal refuges from attacks, reciprocal evolution by control agents, and contrasting selection pressures from other enemy species). However, evolution of resistance may become more probable as agricultural intensification reduces the availability of refuges and diversity of enemy species, or if control agents have genetic barriers to evolution. Here we use 21 y of field data from 196 sites across New Zealand to show that parasitism of a key pasture pest (Listronotus bonariensis; Argentine stem weevil) by an introduced parasitoid (Microctonus hyperodae) was initially nationally successful but then declined by 44% (leading to pasture damage of c. 160 million New Zealand dollars per annum). This decline was not attributable to parasitoid numbers released, elevation, or local climatic variables at sample locations. Rather, in all locations the decline began 7 y (14 host generations) following parasitoid introduction, despite releases being staggered across locations in different years. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that declining parasitism rates occurred in ryegrass Lolium perenne, which is grown nationwide in high-intensity was significantly less than in adjacent plots of a less-common pasture grass (Lolium multiflorum), indicating that resistance to parasitism is host plant-dependent. We conclude that low plant and enemy biodiversity in intensive large-scale agriculture may facilitate the evolution of host resistance by pests and threaten the long-term viability of biological control.

  18. Optimal-Foraging Predator Favors Commensalistic Batesian Mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Honma, Atsushi; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Nishida, Takayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Background Mimicry, in which one prey species (the Mimic) imitates the aposematic signals of another prey (the Model) to deceive their predators, has attracted the general interest of evolutionary biologists. Predator psychology, especially how the predator learns and forgets, has recently been recognized as an important factor in a predator–prey system. This idea is supported by both theoretical and experimental evidence, but is also the source of a good deal of controversy because of its novel prediction that in a Model/Mimic relationship even a moderately unpalatable Mimic increases the risk of the Model (quasi-Batesian mimicry). Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a psychology-based Monte Carlo model simulation of mimicry that incorporates a “Pavlovian” predator that practices an optimal foraging strategy, and examined how various ecological and psychological factors affect the relationships between a Model prey species and its Mimic. The behavior of the predator in our model is consistent with that reported by experimental studies, but our simulation's predictions differed markedly from those of previous models of mimicry because a more abundant Mimic did not increase the predation risk of the Model when alternative prey were abundant. Moreover, a quasi-Batesian relationship emerges only when no or very few alternative prey items were available. Therefore, the availability of alternative prey rather than the precise method of predator learning critically determines the relationship between Model and Mimic. Moreover, the predation risk to the Model and Mimic is determined by the absolute density of the Model rather than by its density relative to that of the Mimic. Conclusions/Significance Although these predictions are counterintuitive, they can explain various kinds of data that have been offered in support of competitive theories. Our model results suggest that to understand mimicry in nature it is important to consider the likely presence of

  19. Femtomolar inhibitors bind to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidases with favorable enthalpy and entropy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Keisha; Haapalainen, Antti M; Burgos, Emmanuel S; Evans, Gary B; Tyler, Peter C; Gulab, Shivali; Guan, Rong; Schramm, Vern L

    2012-09-25

    5'-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of adenine from methylthioadenosine (MTA). Inhibitor design and synthesis informed by transition state analysis have developed femtomolar inhibitors for MTANs, among the most powerful known noncovalent enzyme inhibitors. Thermodynamic analyses of the inhibitor binding reveals a combination of highly favorable contributions from enthalpic (-24.7 to -4.0 kcal mol(-1)) and entropic (-10.0 to 6.4 kcal mol(-1)) interactions. Inhibitor binding to similar MTANs from different bacterial species gave distinct energetic contributions from similar catalytic sites. Thus, binding of four transition state analogues to EcMTAN and SeMTAN is driven primarily by enthalpy, while binding to VcMTAN is driven primarily by entropy. Human MTA phosphorylase (hMTAP) has a transition state structure closely related to that of the bacterial MTANs, and it binds tightly to some of the same transition state analogues. However, the thermodynamic signature of binding of an inhibitor to hMTAP differs completely from that with MTANs. We conclude that factors other than first-sphere catalytic residue contacts contribute to binding of inhibitors because the thermodynamic signature differs between bacterial species of the same enzyme.

  20. Engineering a substrate-specific cold-adapted subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Tindbaek, Nikolaj; Svendsen, Allan; Oestergaard, Peter Rahbek; Draborg, Henriette

    2004-02-01

    One region predicted to be highly flexible for a psychrophilic enzyme, TA39 subtilisin (S39), was transferred in silico to the mesophilic subtilisin, savinase (EC 3.4.21.62), from Bacillus lentus (clausii). The engineered hybrid and savinase were initially investigated by molecular dynamic simulations at 300 K to show binding region and global flexibility. The predicted S39 region consists of 12 residues, which due to homology between the subtilisins, results in a total change of eight residues. By site-directed modifications, the region was transferred to the binding region of savinase, thus a savinase-S39 hybrid, named H5, was constructed. The designed hybrid showed the same temperature optimum and pH profile as savinase, but H5 had higher specific activity on the synthetic substrate N-succinyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Pro-L-Phe-p-nitroanilide (AAPF) at all temperatures measured and, at the same time, H5 showed a decrease in thermostability. The H5 hybrid showed broader substrate specificity, measured at room temperature, due to an increase in catalytic efficiency on AAPF, AAPA and FAAF compared with savinase (N-succinyl-XXXX-pNA; XXXX = AAPF, AAPA and FAAF). The H5 hybrid showed increased activity at low temperature, increased binding region and global flexibility, as investigated by molecular dynamic simulations, and global destabilization from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. These psychrophilic characteristics indicated an increase in binding site flexibility, probably due to the modifications P129S, S130G, P131E, and thus we show that it is possible to increase low temperature activity and global flexibility by engineered flexibility in the binding region.

  1. Energy balance and cold adaptation in the octopus Pareledone charcoti.

    PubMed

    Daly; Peck

    2000-03-15

    A complete energy balance equation is calculated for the Antarctic octopus Pareledone charcoti at 0 degrees C. Energy used in respiration, growth, and excretion of nitrogenous and faecal waste, was recorded along with the total consumption of energy through food, for three specimens of P. charcoti (live weights: 73, 51 and 29 g). Growth rates were very slow for cephalopods, with a mean daily increase in body weight of only 0.11%. Assimilation efficiencies were high, between 95.4 and 97.0%, which is consistent with previous work on octopods. The respiration rate in P. charcoti was low, with a mean of 2.45 mg O(2) h(-1) for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass at 0 degrees C. In the North Sea octopus Eledone cirrhosa, respiration rates of 9.79 mg O(2) h(-1) at 11.5 degrees C and 4.47 mg O(2) h(-1) at 4.5 degrees C for a standard animal of 150 g wet mass were recorded. Respiration rates between P. charcoti and E. cirrhosa were compared using a combined Q(10) value between P. charcoti at 0 degrees C and E. cirrhosa at 4.5 degrees C. This suggests that P. charcoti are respiring at a level predicted by E. cirrhosa rates at 4.5 and 11.5 degrees C extrapolated to 0 degrees C along the curve Q(10)=3, with no evidence of metabolic compensation for low temperature.

  2. A cold-adapted endo-arabinanase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Ihara, H; Kozaki, S; Kawasaki, H

    2003-12-05

    Previously, three arabinan-degrading enzymes were isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here we describe another arabinan-degrading enzyme, termed Abnc, from the culture filtrate of the same organism. Analysis of the reaction products of debranched arabinan by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) revealed that Abnc cleaved the substrate in an endo manner and that the final major product was arabinotriose. The molecular mass of Abnc was estimated to be 35 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Enzyme activity of Abnc was highest at pH 6.0 to 7.0. The enzyme was stable up to 30 degrees C and showed optimum activity at 30 to 40 degrees C. Compared with a mesophilic counterpart from Aspergillus niger, Abnc exhibited a lower thermal stability and optimum enzyme activity at lower temperatures. Production of Abnc in P. chrysogenum was found to be strongly induced by arabinose-containing polymers and required a longer culture time than did other arabinanase isozymes in this strain.

  3. Positive feedback favors invasion by a submersed freshwater plant.

    PubMed

    Urban, Rebecca A; Titus, John E; Hansen, Heidi H

    2013-06-01

    The submersed macrophyte Utricularia inflata has invaded lakes in northern New York State, thereby threatening native isoetids such as Eriocaulon aquaticum. Isoetids often dominate and modify softwater lakes due to their capacity to oxidize sediment and thus influence solute mobilization. Greenhouse experiments tested the hypotheses that U. inflata invasion could result in higher porewater iron (Fe) concentrations and greater ammonium (NH4 (+)) and Fe release from the sediment into the water column, and that this mobilization would stimulate further U. inflata growth. In the first experiment, three levels of U. inflata impact on E. aquaticum were imposed using sediment cores overlain by lake water: E. aquaticum alone, E. aquaticum with a cover of U. inflata, and bare sediment--the latter to simulate local extirpation of the isoetid by the invasive. After 16 weeks, sediment porewater NH4 (+) and total dissolved Fe concentrations were significantly higher (P < 0.05) for the U. inflata and bare sediment treatments. Water column concentrations of these solutes were five-fold higher (P < 0.05) for the bare sediment treatment than E. aquaticum alone, indicating that isoetid extirpation by U. inflata can compromise water quality. A second experiment demonstrated that U. inflata grew faster over bare sediment than over sediment with E. aquaticum (P < 0.05), likely due to greater solute mobilization in the absence of E. aquaticum. Where U. inflata causes a decline of native isoetids in Adirondack Mountain lakes, changes to lake sediment and water chemistry can create a positive feedback loop further escalating the impact of this invasive species.

  4. Macroscale intraspecific variation and environmental heterogeneity: analysis of cold and warm zone abundance, mortality, and regeneration distributions of four eastern US tree species.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anantha M

    2015-11-01

    I test for macroscale intraspecific variation of abundance, mortality, and regeneration of four eastern US tree species (Tsuga canadensis,Betula lenta,Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus prinus) by splitting them into three climatic zones based on plant hardiness zones (PHZs). The primary goals of the analysis are to assess the differences in environmental heterogeneity and demographic responses among climatic zones, map regional species groups based on decision tree rules, and evaluate univariate and multivariate patterns of species demography with respect to environmental variables. I use the Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) data to derive abundance, mortality, and regeneration indices and split the range into three climatic zones based on USDA PHZs: (1) cold adapted, leading region; (2) middle, well-adapted region; and (3) warm adapted, trailing region. I employ decision tree ensemble methods to assess the importance of environmental predictors on the abundance of the species between the cold and warm zones and map zonal variations in species groups. Multivariate regression trees are used to simultaneously explore abundance, mortality, and regeneration in tandem to assess species vulnerability. Analyses point to the relative importance of climate in the warm adapted, trailing zone (especially moisture) compared to the cold adapted, leading zone. Higher mortality and lower regeneration patterns in the warm trailing zone point to its vulnerability to growing season temperature and precipitation changes that could figure more prominently in the future. This study highlights the need to account for intraspecific variation of demography in order to understand environmental heterogeneity and differential adaptation. It provides a methodology for assessing the vulnerability of tree species by delineating climatic zones based on easily available PHZ data, and FIA derived abundance, mortality, and regeneration indices as a proxy for overall growth and fitness. Based on

  5. Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression Changes Lysophosphatidic Acid Homeostasis to Favor its Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Bot, Ilze; Lopez-Vales, Rubén; van de Lest, Chris H.A.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien; Helms, J. Bernd; David, Samuel; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2010-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) accumulates in the central atheroma of human atherosclerotic plaques and is the primary platelet-activating lipid constituent of plaques. Here, we investigated the enzymatic regulation of LPA homeostasis in atherosclerotic lesions at various stages of disease progression. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in carotid arteries of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice by semiconstrictive collar placement. At 2-week intervals after collar placement, lipids and RNA were extracted from the vessel segments carrying the plaque. Enzymatic-and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry–based lipid profiling revealed progressive accumulation of LPA species in atherosclerotic tissue preceded by an increase in lysophosphatidylcholine, a precursor in LPA synthesis. Plaque expression of LPA-generating enzymes cytoplasmic phospholipase A2IVA (cPLA2IVA) and calcium-independent PLA2VIA (iPLA2VIA) was gradually increased, whereas that of the LPA-hydrolyzing enzyme LPA acyltransferase α was quenched. Increased expression of cPLA2IVA and iPLA2VIA in advanced lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, LPA receptors 1 and 2 were 50% decreased and sevenfold upregulated, respectively. Therefore, key proteins in LPA homeostasis are increasingly dysregulated in the plaque during atherogenesis, favoring intracellular LPA production. This might at least partly explain the observed progressive accumulation of this thrombogenic proinflammatory lipid in human and mouse plaques. Thus, intervention in the enzymatic LPA production may be an attractive measure to lower intraplaque LPA content, thereby reducing plaque progression and thrombogenicity. PMID:20431029

  6. The Ecological Conditions That Favor Tool Use and Innovation in Wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Eric M.; Mann, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Dolphins are well known for their exquisite echolocation abilities, which enable them to detect and discriminate prey species and even locate buried prey. While these skills are widely used during foraging, some dolphins use tools to locate and extract prey. In the only known case of tool use in free-ranging cetaceans, a subset of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia habitually employs marine basket sponge tools to locate and ferret prey from the seafloor. While it is clear that sponges protect dolphins' rostra while searching for prey, it is still not known why dolphins probe the substrate at all instead of merely echolocating for buried prey as documented at other sites. By ‘sponge foraging’ ourselves, we show that these dolphins target prey that both lack swimbladders and burrow in a rubble-littered substrate. Delphinid echolocation and vision are critical for hunting but less effective on such prey. Consequently, if dolphins are to access this burrowing, swimbladderless prey, they must probe the seafloor and in turn benefit from using protective sponges. We suggest that these tools have allowed sponge foraging dolphins to exploit an empty niche inaccessible to their non-tool-using counterparts. Our study identifies the underlying ecological basis of dolphin tool use and strengthens our understanding of the conditions that favor tool use and innovation in the wild. PMID:21799801

  7. The ecological conditions that favor tool use and innovation in wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Eric M; Mann, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Dolphins are well known for their exquisite echolocation abilities, which enable them to detect and discriminate prey species and even locate buried prey. While these skills are widely used during foraging, some dolphins use tools to locate and extract prey. In the only known case of tool use in free-ranging cetaceans, a subset of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia habitually employs marine basket sponge tools to locate and ferret prey from the seafloor. While it is clear that sponges protect dolphins' rostra while searching for prey, it is still not known why dolphins probe the substrate at all instead of merely echolocating for buried prey as documented at other sites. By 'sponge foraging' ourselves, we show that these dolphins target prey that both lack swimbladders and burrow in a rubble-littered substrate. Delphinid echolocation and vision are critical for hunting but less effective on such prey. Consequently, if dolphins are to access this burrowing, swimbladderless prey, they must probe the seafloor and in turn benefit from using protective sponges. We suggest that these tools have allowed sponge foraging dolphins to exploit an empty niche inaccessible to their non-tool-using counterparts. Our study identifies the underlying ecological basis of dolphin tool use and strengthens our understanding of the conditions that favor tool use and innovation in the wild.

  8. Randomness + determinism = progresses: why random processes could be favored by evolution.

    PubMed

    Schabanel, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Biologists are somehow pioneers on the idea that progress can be driven by randomness: randomness is one of the main engine of evolution; small variations induced by randomness coupled with natural selection allows the species to self-adapt to their moving environment. Studies from the last 40 years in computer science suggest that randomness is in fact able of doing much more and revealed unexpected possibilities which might appear impossible at first. Furthermore, it turns out that these discoveries are faster, cheaper and above all exponentially thriftier than their deterministic alternatives. This means that random explorations would almost surely generate a stochastic process way before any equivalent deterministic counterpart is found. It follows that most likely these processes are favored by evolution and should thus be known to anyone dealing with systems (alive or not) having access to random sources. This article presents some of these counter-intuitive results as a possible source of inspiration for studying systems fed with randomness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intragenomic conflict produces sex ratio dynamics that favor maternal sex ratio distorters.

    PubMed

    Rood, Elaine S; Freedberg, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Maternal sex ratio distorters (MSDs) are selfish elements that enhance their transmission by biasing their host's sex allocation in favor of females. While previous models have predicted that the female-biased populations resulting from sex ratio distortion can benefit from enhanced productivity, these models neglect Fisherian selection for nuclear suppressors, an unrealistic assumption in most systems. We used individual-based computer simulation modeling to explore the intragenomic conflict between sex ratio distorters and their suppressors and explored the impacts of these dynamics on population-level competition between species characterized by MSDs and those lacking them. The conflict between distorters and suppressors was capable of producing large cyclical fluctuations in the population sex ratio and reproductive rate. Despite fitness costs associated with the distorters and suppressors, MSD populations often exhibited enhanced productivity and outcompeted non-MSD populations in single and multiple-population competition simulations. Notably, the conflict itself is beneficial to the success of populations, as sex ratio oscillations limit the competitive deficits associated with prolonged periods of male rarity. Although intragenomic conflict has been historically viewed as deleterious to populations, our results suggest that distorter-suppressor conflict can provide population-level advantages, potentially helping to explain the persistence of sex ratio distorters in a range of taxa.

  10. The European land leech: biology and DNA-based taxonomy of a rare species that is threatened by climate warming.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Pfeiffer, I; Ebermann, E

    2007-12-01

    The European land leech Xerobdella lecomtei was discovered in 1868 and is one of the rarest animals on Earth. During the 1960s, several individuals of these approx. 40 mm long, cold-adapted terrestrial annelids that inhabit the moist soils of birch forests around Graz, Austria, were investigated. Only one original research paper has been published on the biology of this species. Between 2001 and 2005, we re-investigated the morphology of preserved specimens and searched for living individuals in their natural habitat that appeared to be intact. We found only one juvenile individual (length approx. 10 mm), indicating that this local leech population became largely extinct over the past four decades. The feeding behaviour of our 'lonesome George of the annelids' was studied and is described here in detail. After its death, the Xerobdella individual was used for chemical extraction and molecular studies (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] barcoding, based on one gene, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I). In addition, novel DNA barcodes for a land leech from Madagascar and a recently discovered species from Europe were obtained. Our phylogenetic tree shows that X. lecomtei is not a member of the tropical land leeches (family Haemadipsidae), as previously thought, but represents a separate line of descent (family Xerobdellidae). The decline of the local leech population around Graz correlates with a rise in average summer temperatures of +3 degrees C between 1961 and 2004. This warming led to a drastic reduction in the moisture content of the soil where X. lecomtei lives. We suggest that human-induced climate change without apparent habitat destruction can lead to the extinction of populations of cold-adapted species that have a low colonization ability.

  11. The European land leech: biology and DNA-based taxonomy of a rare species that is threatened by climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Pfeiffer, I.; Ebermann, E.

    2007-12-01

    The European land leech Xerobdella lecomtei was discovered in 1868 and is one of the rarest animals on Earth. During the 1960s, several individuals of these approx. 40 mm long, cold-adapted terrestrial annelids that inhabit the moist soils of birch forests around Graz, Austria, were investigated. Only one original research paper has been published on the biology of this species. Between 2001 and 2005, we re-investigated the morphology of preserved specimens and searched for living individuals in their natural habitat that appeared to be intact. We found only one juvenile individual (length approx. 10 mm), indicating that this local leech population became largely extinct over the past four decades. The feeding behaviour of our ‘lonesome George of the annelids’ was studied and is described here in detail. After its death, the Xerobdella individual was used for chemical extraction and molecular studies (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] barcoding, based on one gene, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I). In addition, novel DNA barcodes for a land leech from Madagascar and a recently discovered species from Europe were obtained. Our phylogenetic tree shows that X. lecomtei is not a member of the tropical land leeches (family Haemadipsidae), as previously thought, but represents a separate line of descent (family Xerobdellidae). The decline of the local leech population around Graz correlates with a rise in average summer temperatures of +3°C between 1961 and 2004. This warming led to a drastic reduction in the moisture content of the soil where X. lecomtei lives. We suggest that human-induced climate change without apparent habitat destruction can lead to the extinction of populations of cold-adapted species that have a low colonization ability.

  12. Are human embryos Kantian persons?: Kantian considerations in favor of embryonic stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2008-01-01

    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to obtain their cells for research fails to treat them as ends in themselves. This argument assumes two points that are rather contentious given a Kantian framework. First, the argument assumes that when Kant maintains that humanity must be treated as an end in itself, he means to argue that all members of the species Homo sapiens must be treated as ends in themselves; that is, that Kant regards personhood as co-extensive with belonging to the species Homo sapiens. Second, the argument assumes that the event of conception is causally responsible for the genesis of a Kantian person and that, therefore, an embryo is a Kantian person from the time of its conception. In this paper, I will present challenges against these two assumptions by engaging in an exegetical study of some of Kant's works. First, I will illustrate that Kant did not use the term "humanity" to denote a biological species, but rather the capacity to set ends according to reason. Second, I will illustrate that it is difficult given a Kantian framework to denote conception (indeed any biological event) as causally responsible for the creation of a person. Kant ascribed to a dualistic view of human agency, and personhood, according to him, was derived from the supersensible capacity for reason. To argue that a Kantian person is generated due to the event of conception ignores Kant's insistence in various aspects of his work that it is not possible to understand the generation of a person qua a physical operation. Finally, I will end the

  13. Are human embryos Kantian persons?: Kantian considerations in favor of embryonic stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2008-01-31

    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to obtain their cells for research fails to treat them as ends in themselves. This argument assumes two points that are rather contentious given a Kantian framework. First, the argument assumes that when Kant maintains that humanity must be treated as an end in itself, he means to argue that all members of the species Homo sapiens must be treated as ends in themselves; that is, that Kant regards personhood as co-extensive with belonging to the species Homo sapiens. Second, the argument assumes that the event of conception is causally responsible for the genesis of a Kantian person and that, therefore, an embryo is a Kantian person from the time of its conception. In this paper, I will present challenges against these two assumptions by engaging in an exegetical study of some of Kant's works. First, I will illustrate that Kant did not use the term "humanity" to denote a biological species, but rather the capacity to set ends according to reason. Second, I will illustrate that it is difficult given a Kantian framework to denote conception (indeed any biological event) as causally responsible for the creation of a person. Kant ascribed to a dualistic view of human agency, and personhood, according to him, was derived from the supersensible capacity for reason. To argue that a Kantian person is generated due to the event of conception ignores Kant's insistence in various aspects of his work that it is not possible to understand the generation of a person qua a physical operation. Finally, I will end the

  14. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity, favor... between the employee and his or her parents, spouse or children, if it is clear that the relationship is the motivating factor. (b) Loans from banks or other financial institutions may be accepted...

  15. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity, favor... between the employee and his or her parents, spouse or children, if it is clear that the relationship is the motivating factor. (b) Loans from banks or other financial institutions may be accepted...

  16. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity, favor... between the employee and his or her parents, spouse or children, if it is clear that the relationship is the motivating factor. (b) Loans from banks or other financial institutions may be accepted...

  17. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity, favor... between the employee and his or her parents, spouse or children, if it is clear that the relationship is the motivating factor. (b) Loans from banks or other financial institutions may be accepted...

  18. 45 CFR 73.735-503 - Criminal provisions relating to gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-503 Criminal provisions relating to gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) The law provides criminal penalties for whoever... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal provisions relating to...

  19. "Time" and "Newsweek" Favor John F. Kennedy, Criticize Robert and Edward Kennedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Finds that the percentage of favorable, neutral, and unfavorable statements about the three Kennedy brothers in two national news magazines was similar and that both magazines published proportionately more favorable statements about John Kennedy than about either of his brothers. (FL)

  20. Local adaptation and the evolution of species' ranges under climate change.

    PubMed

    Atkins, K E; Travis, J M J

    2010-10-07

    The potential impact of climate change on biodiversity is well documented. A well developed range of statistical methods currently exists that projects the possible future habitat of a species directly from the current climate and a species distribution. However, studies incorporating ecological and evolutionary processes remain limited. Here, we focus on the potential role that local adaptation to climate may play in driving the range dynamics of sessile organisms. Incorporating environmental adaptation into a stochastic simulation yields several new insights. Counter-intuitively, our simulation results suggest that species with broader ranges are not necessarily more robust to climate change. Instead, species with broader ranges can be more susceptible to extinction as locally adapted genotypes are often blocked from range shifting by the presence of cooler adapted genotypes that persist even when their optimum climate has left them behind. Interestingly, our results also suggest that it will not always be the cold-adapted phenotypes that drive polewards range expansion. Instead, range shifts may be driven by phenotypes conferring adaptation to conditions prevalent towards the centre of a species' equilibrium distribution. This may have important consequences for the conservation method termed predictive provenancing. These initial results highlight the potential importance of local adaptation in determining how species will respond to climate change and we argue that this is an area requiring urgent theoretical and empirical attention.

  1. Suboptimal temperature favors reserve formation in biennial carrot (Daucus carota) plants.

    PubMed

    González, María V; Sadras, Victor O; Equiza, María A; Tognetti, Jorge A

    2009-09-01

    In response to suboptimal temperatures, temperate annual plants often increase root:shoot ratios, build-up carbohydrates and display typical morphological and anatomical changes. We know less about the responses of biennials such as carrot. As a model plant, carrot has the additional feature of two functionally and morphologically distinct root parts: the taproot, which stores carbohydrate and other compounds, and the fibrous root system involved in acquisition of water and nutrients. Here, we analyze the effects of temperature (12 vs 25°C) on growth, carbohydrate accumulation and whole-plant morphology in two carrot cultivars. Our working hypothesis is that suboptimal temperature favors active formation of reserve structures, rather than passive accumulation of storage carbohydrates. In comparison with plants grown at 25°C, plants grown at 12°C had: (1) higher fibrous root:shoot ratio (13%) , (2) thicker (10-15%) and smaller (up to two- to three-fold) leaves, (3) lower leaf cuticular permeance (two- to four-fold), (4) higher taproot:shoot ratio (two-fold), (5) higher phloem:xylem ratios in taproot (two- to six-fold), (6) unchanged percentage dry matter content (%DMC) in leaves, petioles or fibrous roots and (7) higher %DMC in taproot (20%). However, %DMC of individual taproot tissues (phloem and xylem) was unaffected by temperatures and was consistently higher in the phloem (up to 30%). Therefore, the higher %DMC of whole taproots at 12°C was attributed solely to the increased development of phloem tissue. Carrot, therefore, shares many of the most conspicuous elements of temperate plant responses to low temperatures. Consistently with our hypothesis, however, carrots grown at suboptimal temperature promoted reserve structures, rather than the increase in carbohydrate concentration typical of most temperate annual species and woody perennials. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2009.

  2. UVB Radiation as a Potential Selective Factor Favoring Microcystin Producing Bloom Forming Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Song, Lirong; Sedmak, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the stratospheric ozone depletion, several organisms will become exposed to increased biologically active UVB (280–320 nm) radiation, not only at polar but also at temperate and tropical latitudes. Bloom forming cyanobacteria are exposed to UVB radiation on a mass scale, particularly during the surface bloom and scum formation that can persist for long periods of time. All buoyant species of cyanobacteria are at least periodically exposed to higher irradiation during their vertical migration to the surface that usually occurs several times a day. The aim of this study is to assess the influence on cyanobacteria of UVB radiation at realistic environmental intensities. The effects of two UVB intensities of 0.5 and 0.99 W/m2 in up to 0.5 cm water depth were studied in vitro on Microcystis aeruginosa strains, two microcystin producing and one non-producing. After UVB exposure their ability to proliferate was estimated by cell counting, while cell fitness and integrity were evaluated using light microscopy, autofluorescence and immunofluorescence. Gene damage was assessed by TUNEL assay and SYBR Green staining of the nucleoide area. We conclude that UVB exposure causes damage to the genetic material, cytoskeletal elements, higher sedimentation rates and consequent cell death. In contrast to microcystin producers (PCC7806 and FACHB905), the microcystin non-producing strain PCC7005 is more susceptible to the deleterious effects of radiation, with weak recovery ability. The ecological relevance of the results is discussed using data from eleven years’ continuous UVB radiation measurements within the area of Ljubljana city (Slovenia, Central Europe). Our results suggest that increased solar radiation in temperate latitudes can have its strongest effect during cyanobacterial bloom formation in spring and early summer. UVB radiation in this period may significantly influence strain composition of cyanobacterial blooms in favor of microcystin producers. PMID

  3. UVB radiation as a potential selective factor favoring microcystin producing bloom forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Song, Lirong; Sedmak, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the stratospheric ozone depletion, several organisms will become exposed to increased biologically active UVB (280-320 nm) radiation, not only at polar but also at temperate and tropical latitudes. Bloom forming cyanobacteria are exposed to UVB radiation on a mass scale, particularly during the surface bloom and scum formation that can persist for long periods of time. All buoyant species of cyanobacteria are at least periodically exposed to higher irradiation during their vertical migration to the surface that usually occurs several times a day. The aim of this study is to assess the influence on cyanobacteria of UVB radiation at realistic environmental intensities. The effects of two UVB intensities of 0.5 and 0.99 W/m(2) in up to 0.5 cm water depth were studied in vitro on Microcystis aeruginosa strains, two microcystin producing and one non-producing. After UVB exposure their ability to proliferate was estimated by cell counting, while cell fitness and integrity were evaluated using light microscopy, autofluorescence and immunofluorescence. Gene damage was assessed by TUNEL assay and SYBR Green staining of the nucleoide area. We conclude that UVB exposure causes damage to the genetic material, cytoskeletal elements, higher sedimentation rates and consequent cell death. In contrast to microcystin producers (PCC7806 and FACHB905), the microcystin non-producing strain PCC7005 is more susceptible to the deleterious effects of radiation, with weak recovery ability. The ecological relevance of the results is discussed using data from eleven years' continuous UVB radiation measurements within the area of Ljubljana city (Slovenia, Central Europe). Our results suggest that increased solar radiation in temperate latitudes can have its strongest effect during cyanobacterial bloom formation in spring and early summer. UVB radiation in this period may significantly influence strain composition of cyanobacterial blooms in favor of microcystin producers.

  4. Citations alone were enough to predict favorable conclusions in reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujuan; Wang, Ying; Tsafnat, Guy; Coiera, Enrico; Bourgeois, Florence T; Dunn, Adam G

    2015-01-01

    To examine the use of supervised machine learning to identify biases in evidence selection and determine if citation information can predict favorable conclusions in reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors. Reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors published during January 2005 to May 2013 were identified by searching PubMed. In a blinded evaluation, the reviews were classified as favorable if investigators agreed that they supported the use of neuraminidase inhibitors for prophylaxis or treatment of influenza. Reference lists were used to identify all unique citations to primary articles. Three classification methods were tested for their ability to predict favorable conclusions using only citation information. Citations to 4,574 articles were identified in 152 reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors, and 93 (61%) of these reviews were graded as favorable. Primary articles describing drug resistance were among the citations that were underrepresented in favorable reviews. The most accurate classifier predicted favorable conclusions with 96.2% accuracy, using citations to only 24 of 4,574 articles. Favorable conclusions in reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors can be predicted using only information about the articles they cite. The approach highlights how evidence exclusion shapes conclusions in reviews and provides a method to evaluate citation practices in a corpus of reviews. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 - License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Treatment Countries No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... Favorable Treatment Countries Austria Australia Belgium Bulgaria Canada Cyprus Czech Republic Estonia... Turkey United Kingdom...

  6. Testing the directed dispersal hypothesis: are native ant mounds (Formica sp.) favorable microhabitats for an invasive plant?

    PubMed

    Berg-Binder, Moni C; Suarez, Andrew V

    2012-07-01

    Ant-mediated seed dispersal may be a form of directed dispersal if collected seeds are placed in a favorable microhabitat (e.g., in or near an ant nest) that increases plant establishment, growth, and/or reproduction relative to random locations. We investigated whether the native ant community interacts with invasive leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) in a manner consistent with predictions of the directed dispersal hypothesis. Resident ants quickly located and dispersed 60% of experimentally offered E. esula seeds. Additionally, 40% of seeds whose final deposition site was observed were either brought inside or placed on top of an ant nest. Seed removal was 100% when seeds were placed experimentally on foraging trails of mound-building Formica obscuripes, although the deposition site of these seeds is unknown. Natural density and above-ground biomass of E. esula were greater on Formica mound edges compared to random locations. However, seedling recruitment and establishment from experimentally planted E. esula seeds was not greater on mound edges than random locations 3 m from the mound. Soil from Formica mound edges was greater in available nitrogen and available phosphorus relative to random soil locations 3 m from the mound. These results suggest Formica ant mounds are favorable microhabitats for E. esula growth following seedling establishment, a likely consequence of nutrient limitation during plant growth. The results also indicate positive species interactions may play an important role in biological invasions.

  7. Indirect effects of habitat disturbance on invasion: nutritious litter from a grazing resistant plant favors alien over native Collembola

    PubMed Central

    Leinaas, Hans Petter; Bengtsson, Jan; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Chown, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Biological invasions are major threats to biodiversity, with impacts that may be compounded by other forms of environmental change. Observations of high density of the invasive springtail (Collembola), Hypogastrura manubrialis in heavily grazed renosterveld vegetation in the Western Cape, South Africa, raised the question of whether the invasion was favored by changes in plant litter quality associated with habitat disturbance in this vegetation type. To examine the likely mechanisms underlying the high abundance of H. manubrialis, cages with three types of naturally occurring litter with different nutrient content were placed out in the area and collected after different periods of time. Hypogastrura manubrialis was mainly found in the nutrient-rich litter of the yellowbush (Galenia africana), which responds positively to disturbance in the form of overgrazing. This suggests that invasion may have been facilitated by a positive interaction with this grazing resistant plant. By contrast, indigenous Collembola were least abundant in yellowbush litter. Negative correlations between high abundance of H. manubrialis and the abundance and diversity of other species suggest that competitive interactions might underlie low abundance of these other species at the patch level. Group behavior enables H. manubrialis to utilize efficiently this ephemeral, high quality resource, and might improve its competitive ability. The results suggest that interactions among environmental change drivers may lead to unforeseen invasion effects. H. manubrialis is not likely to be very successful in un-grazed renosterveld, but in combination with grazing, favoring the nutrient-rich yellowbush, it may become highly invasive. Field manipulations are required to fully verify these conclusions. PMID:26380678

  8. Indirect effects of habitat disturbance on invasion: nutritious litter from a grazing resistant plant favors alien over native Collembola.

    PubMed

    Leinaas, Hans Petter; Bengtsson, Jan; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Chown, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    Biological invasions are major threats to biodiversity, with impacts that may be compounded by other forms of environmental change. Observations of high density of the invasive springtail (Collembola), Hypogastrura manubrialis in heavily grazed renosterveld vegetation in the Western Cape, South Africa, raised the question of whether the invasion was favored by changes in plant litter quality associated with habitat disturbance in this vegetation type. To examine the likely mechanisms underlying the high abundance of H. manubrialis, cages with three types of naturally occurring litter with different nutrient content were placed out in the area and collected after different periods of time. Hypogastrura manubrialis was mainly found in the nutrient-rich litter of the yellowbush (Galenia africana), which responds positively to disturbance in the form of overgrazing. This suggests that invasion may have been facilitated by a positive interaction with this grazing resistant plant. By contrast, indigenous Collembola were least abundant in yellowbush litter. Negative correlations between high abundance of H. manubrialis and the abundance and diversity of other species suggest that competitive interactions might underlie low abundance of these other species at the patch level. Group behavior enables H. manubrialis to utilize efficiently this ephemeral, high quality resource, and might improve its competitive ability. The results suggest that interactions among environmental change drivers may lead to unforeseen invasion effects. H. manubrialis is not likely to be very successful in un-grazed renosterveld, but in combination with grazing, favoring the nutrient-rich yellowbush, it may become highly invasive. Field manipulations are required to fully verify these conclusions.

  9. The influence of climate on species distribution over time and space during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, F.; Di Febbraro, M.; Melchionna, M.; Castiglione, S.; Saggese, F.; Serio, C.; Mondanaro, A.; Passaro, F.; Loy, A.; Raia, P.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the effect of climate on the composition of communities and its change over time and space is one of the major aims in ecology and paleoecology. Herein, we tackled on this issue by studying late Quaternary large mammal paleocommunities of Eurasia. The late Quaternary was a period of strong environmental instability, especially characterized by the occurrence of the last glacial maximum (LGM). We used community phylogenetics and joint species distribution models in order to understand the factors determining paleocommunity composition in the late Quaternary. Our results support the existence of strong climatic selection operating on the LGM fauna, both through the disappearance of warm-adapted species such as Elephas antiquus, Hippopothamus amphibious, and Stephanorhinus hemitoechus, and by setting the stage for the existence of a community characterized by cold-adapted large mammals. Patterns of abundance in the fossil record, co-occurrence between species pairs, and the extent of climatic forcing on faunal composition, differ between paleocommunities, but not between extinct and extant species, which is consistent with the idea that climate change, rather than the presence of humans, exerted a major effect on the survival of the late Quaternary megafauna.

  10. Species concepts and species delimitation.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz, Kevin

    2007-12-01

    The issue of species delimitation has long been confused with that of species conceptualization, leading to a half century of controversy concerning both the definition of the species category and methods for inferring the boundaries and numbers of species. Alternative species concepts agree in treating existence as a separately evolving metapopulation lineage as the primary defining property of the species category, but they disagree in adopting different properties acquired by lineages during the course of divergence (e.g., intrinsic reproductive isolation, diagnosability, monophyly) as secondary defining properties (secondary species criteria). A unified species concept can be achieved by treating existence as a separately evolving metapopulation lineage as the only necessary property of species and the former secondary species criteria as different lines of evidence (operational criteria) relevant to assessing lineage separation. This unified concept of species has several consequences for species delimitation, including the following: First, the issues of species conceptualization and species delimitation are clearly separated; the former secondary species criteria are no longer considered relevant to species conceptualization but only to species delimitation. Second, all of the properties formerly treated as secondary species criteria are relevant to species delimitation to the extent that they provide evidence of lineage separation. Third, the presence of any one of the properties (if appropriately interpreted) is evidence for the existence of a species, though more properties and thus more lines of evidence are associated with a higher degree of corroboration. Fourth, and perhaps most significantly, a unified species concept shifts emphasis away from the traditional species criteria, encouraging biologists to develop new methods of species delimitation that are not tied to those properties.

  11. Short-term oral toxicity study of FAVOR PAC in rats.

    PubMed

    Haselbach, J; Hey, S; Berner, T

    2000-12-01

    A short-term rat feeding study was conducted to evaluate the oral toxicity of FAVOR PAC (CAS Registry No. 9003-04-7), one member of a family of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate polymers developed by Stockhausen GmbH & Co KG (Krefeld, Germany). FAVOR polymers are classified as superabsorbent polymers because of their ability to absorb and retain large volumes of fluid. In this short-term study, three groups of 10 male and 10 female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 0 (control), 1, or 5% FAVOR PAC in the diet daily for up to 32 days. No significant changes in clinical signs, body weight and food consumption, functional observation battery results, ophthalmoscopy, hematology and clinical chemistries, or absolute and relative organ weights were observed. Significant differences between treated and control animals were limited to increases in water consumption and modifications in urinary ionic excretion. Both findings were likely the result of the relatively high concentration of sodium in the test article, and thus consistent with adaptive physiologic changes, not overt toxicity. In conclusion, levels of up to 5% FAVOR PAC in the diet produced no treatment-related toxicity in rats under the conditions of this short-term test (i.e., a NOAEL of 5% FAVOR PAC in the diet was identified).

  12. Intraspecific variation and species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, Jeremy W; Dushoff, Jonathan; Levin, Simon A; Pacala, Stephen W

    2007-12-01

    We use a two-species model of plant competition to explore the effect of intraspecific variation on community dynamics. The competitive ability ("performance") of each individual is assigned by an independent random draw from a species-specific probability distribution. If the density of individuals competing for open space is high (e.g., because fecundity is high), species with high maximum (or large variance in) performance are favored, while if density is low, species with high typical (e.g., mean) performance are favored. If there is an interspecific mean-variance performance trade-off, stable coexistence can occur across a limited range of intermediate densities, but the stabilizing effect of this trade-off appears to be weak. In the absence of this trade-off, one species is superior. In this case, intraspecific variation can blur interspecific differences (i.e., shift the dynamics toward what would be expected in the neutral case), but the strength of this effect diminishes as competitor density increases. If density is sufficiently high, the inferior species is driven to extinction just as rapidly as in the case where there is no overlap in performance between species. Intraspecific variation can facilitate coexistence, but this may be relatively unimportant in maintaining diversity in most real communities.

  13. Phytoplasma infection of a tropical root crop triggers bottom-up cascades by favoring generalist over specialist herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, Ignazio; Burra, Dharani Dhar; Walter, Abigail Jan

    2017-01-01

    Global interest on plant-microbe-insect interactions is rapidly growing, revealing the multiple ways in which microorganisms mediate plant-herbivore interactions. Phytopathogens regularly alter whole repertoires of plant phenotypic traits, and bring about shifts in key chemical or morphological characteristics of plant hosts. Pathogens can also cause cascading effects on higher trophic levels, and eventually shape entire plant-associated arthropod communities. We tested the hypothesis that a Candidatus Phytoplasma causing cassava witches’ broom (CWB) on cassava (Manihot esculenta Grantz) is altering species composition of invasive herbivores and their associated parasitic hymenopterans. We conducted observational studies in cassava fields in eastern Cambodia to assess the effect of CWB infection on abundance of specialist and generalist mealybugs (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae), and associated primary and hyper-parasitoid species. CWB infection positively affects overall mealybug abundance and species richness at a plant- and field-level, and disproportionately favors a generalist mealybug over a specialist feeder. CWB phytoplasma infection led to increased parasitoid richness and diversity, with richness of ‘comparative’ specialist taxa being the most significantly affected. Parasitism rate did not differ among infected and uninfected plants, and mealybug host suppression was not impacted. CWB phytoplasma modifies host plant quality for sap-feeding homopterans, differentially affects success rates of two invasive species, and generates niche opportunities for higher trophic orders. By doing so, a Candidatus phytoplasma affects broader food web structure and functioning, and assumes the role of an ecosystem engineer. Our work unveils key facets of phytoplasma ecology, and sheds light upon complex multi-trophic interactions mediated by an emerging phytopathogen. These findings have further implications for invasion ecology and management. PMID:28813469

  14. Effects of Maternal Mental Health on Engagement in Favorable Health Practices During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Ayres, Lauren; DePriest, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A woman’s health practices during pregnancy are associated with maternal and neonatal outcomes. Yet limited research has examined predictors of a woman’s engagement in favorable health practices, particularly in pregnant women at greatest risk for adverse outcomes. We examined the role of mental health on engagement in favorable health practices during pregnancy in a sample of pregnant, low-income, predominantly African American women. Methods A convenience sample of pregnant women was obtained from 3 obstetric clinics within a large Mid-Atlantic academic health system. Pregnant women (N = 166) completed measures of depression, social support, and engagement in favorable health practices during their second trimester. Six domains of health practices (ie, balance of rest and exercise, safety measures, nutrition, substance use, health care access, access to pregnancy-related information) were assessed by the Health Practices in Pregnancy Questionnaire-II. Multiple linear regression was used to examine predictors of engagement in favorable health practices. Results Fifty-nine percent of the study participants experienced depressive symptomatology during pregnancy. Multivariate linear regression modeling demonstrated that increased depressive symptoms, decreased social support, young age, and prepregnancy overweight or obesity were significant predictors of nonengagement in favorable health practices during pregnancy. Discussion Findings suggest that pregnant women with poor mental health (eg, depressive symptomatology, poor social support) and specific sociodemographic characteristics (eg, young age, prepregnancy overweight or obesity) were less likely to engage in favorable health practices during pregnancy. Health care providers are uniquely positioned to assess a woman’s mental health and related indicators to optimize pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:26849176

  15. ASPECTS is a predictor of favorable CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Shadi; Bianchi, Nicholas; Amole, Adewumi; Hinduja, Archana

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is used by some stroke centers to stratify stroke patients who may potentially benefit from endovascular treatment. Our aim is to identify predictors of a favorable CTP in acute ischemic stroke patients evaluated within 8h from symptoms onset for possible endovascular treatment. We reviewed records of patients who had CTP studies between August 2010 and September 2012. We included all patients with anterior circulation strokes with evidence of large vessel disease. All patients had CT head and CT angiography head and neck as part of our protocol. Favorable CTP was defined as core infarct size less than one third the middle cerebral artery distribution and penumbra>20% of infarct size. The patients were divided into two groups based on favorable CTP or not. Baseline characteristics, time parameters, laboratory data and radiological data were compared between both groups. For statistical analysis, we used independent and Fisher's exact tests and a multivariate logistic regression model. During this period, 60 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients with favorable CTP were likely to be ≥ 80 years (33% vs 9%, P = 0.026), have Alberta Stroke Program early CT score (ASPECTS) > 7 (81% v. 21%, P ≤ 0.001) and lower mean time from symptom onset to CTP (234 ± 91 vs 305 ± 122, P = 0.015). On regression analysis, ASPECTS was the only independent predictor of a favorable CTP (OR = 16.2, CI: 4.3-62.2, P < 0.001). ASPECT score may be used as a tool to predict a favorable CTP. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Ratings of characteristics of ethnic groups by authoritarians and nonauthoritarians when stereotypes vary in favorability.

    PubMed

    Raden, David

    2002-12-01

    White non-Jewish participants in the 1990 General Social Survey with low scores on Tolerance of deviation ("Intolerant"), a measure of authoritarianism, rated African Americans more unfavorably than did Tolerant respondents on two traits, intelligence and laziness, when stereotypes about the latter group are unfavorable. But the Intolerant were not more negative in their evaluations than the Tolerant when Jews, a group for whom the stereotypes on these traits are favorable, were rated. The Intolerant rated Jews more favorably on intelligence, and their ratings of laziness did not differ from those by the Tolerant.

  17. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, John

    2014-08-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches.

  18. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    PubMed Central

    Markham, John

    2014-01-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches. PMID:25110113

  19. Biochemical adaptations of notothenioid fishes: comparisons between cold temperate South American and New Zealand species and Antarctic species.

    PubMed

    Petricorena, Zulema L Coppes; Somero, George N

    2007-07-01

    Fishes of the perciform suborder Notothenioidei afford an excellent opportunity for studying the evolution and functional importance of diverse types of biochemical adaptation to temperature. Antarctic notothenioids have evolved numerous biochemical adaptations to stably cold waters, including antifreeze glycoproteins, which inhibit growth of ice crystals, and enzymatic proteins with cold-adapted specific activities (k(cat) values) and substrate binding abilities (K(m) values), which support metabolism at low temperatures. Antarctic notothenioids also exhibit the loss of certain biochemical traits that are ubiquitous in other fishes, including the heat-shock response (HSR) and, in members of the family Channichthyidae, hemoglobins and myoglobins. Tolerance of warm temperatures is also truncated in stenothermal Antarctic notothenioids. In contrast to Antarctic notothenioids, notothenioid species found in South American and New Zealand waters have biochemistries more reflective of cold-temperate environments. Some of the contemporary non-Antarctic notothenioids likely derive from ancestral species that evolved in the Antarctic and later "escaped" to lower latitude waters when the Antarctic Polar Front temporarily shifted northward during the late Miocene. Studies of cold-temperate notothenioids may enable the timing of critical events in the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids to be determined, notably the chronology of acquisition and amplification of antifreeze glycoprotein genes and the loss of the HSR. Genomic studies may reveal how the gene regulatory networks involved in acclimation to temperature differ between stenotherms like the Antarctic notothenioids and more eurythermal species like cold-temperate notothenioids. Comparative studies of Antarctic and cold-temperate notothenioids thus have high promise for revealing the mechanisms by which temperature-adaptive biochemical traits are acquired - or through which traits that cease to be of advantage under

  20. Invasive Species

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  1. Perceptions of Female and Male Comic Strip Characters II: Favorability and Identification are Different Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potkay, Charles R.; Potkay, Catherine E.

    1984-01-01

    Identification ratings of 20 comic strip characters replicated a prediction that male characters would elicit greater identification, even though previous research showed that female characters are seen in an equivalent or more favorable light than male characters. Significant interaction findings also affirmed a great degree of same sex…

  2. Correlates of Perceived Favorability of Online Courses for Quantitative versus Qualitative Undergraduate Business Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary; Pred, Robert; Drennan, Rob B., Jr.; Kapanjie, Darin

    2016-01-01

    An online survey tested the association among background, technological, and course-related variables with perceived favorability of online courses for two independent samples of fall 2015 and spring 2016 business undergraduates taking at least one online or hybrid course. Results showed that perceived learning was a consistent positive correlate…

  3. 49 CFR 805.735-5 - Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Members or employees. 805.735-5 Section 805.735-5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT § 805.735-5 Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees. (a) Except as provided in...

  4. Does Favorable Selection Among Medicare Advantage Enrollees Affect Measurement of Hospital Readmission Rates?

    PubMed

    Wong, Edwin S; Hebert, Paul L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Perkins, Mark; Bryson, Chris L; Au, David H; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2014-08-01

    Literature indicates favorable selection among Medicare Advantage (MA) enrollees compared with fee-for-service (FFS) enrollees. This study examined whether favorable selection into MA affected readmission rates among Medicare-eligible veterans following hospitalization for congestive heart failure in the Veterans Affairs Health System (VA). We measured total (VA + Medicare FFS) 30-day all-cause readmission rates across hospitals and all of VA. We used Heckman's correction to adjust readmission rates to be representative of all Medicare-eligible veterans, not just FFS-enrolled veterans. The adjusted all-cause readmission rate among FFS veterans was 27.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 26.5% to 27.7%), while the adjusted readmission rate among Medicare-eligible veterans was 25.3% (95% CI = 23.6% to 27.1%) after correcting for favorable selection. Readmission rate estimates among FFS veterans generalize to all Medicare-eligible veterans only after accounting for favorable selection into MA. Estimation of quality metrics should carefully consider sample selection to produce valid policy inferences.

  5. Intercultural Attitudes Predict Favorable Study Abroad Expectations of U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Randi I.; Goldstein, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on identifying intercultural attitudes associated with favorable expectations about participation in study abroad programs. A total of 282 U.S. 1st-year college students completed a questionnaire that included measures of ethnocentrism, intercultural communication apprehension, language interest and competence, prejudice,…

  6. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  7. 41 CFR 101-39.404 - Claims in favor of the Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.404 Claims in favor of..., the agency responsible for investigating the accident shall submit all original documents and data pertaining to the accident and its investigation to the servicing GSA IFMS fleet management center. The GSA...

  8. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  9. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  10. Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

    2004-01-01

    An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

  11. Biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius favored by a competence-stimulating signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Fernanda C; Pecharki, Daniele; Scheie, Anne A

    2004-09-01

    Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate population behavior. In several streptococci, quorum sensing mediated by competence-stimulating peptides (CSP) is associated with development of competence for transformation. We show here that a synthetic CSP favored the biofilm mode of growth of Streptococcus intermedius without affecting the rate of culture growth.

  12. 45 CFR 1303.22 - Decision on appeal in favor of grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Decision on appeal in favor of grantee. 1303.22 Section 1303.22 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH...

  13. 49 CFR 805.735-5 - Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Members or employees. 805.735-5 Section 805.735-5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT § 805.735-5 Receipt of gifts, entertainment, and favors by Members or employees. (a) Except as provided in...

  14. Ability of Schizophrenic Women to Create a Favorable or Unfavorable Impression on an Interviewer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Fredda S.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The most striking finding is that schizophrenic women appear capable of creating, at will, favorable or unfavorable impressions. These results support the idea that schizophrenics can be effective in some social situations. The existance of individual differences in schizophrenic women's interpersonal skills was only partially supported.…

  15. Challenging the Courtesy Bias Interpretation of Favorable Clients' Perceptions of Family Planning Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Len, Federico R.; Lundgren, Rebecka; Huapaya, Ana; Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Favorable client perceptions of provider's interpersonal behavior in contraceptive delivery, documented in clinic exit questionnaires, appear to contradict results from qualitative evaluations and are attributed to clients' courtesy bias. In this study, trained simulated clients requested services from Ministry of Health providers in three…

  16. The Art of the Favor: The Connection between Networking and Personal Influence within a College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses various strategies for utilizing favors as a means for developing a personal powerbase and influencing individuals within a college setting. Building a personal network of influence centers upon effectively utilizing various strategies including; learning how to control the budget, how to empower others, when to compromise…

  17. CVT-4325: a potent fatty acid oxidation inhibitor with favorable oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Elzein, Elfatih; Ibrahim, Prabha; Koltun, Dmitry O; Rehder, Ken; Shenk, Kevin D; Marquart, Timothy A; Jiang, Bob; Li, Xiaofen; Natero, Reina; Li, Yuan; Nguyen, Marie; Kerwar, Suresh; Chu, Nancy; Soohoo, Daniel; Hao, Jia; Maydanik, Victoria Y; Lustig, David A; Zeng, Dewan; Leung, Kwan; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2004-12-20

    New inhibitors of palmitoyl-CoA oxidation are based on the introduction of nitrogen heterocycles in the 'Western Portion' of the molecule. SAR studies led to the discovery of CVT-4325 (shown), a potent FOXi (IC50=380 nM rat mitochondria) with favorable PK properties (F=93%, t(1/2)=13.6h, dog).

  18. Correlates of Perceived Favorability of Online Courses for Quantitative versus Qualitative Undergraduate Business Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary; Pred, Robert; Drennan, Rob B., Jr.; Kapanjie, Darin

    2016-01-01

    An online survey tested the association among background, technological, and course-related variables with perceived favorability of online courses for two independent samples of fall 2015 and spring 2016 business undergraduates taking at least one online or hybrid course. Results showed that perceived learning was a consistent positive correlate…

  19. Frequency Affects Object Relative Clause Processing: Some Evidence in Favor of Usage-Based Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reali, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    The processing difficulty of nested grammatical structure has been explained by different psycholinguistic theories. Here I provide corpus and behavioral evidence in favor of usage-based models, focusing on the case of object relative clauses in Spanish as a first language. A corpus analysis of spoken Spanish reveals that, as in English, the…

  20. Monetary favors and their influence on neural responses and revealed preference

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ann H.; Kirk, Ulrich; Denfield, George H.; Montague, P. Read

    2010-01-01

    Favors from a sender to a receiver are known to bias decisions made by the recipient, especially when the decision relates to the sender – a feature of social exchange known as reciprocity. Using an art-viewing paradigm possessing no objectively correct answer for preferring one piece of art over another, we show that sponsorship of the experiment by a company endows the company’s logo with the capacity to bias revealed preference for art displayed next to the logo. Merely offering to sponsor the experiment similarly endowed the gesturing company’s logo with the capacity to bias revealed preferences. These effects do not depend upon the size of the displayed art or the proximity of the sponsoring logo to the piece of art. We used fMRI to show that such monetary favors do not modulate a special collection of brain responses, but instead modulate responses in neural networks normally activated by a wide range of preference judgments. The results raise the important possibility that monetary favors bias judgments in domains seemingly unrelated to the favor, but nevertheless act in an implicit way through neural networks that underlie normal, ongoing preference judgments. PMID:20631188

  1. Challenging the Courtesy Bias Interpretation of Favorable Clients' Perceptions of Family Planning Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Len, Federico R.; Lundgren, Rebecka; Huapaya, Ana; Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Favorable client perceptions of provider's interpersonal behavior in contraceptive delivery, documented in clinic exit questionnaires, appear to contradict results from qualitative evaluations and are attributed to clients' courtesy bias. In this study, trained simulated clients requested services from Ministry of Health providers in three…

  2. Frequency Affects Object Relative Clause Processing: Some Evidence in Favor of Usage-Based Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reali, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    The processing difficulty of nested grammatical structure has been explained by different psycholinguistic theories. Here I provide corpus and behavioral evidence in favor of usage-based models, focusing on the case of object relative clauses in Spanish as a first language. A corpus analysis of spoken Spanish reveals that, as in English, the…

  3. Monetary favors and their influence on neural responses and revealed preference.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ann H; Kirk, Ulrich; Denfield, George H; Montague, P Read

    2010-07-14

    Favors from a sender to a receiver are known to bias decisions made by the recipient, especially when the decision relates to the sender, a feature of social exchange known as reciprocity. Using an art-viewing paradigm possessing no objectively correct answer for preferring one piece of art over another, we show that sponsorship of the experiment by a company endows the logo of the company with the capacity to bias revealed preference for art displayed next to the logo. Merely offering to sponsor the experiment similarly endowed the gesturing logo of the company with the capacity to bias revealed preferences. These effects do not depend upon the size of the displayed art or the proximity of the sponsoring logo to the piece of art. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to show that such monetary favors do not modulate a special collection of brain responses but instead modulate responses in neural networks normally activated by a wide range of preference judgments. The results raise the important possibility that monetary favors bias judgments in domains seemingly unrelated to the favor but nevertheless act in an implicit way through neural networks that underlie normal, ongoing preference judgments.

  4. 48 CFR 53.301-275 - Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States. 53.301-275 Section 53.301-275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-275...

  5. 48 CFR 53.301-275 - Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States. 53.301-275 Section 53.301-275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-275...

  6. 48 CFR 53.301-275 - Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States. 53.301-275 Section 53.301-275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-275...

  7. 48 CFR 53.301-275 - Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States. 53.301-275 Section 53.301-275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-275...

  8. 48 CFR 53.301-275 - Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reinsurance Agreement in Favor of the United States. 53.301-275 Section 53.301-275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-275...

  9. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 - License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS Pt. 740, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 740—License Exception ENC...

  10. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 - License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS Pt. 740, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 740—License Exception ENC...

  11. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 - License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS Pt. 740, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 740—License Exception ENC...

  12. 15 CFR Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 - License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false License Exception ENC Favorable Treatment Countries No. Supplement No. 3 to Part 740 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS Pt. 740, Supp. 3 Supplement No. 3 to Part 740—License Exception ENC...

  13. Colleges, Fighting U.S. Trade Proposal, Say It Favors For-Profit Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Describes how many colleges are opposing a U.S. plan that they say favors for-profit distance education. The proposal before the World Trade Organization asks member countries to begin formal negotiations to reduce barriers that keep higher education institutions from offering courses in other countries. (EV)

  14. Refugial isolation and divergence in the Narrowheaded Gartersnake species complex (Thamnophis rufipunctatus) as revealed by multilocus DNA sequence data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Dustin A.; Vandergast, A.G.; Espinal, A. Lemos; Fisher, R.N.; Holycross, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Glacial–interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene are hypothesized as one of the foremost contributors to biological diversification. This is especially true for cold-adapted montane species, where range shifts have had a pronounced effect on population-level divergence. Gartersnakes of the Thamnophis rufipunctatus species complex are restricted to cold headwater streams in the highlands of the Sierra Madre Occidental and southwestern USA. We used coalescent and multilocus phylogenetic approaches to test whether genetic diversification of this montane-restricted species complex is consistent with two prevailing models of range fluctuation for species affected by Pleistocene climate changes. Our concatenated nuDNA and multilocus species analyses recovered evidence for the persistence of multiple lineages that are restricted geographically, despite a mtDNA signature consistent with either more recent connectivity (and introgression) or recent expansion (and incomplete lineage sorting). Divergence times estimated using a relaxed molecular clock and fossil calibrations fall within the Late Pleistocene, and zero gene flow scenarios among current geographically isolated lineages could not be rejected. These results suggest that increased climate shifts in the Late Pleistocene have driven diversification and current range retraction patterns and that the differences between markers reflect the stochasticity of gene lineages (i.e. ancestral polymorphism) rather than gene flow and introgression. These results have important implications for the conservation of T. rufipunctatus (sensu novo), which is restricted to two drainage systems in the southwestern US and has undergone a recent and dramatic decline.

  15. Refugial isolation and divergence in the Narrowheaded Gartersnake species complex (Thamnophis rufipunctatus) as revealed by multilocus DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wood, Dustin A; Vandergast, A G; Lemos Espinal, J A; Fisher, R N; Holycross, A T

    2011-09-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene are hypothesized as one of the foremost contributors to biological diversification. This is especially true for cold-adapted montane species, where range shifts have had a pronounced effect on population-level divergence. Gartersnakes of the Thamnophis rufipunctatus species complex are restricted to cold headwater streams in the highlands of the Sierra Madre Occidental and southwestern USA. We used coalescent and multilocus phylogenetic approaches to test whether genetic diversification of this montane-restricted species complex is consistent with two prevailing models of range fluctuation for species affected by Pleistocene climate changes. Our concatenated nuDNA and multilocus species analyses recovered evidence for the persistence of multiple lineages that are restricted geographically, despite a mtDNA signature consistent with either more recent connectivity (and introgression) or recent expansion (and incomplete lineage sorting). Divergence times estimated using a relaxed molecular clock and fossil calibrations fall within the Late Pleistocene, and zero gene flow scenarios among current geographically isolated lineages could not be rejected. These results suggest that increased climate shifts in the Late Pleistocene have driven diversification and current range retraction patterns and that the differences between markers reflect the stochasticity of gene lineages (i.e. ancestral polymorphism) rather than gene flow and introgression. These results have important implications for the conservation of T. rufipunctatus (sensu novo), which is restricted to two drainage systems in the southwestern US and has undergone a recent and dramatic decline. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. New Risk-Adjustment System Was Associated With Reduced Favorable Selection in Medicare Advantage

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Hsu, John; Newhouse, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Health plans participating in the Medicare managed care program, now called Medicare Advantage, have historically attracted healthier enrollees than the traditional fee-for-service program. Medicare Advantage plans have gained financially from this favorable risk selection because until recently Medicare payments to plans were adjusted only minimally for the clinical characteristics of enrollees, such that payments systematically exceeded costs for healthier enrollees and were systematically lower than costs for sicker enrollees. To address favorable selection in Medicare Advantage, a new risk-adjustment system adjusting plan payments for clinical diagnoses was phased in from 2004 to 2007. Also, a lock-in provision was instituted in 2006 and strengthened in 2007 to limit midyear disenrollment by Medicare Advantage enrollees, particularly those experiencing health declines whose disenrollment could benefit plans financially. To determine if these reforms were associated with intended reductions in favorable selection in Medicare Advantage, we compared self-reported utilization and health for Medicare Advantage vs. traditional Medicare beneficiaries and for those who switched into or out of Medicare Advantage vs. non-switchers both before and after these reforms were implemented. In 2001-2003, differences in utilization and health between these groups suggested favorable selection in Medicare Advantage. By 2006-2007, however, most differences were substantially narrowed, indicating reduced selection. For example, Medicare Advantage enrollees reported 17.7% lower utilization than traditional Medicare enrollees in 2001-2003 but 8.1% lower in 2006-2007. Similar risk-adjustment methods may help may help mitigate incentives for Accountable Care Organizations participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program and plans competing in health insurance exchanges to select patients with favorable clinical risks. PMID:23213147

  17. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Favorable and Aggressive Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Stacy; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Damber, Jan-Erik; Alukal, Joseph; Lambe, Mats; Stattin, Pär

    2017-05-01

    Purpose The association between exposure to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and prostate cancer risk is controversial. The objective was to examine this association through nationwide, population-based registry data. Methods We performed a nested case-control study in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden, which includes all 38,570 prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 2009 to 2012, and 192,838 age-matched men free of prostate cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to examine associations between TRT and risk of prostate cancer (overall, favorable, and aggressive). Results Two hundred eighty-four patients with prostate cancer (1%) and 1,378 control cases (1%) filled prescriptions for TRT. In multivariable analysis, no association was found between TRT and overall prostate cancer risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17). However, patients who received TRT had more favorable-risk prostate cancer (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.56) and a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.67). The increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer was already observed within the first year of TRT (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.34), whereas the lower risk of aggressive disease was observed after > 1 year of TRT (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.61). After adjusting for previous biopsy findings as an indicator of diagnostic activity, TRT remained significantly associated with more favorable-risk prostate cancer and lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Conclusion The early increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer among patients who received TRT suggests a detection bias, whereas the decrease in risk of aggressive prostate cancer is a novel finding that warrants further investigation.

  18. Evolutionary diversification of cryophilic Grylloblatta species (Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae) in alpine habitats of California

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Climate in alpine habitats has undergone extreme variation during Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs, resulting in repeated expansion and contraction of alpine glaciers. Many cold-adapted alpine species have responded to these climatic changes with long-distance range shifts. These species typically exhibit shallow genetic differentiation over a large geographical area. In contrast, poorly dispersing organisms often form species complexes within mountain ranges, such as the California endemic ice-crawlers (Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae: Grylloblatta). The diversification pattern of poorly dispersing species might provide more information on the localized effects of historical climate change, the importance of particular climatic events, as well as the history of dispersal. Here we use multi-locus genetic data to examine the phylogenetic relationships and geographic pattern of diversification in California Grylloblatta. Results Our analysis reveals a pattern of deep genetic subdivision among geographically isolated populations of Grylloblatta in California. Alpine populations diverged from low elevation populations and subsequently diversified. Using a Bayesian relaxed clock model and both uncalibrated and calibrated measurements of time to most recent common ancestor, we reconstruct the temporal diversification of alpine Grylloblatta populations. Based on calibrated relaxed clock estimates, evolutionary diversification of Grylloblatta occurred during the Pliocene-Pleistocene epochs, with an initial dispersal into California during the Pliocene and species diversification in alpine clades during the middle Pleistocene epoch. Conclusions Grylloblatta species exhibit a high degree of genetic subdivision in California with well defined geographic structure. Distinct glacial refugia can be inferred within the Sierra Nevada, corresponding to major, glaciated drainage basins. Low elevation populations are sister to alpine populations, suggesting alpine

  19. Current termination of resuscitation (TOR) guidelines predict neurologically favorable outcome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kajino, Kentaro; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Iwami, Taku; Daya, Mohamud; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Hiraide, Atsushi; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kishi, Masashi; Yamayoshi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear whether the basic life support (BLS) and advanced life support (ALS) pre-hospital termination of resuscitation (TOR) rules developed in North America can be applied successfully to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in other countries. To assess the performance of the BLS and ALS TOR in Japan. Retrospective nationwide, population-based, observational cohort study of consecutive OHCA patients with emergency responder resuscitation attempts from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2009 in Japan. The BLS TOR rule has 3 criteria whereas the ALS TOR rule includes 2 additional criteria. We extracted OHCA patients meeting all criteria for each TOR rule, and calculated the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of each TOR rule for identifying OHCA patients who did not have neurologically favorable one-month survival. During the study-period, 151,152 cases were available to evaluate the BLS TOR rule, and 137,986 cases to evaluate the ALS TOR rule. Of 113,140 patients that satisfied all three criteria for the BLS TOR rule, 193 (0.2%) had a neurologically favorable one-month survival. The specificity of BLS TOR rule was 0.968 (95% CI: 0.963-0.972), and the PPV was 0.998 (95% CI: 0.998-0.999) for predicting lack of neurologically favorable one-month survival. Of 41,030 patients that satisfied all five criteria for the ALS TOR rule, just 37 (0.1%) had a neurologically favorable one-month survival. The specificity of ALS TOR rule was 0.981 (95% CI: 0.973-0.986), and the PPV was 0.999 (95% CI: 0.998-0.999) for predicting lack of neurologically favorable one-month survival. The prehospital BLS and ALS TOR rules performed well in Japan with high specificity and PPV for predicting lack of neurologically favorable one-month survival in Japan. However, the specificity and PPV were not 1000 and we have to develop more specific TOR rules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Uricase alkaline enzymosomes with enhanced stabilities and anti-hyperuricemia effects induced by favorable microenvironmental changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Mi; He, Dan; Hu, Xueyuan; Xiong, Huarong; Wu, Jianyong; Zhu, Biyue; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme therapy is an effective strategy to treat diseases. Three strategies were pursued to provide the favorable microenvironments for uricase (UCU) to eventually improve its features: using the right type of buffer to constitute the liquid media where catalyze reactions take place; entrapping UCU inside the selectively permeable lipid vesicle membranes; and entrapping catalase together with UCU inside the membranes. The nanosized alkaline enzymosomes containing UCU/(UCU and catalase) (ESU/ESUC) in bicine buffer had better thermal, hypothermal, acid-base and proteolytic stabilities, in vitro and in vivo kinetic characteristics, and uric acid lowering effects. The favorable microenvironments were conducive to the establishment of the enzymosomes with superior properties. It was the first time that two therapeutic enzymes were simultaneously entrapped into one enzymosome having the right type of buffer to achieve added treatment efficacy. The development of ESU/ESUC in bicine buffer provides valuable tactics in hypouricemic therapy and enzymosomal application. PMID:26823332

  1. Detecting Two-Spirit erotics: The fiction of Carole laFavor.

    PubMed

    Tatonetti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the life and novels of Carole laFavor, arguing for her importance to and influence in Two-Spirit studies. Along with being a writer, laFavor was a powerful voice for social justice and Indigenous health sovereignty in Minnesota and the nation. Her two novels, Along the Journey River and Evil Dead Center, which both focus on Anishinaabe lesbian detective protagonist Renee LaRoche, are the first lesbian detective fiction published by a Native author. Renee's embrace of a specifically Two-Spirit erotics anchors her to family and brings her tribal community a powerful healing when she employs her skills to protect her people from instances of racism, abuse, and injustice. This article, then, reads these novels as the first of an emerging genre of texts that claim an overtly Two-Spirit erotic as well as vital precursors to the present embrace of sovereign erotics in Indigenous studies.

  2. Cytoskeleton-centric protein transportation by exosomes transforms tumor-favorable macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yizhi; Zhou, Yanlong; Yin, Xingfeng; Guo, Jiahui; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The exosome is a key initiator of pre-metastatic niche in numerous cancers, where macrophages serve as primary inducers of tumor microenvironment. However, the proteome that can be exosomally transported from cancer cells to macrophages has not been sufficiently characterized so far. Here, we used colorectal cancer (CRC) exosomes to educate tumor-favorable macrophages. With a SILAC-based mass spectrometry strategy, we successfully traced the proteome transported from CRC exosomes to macrophages. Such a proteome primarily focused on promoting cytoskeleton rearrangement, which was biologically validated with multiple cell lines. We reproduced the exosomal transportation of functional vimentin as a proof-of-concept example. In addition, we found that some CRC exosomes could be recognized by macrophages via Fc receptors. Therefore, we revealed the active and necessary role of exosomes secreted from CRC cells to transform cancer-favorable macrophages, with the cytoskeleton-centric proteins serving as the top functional unit. PMID:27602764

  3. Development of Discussion Supporting System Based on the "Value of Favorable Words' Influence"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Tetsuro; Seki, Kazuya; Matsui, Tatsunori; Okamoto, Toshio

    The importance of the WEB chat in discussion has been well known and used effectively in collaborative learning environment. In order to activate discussions, various functions such as identification of participants' roles, motivation to participate, and resolution of depressed discussions are needed. This research proposes the function to calculate the "values of favorable words' influence" on real time, which are estimated by member of participants' words and their transitive structures. In this paper, firstly we define the "values of favorable wards' influence" as an index for the active direction of discussion and the discussion model based on this index, secondly we introduce an architecture of the discussion supporting system based on this model and its performance and finally through some practical experiments we examine the validity and effectiveness of our discussion model.

  4. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  5. Perceived Distributive Fairness of EU Transfer Payments, Outcome Favorability, Identity, and EU-Tax Compliance.

    PubMed

    Hartner, Martina; Rechberger, Silvia; Kirchler, Erich; Wenzel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In a representative UK study (N = 1000) the link between distributive fairness perceptions, outcome favorability, identity, and tax compliance was researched in the context of European transfer payments. Results showed that both forms of tax compliance (i.e., individual and collective EU-tax compliance) were influenced by perceived distributive fairness judgments of EU transfer payments. Fairness itself was related to perceived outcome favorability (i.e., whether their own nation benefits from the EU in financial as well as socio-political terms). Additionally, national identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation, but not with Europe) perceived EU membership as unbeneficial in financial as well as in socio-political terms and thus considered the transfer payments as less fair. Dual identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation and with Europe) perceived the socio-political outcomes from EU membership as more beneficial and thus evaluated the transfer payments as fairer.

  6. Favorable Long-term Prognosis of Cataract Surgery in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kulbhushan Prakash; Mahajan, Deepti; Panwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Scleritis is a rare presentation of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complicated most commonly by iridocyclitis and raised intraocular pressure. These complications can recur in subsequent years, therefore they should be managed well. Case Report: We describe a female patient who developed scleritis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma 2 years after being diagnosed by HZO. Secondary glaucoma was managed medically, and the patient underwent extracapsular cataract extraction for the complicated cataract. Final visual acuity was 6/6 and IOP was 22.4 mm Hg. This is a rare report describing favorable long-term (>20 years) prognosis for surgical management of cataract associated with HZO together with scleritis, secondary glaucoma and post-herpetic neuralgia. Conclusion: A favorable outcome may be attained with surgery for complicated cataract associated with HZO if the condition is managed optimally and intraocular inflammation is well controlled. PMID:27413505

  7. Influences of Mental Illness Stigma on Perceptions of and Responses to Requests for Favors.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tatsuya; Dailey, René

    2016-07-01

    This article examines mental illness stigma effects on a request for a favor from a mentally ill individual. Four hundred and fourteen participants interacted with a hypothetical target on Facebook who was believed to have schizophrenia, depression, or a tooth cavity (i.e., the control group). Participants were asked to rate the favor request in terms of face threat, in addition to writing a response, which was then coded using message design logics. Results indicated that a request by a schizophrenic target threatened participants' positive face more significantly than that of a target with depression or without any mental illness. Participants' responses to the schizophrenic target were more likely to be conventional messages, whereas responses to the depressed target were more likely to be rhetorical messages. Theoretical and practical contributions are considered.

  8. A favorable effect of hydroxychloroquine on glucose and lipid metabolism beyond its anti-inflammatory role.

    PubMed

    Hage, Mirella P; Al-Badri, Marwa R; Azar, Sami T

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a commonly used antimalarial drug in rheumatic diseases, has shown favorable metabolic effects on both glucose control and lipid profiles. We describe a case of a young woman with type 1 diabetes whose glycemic control was optimized with the introduction of HCQ as a treatment for her Sjogren syndrome in addition to a subtle yet measurable improvement in her lipid profile. An increasing body of evidence supports the beneficial impacts of HCQ in various ancillary conditions, including diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. However, mechanisms of action responsible for these effects remain ill-defined and may include alterations in insulin metabolism and signaling through cellular receptors. These favorable metabolic effects of HCQ and further understanding of underlying mechanisms may provide an additional rational for its use in rheumatic diseases, conditions associated with an elevated cardiovascular risk.

  9. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, William D; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-08-07

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  10. Uricase alkaline enzymosomes with enhanced stabilities and anti-hyperuricemia effects induced by favorable microenvironmental changes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Mi; He, Dan; Hu, Xueyuan; Xiong, Huarong; Wu, Jianyong; Zhu, Biyue; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-01-29

    Enzyme therapy is an effective strategy to treat diseases. Three strategies were pursued to provide the favorable microenvironments for uricase (UCU) to eventually improve its features: using the right type of buffer to constitute the liquid media where catalyze reactions take place; entrapping UCU inside the selectively permeable lipid vesicle membranes; and entrapping catalase together with UCU inside the membranes. The nanosized alkaline enzymosomes containing UCU/(UCU and catalase) (ESU/ESUC) in bicine buffer had better thermal, hypothermal, acid-base and proteolytic stabilities, in vitro and in vivo kinetic characteristics, and uric acid lowering effects. The favorable microenvironments were conducive to the establishment of the enzymosomes with superior properties. It was the first time that two therapeutic enzymes were simultaneously entrapped into one enzymosome having the right type of buffer to achieve added treatment efficacy. The development of ESU/ESUC in bicine buffer provides valuable tactics in hypouricemic therapy and enzymosomal application.

  11. Preferential uptake of ribose by primitive cells might explain why RNA was favored over its analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wei, Chenyu

    perme-ation, even though it is non-negligibly populated in aqueous solution. The differences in free energy barrier between ribose and arabinose or xylose are due to stronger, highly cooperative, intramolecular interactions between consecutive exocyclic hydroxyl groups, which are stable in non-polar media, but rare in water. Most recently, we extended calculations of permeations to ribonucleosides and their anomers. We determined that, in contrast to sugars, permeation of membranes to these species is nearly identical. This is because sugars of nucleotides exist in the furanose rather than pyranose form. In this form intermolecular interactions between hydroxyl groups are not nearly as efficient for sterical reasons. Our results contribute to the discussion about autotrophic vs. heterotrophic origins of life. Chemical reactions inside protobiological vesicle required supply of organic material from the environment. What was the inventory of organics that must have been delivered to primitive cells is still being debated. According to the autotrophic hypothesis, ancestors of cells pro-duced complex organic molecules from simple substrates. In contrast, the heterotrophic model implies that protocells were able to utilize complex organics delivered from external sources. A possibility of sufficiently efficient uptake of molecules needed to build biopolymers provides an important argument supporting the heterotrophic hypothesis [3]. Viewed in the context of the "RNA world" hypothesis [4], which states that RNA molecules were the first biological poly-mers and acted as both catalysts of biochemical reactions and information storage systems, our results demonstrate that, in the absence of sophisticated mechanisms available to contemporary organisms for achieving selectivity during synthesis and transmembrane transport, preferential uptake of ribose by primitive cells might have provided a kinetic mechanism that favored its selective incorporation into nucleic acids and

  12. Experimental Investigation of a Supersonic Boundary Layer Including Favorable Pressure Gradient Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-21

    United States Government. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF A SUPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER INCLUDING FAVORABLE PRESSURE GRADIENT EFFECTS THESIS Presented to...flow to be disturbed from its original state . Aside from providing a non-intrusive method of measurement, LDV has the advantage of measuring the...providing some useful test of turbulence modeling. 4. Well-defined experimental boundary conditions: All incoming conditions (especially the state of

  13. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    PubMed

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley. Overall, small

  14. Domain expertise insulates against judgment bias by monetary favors through a modulation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Ulrich; Harvey, Ann; Montague, P. Read

    2011-01-01

    Recent work using an art-viewing paradigm shows that monetary sponsorship of the experiment by a company (a favor) increases the valuation of paintings placed next to the sponsoring corporate logo, an effect that correlates with modulation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC). We used the same art-viewing paradigm to test a prevailing idea in the domain of conflict-of-interest: that expertise in a domain insulates against judgment bias even in the presence of a monetary favor. Using a cohort of art experts, we show that monetary favors do not bias the experts’ valuation of art, an effect that correlates with a lack of modulation of the VMPFC across sponsorship conditions. The lack of sponsorship effect in the VMPFC suggests the hypothesis that their brains remove the behavioral sponsorship effect by censoring sponsorship-dependent modulation of VMPFC activity. We tested the hypothesis that prefrontal regions play a regulatory role in mediating the sponsorship effect. We show that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is recruited in the expert group. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis in nonexpert controls by contrasting brain responses in controls who did not show a sponsorship effect to controls who did. Changes in effective connectivity between the DLPFC and VMPFC were greater in nonexpert controls, with an absence of the sponsorship effect relative to those with a presence of the sponsorship effect. The role of the DLPFC in cognitive control and emotion regulation suggests that it removes the influence of a monetary favor by controlling responses in known valuation regions of the brain including the the VMPFC. PMID:21646526

  15. [Caroli's syndrome. Report of a case beginning in childhood with favorable course].

    PubMed

    Rivero, M J; Román, E; Cilleruelo, M L; Sánchez, F; Barrio, J

    2000-07-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare entity that is included in the fibropolycystic abnormalities of the bile ducts. Ultrasonographic patterns consist of evident dilatation of the bile ducts. Although it is thought to be a congenital disease, it usually presents in young adults and few cases have been reported in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with Caroli's syndrome (Caroli's disease, congenital hepatic fibrosis and polycystic renal disease). Evolution was favorable.

  16. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism

    PubMed Central

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O’Malley. Overall

  17. Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Erin P; Mo, Jun; Yoon, Janet M

    2015-11-01

    Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is most commonly associated with malignancy, infection, or an underlying autoimmune disorder. Malignancy-associated hemophagocytic syndrome is responsible for most secondary HLH cases, but it has not been well described in children. We present a case of a 4-year-old female with favorable histology of Wilms tumor who developed secondary HLH after unsuccessful resection of the tumor and initiation of chemotherapy.

  18. [Comparison of the quick Gram stain method to the B&M modified and favor methods].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kayo; Kataoka, Nobumasa; Maruo, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The Gram stain is an established method for bacterial identification, but the time needed to carry out this stain is 2-3 min. We attempted to shorten this time and stained a total of 70 clinical specimens isolated from using the Bartholomew & Mittwer (B&M) modified or Favor methods with a 3 s duration for washing and staining steps. Results were plotted and analyzed using a Hue Saturation Intensity (HSI) model. The range based on a plot of the two methods with the HSI model was presented as a reference interval. Our results indicated that 100% (35/35) of strains were Gram positive and 97.1% (34/35) were Gram negative for the quick B&M modified method. In the quick Favor method, 80.0% (28/35) were Gram positive and 68.6% (24/35) of strains were Gram negative. We propose that the quick B&M modified method is equivalent to the standard Gram staining method and is superior to the quick Favor method.

  19. Favorable prognosis for children with Pfeiffer syndrome types 2 and 3: implications for classification.

    PubMed

    Robin, N H; Scott, J A; Arnold, J E; Goldstein, J A; Shilling, B B; Marion, R W; Cohen, M M

    1998-01-23

    Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) is an autosomal dominant condition comprising bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia with a beaked nasal tip, and broad and medially deviated thumbs and great toes. It is a clinically variable disorder and has been divided into three subtypes [Cohen, 1993: Am J Med Genet 45:300-307]. Type 1 represents the less severe cases, while types 2 and 3 are the more severe cases. These latter types tend to have a higher risk for neurodevelopmental problems and a reduced life expectancy. Here we review the clinical course of seven children with PS type 3. All of these children had severe manifestations of PS; however, development was essentially normal in three, mild delay was noted in two, and moderate delay in one. Favorable outcomes in children with types 2 and 3 PS were also documented by Moore et al. [1995: Cleft Pal-Craniofac J 32:62-70]. These cases illustrate that while children with PS types 2 and 3 have an increased risk for neurodevelopmental difficulties, a favorable outcome can be achieved in some cases with aggressive medical and surgical management. Finally, although such management should be the rule for PS types 2 and 3, it needs to be remembered that normal outcome is not the rule. The prognosis for favorable neurodevelopmental outcome and/or life expectancy remains guarded in most cases.

  20. Some features of surface pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers with zero and favorable pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, B. E.; Simpson, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure fluctuation spectra, coherence and convective wave speeds from zero and favorable pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers are reported for momentum Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 18,800. The acceleration parameter K is near 2 x 10 to the -7 power for the favorable pressure gradient flow. The outer variables, U sub e, tau sub w and delta sub 1 non-dimensionalize and collapse the spectra for the low to middle range of frequencies for most test cases. The grouping using the inner variable, U sub tau and gamma, collapse the spectra for the middle to high range of frequencies for all test cases. The value of p'/tau sub w was near 3.8 and 2.8 for the smallest values of d+ in the zero and favorable pressure gradient flows, respectively. The coherence exhibits a decay that is not exponential in some cases, but the Corcos similarity parameters omega Delta x/U sub c and omega Delta z/U sub c collapse the data for all test cases. The ratio of U sub c/U sub e increases with omega delta sub 1/U sub e up to omega delta sub 1/U sub e on the order of unity, where U sub c/U sub e becomes nearly constant. This was observed in the present results for both streamwise pressure gradient flows. The experimental results presented show good agreement with previous research.

  1. Effects of Personality Disorders on Self-Other Agreement and Favorableness in Personality Descriptions.

    PubMed

    Tandler, Nancy; Mosch, Alice; Wolf, Annegret; Borkenau, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The authors studied effects of self-reported personality disorder (PD) symptoms on interpersonal perception, particularly self-other agreement and favorableness. Using a round-robin design, 52 groups of four well-acquainted students described themselves and each other on a measure of the Five-Factor model of personality and were administered a self-report screening instrument for DSM-IV (Axis 2). Using the Social Accuracy Model, the peer reports were predicted, across items, from either (a) the target person's self-reports plus the self-report item means, or (b) the items' social desirability. This resulted in separate coefficients for each peer-target dyad, indicating either self-other agreement or favorableness. These coefficients were then predicted from the PD scores of the target and the peer, using multilevel modeling. Main findings were that persons scoring high on PD measures agreed less with their peers on their unique personality characteristics, and that such persons were described by, and described their peers, less favorably.

  2. A Global Overview of the Impact of Peritoneal Dialysis First or Favored Policies: An Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Frank Xiaoqing; Gao, Xin; Inglese, Gary; Chuengsaman, Piyatida; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Yu, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Given the ever-increasing burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a global milieu of limited financial and health resources, interested parties continue to search for ways to optimize dialysis access. Government and payer initiatives to increase access to renal replacement therapies (RRTs), particularly peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD), may have meaningful impacts from clinical and health-economic perspectives; and despite similar clinical and humanistic outcomes between the two dialysis modalities, PD may be the more convenient and resource-conscious option. This review assessed country-specific PD-First/Favored policies and their associated background, implementation, and outcomes. It was found that barriers to policy-implementation are broadly associated with government policy, economics, provider or healthcare professional education, modality-related factors, and patient-related factors. Notably, the success of a given country's PD-Favored policy was inversely associated with the extent of HD infrastructure. It is hoped that this review will provide a foundation across countries to share lessons learned during the development and implementation of PD-First/Favored policies. PMID:25082840

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists favorably address all components of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sanjay; Ghosal, Samit; Chatterjee, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular death is the leading cause of mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The etiology of cardiovascular disease in diabetes may be divided into hyperglycemia per se and factors operating through components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Hyperglycemia causes direct injury to vascular endothelium and possibly on cardiac myocytes. MetS is a cluster of risk factors like obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The incidence of this syndrome is rising globally. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) are a group of drugs, which address all components of this syndrome favorably. Experimental evidence suggests that they have favorable actions on myocardium as well. Several compounds belonging to GLP-1RA class are in market now and a large number awaiting their entry. Although, originally this class of drugs emerged as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, more recent data generated revealed beneficial effects on multiple metabolic parameters. We have studied literature published between 2000 and 2016 to look into effects of GLP-1RA on components of MetS. Results from recently concluded clinical trials suggest that some of the molecules in this class may have favorable effects on cardiovascular outcome. PMID:27795818

  4. Global health actors no longer in favor of user fees: a documentary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the advent of health user fees in low- and middle-income countries in the 1980s, the discourse of global health actors (GHAs) has changed to the disadvantage of this type of healthcare financing mechanism. The aim of the study was to identify and analyze the stance of GHAs in the debate on user fees. Methods We conducted documentary research using public documents published by and officially attributed to GHAs from 2005 to 2011. We categorized GHAs into four groups: intergovernmental organizations, international non-governmental organizations, government agencies, and working groups and networks. We then classified the GHAs according to their stance relative to the abolition of user fees, and conducted a thematic analysis of their discourse to understand the arguments used by each GHA to justify its stance. Results We identified 56 GHAs, for which we analyzed 140 documents. Among them, 55% were in favor of the abolition of user fees or in favor of free care at the point of delivery. None of the GHAs stated that they were in favor of user fees; however, 30% did not take a stand. Only the World Bank declares that it is both in favor of user fees and in favor of free care at point of service. GHAs generally circumscribe their stance to specific populations (pregnant women, children under 5 years, etc.) or to specific health services (primary, basic, essential). Three types of arguments are used by GHAs to justify their stance: economic, moral and ethical, and pragmatic. Conclusions The principle of “user pays” seems to have fizzled. Production and dissemination of evidence, as well as certain advocacy networks, may have contributed to this change in discourse. However, GHAs should go a step further and translate their words into action, so that free healthcare at the point of delivery becomes a reality in low- and middle-income countries. They should provide technical and financial support to those countries that have chosen to implement user fee

  5. Elongated TCR alpha chain CDR3 favors an altered CD4 cytokine profile

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background CD4 T lymphocyte activation requires T cell receptor (TCR) engagement by peptide/MHC (major histocompatibility complex) (pMHC). The TCR complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) contains variable α and β loops critical for pMHC recognition. During any immune response, tuning of TCR usage through progressive clonal selection occurs. Th1 and Th2 cells operate at different avidities for activation and display distinct transcriptional programs, although polarization may be plastic, influenced by pathogens and cytokines. We therefore hypothesized that CDR3αβ sequence features may intrinsically influence CD4 phenotype during progression of a response. Results We show that CD4 polarization involves distinct CDR3α usage: Th1 and Th17 cells favored short TCR CDR3α sequences of 12 and 11 amino acids, respectively, while Th2 cells favored elongated CDR3α loops of 14 amino acids, with lower predicted affinity. The dominant Th2- and Th1-derived TCRα sequences with14 amino acid CDR3 loops and 12 amino acid CDR3 loops, respectively, were expressed in TCR transgenics. The functional impact of these TCRα transgenes was assessed after in vivo priming with a peptide/adjuvant. The short, Th1-derived receptor transgenic T cell lines made IFNγ, but not IL-4, 5 or 13, while the elongated, Th2-derived receptor transgenic T cell lines made little or no IFNγ, but increased IL-4, 5 and 13 with progressive re-stimulations, mirrored by GATA-3 up-regulation. T cells from primed Th2 TCRα transgenics selected dominant TCR Vβ expansions, allowing us to generate TCRαβ transgenics carrying the favored, Th2-derived receptor heterodimer. Primed T cells from TCRαβ transgenics made little or no IL-17 or IFNγ, but favored IL-9 after priming with Complete Freund’s adjuvant and IL-4, 5, 9, 10 and 13 after priming with incomplete Freund’s. In tetramer-binding studies, this transgenic receptor showed low binding avidity for pMHC and polarized T cell lines show TCR avidity

  6. Prehospital Intubation is Associated with Favorable Outcomes and Lower Mortality in ProTECT III.

    PubMed

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Nuño, Tomas; Pauls, Qi; Yeatts, Sharon D; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y; Merck, Lisa H; Manley, Geoff T; Wright, David W

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes more than 2.5 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or deaths annually. Prehospital endotracheal intubation has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with TBI in several retrospective observational studies. We evaluated the relationship between prehospital intubation, functional outcomes, and mortality using high quality data on clinical practice collected prospectively during a randomized multicenter clinical trial. ProTECT III was a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of early administration of progesterone in 882 patients with acute moderate to severe nonpenetrating TBI. Patients were excluded if they had an index GCS of 3 and nonreactive pupils, those with withdrawal of life support on arrival, and if they had documented prolonged hypotension and/or hypoxia. Prehospital intubation was performed as per local clinical protocol in each participating EMS system. Models for favorable outcome and mortality included prehospital intubation, method of transport, index GCS, age, race, and ethnicity as independent variables. Significance was set at α = 0.05. Favorable outcome was defined by a stratified dichotomy of the GOS-E scores in which the definition of favorable outcome depended on the severity of the initial injury. Favorable outcome was more frequent in the 349 subjects with prehospital intubation (57.3%) than in the other 533 patients (46.0%, p = 0.003). Mortality was also lower in the prehospital intubation group (13.8% v. 19.5%, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis of prehospital intubation and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed that odds of dying for those with prehospital intubation were 47% lower than for those that were not intubated (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.36-0.78). 279 patients with prehospital intubation were transported by air. Modeling transport method and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed increased odds of dying in those transported by ground

  7. Selection through male function favors smaller floral display size in the common morning glory Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer A; Miller, Richard E; Rausher, Mark D

    2008-07-01

    In self-compatible, hermaphroditic plants, display size-the number of flowers open on a plant at one time-is believed to be influenced by trade-offs between increasing geitonogamous selfing and decreasing per-flower pollen export as display size increases. Experimental results presented here indicate that selection through male function favors smaller display sizes in Ipomoea purpurea. In small arrays, plant display size was manipulated experimentally, and female selfing rate, male outcross success, and total male fitness were estimated using genetic markers and likelihood and regression analyses. As would be expected if larger displays experience greater geitonogamy, selfing rate increased with display size. However, the per-flower amount of pollen exported to other plants decreased with display size. The magnitude of this effect is more than sufficient to offset the increase in selfing rate, resulting in reduced per-flower total male fitness with increasing display size. The low values of inbreeding depression previously reported for this species would enhance this effect.

  8. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuanyu; VanRaden, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear weights based on square root of frequency of the favorable allele. The new formulas included a parameter δ to balance long- and short-term progress; one used square root and the other used simple linear weights. The formulas were tested by simulation of 20 generations (population size of 3,000 for each generation) with direct selection on 3,000 QTLs (100 per chromosome). A QTL distribution with normally distributed allele effects and a heavy-tailed distribution were tested. Optimum δ from simulation was applied to data from Holstein, Jersey and Brown Swiss dairy cattle to compare differences of adjusted and official genomic evaluations. From simulation, optimum δ was 0.4 for the heavy-tailed QTL distribution but only 0.1 or 0.2 for a normal distribution. The previous formula had slower response than unweighted selection in early generations and did not recover by generation 20. Long-term response was slightly greater with the new formulas than with unweighted selection; the linear formula may be best for routine use because of more progress in early generations compared to nonlinear formula. Official and adjusted U.S. evaluations based on actual genotypes and estimated marker effects were correlated by 0.994 for Holsteins and Jerseys and 0.989 for Brown Swiss using linear weighting of allele frequency, which was higher than nonlinear weighting. The difference between adjusted and official evaluations was highly correlated negatively with an animal's average genomic relationship to the population. Thus, strategies to reduce genomic inbreeding may achieve almost as much long-term progress as selection of favorable minor alleles.

  9. Molecular Crowding Favors Reactivity of a Human Ribozyme Under Physiological Ionic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Strulson, Christopher A.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Rambo, Robert P.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to relate RNA folding to function under cellular-like conditions, we monitored the self-cleavage reaction of the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-like CPEB3 ribozyme in the background of physiological ionic concentrations and various crowding and cosolute agents. We found that under physiological free Mg2+ concentrations (~0.1 to 0.5 mM Mg2+), both crowders and cosolutes stimulate the rate of self-cleavage, up to ~6-fold, but that in 10 mM Mg2+—conditions widely used for in vitro ribozyme studies—these same additives have virtually no effect on self-cleavage rate. We further observe a dependence of self-cleavage rate on crowder size, wherein rate stimulation is diminished for crowders larger than the size of the unfolded RNA. Monitoring effects of crowding and cosolute agents on rates in biological amounts of urea revealed additive-promoted increases in both low and high Mg2+ concentrations, with a maximal stimulation of more than 10-fold and a rescue of the rate to its urea-free values. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments reveal a structural basis for this stimulation in that higher molecular weight crowding agents favor a more compact form of the ribozyme in 0.5 mM Mg2+ that is essentially equivalent to the form under standard ribozyme conditions of 10 mM Mg2+ and no crowder. This finding suggests that at least a portion of the rate enhancement arises from favoring the native RNA tertiary structure. We conclude that cellular-like crowding supports ribozyme reactivity by favoring a compact form of the ribozyme, but only under physiological ionic and cosolute conditions. PMID:24187989

  10. Partisan perspectives in the medical literature: a study of high frequency editorialists favoring hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Tatsioni, Athina; Siontis, George C M; Ioannidis, John P A

    2010-09-01

    Unfavorable results of major studies have led to a large shrinkage of the market for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the last 6 years. Some scientists continue to strongly support the use of HRT. We analyzed a sample of partisan editorializing articles on HRT to examine their arguments, the reporting of competing interests, the journal venues and their sponsoring societies. Through Thomson ISI database, we selected articles without primary data written by the five most prolific editorialists that addressed clinical topics pertaining to HRT and that were published in regular journal issues in 2002-2008. We recorded the number of articles with a partisan stance and their arguments, the number of partisan articles that reported conflicting interests, and the journal venues and their sponsoring societies publishing the partisan editorials. We analyzed 114 eligible articles (58 editorials, 16 guidelines, 37 reviews, 3 letters), of which 110 (96%) had a partisan stance favoring HRT. Typical arguments were benefits for menopausal and related symptoms (64.9%), criticism of unfavorable studies (78.9%), preclinical data that showed favorable effects of HRT (50%), and benefits for major outcomes such as osteoporosis and fractures (49.1%), cardiovascular disease (31.6%), dementia (24.6%) or colorectal cancer (20.2%), but also even breast cancer (4.4%). All 5 prolific editorialists had financial relationships with hormone manufacturers, but these were reported in only 6 of the 110 partisan articles. Four journals published 15-37 partisan articles each. The medical societies of these journals reported on their websites that several pharmaceutical companies sponsored them or their conferences. There is a considerable body of editorializing articles favoring HRT use and very few of these articles report conflicts of interest. Full disclosure of conflicts of interest is needed, especially for articles without primary data.

  11. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-06

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  12. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, H.H.

    1981-03-01

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

  13. Sex differences favoring women in verbal but not in visuospatial episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Lewin, C; Wolgers, G; Herlitz, A

    2001-04-01

    Sex differences favoring women have been found in a number of studies of episodic memory. This study examined sex differences in verbal, nonverbal, and visuospatial episodic memory tasks. Results showed that although women performed at a higher level on a composite verbal and nonverbal episodic memory score, men performed at a higher level on a composite score of episodic memory tasks requiring visuospatial processing. Thus, men can use their superior visuospatial abilities to excel in highly visuospatial episodic memory tasks, whereas women seem to excel in episodic memory tasks in which a verbalization of the material is possible.

  14. The development of cambered airfoil sections having favorable lift characteristics at supercritical Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Donald J

    1949-01-01

    Several groups of new airfoil sections, designated as the NACA 8-series, are derived analytically to have lift characteristics at supercritical Mach numbers which are favorable in the sense that the abrupt loss of lift, characteristic of the usual airfoil section at Mach numbers above the critical, is avoided. Aerodynamic characteristics determined from two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests at Mach numbers up to approximately 0.9 are presented for each of the derived airfoils. Comparisons are made between the characteristics of these airfoils and the corresponding characteristics of representative NACA 6-series airfoils.

  15. Expectant management with selective delayed intervention for favorable risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Laurence

    2002-01-01

    Management options for favorable risk prostate cancer are diverse, varying from a conservative approach (expectant management) to definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy.) Several studies have suggested that expectant management provides similar 10-year survival rates and quality-adjusted life years compared with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy. Expectant management alone clearly deprives some patients with potentially curable life-threatening disease of the opportunity for curative therapy. However, every series of conservative management contains a substantial subset of long-term survivors, particularly in the group with favorable clinical parameters. We have conducted a clinical study to evaluate a novel approach in which the choice between a definitive therapy and conservative policy is determined by the rate of PSA increase or the development of early, rapid clinical and/or histologic progression. This strategy, which has never been previously evaluated, offers the powerful attraction of individualizing therapy according to the biological behavior of the cancer. This would mean that patients with slowly growing malignancy would be spared the side effects of radical treatment, while those with more rapidly progressive cancer would still benefit from curative therapy. Doubling time varied widely. In this series of 200 patients, neither grade, stage, nor baseline PSA predicted the PSA doubling time. Thirty-three percent of patients had a PSA doubling time (T(D)) > 10 years. Doubling time appears to be a useful tool to guide treatment intervention for patients managed initially with expectant management. A doubling time of less than 2 years appears to identify patients at high risk for local progression in spite of otherwise favorable prognostic factors. Fifteen to 20% of patients will fall into this category. The remainder have a high chance of remaining free of recurrence and progression for many years. Watchful waiting is clearly

  16. [Postero-medial bulbar hematoma with a favorable outcome. Study of dysautonomia].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M; Griffie, G; Dhellemmes, P; Dupard, T; Caron, J

    1988-01-01

    A case of postero-medial medullary hematoma in a 21 year-old woman is reported. An initial neurovegetative severe disregulation had a favorable outcome after surgery. Late deficits, characterizing the postero-medial medullary syndrome have been studied: paresis of the tongue, suppression of the nauseous reflex, instability with retropulsion, and downbeating nystagmus in primary position of the eyes were noted. Heart rate and arterial blood pressure analysis showed explosive tachycardic reactions and transitory disappearance of oculo-cardiac reflexes, suggesting the involvement of the efferent parasympathetic system coming from the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve.

  17. Population synthesis analysis: determining parameters and favorable scenarios for the formation of Solar System Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; Gulera, O. M.; de Elía, G. C.

    2017-07-01

    The primordial scenario and the initial conditions that gave rise to the Solar System are still under debate. A population synthesis analysis of the formation and evolution of Solar System Analogs (SSA) is a possible mechanism to understand our own Solar System. From a new numerical code called PlanetaLP, which is able to build a diversity of planetary systems describing the evolution of embryos and planetesimals during the gaseous phase, we determine which are the parameters of the disk and the most favorable scenarios that provide planetary systems like our own.

  18. Favorable areas for prospecting adjacent to the Roberts Mountains thrust in southern Lander County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; McKee, Edwin H.

    1968-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey of more than 2,500 square miles of a relatively little-studied part of central Nevada has outlined four areas favorable for the discovery of metallic mineral deposits. In these areas, lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks crop out below the Roberts Mountains thrust, a widespread fault in central and north-central Nevada. These areas have a stratigraphic and structural setting similar to that of the areas where large, open-pit gold deposits have been discovered recently at Carlin and Cortez in north-central Nevada.

  19. Tau Neutrinos Favored over Sterile Neutrinos in Atmospheric Muon Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Okumura, K.; Sakurai, N.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Toshito, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Yamada, S.; Earl, M.; Habig, A.; Kearns, E.; Messier, M. D.; Scholberg, K.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Walter, C. W.; Goldhaber, M.; Barszczak, T.; Casper, D.; Gajewski, W.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Price, L. R.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H. W.; Vagins, M. R.; Ganezer, K. S.; Keig, W. E.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Tasaka, S.; Kibayashi, A.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Takemori, D.; Hayato, Y.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakai, A.; Sakuda, M.; Sasaki, O.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, A. T.; Inagaki, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Haines, T. J.; Blaufuss, E.; Kim, B. K.; Sanford, R.; Svoboda, R.; Chen, M. L.; Goodman, J. A.; Guillian, G.; Sullivan, G. W.; Hill, J.; Jung, C. K.; Martens, K.; Malek, M.; Mauger, C.; McGrew, C.; Sharkey, E.; Viren, B.; Yanagisawa, C.; Kirisawa, M.; Inaba, S.; Mitsuda, C.; Miyano, K.; Okazawa, H.; Saji, C.; Takahashi, M.; Takahata, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Nitta, K.; Takita, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kim, S. B.; Ishizuka, T.; Etoh, M.; Gando, Y.; Hasegawa, T.; Inoue, K.; Ishihara, K.; Maruyama, T.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Koshiba, M.; Hatakeyama, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Koike, M.; Nishijima, K.; Fujiyasu, H.; Ishino, H.; Morii, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Golebiewska, U.; Kielczewska, D.; Boyd, S. C.; Stachyra, A. L.; Wilkes, R. J.; Young, K. K.

    2000-11-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  20. Active Surveillance for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer in African Caribbean Men: Results of a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Matthias; Eyraud, Rémi; Sénéchal, Cédric; Gourtaud, Gilles; Roux, Virginie; Lanchon, Cécilia; Brureau, Laurent; Blanchet, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    Active surveillance is a treatment option for favorable risk prostate cancer. However, data are missing on populations of African descent. We evaluated the safety and benefit of active surveillance in an African Caribbean cohort with favorable risk prostate cancer. Between 2005 and 2016, a single center, prospective cohort study was performed in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, including patients on active surveillance who had low risk prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen 10 ng/ml or less and Gleason score 6 or less) or favorable intermediate risk prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen 10 to 20 ng/ml, Gleason score 3 + 4 or less and life expectancy less than 10 years). Treatment was recommended in case of grade progression, increased tumor volume, prostate cancer doubling time less than 36 months or patient wish. Overall survival, disease specific survival and duration of active surveillance were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model to identify predictors of active surveillance termination. A total of 234 patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled in study. Median followup was 4 years (IQR 2.3-5.5). Overall survival at 30 months, 5 years and 10 years was 99.5%, 98.5% and 90.7%, respectively. Disease specific survival at 30 months, and 5 and 10 years was 100%. At 30 months, 5 years and 10 years 72.7%, 52.6% and 40.4% of patients, respectively, remained untreated and on active surveillance. Age (HR 0.96 per additional year, 95% CI 0.93-0.99) and prostate specific antigen density (HR 1.52 per additional 0.1 ng/ml, 95% CI 1.20-1.89) were found to be independent predictors of active surveillance termination. Active surveillance is safe and beneficial for highly selected African Caribbean patients. It seems to be feasible for patients at low risk and intermediate favorable risk. Prostate specific antigen density could help better select these patients. Copyright © 2017

  1. Conservation of avian species: Chapter 23

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.; Crosta, Lorenzo; Gartrell, Brett D.; Marsh, Philip M.; Stringfield, Cynthia E.

    2016-01-01

    Health of humans, animals, plants, and ecosystems are intertwined. Disturbance tips the balance in favor of weedy species, vectors, and disease agents. Biodiversity is important to prevent imbalance in nature. However, more scholarship is needed, and there is still much more to study, understand, and manage than we currently know.

  2. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 2)

    Treesearch

    Mee-Sook Kim; Jack Butler

    2008-01-01

    Mee-Sook and I received several favorable comments regarding the first issue of the Invasive Species Science Update. In true Government form, the newsletter is now often referenced by the acronym ISSU. So, this is the second issue of ISSU.

  3. Favorable effect of moderate dose caffeine on the skeletal system in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Pytlik, Maria; Zych, Maria; Cegieła, Urszula; Kaczmarczyk-Sedlak, Ilona; Nowińska, Barbara; Sliwiński, Leszek

    2013-10-01

    Caffeine, a methylxanthine present in coffee, has been postulated to be responsible for an increased risk of osteoporosis in coffee drinkers; however, the data are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a moderate dose of caffeine on the skeletal system of rats with normal and decreased estrogen level (developing osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency). The experiments were carried out on mature nonovariectomized and ovariectomized Wistar rats, divided into control rats and rats receiving caffeine once daily, 20 mg/kg p.o., for 4 wk. Serum bone turnover markers, bone mass, mass of bone mineral, calcium and phosphorus content, histomorphometric parameters, and bone mechanical properties were examined. Caffeine favorably affected the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats, slightly inhibiting the development of bone changes induced by estrogen deficiency (increasing bone mineralization, and improving the strength and structure of cancellous bone). Moreover, it favorably affected mechanical properties of compact bone. There were no significant effects of caffeine in rats with normal estrogen levels. In conclusion, results of the present study indicate that low-to-moderate caffeine intake may exert some beneficial effects on the skeletal system of mature organisms. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game with multiple interactive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2017-02-01

    Spatial reciprocity is generally regarded as a positive rule facilitating the evolution of cooperation. However, a few recent studies show that, in the snowdrift game, spatial structure still could be detrimental to cooperation. Here we propose a model of multiple interactive dynamics, where each individual can cooperate and defect simultaneously against different neighbors. We realize individuals' multiple interactions simply by endowing them with strategies relevant to probabilities, and every one decides to cooperate or defect with a probability. With multiple interactive dynamics, the cooperation level in square lattices is higher than that in the well-mixed case for a wide range of cost-to-benefit ratio r, implying that spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game. Moreover, in square lattices, the most favorable strategy follows a simple relation of r, which confers theoretically the average evolutionary frequency of cooperative behavior. We further extend our study to various homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, which demonstrates the robustness of our results. Here multiple interactive dynamics stabilizes the positive role of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation and individuals' distinct reactions to different neighbors can be a new line in understanding the emergence of cooperation.

  5. Bound on the Slope of Steady Water Waves with Favorable Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Walter A.; Wheeler, Miles H.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the angle {θ} of inclination (with respect to the horizontal) of the profile of a steady two dimensional inviscid symmetric periodic or solitary water wave subject to gravity. Although {θ} may surpass 30° for some irrotational waves close to the extreme wave, Amick (Arch Ration Mech Anal 99(2):91-114, 1987) proved that for any irrotational wave the angle must be less than 31.15°. Is the situation similar for periodic or solitary waves that are not irrotational? The extreme Gerstner wave has infinite depth, adverse vorticity and vertical cusps ( θ = 90°). Moreover, numerical calculations show that even waves of finite depth can overturn if the vorticity is adverse. In this paper, on the other hand, we prove an upper bound of 45° on {θ} for a large class of waves with favorable vorticity and finite depth. In particular, the vorticity can be any constant with the favorable sign. We also prove a series of general inequalities on the pressure within the fluid, including the fact that any overturning wave must have a pressure sink.

  6. VEGF expression correlates with neuronal differentiation and predicts a favorable prognosis in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wen-Chin; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Wu, Pei-Yi; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Liu, Yen-Lin; Wang, Bo-Jeng; Chen, Chien-Chin; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Liao, Yung-Feng; Lee, Wang-Tso; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lee, Hsinyu

    2017-09-11

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer with a low survival rate and great metastatic potential. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenesis factor, has been found to be involved in CRT-related neuronal differentiation of NB cells. In this study, we further confirmed the role VEGF in NB through mouse xenograft model and clinical analysis from NB patients. In xenograft experiments, CRT overexpression effectively inhibited the tumor growth. In addition, the mRNA and protein levels of VEGF and differentiation marker GAP-43 were upregulated by induced CRT expression. However, no significant correlation between the expression level of VEGF and microvessel density was observed in human NB tumors, suggesting a novel mechanism of VEGF participating in NB tumorigenesis through an angiogenesis-independent pathway. In NB patients' samples, mRNA expression levels of CRT and VEGF were positively correlated. Furthermore, positive VEGF expression by immunostaining of NB tumors was found to correlate well with histological grade of differentiation and predicted a favorable prognosis. In conclusion, our findings suggest that VEGF is a favorable prognostic factor of NB and might affect NB tumor behavior through CRT-driven neuronal differentiation rather than angiogenesis that might shed light on a novel therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of NB.

  7. Atomistic Design of Favored Compositions for Synthesizing the Al-Ni-Y Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Li, J. H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, B. X.

    2015-01-01

    For a ternary alloy system promising for obtaining the so-called bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the first priority issue is to predict the favored compositions, which could then serve as guidance for the appropriate alloy design. Taking the Al-Ni-Y system as an example, here we show an atomistic approach, which is developed based on a recently constructed and proven realistic interatomic potential of the system. Applying the Al-Ni-Y potential, series simulations not only clarify the glass formation mechanism, but also predict in the composition triangle, a hexagonal region, in which a disordered state, i.e., the glassy phase, is favored energetically. The predicted region is defined as glass formation region (GFR) for the ternary alloy system. Moreover, the approach is able to calculate an amorphization driving force (ADF) for each possible glassy alloy located within the GFR. The calculations predict an optimized sub-region nearby a stoichiometry of Al80Ni5Y15, implying that the Al-Ni-Y metallic glasses designed in the sub-region could be the most stable. Interestingly, the atomistic predictions are supported by experimental results observed in the Al-Ni-Y system. In addition, structural origin underlying the stability of the Al-Ni-Y metallic glasses is also discussed in terms of a hybrid packing mode in the medium-range scale. PMID:26592568

  8. Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal Caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Jacky G.; Minguet, Susana; Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Lazcano, Juan José; Samaniego, Rafael; Calvo, Enrique; Tello, Marta; Osteso-Ibáñez, Teresa; Pellinen, Teijo; Echarri, Asier; Cerezo, Ana; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Garcia, Ricardo; Keely, Patricia J.; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Cukierman, Edna; Del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mechanotransduction, a key determinant of tissue homeostasis and tumor progression, is driven by intercellular adhesions, cell contractility and forces generated with the microenvironment, dependent on extracellular matrix composition, organization and compliance. Caveolin-1 (Cav1) favors cell elongation in 3D cultures and promotes Rho-and force-dependent contraction, matrix alignment and microenvironment stiffening through regulation of p190RhoGAP. In turn, microenvironment remodeling by Cav1-fibroblasts forces cell elongation. Cav1-deficient mice have disorganized stromal tissue architecture. Stroma associated with human carcinomas and melanoma metastases is enriched in Cav1-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Cav1 expression in breast CAFs correlates with low survival, and Cav1 depletion in CAFs decreases CAF contractility. Consistently, fibroblast expression of Cav1, through p190RhoGAP regulation, favors directional migration and invasiveness of carcinoma cells in vitro. In vivo, stromal Cav1 remodels peri- and intratumoral microenvironments to facilitate tumor invasion, correlating with increased metastatic potency. Thus, Cav1 modulates tissue responses through force-dependent architectural regulation of the microenvironment. PMID:21729786

  9. High DBC1 (CCAR2) expression in gallbladder carcinoma is associated with favorable clinicopathological factors.

    PubMed

    Won, Kyu Yeoun; Cho, Hyuck; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Bae, Go Eun; Lim, Jun Uk; Sung, Ji-Youn; Park, Yong-Koo; Kim, Youn Wha; Lee, Juhie

    2015-01-01

    There have been several studies on gallbladder carcinogenesis, and mutations of the KRAS, TP53, and CDKN2A genes have been reported in gallbladder carcinoma. The DBC1 gene (deleted in breast cancer 1) was initially cloned from region 8p21, which was homozygously deleted in breast cancer. DBC1 has been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and death. The functional role of DBC1 in normal cells and the role of DBC1 loss in cancer are not entirely clear. And DBC1 expression and its clinical implications in gallbladder carcinoma have yet to be thoroughly elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated DBC1 expression in 104 gallbladder carcinoma tissues in relation to survival and other prognostic factors via immunohistochemical analysis. DBC1 expression was divided into two categories: high DBC1 expression was observed in 32/104 cases (30.8%) and low expression in 72/104 cases (69.2%). High DBC1 expression correlated significantly with favorable clinicopathologic variables. Furthermore, in survival analysis, the high-DBC1 expression group showed a better survival rate compared to the low-DBC1 expression group. In conclusion, high DBC1 expression is associated with several favorable clinicopathologic factors in gallbladder carcinoma. These findings suggest that loss of DBC1 expression plays a role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in gallbladder carcinoma.

  10. [Who is against prevention? A map of policy actors favoring smoking in Spain].

    PubMed

    Granero, Lluís; Villalbí, Joan Ramón; Gallego, Raquel

    2004-01-01

    For a comprehensive approach to policies on smoking, the map of actors related to tobacco and their political ties needs to be identified. The present article constitutes the first attempt at this task in Spain. Analysis of the press, industry publications, and interviews with key people. Active actors favoring smoking in Spain were identified and classified according to their characteristics, the sphere in which they act, and their preferred territorial arena. We identified tobacco companies (Altadis and Philip Morris dominate the market), tobacco trade organizations (tobacconists), front-line organizations created by the tobacco industry (The Smokers for Tolerance Club), organizations of tobacco growers, and processing companies. Distribution to retailers is dominated by Logista, owned by Altadis. Other sectors to take into account are vending companies and those manufacturing related products (cigarette paper, matches or lighters). The contacts of these actors with the public administration are reviewed, notable among which are the role of the Commissioner for the Tobacco Market, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of the Economy. Ties were also found with employers' organizations, some political parties, and unions, as well as with other sectors with social influence such as the media and advertising sectors. The map of actors favoring smoking in Spain is complex and goes beyond the confines of the tobacco industry. Understanding this web is crucial to promoting comprehensive prevention policies.

  11. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Hodgkin Lymphoma-Favorable Prognosis Stage I and II.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Advani, Ranjana; Ballas, Leslie K; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Flowers, Christopher R; Ha, Chul S; Hoppe, Bradford S; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Metzger, Monika L; Plastaras, John P; Roberts, Kenneth B; Shapiro, Ronald; Smith, Sonali M; Terezakis, Stephanie A; Winkfield, Karen M; Younes, Anas; Constine, Louis S

    2016-12-01

    This topic addresses the treatment of newly diagnosed patients with favorable prognosis stage I and II Hodgkin lymphoma. In most cases, combined modality therapy (chemotherapy followed by involved site radiation therapy) constitutes the current standard of care. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. By combining the most recent medical literature and expert opinion, this revised guideline can aid clinicians in the appropriate use of combined modality therapy for favorable prognosis stage I and II Hodgkin lymphoma. Increasing information about the late effects of treatment has led to attempts to decrease toxicity by using less chemotherapy (decreased duration and/or intensity or different agents) and less radiation therapy (reduced volume and/or dose) while maintaining excellent efficacy.

  12. Selection on Inversion Breakpoints Favors Proximity to Pairing Sensitive Sites in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Corbett-Detig, Russell B

    2016-09-01

    Chromosomal inversions are widespread among taxa, and have been implicated in a number of biological processes including adaptation, sex chromosome evolution, and segregation distortion. Consistent with selection favoring linkage between loci, it is well established that length is a selected trait of inversions. However, the factors that affect the distribution of inversion breakpoints remain poorly understood. "Sensitive sites" have been mapped on all euchromatic chromosome arms in Drosophila melanogaster, and may be a source of natural selection on inversion breakpoint positions. Briefly, sensitive sites are genomic regions wherein proximal structural rearrangements result in large reductions in local recombination rates in heterozygotes. Here, I show that breakpoints of common inversions are significantly more likely to lie within a cytological band containing a sensitive site than are breakpoints of rare inversions. Furthermore, common inversions for which neither breakpoint intersects a sensitive site are significantly longer than rare inversions, but common inversions whose breakpoints intersect a sensitive site show no evidence for increased length. I interpret these results to mean that selection favors inversions whose breakpoints disrupt synteny near to sensitive sites, possibly because these inversions suppress recombination in large genomic regions. To my knowledge this is the first evidence consistent with positive selection acting on inversion breakpoint positions. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Does Spontaneous Favorability to Power (vs. Universalism) Values Predict Spontaneous Prejudice and Discrimination?

    PubMed

    Souchon, Nicolas; Maio, Gregory R; Hanel, Paul H P; Bardin, Brigitte

    2017-10-01

    We conducted five studies testing whether an implicit measure of favorability toward power over universalism values predicts spontaneous prejudice and discrimination. Studies 1 (N = 192) and 2 (N = 86) examined correlations between spontaneous favorability toward power (vs. universalism) values, achievement (vs. benevolence) values, and a spontaneous measure of prejudice toward ethnic minorities. Study 3 (N = 159) tested whether conditioning participants to associate power values with positive adjectives and universalism values with negative adjectives (or inversely) affects spontaneous prejudice. Study 4 (N = 95) tested whether decision bias toward female handball players could be predicted by spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values. Study 5 (N = 123) examined correlations between spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values, spontaneous importance toward power (vs. universalism) values, and spontaneous prejudice toward Black African people. Spontaneous positivity toward power (vs. universalism) values was associated with spontaneous negativity toward minorities and predicted gender bias in a decision task, whereas the explicit measures did not. These results indicate that the implicit assessment of evaluative responses attached to human values helps to model value-attitude-behavior relations. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Personality Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Immunolocalization of thymidylate synthase as a favorable prognostic marker in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Amano, Goro; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis, and it is a target for 5-fluorouracil. Previous studies have demonstrated that TS is a potent estrogen-induced gene in breast carcinoma cells, suggesting the importance of TS in estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast carcinoma. TS immunolocalization has been reported previously, but the clinicopathological significance of TS in ER-positive breast carcinoma still remains unclear. We immunolocalized TS in 178 breast carcinoma tissues in total, and examined its significance according to the ER-status. TS status was positive in 58% of ER-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases, and it was significantly associated with the Ki-67 and progesterone receptor (PR). Moreover, in ER-positive DCIS patients who received aromatase inhibitor (AI) before surgery, TS immunoreactivity was significantly decreased after AI treatment. In ER-positive invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases, TS status was significantly associated with PR, and it turned out an independent favorable prognostic factor for recurrence of the patients by multivariate analysis. On the other hand, TS status was positively correlated with pathological T factor in ER-negative IDC cases, and tended to have a worse prognosis for disease-free survival of the patients. These results suggest that TS expression is mainly regulated by estrogen in ER-positive breast carcinoma and is associated with estrogen-mediated proliferation. TS status is a favorable prognostic factor in ER-positive IDC patients, which is different from the ER-negative cases.

  15. Transient hypothyroidism favors oligodendrocyte generation providing functional remyelination in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Sylvie; Ortiz, Fernando C; Perret-Jeanneret, Marine; Aigrot, Marie-Stéphane; Gothié, Jean-David; Fekete, Csaba; Kvárta-Papp, Zsuzsanna; Gereben, Balázs; Langui, Dominique; Lubetzki, Catherine; Angulo, Maria Cecilia; Zalc, Bernard; Demeneix, Barbara

    2017-09-06

    In the adult brain, both neurons and oligodendrocytes can be generated from neural stem cells located within the Sub-Ventricular Zone (SVZ). Physiological signals regulating neuronal versus glial fate are largely unknown. Here we report that a thyroid hormone (T3)-free window, with or without a demyelinating insult, provides a favorable environment for SVZ-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor generation. After demyelination, oligodendrocytes derived from these newly-formed progenitors provide functional remyelination, restoring normal conduction. The cellular basis for neuronal versus glial determination in progenitors involves asymmetric partitioning of EGFR and TRα1, expression of which favor glio- and neuro-genesis, respectively. Moreover, EGFR(+) oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not neuroblasts, express high levels of a T3-inactivating deiodinase, Dio3. Thus, TRα absence with high levels of Dio3 provides double-pronged blockage of T3 action during glial lineage commitment. These findings not only transform our understanding of how T3 orchestrates adult brain lineage decisions, but also provide potential insight into demyelinating disorders.

  16. Glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in nondieting obese female patients. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Laviano, A; Molfino, A; Lacaria, M T; Canelli, A; De Leo, S; Preziosa, I; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in critically ill patients, and prevents obesity in animals fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in humans. Obese and overweight female patients (n=6) were enrolled in a pilot, cross-over study. After recording anthropometric (that is, body weight, waist circumference) and metabolic (that is, glycemia, insulinemia, homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) characteristics, patients were randomly assigned to 4-week supplementation with glutamine or isonitrogenous protein supplement (0.5 g/KgBW/day). During supplementation, patients did not change their dietary habits nor lifestyle. At the end, anthropometric and metabolic features were assessed, and after 2 weeks of washout, patients were switched to the other supplement for 4 weeks. Body weight and waist circumference significantly declined only after glutamine supplementation (85.0±10.4 Kg vs 82.2±10.1 Kg, and 102.7±2.0 cm vs 98.9±2.9 cm, respectively; P=0.01). Insulinemia and HOMA-IR declined by 20% after glutamine, but not significantly so. This pilot study shows that glutamine is safe and effective in favoring weight loss and possibly enhancing glucose metabolism.

  17. Resource allocation in offspring provisioning: An evaluation of the conditions favoring the evolution of matrotrophy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trexler, Joel C.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    We used analytic and simulation models to determine the ecological conditions favoring evolution of a matrotrophic fish from a lecithotrophic ancestor given a complex set of trade‐offs. Matrotrophy is the nourishment of viviparous embryos by resources provided between fertilization and parturition, while lecithotrophy describes embryo nourishment provided before fertilization. In fishes and reptiles, embryo nourishment encompasses a continuum from solely lecithotrophic to primarily matrotrophic. Matrotrophy has evolved independently from lecithotrophic ancestors many times in many groups. We assumed matrotrophy increased the number of offspring a viviparous female could gestate and evaluated conditions of food availability favoring lecithotrophy or matrotrophy. The matrotrophic strategy was superior when food resources exceeded demand during gestation but at a risk of overproduction and reproductive failure if food intake was limited. Matrotrophic females were leaner during gestation than lecithotrophic females, yielding shorter life spans. Our models suggest that matrotrophic embryo nourishment evolved in environments with high food availability, consistently exceeding energy requirements for maintaining relatively large broods. Embryo abortion with some resorption of invested energy is a necessary preadaptation to the evolution of matrotrophy. Future work should explore trade‐offs of age‐specific mortality and reproductive output for females maintaining different levels of fat storage during gestation.

  18. Determining Favorable Maxillary Implant Locations Using Three-Dimensional Simulation Software and Computed Tomography Data.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Tomoya; Kamei, Koichiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    Success rates for maxillary implant treatment are lower than for mandibular treatment because of the presence of poorer bone quality or quantity in the maxilla. The purpose of this study was to determine favorable implant positions in the maxilla using implant simulation software and clinical anatomical morphology together with bone quality data obtained by computed tomography (CT). A convenience research sample of 10 edentulous subjects was recruited, and research information from right and left edentulous sites was obtained from each subject. The height, width, angulation, and Hounsfield unit value of the maxillary alveolar bone were measured using CT data obtained from the subjects. Bone height in the incisor area was significantly greater than in the molar area, and bone width in the incisor area was significantly narrower than in the molar area. The average bone quality in the maxillary molar area was significantly higher when compared with the premolar and incisor areas. The angle between the occlusal plane and the bisector of the alveolar bone in the incisor area was reduced when compared with the molar area. The premolar region appears to be the most favorable area in the maxillary arch for implant placement with regard to bone height, width, angulation, and quality.

  19. Molecular subtype analysis determines the association of advanced breast cancer in Egypt with favorable biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prognostic markers and molecular breast cancer subtypes reflect underlying biological tumor behavior and are important for patient management. Compared to Western countries, women in North Africa are less likely to be prognosticated and treated based on well-characterized markers such as the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her2. We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of breast cancer molecular subtypes in the North African country of Egypt as a measure of underlying biological characteristics driving tumor manifestations. Methods To determine molecular subtypes we characterized over 200 tumor specimens obtained from Egypt by performing ER, PR, Her2, CK5/6, EGFR and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Results Our study demonstrated that the Luminal A subtype, associated with favorable prognosis, was found in nearly 45% of cases examined. However, the basal-like subtype, associated with poor prognosis, was found in 11% of cases. These findings are in sharp contrast to other parts of Africa in which the basal-like subtype is over-represented. Conclusions Egyptians appear to have favorable underlying biology, albeit having advanced disease at diagnosis. These data suggest that Egyptians would largely profit from early detection of their disease. Intervention at the public health level, including education on the benefits of early detection is necessary and would likely have tremendous impact on breast cancer outcome in Egypt. PMID:21961708

  20. Nut consumption has favorable effects on lipid profiles of Korean women with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Joo; Nam, Ga Eun; Seo, Ji A; Yoon, Taehyung; Seo, Ilwon; Lee, Jin Hee; Im, Donggil; Bahn, Kyeong-Nyeo; Jeong, Si An; Kang, Tae Seok; Ahn, Jae Hee; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Nan Hee

    2014-09-01

    Nut consumption has been studied for its cardioprotective effects. However, the findings of clinical intervention studies are inconsistent; and no intervention studies have been conducted in the Korean population. We hypothesized that nut supplementation may have favorable influence on metabolic markers. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of nut consumption on metabolic parameters and biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function in Korean adults with metabolic syndrome. To this end, we designed a randomized, parallel, controlled dietary intervention study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02023749). Subjects with metabolic syndrome and a body mass index of at least 23 kg/m(2) were randomized to the Control group and the Nut group, which received supplementation with 30 g/d of mixed nuts (walnuts, peanuts, and pine nuts) for 6 weeks. Sixty volunteers were included in the final analysis. Metabolic markers were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study. Total cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels significantly improved in the Nut group compared to those in the Control group (P = .023 and P = .016, respectively) in women. Biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function did not significantly change from baseline in either group. Thus, supplementing a usual diet with mixed nuts for 6 weeks had favorable effects on several lipid parameters in Korean women with metabolic syndrome. These findings present a possible mechanism for the cardioprotective effects of nut consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth...

  2. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth of...

  3. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth of...

  4. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth of...

  5. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth of...

  6. Low preoperative albumin-globulin score predicts favorable survival in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Wang, De-shen; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Fu, Jian-hua; Xu, Rui-hua; Li, Yu-hong

    2016-01-01

    This study retrospectively investigated the prognostic significance of the preoperative albumin-globulin score (AGS) and albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A cohort of 458 newly diagnosed ESCC patients who underwent radical esophagectomy in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (Guangzhou, China) between January 2006 and December 2010 were selected into this study. The optimal cut-off value was identified to be 45.6 g/L, 26.9 g/L and 1.30 for albumin (ALB), globulin (GLB) and AGR in terms of survival, respectively. Patients with low ALB levels (< 45.6 g/L) and high GLB levels (≥ 26.9 g/L) were assigned an AGS of 2, those with only one of the two abnormalities were assigned an AGS of 1, and those with neither of the two abnormalities were assigned an AGS of 0. Univariate survival analysis showed that low AGS (0) was significantly associated with favorable disease free survival (DFS) [hazard ratio (HR), 0.635; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.441–0.914; P = 0.015] and overall survival (OS) (HR, 0.578; 95% CI, 0.387–0.862; P = 0.007), and it remained an independent predictor for OS (HR, 0.630; 95% CI, 0.418–0.952; P = 0.028), but not for DFS (HR, 0.697; 95% CI, 0.479–1.061; P = 0.060) in multivariate models. High AGR (≥ 1.30) was also correlated with favorable DFS (HR, 0.626; 95% CI, 0.430–0.910; P = 0.014) and OS (HR, 0.622; 95% CI, 0.422–0.916; P = 0.016) in univariate analysis, but it failed to be an independent prognostic indicator for DFS (HR, 0.730; 95% CI, 0.494–1.078; P = 0.114) or OS (HR, 0.759; 95% CI, 0.507–1.137; P = 0.181) by multivariate analysis. Low preoperative AGS could serve as a valuable and convenient biochemical marker to predict favorable long-term survival in ESCC patients. PMID:27105522

  7. Partisan Perspectives in the Medical Literature: A Study of High Frequency Editorialists Favoring Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tatsioni, Athina; Siontis, George C. M.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Unfavorable results of major studies have led to a large shrinkage of the market for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the last 6 years. Some scientists continue to strongly support the use of HRT. Objectives We analyzed a sample of partisan editorializing articles on HRT to examine their arguments, the reporting of competing interests, the journal venues and their sponsoring societies. Data Sources Through Thomson ISI database, we selected articles without primary data written by the five most prolific editorialists that addressed clinical topics pertaining to HRT and that were published in regular journal issues in 2002–2008. Main Measures We recorded the number of articles with a partisan stance and their arguments, the number of partisan articles that reported conflicting interests, and the journal venues and their sponsoring societies publishing the partisan editorials. Key Results We analyzed 114 eligible articles (58 editorials, 16 guidelines, 37 reviews, 3 letters), of which 110 (96%) had a partisan stance favoring HRT. Typical arguments were benefits for menopausal and related symptoms (64.9%), criticism of unfavorable studies (78.9%), preclinical data that showed favorable effects of HRT (50%), and benefits for major outcomes such as osteoporosis and fractures (49.1%), cardiovascular disease (31.6%), dementia (24.6%) or colorectal cancer (20.2%), but also even breast cancer (4.4%). All 5 prolific editorialists had financial relationships with hormone manufacturers, but these were reported in only 6 of the 110 partisan articles. Four journals published 15–37 partisan articles each. The medical societies of these journals reported on their websites that several pharmaceutical companies sponsored them or their conferences. Conclusions There is a considerable body of editorializing articles favoring HRT use and very few of these articles report conflicts of interest. Full disclosure of conflicts of interest is needed, especially

  8. Use of abundance of one species as a surrogate for abundance of others

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin S. McKelvey; Barry R. Noon; Kevin McGarigal

    2010-01-01

    Indicator species concepts have a long history in conservation biology. Arguments in favor of these approaches generally stress expediency and assume efficacy. We tested the premise that the abundance patterns of one species can be used to infer those of other species. Our data consisted of 72,495 bird observations on 55 species across 1046 plots distributed across 30...

  9. Favored configurations for four-quasiparticle K isomerism in the heaviest nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. L.; Walker, P. M.; Xu, F. R.

    2014-04-01

    Configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations are performed including β6 deformation to investigate high-K isomeric states in nuclei around 254No and 270Ds, the heaviest nuclei where there have been some observations of two-quasiparticle isomers, while data for four-quasiparticle isomers are scarce. We predict the prevalent occurrence of four-quasiparticle isomeric states in these nuclei, together with their favored configurations. The most notable examples, among others, are Kπ=20+ states in 266,268Ds and 268,270Cn having very high K value, relatively low excitation energy, and well-deformed axially symmetric shape. The predicted isomeric states, with hindered spontaneous fission and α decay, could play a significant role in the future study of superheavy nuclei.

  10. Cosmology favoring extra radiation and sub-eV mass sterile neutrinos as an option.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G; Tamborra, Irene; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2010-10-29

    Precision cosmology and big-bang nucleosynthesis